Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic source localization

  1. Acoustic sources' localization in presence of reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julliard, E.; Pauzin, S.; Simon, F.; Biron, D.

    2005-09-01

    For several years, aeronautical industries have wished to improve internal acoustical comfort. In order to make it, they need metrological tools which are able to help them to spot acoustical sources and the associated path in a specific frequency range (i.e., for helicopters' internal noise: 1000-5000 Hz). Two major source' localization' tools exist: holography and beamforming, but these two techniques are based on a free field's hypothesis. So, problems appear when these techniques are used in a reverberant medium. This paper deals with the study and the comparison of holography and beamforming results in an enclosed area. To complete the study, intensimetry is also implemented to have information on the energy propagation. In order to test the performances of each method, two reflecting panels are put at right angles to create a reverberant environment, in an anechoic chamber. We seek to locate loudspeakers clamped in one panel, in the presence of parasite loudspeakers located on the other one. Then, a parametrical study is led: localization and number of sources, coherent or noncoherent sources. Thus, using limitations, precautions to take, and a base of comparison three methods are put forward. Finally, some envisaged solutions to limit problems of reflections (signal processing, overturning, etc.) are presented.

  2. Passive acoustic source localization using sources of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Christopher M A; Sarkar, J; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Sabra, K G

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of using data derived replicas from ships of opportunity for implementing matched field processing is demonstrated. The Automatic Identification System (AIS) is used to provide the library coordinates for the replica library and a correlation based processing procedure is used to overcome the impediment that the replica library is constructed from sources with different spectra and will further be used to locate another source with its own unique spectral structure. The method is illustrated with simulation and then verified using acoustic data from a 2009 experiment for which AIS information was retrieved from the United States Coast Guard Navigation Center Nationwide AIS database.

  3. Passive acoustic source localization using sources of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Christopher M A; Sarkar, J; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Sabra, K G

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of using data derived replicas from ships of opportunity for implementing matched field processing is demonstrated. The Automatic Identification System (AIS) is used to provide the library coordinates for the replica library and a correlation based processing procedure is used to overcome the impediment that the replica library is constructed from sources with different spectra and will further be used to locate another source with its own unique spectral structure. The method is illustrated with simulation and then verified using acoustic data from a 2009 experiment for which AIS information was retrieved from the United States Coast Guard Navigation Center Nationwide AIS database. PMID:26233061

  4. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  5. Developing a system for blind acoustic source localization and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra

    This dissertation presents innovate methodologies for locating, extracting, and separating multiple incoherent sound sources in three-dimensional (3D) space; and applications of the time reversal (TR) algorithm to pinpoint the hyper active neural activities inside the brain auditory structure that are correlated to the tinnitus pathology. Specifically, an acoustic modeling based method is developed for locating arbitrary and incoherent sound sources in 3D space in real time by using a minimal number of microphones, and the Point Source Separation (PSS) method is developed for extracting target signals from directly measured mixed signals. Combining these two approaches leads to a novel technology known as Blind Sources Localization and Separation (BSLS) that enables one to locate multiple incoherent sound signals in 3D space and separate original individual sources simultaneously, based on the directly measured mixed signals. These technologies have been validated through numerical simulations and experiments conducted in various non-ideal environments where there are non-negligible, unspecified sound reflections and reverberation as well as interferences from random background noise. Another innovation presented in this dissertation is concerned with applications of the TR algorithm to pinpoint the exact locations of hyper-active neurons in the brain auditory structure that are directly correlated to the tinnitus perception. Benchmark tests conducted on normal rats have confirmed the localization results provided by the TR algorithm. Results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of this source localization can be as high as the micrometer level. This high precision localization may lead to a paradigm shift in tinnitus diagnosis, which may in turn produce a more cost-effective treatment for tinnitus than any of the existing ones.

  6. Acoustic Source Localization in Aircraft Interiors Using Microphone Array Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklanka, Bernard J.; Tuss, Joel R.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Klos, Jacob; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    Using three microphone array configurations at two aircraft body stations on a Boeing 777-300ER flight test, the acoustic radiation characteristics of the sidewall and outboard floor system are investigated by experimental measurement. Analysis of the experimental data is performed using sound intensity calculations for closely spaced microphones, PATCH Inverse Boundary Element Nearfield Acoustic Holography, and Spherical Nearfield Acoustic Holography. Each method is compared assessing strengths and weaknesses, evaluating source identification capability for both broadband and narrowband sources, evaluating sources during transient and steady-state conditions, and quantifying field reconstruction continuity using multiple array positions.

  7. Sound source localization by hearing preservation patients with and without symmetric, low-frequency acoustic hearing

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Louise H.; Dorman, Michael F.; Yost, William A.; Gifford, Rene H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study sound source localization by cochlear implant (CI) listeners with low-frequency (LF) acoustic hearing in both the operated ear and in the contralateral ear. Eight CI listeners had symmetrical LF acoustic hearing (symm) and four had asymmetric LF acoustic hearing (asymm). The effects of two variables were assessed: (i) the symmetry of the LF thresholds in the two ears and (ii) the presence/absence of bilateral acoustic amplification. Stimuli consisted of low-pass, high pass, and wide-band noise bursts presented in the frontal horizontal plane. Localization accuracy was 23 degrees of error for the symm listeners and 76 degrees of error for the asymm listeners. The presence of a unilateral CI used in conjunction with bilateral LF acoustic hearing does not impair sound source localization accuracy, but amplification for acoustic hearing can be detrimental to sound source localization accuracy. PMID:25832907

  8. Underwater acoustic source localization using closely spaced hydrophone pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Seop; Choi, Bok-Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Lee, Kyun Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Underwater sound source position is determined using a line array. However, performance degradation occurs owing to a multipath environment, which generates incoherent signals. In this paper, a hydrophone array is proposed for underwater source position estimation robust to a multipath environment. The array is composed of three pairs of sensors placed on the same line. The source position is estimated by performing generalized cross-correlation (GCC). The proposed system is not affected by a multipath time delay because of the close distance between closely spaced sensors. The validity of the array is confirmed by simulation using acoustic signals synthesized by eigenrays.

  9. Acoustic emission source localization based on distance domain signal representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, M.; Grabowski, K.; Russek, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.; Packo, P.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is a vital non-destructive testing technique and is widely used in industry for damage detection, localisation and characterization. The latter two aspects are particularly challenging, as AE data are typically noisy. What is more, elastic waves generated by an AE event, propagate through a structural path and are significantly distorted. This effect is particularly prominent for thin elastic plates. In these media the dispersion phenomenon results in severe localisation and characterization issues. Traditional Time Difference of Arrival methods for localisation techniques typically fail when signals are highly dispersive. Hence, algorithms capable of dispersion compensation are sought. This paper presents a method based on the Time - Distance Domain Transform for an accurate AE event localisation. The source localisation is found through a minimization problem. The proposed technique focuses on transforming the time signal to the distance domain response, which would be recorded at the source. Only, basic elastic material properties and plate thickness are used in the approach, avoiding arbitrary parameters tuning.

  10. Source Localization with Acoustic Sensor Arrays Using Generative Model Based Fitting with Sparse Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Jose; Pizarro, Daniel; Macias-Guarasa, Javier

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for indoor acoustic source localization using sensor arrays. The proposed solution starts by defining a generative model, designed to explain the acoustic power maps obtained by Steered Response Power (SRP) strategies. An optimization approach is then proposed to fit the model to real input SRP data and estimate the position of the acoustic source. Adequately fitting the model to real SRP data, where noise and other unmodelled effects distort the ideal signal, is the core contribution of the paper. Two basic strategies in the optimization are proposed. First, sparse constraints in the parameters of the model are included, enforcing the number of simultaneous active sources to be limited. Second, subspace analysis is used to filter out portions of the input signal that cannot be explained by the model. Experimental results on a realistic speech database show statistically significant localization error reductions of up to 30% when compared with the SRP-PHAT strategies. PMID:23202021

  11. Properties and Localizations of Acoustic Sources in High Speed Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Pinqing; Lewalle, Jacques; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark; Syracuse University Team

    2014-11-01

    Jet noise has become one major concern for aircraft engine design in recent decades. The problem is to identify the near-field (NF) structures that produce far-field (FF) noise and develop noise control and reduction strategies. We developed an algorithm to identify the events that are responsible for NF and FF cross-correlations. Two sets of experimental data from Mach 0.6 jets are analyzed. They consist of 10 kHz TRPIV measurement and pressure sampling in both near- and far-field. Several NF diagnostics (velocity, vorticity, Q criterion, etc.) are calculated to represent the 2D velocity fields. The main contributors between these NF diagnostics and FF pressure are extracted as Diagnostic-Microphone (DM) events. The NF localization of DM event clusters will be compared to the NF triangulation of MM events, which were acquired using FF signals alone. In the time-frequency domain, the events are short wave packets, distorted by ambient perturbations. As a result, the matching of DM to MM events at physical lags is particularly difficult. We will report on different algorithms using time, frequency and space information to improve the reliability of the matches. We will also relate the event localization to the NF flow fields that correspond to FF ``loud'' POD modes (Low et al. 2013 and Berger et al. 2014). This work is supported by Spectra Energies LLC, Syracuse University MAE Department and the Glauser group at Syracuse University.

  12. Source localization results for airborne acoustic platforms in the 2010 Yuma Proving Ground test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Collier, Sandra L.; Reiff, Christian G.; Cheinet, Sylvain; Ligon, David A.; Wilson, D. Keith; Noble, John M.; Alberts, William C.

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic sensors are being employed on airborne platforms, such as Persistent Threat Detection System (PTDS) and Persistent Ground Surveillance System (PGSS), for source localization. Under certain atmospheric conditions, airborne sensors offer a distinct advantage over ground sensors. Among other factors, the performance of airborne sensors is affected by refraction of sound signals due to vertical gradients in temperature and wind velocity. A comprehensive experiment in source localization with an aerostat-mounted acoustic system was conducted in summer of 2010 at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG). Acoustic sources on the ground consisted of one-pound TNT denotations and small arms firings. The height of the aerostat was approximately 1 km above the ground. In this paper, horizontal, azimuthal, and elevation errors in source localization and their statistics are studied in detail. Initially, straight-line propagation is assumed; then refraction corrections are introduced to improve source localization and decrease the errors. The corrections are based on a recently developed theory [Ostashev, et. al, JASA 2008] which accounts for sound refraction due to vertical profiles of temperature and wind velocity. During the 2010 YPG field test, the vertical profiles were measured only up to a height of approximately 100 m. Therefore, the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is used to generate the profiles for July of 2010.

  13. Incident signal power comparison for localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Salvati, Daniele; Canazza, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a method to solve the localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources in large open spaces is presented. The problem of the multisource localization in far-field conditions is to correctly associate the direction of arrival (DOA) estimated by a network array system to the same source. The use of systems implementing a Bayesian filter is a traditional approach to address the problem of localization in multisource acoustic scenario. However, in a real noisy open space the acoustic sources are often discontinuous with numerous short-duration events and thus the filtering methods may have difficulty to track the multiple sources. Incident signal power comparison (ISPC) is proposed to compute DOAs association. ISPC is based on identifying the incident signal power (ISP) of the sources on a microphone array using beamforming methods and comparing the ISP between different arrays using spectral distance (SD) measurement techniques. This method solves the ambiguities, due to the presence of simultaneous sources, by identifying sounds through a minimization of an error criterion on SD measures of DOA combinations. The experimental results were conducted in an outdoor real noisy environment and the ISPC performance is reported using different beamforming techniques and SD functions. PMID:24701179

  14. Incident Signal Power Comparison for Localization of Concurrent Multiple Acoustic Sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a method to solve the localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources in large open spaces is presented. The problem of the multisource localization in far-field conditions is to correctly associate the direction of arrival (DOA) estimated by a network array system to the same source. The use of systems implementing a Bayesian filter is a traditional approach to address the problem of localization in multisource acoustic scenario. However, in a real noisy open space the acoustic sources are often discontinuous with numerous short-duration events and thus the filtering methods may have difficulty to track the multiple sources. Incident signal power comparison (ISPC) is proposed to compute DOAs association. ISPC is based on identifying the incident signal power (ISP) of the sources on a microphone array using beamforming methods and comparing the ISP between different arrays using spectral distance (SD) measurement techniques. This method solves the ambiguities, due to the presence of simultaneous sources, by identifying sounds through a minimization of an error criterion on SD measures of DOA combinations. The experimental results were conducted in an outdoor real noisy environment and the ISPC performance is reported using different beamforming techniques and SD functions. PMID:24701179

  15. New approaches for automatic threedimensional source localization of acoustic emissions--Applications to concrete specimens.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Jochen H

    2015-12-01

    The task of locating a source in space by measuring travel time differences of elastic or electromagnetic waves from the source to several sensors is evident in varying fields. The new concepts of automatic acoustic emission localization presented in this article are based on developments from geodesy and seismology. A detailed description of source location determination in space is given with the focus on acoustic emission data from concrete specimens. Direct and iterative solvers are compared. A concept based on direct solvers from geodesy extended by a statistical approach is described which allows a stable source location determination even for partly erroneous onset times. The developed approach is validated with acoustic emission data from a large specimen leading to travel paths up to 1m and therefore to noisy data with errors in the determined onsets. The adaption of the algorithms from geodesy to the localization procedure of sources of elastic waves offers new possibilities concerning stability, automation and performance of localization results. Fracture processes can be assessed more accurately.

  16. New approaches for automatic threedimensional source localization of acoustic emissions--Applications to concrete specimens.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Jochen H

    2015-12-01

    The task of locating a source in space by measuring travel time differences of elastic or electromagnetic waves from the source to several sensors is evident in varying fields. The new concepts of automatic acoustic emission localization presented in this article are based on developments from geodesy and seismology. A detailed description of source location determination in space is given with the focus on acoustic emission data from concrete specimens. Direct and iterative solvers are compared. A concept based on direct solvers from geodesy extended by a statistical approach is described which allows a stable source location determination even for partly erroneous onset times. The developed approach is validated with acoustic emission data from a large specimen leading to travel paths up to 1m and therefore to noisy data with errors in the determined onsets. The adaption of the algorithms from geodesy to the localization procedure of sources of elastic waves offers new possibilities concerning stability, automation and performance of localization results. Fracture processes can be assessed more accurately. PMID:26233938

  17. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  18. Measurement and modeling of the acoustic field near an underwater vehicle and implications for acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Lepper, Paul A; D'Spain, Gerald L

    2007-08-01

    The performance of traditional techniques of passive localization in ocean acoustics such as time-of-arrival (phase differences) and amplitude ratios measured by multiple receivers may be degraded when the receivers are placed on an underwater vehicle due to effects of scattering. However, knowledge of the interference pattern caused by scattering provides a potential enhancement to traditional source localization techniques. Results based on a study using data from a multi-element receiving array mounted on the inner shroud of an autonomous underwater vehicle show that scattering causes the localization ambiguities (side lobes) to decrease in overall level and to move closer to the true source location, thereby improving localization performance, for signals in the frequency band 2-8 kHz. These measurements are compared with numerical modeling results from a two-dimensional time domain finite difference scheme for scattering from two fluid-loaded cylindrical shells. Measured and numerically modeled results are presented for multiple source aspect angles and frequencies. Matched field processing techniques quantify the source localization capabilities for both measurements and numerical modeling output.

  19. Three-dimensional localization of transient acoustic sources using an ice-mounted geophone.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Stan E

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to three-dimensional (3D) localization of ocean acoustic sources using a single three-component geophone on Arctic sea ice. Source bearing is estimated by maximizing the radial signal power as a function of horizontal look angle, applying seismic polarization filters to suppress shear waves with transverse particle motion. The inherent 180° ambiguity is resolved by requiring outgoing (prograde) particle motion in the radial-vertical plane. Source range and depth estimates and uncertainties are computed by Bayesian inversion of arrival-time differences of the water-borne acoustic wave and ice seismic waves, including the horizontally-polarized shear wave and longitudinal plate wave. The 3D localization is applied to geophone recordings of impulsive sources deployed in the water column at a series of ranges (200 to 1000 m) and bearings (0° to 90°) for three sites in the Lincoln Sea characterized by smooth annual ice, rough/ridged annual ice, and thick multi-year ice. Good bearing estimates are obtained in all cases. Range-depth localization is successful for ranges over which ice seismic arrivals could be reliably detected, approximately 200 m on rough ice, 500 m on smooth ice, and 800 m on multi-year ice. Effects of environmental uncertainty on localization are quantified by marginalizing over unknown environmental parameters. PMID:24437752

  20. Three-dimensional localization of transient acoustic sources using an ice-mounted geophone.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Stan E

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to three-dimensional (3D) localization of ocean acoustic sources using a single three-component geophone on Arctic sea ice. Source bearing is estimated by maximizing the radial signal power as a function of horizontal look angle, applying seismic polarization filters to suppress shear waves with transverse particle motion. The inherent 180° ambiguity is resolved by requiring outgoing (prograde) particle motion in the radial-vertical plane. Source range and depth estimates and uncertainties are computed by Bayesian inversion of arrival-time differences of the water-borne acoustic wave and ice seismic waves, including the horizontally-polarized shear wave and longitudinal plate wave. The 3D localization is applied to geophone recordings of impulsive sources deployed in the water column at a series of ranges (200 to 1000 m) and bearings (0° to 90°) for three sites in the Lincoln Sea characterized by smooth annual ice, rough/ridged annual ice, and thick multi-year ice. Good bearing estimates are obtained in all cases. Range-depth localization is successful for ranges over which ice seismic arrivals could be reliably detected, approximately 200 m on rough ice, 500 m on smooth ice, and 800 m on multi-year ice. Effects of environmental uncertainty on localization are quantified by marginalizing over unknown environmental parameters.

  1. Three-dimensional volcano-acoustic source localization at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowell, Colin R.; Fee, David; Szuberla, Curt A. L.; Arnoult, Ken; Matoza, Robin S.; Firstov, Pavel P.; Kim, Keehoon; Makhmudov, Evgeniy

    2014-08-01

    We test two methods of 3-D acoustic source localization on volcanic explosions and small-scale jetting events at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Recent infrasound studies have provided evidence that volcanic jets produce low-frequency aerodynamic sound (jet noise) similar to that from man-made jet engines. For man-made jet noise, noise sources localize along the turbulent jet flow downstream of the nozzle. Discrimination of jet noise sources along the axis of a volcanic jet requires high resolution in the vertical dimension, which is very difficult to achieve with typical volcano-acoustic network geometries. At Karymsky Volcano, an eroded edifice (Dvor Caldera) adjacent to the active cone provided a platform for the deployment of five infrasound sensors in July 2012 with intra-network relief of ~ 600 m. The network was designed to target large-scale jetting, but unfortunately only small-scale jetting and explosions were recorded during the 12-day experiment. A novel 3-D inverse localization method, srcLoc, is tested and compared against a more common grid-search semblance technique. Simulations using synthetic signals show that srcLoc is capable of determining vertical solutions to within ± 150 m or better (for signal-to-noise ratios ≥ 1) for this network configuration. However, srcLoc locations for explosions and small-scale jetting at Karymsky Volcano show a persistent overestimation of source elevation and underestimation of sound speed. The semblance method provides more realistic source locations, likely because it uses a fixed, realistic sound speed of ~ 340 m/s. Explosion waveforms exhibit amplitude relationships and waveform distortion strikingly similar to those theorized by modeling studies of wave diffraction around the crater rim. We suggest that the delay of acoustic signals and apparent elevated source locations are due to raypaths altered by topography and/or crater diffraction effects, implying that topography in the vent region must be

  2. Bio-inspired UAV routing, source localization, and acoustic signature classification for persistent surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Pham, Tien

    2011-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara and the Army Research Laboratory* is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bio-inspired techniques for search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data. A fast and accurate method has been developed to localize an event by fusing data from a sparse number of UGSs. This technique uses a bio-inspired algorithm based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. A unique acoustic event classification algorithm was also developed based on using swarm optimization. Additional studies addressed the problem of routing multiple UAVs, optimally placing sensors in the field and locating the source of gunfire at helicopters. A field test was conducted in November of 2009 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that a system controlled by bio-inspired software algorithms can autonomously detect and locate the source of an acoustic event with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In nine independent test runs of a UAV, the system autonomously located the position of an explosion nine times with an average accuracy of 3 meters. The time required to perform source localization using the UAV was on the order of a few minutes based on UAV flight times. In June 2011, additional field tests of the system will be performed and will include multiple acoustic events, optimal sensor placement based on acoustic phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA

  3. Acoustic Source Localization via Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob; Wardlaw, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. The complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on an optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. They investigate key concepts of threat-detection algorithms such as Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) estimation via sensor data correlation in the time domain with the purpose of implementation on the optical-core processor. they illustrate their results with the aid of numerical simulation and actual optical hardware runs. The major accomplishments of this research, in terms of computational speedup and numerical accurcy achieved via the deployment of optical processing technology, should be of substantial interest to the acoustic signal processing community.

  4. Distance-domain based localization techniques for acoustic emission sources: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Nakatani, Hayato; Packo, Pawel; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic Emission phenomenon is of great importance for analyzing and monitoring health status of critical structural components. In acoustic emission, elastic waves generated by sources propagate through the structure and are acquired by networks of sensors. Ability to accurately locate the event strongly depends on the type of medium (e.g. geometrical features) and material properties, that result in wave signals distortion. These effects manifest themselves particularly in plate structures due to intrinsic dispersive nature of Lamb waves. In this paper two techniques for acoustic emission source localization in elastic plates are compared: one based on a time-domain distance transform and the second one is a two-step hybrid technique. A time-distance domain transform approach, transforms the time-domain waveforms into the distance domain by using wavenumber-frequency mapping. The transform reconstructs the source signal removing distortions resulting from dispersion effects. The method requires input of approximate material properties and geometrical features of the structure that are relatively easy to estimate prior to measurement. Hence, the method is of high practical interest. Subsequently, a two-step hybrid technique, which does not require apriori knowledge of material parameters, is employed. The method requires a setup of two predefined clusters of three sensors in each. The Lamb wave source is localized from the intersection point of the predicted wave propagation directions for the two clusters. The second step of the two-step hybrid technique improves the prediction by minimizing an objective function. The two methods are compared for analytic, simulated and experimental signals.

  5. Nonlinear Kalman Filtering for acoustic emission source localization in anisotropic panels.

    PubMed

    Dehghan Niri, E; Farhidzadeh, A; Salamone, S

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear Kalman Filtering is an established field in applied probability and control systems, which plays an important role in many practical applications from target tracking to weather and climate prediction. However, its application for acoustic emission (AE) source localization has been very limited. In this paper, two well-known nonlinear Kalman Filtering algorithms are presented to estimate the location of AE sources in anisotropic panels: the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). These algorithms are applied to two cases: velocity profile known (CASE I) and velocity profile unknown (CASE II). The algorithms are compared with a more traditional nonlinear least squares method. Experimental tests are carried out on a carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel instrumented with a sparse array of piezoelectric transducers to validate the proposed approaches. AE sources are simulated using an instrumented miniature impulse hammer. In order to evaluate the performance of the algorithms, two metrics are used: (1) accuracy of the AE source localization and (2) computational cost. Furthermore, it is shown that both EKF and UKF can provide a confidence interval of the estimated AE source location and can account for uncertainty in time of flight measurements.

  6. Localization of virtual sound sources with bilateral hearing aids in realistic acoustical scenes.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Martin F; Kegel, Andrea; Schimmel, Steven M; Dillier, Norbert; Hofbauer, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Sound localization with hearing aids has traditionally been investigated in artificial laboratory settings. These settings are not representative of environments in which hearing aids are used. With individual Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) and room simulations, realistic environments can be reproduced and the performance of hearing aid algorithms can be evaluated. In this study, four different environments with background noise have been implemented in which listeners had to localize different sound sources. The HRTFs were measured inside the ear canals of the test subjects and by the microphones of Behind-The-Ear (BTEs) hearing aids. In the first experiment the system for virtual acoustics was evaluated by comparing perceptual sound localization results for the four scenes in a real room with a simulated one. In the second experiment, sound localization with three BTE algorithms, an omnidirectional microphone, a monaural cardioid-shaped beamformer and a monaural noise canceler, was examined. The results showed that the system for generating virtual environments is a reliable tool to evaluate sound localization with hearing aids. With BTE hearing aids localization performance decreased and the number of front-back confusions was at chance level. The beamformer, due to its directivity characteristics, allowed the listener to resolve the front-back ambiguity.

  7. A reliable acoustic path: Physical properties and a source localization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Rui; Yang, Kun-De; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Lei, Bo

    2012-12-01

    The physical properties of a reliable acoustic path (RAP) are analysed and subsequently a weighted-subspace-fitting matched field (WSF-MF) method for passive localization is presented by exploiting the properties of the RAP environment. The RAP is an important acoustic duct in the deep ocean, which occurs when the receiver is placed near the bottom where the sound velocity exceeds the maximum sound velocity in the vicinity of the surface. It is found that in the RAP environment the transmission loss is rather low and no blind zone of surveillance exists in a medium range. The ray theory is used to explain these phenomena. Furthermore, the analysis of the arrival structures shows that the source localization method based on arrival angle is feasible in this environment. However, the conventional methods suffer from the complicated and inaccurate estimation of the arrival angle. In this paper, a straightforward WSF-MF method is derived to exploit the information about the arrival angles indirectly. The method is to minimize the distance between the signal subspace and the spanned space by the array manifold in a finite range-depth space rather than the arrival-angle space. Simulations are performed to demonstrate the features of the method, and the results are explained by the arrival structures in the RAP environment.

  8. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  9. Acoustic Localization with Infrasonic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threatt, Arnesha; Elbing, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Numerous geophysical and anthropogenic events emit infrasonic frequencies (<20 Hz), including volcanoes, hurricanes, wind turbines and tornadoes. These sounds, which cannot be heard by the human ear, can be detected from large distances (in excess of 100 miles) due to low frequency acoustic signals having a very low decay rate in the atmosphere. Thus infrasound could be used for long-range, passive monitoring and detection of these events. An array of microphones separated by known distances can be used to locate a given source, which is known as acoustic localization. However, acoustic localization with infrasound is particularly challenging due to contamination from other signals, sensitivity to wind noise and producing a trusted source for system development. The objective of the current work is to create an infrasonic source using a propane torch wand or a subwoofer and locate the source using multiple infrasonic microphones. This presentation will present preliminary results from various microphone configurations used to locate the source.

  10. Experimental Results of Underwater Cooperative Source Localization Using a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Felisberto, Paulo; Rodriguez, Orlando; Santos, Paulo; Ey, Emanuel; Jesus, Sérgio M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at estimating the azimuth, range and depth of a cooperative broadband acoustic source with a single vector sensor in a multipath underwater environment, where the received signal is assumed to be a linear combination of echoes of the source emitted waveform. A vector sensor is a device that measures the scalar acoustic pressure field and the vectorial acoustic particle velocity field at a single location in space. The amplitudes of the echoes in the vector sensor components allow one to determine their azimuth and elevation. Assuming that the environmental conditions of the channel are known, source range and depth are obtained from the estimates of elevation and relative time delays of the different echoes using a ray-based backpropagation algorithm. The proposed method is tested using simulated data and is further applied to experimental data from the Makai'05 experiment, where 8–14 kHz chirp signals were acquired by a vector sensor array. It is shown that for short ranges, the position of the source is estimated in agreement with the geometry of the experiment. The method is low computational demanding, thus well-suited to be used in mobile and light platforms, where space and power requirements are limited. PMID:23857257

  11. Localization of multiple acoustic sources with small arrays using a coherence test.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Satish; Lockwood, Michael E; Kramer, Michael L; Jones, Douglas L

    2008-04-01

    Direction finding of more sources than sensors is appealing in situations with small sensor arrays. Potential applications include surveillance, teleconferencing, and auditory scene analysis for hearing aids. A new technique for time-frequency-sparse sources, such as speech and vehicle sounds, uses a coherence test to identify low-rank time-frequency bins. These low-rank bins are processed in one of two ways: (1) narrowband spatial spectrum estimation at each bin followed by summation of directional spectra across time and frequency or (2) clustering low-rank covariance matrices, averaging covariance matrices within clusters, and narrowband spatial spectrum estimation of each cluster. Experimental results with omnidirectional microphones and colocated directional microphones demonstrate the algorithm's ability to localize 3-5 simultaneous speech sources over 4 s with 2-3 microphones to less than 1 degree of error, and the ability to localize simultaneously two moving military vehicles and small arms gunfire. PMID:18397021

  12. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  13. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore » readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  14. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  15. One sensor acoustic emission localization in plates.

    PubMed

    Ernst, R; Zwimpfer, F; Dual, J

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic emissions are elastic waves accompanying damage processes and are therefore used for monitoring the health state of structures. Most of the traditional acoustic emission techniques use a trilateration approach requiring at least three sensors on a 2D domain in order to localize sources of acoustic emission events. In this paper, we present a new approach which requires only a single sensor to identify and localize the source of acoustic emissions in a finite plate. The method proposed makes use of the time reversal principle and the dispersive nature of the flexural wave mode in a suitable frequency band. The signal shape of the transverse velocity response contains information about the propagated paths of the incoming elastic waves. This information is made accessible by a numerical time reversal simulation. The effect of dispersion is reversed and the original shape of the flexural wave is restored at the origin of the acoustic emission. The time reversal process is analyzed first for an infinite Mindlin plate, then by a 3D FEM simulation which in combination results in a novel acoustic emission localization process. The process is experimentally verified for different aluminum plates for artificially generated acoustic emissions (Hsu-Nielsen source). Good and reliable localization was achieved for a homogeneous quadratic aluminum plate with only one measurement. PMID:26372509

  16. Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) analog-to-feature converter chipsets for sub-wavelength acoustic source localization and bearing estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2010-04-01

    Localization of acoustic sources using miniature microphone arrays poses a significant challenge due to fundamental limitations imposed by the physics of sound propagation. With sub-wavelength distances between the microphones, resolving acute localization cues become difficult due to precision artifacts. In this work, we present the design of a miniature, microphone array sensor based on a patented Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO) analog-to-feature converter (AFC) chip-sets which overcomes the limitations due to precision artifacts. Measured results from fabricated prototypes demonstrate a bearing range of 0 degrees to 90 degrees with a resolution less than 2 degrees. The power dissipation of the MIMO-ADC chip-set for this task was measured to be less than 75 microwatts making it ideal for portable, battery powered sniper and gunshot detection applications.

  17. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.

  18. Localization of acoustic sensors from passive Green's function estimation.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Thibault; Daudet, Laurent; de Rosny, Julien

    2015-11-01

    A number of methods have recently been developed for passive localization of acoustic sensors, based on the assumption that the acoustic field is diffuse. This article presents the more general case of equipartition fields, which takes into account reflections off boundaries and/or scatterers. After a thorough discussion on the fundamental differences between the diffuse and equipartition models, it is shown that the method is more robust when dealing with wideband noise sources. Finally, experimental results show, for two types of boundary conditions, that this approach is especially relevant when acoustic sensors are close to boundaries.

  19. Acoustic sensor networks for woodpecker localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chen, C. E.; Ali, A.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R. E.; Yao, K.; Estrin, D.; Taylor, C.

    2005-08-01

    Sensor network technology can revolutionize the study of animal ecology by providing a means of non-intrusive, simultaneous monitoring of interaction among multiple animals. In this paper, we investigate design, analysis, and testing of acoustic arrays for localizing acorn woodpeckers using their vocalizations. Each acoustic array consists of four microphones arranged in a square. All four audio channels within the same acoustic array are finely synchronized within a few micro seconds. We apply the approximate maximum likelihood (AML) method to synchronized audio channels of each acoustic array for estimating the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of woodpecker vocalizations. The woodpecker location is estimated by applying least square (LS) methods to DOA bearing crossings of multiple acoustic arrays. We have revealed the critical relation between microphone spacing of acoustic arrays and robustness of beamforming of woodpecker vocalizations. Woodpecker localization experiments using robust array element spacing in different types of environments are conducted and compared. Practical issues about calibration of acoustic array orientation are also discussed.

  20. Localization in virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a particular spatial display medium, the virtual acoustic display. Although the technology can stand alone, it is envisioned ultimately to be a component of a larger multisensory environment and will no doubt find its greatest utility in that context. A general philosophy of the project has been that the development of advanced computer interfaces should be driven first by an understanding of human perceptual requirements, and secondarily by technological capabilities or constraints. In expanding on this view, the paper addresses why virtual acoustic displays are useful, characterizes the abilities of such displays, reviews some recent approaches to their implementation and application, describes the research project at NASA Ames in some detail, and finally outlines some critical research issues for the future.

  1. Localization in virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    This paper discusses the development of a particular spatial display medium, the virtual acoustic display. Although the technology can stand alone, it is envisioned ultimately to be a component of a larger multisensory environment and will no doubt find its greatest utility in that context. A general philosophy of the project has been that the development of advanced computer interfaces should be driven first by an understanding of human perceptual requirements, and secondarily by technological capabilities or constraints. In expanding on this view, the paper addresses why virtual acoustic displays are useful, characterizes the abilities of such displays, reviews some recent approaches to their implementation and application, describes the research project at NASA Ames in some detail, and finally outlines some critical research issues for the future.

  2. Properties of acoustic sources in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Pawan

    1994-01-01

    The power spectrum of solar acoustic oscillations shows peaks extending out to frequencies much greater than the acoustic cutoff frequency of approximately 5.3 mHz, where waves are no longer trapped. Kumar & Lu (1991) proposed that these peaks arise from the interference of traveling waves which are generated by turbulent convection. According to this model, the frequencies of the peaks in the power spectrum depend on the static structure of the Sun as well as the radial location of the sources. Kumar & Lu used this idea to determine the depth of the acoustic sources. However, they ignored dissipative effects and found that the theoretically computed power spectrum was falling off much more rapidly than the observed spectrum. In this paper, we include the interaction of radiation with acoustic waves in the computation of the power spectrum. We find that the theoretically calculated power spectra, when radiative damping is included are in excellent agreement with the observed power spectra over the entire observed frequency range of 5.3 to 7.5 mHz above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Moreover, by matching the peak frequencies in the observed and theoretical spectra we find the mean depth of acoustic sources to be 140 +/- 60 km below the photosphere. We show that the spectrum of solar turbulence near the top of the solar convection zone is consistent with the Kolmogorov spectrum, and that the observed high frequency power spectrum provides strong evidence that the acoustic sources in the Sun are quadrupolar. The data, in fact, rules out dipole sources as significant contributors to acoustic wave generation in the Sun. The radial extent of the sources is poorly determined and is estimated to be less than about 550 km.

  3. Acoustic Network Localization and Interpretation of Infrasonic Pulses from Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Badillo, E.; Michnovicz, J. C.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.

    2011-12-01

    We improve on the localization accuracy of thunder sources and identify infrasonic pulses that are correlated across a network of acoustic arrays. We attribute these pulses to electrostatic charge relaxation (collapse of the electric field) and attempt to model their spatial extent and acoustic source strength. Toward this objective we have developed a single audio range (20-15,000 Hz) acoustic array and a 4-station network of broadband (0.01-500 Hz) microphone arrays with aperture of ~45 m. The network has an aperture of 1700 m and was installed during the summers of 2009-2011 in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico, an area that is subject to frequent lightning activity. We are exploring a new technique based on inverse theory that integrates information from the audio range and the network of broadband acoustic arrays to locate thunder sources more accurately than can be achieved with a single array. We evaluate the performance of the technique by comparing the location of thunder sources with RF sources located by the lightning mapping array (LMA) of Langmuir Laboratory at New Mexico Tech. We will show results of this technique for lightning flashes that occurred in the vicinity of our network of acoustic arrays and over the LMA. We will use acoustic network detection of infrasonic pulses together with LMA data and electric field measurements to estimate the spatial distribution of the charge (within the cloud) that is used to produce a lightning flash, and will try to quantify volumetric charges (charge magnitude) within clouds.

  4. Acoustic and non-acoustic factors in modeling listener-specific performance of sagittal-plane sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Baumgartner, Robert; Laback, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The ability of sound-source localization in sagittal planes (along the top-down and front-back dimension) varies considerably across listeners. The directional acoustic spectral features, described by head-related transfer functions (HRTFs), also vary considerably across listeners, a consequence of the listener-specific shape of the ears. It is not clear whether the differences in localization ability result from differences in the encoding of directional information provided by the HRTFs, i.e., an acoustic factor, or from differences in auditory processing of those cues (e.g., spectral-shape sensitivity), i.e., non-acoustic factors. We addressed this issue by analyzing the listener-specific localization ability in terms of localization performance. Directional responses to spatially distributed broadband stimuli from 18 listeners were used. A model of sagittal-plane localization was fit individually for each listener by considering the actual localization performance, the listener-specific HRTFs representing the acoustic factor, and an uncertainty parameter representing the non-acoustic factors. The model was configured to simulate the condition of complete calibration of the listener to the tested HRTFs. Listener-specifically calibrated model predictions yielded correlations of, on average, 0.93 with the actual localization performance. Then, the model parameters representing the acoustic and non-acoustic factors were systematically permuted across the listener group. While the permutation of HRTFs affected the localization performance, the permutation of listener-specific uncertainty had a substantially larger impact. Our findings suggest that across-listener variability in sagittal-plane localization ability is only marginally determined by the acoustic factor, i.e., the quality of directional cues found in typical human HRTFs. Rather, the non-acoustic factors, supposed to represent the listeners' efficiency in processing directional cues, appear to be

  5. Simulation Of Static And Moving Acoustical Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Foster, Scott H.; Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1992-01-01

    Sounds in headphones changed according to movements of listener's head. Signal processor generates three-dimensional sound cues for headphones. Provides up to four independent acoustical sources simultaneously and simulates movements of each source in real time. Used to enhance presentations of data in cockpits of airplanes, in air-traffic-control towers, for training people whose hearing is impaired, for monitoring telerobots in hazardous situations, and for visualizing multidimensional scientific data, among many possible applications.

  6. Acoustic-Gravity Waves from Bolide Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revelle, Douglas O.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a new approach to modeling the acoustic-gravity wave (AGW) radiation from bolide sources. This first effort involves entry modeling of bolide sources that have available satellite data through procedures developed in ReVelle (Earth Moon Planets 95, 441-476, 2004a; in: A. Milani, G. Valsecchi, D. Vokrouhlicky (eds) NEO Fireball Diversity: Energetics-based Entry Modeling and Analysis Techniques, Near-earth Objects: Our Celestial Neighbors (IAU S236), 2007b). Results from the entry modeling are directly coupled to AGW production through line source blast wave theory for the initial wave amplitude and period at x=10 (at 10 blast wave radii and perpendicular to the trajectory). The second effort involves the prediction of the formation and or dominance of the propagation of the atmospheric Lamb, edge-wave composite mode in a viscous fluid (Pierce, J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 35, 1798-1807, 1963) as a function of the source energy, horizontal range and source altitude using the Lamb wave frequency that was deduced directly during the entry modeling and that is used as a surrogate for the source energy. We have also determined that Lamb wave production by bolides at close range decreases dramatically as either the source energy decreases or the source altitude increases. Finally using procedures in Gill ( Atmospheric-Ocean Dynamics, 1982) and in Tolstoy ( Wave Propagation, 1973), we have analyzed two simple dispersion relationships and have calculated the expected dispersion for the Lamb edge-wave mode and for the excited, propagating internal acoustic waves. Finally, we have used the above formalism to fully evaluate these techniques for four large bolides, namely: the Tunguska bolide of June 30, 1908; the Revelstoke bolide of March 31, 1965; the Crete bolide of June 6, 2002 and the Antarctic bolide of September 3, 2004. Due to page limitations, we will only present results in detail for the Revelstoke bolide.

  7. A covariance fitting approach for correlated acoustic source mapping.

    PubMed

    Yardibi, Tarik; Li, Jian; Stoica, Petre; Zawodny, Nikolas S; Cattafesta, Louis N

    2010-05-01

    Microphone arrays are commonly used for noise source localization and power estimation in aeroacoustic measurements. The delay-and-sum (DAS) beamformer, which is the most widely used beamforming algorithm in practice, suffers from low resolution and high sidelobe level problems. Therefore, deconvolution approaches, such as the deconvolution approach for the mapping of acoustic sources (DAMAS), are often used for extracting the actual source powers from the contaminated DAS results. However, most deconvolution approaches assume that the sources are uncorrelated. Although deconvolution algorithms that can deal with correlated sources, such as DAMAS for correlated sources, do exist, these algorithms are computationally impractical even for small scanning grid sizes. This paper presents a covariance fitting approach for the mapping of acoustic correlated sources (MACS), which can work with uncorrelated, partially correlated or even coherent sources with a reasonably low computational complexity. MACS minimizes a quadratic cost function in a cyclic manner by making use of convex optimization and sparsity, and is guaranteed to converge at least locally. Simulations and experimental data acquired at the University of Florida Aeroacoustic Flow Facility with a 63-element logarithmic spiral microphone array in the absence of flow are used to demonstrate the performance of MACS. PMID:21117743

  8. On the output of acoustical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1979-01-01

    Contents: (1) a theoretical basis for local power calculation; (2) source radiation in the presence of a half-plane; (3) radiation from a line source near an edge at which a Kutta condition holds; (4) radiation by a point source above a plane independence boundary; and (5) power output of a point source in a uniform flow.

  9. Networked localization of sniper shots using acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; Hamery, P.; De Mezzo, S.; Duffner, P.

    2011-06-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) initiated studies in the domain of acoustic localization of shots. Mobile antennas mounted on the soldier's helmet were initially used for real-time detection, classification and localization of sniper shots. It showed good performances in land scenarios, but also in urban scenarios if the array was in the shot corridor, meaning that the microphones first detect the direct wave and then the reflections of the Mach and muzzle waves. As soon as the acoustic arrays were not near to the shot corridor (only reflections are detected) this solution lost its efficiency and erroneous estimated position were given. In order to estimate the position of the shooter in every kind of urban scenario, ISL started studying time reversal techniques. Knowing the position of every reflective object in the environment (buildings, walls, ...) it should be possible to estimate the position of the shooter. First, a synthetic propagation algorithm has been developed and validated for real scale applications. It has then been validated for small scale models, allowing us to test our time reversal based algorithms in our laboratory. In this paper we discuss all the challenges that are induced by the application of sniper detection using time reversal techniques. We will discuss all the hard points that can be encountered and try to find some solutions in order to optimize the use of this technique.

  10. Neural correlates of sound localization in complex acoustic environments.

    PubMed

    Zündorf, Ida C; Lewald, Jörg; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2013-01-01

    Listening to and understanding people in a "cocktail-party situation" is a remarkable feature of the human auditory system. Here we investigated the neural correlates of the ability to localize a particular sound among others in an acoustically cluttered environment with healthy subjects. In a sound localization task, five different natural sounds were presented from five virtual spatial locations during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Activity related to auditory stream segregation was revealed in posterior superior temporal gyrus bilaterally, anterior insula, supplementary motor area, and frontoparietal network. Moreover, the results indicated critical roles of left planum temporale in extracting the sound of interest among acoustical distracters and the precuneus in orienting spatial attention to the target sound. We hypothesized that the left-sided lateralization of the planum temporale activation is related to the higher specialization of the left hemisphere for analysis of spectrotemporal sound features. Furthermore, the precuneus - a brain area known to be involved in the computation of spatial coordinates across diverse frames of reference for reaching to objects - seems to be also a crucial area for accurately determining locations of auditory targets in an acoustically complex scene of multiple sound sources. The precuneus thus may not only be involved in visuo-motor processes, but may also subserve related functions in the auditory modality.

  11. Vehicular sources in acoustic propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Fitzgerald, James; Arruda, Anthony; Parides, George

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important uses of acoustic propagation models lies in the area of detection and tracking of vehicles. Propagation models are used to compute transmission losses in performance prediction models and to analyze the results of past experiments. Vehicles can also provide the means for cost effective experiments to measure acoustic propagation conditions over significant ranges. In order to properly correlate the information provided by the experimental data and the propagation models, the following issues must be taken into consideration: the phenomenology of the vehicle noise sources must be understood and characterized; the vehicle's location or 'ground truth' must be accurately reproduced and synchronized with the acoustic data; and sufficient meteorological data must be collected to support the requirements of the propagation models. The experimental procedures and instrumentation needed to carry out propagation experiments are discussed. Illustrative results are presented for two cases. First, a helicopter was used to measure propagation losses at a range of 1 to 10 Km. Second, a heavy diesel-powered vehicle was used to measure propagation losses in the 300 to 2200 m range.

  12. Model-based ocean acoustic passive localization. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    A model-based approach is developed (theoretically) to solve the passive localization problem. Here the authors investigate the design of a model-based identifier for a shallow water ocean acoustic problem characterized by a normal-mode model. In this problem they show how the processor can be structured to estimate the vertical wave numbers directly from measured pressure-field and sound speed measurements thereby eliminating the need for synthetic aperture processing or even a propagation model solution. Finally, they investigate various special cases of the source localization problem, designing a model-based localizer for each and evaluating the underlying structure with the expectation of gaining more and more insight into the general problem.

  13. Identifying Potential Noise Sources within Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Victoria; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    We test a new algorithm for its ability to detect sources of noise within random background. The goal of these tests is to better understand how to identify sources within acoustic signals while simultaneously determining the strengths and weaknesses of the algorithm in question. Unlike previously published algorithms, the antenna method does not pinpoint events by looking for the most energetic portions of a signal. The algorithm searches for the ideal lag combinations between three signals by taking excerpts of possible events. The excerpt with the lowest calculated minimum distance between possible events is how the algorithm identifies sources. At the minimum distance, the events are close in time and frequency. This method can be compared to the cross correlation and denoising methods to better understand its effectiveness. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL, as well as the Syracuse University MAE department.

  14. A study of acoustic source generation mechanism of Magnetoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Zhang, Shunqi; Ma, Ren; Yin, Tao; Liu, Zhipeng

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic Tomography (MAT) is a non-invasive imaging modality for electrical conductivity with good contrast and high spatial resolution. We have analyzed the acoustic source generation mechanism of MAT and presented its physical model, including the simulations and experiments in this paper. In MAT, acoustic sources are generated in a conductive object placed in a static magnetic field. Pulsed current is injected into the object and produces a Lorentz force due to the static magnetic filed. Acoustic vibration was excited by the Lorentz force, and hence, ultrasound waves propagate in all directions and are collected with transducers placed around the object. The conductivity image can then be reconstructed with acoustic waves using some reconstruction algorithms. Because the acoustic source generation mechanism of MAT is the key problem of forward and inverse problems, we analyzed the physical process of acoustic source generation and presented the acoustic dipole source model according to the Lorentz force imposed on the object. In addition, computer simulations and experiments were also conducted. The results of simulations applying an acoustic dipole source model are consistent with experimental results. This study has cardinal significance for the accurate algorithm of MAT and provides a methodology and reference for acoustic source problems.

  15. Seismo-Acoustic Observations of Explosive Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chael, E. P.; Hart, D. M.; Jones, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    Since January 2011, the Sandia National Laboratories Facility for Acceptance, Calibration and Testing (FACT) has operated a seismo-acoustic station with the purpose of recording local explosions on Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). Our immediate goals are to develop a catalog of events and a database of seismo-acoustic waveforms from ordnance disposal and Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) events. The catalog of events will include metadata such as shot time, size, type and location. The waveform archive includes a three-channel GS-13 seismometer and a single infrasound sensor (Chaparral 25 with 50' porous hose wind reduction system). In June of 2011 a weather station was added to complement the monitoring system by providing accurate wind conditions at the times of the explosive events. Monthly internal reports compiled by KAFB provided us with the metadata for the ordnance disposal explosions, and an agreement with DTRA has enabled us to obtain metadata on their events. To date 157 explosions have been identified, including 153 ordnance disposal events and 4 DTRA tests. Along with the catalog of events we have developed automated processing routines to extract both seismic and infrasound arrivals and measure basic waveform characteristics. These include amplitudes of pre-event noise, the direct seismic arrival, air-coupled seismic arrival, infrasound arrival, and wind speed/direction. Using the waveform measurements from the pre-event noise and air-coupled seismic arrival we calculate the SNR for the seismic component of the event. We also calculate the SNR for the infrasonic component of the event using pre-event noise and the direct infrasound arrival. Using the metadata and seismic and infrasonic SNR values we are able to calculate an air-to-ground coupling ratio for each event. For local (<10 km) explosion monitoring, the wind speed and direction can influence all of the analysis parameters. It will affect the pre-event noise level as well as the infrasound

  16. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation using compressional acoustic sources

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for investigating rock formations outside a borehole are provided. The method includes generating a first compressional acoustic wave at a first frequency by a first acoustic source; and generating a second compressional acoustic wave at a second frequency by a second acoustic source. The first and the second acoustic sources are arranged within a localized area of the borehole. The first and the second acoustic waves intersect in an intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving a third shear acoustic wave at a third frequency, the third shear acoustic wave returning to the borehole due to a non-linear mixing process in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume at a receiver arranged in the borehole. The third frequency is equal to a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency.

  17. Acoustic radiation from lined, unflanged ducts: Acoustic source distribution program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckemeyer, R. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1971-01-01

    An acoustic radiation analysis was developed to predict the far-field characteristics of fan noise radiated from an acoustically lined unflanged duct. This analysis is comprised of three modular digital computer programs which together provide a capability of accounting for the impedance mismatch at the duct exit plane. Admissible duct configurations include circular or annular, with or without an extended centerbody. This variation in duct configurations provides a capability of modeling inlet and fan duct noise radiation. The computer programs are described in detail.

  18. Broadband acoustic source processing in a noisy shallow ocean environment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1996-07-18

    Acoustic sources found in the ocean environment are spatially complex and broadband, complicating the analysis of received acoustic data considerably. A model-based approach is developed for a broadband source in a shallow ocean environment characterized by a normal-mode propagation model. Here we develop the optimal Bayesian solution to the broadband pressure-field enhancement and modal function extraction problem.

  19. Chemical plume source localization.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shuo; Farrell, Jay A

    2006-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the dispersion of the chemical is dominated by turbulence, resulting in an intermittent chemical signal. The vehicle is capable of detecting above-threshold chemical concentration and sensing the fluid flow velocity at the vehicle location. This paper reviews instances of biological plume tracing and reviews previous strategies for a vehicle-based plume tracing. The main contribution is a new source-likelihood mapping approach based on Bayesian inference methods. Using this Bayesian methodology, the source-likelihood map is propagated through time and updated in response to both detection and nondetection events. Examples are included that use data from in-water testing to compare the mapping approach derived herein with the map derived using a previously existing technique. PMID:17036813

  20. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature.

  1. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature. PMID:26933692

  2. Acoustic intensity in the interaction region of a parametric source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauchle, G. C.; Gabrielson, T. B.; van Tol, D. J.; Kottke, N. F.; McConnell, J. A.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this project was to measure acoustic intensity in the strong interaction region of a parametric source in order to obtain a clear definition of the source-generation region and to separate the local generation (the reactive field) from propagation (the real or active field). The acoustic intensity vector was mapped in the interaction region of a parametric projector at Lake Seneca. The source was driven with primary signals at 22 kHz and 27 kHz. Receiving sensors were located 8.5 meters from the projector. At that range, the secondary at 5 kHz was between 40 and 45 dB below either primary. For the primary levels used, the plane-wave shock inception distance would have been at least 14 meters. Furthermore, the Rayleigh distance for the projector was about 4 meters so the measurements at 8.5 meters were in the strong interaction region but not in saturation. Absorption was negligible over these ranges. The intensity measurements were made at fixed range but varying azimuth angle and varying depth thus developing a two-dimensional cross-section of the secondary beam. Measurements of both the active and reactive intensity vectors will be presented along with a discussion of measurement error. [Work supported by ONR Code 321SS.

  3. Sources and propagation of atmospherical acoustic shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Sources of aerial shock waves are numerous and produce acoustical signals that propagate in the atmosphere over long ranges, with a wide frequency spectrum ranging from infrasonic to audible, and with a complex human response. They can be of natural origin, like meteors, lightning or volcanoes, or human-made as for explosions, so-called "buzz-saw noise" (BSN) from aircraft engines or sonic booms. Their description, modeling and data analysis within the viewpoint of nonlinear acoustics will be the topic of the present lecture, with focus on two main points: the challenges of the source description, and the main features of nonlinear atmospheric propagation. Inter-disciplinary aspects, with links to atmospheric and geo-sciences will be outlined. Detailed description of the source is very dependent on its nature. Mobile supersonic sources can be rotating (fan blades of aircraft engines) or in translation (meteors, sonic boom). Mach numbers range from transonic to hypersonic. Detailed knowledge of geometry is critical for the processes of boom minimization and audible frequency spectrum of BSN. Sources of geophysical nature are poorly known, and various mechanisms for explaining infrasound recorded from meteors or thunderstorms have been proposed. Comparison between recorded data and modeling may be one way to discriminate between them. Moreover, the nearfield of these sources is frequently beyond the limits of acoustical approximation, or too complex for simple modeling. A proper numerical description hence requires specific matching procedures between nearfield behavior and farfield propagation. Nonlinear propagation in the atmosphere is dominated by temperature and wind stratification. Ray theory is an efficient way to analyze observations, but is invalid in various situations. Nonlinear effects are enhanced locally at caustics, or in case of grazing propagation over a rigid surface. Absorption, which controls mostly the high frequency part of the spectrum contained

  4. Localization of acoustic modes in periodic porous silicon structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinal acoustic waves in multilayer structures based on porous silicon and the experimental measurement of acoustic transmission for the structures in the gigahertz range are reported and studied theoretically. The considered structures exhibit band gaps in the transmission spectrum and these are localized modes inside the band gap, coming from defect layers introduced in periodic systems. The frequency at which the acoustic resonances appear can be tuned by changing the porosity and/or thickness of the defect layer. PMID:25206317

  5. Selective source reduction to identify masked sources using time reversal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Anderson, Brian E.; Griffa, M.; Johnson, Paul A.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2008-08-01

    The presence of strong sources of elastic waves often makes it impossible to localize weaker ones, which are sometimes the most meaningful, e.g. in the characterization of complexity of active Earth faults or of microdamage in a composite structural material. To address this problem, a selective source reduction method is proposed here which, applied in conjunction with time reversal acoustics (TRA), provides the means to selectively reduce the contribution of strong sources allowing full illumination of the weak ones. The method is complementary to other methods based on TRA which aim at the selective illumination of scatterers in the propagation medium. In this paper, a description of the method is given along with presentation of a few numerical results to demonstrate its usefulness for localization of sources. Validation and some experimental results are also presented.

  6. A non-local computational boundary condition for duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.; Watson, Willie R.; Hodge, Steve L.

    1994-01-01

    A non-local boundary condition is formulated for acoustic waves in ducts without flow. The ducts are two dimensional with constant area, but with variable impedance wall lining. Extension of the formulation to three dimensional and variable area ducts is straightforward in principle, but requires significantly more computation. The boundary condition simulates a nonreflecting wave field in an infinite duct. It is implemented by a constant matrix operator which is applied at the boundary of the computational domain. An efficient computational solution scheme is developed which allows calculations for high frequencies and long duct lengths. This computational solution utilizes the boundary condition to limit the computational space while preserving the radiation boundary condition. The boundary condition is tested for several sources. It is demonstrated that the boundary condition can be applied close to the sound sources, rendering the computational domain small. Computational solutions with the new non-local boundary condition are shown to be consistent with the known solutions for nonreflecting wavefields in an infinite uniform duct.

  7. An optoacoustic point source for acoustic scale model measurements.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Javier Gómez; Pulkki, Ville; Karppinen, Pasi; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-04-01

    A massless acoustic source is proposed for scale model work. This source is generated by focusing a pulsed laser beam to rapidly heat the air at the focal point. This produces an expanding small plasma ball which generates a sonic impulse that may be used as an acoustic point source. Repeatability, frequency response, and directivity of the source were measured to show that it can serve as a massless point source. The impulse response of a rectangular space was determined using this type of source. A good match was found between the predicted and the measured impulse responses of the space.

  8. The application of Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm to Wavelet Neural Networks for acoustic emission source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Li; Deng, Aideng; Bao, Yongqiang; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Yunliang

    2014-04-01

    When using acoustic emission to locate the friction fault source of rotating machinery, the effects of strong noise and waveform distortion make accurate locating difficult. Applying neural network for acoustic emission source location could be helpful. In the BP Wavelet Neural Network, BP is a local search algorithm, which falls into local minimum easily. The probability of successful search is low. We used Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm (SFLA) to optimize the parameters of the Wavelet Neural Network, and the optimized Wavelet Neural Network to locate the source. After having performed the experiments of friction acoustic emission's source location on the rotor friction test machine, the results show that the calculation of SFLA is simple and effective, and that locating is accurate with proper structure of the network and input parameters.

  9. Trends in EEG source localization.

    PubMed

    Koles, Z J

    1998-02-01

    The concepts underlying the quantitative localization of the sources of the EEG inside the brain are reviewed along with the current and emerging approaches to the problem. The concepts mentioned include monopolar and dipolar source models and head models ranging from the spherical to the more realistic based on boundary and finite elements. The forward and inverse problems in electroencephalography are discussed, including the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. The approaches to the solution of the inverse problem described include single and multiple time-slice localization, equivalent dipole localization and the weighted minimum norm. The multiple time-slice localization approach is highlighted as probably the best available at this time and is discussed in terms of the spatiotemporal model of the EEG. The effect of noise corruption, artifacts and the number of recording electrodes on the accuracy of source localization is also mentioned. It is suggested that the main appeal of the minimum norm is that it does not assume a model for the sources and provides an estimate of the current density everywhere in the three dimensional volume of the head.

  10. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions.

  11. Locating the acoustic source in thin glass plate using low sampling rate data.

    PubMed

    Hoseini Sabzevari, S Amir; Moavenian, Majid

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic source localization is an important step for structural health monitoring (SHM). There are many research studies dealing with localization based on high sampling rate data. In this paper, for the first time, acoustic source is localized on an isotropic plate using low sampling rate data. Previous studies have mainly used a cluster of specific sensors to easily record high sampling rate signals containing qualitative time domain features. This paper proposes a novel technique to localize the acoustic source on isotropic plates by simply implementing a combination of two simple electret microphones and Loci of k-Tuple Distances (LkTD) from the two sensors with low sampling rate data. In fact the method proposes substitution of previous methods based on solving the system of equations and increasing the number of sensors by implementing the selection of LkTD. Unlike most previous studies, estimation of time difference of arrival (TDOA) is based on the frequency properties of the signal rather than it's time properties. An experimental set-up is prepared and experiments are conducted to validate the proposed technique by prediction of the acoustic source location. The experimental results show that TDOA estimations based on low sampling rate data can produce more accurate predictions in comparison with previous studies. It is also shown that the selection of LkTD on the plate has noticeable effects on the performance of this technique.

  12. Single Molecule as a Local Acoustic Detector for Mechanical Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuxi; Navarro, Pedro; Orrit, Michel

    2014-09-01

    A single molecule can serve as a nanometer-sized detector of acoustic strain. Such a nanomicrophone has the great advantage that it can be placed very close to acoustic signal sources and high sensitivities can be achieved. We demonstrate this scheme by monitoring the fluorescence intensity of a single dibenzoterrylene molecule in an anthracene crystal attached to an oscillating tuning fork. The characterization of the vibration amplitude and of the detection sensitivity is a first step towards detection and control of nanomechanical oscillators through optical detection and feedback.

  13. Scaling of membrane-type locally resonant acoustic metamaterial arrays.

    PubMed

    Naify, Christina J; Chang, Chia-Ming; McKnight, Geoffrey; Nutt, Steven R

    2012-10-01

    Metamaterials have emerged as promising solutions for manipulation of sound waves in a variety of applications. Locally resonant acoustic materials (LRAM) decrease sound transmission by 500% over acoustic mass law predictions at peak transmission loss (TL) frequencies with minimal added mass, making them appealing for weight-critical applications such as aerospace structures. In this study, potential issues associated with scale-up of the structure are addressed. TL of single-celled and multi-celled LRAM was measured using an impedance tube setup with systematic variation in geometric parameters to understand the effects of each parameter on acoustic response. Finite element analysis was performed to predict TL as a function of frequency for structures with varying complexity, including stacked structures and multi-celled arrays. Dynamic response of the array structures under discrete frequency excitation was investigated using laser vibrometry to verify negative dynamic mass behavior. PMID:23039544

  14. Aero-acoustics source separation with sparsity inducing priors in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwander, Olivier; Picheral, José; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Blacodon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of acoustic sources is of great interest in many industrial applications, in particular for the aeronautic or automotive industry for the development of new products. While localization of sources using observations from a wind tunnel is a well-known subject, the characterization and separation of the sources still needs to be explored. We present here a Bayesian approach for sources separation. Two prior modeling of the sources are considered: a sparsity inducing prior in the frequency domain and an autoregressive model in the time domain. The proposed methods are evaluated on synthetic data simulating noise sources emitting from an airfoil inside a wind tunnel.

  15. Identification of aerospace acoustic sources using sparse distributed associative memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. A.; Fuller, C. R.; O'Brien, W. F.

    1990-01-01

    A pattern recognition system has been developed to classify five different aerospace acoustic sources. In this paper the performance of two new classifiers, an associative memory classifier and a neural network classifier, is compared to the performance of a previously designed system. Sources are classified using features calculated from the time and frequency domain. Each classifier undergoes a training period where it learns to classify sources correctly based on a set of known sources. After training the classifier is tested with unknown sources. Results show that over 96 percent of sources were identified correctly with the new associative memory classifier. The neural network classifier identified over 81 percent of the sources correctly.

  16. Note: Localization based on estimated source energy homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Eriksen, Fredrik Kvalheim; Lengliné, Olivier; Daniel, Guillaume; Flekkøy, Eirik G.; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen

    2016-09-01

    Acoustic signal localization is a complex problem with a wide range of industrial and academic applications. Herein, we propose a localization method based on energy attenuation and inverted source amplitude comparison (termed estimated source energy homogeneity, or ESEH). This inversion is tested on both synthetic (numerical) data using a Lamb wave propagation model and experimental 2D plate data (recorded with 4 accelerometers sensitive up to 26 kHz). We compare the performance of this technique with classic source localization algorithms: arrival time localization, time reversal localization, and localization based on energy amplitude. Our technique is highly versatile and out-performs the conventional techniques in terms of error minimization and cost (both computational and financial).

  17. Reconstruction of moving acoustic sources in heterogeneous elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Stephen F.; Jeong, Chanseok

    2016-04-01

    A novel computational framework for reconstructing spatial and temporal profiles of moving acoustic sources from wave responses measured at sparsely distributes sensors is introduced in this paper. This method can be applied to a broad range of acoustic-source inversion (ASI) problems for heterogeneous, complex-shaped coupled dynamic systems. The finite element method (FEM) is used to obtain wave response solutions due guessed moving sources. An adjoint-gradient based optimization technique iteratively improves the guesses so that the guessed moving sources converge on the actual moving sources. To reconstruct acoustic source profiles without a-priori knowledge of sources, we will employ high-resolution discretization of source functions in space and time. Because of such dense discretization, the order of magnitude of number of inversion parameters could range from millions to billions. Numerical experiments prove the robustness of this method by reconstructing spatial and temporal profiles of multiple dynamic moving body forces in a one-dimensional heterogeneous solid bar. The sources create stress waves propagating through the bar. The guessed source functions are spatially discretized by using linear shape functions with an element size of 1m at discrete times with a time step of 0.001s. Thus, the total number of control parameters in this example is 100,000 (i.e., 100 (in space) by 1000 (in time)). The convergence toward the target in the numerical examples is excellent, reconstructing the spatial and temporal footprints of the sources.

  18. The effect of brain lesions on sound localization in complex acoustic environments.

    PubMed

    Zündorf, Ida C; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Lewald, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Localizing sound sources of interest in cluttered acoustic environments--as in the 'cocktail-party' situation--is one of the most demanding challenges to the human auditory system in everyday life. In this study, stroke patients' ability to localize acoustic targets in a single-source and in a multi-source setup in the free sound field were directly compared. Subsequent voxel-based lesion-behaviour mapping analyses were computed to uncover the brain areas associated with a deficit in localization in the presence of multiple distracter sound sources rather than localization of individually presented sound sources. Analyses revealed a fundamental role of the right planum temporale in this task. The results from the left hemisphere were less straightforward, but suggested an involvement of inferior frontal and pre- and postcentral areas. These areas appear to be particularly involved in the spectrotemporal analyses crucial for effective segregation of multiple sound streams from various locations, beyond the currently known network for localization of isolated sound sources in otherwise silent surroundings.

  19. Material sound source localization through headphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunai, Larisa; Peris-Fajarnes, Guillermo; Lengua, Ismael Lengua; Montaña, Ignacio Tortajada

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper a study of sound localization is carried out, considering two different sounds emitted from different hit materials (wood and bongo) as well as a Delta sound. The motivation of this research is to study how humans localize sounds coming from different materials, with the purpose of a future implementation of the acoustic sounds with better localization features in navigation aid systems or training audio-games suited for blind people. Wood and bongo sounds are recorded after hitting two objects made of these materials. Afterwards, they are analysed and processed. On the other hand, the Delta sound (click) is generated by using the Adobe Audition software, considering a frequency of 44.1 kHz. All sounds are analysed and convolved with previously measured non-individual Head-Related Transfer Functions both for an anechoic environment and for an environment with reverberation. The First Choice method is used in this experiment. Subjects are asked to localize the source position of the sound listened through the headphones, by using a graphic user interface. The analyses of the recorded data reveal that no significant differences are obtained either when considering the nature of the sounds (wood, bongo, Delta) or their environmental context (with or without reverberation). The localization accuracies for the anechoic sounds are: wood 90.19%, bongo 92.96% and Delta sound 89.59%, whereas for the sounds with reverberation the results are: wood 90.59%, bongo 92.63% and Delta sound 90.91%. According to these data, we can conclude that even when considering the reverberation effect, the localization accuracy does not significantly increase.

  20. Directional Hearing and Sound Source Localization in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Sisneros, Joseph A; Rogers, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the capacity for sound source localization is common to mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians, but surprisingly it is not known whether fish locate sound sources in the same manner (e.g., combining binaural and monaural cues) or what computational strategies they use for successful source localization. Directional hearing and sound source localization in fishes continues to be important topics in neuroethology and in the hearing sciences, but the empirical and theoretical work on these topics have been contradictory and obscure for decades. This chapter reviews the previous behavioral work on directional hearing and sound source localization in fishes including the most recent experiments on sound source localization by the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus), which has proven to be an exceptional species for fish studies of sound localization. In addition, the theoretical models of directional hearing and sound source localization for fishes are reviewed including a new model that uses a time-averaged intensity approach for source localization that has wide applicability with regard to source type, acoustic environment, and time waveform.

  1. Laser-Generated Thermoelastic Acoustic Sources in Anisotropic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Hurley

    2004-05-01

    An analytical model appropriate for thermoelastic generation of acoustic waves in anisotropic materials is presented for both plane and line sources. The interaction of acoustic waves produced by subsurface sources with the bounding surface is accounted for using a method of images. For the plane source case, analytical solutions are found that form an appropriate basis for an angular spectrum of plane waves. For the line source case and for specific crystal symmetries and source orientations, it is shown in the limit of strong optical absorption, a buried line source is equivalent to applying a shear stress dipole at the bounding surface. However, contrary to the isotropic case, the character and strength of the equivalent surface stress is a function of propagation direction.

  2. Development of an Acoustic Localization Method for Cavitation Experiments in Reverberant Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjeva, Minna; Thompson, Lee; Perlitz, Daniel; Bonness, William; Capone, Dean; Elbing, Brian

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation is a major concern for the US Navy since it can cause ship damage and produce unwanted noise. The ability to precisely locate cavitation onset in laboratory scale experiments is essential for proper design that will minimize this undesired phenomenon. Measuring the cavitation onset is more accurately determined acoustically than visually. However, if other parts of the model begin to cavitate prior to the component of interest the acoustic data is contaminated with spurious noise. Consequently, cavitation onset is widely determined by optically locating the event of interest. The current research effort aims at developing an acoustic localization scheme for reverberant environments such as water tunnels. Currently cavitation bubbles are being induced in a static water tank with a laser, allowing the localization techniques to be refined with the bubble at a known location. The source is located with the use of acoustic data collected with hydrophones and analyzed using signal processing techniques. To verify the accuracy of the acoustic scheme, the events are simultaneously monitored visually with the use of a high speed camera. Once refined testing will be conducted in a water tunnel. This research was sponsored by the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC).

  3. Location of acoustic radiators and inversion for energy density using radio-frequency sources and thunder recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Johnson, J. B.; Arechiga, R. O.; Edens, H. E.; Thomas, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    We use radio frequency (VHF) pulse locations mapped with the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) to study the distribution of thunder sources in lightning channels. A least squares inversion is used to fit channel acoustic energy radiation with broadband (0.01 to 500 Hz) acoustic recordings using microphones deployed local (< 10 km) to the lightning. We model the thunder (acoustic) source as a superposition of line segments connecting the LMA VHF pulses. An optimum branching algorithm is used to reconstruct conductive channels delineated by VHF sources, which we discretize as a superposition of finely-spaced (0.25 m) acoustic point sources. We consider total radiated thunder as a weighted superposition of acoustic waves from individual channels, each with a constant current along its length that is presumed to be proportional to acoustic energy density radiated per unit length. Merged channels are considered as a linear sum of current-carrying branches and radiate proportionally greater acoustic energy. Synthetic energy time series for a given microphone location are calculated for each independent channel. We then use a non-negative least squares inversion to solve for channel energy densities to match the energy time series determined from broadband acoustic recordings across a 4-station microphone network. Events analyzed by this method have so far included 300-1000 VHF sources, and correlations as high as 0.5 between synthetic and recorded thunder energy were obtained, despite the presence of wind noise and 10-30 m uncertainty in VHF source locations.

  4. Acoustic multipole sources for the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggen, Erlend Magnus

    2013-02-01

    By including an oscillating particle source term, acoustic multipole sources can be implemented in the lattice Boltzmann method. The effect of this source term on the macroscopic conservation equations is found using a Chapman-Enskog expansion. In a lattice with q particle velocities, the source term can be decomposed into q orthogonal multipoles. More complex sources may be formed by superposing these basic multipoles. Analytical solutions found from the macroscopic equations and an analytical lattice Boltzmann wavenumber are compared with inviscid multipole simulations, finding very good agreement except close to singularities in the analytical solutions. Unlike the BGK operator, the regularized collision operator is proven capable of accurately simulating two-dimensional acoustic generation and propagation at zero viscosity.

  5. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  6. Impact of source depth on coherent underwater acoustic communications.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijun; Badiey, Mohsen; Song, H C; Hodgkiss, W S

    2010-08-01

    A recent paper [Song et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 123, 856-865 (2008)] investigated ocean variability impact on coherent underwater acoustic communications (8-16 kHz) for a single near-seafloor transmitter in shallow water during an extended period (27 h). This letter extends that investigation to various source depths and receiver subarrays. Specifically, the middle water column source, which is either in or out of the thermocline, experiences performance variability of 6-7 dB in terms of output signal-to-noise ratio. Further, the source below the thermocline consistently outperforms the source above the thermocline when the receiver subarray is located below the thermocline.

  7. Acoustic source identification using a Generalized Weighted Inverse Beamforming technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presezniak, Flavio; Zavala, Paulo A. G.; Steenackers, Gunther; Janssens, Karl; Arruda, Jose R. F.; Desmet, Wim; Guillaume, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    In the last years, acoustic source identification has gained special attention, mainly due to new environmental norms, urbanization problems and more demanding acoustic comfort expectation of consumers. From the current methods, beamforming techniques are of common use, since normally demands affordable data acquisition effort, while producing clear source identification in most of the applications. In order to improve the source identification quality, this work presents a method, based on the Generalized Inverse Beamforming, that uses a weighted pseudo-inverse approach and an optimization procedure, called Weighted Generalized Inverse Beamforming. To validate this method, a simple case of two compact sources in close vicinity in coherent radiation was investigated by numerical and experimental assessment. Weighted generalized inverse results are compared to the ones obtained by the conventional beamforming, MUltiple Signal Classification, and Generalized Inverse Beamforming. At the end, the advantages of the proposed method are outlined together with the computational effort increase compared to the Generalized Inverse Beamforming.

  8. Localization with a mobile beacon in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Kiseon

    2012-01-01

    Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB). The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node's location and then the node's location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals.

  9. Mapping thunder sources by inverting acoustic and electromagnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. F.; Johnson, J. B.; Arechiga, R. O.; Thomas, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new method of locating current flow in lightning strikes by inversion of thunder recordings constrained by Lightning Mapping Array observations. First, radio frequency (RF) pulses are connected to reconstruct conductive channels created by leaders. Then, acoustic signals that would be produced by current flow through each channel are forward modeled. The recorded thunder is considered to consist of a weighted superposition of these acoustic signals. We calculate the posterior distribution of acoustic source energy for each channel with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion that fits power envelopes of modeled and recorded thunder; these results show which parts of the flash carry current and produce thunder. We examine the effects of RF pulse location imprecision and atmospheric winds on quality of results and apply this method to several lightning flashes over the Magdalena Mountains in New Mexico, USA. This method will enable more detailed study of lightning phenomena by allowing researchers to map current flow in addition to leader propagation.

  10. Experimental source characterization techniques for studying the acoustic properties of perforates under high level acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Bodén, Hans

    2011-11-01

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for obtaining the acoustic properties of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic characteristic. The methods developed are intended both for studies of non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples only accessible from one side such as wall treatment in aircraft engine ducts or automotive exhaust systems and for samples accessible from both sides such as perforates or other top sheets. When harmonic sound waves are incident on the sample nonlinear energy transfer results in sound generation at higher harmonics at the sample (perforate) surface. The idea is that these sources can be characterized using linear system identification techniques similar to one-port or two-port techniques which are traditionally used for obtaining source data for in-duct sources such as IC-engines or fans. The starting point will be so called polyharmonic distortion modeling which is used for characterization of nonlinear properties of microwave systems. It will be shown how acoustic source data models can be expressed using this theory. Source models of different complexity are developed and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental tests show that these techniques can give results which are useful for understanding non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics.

  11. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  12. The influence of source acceleration on acoustic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Wilson, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of aircraft acceleration on acoustic signals is often ignored in both analytical studies and data reduction of flight test measurements. In this study, the influence of source acceleration on acoustic signals is analyzed using computer simulated signals for an accelerating point source. Both rotating and translating sources are considered. Using a known signal allows an assessment of the influence of source acceleration on the received signal. Aircraft acceleration must also be considered in the measurement and reduction of flyover noise. Tracking of the aircraft over an array of microphones enables ensemble averaging of the acoustic signal, thus increasing the confidence in the measured data. This is only valid when both the altitude and velocity remain constant. For an accelerating aircraft, each microphone is exposed to differing flight velocities, Doppler shifts, and smear angles. Thus, averaging across the array in the normal manner is constrained by aircraft acceleration and microphone spacing. In this study computer simulated spectra, containing acceleration, are averaged across a 12 microphone array mimicking a flight test with accelerated profile in which noise data was obtained. Overlapped processing is performed is performed in the flight test measurements in order to alleviate spectral smearing.

  13. Acoustic emission source mechanisms for steel bridge material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M.; Yu, J.; Ziehl, P.; Caicedo, J.; Matta, F.; Guo, S.; Sutton, M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past twenty years acoustic emission (AE) has been studied for applications to the structural health monitoring (SHM) of metallic structures. The success of AE for prognosis of in-service steel bridges depends on the reliability of the received AE signals. The emphasis of this paper is on the characterization of acoustic emission source mechanisms for ASTM A572 grade 50 steel. The source characterization was aided by Digital Imaging Correlation (DIC) and Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that both ductile and brittle mechanisms can produce AE during fatigue crack growth in the steel. However, the fracture mechanisms are predominately ductile. A key preliminary finding is that fatigue crack extension does not generally produce AE events in the early stage of fatigue crack growth for the steel bridge material investigated.

  14. S-Band Shallow Bulk Acoustic Wave (SBAW) microwave source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Techniques necessary to fabricate a high performance S-band microwave single source using state-of-the-art shallow bulk acoustic wave (SBAW) were explored. The bulk wave structures of the AlN/Al 2O3 were investigated for both the R plane and basal plane of sapphire. A 1.072 GHz SBAW delay line and oscillators were developed. A method of selecting and setting oscillator output frequency by selecting substrate orientation angle was also established.

  15. Acoustic source separation for the detection of coronary artery sounds.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Daniel B; Roan, Michael J; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2011-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, being responsible for more than 20% of all deaths in the country. This is in large part due to the difficulty of diagnostic screening for CAD. Phonoangiography seeks to detect CAD via the acoustic signature associated with turbulent flow near an abnormally constricted, or stenosed, region. However, the usefulness of the technique is severely hindered by the low strength of the CAD signal compared to the background noise within the chest. In this work, acoustic finite element analysis (FEA) was performed on physiologically accurate chest geometries to demonstrate the feasibility of an original acoustic source separation methodology for isolating coronary sounds. This approach is based upon pseudoinversion of mixing matrices determined through a combination of experiment and computation. This allows calculation of the sound emitted by the coronary arteries based upon measurements of the acoustic velocity on the chest surface. This work demonstrates the feasibility of such a technique computationally and examines the vulnerability of the proposed approach to measurement errors. PMID:22225070

  16. Aerodynamic sources of acoustic resonance in a duct with baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourigan, K.; Welsh, M. C.; Thompson, M. C.; Stokes, A. N.

    1990-07-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations of the generation of resonant sound by flow in a duct containing two sets of baffles and the 'feedback' of the sound on the vortex shedding process are reported. The experiments are conducted in a wind tunnel and the numerical simulations are used to predict the sources of resonant sound in the flow. The resonant sound field, which is principally longitudinal, is calculated by the finite element method and a discrete-vortex model is used to predict the observed separated flow. Analysis of the passage of a single point vortex past a baffle indicates that the amount of acoustic energy generated is a function of the phase of the acoustic cycle at which the vortex passes the baffle. A more elaborate model simulates the growth of vortex clouds through the clustering of elemental vortices shed from an upstream baffle, tracks the passage of these vortex clouds past a downstream baffle, predicts the generation of acoustic energy using Howe's theory of aerodynamic sound, and accounts for the feedback of sound on the vortex shedding. Comparison is made between the predicted time-dependent structures and the observed flow structures using smoke visualization. The vortex cloud model predicts the flow conditions under which net acoustic energy is generated by the flow and therefore when resonance can be sustained; the results are consistent with the occurrence of peaks in the observed resonant sound pressure levels.

  17. Robotic vehicle uses acoustic array for detection and localization in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2001-09-01

    Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites are quickly replacing the eyes and ears of soldiers on the complex battlefield. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Maryland has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing or door slam, and activate a pan-tilt to orient a visible and infrared camera toward the detected sound. Once the cameras are cued to the target, onboard image processing can then track the target and/or transmit the imagery to a remote operator for navigation, situational awareness, and target detection. Such a vehicle can provide reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition for soldiers, law enforcement, and rescue personnel, and remove these people from hazardous environments. ARL's primary robotic platforms contain 16-in. diameter, eight-element acoustic arrays. Additionally, a 9- in. array is being developed in support of DARPA's Tactical Mobile Robot program. The robots have been tested in both urban and open terrain. The current acoustic processing algorithm has been optimized to detect the muzzle blast from a sniper's weapon, and reject many interfering noise sources such as wind gusts, generators, and self-noise. However, other detection algorithms for speech and vehicle detection/tracking are being developed for implementation on this and smaller robotic platforms. The collaboration between two robots, both with known positions and orientations, can provide useful triangulation information for more precise localization of the acoustic events. These robots can be mobile sensor nodes in a larger, more expansive, sensor network that may include stationary ground sensors, UAVs, and other command and control assets. This report will document the performance of the robot's acoustic localization, describe the algorithm, and outline future work.

  18. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  19. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  20. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  1. Ray-theoretic localization of an impulsive source in a stratified ocean using two hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarsoulis, E. K.; Kalogerakis, M. A.

    2005-11-01

    A method is presented for passive localization of impulsive acoustic sources in a stratified ocean by measuring relative times of direct and surface-reflected arrivals at two hydrophones. The proposed method is based on ray theory and takes into account the effects of refraction on the geometry of acoustic paths (ray bending) and travel times, generalizing previous approaches based on the homogeneous-ocean assumption (straight-line localization). If the hydrophone depths are known, then the source depth and distance from each hydrophone can be estimated from the three differential arrival times. If in addition the hydrophone separation is known, the bearing of the source can be estimated as well. Apart from the effects on ray geometry and travel times, stratification affects localization by introducing shadow zones and caustics. For source locations in the neighborhood of caustics, the localization problem accepts two solutions, one of which is the true source location and the other one which is an artifact (ghost solution). This ambiguity can be resolved in the case of tracking moving sources since as the source moves away from the caustic only the track corresponding to the true source position will be continued. The present method has been developed primarily for monitoring the dive behavior of sperm whales producing acoustic clicks, yet it is general and can be applied for the localization and tracking of any kind of impulsive acoustic source in the ocean.

  2. Application of Time Reversed Acoustics for Seismic Source Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.; Toksöz, M.

    2005-05-01

    Traditionally an earthquake is located and the source mechanism is determined by using P and S phases. This uses only a limited portion of the information contained in a seismogram. A large part of the information carried by the waveform is not used. In this study we investigate the applicability of the Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) technique, and thus the whole waveform of the recorded signal, for earthquake locations and source characterization. The basic concept involved in TRA is the fundamental symmetry of time reversal invariance. Injecting the recorded signal, with time running backwards, can focus the wave field to the source. TRA has emerged as an important technique in acoustics with applications to medicine, underwater sound, and many other disciplines. Numerical simulations show that the TRA technique can successfully locate a seismic source inside a layered earth model and can also recover the source time function. Finite difference modeling results show that TRA can determine the fault dip, rupture direction, and rupture length. The method is especially advantageous when data are available only from a sparse station network. Full seismograms contain source information from both waves radiated along the source-station ray path and from waves that radiated in all other directions but scattered toward the receivers. Application of the TRA technique to seismic source characterization requires the Green's function, which can be obtained in two ways. If the earth structure is known then the Green's function can be calculated numerically. To improve the efficiency, the method of constructing a medium response library is developed. This improves computation time significantly. The second approach uses small events (e.g., aftershocks) as an empirical Green's function. The performance of the TRA technique is demonstrated with data from real earthquakes.

  3. Influence of sound source width on human sound localization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel T; Paige, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    Free-field sound localization experiments generally assume that a loudspeaker can be approximated by a point-source; however, a large loudspeaker may extend beyond the width that two sources can be discriminated. Humans can accurately discriminate sound source locations within a few degrees, thus one might expect localization precision to decrease as a function of sound source diameter, much as precision is lower for localizing the center of a wide, blurry light source. In order to test the degree to which humans differentially localize small and large sound sources, auditory targets were presented using a single 25.4 cm by 10.2 cm elliptical loudspeaker with the primary axis oriented both horizontally and vertically in different sessions. Subjects were seated with their heads fixed by a bite bar in a darkened, echo-attenuating room facing a cylindrical, acoustically transparent screen at a distance of 2 meters. Auditory targets consisted of repeating bursts (5 Hz) of low frequency band-pass noise (0.2 - 1 kHz, 75 dB SPL). Subjects were instructed to quickly and accurately guide a laser pointer mounted on a cylindrical joystick towards targets, presented randomly within a field ± 40° in azimuth by ± 10° in elevation, with oversampled points located every ten degrees along the primary meridians. Localization accuracy and precision (mean and standard deviation of localization error at oversampled locations) were not significantly different between speaker orientations, and were comparable to baseline measurements recorded using a 7.6 cm circular speaker. We conclude that low frequency sound localization performance is not dependent upon the size of the sound source as predicted theoretically, and is well approximated by a point source.

  4. An Amplitude-Based Estimation Method for International Space Station (ISS) Leak Detection and Localization Using Acoustic Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Madaras, Eric I.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a robust and efficient leak detection and localization system within a space station environment presents a unique challenge. A plausible approach includes the implementation of an acoustic sensor network system that can successfully detect the presence of a leak and determine the location of the leak source. Traditional acoustic detection and localization schemes rely on the phase and amplitude information collected by the sensor array system. Furthermore, the acoustic source signals are assumed to be airborne and far-field. Likewise, there are similar applications in sonar. In solids, there are specialized methods for locating events that are used in geology and in acoustic emission testing that involve sensor arrays and depend on a discernable phase front to the received signal. These methods are ineffective if applied to a sensor detection system within the space station environment. In the case of acoustic signal location, there are significant baffling and structural impediments to the sound path and the source could be in the near-field of a sensor in this particular setting.

  5. Performance evaluation of an acoustic indoor localization system based on a fingerprinting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, Nadia; Raoof, Kosai; Bouallegue, Ammar; Letourneur, Stephane; Zaibi, Sonia

    2014-12-01

    We present an acoustic location system that adopts the time of arrival of the path of maximum amplitude as a signature and estimates the target position through nonparametric kernel regression. The system was evaluated in experiments for two main configurations: a privacy-oriented configuration with code division multiple access operation and a centralized configuration with time division multiple access operation. The effects of the number and positions of sources on the performance of the privacy-oriented system was studied. Moreover, the effect of the number of fingerprint positions on the performance of both systems was investigated. Results showed that our privacy-oriented scheme provides an accuracy of 8.5 cm with 87% precision, whereas our centralized system provides an accuracy of 2.7 cm for 93% of measurements. A comparison between our privacy-oriented system and another acoustic location system based on code division multiple access operation and lateration was conducted on our test bench and revealed that the cumulative error distribution function of the fingerprint-based system is better than that of the lateration-based system. This result is similar to that found for Wi-Fi radio-based localization. However, our experiments are the first to demonstrate the detrimental effect that reverberation has on naive acoustic localization approaches.

  6. Localization from near-source quasi-static electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    A wide range of research has been published on the problem of estimating the parameters of electromagnetic and acoustical sources from measurements of signals measured at an array of sensors. In the quasi-static electromagnetic cases examined here, the signal variation from a point source is relatively slow with respect to the signal propagation and the spacing of the array of sensors. As such, the location of the point sources can only be determined from the spatial diversity of the received signal across the array. The inverse source localization problem is complicated by unknown model order and strong local minima. The nonlinear optimization problem is posed for solving for the parameters of the quasi-static source model. The transient nature of the sources can be exploited to allow subspace approaches to separate out the signal portion of the spatial correlation matrix. Decomposition techniques are examined for improved processing, and an adaptation of MUtiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC) is presented for solving the source localization problem. Recent results on calculating the Cramer-Rao error lower bounds are extended to the multidimensional problem here. This thesis focuses on the problem of source localization in magnetoencephalography (MEG), with a secondary application to thunderstorm source localization. Comparisons are also made between MEG and its electrical equivalent, electroencephalography (EEG). The error lower bounds are examined in detail for several MEG and EEG configurations, as well as localizing thunderstorm cells over Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center. Time-eigenspectrum is introduced as a parsing technique for improving the performance of the optimization problem.

  7. Equivalent Source Method Applied to Launch Acoustic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housman, Jeffrey A.; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    Aeroacoustic simulations of the launch environment are described. A hybrid computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/computational aeroacoustic (CAA) approach is developed in order to accurately and efficiently predict the sound pressure level spectrum on the launch vehicle and surrounding structures. The high-fidelity CFD code LAVA (Launch Ascent and Vehicle Analysis), is used to generate pressure time history at select locations in the flow field. A 3D exterior Helmholtz solver is then used to iteratively determine a set of monopole sources which mimic the noise generating mechanisms identified by the CFD solver. The acoustic pressure field generated from the Helmholtz solver is then used to evaluate the sound pressure levels.

  8. Near- Source, Seismo-Acoustic Signals Accompanying a NASCAR Race at the Texas Motor Speedway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, B. W.; Hayward, C.; Underwood, R.; Howard, J. E.; MacPhail, M. D.; Golden, P.; Endress, A.

    2014-12-01

    Near-source, seismo-acoustic observations provide a unique opportunity to characterize urban sources, remotely sense human activities including vehicular traffic and monitor large engineering structures. Energy separately coupled into the solid earth and atmosphere provides constraints on not only the location of these sources but also the physics of the generating process. Conditions and distances at which these observations can be made are dependent upon not only local geological conditions but also atmospheric conditions at the time of the observations. In order to address this range of topics, an empirical, seismo-acoustic study was undertaken in and around the Texas Motor Speedway in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area during the first week of April 2014 at which time a range of activities associated with a series of NASCAR races occurred. Nine, seismic sensors were deployed around the 1.5-mile track for purposes of documenting the direct-coupled seismic energy from the passage of the cars and other vehicles on the track. Six infrasound sensors were deployed on a rooftop in a rectangular array configuration designed to provide high frequency beam forming for acoustic signals. Finally, a five-element infrasound array was deployed outside the track in order to characterize how the signals propagate away from the sources in the near-source region. Signals recovered from within the track were able to track and characterize the motion of a variety of vehicles during the race weekend including individual racecars. Seismic data sampled at 1000 sps documented strong Doppler effects as the cars approached and moved away from individual sensors. There were faint seismic signals that arrived at seismic velocity but local acoustic to seismic coupling as supported by the acoustic observations generated the majority of seismic signals. Actual seismic ground motions were small as demonstrated by the dominance of regional seismic signals from a magnitude 4.0 earthquake that arrived at

  9. Resolving the source of the solar acoustic oscillations: What will be possible with DKIST?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, Mark; Martinez Pillet, Valentin

    2016-05-01

    The solar p-modes are likely excited by small-scale convective dynamics in the solar photosphere, but the detailed source properties are not known. Theoretical models differ and observations are yet unable to differentiate between them. Resolving the underlying source events is more than a curiosity. It is important to the veracity of global helioseismic measurements (including local spectral methods such as ring diagram analysis) because global p-mode line shapes and thus accurate frequency determinations depend critically on the relationship between intensity and velocity during the excitation events. It is also fundamental to improving the accuracy of the local time-distance measurements because in these kernel calculations depend on knowledge of the source profile and the properties of the excitation noise. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) will have the spatial resolution and spectral range needed to resolve the solar acoustic excitation events in both time and space (horizontally and with height) using multi-wavelength observations. Inversions to determine the dynamic and thermodynamic evolution of the discrete small-scale convective events that serve as acoustic sources may also be possible, though determination of the pressure fluctuations associated with the sources is a challenge. We describe the DKIST capabilities anticipated and the preliminary work needed to prepare for them.

  10. An autonomous surveillance system for blind sources localization and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sean; Kulkarni, Raghavendra; Duraiswamy, Srikanth

    2013-05-01

    This paper aims at developing a new technology that will enable one to conduct an autonomous and silent surveillance to monitor sound sources stationary or moving in 3D space and a blind separation of target acoustic signals. The underlying principle of this technology is a hybrid approach that uses: 1) passive sonic detection and ranging method that consists of iterative triangulation and redundant checking to locate the Cartesian coordinates of arbitrary sound sources in 3D space, 2) advanced signal processing to sanitizing the measured data and enhance signal to noise ratio, and 3) short-time source localization and separation to extract the target acoustic signals from the directly measured mixed ones. A prototype based on this technology has been developed and its hardware includes six B and K 1/4-in condenser microphones, Type 4935, two 4-channel data acquisition units, Type NI-9234, with a maximum sampling rate of 51.2kS/s per channel, one NI-cDAQ 9174 chassis, a thermometer to measure the air temperature, a camera to view the relative positions of located sources, and a laptop to control data acquisition and post processing. Test results for locating arbitrary sound sources emitting continuous, random, impulsive, and transient signals, and blind separation of signals in various non-ideal environments is presented. This system is invisible to any anti-surveillance device since it uses the acoustic signal emitted by a target source. It can be mounted on a robot or an unmanned vehicle to perform various covert operations, including intelligence gathering in an open or a confined field, or to carry out the rescue mission to search people trapped inside ruins or buried under wreckages.

  11. Acoustic localization in weakly compressible elastic media containing random air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the propagation of longitudinal wave in weakly compressible elastic media containing random air bubbles by using a self-consistent method. By inspecting the scattering cross section of an individual bubble and estimating the mean free paths of the elastic wave propagating in the bubbly weakly compressible media, the mode conversion is numerically proved negligible as the longitudinal wave is scattered by the bubbles. On the basis of the bubble dynamic equation, the wave propagation is solved rigorously with the multiple scattering effects incorporated. In a range of frequency slightly above the bubble resonance frequency, the acoustic localization in such a class of media is theoretically identified with even a very small volume fraction of bubbles. We present a method by analyzing the spatial correlation of wave field to identify the phenomenon of localization, which turns out to be effective. The sensibility of the features of localization to the structure parameters is numerically investigated. The spatial distribution of acoustic energy is also studied and the results show that the waves are trapped within a spatial domain adjacent to the source when localization occurs.

  12. Towards optimal design of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushynska, A. O.; Kouznetsova, V. G.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents an in-depth analysis of solid locally resonant acoustic metamaterials (LRAMs) consisting of rubber-coated inclusions. Dispersion properties of two-dimensional LRAMs are studied by means of finite-element modal analysis. For an incompressible rubber, only one practically important spectral band gap is found for in-plane modes in a low-frequency range. This result is in striking contrast with the compressible coating case, previously studied in the literature. For inclusions with a circular cross-section, the lower bound of the band gap can be evaluated exactly by means of the derived analytical solution, which is also valid for compressible coatings and can therefore be used to determine lower bounds of higher band gaps as well. The influence of geometric and material parameters, filling fraction and inclusion shape on the width of the lowest band gap is investigated in detail. Based on the results of this analysis, an optimal microstructure of LRAMs yielding the widest low-frequency band gap is proposed. To achieve the band gap at the lowest possible frequencies in LRAMs suitable for practical applications, the use of the tungsten core material is advised, as a safe and economically viable alternative to commonly considered lead and gold. Two configurations of LRAM with various sizes of coated tungsten cylindrical inclusions with circular cross-section are considered. The evolution of dispersion spectra due to the presence of different inclusions is investigated, and the parameters for optimal design of LRAMs are determined.

  13. Moving source localization using seismic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Stafsudd, Jing Z.; Hudson, Ralph E.; Yao, Kung; Taciroglu, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    Accurate localization of a seismic source in a near-field scenario where the distances between sensors and the source are less than a few wavelengths of the generated signal has shown to be a challenging task. Conventional localization algorithms often prove to be ineffective, as near-field seismic signals exhibit characteristics different from the well-studied far-field signals. The current work is aimed at the employment of a seismic sensor array for the localization and tracking of a near-field wideband moving source. In this paper, the mathematical derivation of a novel DOA estimation algorithm-dubbed the Modified Kirlin Method-has been presented in details. The estimated DOAs are then combined using a least-squares optimization method for source localization. The performance of the proposed method has been evaluated in a field experiment to track a moving truck. We also compare the DOA estimation and source localization results of the proposed method with those of two other existing methods originally developed for localization of a stationary wideband source; Covariance Matrix Analysis and the Surface Wave Analysis. Our results indicate that both the Surface Wave Analysis and the Modified Kirlin Methods are effective in locating and tracking a moving truck.

  14. Acoustic signatures of sound source-tract coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2011-04-01

    Birdsong is a complex behavior, which results from the interaction between a nervous system and a biomechanical peripheral device. While much has been learned about how complex sounds are generated in the vocal organ, little has been learned about the signature on the vocalizations of the nonlinear effects introduced by the acoustic interactions between a sound source and the vocal tract. The variety of morphologies among bird species makes birdsong a most suitable model to study phenomena associated to the production of complex vocalizations. Inspired by the sound production mechanisms of songbirds, in this work we study a mathematical model of a vocal organ, in which a simple sound source interacts with a tract, leading to a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically, and by taking it to the weakly nonlinear limit, we are able to examine its periodic solutions analytically. By these means we are able to explore the dynamics of oscillatory solutions of a sound source-tract coupled system, which are qualitatively different from those of a sound source-filter model of a vocal organ. Nonlinear features of the solutions are proposed as the underlying mechanisms of observed phenomena in birdsong, such as unilaterally produced “frequency jumps,” enhancement of resonances, and the shift of the fundamental frequency observed in heliox experiments.

  15. Acoustic signatures of sound source-tract coupling.

    PubMed

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B

    2011-04-01

    Birdsong is a complex behavior, which results from the interaction between a nervous system and a biomechanical peripheral device. While much has been learned about how complex sounds are generated in the vocal organ, little has been learned about the signature on the vocalizations of the nonlinear effects introduced by the acoustic interactions between a sound source and the vocal tract. The variety of morphologies among bird species makes birdsong a most suitable model to study phenomena associated to the production of complex vocalizations. Inspired by the sound production mechanisms of songbirds, in this work we study a mathematical model of a vocal organ, in which a simple sound source interacts with a tract, leading to a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically, and by taking it to the weakly nonlinear limit, we are able to examine its periodic solutions analytically. By these means we are able to explore the dynamics of oscillatory solutions of a sound source-tract coupled system, which are qualitatively different from those of a sound source-filter model of a vocal organ. Nonlinear features of the solutions are proposed as the underlying mechanisms of observed phenomena in birdsong, such as unilaterally produced "frequency jumps," enhancement of resonances, and the shift of the fundamental frequency observed in heliox experiments.

  16. A semi-analytic model for localized variable charge dust acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Gougam, Leila Ait; Aoutou, Kamal

    2006-09-15

    A semi-analytic model for nonlinear variable charge dust acoustic waves is outlined. It is shown that rarefactive variable charge dust acoustic solitons involving cusped density humps can exist. The effects of dust dynamics as well as equilibrium dust charge on these nonlinear localized structures are briefly discussed.

  17. Access to patents as sources to musical acoustics inventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock-Nannestad, George

    2005-09-01

    Patents are important sources for the development of any technology. The paper addresses modern methods of access to patent publications relating to musical acoustics, in particular the constructions of instruments and components for instruments, methods for tuning, methods for teaching, and measuring equipment. The patent publications available are, among others, from the U.S., England, France, Germany, Japan, Russia, and the date range is from ca. 1880 to the present day. The two main searchable websites use different classification systems in their approach, and by suitable combination of the information it is possible to target the search efficiently. The paper will demonstrate the recent transfer of inventions relating to physical instruments to electronic simulations, and the fact that most recent inventions were made by independent inventors. A specific example is given by discussing the proposals for improved pipe organ and violin constructions invented in Denmark in the 1930s by Jarnak based on patented improvements for telephone reproducers.

  18. Determination of the acoustic source power levels of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debruijn, A.; Stam, W. J.; Dewolf, W. B.

    To facilitate Wind Energy Conversin System (WECS) licensing, it is recommended to obtain the immission-relevant sound power from the WECS, since this quantity fits into most recommendations for industrial installations. Measurements on small and medium-scale WECS show that rotor rotation speed is a more important parameter than the wind velocity with regard to the radiated noise. An acoustic telescope was used to identify noise sources on two medium-size wind turbines. The mechanical noise from the nacelle is mostly predominant but the trailing edge aerodynamic noise is not negligible. A prediction model for this type of noise, which leads to good agreement with experimental data was developed. A method to suppress turbulence signals around WECS is a set-up with twin microphones, using correlation techniques on both signals.

  19. Evaluation of Electroencephalography Source Localization Algorithms with Multiple Cortical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Allison; Yao, Jun; Dewald, Jules; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Source localization algorithms often show multiple active cortical areas as the source of electroencephalography (EEG). Yet, there is little data quantifying the accuracy of these results. In this paper, the performance of current source density source localization algorithms for the detection of multiple cortical sources of EEG data has been characterized. Methods EEG data were generated by simulating multiple cortical sources (2–4) with the same strength or two sources with relative strength ratios of 1:1 to 4:1, and adding noise. These data were used to reconstruct the cortical sources using current source density (CSD) algorithms: sLORETA, MNLS, and LORETA using a p-norm with p equal to 1, 1.5 and 2. Precision (percentage of the reconstructed activity corresponding to simulated activity) and Recall (percentage of the simulated sources reconstructed) of each of the CSD algorithms were calculated. Results While sLORETA has the best performance when only one source is present, when two or more sources are present LORETA with p equal to 1.5 performs better. When the relative strength of one of the sources is decreased, all algorithms have more difficulty reconstructing that source. However, LORETA 1.5 continues to outperform other algorithms. If only the strongest source is of interest sLORETA is recommended, while LORETA with p equal to 1.5 is recommended if two or more of the cortical sources are of interest. These results provide guidance for choosing a CSD algorithm to locate multiple cortical sources of EEG and for interpreting the results of these algorithms. PMID:26809000

  20. Underwater passive acoustic localization of Pacific walruses in the northeastern Chukchi Sea.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Brendan P; Dosso, Stan E; Hannay, David E

    2013-09-01

    This paper develops and applies a linearized Bayesian localization algorithm based on acoustic arrival times of marine mammal vocalizations at spatially-separated receivers which provides three-dimensional (3D) location estimates with rigorous uncertainty analysis. To properly account for uncertainty in receiver parameters (3D hydrophone locations and synchronization times) and environmental parameters (water depth and sound-speed correction), these quantities are treated as unknowns constrained by prior estimates and prior uncertainties. Unknown scaling factors on both the prior and arrival-time uncertainties are estimated by minimizing Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (a maximum entropy condition). Maximum a posteriori estimates for sound source locations and times, receiver parameters, and environmental parameters are calculated simultaneously using measurements of arrival times for direct and interface-reflected acoustic paths. Posterior uncertainties for all unknowns incorporate both arrival time and prior uncertainties. Monte Carlo simulation results demonstrate that, for the cases considered here, linearization errors are small and the lack of an accurate sound-speed profile does not cause significant biases in the estimated locations. A sequence of Pacific walrus vocalizations, recorded in the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska, is localized using this technique, yielding a track estimate and uncertainties with an estimated speed comparable to normal walrus swim speeds. PMID:23968051

  1. Underwater passive acoustic localization of Pacific walruses in the northeastern Chukchi Sea.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Brendan P; Dosso, Stan E; Hannay, David E

    2013-09-01

    This paper develops and applies a linearized Bayesian localization algorithm based on acoustic arrival times of marine mammal vocalizations at spatially-separated receivers which provides three-dimensional (3D) location estimates with rigorous uncertainty analysis. To properly account for uncertainty in receiver parameters (3D hydrophone locations and synchronization times) and environmental parameters (water depth and sound-speed correction), these quantities are treated as unknowns constrained by prior estimates and prior uncertainties. Unknown scaling factors on both the prior and arrival-time uncertainties are estimated by minimizing Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (a maximum entropy condition). Maximum a posteriori estimates for sound source locations and times, receiver parameters, and environmental parameters are calculated simultaneously using measurements of arrival times for direct and interface-reflected acoustic paths. Posterior uncertainties for all unknowns incorporate both arrival time and prior uncertainties. Monte Carlo simulation results demonstrate that, for the cases considered here, linearization errors are small and the lack of an accurate sound-speed profile does not cause significant biases in the estimated locations. A sequence of Pacific walrus vocalizations, recorded in the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska, is localized using this technique, yielding a track estimate and uncertainties with an estimated speed comparable to normal walrus swim speeds.

  2. Towards quantifying cochlear implant localization performance in complex acoustic environments.

    PubMed

    Kerber, S; Seeber, B U

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users frequently report listening difficulties in reverberant and noisy spaces. While it is common to assess speech understanding with implants in background noise, binaural hearing performance has rarely been quantified in the presence of other sources, although the binaural system is a major contributor to the robustness of speech understanding in noisy situations with normal hearing. Here, a pointing task was used to measure horizontal localization ability of a bilateral CI user in quiet and in a continuous diffuse noise interferer at a signal-to-noise ratio of 0 dB. Results were compared to localization performance of six normal hearing listeners. The average localization error of the normal hearing listeners was within normal ranges reported previously and only increased by 1.8° when the interfering noise was introduced. In contrast, the bilateral CI user showed a localization error of 22° in quiet which rose to 31° in noise. This increase was partly due to target sounds being inaudible when presented from frontal locations between -20° and +20°. With the noise present, the implant user was only able to reliably hear target sounds presented from locations well off the median plane. The results give support to the informal complaints raised by CI users and can help to define targets for the design of, e.g., noise reduction algorithms for implant processors.

  3. Resolving the Location of Acoustic Point Sources Scattered Due to the Presence of a Skull Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, J.; Shapoori, K.; Malyarenko, E.; DiCarlo, A.; Dech, J.; Severin, F.; Maev, R. Gr.

    This paper considers resolving the location of a foreign object in the brain without the removal of the skull bone by detecting and processing the acoustic waves emitted from the foreign object modeled as point source. The variable thickness of the skull bone causes propagation acoustic waves to be scattered in such a manner that the acoustic wave undergoes a variable time delay relative to its entry point on the skull. Matched filtering can be used to detect the acoustic wave front, the time delay variations of the skull can be corrected for, and matched filtering time reversal algorithms can then detect the location of the acoustic source. This process is examined experimentally in a water tank system containing an acoustic source, custom-made skull phantom, and receiver. The apparatus is arranged in transmission mode so that the acoustic waves are emitted from the source, scattered by the phantom, and then received by a second transducer. The skull phantom has been designed so that the acoustic properties (velocity, density, and attenuation correspond approximately to those of a typical human skull. In addition, the phantom has been molded so that the surface closest to the acoustic source has smoothly oscillating ridges and valleys and a flat outer surface, approximately modeling a real-world skull bone. The data obtained from the experiment is processed to detect and extract the scattered acoustic wave front and correct for the time of flight variations in the skull. This re-creates the approximate wave front of a point source, whose location can be resolved via a matched filtering time reversal algorithm. The results of this process are examined for cases where there is no phantom present (no scattering), and with the phantom present. Comparison of these results shows a correlation between the calculated locations of the acoustic source and the expected location.

  4. Data-based matched-mode source localization for a moving source.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C

    2014-03-01

    A data-based matched-mode source localization method is proposed in this paper for a moving source, using mode wavenumbers and depth functions estimated directly from the data, without requiring any environmental acoustic information and assuming any propagation model. The method is in theory free of the environmental mismatch problem because the mode replicas are estimated from the same data used to localize the source. Besides the estimation error due to the approximations made in deriving the data-based algorithms, the method has some inherent drawbacks: (1) It uses a smaller number of modes than theoretically possible because some modes are not resolved in the measurements, and (2) the depth search is limited to the depth covered by the receivers. Using simulated data, it is found that the performance degradation due to the afore-mentioned approximation/limitation is marginal compared with the original matched-mode source localization method. The proposed method has a potential to estimate the source range and depth for real data and be free of the environmental mismatch problem, noting that certain aspects of the (estimation) algorithms have previously been tested against data. The key issues are discussed in this paper.

  5. Local tsunamis and earthquake source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Dmowska, Renata; Saltzman, Barry

    1999-01-01

    This chapter establishes the relationship among earthquake source parameters and the generation, propagation, and run-up of local tsunamis. In general terms, displacement of the seafloor during the earthquake rupture is modeled using the elastic dislocation theory for which the displacement field is dependent on the slip distribution, fault geometry, and the elastic response and properties of the medium. Specifically, nonlinear long-wave theory governs the propagation and run-up of tsunamis. A parametric study is devised to examine the relative importance of individual earthquake source parameters on local tsunamis, because the physics that describes tsunamis from generation through run-up is complex. Analysis of the source parameters of various tsunamigenic earthquakes have indicated that the details of the earthquake source, namely, nonuniform distribution of slip along the fault plane, have a significant effect on the local tsunami run-up. Numerical methods have been developed to address the realistic bathymetric and shoreline conditions. The accuracy of determining the run-up on shore is directly dependent on the source parameters of the earthquake, which provide the initial conditions used for the hydrodynamic models.

  6. Reflection of an acoustic line source by an impedance surface with uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambley, E. J.; Gabard, G.

    2014-10-01

    An exact analytic solution is derived for the 2D acoustic pressure field generated by a time-harmonic line mass source located above an impedance surface with uniform grazing flow. Closed-form asymptotic solutions in the far field are also provided. The analysis is valid for both locally-reacting and nonlocally-reacting impedances, as is demonstrated by analyzing a nonlocally reacting effective impedance representing the presence of a thin boundary layer over the surface. The analytic solution may be written in a form suggesting a generalization of the method of images to account for the impedance surface. The line source is found to excite surface waves on the impedance surface, some of which may be leaky waves which contradict the assumption of decay away from the surface predicted in previous analyses of surface waves with flow. The surface waves may be treated either (correctly) as unstable waves or (artificially) as stable waves, enabling comparison with previous numerical or mathematical studies which make either of these assumptions. The computer code for evaluating the analytic solution and far-field asymptotics is provided in the supplementary material. It is hoped this work will provide a useful benchmark solution for validating 2D numerical acoustic codes.

  7. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF ABSORPTION, LOCAL SUPPRESSION, AND EMISSIVITY REDUCTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN MAGNETIC REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Liang Zhichao; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-11-20

    Observed acoustic power in magnetic regions is lower than the quiet Sun because of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions. In the previous studies, we have developed a method to measure the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of sunspots. In this study, we go one step further to measure the spatial distributions of three coefficients in two active regions, NOAA 9055 and 9057. The maps of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression coefficients correlate with the magnetic map, including plage regions, except the emissivity reduction coefficient of NOAA 9055 where the emissivity reduction coefficient is too weak and lost among the noise.

  8. Improving the efficiency of deconvolution algorithms for sound source localization.

    PubMed

    Lylloff, Oliver; Fernández-Grande, Efrén; Agerkvist, Finn; Hald, Jørgen; Roig, Elisabet Tiana; Andersen, Martin S

    2015-07-01

    The localization of sound sources with delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming is limited by a poor spatial resolution-particularly at low frequencies. Various methods based on deconvolution are examined to improve the resolution of the beamforming map, which can be modeled by a convolution of the unknown acoustic source distribution and the beamformer's response to a point source, i.e., point-spread function. A significant limitation of deconvolution is, however, an additional computational effort compared to beamforming. In this paper, computationally efficient deconvolution algorithms are examined with computer simulations and experimental data. Specifically, the deconvolution problem is solved with a fast gradient projection method called Fast Iterative Shrikage-Thresholding Algorithm (FISTA), and compared with a Fourier-based non-negative least squares algorithm. The results indicate that FISTA tends to provide an improved spatial resolution and is up to 30% faster and more robust to noise. In the spirit of reproducible research, the source code is available online. PMID:26233017

  9. Acid rain: the impact of local sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaite, P.; Esposito, M.P.; Szabo, M.F.; Devitt, T.W.

    1980-11-24

    It has been assumed that acid rain is predominantly a problem of long-range transport of pollutants from large fossil fuel combustion sources, namely coal-fired utilities. However, close examination of fuel use information and source emission characteristics in the Adirondacks, Florida, and California suggests that local oil burning and automotive sources may be major contributors to the occurrence of acid rain in these areas. This report describes the possible role of local combustion sources in the production of acid rain, discusses the implications of the findings, and their relevance to alternative control strategies for acid rain. Oil-fired boilers, especially the smaller commercial, industrial, and residential units, produce at least 3 to 10 times as much primary sulfate per unit of sulfur content as coal-fired units. Moreover, oil-fired units emit comparatively large quantities of catalytic compounds capable of rapidly converting still more sulfur oxide to sulfate in the atmosphere. Thus, in areas where large quantities of oil are burned, the direct impact from locally generated sulfates may equal or even exceed that produced by imported sulfates derived from distant coal-burning sources. Fuel consumption data show that large quantities of oil are being consumed in areas experiencing acid rain. Forty percent of the residual and 36 percent of the distillate oil burned in the United States is consumed in the eight-state area surrounding the Adirondacks. California is the next largest oil-consuming area and Florida is third. Nitric acid is responsible for about 30 percent of rainfall acidity in the Northeast and Florida, and for about 30 to 75 percent of the rainfall acidity in California.

  10. Characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-03-13

    A system for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate and animate sound sources. Electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as animate sound sources such as the human voice, or from machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The systems disclosed enable accurate calculation of transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  11. MEG and EEG source localization in beamspace.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rivera, Alberto; Baryshnikov, Boris V; Van Veen, Barry D; Wakai, Ronald T

    2006-03-01

    Beamspace methods are applied to EEG/MEG source localization problems in this paper. Beamspace processing involves passing the data through a linear transformation that reduces the data dimension prior to applying a desired statistical signal processing algorithm. This process generally reduces the data requirements of the subsequent algorithm. We present one approach for designing beamspace transformations that are optimized to preserve source activity located within a given region of interest and show that substantial reductions in dimension are obtained with negligible signal loss. Beamspace versions of maximum likelihood dipole fitting, MUSIC, and minimum variance beamforming source localization algorithms are presented. The performance improvement offered by the beamspace approach with limited data is demonstrated by bootstrapping somatosensory data to evaluate the variability of the source location estimates obtained with each algorithm. The quantitative benefits of beamspace processing depend on the algorithm, signal to noise ratio, and amount of data. Dramatic performance improvements are obtained in scenarios with low signal to noise ratio and a small number of independent data samples.

  12. Acoustic Emission Source Location Using a Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser Rosette

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE) source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ) DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location. PMID:24141266

  13. Acoustic emission source location using a distributed feedback fiber laser rosette.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE) source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ) DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location. PMID:24141266

  14. Response of a viscoelastic halfspace to subsurface distributed acoustic sources with application to medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Thomas J.; Yazicioglu, Yigit; Loth, Francis

    2003-04-01

    The response within and at the surface of an isotropic viscoelastic medium to subsurface distributed low audible frequency acoustic sources is considered. Spherically and cylindrically distributed sources are approximated as arrays of infinitesimal point sources. Analytical approximations for the acoustic field radiating from these sources are then obtained as a summation of tractable point source expressions. These theoretical approximations are compared to computational finite element predictions and experimental studies in selected cases. The objective is to better understand low audible frequency sound propagation in soft biological tissue caused by subsurface sources. Distributed acoustic sources could represent vibratory motion of the vascular wall caused by turbulent blood flow past a constriction (stenosis). Additionally focused vibratory stimulation using a dynamic radiation force caused by interfering ultrasound beams effectively creates a distributed subsurface acoustic source. A dynamic radiation force has been investigated as a means of probing subsurface tissue anomalies, including calcified vascular plaque and tumorous growths. In these cases, there is an interest in relating acoustic measurements at the skin surface and within the medium to the underlying flow/constriction environment or tissue anomaly. [Research supported by NIH NCRR 14250 and Whitaker Foundation BME RG 01-0198.

  15. Recovery of burner acoustic source structure from far-field sound spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Jones, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the thermal-acoustic efficiency spectrum in a long turbulent burner to be recovered from the corresponding far-field sound spectrum. An acoustic source/propagation model is used based on the perturbation solution of the equations describing the unsteady one-dimensional flow of an inviscid ideal gas with a distributed heat source. The technique is applied to a long cylindrical hydrogen-flame burner operating over power levels of 4.5-22.3 kW. The results show that the thermal-acoustic efficiency at a given frequency, defined as the fraction of the total burner power converted to acoustic energy at that frequency, is rather insensitive to burner power, having a maximum value on the order of 10 to the -4th at 150 Hz and rolling off steeply with increasing frequency. Evidence is presented that acoustic agitation of the flame at low frequencies enhances the mixing of the unburned fuel and air with the hot products of combustion. The paper establishes the potential of the technique as a useful tool for characterizing the acoustic source structure in any burner, such as a gas turbine combustor, for which a reasonable acoustic propagation model can be postulated.

  16. Source fields reconstruction with 3D mapping by means of the virtual acoustic volume concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, S.; Totaro, N.; Guyader, J. L.; Schaeffer, M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the theoretical framework of the virtual acoustic volume concept and two related inverse Patch Transfer Functions (iPTF) identification methods (called u-iPTF and m-iPTF depending on the chosen boundary conditions for the virtual volume). They are based on the application of Green's identity on an arbitrary closed virtual volume defined around the source. The reconstruction of sound source fields combines discrete acoustic measurements performed at accessible positions around the source with the modal behavior of the chosen virtual acoustic volume. The mode shapes of the virtual volume can be computed by a Finite Element solver to handle the geometrical complexity of the source. As a result, it is possible to identify all the acoustic source fields at the real surface of an irregularly shaped structure and irrespective of its acoustic environment. The m-iPTF method is introduced for the first time in this paper. Conversely to the already published u-iPTF method, the m-iPTF method needs only acoustic pressure and avoids particle velocity measurements. This paper is focused on its validation, both with numerical computations and by experiments on a baffled oil pan.

  17. Investigations of incorporating source directivity into room acoustics computer models to improve auralizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.

    Room acoustics computer modeling and auralizations are useful tools when designing or modifying acoustically sensitive spaces. In this dissertation, the input parameter of source directivity has been studied in great detail to determine first its effect in room acoustics computer models and secondly how to better incorporate the directional source characteristics into these models to improve auralizations. To increase the accuracy of room acoustics computer models, the source directivity of real sources, such as musical instruments, must be included in the models. The traditional method for incorporating source directivity into room acoustics computer models involves inputting the measured static directivity data taken every 10° in a sphere-shaped pattern around the source. This data can be entered into the room acoustics software to create a directivity balloon, which is used in the ray tracing algorithm to simulate the room impulse response. The first study in this dissertation shows that using directional sources over an omni-directional source in room acoustics computer models produces significant differences both in terms of calculated room acoustics parameters and auralizations. The room acoustics computer model was also validated in terms of accurately incorporating the input source directivity. A recently proposed technique for creating auralizations using a multi-channel source representation has been investigated with numerous subjective studies, applied to both solo instruments and an orchestra. The method of multi-channel auralizations involves obtaining multi-channel anechoic recordings of short melodies from various instruments and creating individual channel auralizations. These auralizations are then combined to create a total multi-channel auralization. Through many subjective studies, this process was shown to be effective in terms of improving the realism and source width of the auralizations in a number of cases, and also modeling different

  18. Absence of localized acoustic waves in a scale-free correlated random system.

    PubMed

    Costa, A E B; de Moura, F A B F

    2011-02-16

    We numerically study the propagation of acoustic waves in a one-dimensional medium with a scale-free long-range correlated elasticity distribution. The random elasticity distribution is assumed to have a power spectrum S(k) ∼ 1/k(α). By using a transfer-matrix method we solve the discrete version of the scalar wave equation and compute the localization length. In addition, we apply a second-order finite-difference method for both the time and spatial variables and study the nature of the waves that propagate in the chain. Our numerical data indicate the presence of extended acoustic waves for a high degree of correlations. In contrast with local correlations, we numerically demonstrate that scale-free correlations promote a stable phase of free acoustic waves in the thermodynamic limit. PMID:21406919

  19. Spatial resolution limits for the localization of noise sources using direct sound mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Comesaña, D.; Holland, K. R.; Fernandez-Grande, E.

    2016-08-01

    One of the main challenges arising from noise and vibration problems is how to identify the areas of a device, machine or structure that produce significant acoustic excitation, i.e. the localization of main noise sources. The direct visualization of sound, in particular sound intensity, has extensively been used for many years to locate sound sources. However, it is not yet well defined when two sources should be regarded as resolved by means of direct sound mapping. This paper derives the limits of the direct representation of sound pressure, particle velocity and sound intensity by exploring the relationship between spatial resolution, noise level and geometry. The proposed expressions are validated via simulations and experiments. It is shown that particle velocity mapping yields better results for identifying closely spaced sound sources than sound pressure or sound intensity, especially in the acoustic near-field.

  20. A reverse localization scheme for underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Marjan; Rezazadeh, Javad; Ismail, Abdul Samad

    2012-01-01

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) provide new opportunities to observe and predict the behavior of aquatic environments. In some applications like target tracking or disaster prevention, sensed data is meaningless without location information. In this paper, we propose a novel 3D centralized, localization scheme for mobile underwater wireless sensor network, named Reverse Localization Scheme or RLS in short. RLS is an event-driven localization method triggered by detector sensors for launching localization process. RLS is suitable for surveillance applications that require very fast reactions to events and could report the location of the occurrence. In this method, mobile sensor nodes report the event toward the surface anchors as soon as they detect it. They do not require waiting to receive location information from anchors. Simulation results confirm that the proposed scheme improves the energy efficiency and reduces significantly localization response time with a proper level of accuracy in terms of mobility model of water currents. Major contributions of this method lie on reducing the numbers of message exchange for localization, saving the energy and decreasing the average localization response time.

  1. A Reverse Localization Scheme for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Marjan; Rezazadeh, Javad; Ismail, Abdul Samad

    2012-01-01

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) provide new opportunities to observe and predict the behavior of aquatic environments. In some applications like target tracking or disaster prevention, sensed data is meaningless without location information. In this paper, we propose a novel 3D centralized, localization scheme for mobile underwater wireless sensor network, named Reverse Localization Scheme or RLS in short. RLS is an event-driven localization method triggered by detector sensors for launching localization process. RLS is suitable for surveillance applications that require very fast reactions to events and could report the location of the occurrence. In this method, mobile sensor nodes report the event toward the surface anchors as soon as they detect it. They do not require waiting to receive location information from anchors. Simulation results confirm that the proposed scheme improves the energy efficiency and reduces significantly localization response time with a proper level of accuracy in terms of mobility model of water currents. Major contributions of this method lie on reducing the numbers of message exchange for localization, saving the energy and decreasing the average localization response time. PMID:22666034

  2. Measurement of acoustic characteristics of Japanese Buddhist temples in relation to sound source location and direction.

    PubMed

    Soeta, Yoshiharu; Shimokura, Ryota; Kim, Yong Hee; Ohsawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Ken

    2013-05-01

    Although temples are important buildings in the Buddhist community, the acoustic quality has not been examined in detail. Buddhist monks change the location and direction according to the ceremony, and associated acoustical changes have not yet been examined scientifically. To discuss the desired acoustics of temples, it is necessary to know the acoustic characteristics appropriate for each phase of a ceremony. In this study, acoustic measurements were taken at various source locations and directions in Japanese temples. A directional loudspeaker was used as the source to provide vocal acoustic fields, and impulse responses were measured and analyzed. The speech transmission index was higher and the interaural cross-correlation coefficient was lower for the sound source directed toward the side wall than that directed toward the altar. This suggests that the change in direction improves speech intelligibility, and the asymmetric property of direct sound and complex reflections from the altar and side wall increases the apparent source width. The large and coupled-like structure of the altar of a Buddhist temple may have reinforced the reverberation components and the table in the altar, which is called the "syumidan," may have decreased binaural coherence.

  3. Toward a Nonlinear Acoustic Analogy: Turbulence as a Source of Sound and Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is proposed that directly includes nonlinear propagation effects. We examine the Lighthill acoustic analogy and replace the Green's function of the wave equation with numerical solutions of the generalized Burgers' equation. This is justified mathematically by using similar arguments that are the basis of the solution of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This approach is superior to alternatives because propagation is accounted for directly from the source to the far-field observer instead of from an arbitrary intermediate point. Validation of a numerical solver for the generalized Burgers' equation is performed by comparing solutions with the Blackstock bridging function and measurement data. Most importantly, the mathematical relationship between the Navier-Stokes equations, the acoustic analogy that describes the source, and canonical nonlinear propagation equations is shown. Example predictions are presented for nonlinear propagation of jet mixing noise at the sideline angle.

  4. Toward a Nonlinear Acoustic Analogy: Turbulence as a Source of Sound and Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is proposed that directly includes nonlinear propagation effects. We examine the Lighthill acoustic analogy and replace the Green's function of the wave equation with numerical solutions of the generalized Burgers' equation. This is justified mathematically by using similar arguments that are the basis of the solution of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This approach is superior to alternatives because propagation is accounted for directly from the source to the far-field observer instead of from an arbitrary intermediate point. Validation of a numerical solver for the generalized Burgers' equation is performed by comparing solutions with the Blackstock bridging function and measurement data. Most importantly, the mathematical relationship between the Navier- Stokes equations, the acoustic analogy that describes the source, and canonical nonlinear propagation equations is shown. Example predictions are presented for nonlinear propagation of jet mixing noise at the sideline angle

  5. Search-matching algorithm for acoustics-based automatic sniper localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Juan R.; Salinas, Renato A.; Abidi, Mongi A.

    2007-04-01

    Most of modern automatic sniper localization systems are based on the utilization of the acoustical emissions produced by the gun fire events. In order to estimate the spatial coordinates of the sniper location, these systems measures the time delay of arrival of the acoustical shock wave fronts to a microphone array. In more advanced systems, model based estimation of the nonlinear distortion parameters of the N-waves is used to make projectile trajectory and calibre estimations. In this work we address the sniper localization problem using a model based search-matching approach. The automatic sniper localization algorithm works searching for the acoustics model of ballistic shock waves which best matches the measured data. For this purpose, we implement a previously released acoustics model of ballistic shock waves. Further, the sniper location, the projectile trajectory and calibre, and the muzzle velocity are regarded as the inputs variables of such a model. A search algorithm is implemented in order to found what combination of the input variables minimize a fitness function defined as the distance between measured and simulated data. In such a way, the sniper location, the projectile trajectory and calibre, and the muzzle velocity can be found. In order to evaluate the performance of the algorithm, we conduct computer based experiments using simulated gunfire event data calculated at the nodes of a virtual distributed sensor network. Preliminary simulation results are quite promising showing fast convergence of the algorithm and good localization accuracy.

  6. Analysis of underwater decoupling properties of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling-Zhi, Huang; Yong, Xiao; Ji-Hong, Wen; Hai-Bin, Yang; Xi-Sen, Wen

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical solution for the vibration and sound radiation of a semi-infinite plate covered by a decoupling layer consisting of locally resonant acoustic metamaterial. Formulations are derived based on a combination use of effective medium theory and the theory of elasticity for the decoupling material. Theoretical results show good agreements between the method developed in this paper and the conventional finite element method (FEM), but the method of this paper is more efficient than FEM. Numerical results also show that system with acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer exhibits significant noise reduction performance at the local resonance frequency of the acoustic metamaterial, and such performance can be ascribed to the vibration suppression of the base plate. It is demonstrated that the effective density of acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer has a great influence on the mechanical impedance of the system. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of locally resonant structure can be effectively predicted by a simple model, and it can be significantly affected by the material properties of the locally resonant structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51305448 and 51275519).

  7. EEG source localization: a neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Sclabassi, R J; Sonmez, M; Sun, M

    2001-07-01

    Functional activity in the brain is associated with the generation of currents and resultant voltages which may be observed on the scalp as the electroencephelogram. The current sources may be modeled as dipoles. The properties of the current dipole sources may be studied by solving either the forward or inverse problems. The forward problem utilizes a volume conductor model for the head, in which the potentials on the conductor surface are computed based on an assumed current dipole at an arbitrary location, orientation, and strength. In the inverse problem, on the other hand, a current dipole, or a group of dipoles, is identified based on the observed EEG. Both the forward and inverse problems are typically solved by numerical procedures, such as a boundary element method and an optimization algorithm. These approaches are highly time-consuming and unsuitable for the rapid evaluation of brain function. In this paper we present a different approach to these problems based on machine learning. We solve both problems using artificial neural networks which are trained off-line using back-propagation techniques to learn the complex source-potential relationships of head volume conduction. Once trained, these networks are able to generalize their knowledge to localize functional activity within the brain in a computationally efficient manner.

  8. Local probing of propagating acoustic waves in a gigahertz echo chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Santos, Paulo V.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2012-04-01

    In the same way that micro-mechanical resonators resemble guitar strings and drums, surface acoustic waves resemble the sound these instruments produce, but moving over a solid surface rather than through air. In contrast with oscillations in suspended resonators, such propagating mechanical waves have not before been studied near the quantum mechanical limits. Here, we demonstrate local probing of surface acoustic waves with a displacement sensitivity of 30amRMSHz-1/2 and detection sensitivity on the single-phonon level after averaging, at a frequency of 932MHz. Our probe is a piezoelectrically coupled single-electron transistor, which is sufficiently fast, non-destructive and localized to enable us to track pulses echoing back and forth in a long acoustic cavity, self-interfering and ringing the cavity up and down. We project that strong coupling to quantum circuits will enable new experiments, and hybrids using the unique features of surface acoustic waves. Prospects include quantum investigations of phonon-phonon interactions, and acoustic coupling to superconducting qubits for which we present favourable estimates.

  9. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated. PMID:24993239

  10. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated.

  11. Effects of individual sound sources on the subjective loudness and acoustic comfort in underground shopping streets.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Meng, Qi; Jin, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort depends on a series of factors in a particular situation rather than only on sound pressure levels. In the present study, a large-scale subjective survey has been undertaken on underground shopping streets in Harbin, China, to determine how individual sound sources influence subjective loudness and acoustic comfort evaluation. Based on the analysis of case study results, it has been shown that all individual sound sources can increase subjective loudness to a certain degree. However, their levels of influence on acoustic comfort are different. Background music and the public address system can increase acoustic comfort, with a mean difference of 0.18 to 0.32 and 0.21 to 0.27, respectively, where a five-point bipolar category scale is used. Music from shops and vendor shouts can decrease acoustic comfort, with a mean difference of -0.11 to -0.38 and -0.39 to -0.62, respectively. The feasibility of improving acoustic comfort by changing certain sound sources is thus demonstrated.

  12. Design of acoustic logging signal source of imitation based on field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Ju, X. D.; Lu, J. Q.; Men, B. Y.

    2014-08-01

    An acoustic logging signal source of imitation is designed and realized, based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to improve the efficiency of examining and repairing acoustic logging tools during research and field application, and to inspect and verify acoustic receiving circuits and corresponding algorithms. The design of this signal source contains hardware design and software design,and the hardware design uses an FPGA as the control core. Four signals are made first by reading the Random Access Memory (RAM) data which are inside the FPGA, then dealing with the data by digital to analog conversion, amplification, smoothing and so on. Software design uses VHDL, a kind of hardware description language, to program the FPGA. Experiments illustrate that the ratio of signal to noise for the signal source is high, the waveforms are stable, and also its functions of amplitude adjustment, frequency adjustment and delay adjustment are in accord with the characteristics of real acoustic logging waveforms. These adjustments can be used to imitate influences on sonic logging received waveforms caused by many kinds of factors such as spacing and span of acoustic tools, sonic speeds of different layers and fluids, and acoustic attenuations of different cementation planes.

  13. Issues in Humanoid Audition and Sound Source Localization by Active Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Kitano, Hiroaki

    In this paper, we present an active audition system which is implemented on the humanoid robot "SIG the humanoid". The audition system for highly intelligent humanoids localizes sound sources and recognizes auditory events in the auditory scene. Active audition reported in this paper enables SIG to track sources by integrating audition, vision, and motor movements. Given the multiple sound sources in the auditory scene, SIG actively moves its head to improve localization by aligning microphones orthogonal to the sound source and by capturing the possible sound sources by vision. However, such an active head movement inevitably creates motor noises.The system adaptively cancels motor noises using motor control signals and the cover acoustics. The experimental result demonstrates that active audition by integration of audition, vision, and motor control attains sound source tracking in variety of conditions.onditions.

  14. Introduction to acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Possa, G.

    1983-01-01

    Typical acoustic emission signal characteristics are described and techniques which localize the signal source by processing the acoustic delay data from multiple sensors are discussed. The instrumentation, which includes sensors, amplifiers, pulse counters, a minicomputer and output devices is examined. Applications are reviewed.

  15. Wireless acoustic modules for real-time data fusion using asynchronous sniper localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; De Mezzo, S.; Duffner, P.; Naz, P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) has been conducting studies in the domain of acoustic localization of shots. Mobile antennas mounted on the soldier's helmet were initially used for real-time detection, classification and localization of sniper shots. It showed good performances in land scenarios, but also in urban scenarios if the array was in the shot corridor, meaning that the microphones first detect the direct wave and then the reflections of the Mach and muzzle waves (15% distance estimation error compared to the actual shooter array distance). Fusing data sent by multiple sensor nodes distributed on the field showed some of the limitations of the technologies that have been implemented in ISL's demonstrators. Among others, the determination of the arrays' orientation was not accurate enough, thereby degrading the performance of data fusion. Some new solutions have been developed in the past year in order to obtain better performance for data fusion. Asynchronous localization algorithms have been developed and post-processed on data measured in both free-field and urban environments with acoustic modules on the line of sight of the shooter. These results are presented in the first part of the paper. The impact of GPS position estimation error is also discussed in the article in order to evaluate the possible use of those algorithms for real-time processing using mobile acoustic nodes. In the frame of ISL's transverse project IMOTEP (IMprovement Of optical and acoustical TEchnologies for the Protection), some demonstrators are developed that will allow real-time asynchronous localization of sniper shots. An embedded detection and classification algorithm is implemented on wireless acoustic modules that send the relevant information to a central PC. Data fusion is then processed and the

  16. An acoustic dual filter in the audio frequencies with two local resonant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-qun; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shu-yi; Fan, Li

    2014-08-01

    We report an acoustic dual filter to realize the sound regulation in the audio frequency range, in which resonant vibrations of two membrane-air and metal-elastomer systems generate two sound transmission peaks and a sound blocking below 3000 Hz. The local vibrational profiles manifest that the transmission peak at lower frequency is mainly dependent on the resonant vibration of the membrane-air system, and the coupling vibrations of two systems generate the blocking frequency and transmission peak at higher frequency. Importantly, two transmission peaks can be controlled independently. It is feasible to realize the acoustic device in sound shield and dual filters.

  17. B-Scan Based Acoustic Source Reconstruction for Magnetoacoustic Tomography with Magnetic Induction (MAT-MI)

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Leo; Li, Xu; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    We present in this study an acoustic source reconstruction method using focused transducer with B mode imaging for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). MAT-MI is an imaging modality proposed for non-invasive conductivity imaging with high spatial resolution. In MAT-MI acoustic sources are generated in a conductive object by placing it in a static and a time-varying magnetic field. The acoustic waves from these sources propagate in all directions and are collected with transducers placed around the object. The collected signal is then usedto reconstruct the acoustic source distribution and to further estimate the electrical conductivity distribution of the object. A flat piston transducer acting as a point receiver has been used in previous MAT-MI systems to collect acoustic signals. In the present study we propose to use B mode scan scheme with a focused transducer that gives a signal gain in its focus region and improves the MAT-MI signal quality. A simulation protocol that can take into account different transducer designs and scan schemes for MAT-MI imaging is developed and used in our evaluation of different MAT-MI system designs. It is shown in our computer simulations that, as compared to the previous approach, the MAT-MI system using B-scan with a focused transducer allows MAT-MI imaging at a closer distance and has improved system sensitivity. In addition, the B scan imaging technique allows reconstruction of the MAT-MI acoustic sources with a discrete number of scanning locations which greatly increases the applicability of the MAT-MI approach especially when a continuous acoustic window is not available in real clinical applications. We have also conducted phantom experiments to evaluate the proposed method and the reconstructed image shows a good agreement with the target phantom. PMID:21097372

  18. Helmet-mounted acoustic array for hostile fire detection and localization in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2008-04-01

    The detection and localization of hostile weapons firing has been demonstrated successfully with acoustic sensor arrays on unattended ground sensors (UGS), ground-vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Some of the more mature systems have demonstrated significant capabilities and provide direct support to ongoing counter-sniper operations. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is conducting research and development for a helmet-mounted system to acoustically detect and localize small arms firing, or other events such as RPG, mortars, and explosions, as well as other non-transient signatures. Since today's soldier is quickly being asked to take on more and more reconnaissance, surveillance, & target acquisition (RSTA) functions, sensor augmentation enables him to become a mobile and networked sensor node on the complex and dynamic battlefield. Having a body-worn threat detection and localization capability for events that pose an immediate danger to the soldiers around him can significantly enhance their survivability and lethality, as well as enable him to provide and use situational awareness clues on the networked battlefield. This paper addresses some of the difficulties encountered by an acoustic system in an urban environment. Complex reverberation, multipath, diffraction, and signature masking by building structures makes this a very harsh environment for robust detection and classification of shockwaves and muzzle blasts. Multifunctional acoustic detection arrays can provide persistent surveillance and enhanced situational awareness for every soldier.

  19. Particle filtering for arrival time tracking in space and source localization.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Jain, Rashi

    2012-11-01

    Locating and tracking a source in an ocean environment and estimating environmental parameters of a sound propagation medium are critical tasks in ocean acoustics. Many approaches for both are based on full field calculations which are computationally intensive and sensitive to assumptions on the structure of the environment. Alternative methods that use only select features of the acoustic field for localization and environmental parameter estimation have been proposed. The focus of this paper is the development of a method that extracts arrival times and amplitudes of distinct paths from measured acoustic time-series using sequential Bayesian filtering, namely, particle filtering. These quantities, along with complete posterior probability density functions, also extracted by filtering, are employed in source localization and bathymetry estimation. Aspects of the filtering methodology are presented and studied in terms of their impact on the uncertainty in the arrival time estimates. Using the posterior probability densities of arrival times, source localization and water depth estimation are performed for the Haro Strait Primer experiment; the results are compared to those of conventional methods. The comparison demonstrates a significant advantage in the proposed approach.

  20. High frequency source localization in a shallow ocean sound channel using frequency difference matched field processing.

    PubMed

    Worthmann, Brian M; Song, H C; Dowling, David R

    2015-12-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an established technique for source localization in known multipath acoustic environments. Unfortunately, in many situations, particularly those involving high frequency signals, imperfect knowledge of the actual propagation environment prevents accurate propagation modeling and source localization via MFP fails. For beamforming applications, this actual-to-model mismatch problem was mitigated through a frequency downshift, made possible by a nonlinear array-signal-processing technique called frequency difference beamforming [Abadi, Song, and Dowling (2012). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 3018-3029]. Here, this technique is extended to conventional (Bartlett) MFP using simulations and measurements from the 2011 Kauai Acoustic Communications MURI experiment (KAM11) to produce ambiguity surfaces at frequencies well below the signal bandwidth where the detrimental effects of mismatch are reduced. Both the simulation and experimental results suggest that frequency difference MFP can be more robust against environmental mismatch than conventional MFP. In particular, signals of frequency 11.2 kHz-32.8 kHz were broadcast 3 km through a 106-m-deep shallow ocean sound channel to a sparse 16-element vertical receiving array. Frequency difference MFP unambiguously localized the source in several experimental data sets with average peak-to-side-lobe ratio of 0.9 dB, average absolute-value range error of 170 m, and average absolute-value depth error of 10 m. PMID:26723312

  1. The theory of magnetohydrodynamic wave generation by localized sources. I - General asymptotic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, William

    1989-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic wave emission from several localized, periodic, kinematically specified fluid velocity fields are calculated using Lighthill's method for finding the far-field wave forms. The waves propagate through an isothermal and uniform plasma with a constant B field. General properties of the energy flux are illustrated with models of pulsating flux tubes and convective rolls. Interference theory from geometrical optics is used to find the direction of minimum fast-wave emission from multipole sources and slow-wave emission from discontinuous sources. The distribution of total flux in fast and slow waves varies with the ratios of the source dimensions l to the acoustic and Alfven wavelengths.

  2. Underwater Acoustic Localization and Tracking of Pacific Walruses in the Northeastern Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rideout, Brendan Pearce

    This thesis develops and demonstrates an approach for estimating the three-dimensional (3D) location of a vocalizing underwater marine mammal using acoustic arrival time measurements at three spatially separated receivers while providing rigorous location uncertainties. To properly account for uncertainty in the measurements of receiver parameters (e.g., 3D receiver locations and synchronization times) and environmental parameters (water depth and sound speed correction), these quantities are treated as unknowns constrained with prior estimates and prior uncertainties. While previous localization algorithms have solved for an unknown scaling factor on the prior uncertainties as part of the inversion, in this work unknown scaling factors on both the prior and arrival time uncertainties are estimated. Maximum a posteriori estimates for sound source locations and times, receiver parameters, and environmental parameters are calculated simultaneously. Posterior uncertainties for all unknowns are calculated and incorporate both arrival time and prior uncertainties. Simulation results demonstrated that, for the case considered here, linearization errors are generally small and that the lack of an accurate sound speed profile does not necessarily cause large uncertainties or biases in the estimated positions. The primary motivation for this work was to develop an algorithm for locating underwater Pacific walruses in the coastal waters around Alaska. In 2009, an array of approximately 40 underwater acoustic receivers was deployed in the northeastern Chukchi Sea (northwest of Alaska) from August to October to record the vocalizations of marine mammals including Pacific walruses and bowhead whales. Three of these receivers were placed in a triangular arrangement approximately 400 m apart near the Hanna Shoal (northwest of Wainwright, Alaska). A sequence of walrus knock vocalizations from this data set was processed using the localization algorithm developed in this thesis

  3. Strong localization of an acoustic wave in a sub-wavelength slot between two plates.

    PubMed

    Cai, Feiyan; Li, Fei; Meng, Long; Wu, Junru; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-03-01

    The dispersion relation of the acoustic field in a sub-wavelength slot (its width is smaller than the acoustic wavelength) between two identical plates immersed in an inviscid liquid is theoretically analyzed. Each plate has a phononic crystal structure consisting of periodical grooves drilled in one of outer sides of each plate. It is found that highly localization of acoustic energy can be achieved in the sub-wavelength slot when a traveling acoustic wave is incident upon the slots. The associate physical principle is as follows: The lowest anti-symmetric non-leaky A0 mode of the Lamb wave of each individual thin plate propagating as an evanescent wave extends to the liquid from opposite direction; when the width of the slot is much smaller than the characteristic decay length of the evanescent wave in the liquid, the constructive interference of evanescent waves of the both plates takes place, leading to a strong acoustic field in the slot. This system has potential to serve as an excellent candidate for the ultrasensitive microscopic chemical/biological stimulators and sensors.

  4. Quad Cities Unit 2 Main Steam Line Acoustic Source Identification and Load Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, Guy; Ramsden, Kevin; Gesior, Roman

    2006-07-01

    The Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 have a history of steam line vibration issues. The implementation of an Extended Power Up-rate resulted in significant increases in steam line vibration as well as acoustic loading of the steam dryers, which led to equipment failures and fatigue cracking of the dryers. This paper discusses the results of extensive data collection on the Quad Cities Unit 2 replacement dryer and the Main Steam Lines. This data was taken with the intent of identifying acoustic sources in the steam system. Review of the data confirmed that vortex shedding coupled column resonance in the relief and safety valve stub pipes were the principal sources of large magnitude acoustic loads in the main steam system. Modifications were developed in sub-scale testing to alter the acoustic properties of the valve standpipes and add acoustic damping to the system. The modifications developed and installed consisted of acoustic side branches that were attached to the Electromatic Relief Valve (ERV) and Main Steam Safety Valve (MSSV) attachment pipes. Subsequent post-modification testing was performed in plant to confirm the effectiveness of the modifications. The modifications have been demonstrated to reduce vibration loads at full Extended Power Up-rate (EPU) conditions to levels below those at Original Licensed Thermal Power (OLTP). (authors)

  5. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  6. Objective approach for analysis of noise source characteristics and acoustic conditions in noisy computerized embroidery workrooms.

    PubMed

    Aliabadi, Mohsen; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Mansoorizadeh, Muharram

    2014-03-01

    It is highly important to analyze the acoustic properties of workrooms in order to identify best noise control measures from the standpoint of noise exposure limits. Due to the fact that sound pressure is dependent upon environments, it cannot be a suitable parameter for determining the share of workroom acoustic characteristics in producing noise pollution. This paper aims to empirically analyze noise source characteristics and acoustic properties of noisy embroidery workrooms based on special parameters. In this regard, reverberation time as the special room acoustic parameter in 30 workrooms was measured based on ISO 3382-2. Sound power quantity of embroidery machines was also determined based on ISO 9614-3. Multiple linear regression was employed for predicting reverberation time based on acoustic features of the workrooms using MATLAB software. The results showed that the measured reverberation times in most of the workrooms were approximately within the ranges recommended by ISO 11690-1. Similarity between reverberation time values calculated by the Sabine formula and measured values was relatively poor (R (2) = 0.39). This can be due to the inaccurate estimation of the acoustic influence of furniture and formula preconditions. Therefore, this value cannot be considered representative of an actual acoustic room. However, the prediction performance of the regression method with root mean square error (RMSE) = 0.23 s and R (2) = 0.69 is relatively acceptable. Because the sound power of the embroidery machines was relatively high, these sources get the highest priority when it comes to applying noise controls. Finally, an objective approach for the determination of the share of workroom acoustic characteristics in producing noise could facilitate the identification of cost-effective noise controls. PMID:24214295

  7. Localization of quenches and mechanical disturbances in the Mu2e transport solenoid prototype using acoustic emission technique

    DOE PAGES

    Marchevsky, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Lamm, M.; Tartaglia, M. A.; Lopes, M. L.

    2016-02-12

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection is a noninvasive technique allowing the localization of the mechanical events and quenches in superconducting magnets. Application of the AE technique is especially advantageous in situations where magnet integrity can be jeopardized by the use of voltage taps or inductive pickup coils. As the prototype module of the transport solenoid (TS) for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab represents such a special case, we have developed a dedicated six-channel AE detection system and accompanying software aimed at localizing mechanical events during the coil cold testing. The AE sensors based on transversely polarized piezoceramic washers combined with cryogenicmore » preamplifiers were mounted at the outer surface of the solenoid aluminum shell, with a 60° angular step around the circumference. Acoustic signals were simultaneously acquired at a rate of 500 kS/s, prefiltered and sorted based on their arrival time. Next, based on the arrival timing, angular and axial coordinates of the AE sources within the magnet structure were calculated. Furthermore, we present AE measurement results obtained during cooldown, spot heater firing, and spontaneous quenching of the Mu2e TS module prototype and discuss their relevance for mechanical stability assessment and quench localization.« less

  8. Source implementation to eliminate low-frequency artifacts in finite difference time domain room acoustic simulation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyok; Lam, Yiu Wai

    2012-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is a numerical technique that is straight forward to implement for the simulation of acoustic propagation. For room acoustics applications, the implementation of efficient source excitation and frequency dependent boundary conditions on arbitrary geometry can be seen as two of the most significant problems. This paper deals with the source implementation problem. Among existing source implementation methods, the hard source implementation is the simplest and computationally most efficient. Unfortunately, it generates a large low-frequency modulation in the measured time response. This paper presents a detailed investigation into these side effects. Surprisingly, some of these side effects are found to exist even if a transparent source implementation is used. By combing a time limited approach with a class of more natural source pulse function, this paper develops a source implementation method in FDTD that is as simple and computationally as efficient as a hard source implementation and yet capable of producing results that are virtually the same as a true transparent source. It is believed that the source implementation method developed in this paper will provide an improvement to the practical usability of the FDTD method for room acoustic simulation. PMID:22280589

  9. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  10. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) Determined from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Current processing of acoustic array data is burdened with considerable uncertainty. This study reports an original methodology that serves to demystify array results, reduce misinterpretation, and accurately quantify position and strength of acoustic sources. Traditional array results represent noise sources that are convolved with array beamform response functions, which depend on array geometry, size (with respect to source position and distributions), and frequency. The Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) method removes beamforming characteristics from output presentations. A unique linear system of equations accounts for reciprocal influence at different locations over the array survey region. It makes no assumption beyond the traditional processing assumption of statistically independent noise sources. The full rank equations are solved with a new robust iterative method. DAMAS is quantitatively validated using archival data from a variety of prior high-lift airframe component noise studies, including flap edge/cove, trailing edge, leading edge, slat, and calibration sources. Presentations are explicit and straightforward, as the noise radiated from a region of interest is determined by simply summing the mean-squared values over that region. DAMAS can fully replace existing array processing and presentations methodology in most applications. It appears to dramatically increase the value of arrays to the field of experimental acoustics.

  11. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) Determined from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Current processing of acoustic array data is burdened with considerable uncertainty. This study reports an original methodology that serves to demystify array results, reduce misinterpretation, and accurately quantify position and strength of acoustic sources. Traditional array results represent noise sources that are convolved with array beamform response functions, which depend on array geometry, size (with respect to source position and distributions), and frequency. The Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) method removes beamforming characteristics from output presentations. A unique linear system of equations accounts for reciprocal influence at different locations over the array survey region. It makes no assumption beyond the traditional processing assumption of statistically independent noise sources. The full rank equations are solved with a new robust iterative method. DAMAS is quantitatively validated using archival data from a variety of prior high-lift airframe component noise studies, including flap edge/cove, trailing edge, leading edge, slat, and calibration sources. Presentations are explicit and straightforward, as the noise radiated from a region of interest is determined by simply summing the mean-squared values over that region. DAMAS can fully replace existing array processing and presentations methodology in most applications. It appears to dramatically increase the value of arrays to the field of experimental acoustics.

  12. Military jet noise source imaging using multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; McKinley, Richard L; James, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    The identification of acoustic sources is critical to targeted noise reduction efforts for jets on high-performance tactical aircraft. This paper describes the imaging of acoustic sources from a tactical jet using near-field acoustical holography techniques. The measurement consists of a series of scans over the hologram with a dense microphone array. Partial field decomposition methods are performed to generate coherent holograms. Numerical extrapolation of data beyond the measurement aperture mitigates artifacts near the aperture edges. A multisource equivalent wave model is used that includes the effects of the ground reflection on the measurement. Multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (M-SONAH) is used to reconstruct apparent source distributions between 20 and 1250 Hz at four engine powers. It is shown that M-SONAH produces accurate field reconstructions for both inward and outward propagation in the region spanned by the physical hologram measurement. Reconstructions across the set of engine powers and frequencies suggests that directivity depends mainly on estimated source location; sources farther downstream radiate at a higher angle relative to the inlet axis. At some frequencies and engine powers, reconstructed fields exhibit multiple radiation lobes originating from overlapped source regions, which is a phenomenon relatively recently reported for full-scale jets. PMID:27106340

  13. A method to determine the acoustical properties of locally and nonlocally reacting duct liners in grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustical properties of locally and nonlocally reacting acoustical liners in grazing flow are described. The effect of mean flow and shear flow are considered as well as the application to rigid and limp bulk reacting materials. The axial wavenumber of the least attenuated mode in a flow duct is measured. The acoustical properties of duct liners is then deduced from the measured axial wavenumber and known flow profile and boundary conditions. This method is a natural extension of impedance-like measurements.

  14. Transient nearfield acoustic holography based on an interpolated time-domain equivalent source method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Zhang, Yong-Bin; Xu, Liang

    2011-09-01

    Transient nearfield acoustic holography based on an interpolated time-domain equivalent source method (ESM) is proposed to reconstruct transient acoustic fields directly in the time domain. Since the equivalent source strengths solved by the traditional time-domain ESM formulation cannot be used to reconstruct the pressure on the source surface directly, an interpolation function is introduced to develop an interpolated time-domain ESM formulation which permits one to deduce an iterative reconstruction process. As the reconstruction process is ill-conditioned and especially there exists a cumulative effect of errors, the Tikhonov regularization is used to stabilize the process. Numerical examples of reconstructing transient acoustic fields from a baffled planar piston, an impulsively accelerating sphere and a cube box, respectively, demonstrate that the proposed method not only can effectively reconstruct transient acoustic fields in the time domain, but also can visualize acoustic fields in the space domain. And, in the first numerical example, the cumulative effect of errors and the validity of using the Tikhonov regularization to suppress the errors are described.

  15. The Doppler Effect based acoustic source separation for a wayside train bearing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Shangbin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-01-01

    Wayside acoustic condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for train bearings depend on acquired acoustic signals, which consist of mixed signals from different train bearings with obvious Doppler distortion as well as background noises. This study proposes a novel scheme to overcome the difficulties, especially the multi-source problem in wayside acoustic diagnosis system. In the method, a time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) strategy is applied to weaken the Heisenberg's uncertainty limit for a signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) of high resolution. Due to the Doppler Effect, the signals from different bearings have different time centers even with the same frequency. A Doppler feature matching search (DFMS) algorithm is then put forward to locate the time centers of different bearings in the TFD spectrogram. With the determined time centers, time-frequency filters (TFF) are designed with thresholds to separate the acoustic signals in the time-frequency domain. Then the inverse STFT (ISTFT) is taken and the signals are recovered and filtered aiming at each sound source. Subsequently, a dynamical resampling method is utilized to remove the Doppler Effect. Finally, accurate diagnosis for train bearing faults can be achieved by applying conventional spectrum analysis techniques to the resampled data. The performance of the proposed method is verified by both simulated and experimental cases. It shows that it is effective to detect and diagnose multiple defective bearings even though they produce multi-source acoustic signals.

  16. Flat acoustic sources with frequency response correction based on feedback and feed-forward distributed control.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an acoustic source with a small thickness and high bending stiffness. The high bending stiffness is obtained with a sandwich structure in which the face of the sandwich structure internal to the source is perforated to increase the acoustic compliance, thereby leading to increased electroacoustic conversion efficiency. Multiple actuators are used to drive the moving component of the acoustic source. Control of the acoustic resonances and structural resonances is required to obtain an even frequency response. The use of collocated decentralized feedback control based on velocity sensing was found to be ineffective for controlling these resonances due to the destabilizing asymmetric modes caused by the coupling of the internal acoustic cavity and the rigid body vibration of the moving component. Resonances can be controlled by a set of independent combinations of symmetric driving patterns with corresponding velocity feedback controllers such that the fundamental mass-air resonance is effectively controlled, as is the lowest bending mode of the moving component. Finally, a compensation scheme for low frequencies is used which enables a flat frequency response in the range of 30 Hz to 1 kHz with deviations smaller than 3 dB.

  17. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process.

  18. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process. PMID:26627802

  19. Acoustical “transparency” induced by local resonance in Bragg bandgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Gaokun; Wang, Xinlong

    2014-01-28

    We show that sound waves can resonantly transmit through Bragg bandgaps in an acoustical duct periodically attached with an array of Helmholtz resonators, forming within the normally forbidden band a transparency window with group velocity smaller than the normal speed of sound. The transparency occurs for the locally resonant frequency so much close to the Bragg one that both the local-resonance-induced bandgap and the Bragg one heavily overlap with each other. The phenomenon seems an acoustical analog of the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency by quantum interference. Different from the Fano-like interference explanation, we also provide a mechanism for the transparency window phenomenon which makes it possible to extend the phenomenon in general.

  20. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  1. Nonlinear localized dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Amour, Rabia

    2007-10-15

    A numerical investigation is presented to show the existence, formation, and possible realization of large-amplitude dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions. These nonlinear localized structures are self-consistent solutions of the collisionless Vlasov equation with a population of fast particles. The spatial patterns of the variable charge DA solitary wave are significantly modified by the nonthermal effects. The results complement and provide new insights into previously published results on this problem.

  2. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for underwater acoustic problems using seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Odom, Robert I; Collis, Jon M

    2013-03-01

    Several problems of current interest involve elastic bottom range-dependent ocean environments with buried or earthquake-type sources, specifically oceanic T-wave propagation studies and interface wave related analyses. Additionally, observed deep shadow-zone arrivals are not predicted by ray theoretic methods, and attempts to model them with fluid-bottom parabolic equation solutions suggest that it may be necessary to account for elastic bottom interactions. In order to study energy conversion between elastic and acoustic waves, current elastic parabolic equation solutions must be modified to allow for seismic starting fields for underwater acoustic propagation environments. Two types of elastic self-starter are presented. An explosive-type source is implemented using a compressional self-starter and the resulting acoustic field is consistent with benchmark solutions. A shear wave self-starter is implemented and shown to generate transmission loss levels consistent with the explosive source. Source fields can be combined to generate starting fields for source types such as explosions, earthquakes, or pile driving. Examples demonstrate the use of source fields for shallow sources or deep ocean-bottom earthquake sources, where down slope conversion, a known T-wave generation mechanism, is modeled. Self-starters are interpreted in the context of the seismic moment tensor. PMID:23464007

  3. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for underwater acoustic problems using seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Odom, Robert I; Collis, Jon M

    2013-03-01

    Several problems of current interest involve elastic bottom range-dependent ocean environments with buried or earthquake-type sources, specifically oceanic T-wave propagation studies and interface wave related analyses. Additionally, observed deep shadow-zone arrivals are not predicted by ray theoretic methods, and attempts to model them with fluid-bottom parabolic equation solutions suggest that it may be necessary to account for elastic bottom interactions. In order to study energy conversion between elastic and acoustic waves, current elastic parabolic equation solutions must be modified to allow for seismic starting fields for underwater acoustic propagation environments. Two types of elastic self-starter are presented. An explosive-type source is implemented using a compressional self-starter and the resulting acoustic field is consistent with benchmark solutions. A shear wave self-starter is implemented and shown to generate transmission loss levels consistent with the explosive source. Source fields can be combined to generate starting fields for source types such as explosions, earthquakes, or pile driving. Examples demonstrate the use of source fields for shallow sources or deep ocean-bottom earthquake sources, where down slope conversion, a known T-wave generation mechanism, is modeled. Self-starters are interpreted in the context of the seismic moment tensor.

  4. Noise in an acoustic-optic modulated laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Kachelmyer, A.L.; Eng, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers the measurement of amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) noise in a tunable CO{sub 2} laser source. Theoretical and experimental heterodyned output power spectrums are used to evaluate the quality of the acousto-optically tuned source.

  5. Numerical investigation and electro-acoustic modeling of measurement methods for the in-duct acoustical source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seung-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2003-02-01

    It is known that the direct method yields different results from the indirect (or load) method in measuring the in-duct acoustic source parameters of fluid machines. The load method usually comes up with a negative source resistance, although a fairly accurate prediction of radiated noise can be obtained from any method. This study is focused on the effect of the time-varying nature of fluid machines on the output results of two typical measurement methods. For this purpose, a simplified fluid machine consisting of a reservoir, a valve, and an exhaust pipe is considered as representing a typical periodic, time-varying system and the measurement situations are simulated by using the method of characteristics. The equivalent circuits for such simulations are also analyzed by considering the system as having a linear time-varying source. It is found that the results from the load method are quite sensitive to the change of cylinder pressure or valve profile, in contrast to those from the direct method. In the load method, the source admittance turns out to be predominantly dependent on the valve admittance at the calculation frequency as well as the valve and load admittances at other frequencies. In the direct method, however, the source resistance is always positive and the source admittance depends mainly upon the zeroth order of valve admittance.

  6. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-05-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 {+-} 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 {+-} 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 {+-} 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10{sup -5} rad s{sup -1}.

  7. Lamb waves from airborne explosion sources: Viscous effects and comparisons to ducted acoustic arrivals

    SciTech Connect

    Revelle, D.O.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    Observations of large explosions in the atmosphere at long range are dominated by a leading pulse of large amplitude and long period that is often followed by a series of higher frequency impulses usually of smaller amplitude. This description can be interpreted using linearized acoustic-gravity wave theory in terms of a Lamb wave arrival followed by ducted acoustic and/or gravity waves. This pattern of arrivals is not the same at all ranges nor is it independent of the source energy or of the altitude of the source. Earlier, Pierce, using an isothermal, windless atmospheric model, theoretically formulated the distances beyond which the Lamb wave would just be discernible and also where it would dominate the arriving signals for a specified explosion source. In this work the authors have evaluated these distances for the cases of both an inviscid and a viscous fluid for the source energies of interest to the CTBT (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) R and D work at Los Alamos. Although the inviscid results are analytic, the fully viscous solutions are iterative. For the inviscid solutions, the authors find that the Lamb wave domination distance is proportional to wave frequency at frequencies large with respect to the acoustic waveguide cut-off frequency. Under similar conditions they also find that the computed distances are linearly proportional to the source height. At 1 Hz for example, the Lamb wave must propagate about 200 km before having a significant amplitude. For a viscous fluid they found slight increases in the distances compared to an inviscid fluid with the lower frequencies, near the acoustic cut-off frequency, exhibiting the greatest changes. During the period from 1981--1994 at Los Alamos, they have also observed infrasound from eight point source, near-surface ANFO explosions at White Sands Missile Range events even though the ducted acoustic waves were observed. In this work, they will compare the current theory against some of these observations.

  8. Supersonic acoustic source mechanisms for free jets of various geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiner, John M.; Ponton, Michael K.

    1992-04-01

    The aeroacoustic performance of several generic nozzle geometries was tested to evaluate the potential benefits of using non-round jet exit geometries to reduce noise from combat military aircraft. Both the aerodynamics and far field acoustics of several M(sub d) = 1.5 and 2.0 round, elliptic, and rectangular nozzles, including an augmented deflector exhaust nozzle (ADEN), were studied to assess noise emission. The nozzles were operated to jet total temperatures, T(sub 0) = 1160 degree R, and the data scaled to constant thrust. The data were propagated to 1500 ft. and corrected to perceived noise level. The aerodynamic results of the study show that the non-round nozzle geometries mix much faster with the surrounding medium than does an equivalent round nozzle plume. Both the ADEN and elliptic nozzles provide significant reduction of noise, 6 to 7 PNdB, along the major axis direction with little expected impact on nozzle performance. Shock noise processes are eliminated for elliptic nozzles, but are still significant with rectangular nozzles. Comparison of measurements to theoretical predictions of noise using the quasi-linear instability wave model demonstrates good qualitative agreement.

  9. On Acoustic Source Specification for Rotor-Stator Interaction Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Caesy L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of measured source data to assess the effects of acoustic source specification on rotor-stator interaction noise predictions. Specifically, the acoustic propagation and radiation portions of a recently developed coupled computational approach are used to predict tonal rotor-stator interaction noise from a benchmark configuration. In addition to the use of full measured data, randomization of source mode relative phases is also considered for specification of the acoustic source within the computational approach. Comparisons with sideline noise measurements are performed to investigate the effects of various source descriptions on both inlet and exhaust predictions. The inclusion of additional modal source content is shown to have a much greater influence on the inlet results. Reasonable agreement between predicted and measured levels is achieved for the inlet, as well as the exhaust when shear layer effects are taken into account. For the number of trials considered, phase randomized predictions follow statistical distributions similar to those found in previous statistical source investigations. The shape of the predicted directivity pattern relative to measurements also improved with phase randomization, having predicted levels generally within one standard deviation of the measured levels.

  10. Source signature and acoustic field of seismic physical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q.; Jackson, C.; Tang, G.; Burbach, G.

    2004-12-01

    As an important tool of seismic research and exploration, seismic physical modeling simulates the real world data acquisition by scaling the model, acquisition parameters, and some features of the source generated by a transducer. Unlike the numerical simulation where a point source is easily satisfied, the transducer can't be made small enough for approximating the point source in physical modeling, therefore yield different source signature than the sources applied in the field data acquisition. To better understand the physical modeling data, characterizing the wave field generated by ultrasonic transducers is desirable and helpful. In this study, we explode several aspects of source characterization; including their radiation pattern, directivity, sensitivity and frequency response. We also try to figure out how to improve the acquired data quality, such as minimize ambient noise, use encoded chirp to prevent ringing, apply deterministic deconvolution to enhance data resolution and t-P filtering to remove linear events. We found that the transducer and their wave field, the modeling system performance, as well as material properties of the model and their coupling conditions all play roles in the physical modeling data acquisition.

  11. A Low-Cost Open-Source Acoustic Recorder for Bioacoustics Research.

    PubMed

    Atkins, John; Johnson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic recorders are the primary tool used in marine bioacoustics; however, available devices are either expensive or lack self-calibration capabilities that are critical for high-quality measurements. Moreover, the software used in proprietary designs can be inflexible and may involve unknown processing steps. To address this, we have designed a miniature low-cost yet high-performance acoustic recorder that features open-source hardware and software. Circuitry is included for self-calibration, making it possible to evaluate device performance in situ. Our intention is that the design will develop in conjunction with the needs of the bioacoustics community.

  12. Embedded Acoustic Sensor Array for Engine Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Feasibility of Noise Telemetry via Wireless Smart Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Bauch, Matthew; Raible, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines have evolved into a highly complex system to meet ever-increasing demands. The evolution of engine technologies has primarily been driven by fuel efficiency, reliability, as well as engine noise concerns. One of the sources of engine noise is pressure fluctuations that are induced on the stator vanes. These local pressure fluctuations, once produced, propagate and coalesce with the pressure waves originating elsewhere on the stator to form a spinning pressure pattern. Depending on the duct geometry, air flow, and frequency of fluctuations, these spinning pressure patterns are self-sustaining and result in noise which eventually radiate to the far-field from engine. To investigate the nature of vane pressure fluctuations and the resulting engine noise, unsteady pressure signatures from an array of embedded acoustic sensors are recorded as a part of vane noise source diagnostics. Output time signatures from these sensors are routed to a control and data processing station adding complexity to the system and cable loss to the measured signal. "Smart" wireless sensors have data processing capability at the sensor locations which further increases the potential of wireless sensors. Smart sensors can process measured data locally and transmit only the important information through wireless communication. The aim of this wireless noise telemetry task was to demonstrate a single acoustic sensor wireless link for unsteady pressure measurement, and thus, establish the feasibility of distributed smart sensors scheme for aircraft engine vane surface unsteady pressure data transmission and characterization.

  13. Acoustic propagation from a spiral wave front source in an ocean environment.

    PubMed

    Hefner, Brian T; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R

    2012-03-01

    A spiral wave front source generates a pressure field that has a phase that depends linearly on the azimuthal angle at which it is measured. This differs from a point source that has a phase that is constant with direction. The spiral wave front source has been developed for use in navigation; however, very little work has been done to model this source in an ocean environment. To this end, the spiral wave front analogue of the acoustic point source is developed and is shown to be related to the point source through a simple transformation. This makes it possible to transform the point source solution in a particular ocean environment into the solution for a spiral source in the same environment. Applications of this transformation are presented for a spiral source near the ocean surface and seafloor as well as for the more general case of propagation in a horizontally stratified waveguide.

  14. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  15. Action Enhances Acoustic Cues for 3-D Target Localization by Echolocating Bats

    PubMed Central

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J.

    2016-01-01

    Under natural conditions, animals encounter a barrage of sensory information from which they must select and interpret biologically relevant signals. Active sensing can facilitate this process by engaging motor systems in the sampling of sensory information. The echolocating bat serves as an excellent model to investigate the coupling between action and sensing because it adaptively controls both the acoustic signals used to probe the environment and movements to receive echoes at the auditory periphery. We report here that the echolocating bat controls the features of its sonar vocalizations in tandem with the positioning of the outer ears to maximize acoustic cues for target detection and localization. The bat’s adaptive control of sonar vocalizations and ear positioning occurs on a millisecond timescale to capture spatial information from arriving echoes, as well as on a longer timescale to track target movement. Our results demonstrate that purposeful control over sonar sound production and reception can serve to improve acoustic cues for localization tasks. This finding also highlights the general importance of movement to sensory processing across animal species. Finally, our discoveries point to important parallels between spatial perception by echolocation and vision. PMID:27608186

  16. Action Enhances Acoustic Cues for 3-D Target Localization by Echolocating Bats.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Kothari, Ninad B; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-09-01

    Under natural conditions, animals encounter a barrage of sensory information from which they must select and interpret biologically relevant signals. Active sensing can facilitate this process by engaging motor systems in the sampling of sensory information. The echolocating bat serves as an excellent model to investigate the coupling between action and sensing because it adaptively controls both the acoustic signals used to probe the environment and movements to receive echoes at the auditory periphery. We report here that the echolocating bat controls the features of its sonar vocalizations in tandem with the positioning of the outer ears to maximize acoustic cues for target detection and localization. The bat's adaptive control of sonar vocalizations and ear positioning occurs on a millisecond timescale to capture spatial information from arriving echoes, as well as on a longer timescale to track target movement. Our results demonstrate that purposeful control over sonar sound production and reception can serve to improve acoustic cues for localization tasks. This finding also highlights the general importance of movement to sensory processing across animal species. Finally, our discoveries point to important parallels between spatial perception by echolocation and vision.

  17. Action Enhances Acoustic Cues for 3-D Target Localization by Echolocating Bats.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Kothari, Ninad B; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-09-01

    Under natural conditions, animals encounter a barrage of sensory information from which they must select and interpret biologically relevant signals. Active sensing can facilitate this process by engaging motor systems in the sampling of sensory information. The echolocating bat serves as an excellent model to investigate the coupling between action and sensing because it adaptively controls both the acoustic signals used to probe the environment and movements to receive echoes at the auditory periphery. We report here that the echolocating bat controls the features of its sonar vocalizations in tandem with the positioning of the outer ears to maximize acoustic cues for target detection and localization. The bat's adaptive control of sonar vocalizations and ear positioning occurs on a millisecond timescale to capture spatial information from arriving echoes, as well as on a longer timescale to track target movement. Our results demonstrate that purposeful control over sonar sound production and reception can serve to improve acoustic cues for localization tasks. This finding also highlights the general importance of movement to sensory processing across animal species. Finally, our discoveries point to important parallels between spatial perception by echolocation and vision. PMID:27608186

  18. Acoustic noise associated with the MOD-1 wind turbine: its source, impact, and control

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N.D.; McKenna, H.E.; Hemphill, R.R.; Etter, C.L.; Garrelts, R.L.; Linn, N.C.

    1985-02-01

    This report summarizes extensive research by staff of the Solar Energy Research Institute and its subcontractors conducted to establish the origin and possible amelioration of acoustic disturbances associated with the operation of the DOE/NASA MOD-1 wind turbine installed in 1979 near Boone, North Carolina. Results have shown that the source of this acoustic annoyance was the transient, unsteady aerodynamic lift imparted to the turbine blades as they passed through the lee wakes of the large, cylindrical tower supports. Nearby residents were annoyed by the low-frequency, acoustic impulses propagated into the structures in which the complainants lived. The situation was aggravated further by a complex sound propagation process controlled by terrain and atmospheric focusing. Several techniques for reducing the abrupt, unsteady blade load transients were researched and are discussed in the report.

  19. The advantages of sound localization and speech perception of bilateral electric acoustic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Moteki, Hideaki; Kitoh, Ryosuke; Tsukada, Keita; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Nishio, Shin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Bilateral electric acoustic stimulation (EAS) effectively improved speech perception in noise and sound localization in patients with high-frequency hearing loss. Objective: To evaluate bilateral EAS efficacy of sound localization detection and speech perception in noise in two cases of high-frequency hearing loss. Methods: Two female patients, aged 38 and 45 years, respectively, received bilateral EAS sequentially. Pure-tone audiometry was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to evaluate the hearing preservation in the lower frequencies. Speech perception outcomes in quiet and noise and sound localization were assessed with unilateral and bilateral EAS. Results: Residual hearing in the lower frequencies was well preserved after insertion of a FLEX24 electrode (24 mm) using the round window approach. After bilateral EAS, speech perception improved in quiet and even more so in noise. In addition, the sound localization ability of both cases with bilateral EAS improved remarkably. PMID:25423260

  20. Method for rapid localization of seafloor petroleum contamination using concurrent mass spectrometry and acoustic positioning.

    PubMed

    Camilli, R; Bingham, B; Reddy, C M; Nelson, R K; Duryea, A N

    2009-10-01

    Locating areas of seafloor contamination caused by heavy oil spills is challenging, in large part because of observational limitations in aquatic subsurface environments. Accepted methods for surveying and locating sunken oil are generally slow, labor intensive and spatially imprecise. This paper describes a method to locate seafloor contamination caused by heavy oil fractions using in situ mass spectrometry and concurrent acoustic navigation. We present results of laboratory sensitivity tests and proof-of-concept evaluations conducted at the US Coast Guard OHMSETT national oil spill response test facility. Preliminary results from a robotic seafloor contamination survey conducted in deep water using the mass spectrometer and a geo-referenced acoustic navigation system are also described. Results indicate that this technological approach can accurately localize seafloor oil contamination in real-time at spatial resolutions better than a decimeter.

  1. A Investigation of the Plasma Jet as AN Underwater Acoustic Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert David

    The plasma jet, a commonly used ignition device, has been investigated as a source of acoustic energy suitable for sub-bottom profiling. Named the plasma gun, the device discharges electrical energy in a cylindrical arc ignited in a gaseous environment surrounded by water. When the arc energy evaporates water, it produces a rapidly expanding vapor bubble that creates the acoustic pressure wave. Acoustic properties of the device are similar to small explosives, and to electric sparkers. Multiple bubble oscillations, a problem of explosive-type sources, are generally less troublesome for the plasma gun than with the sparker sources. Some degree of frequency control of the acoustic pulse is possible if proper values are selected for the electrical circuit components and for the total stored electrical energy. Peak acoustic pressures are controlled both by the total electric energy and by the rate it is delivered to the arc. These quantities are determined by capacitance, inductance, and charging voltage. Frequency components of the primary pressure pulse depend on the arc discharge frequency and on the immersion depth of the device. The bubble period depends primarily on the amount of energy discharged into the water; this in turn is proportional to the total stored electrical energy. The plasma gun has been compared to small air guns, pingers, sparkers, and boomers. Sub-bottom profiles obtained show penetration less than the 1 in^3 air gun but with more resolution. Stored energy in the plasma gun, however, was nearly five times less. Penetration was equal and resolution better than electric sparkers of the same energy. Penetration was better and resolution poorer than the pinger, and resolution poorer and penetration slightly better than the boomer source. Except for the sparkers, which used the same power supply, the plasma gun has a decided advantage in equipment size and ease of deployment.

  2. Electromagnetic acoustic source (EMAS) for generating shock waves and cavitation in mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi

    In the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory a vessel of liquid mercury is subjected to a proton beam. The resulting nuclear interaction produces neutrons that can be used for materials research, among other things, but also launches acoustic waves with pressures in excess of 10 MPa. The acoustic waves have high enough tensile stress to generate cavitation in the mercury which results in erosion to the steel walls of the vessel. In order to study the cavitation erosion and develop mitigation schemes it would be convenient to have a way of generating similar pressures and cavitation in mercury, without the radiation concerns associated with a proton beam. Here an electromagnetic acoustic source (EMAS) has been developed which consisted of a coil placed close to a metal plate which is in turn is in contact with a fluid. The source is driven by discharging a capacitor through the coil and results in a repulsive force on the plate launching acoustic waves in the fluid. A theoretical model is presented to predict the acoustic field from the EMAS and compares favorably with measurements made in water. The pressure from the EMAS was reported as a function of capacitance, charging voltage, number of coils, mylar thickness, and properties of the plates. The properties that resulted in the highest pressure were employed for experiments in mercury and a maximum pressure recorded was 7.1 MPa. Cavitation was assessed in water and mercury by high speed camera and by detecting acoustic emissions. Bubble clouds with lifetimes on the order of 100 µs were observed in water and on the order of 600 µs in mercury. Based on acoustic emissions the bubble radius in mercury was estimated to be 0.98 mm. Experiments to produce damage to a stainless steel plate in mercury resulted in a minimal effect after 2000 shock waves at a rate of 0.33 Hz - likely because the pressure amplitude was not high enough. In order to replicate the conditions in the SNS it is

  3. Extension of deconvolution algorithms for the mapping of moving acoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent; Bulté, Jean

    2011-03-01

    Several deconvolution algorithms are commonly used in aeroacoustics to estimate the power level radiated by static sources, for instance, the deconvolution approach for the mapping of acoustic sources (DAMAS), DAMAS2, CLEAN, and the CLEAN based on spatial source coherence algorithm (CLEAN-SC). However, few efficient methodologies are available for moving sources. In this paper, several deconvolution approaches are proposed to estimate the narrow-band spectra of low-Mach number uncorrelated sources. All of them are based on a beamformer output. Due to velocity, the beamformer output is inherently related to the source spectra over the whole frequency range, which makes the deconvolution very complex from a computational point of view. Using the conventional Doppler approximation and for limited time analysis, the problem can be separated into multiple independent problems, each involving a single source frequency, as for static sources. DAMAS, DAMAS2, CLEAN, and CLEAN-SC are then extended to moving sources. These extensions are validated from both synthesized data and real aircraft flyover noise measurements. Comparable performances to those of the corresponding static methodologies are recovered. All these approaches constitute complementary and efficient tools in order to quantify the noise level emitted from moving acoustic sources.

  4. An eighth-scale speech source for subjective assessments in acoustic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, R. J.

    1981-08-01

    The design of a source is described which is suitable for making speech recordings in eighth-scale acoustic models of auditoria. An attempt was made to match the directionality of the source with the directionality of the human voice using data reported in the literature. A narrow aperture was required for the design which was provided by mounting an inverted conical horn over the diaphragm of a high frequency loudspeaker. Resonance problems were encountered with the use of a horn and a description is given of the electronic techniques adopted to minimize the effect of these resonances. Subjective and objective assessments on the completed speech source have proved satisfactory. It has been used in a modelling exercise concerned with the acoustic design of a theatre with a thrust-type stage.

  5. Source identification in acoustics and structural mechanics using Sierra/SD.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis; Aquino, Wilkins; Ross, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In this report we derive both time and frequency-domain methods for inverse identification of sources in elastodynamics and acoustics. The inverse/design problem is cast in a PDE-constrained optimization framework with efficient computation of gradients using the adjoint method. The implementation of source inversion in Sierra/SD is described, and results from both time and frequency domain source inversion are compared to actual experimental data for a weapon store used in captive carry on a military aircraft. The inverse methodology is advantageous in that it provides a method for creating ground based acoustic and vibration tests that can reduce the actual number of flight tests, and thus, saving costs and time for the program.

  6. Surface response of a viscoelastic medium to subsurface acoustic sources with application to medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Thomas J.; Yazicioglu, Yigit; Loth, Francis

    2003-02-01

    The response at the surface of an isotropic viscoelastic medium to buried fundamental acoustic sources is studied theoretically, computationally and experimentally. Finite and infinitesimal monopole and dipole sources within the low audible frequency range (40-400 Hz) are considered. Analytical and numerical integral solutions that account for compression, shear and surface wave response to the buried sources are formulated and compared with numerical finite element simulations and experimental studies on finite dimension phantom models. It is found that at low audible frequencies, compression and shear wave propagation from point sources can both be significant, with shear wave effects becoming less significant as frequency increases. Additionally, it is shown that simple closed-form analytical approximations based on an infinite medium model agree well with numerically obtained ``exact'' half-space solutions for the frequency range and material of interest in this study. The focus here is on developing a better understanding of how biological soft tissue affects the transmission of vibro-acoustic energy from biological acoustic sources below the skin surface, whose typical spectral content is in the low audible frequency range. Examples include sound radiated from pulmonary, gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular system functions, such as breath sounds, bowel sounds and vascular bruits, respectively.

  7. LOCAL HELIOSEISMIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ACOUSTIC WAVES AND A SUNSPOT

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaguru, S. P.; Wachter, R.; Couvidat, S.; Sankarasubramanian, K.

    2010-10-01

    Using a high-cadence imaging spectropolarimetric observation of a sunspot and its surroundings in magnetically sensitive (Fe I 6173 A) and insensitive (Fe I 7090 A) upper photospheric absorption lines, we map the instantaneous wave phases and helioseismic travel times as a function of observation height and inclination of magnetic field to the vertical. We confirm the magnetic inclination-angle-dependent transmission of incident acoustic waves into upward propagating waves and derive (1) proof that helioseismic travel times receive direction-dependent contributions from such waves and hence cause errors in conventional flow inferences, (2) evidences for acoustic wave sources beneath the umbral photosphere, and (3) significant differences in travel times measured from the chosen magnetically sensitive and insensitive spectral lines.

  8. Sources of Local Time Asymmetries in Magnetodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Kane, M.; Sergis, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The rapidly rotating magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn contain a near-equatorial thin current sheet over most local times known as the magnetodisc, resembling a wrapped-up magnetotail. The Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons spacecraft at Jupiter and Saturn have provided extensive datasets from which to observationally identify local time asymmetries in these magnetodiscs. Imaging in the infrared and ultraviolet from ground- and space-based instruments have also revealed the presence of local time asymmetries in the aurora which therefore must map to local time asymmetries in the magnetosphere. Asymmetries are found in (i) the configuration of the magnetic field and magnetospheric currents, where a thicker disc is found in the noon and dusk sectors; (ii) plasma flows where the plasma flow has local time-dependent radial components; (iii) a thicker plasma sheet in the dusk sector. Many of these features are also reproduced in global MHD simulations. Several models have been developed to interpret these various observations and typically fall into two groups: ones which invoke coupling with the solar wind (via reconnection or viscous processes) and ones which invoke internal rotational processes operating inside an asymmetrical external boundary. In this paper we review these observational in situ findings, review the models which seek to explain them, and highlight open questions and directions for future work.

  9. Data-driven and calibration-free Lamb wave source localization with sparse sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Harley, Joel B; Moura, José M F

    2015-08-01

    Most Lamb wave localization techniques require that we know the wave's velocity characteristics; yet, in many practical scenarios, velocity estimates can be challenging to acquire, are unavailable, or are unreliable because of the complexity of Lamb waves. As a result, there is a significant need for new methods that can reduce a system's reliance on a priori velocity information. This paper addresses this challenge through two novel source localization methods designed for sparse sensor arrays in isotropic media. Both methods exploit the fundamental sparse structure of a Lamb wave's frequency-wavenumber representation. The first method uses sparse recovery techniques to extract velocities from calibration data. The second method uses kurtosis and the support earth mover's distance to measure the sparseness of a Lamb wave's approximate frequency-wavenumber representation. These measures are then used to locate acoustic sources with no prior calibration data. We experimentally study each method with a collection of acoustic emission data measured from a 1.22 m by 1.22 m isotropic aluminum plate. We show that both methods can achieve less than 1 cm localization error and have less systematic error than traditional time-of-arrival localization methods. PMID:26276960

  10. Modeling the acoustic receptions at the NPAL array from the Kauai source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Michael D.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic transmissions from a 75-Hz source near Kauai to a vertical line array near California were recorded as part of the North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) experiment. Extensive environmental measurements were also performed as part of the experiment and were intended to ensure correspondence between numerical simulations and the data. Despite the availability of this information, the process of identifying the recorded arrivals with predictions has not been a simple one. Since the source is near the seafloor at about 800 m depth, and the depth at the receiver is approximately 1800 m, acoustic interaction with the bathymetry has been explored as a possible complication. Ray simulations that allow for specular reflection from the bottom indicate that fully-refracted and bottom-interacting paths can reach the receiver range (about 3900 km) at similar travel times. The simultaneous presence of both kinds of acoustic energy could contribute to the identification difficulties. A series of parabolic-equation simulations have been performed for different geoacoustic parameters in an attempt to correspond more closely to the data. The sensitivity of the predictions to the method used to extract and interpolate the sound speeds has also been investigated. [Work supported by ONR.] a)J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, B. M. Howe, J. A. Mercer, R. C. Spindel, and P. F. Worcester.

  11. The model of local mode analysis for structural acoustics of box structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, King-Wah

    Structure-borne noise is a new noise pollution problem emerging from railway concrete box structures in Hong Kong. Its low frequency noise with intermittent effect can cause considerable nuisance to neighborhoods. The tonal noise peaks in this low frequency range should be one of the important factors in structure-borne noise analysis. In the acoustic field, the deterministic analysis of all the resonant modes of vibration is generally considered as not practical. Many acoustic experts use the statistical energy analysis as the main tool for the noise investigation whereas the application of the experimental modal analysis in the structural acoustic problem is comparatively rare. In the past, most studies mainly focused on the structure-borne noise measurement and analysis. The detail study of the cause of structure-borne noise is lack, especially for the rectangular concrete box structure. In this dissertation, an experimental and analytical approach is adopted to study a typical concrete box model. This thesis aims at confirming the importance of modal analysis in the structure-borne noise study and then at identifying the local vibration modes along the cross-section of box structure. These local modes are responsible for the structure-borne noise radiation. The findings of this study suggest that the web of viaduct cross-section is not as rigid as assumed in the conventional viaduct design and the web face is likely to be more flexible in the vertical displacement of the concrete viaduct. Two types of local vibration modes along the cross-section are identified: the centre mode and the web mode. At the top panel of the viaduct, the centre mode has movement in the middle but not at the edges. The web mode has movement at the edges with the middle fixed. The combined centre and web mode has been found to be important in the structural acoustics of the concrete box structure. In the actual concrete viaduct, the coincidence frequency is especially low (often around

  12. Using Distant Sources in Local Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Bruce; Foulgr, Gillian

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography methods such as the 'ACH' method of Aki, Christoffersson & Husebye (1976, 1977) are subject to significant bias caused by the unknown wave-speed structure outside the study volume, whose effects are mathematically of the same order as the local-structure effects being studied. Computational experiments using whole-mantle wave-speed models show that the effects are also of comparable numerical magnitude (Masson & Trampert, 1997). Failure to correct for these effects will significantly corrupt computed local structures. This bias can be greatly reduced by solving for additional parameters defining the shapes, orientations, and arrival times of the incident wavefronts. The procedure is exactly analogous to solving for hypocentral locations in local-earthquake tomography. For planar incident wavefronts, each event adds three free parameters and the forward problem is surprisingly simple: The first-order change in the theoretical arrival time at observation point B resulting from perturbations in the incident-wave time t0 and slowness vector s is δtB ≡ δt0 + δs · rA = δtA, the change in the time of the plane wave at the point A where the un-perturbed ray enters the study volume (Julian and Foulger, submitted). This consequence of Fermat's principle apparently has not previously been recognized. In addition to eliminating the biasing effect of structure outside the study volume, this formalism enables us to combine data from local and distant events in studies of local structure, significantly improving resolution of deeper structure, particularly in places such as volcanic and geothermal areas where seismicity is confined to shallow depths. Many published models that were derived using ACH and similar methods probably contain significant artifacts and are in need of re-evaluation.

  13. The sound source distance dependence of the acoustical cues to location and their encoding by neurons in the inferior colliculus: implications for the Duplex theory.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heath G; Koka, Kanthaiah; Thornton, Jennifer; Tollin, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    For over a century, the Duplex theory has posited that low- and ­high-frequency sounds are localized using two different acoustical cues, interaural time (ITDs) and level (ILDs) differences, respectively. Psychophysical data have generally supported the theory for pure tones. Anatomically, ITDs and ILDs are separately encoded in two parallel brainstem pathways. Acoustically ILDs are a function of location and frequency such that lower and higher frequencies exhibit smaller and larger ILDs, respectively. It is well established that neurons throughout the auditory neuraxis encode high-frequency ILDs. Acoustically, low-frequency ILDs are negligible (∼1–2 dB); however, humans are still sensitive to them and physiological studies often report low-frequency ILD-sensitive neurons. These ­latter findings are at odds with the Duplex theory. We suggest that these discrepancies arise from an inadequate characterization of the acoustical environment. We hypothesize that low-frequency ILDs become large and useful when sources are located near the head. We tested this hypothesis by making measurements of the ILDs in chinchillas as a function of source distance and the sensitivity to ILDs in 103 neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC). The ILD sensitivity of IC neurons was found to be frequency independent even though far-field acoustical ILDs were frequency dependent. However, as source distance was decreased, the magnitudes of low-frequency ILDs increased. Using information theoretic methods, we ­demonstrate that a population of IC neurons can encode the full range of acoustic ILDs across frequency that would be experienced as a joint function of source location and distance. PMID:23716233

  14. Optimizing stepwise rotation of dodecahedron sound source to improve the accuracy of room acoustic measures.

    PubMed

    Martellotta, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Dodecahedron sound sources are widely used for acoustical measurement purposes as they produce a good approximation of omnidirectional radiation. Evidence shows that such an assumption is acceptable only in the low-frequency range (namely below 1 kHz), while at higher frequencies sound radiation is far from being uniform. In order to improve the accuracy of acoustical measurements obtained from dodecahedron sources, international standard ISO 3382 suggests an averaging of results after a source rotation. This paper investigates the effects of such rotations, both in terms of variations in acoustical parameters and spatial distribution of sound reflections. Taking advantage of a spherical microphone array, the different reflection patterns were mapped as a function of source rotation, showing that some reflections may be considerably attenuated for different aiming directions. This paper investigates the concept of averaging results while changing rotation angles and the minimum number of rotations required to improve the accuracy of the average value. Results show that averages of three measurements carried out at 30° angular steps are closer to actual values and show much less fluctuation. In addition, an averaging of the directional intensity components of the selected responses stabilizes the spatial distribution of the reflections.

  15. Interactions between a spherical elastic shell and acoustic waves from a water-entry moving source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.

    2004-05-01

    A possible interaction between the acoustic waves, which are generated from a water-entry body (moving source), and a submerged elastic shell is investigated theoretically within the scope of linear theory. The incident wave is defined from the ballistic wave model. The transient interaction is solved through extension of a method formulated for the excitation from a stationary source in an infinite domain. Numerical examples for the incident wave forms and corresponding shell responses are given to illustrate the effect of a moving source on the structure response.

  16. Localization of small arms fire using acoustic measurements of muzzle blast and/or ballistic shock wave arrivals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kam W; Ferguson, Brian G

    2012-11-01

    The accurate localization of small arms fire using fixed acoustic sensors is considered. First, the conventional wavefront-curvature passive ranging method, which requires only differential time-of-arrival (DTOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave to estimate the source position, is modified to account for sensor positions that are not strictly collinear (bowed array). Second, an existing single-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires both DTOA and differential angle-of-arrival (DAOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave and ballistic shock wave, is improved by replacing the basic external ballistics model (which describes the bullet's deceleration along its trajectory) with a more rigorous model and replacing the look-up table ranging procedure with a nonlinear (or polynomial) equation-based ranging procedure. Third, a new multiple-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires only DTOA measurements of the ballistic shock wave to localize the point of fire, is formulated. The first method is applicable to situations when only the muzzle blast wave is received, whereas the third method applies when only the ballistic shock wave is received. The effectiveness of each of these methods is verified using an extensive set of real data recorded during a 7 day field experiment. PMID:23145587

  17. Localization of small arms fire using acoustic measurements of muzzle blast and/or ballistic shock wave arrivals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kam W; Ferguson, Brian G

    2012-11-01

    The accurate localization of small arms fire using fixed acoustic sensors is considered. First, the conventional wavefront-curvature passive ranging method, which requires only differential time-of-arrival (DTOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave to estimate the source position, is modified to account for sensor positions that are not strictly collinear (bowed array). Second, an existing single-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires both DTOA and differential angle-of-arrival (DAOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave and ballistic shock wave, is improved by replacing the basic external ballistics model (which describes the bullet's deceleration along its trajectory) with a more rigorous model and replacing the look-up table ranging procedure with a nonlinear (or polynomial) equation-based ranging procedure. Third, a new multiple-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires only DTOA measurements of the ballistic shock wave to localize the point of fire, is formulated. The first method is applicable to situations when only the muzzle blast wave is received, whereas the third method applies when only the ballistic shock wave is received. The effectiveness of each of these methods is verified using an extensive set of real data recorded during a 7 day field experiment.

  18. Numerical investigation of the seismo-acoustic responses of the Source Physics Experiment underground explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoun, T.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Glenn, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed three-dimensional high resolution simulations of underground explosions conducted recently in jointed rock outcrop as part of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) being conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The main goal of the current study is to investigate the effects of the structural and geomechanical properties on the spall phenomena due to underground explosions and its subsequent effect on the seismo-acoustic signature at far distances. Two parametric studies have been undertaken to assess the impact of different 1) conceptual geological models including a single layer and two layers model, with and without joints and with and without varying geomechanical properties, and 2) depth of bursts of the explosions and explosion yields. Through these investigations we have explored not only the near-field response of the explosions but also the far-field responses of the seismic and the acoustic signatures. The near-field simulations were conducted using the Eulerian and Lagrangian codes, GEODYN and GEODYN -L, respectively, while the far-field seismic simulations were conducted using the elastic wave propagation code, WPP, and the acoustic response using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz-Rayleigh time-dependent approximation code, KHR. Though a series of simulations, we have recorded the velocity field histories a) at the ground surface on an acoustic-source-patch for the acoustic simulations, and 2) on a seismic-source-box for the seismic simulations. We first analyzed the SPE3 and SPE4-prime experimental data and simulated results, and then simulated SPE5, SPE6/7 to anticipate their seismo-acoustic responses given conditions of uncertainties. SPE experiments were conducted in a granitic formation; we have extended the parametric study to include other geological settings such dolomite and alluvial formations. These parametric studies enabled us 1) investigating the geotechnical and geophysical key parameters that impact the seismo-acoustic

  19. Acoustical model of small calibre ballistic shock waves in air for automatic sniper localization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Juan R.; Salinas, Renato A.; Abidi, Mongi A.

    2007-04-01

    The phenomenon of ballistic shock wave emission by a small calibre projectile at supersonic speed is quite relevant in automatic sniper localization applications. When available, ballistic shock wave analysis makes possible the estimation of the main ballistic features of a gunfire event. The propagation of ballistic shock waves in air is a process which mainly involves nonlinear distortion, or steepening, and atmospheric absorption. Current ballistic shock waves propagation models used in automatic sniper localization systems only consider nonlinear distortion effects. This means that only the rates of change of shock peak pressure and the N-wave duration with distance are considered in the determination of the miss distance. In the present paper we present an improved acoustical model of small calibre ballistic shock wave propagation in air, intended to be used in acoustics-based automatic sniper localization applications. In our approach, we have considered nonlinear distortion, but additionally we have also introduced the effects of atmospheric sound absorption. Atmospheric absorption is implemented in the time domain in order to get faster calculation times than those computed in frequency domain. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that atmospheric absorption plays a fundamental role in the rise times of the shocks, and introduce the rate of change of the rise time with distance as a third parameter to be used in the determination of the miss distance. This lead us to a more accurate and robust estimation of the miss distance, and consequently of the projectile trajectory, and the spatial coordinates of the gunshot origin.

  20. Sound source localization identification accuracy: Level and duration dependencies.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A

    2016-07-01

    Sound source localization accuracy for noises was measured for sources in the front azimuthal open field mainly as a function of overall noise level and duration. An identification procedure was used in which listeners identify which loudspeakers presented a sound. Noises were filtered and differed in bandwidth and center frequency. Sound source localization accuracy depended on the bandwidth of the stimuli, and for the narrow bandwidths, accuracy depended on the filter's center frequency. Sound source localization accuracy did not depend on overall level or duration. PMID:27475204

  1. Acoustic source identification of an axial fan in a duct considering the rotation effect.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2016-07-01

    For developing the quiet axial fans, the spatial distribution of acoustic source parameters over the source plane provides essential information. In this study, the previously suggested source identification technique by authors is newly applied to an axial fan. To obtain the acoustic source parameters in a duct, one should overcome many technical difficulties related with: the turbulent flow, high order modes, rotating sources, inverse estimation. Measurements are conducted with several arrays of flush mounted microphones deployed on the periphery of the duct wall. A reference trigger signal obtained from the rotating blade is used to suppress the effect of turbulent flow in the measured pressure spectra with a reduction of about 25 dB in the present work. The maximum error between measurement and estimation is generally <-20 dB in the measurement plane in the very vicinity to the source. The visualized source images clearly indicate the locations and the strengths of main contributors to the radiated sound, e.g., for the inlet of the axial fan, the tip clearance between fan blades and shroud wall.

  2. Acoustic source identification of an axial fan in a duct considering the rotation effect.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2016-07-01

    For developing the quiet axial fans, the spatial distribution of acoustic source parameters over the source plane provides essential information. In this study, the previously suggested source identification technique by authors is newly applied to an axial fan. To obtain the acoustic source parameters in a duct, one should overcome many technical difficulties related with: the turbulent flow, high order modes, rotating sources, inverse estimation. Measurements are conducted with several arrays of flush mounted microphones deployed on the periphery of the duct wall. A reference trigger signal obtained from the rotating blade is used to suppress the effect of turbulent flow in the measured pressure spectra with a reduction of about 25 dB in the present work. The maximum error between measurement and estimation is generally <-20 dB in the measurement plane in the very vicinity to the source. The visualized source images clearly indicate the locations and the strengths of main contributors to the radiated sound, e.g., for the inlet of the axial fan, the tip clearance between fan blades and shroud wall. PMID:27475140

  3. Compensation for source nonstationarity in multireference, scan-based near-field acoustical holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyu-Sang; Kim, Yong-Joe; Bolton, J. Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Multireference, scan-based near-field acoustical holography is a useful measurement tool that can be applied when an insufficient number of microphones is available to make measurements on a complete hologram surface simultaneously. The scan-based procedure can be used to construct a complete hologram by joining together subholograms captured using a relatively small, roving scan array and a fixed reference array. For the procedure to be successful, the source levels must remain stationary for the time taken to record the complete hologram; that is unlikely to be the case in practice, however. Usually, the reference signal levels measured during each scan differ from each other with the result that spatial noise is added to the hologram. A procedure to suppress the effects of source level, and hence reference level, variations is proposed here. The procedure is based on a formulation that explicitly features the acoustical transfer functions between the sources and both the reference and scanning, field microphones. When it is assumed that source level changes do not affect the sources' directivity, a nonstationarity compensation procedure can be derived that is based on measured transfer functions between the reference and field microphones. It has been verified both experimentally and in numerical simulations that the proposed procedure can help suppress spatially distributed noise caused by the type of source level nonstationarity that is characteristic of realistic sources.

  4. Monaural sound-source-direction estimation using the acoustic transfer function of a parabolic reflection board.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Ryoichi; Takiguchi, Tetsuya; Ariki, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a sound-source-direction estimation method using only a single microphone with a parabolic reflection board. A simple signal-power-based method using a parabolic antenna has been proposed in the radar field. But the signal-power-based method is not effective for finding the direction of a talking person due to the varying power of the uttered speech signals. In this paper, the sound-source-direction estimation method focuses on the acoustic transfer function instead of the signal power. The use of the parabolic reflection board leads to a difference in the acoustic transfer functions of the target direction and the non-target directions, where the parabolic reflector and its associated microphone rotate together and observe the speech at each angle. The acoustic transfer function is estimated from the observed speech using the statistics of clean speech signals. Its effectiveness has been confirmed by monaural sound-source-direction estimation experiments in a room environment.

  5. Efficient source separation algorithms for acoustic fall detection using a microsoft kinect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Ho, K C; Popescu, Mihail

    2014-03-01

    Falls have become a common health problem among older adults. In previous study, we proposed an acoustic fall detection system (acoustic FADE) that employed a microphone array and beamforming to provide automatic fall detection. However, the previous acoustic FADE had difficulties in detecting the fall signal in environments where interference comes from the fall direction, the number of interferences exceeds FADE's ability to handle or a fall is occluded. To address these issues, in this paper, we propose two blind source separation (BSS) methods for extracting the fall signal out of the interferences to improve the fall classification task. We first propose the single-channel BSS by using nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to automatically decompose the mixture into a linear combination of several basis components. Based on the distinct patterns of the bases of falls, we identify them efficiently and then construct the interference free fall signal. Next, we extend the single-channel BSS to the multichannel case through a joint NMF over all channels followed by a delay-and-sum beamformer for additional ambient noise reduction. In our experiments, we used the Microsoft Kinect to collect the acoustic data in real-home environments. The results show that in environments with high interference and background noise levels, the fall detection performance is significantly improved using the proposed BSS approaches.

  6. Local Measurement of Electron Density and Temperature in High Temperature Laser Plasma Using the Ion-Acoustic Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Davis, P; Ross, S; Meezan, N; Divol, L; Price, D; Glenzer, S H; Rousseaux, C

    2005-09-20

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

  7. Comparison and improvements of LCMV and MUSIC source localization techniques for use in real clinical environments.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, A de; Portillo, J; Portillo, I; Marín, P; Maestú, F; Poch-Broto, J; Ortiz, T; Hernando, Antonio

    2012-04-15

    The present work shows some improvements realized on practical aspects of the implementation of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) methods to localize the sources of neural activity by means of magnetoencephalograph (MEG). Two methods have been improved and compared i.e. a spatial filter, the Linearly Constrained Minimum Variance Beamformer (LCMV) method, and a signal subspace method that is an implementation of the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) method due to Mosher et al. (1992). It also shows the performance of both methods comparing three different averaging procedures. The influence of the correct selection of the noise subspace dimension has been analyzed. Using acoustic stimulus for real patient measurements, we discuss the relevant differences of both methods and propose an adequate strategy for future diagnosis based on correct source localization.

  8. Color filtering localization for three-dimensional underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Gao, Han; Wang, Wuling; Chang, Shuai; Chen, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Accurate localization of mobile nodes has been an important and fundamental problem in underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs). The detection information returned from a mobile node is meaningful only if its location is known. In this paper, we propose two localization algorithms based on color filtering technology called PCFL and ACFL. PCFL and ACFL aim at collaboratively accomplishing accurate localization of underwater mobile nodes with minimum energy expenditure. They both adopt the overlapping signal region of task anchors which can communicate with the mobile node directly as the current sampling area. PCFL employs the projected distances between each of the task projections and the mobile node, while ACFL adopts the direct distance between each of the task anchors and the mobile node. The proportion factor of distance is also proposed to weight the RGB values. By comparing the nearness degrees of the RGB sequences between the samples and the mobile node, samples can be filtered out. The normalized nearness degrees are considered as the weighted standards to calculate the coordinates of the mobile nodes. The simulation results show that the proposed methods have excellent localization performance and can localize the mobile node in a timely way. The average localization error of PCFL is decreased by about 30.4% compared to the AFLA method.

  9. Color Filtering Localization for Three-Dimensional Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihua; Gao, Han; Wang, Wuling; Chang, Shuai; Chen, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Accurate localization of mobile nodes has been an important and fundamental problem in underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs). The detection information returned from a mobile node is meaningful only if its location is known. In this paper, we propose two localization algorithms based on color filtering technology called PCFL and ACFL. PCFL and ACFL aim at collaboratively accomplishing accurate localization of underwater mobile nodes with minimum energy expenditure. They both adopt the overlapping signal region of task anchors which can communicate with the mobile node directly as the current sampling area. PCFL employs the projected distances between each of the task projections and the mobile node, while ACFL adopts the direct distance between each of the task anchors and the mobile node. The proportion factor of distance is also proposed to weight the RGB values. By comparing the nearness degrees of the RGB sequences between the samples and the mobile node, samples can be filtered out. The normalized nearness degrees are considered as the weighted standards to calculate the coordinates of the mobile nodes. The simulation results show that the proposed methods have excellent localization performance and can localize the mobile node in a timely way. The average localization error of PCFL is decreased by about 30.4% compared to the AFLA method. PMID:25774706

  10. Lightweight filter architecture for energy efficient mobile vehicle localization based on a distributed acoustic sensor network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonwook

    2013-08-23

    The generic properties of an acoustic signal provide numerous benefits for localization by applying energy-based methods over a deployed wireless sensor network (WSN). However, the signal generated by a stationary target utilizes a significant amount of bandwidth and power in the system without providing further position information. For vehicle localization, this paper proposes a novel proximity velocity vector estimator (PVVE) node architecture in order to capture the energy from a moving vehicle and reject the signal from motionless automobiles around the WSN node. A cascade structure between analog envelope detector and digital exponential smoothing filter presents the velocity vector-sensitive output with low analog circuit and digital computation complexity. The optimal parameters in the exponential smoothing filter are obtained by analytical and mathematical methods for maximum variation over the vehicle speed. For stationary targets, the derived simulation based on the acoustic field parameters demonstrates that the system significantly reduces the communication requirements with low complexity and can be expected to extend the operation time considerably.

  11. Lightweight Filter Architecture for Energy Efficient Mobile Vehicle Localization Based on a Distributed Acoustic Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keonwook

    2013-01-01

    The generic properties of an acoustic signal provide numerous benefits for localization by applying energy-based methods over a deployed wireless sensor network (WSN). However, the signal generated by a stationary target utilizes a significant amount of bandwidth and power in the system without providing further position information. For vehicle localization, this paper proposes a novel proximity velocity vector estimator (PVVE) node architecture in order to capture the energy from a moving vehicle and reject the signal from motionless automobiles around the WSN node. A cascade structure between analog envelope detector and digital exponential smoothing filter presents the velocity vector-sensitive output with low analog circuit and digital computation complexity. The optimal parameters in the exponential smoothing filter are obtained by analytical and mathematical methods for maximum variation over the vehicle speed. For stationary targets, the derived simulation based on the acoustic field parameters demonstrates that the system significantly reduces the communication requirements with low complexity and can be expected to extend the operation time considerably. PMID:23979482

  12. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  13. Acoustic detection and localization of small arms, influence of urban conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, P.; Marty, Ch.; Hengy, S.; Hamery, P.

    2008-04-01

    The detection and localization of small fire arms is envisaged by use of acoustic devices. This paper describes the capability to detect and localize snipers in open field and in urban conditions. This work was performed by ISL and DGA during various national and NATO trials. During recent military conflicts, as well as for security interventions, the urban zone has taken a prominent place. Experimental results measured in free-field conditions, compared with those measured in a village used for military training, show that the streets and houses can generate many reflections of the original gunshot, requiring new signal processing techniques to separate each contribution. For this purpose a specific numerical model has been developed. A few examples of experimental and numerical results obtained for the validation of this methodology will be presented.

  14. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  15. A smart pattern recognition system for the automatic identification of aerospace acoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Fuller, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An intelligent air-noise recognition system is described that uses pattern recognition techniques to distinguish noise signatures of five different types of acoustic sources, including jet planes, propeller planes, a helicopter, train, and wind turbine. Information for classification is calculated using the power spectral density and autocorrelation taken from the output of a single microphone. Using this system, as many as 90 percent of test recordings were correctly identified, indicating that the linear discriminant functions developed can be used for aerospace source identification.

  16. Damage Source Identification of Reinforced Concrete Structure Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    PubMed Central

    Panjsetooni, Alireza; Bunnori, Norazura Muhamad; Vakili, Amir Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is one of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that have been considered as the prime candidate for structural health and damage monitoring in loaded structures. This technique was employed for investigation process of damage in reinforced concrete (RC) frame specimens. A number of reinforced concrete RC frames were tested under loading cycle and were simultaneously monitored using AE. The AE test data were analyzed using the AE source location analysis method. The results showed that AE technique is suitable to identify the sources location of damage in RC structures. PMID:23997681

  17. Physical and numerical constraints in source modeling for finite difference simulation of room acoustics.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Jonathan; van Walstijn, Maarten; Fazenda, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    In finite difference time domain simulation of room acoustics, source functions are subject to various constraints. These depend on the way sources are injected into the grid and on the chosen parameters of the numerical scheme being used. This paper addresses the issue of selecting and designing sources for finite difference simulation, by first reviewing associated aims and constraints, and evaluating existing source models against these criteria. The process of exciting a model is generalized by introducing a system of three cascaded filters, respectively, characterizing the driving pulse, the source mechanics, and the injection of the resulting source function into the grid. It is shown that hard, soft, and transparent sources can be seen as special cases within this unified approach. Starting from the mechanics of a small pulsating sphere, a parametric source model is formulated by specifying suitable filters. This physically constrained source model is numerically consistent, does not scatter incoming waves, and is free from zero- and low-frequency artifacts. Simulation results are employed for comparison with existing source formulations in terms of meeting the spectral and temporal requirements on the outward propagating wave.

  18. Deconvolution methods and systems for the mapping of acoustic sources from phased microphone arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for mapping acoustic sources determined from a phased microphone array. A plurality of microphones are arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations thereof. A linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can be formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. A full-rank equation derived from the linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can then be iteratively determined. A full-rank can be attained by the solution requirement of the positivity constraint equivalent to the physical assumption of statically independent noise sources at each N location. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with the phased microphone array in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing the beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  19. Deconvolution Methods and Systems for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Mapping coherent/incoherent acoustic sources as determined from a phased microphone array. A linear configuration of equations and unknowns are formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more cross-beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. An equation derived from the linear configuration of equations and unknowns can then be iteratively determined. The equation can be attained by the solution requirement of a constraint equivalent to the physical assumption that the coherent sources have only in phase coherence. The size of the problem may then be reduced using zoning methods. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with a phased microphone array (microphones arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations) in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  20. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  1. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  2. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  3. Focused acoustic beam imaging of grain structure and local Young's modulus with Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R. W.; Sathish, S.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2013-01-25

    The interaction of a focused acoustic beam with materials generates Rayleigh surface waves (RSW) and surface skimming longitudinal waves (SSLW). Acoustic microscopic investigations have used the RSW amplitude and the velocity measurements, extensively for grain structure analysis. Although, the presence of SSLW has been recognized, it is rarely used in acoustic imaging. This paper presents an approach to perform microstructure imaging and local elastic modulus measurements by combining both RSW and SSLW. The acoustic imaging of grain structure was performed by measuring the amplitude of RSW and SSLW signal. The microstructure images obtained on the same region of the samples with RSW and SSLW are compared and the difference in the contrast observed is discussed based on the propagation characteristics of the individual surface waves. The velocity measurements are determined by two point defocus method. The surface wave velocities of RSW and SSLW of the same regions of the sample are combined and presented as average Young's modulus image.

  4. Sound source localization technique using a seismic streamer and its extension for whale localization during seismic surveys.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Shima H; Wilcock, William S D; Tolstoy, Maya; Crone, Timothy J; Carbotte, Suzanne M

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic surveys are under increasing scrutiny because of concern that they may disturb or otherwise harm marine mammals and impede their communications. Most of the energy from seismic surveys is low frequency, so concerns are particularly focused on baleen whales. Extensive mitigation efforts accompany seismic surveys, including visual and acoustic monitoring, but the possibility remains that not all animals in an area can be observed and located. One potential way to improve mitigation efforts is to utilize the seismic hydrophone streamer to detect and locate calling baleen whales. This study describes a method to localize low frequency sound sources with data recoded by a streamer. Beamforming is used to estimate the angle of arriving energy relative to sub-arrays of the streamer which constrains the horizontal propagation velocity to each sub-array for a given trial location. A grid search method is then used to minimize the time residual for relative arrival times along the streamer estimated by cross correlation. Results from both simulation and experiment are shown and data from the marine mammal observers and the passive acoustic monitoring conducted simultaneously with the seismic survey are used to verify the analysis.

  5. Locally sourced probiotics, the next opportunity for developing countries?

    PubMed

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Kort, Remco; Lee, Yuan-Kun

    2015-04-01

    We describe factors promoting the exploration of locally sourced probiotics, targeting local populations to balance human needs and market opportunities. This would be particularly beneficial for people in developing countries, who generally lack access to affordable probiotics and are often exposed to poor hygiene conditions, toxic compounds, malnutrition, and chronic enteric infections.

  6. Locally sourced probiotics, the next opportunity for developing countries?

    PubMed

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Kort, Remco; Lee, Yuan-Kun

    2015-04-01

    We describe factors promoting the exploration of locally sourced probiotics, targeting local populations to balance human needs and market opportunities. This would be particularly beneficial for people in developing countries, who generally lack access to affordable probiotics and are often exposed to poor hygiene conditions, toxic compounds, malnutrition, and chronic enteric infections. PMID:25812840

  7. Acoustic flight tests of rotorcraft noise-abatement approaches using local differential GPS guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Robert T. N.; Hindson, William S.; Mueller, Arnold W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the test design, instrumentation set-up, data acquisition, and the results of an acoustic flight experiment to study how noise due to blade-vortex interaction (BVI) may be alleviated. The flight experiment was conducted using the NASA/Army Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) research helicopter. A Local Differential Global Positioning System (LDGPS) was used for precision navigation and cockpit display guidance. A laser-based rotor state measurement system on board the aircraft was used to measure the main rotor tip-path-plane angle-of-attack. Tests were performed at Crows Landing Airfield in northern California with an array of microphones similar to that used in the standard ICAO/FAA noise certification test. The methodology used in the design of a RASCAL-specific, multi-segment, decelerating approach profile for BVI noise abatement is described, and the flight data pertaining to the flight technical errors and the acoustic data for assessing the noise reduction effectiveness are reported.

  8. Empirical source strength correlations for rans-based acoustic analogy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kube-McDowell, Matthew Tyndall

    JeNo is a jet noise prediction code based on an acoustic analogy method developed by Mani, Gliebe, Balsa, and Khavaran. Using the flow predictions from a standard Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics solver, JeNo predicts the overall sound pressure level and angular spectra for high-speed hot jets over a range of observer angles, with a processing time suitable for rapid design purposes. JeNo models the noise from hot jets as a combination of two types of noise sources; quadrupole sources dependent on velocity fluctuations, which represent the major noise of turbulent mixing, and dipole sources dependent on enthalpy fluctuations, which represent the effects of thermal variation. These two sources are modeled by JeNo as propagating independently into the far-field, with no cross-correlation at the observer location. However, high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics solutions demonstrate that this assumption is false. In this thesis, the theory, assumptions, and limitations of the JeNo code are briefly discussed, and a modification to the acoustic analogy method is proposed in which the cross-correlation of the two primary noise sources is allowed to vary with the speed of the jet and the observer location. As a proof-of-concept implementation, an empirical correlation correction function is derived from comparisons between JeNo's noise predictions and a set of experimental measurements taken for the Air Force Aero-Propulsion Laboratory. The empirical correlation correction is then applied to JeNo's predictions of a separate data set of hot jets tested at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Metrics are derived to measure the qualitative and quantitative performance of JeNo's acoustic predictions, and the empirical correction is shown to provide a quantitative improvement in the noise prediction at low observer angles with no freestream flow, and a qualitative improvement in the presence of freestream flow. However, the results also demonstrate

  9. Localization of Thirteen Unidentified Sources of Xss Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, Mikhail

    We propose to perform a set of scan observations in order to improve localization of unidentified sources of RXTE All Sky Slew survey. Out of 34 remaining unidentified XSS sources we have selected sources which have no ROSAT counterparts. Unless the scans of the RXTE will help to determine more accurate position of these sources no identification can be done by any focusing telescopes because of their small field of view. Significant part of proposed sources have very hard spectra and can be absorbed Seyfert galaxies (Seyfert2s).

  10. Source localization for active control of turbofan rotor-stator broadband noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Bruce E.

    2005-09-01

    In order to identify a reference signal source for an active noise cancellation system, cross-correlation techniques were used to localize broadband noise source regions on exit guide vanes of the NASA Glenn Research Center Advance Noise Control Fan (ANCF). Arrays of surface pressure sensors were imbedded in one guide vane and in the wall of the fan. Synchronous sampling was used with a multichannel data acquisition system to allow removal of periodic components from the signals. The signals were then cross-correlated to assess radiation directivity and the relationship between vane surface pressure and in-duct acoustic noise. The results of these measurements indicated that broadband unsteady pressures near the leading edge tip of the guide vane were well enough correlated with acoustic radiation that 2-3 dB active noise cancellation could be achieved using a simple gain-delay control algorithm and actuator array. After successful simulation in a wind tunnel environment the concept was incorporated on 15 guide vanes and tested in ANCF. Cross-correlation measurements were further used to evaluate system performance and to identify competing noises from rotating and stationary sources within the fan.

  11. Jet Noise Source Localization Using Linear Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Ferni A.; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to further clarify the interpretation and application of linear phased array microphone results, for localizing aeroacoustics sources in aircraft exhaust jet. Two model engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array position was varied as well to determine best location for the array. The results showed that it is possible to resolve jet noise sources with bypass and other components separation. The results also showed that a focused near field image provides more realistic noise source localization at low to mid frequencies.

  12. Detection and localization using an acoustic array on a small robotic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated autonomous and semi-autonomous ground, air and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  13. Wideband spherically focused PVDF acoustic sources for calibration of ultrasound hydrophone probes.

    PubMed

    Selfridge, A; Lewin, P A

    2000-01-01

    Several broadband sources have been developed for the purpose of calibrating hydrophones. The specific configuration described is intended for the calibration of hydrophones In a frequency range of 1 to 40 MHz. All devices used 25 /spl mu/m film of PVDF bonded to a matched backing. Two had radii of curvatures (ROC) of 25.4 and 127 mm with f numbers of 3.8 and 19, respectively. Their active element diameter was 0.28 in (6.60 mm). The active diameter of the third source used was 25 mm, and it had an ROC of 254 mm and an f number of 10. The use of a focused element minimized frequency-dependent diffraction effects, resulting in a smooth variation of acoustic pressure at the focus from 1 to 40 MHz. Also, using a focused PVDF source permitted calibrations above 20 MHz without resorting to harmonic generation via nonlinear propagation. PMID:18238683

  14. Single layer planar near-field acoustic holography for compact sources and a parallel reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zea, Elias; Lopez Arteaga, Ines

    2016-10-01

    We consider the problem of planar near-field acoustic holography (PNAH) and introduce a new reconstruction method that can be used to process single layer pressure measurements performed in the presence of a reflective surface that is parallel to the measurement plane. The method is specially tailored for compact sources, or for problems in which the scattered field due to the source can be neglected. The approach consists in formulating a seismic model (WRW model) in wavenumber-space and employ it for sound source reconstructions. The proposed method is validated with numerical and experimental data, and, although the most accurate results are obtained when an estimate of the surface impedance is known beforehand, we show that it can substantially improve the reconstruction performance with respect to that of free-field PNAH.

  15. Comparing passive source localization and tracking approaches with a towed horizontal receiver array in an ocean waveguide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tran, Duong D; Ratilal, Purnima

    2013-11-01

    Approaches for instantaneous passive source localization using a towed horizontal receiver array in a random range-dependent ocean waveguide are examined. They include: (1) Moving array triangulation, (2) array invariant, (3) bearings-only target motion analysis in modified polar coordinates via the extended Kalman filter, and (4) bearings-migration minimum mean-square error. These methods are applied to localize and track a vertical source array deployed in the far-field of a towed horizontal receiver array during the Gulf of Maine 2006 Experiment. The source transmitted intermittent broadband pulses in the 300 to 1200 Hz frequency range. A nonlinear matched-filter kernel designed to replicate the acoustic signal measured by the receiver array is applied to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. The source localization accuracy is found to be highly dependent on source-receiver geometry and the localization approach. For a relatively stationary source drifting at speeds much slower than the receiver array tow-speed, the mean source position can be estimated by moving array triangulation with less than 3% error near broadside direction. For a moving source, the Kalman filter method gives the best performance with 5.5% error. The array invariant is the best approach for localizing sources within the endfire beam of the receiver array with 7% error.

  16. Local elasticity and mobility of twin boundaries in martensitic films studied by atomic force acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuansu; Büchsenschütz-Göbeler, Matthias; Arnold, Walter; Samwer, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale elastic properties of twinned martensite NiMnGa films were characterized by means of atomic force acoustic microscopy using cantilever contact-resonance spectra to measure the local contact stiffness k* and the local damping Q-1, which contains information on the crystallographic anisotropy of martensitic twin variants and the dissipative motion of twin boundaries (TBs). Images of k* and indentation modulus maps were obtained. Similar to topography images measured by conventional atomic force microscopy in contact mode, they show the nature of the twin structure and thus a regular variation in local elastic modulus. A correlation between k* and Q-1 was observed and mirrors the motion of the TB accompanied by a viscoelastic procedure. The k*-image and the topography image measured are opposite in contrast, which likely arises from mobile and immobile TBs depending on the geometry of twinning. Multi-resonance spectra were measured, which can be related to martensitic multivariants and are explainable as different types of nanotwins. A critical stress, defined as the starting point of softening due to TB movement was determined to be about 0.5 GPa for a thick film (1 μm) and 0.75 GPa for a thin film (0.15 μm), respectively. The values are much larger than that measured for bulk materials, but reasonable due to a large internal stress in the films.

  17. Brain source localization in the presence of leadfield perturbations.

    PubMed

    Momin, Rabiya; Mir, Hasan S; Al-Nashash, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the performance of the recently developed G-MUSIC algorithm as applied to the problem of brain source localization. G-MUSIC is a form of weighted MUSIC that performs better in scenarios where only limited sample support is available. Two transfer function based calibration algorithms are also developed to estimate the location of neural activity in the brain accurately when the measured leadfield is perturbed. The localization performance of G-MUSIC is compared to traditional MUSIC and quantified in terms of the localization error. Simulations suggest that G-MUSIC can offer significantly improved localization accuracy over conventional MUSIC. PMID:25571004

  18. Application of cylindrical near-field acoustical holography to the visualization of aeroacoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moohyung; Bolton, J Stuart; Mongeau, Luc

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop methods for visualizing the sound radiation from aeroacoustic sources in order to identify their source strength distribution, radiation patterns, and to quantify the performance of noise control solutions. Here, cylindrical Near-field Acoustical Holography was used for that purpose. In a practical holographic measurement of sources comprising either partially correlated or uncorrelated subsources, it is necessary to use a number of reference microphones so that the sound field on the hologram surface can be decomposed into mutually incoherent partial fields before holographic projection. In this article, procedures are described for determining the number of reference microphones required when visualizing partially correlated aeroacoustic sources; performing source nonstationarity compensation; and applying regularization. The procedures have been demonstrated by application to a ducted fan. Holographic tests were performed to visualize the sound radiation from that source in its original form. The system was then altered to investigate the effect of two modifications on the fan's sound radiation pattern: first, leaks were created in the fan and duct assembly, and second, sound absorbing material was used to line the downstream duct section. Results in all three cases are shown at the blade passing frequency and for a broadband noise component. In the absence of leakage, both components were found to exhibit a dipole-like radiation pattern. Leakage was found to have a strong influence on the directivity of the blade passing tone. The increase of the flow resistance caused by adding the acoustical lining resulted in a nearly symmetric reduction of sound radiation. PMID:12942967

  19. Application of cylindrical near-field acoustical holography to the visualization of aeroacoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moohyung; Bolton, J. Stuart; Mongeau, Luc

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop methods for visualizing the sound radiation from aeroacoustic sources in order to identify their source strength distribution, radiation patterns, and to quantify the performance of noise control solutions. Here, cylindrical Near-field Acoustical Holography was used for that purpose. In a practical holographic measurement of sources comprising either partially correlated or uncorrelated subsources, it is necessary to use a number of reference microphones so that the sound field on the hologram surface can be decomposed into mutually incoherent partial fields before holographic projection. In this article, procedures are described for determining the number of reference microphones required when visualizing partially correlated aeroacoustic sources; performing source nonstationarity compensation; and applying regularization. The procedures have been demonstrated by application to a ducted fan. Holographic tests were performed to visualize the sound radiation from that source in its original form. The system was then altered to investigate the effect of two modifications on the fan's sound radiation pattern: first, leaks were created in the fan and duct assembly, and second, sound absorbing material was used to line the downstream duct section. Results in all three cases are shown at the blade passing frequency and for a broadband noise component. In the absence of leakage, both components were found to exhibit a dipole-like radiation pattern. Leakage was found to have a strong influence on the directivity of the blade passing tone. The increase of the flow resistance caused by adding the acoustical lining resulted in a nearly symmetric reduction of sound radiation.

  20. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  1. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of under-balcony acoustics with real and simulated arrays of multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Youngmin

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively identify the acoustics of the under-balcony areas in music performance halls under realistic conditions that are close to an orchestral performance in consideration of multiple music instrumental sources and their diverse sound propagation patterns. The study executed monaural and binaural impulse response measurements with an array of sixteen directional sources (loudspeakers) for acoustical assessments. Actual measurements in a performance hall as well as computer simulations were conducted for the quantitative assessments. Psycho-acoustical listening tests were conducted for the qualitative assessments using the music signals binaurally recorded in the hall with the same source array. The results obtained from the multiple directional source tests were analyzed by comparing them to those obtained from the tests performed with a single omni-directional source. These two sets of results obtained in the under-balcony area were also compared to those obtained in the main orchestra area. The quantitative results showed that the use of a single source conforming to conventional measurement protocol seems to be competent for measurements of the room acoustical parameters such as EDTmid, RTmid, C80500-2k, IACCE3 and IACCL3. These quantitative measures, however, did not always agree with the results of the qualitative assessments. The primary reason is that, in many other acoustical analysis respects, the acoustical phenomena shown from the multiple source measurements were not similar to those shown from the single source measurements. Remarkable differences were observed in time-domain impulse responses, frequency content, spectral distribution, directional distribution of the early reflections, and in sound energy density over time. Therefore, the room acoustical parameters alone should not be the acoustical representative characterizing a performance hall or a specific area such as the under

  2. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Two-Dimensional Locally Resonant Sonic Crystals Comprised of Helmholtz Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, L.; Elford, D. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Swallowe, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new type of sonic crystal technology offering a novel method of achieving broad acoustic band gaps. The proposed design of a locally resonating sonic crystal (LRSC) is constructed from "C"-shaped Helmholtz resonators as opposed to traditional solid scattering units. This unique construction enables a two band gap system to be generated in which the first -- a Bragg type band gap, arises due to the periodic nature of the crystal, whilst the second gap results from resonance of the air column within the resonators. The position of this secondary band gap is found to be dependent upon the dimensions of the resonating cavity. The band gap formation is investigated theoretically using finite element methods, and confirmed through experimental testing. It is noted that the resonance band gaps detected cover a much broader frequency range (in the order of kHz) than has been achieved to date. In addition the possibility of overlapping such a wide band gap with the characteristic Bragg gap generated by the structure itself could yield gaps of even greater range. A design of sonic crystal is proposed, that comprises of several resonators with differing cavity sizes. Such a structure generates multiple resonance gaps corresponding to the various resonator sizes, which may be overlapped to form yet larger band gaps. This multiple resonance gap system can occur in two configurations. Firstly a simple mixed array can be created by alternating resonator sizes in the array and secondly using a System coined the Matryoshka (Russian doll) array in which the resonators are distributed inside one another. The proposed designs of LRSC's offer a real potential for acoustic shielding using sonic crystals, as both the size and position of the band gaps generated can be controlled. This is an application which has been suggested and investigated for several years with little progress. Furthermore the frequency region attenuated by resonance is unrelated to the crystals lattice

  3. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Two-Dimensional Locally Resonant Sonic Crystals Comprised of Helmholtz Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, L.; Elford, D. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Swallowe, G. M.

    We present a new type of sonic crystal technology offering a novel method of achieving broad acoustic band gaps. The proposed design of a locally resonating sonic crystal (LRSC) is constructed from "C"-shaped Helmholtz resonators as opposed to traditional solid scattering units. This unique construction enables a two band gap system to be generated in which the first — a Bragg type band gap, arises due to the periodic nature of the crystal, whilst the second gap results from resonance of the air column within the resonators. The position of this secondary band gap is found to be dependent upon the dimensions of the resonating cavity. The band gap formation is investigated theoretically using finite element methods, and confirmed through experimental testing. It is noted that the resonance band gaps detected cover a much broader frequency range (in the order of kHz) than has been achieved to date. In addition the possibility of overlapping such a wide band gap with the characteristic Bragg gap generated by the structure itself could yield gaps of even greater range. A design of sonic crystal is proposed, that comprises of several resonators with differing cavity sizes. Such a structure generates multiple resonance gaps corresponding to the various resonator sizes, which may be overlapped to form yet larger band gaps. This multiple resonance gap system can occur in two configurations. Firstly a simple mixed array can be created by alternating resonator sizes in the array and secondly using a system coined the Matryoshka (Russian doll) array in which the resonators are distributed inside one another. The proposed designs of LRSC's offer a real potential for acoustic shielding using sonic crystals, as both the size and position of the band gaps generated can be controlled. This is an application which has been suggested and investigated for several years with little progress. Furthermore the frequency region attenuated by resonance is unrelated to the crystals

  4. Evaluating dipolar source localization feasibility from intracerebral SEEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Caune, V; Ranta, R; Le Cam, S; Hofmanis, J; Maillard, L; Koessler, L; Louis-Dorr, V

    2014-09-01

    Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) is considered as the golden standard for exploring targeted structures during pre-surgical evaluation in drug-resistant partial epilepsy. The depth electrodes, inserted in the brain, consist of several collinear measuring contacts (sensors). Clinical routine analysis of SEEG signals is performed on bipolar montage, providing a focal view of the explored structures, thus eliminating activities of distant sources that propagate through the brain volume. We propose in this paper to exploit the common reference SEEG signals. In this case, the volume propagation information is preserved and electrical source localization (ESL) approaches can be proposed. Current ESL approaches used to localize and estimate the activity of the neural generators are mainly based on surface EEG/MEG signals, but very few studies exist on real SEEG recordings, and the case of equivalent current dipole source localization has not been explored yet in this context. In this study, we investigate the influence of volume conduction model, spatial configuration of SEEG sensors and level of noise on the ESL accuracy, using a realistic simulation setup. Localizations on real SEEG signals recorded during intracerebral electrical stimulations (ICS, known sources) as well as on epileptic interictal spikes are carried out. Our results show that, under certain conditions, a straightforward approach based on an equivalent current dipole model for the source and on simple analytical volume conduction models yields sufficiently precise solutions (below 10mm) of the localization problem. Thus, electrical source imaging using SEEG signals is a promising tool for distant brain source investigation and might be used as a complement to routine visual interpretations.

  5. Source localization using rational approximation on plane sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, M.; Leblond, J.; Marmorat, J.-P.; Papadopoulo, T.

    2012-05-01

    In functional neuroimaging, a crucial problem is to localize active sources within the brain non-invasively, from knowledge of electromagnetic measurements outside the head. Identification of point sources from boundary measurements is an ill-posed inverse problem. In the case of electroencephalography (EEG), measurements are only available at electrode positions, the number of sources is not known in advance and the medium within the head is inhomogeneous. This paper presents a new method for EEG source localization, based on rational approximation techniques in the complex plane. The method is used in the context of a nested sphere head model, in combination with a cortical mapping procedure. Results on simulated data prove the applicability of the method in the context of realistic measurement configurations.

  6. Near field acoustic holography based on the equivalent source method and pressure-velocity transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Jacobsen, Finn; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Chen, Xin-Zhao

    2009-09-01

    The advantage of using the normal component of the particle velocity rather than the sound pressure in the hologram plane as the input of conventional spatial Fourier transform based near field acoustic holography (NAH) and also as the input of the statistically optimized variant of NAH has recently been demonstrated. This paper examines whether there might be a similar advantage in using the particle velocity as the input of NAH based on the equivalent source method (ESM). Error sensitivity considerations indicate that ESM-based NAH is less sensitive to measurement errors when it is based on particle velocity input data than when it is based on measurements of sound pressure data, and this is confirmed by a simulation study and by experimental results. A method that combines pressure- and particle velocity-based reconstructions in order to distinguish between contributions to the sound field generated by sources on the two sides of the hologram plane is also examined.

  7. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  8. Source-space ICA for EEG source separation, localization, and time-course reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Poudel, Govinda; Innes, Carrie; Jones, Richard

    2014-11-01

    We propose source-space independent component analysis (ICA) for separation, tomography, and time-course reconstruction of EEG and MEG source signals. Source-space ICA is based on the application of singular value decomposition and ICA on the neuroelectrical signals from all brain voxels obtained post minimum-variance beamforming of sensor-space EEG or MEG. We describe the theoretical background and equations, then evaluate the performance of this technique in several different situations, including weak sources, bilateral correlated sources, multiple sources, and cluster sources. In this approach, tomographic maps of sources are obtained by back-projection of the ICA mixing coefficients into the source-space (3-D brain template). The advantages of source-space ICA over the popular alternative approaches of sensor-space ICA together with dipole fitting and power mapping via minimum-variance beamforming are demonstrated. Simulated EEG data were produced by forward head modeling to project the simulated sources onto scalp sensors, then superimposed on real EEG background. To illustrate the application of source-space ICA to real EEG source reconstruction, we show the localization and time-course reconstruction of visual evoked potentials. Source-space ICA is superior to the minimum-variance beamforming in the reconstruction of multiple weak and strong sources, as ICA allows weak sources to be identified and reconstructed in the presence of stronger sources. Source-space ICA is also superior to sensor-space ICA on accuracy of localization of sources, as source-space ICA applies ICA to the time-courses of voxels reconstructed from minimum-variance beamforming on a 3D scanning grid and these time-courses are optimally unmixed via the beamformer. Each component identified by source-space ICA has its own tomographic map which shows the extent to which each voxel has contributed to that component.

  9. Source-space ICA for EEG source separation, localization, and time-course reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Poudel, Govinda; Innes, Carrie; Jones, Richard

    2014-11-01

    We propose source-space independent component analysis (ICA) for separation, tomography, and time-course reconstruction of EEG and MEG source signals. Source-space ICA is based on the application of singular value decomposition and ICA on the neuroelectrical signals from all brain voxels obtained post minimum-variance beamforming of sensor-space EEG or MEG. We describe the theoretical background and equations, then evaluate the performance of this technique in several different situations, including weak sources, bilateral correlated sources, multiple sources, and cluster sources. In this approach, tomographic maps of sources are obtained by back-projection of the ICA mixing coefficients into the source-space (3-D brain template). The advantages of source-space ICA over the popular alternative approaches of sensor-space ICA together with dipole fitting and power mapping via minimum-variance beamforming are demonstrated. Simulated EEG data were produced by forward head modeling to project the simulated sources onto scalp sensors, then superimposed on real EEG background. To illustrate the application of source-space ICA to real EEG source reconstruction, we show the localization and time-course reconstruction of visual evoked potentials. Source-space ICA is superior to the minimum-variance beamforming in the reconstruction of multiple weak and strong sources, as ICA allows weak sources to be identified and reconstructed in the presence of stronger sources. Source-space ICA is also superior to sensor-space ICA on accuracy of localization of sources, as source-space ICA applies ICA to the time-courses of voxels reconstructed from minimum-variance beamforming on a 3D scanning grid and these time-courses are optimally unmixed via the beamformer. Each component identified by source-space ICA has its own tomographic map which shows the extent to which each voxel has contributed to that component. PMID:25108125

  10. On optimal retreat distance for the equivalent source method-based nearfield acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Lin, Jia-Hong

    2011-03-01

    As a basic form of the equivalent source method (ESM) that is used to nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) problems, discrete monopoles are utilized to represent the sound field of interest. When setting up the virtual source distribution, it is vital to maintain a "retreat distance" between the virtual sources and the actual source surface such that reconstruction would not suffer from singularity problems. However, one cannot increase the distance without bound because of the ill-posedness inherent in the reconstruction process with large distance. In prior research, 1-2 times lattice spacing, or the inter-element distance of microphones, is generally recommended as retreat distance in using the ESM-based NAH. While this rule has shown to yield good results in many cases, the optimal choice is a complicated issue that depends on frequency, geometry of the physical source, content of evanescent waves, distribution of sensors and virtual sources, etc. This paper deals about attaining the best compromise between the reconstruction errors induced by the point source singularity; the reconstruction ill-posedness is an interesting problem in its own right. The paper revisits this issue, with the aid of an optimization algorithm based on the golden section search and parabolic interpolation. Numerical simulations were conducted for a baffled planar piston source and a spherically baffled piston source. The results revealed that the retreat distance appropriate for the ESM ranged from 0.4 to 0.5 times the spacing for the planar piston, while from 0.8 to 1.7 times average spacing for the spherical piston. Experiments carried out for a vibrating aluminum plate also revealed that the retreat distance with 0.5 times the spacing yielded better reconstructed velocity than those with 1/20 and 1 times the spacing.

  11. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  12. On optimal retreat distance for the equivalent source method-based nearfield acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Lin, Jia-Hong

    2011-03-01

    As a basic form of the equivalent source method (ESM) that is used to nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) problems, discrete monopoles are utilized to represent the sound field of interest. When setting up the virtual source distribution, it is vital to maintain a "retreat distance" between the virtual sources and the actual source surface such that reconstruction would not suffer from singularity problems. However, one cannot increase the distance without bound because of the ill-posedness inherent in the reconstruction process with large distance. In prior research, 1-2 times lattice spacing, or the inter-element distance of microphones, is generally recommended as retreat distance in using the ESM-based NAH. While this rule has shown to yield good results in many cases, the optimal choice is a complicated issue that depends on frequency, geometry of the physical source, content of evanescent waves, distribution of sensors and virtual sources, etc. This paper deals about attaining the best compromise between the reconstruction errors induced by the point source singularity; the reconstruction ill-posedness is an interesting problem in its own right. The paper revisits this issue, with the aid of an optimization algorithm based on the golden section search and parabolic interpolation. Numerical simulations were conducted for a baffled planar piston source and a spherically baffled piston source. The results revealed that the retreat distance appropriate for the ESM ranged from 0.4 to 0.5 times the spacing for the planar piston, while from 0.8 to 1.7 times average spacing for the spherical piston. Experiments carried out for a vibrating aluminum plate also revealed that the retreat distance with 0.5 times the spacing yielded better reconstructed velocity than those with 1/20 and 1 times the spacing. PMID:21428505

  13. Adaptively Reevaluated Bayesian Localization (ARBL). A Novel Technique for Radiological Source Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; Robinson, Sean M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; McCall, Jonathon D.; Prinke, Amanda M.; Webster, Jennifer B.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2015-01-19

    Here we present a novel technique for the localization of radiological sources in urban or rural environments from an aerial platform. The technique is based on a Bayesian approach to localization, in which measured count rates in a time series are compared with predicted count rates from a series of pre-calculated test sources to define likelihood. Furthermore, this technique is expanded by using a localized treatment with a limited field of view (FOV), coupled with a likelihood ratio reevaluation, allowing for real-time computation on commodity hardware for arbitrarily complex detector models and terrain. In particular, detectors with inherent asymmetry of response (such as those employing internal collimation or self-shielding for enhanced directional awareness) are leveraged by this approach to provide improved localization. Our results from the localization technique are shown for simulated flight data using monolithic as well as directionally-aware detector models, and the capability of the methodology to locate radioisotopes is estimated for several test cases. This localization technique is shown to facilitate urban search by allowing quick and adaptive estimates of source location, in many cases from a single flyover near a source. In particular, this method represents a significant advancement from earlier methods like full-field Bayesian likelihood, which is not generally fast enough to allow for broad-field search in real time, and highest-net-counts estimation, which has a localization error that depends strongly on flight path and cannot generally operate without exhaustive search

  14. Spatio-temporal source modeling of evoked potentials to acoustic and cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponton, C W; Don, M; Waring, M D; Eggermont, J J; Masuda, A

    1993-01-01

    Spatio-temporal source modeling (STSM) of event-related potentials was used to estimate the loci and characteristics of cortical activity evoked by acoustic stimulation in normal hearing subjects and by electrical stimulation in cochlear implant (CI) subjects. In both groups of subjects, source solutions obtained for the N1/P2 complex were located in the superior half of the temporal lobe in the head model. Results indicate that it may be possible to determine whether stimulation of different implant channels activates different regions of cochleotopically organized auditory cortex. Auditory system activation can be assessed further by examining the characteristics of the source wave forms. For example, subjects whose cochlear implants provided auditory sensations and normal hearing subjects had similar source activity. In contrast, a subject in whom implant activation evoked eyelid movements exhibited different source wave forms. STSM analysis may provide an electrophysiological technique for guiding rehabilitation programs based on the capabilities of the individual implant user and for disentangling the complex response patterns to electrical stimulation of the brain.

  15. Acoustic emission source location in composite structure by Voronoi construction using geodesic curve evolution.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, R; Prasanna, G; Bhat, M R; Murthy, C R L; Gopalakrishnan, S

    2009-11-01

    Conventional analytical/numerical methods employing triangulation technique are suitable for locating acoustic emission (AE) source in a planar structure without structural discontinuities. But these methods cannot be extended to structures with complicated geometry, and, also, the problem gets compounded if the material of the structure is anisotropic warranting complex analytical velocity models. A geodesic approach using Voronoi construction is proposed in this work to locate the AE source in a composite structure. The approach is based on the fact that the wave takes minimum energy path to travel from the source to any other point in the connected domain. The geodesics are computed on the meshed surface of the structure using graph theory based on Dijkstra's algorithm. By propagating the waves in reverse virtually from these sensors along the geodesic path and by locating the first intersection point of these waves, one can get the AE source location. In this work, the geodesic approach is shown more suitable for a practicable source location solution in a composite structure with arbitrary surface containing finite discontinuities. Experiments have been conducted on composite plate specimens of simple and complex geometry to validate this method. PMID:19894815

  16. Joint inversion for transponder localization and sound-speed profile temporal variation in high-precision acoustic surveys.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Dosso, Stan E; Sun, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    This letter develops a Bayesian inversion for localizing underwater acoustic transponders using a surface ship which compensates for sound-speed profile (SSP) temporal variation during the survey. The method is based on dividing observed acoustic travel-time data into time segments and including depth-independent SSP variations for each segment as additional unknown parameters to approximate the SSP temporal variation. SSP variations are estimated jointly with transponder locations, rather than calculated separately as in existing two-step inversions. Simulation and sea-trial results show this localization/SSP joint inversion performs better than two-step inversion in terms of localization accuracy, agreement with measured SSP variations, and computational efficiency. PMID:27475210

  17. Joint inversion for transponder localization and sound-speed profile temporal variation in high-precision acoustic surveys.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Dosso, Stan E; Sun, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    This letter develops a Bayesian inversion for localizing underwater acoustic transponders using a surface ship which compensates for sound-speed profile (SSP) temporal variation during the survey. The method is based on dividing observed acoustic travel-time data into time segments and including depth-independent SSP variations for each segment as additional unknown parameters to approximate the SSP temporal variation. SSP variations are estimated jointly with transponder locations, rather than calculated separately as in existing two-step inversions. Simulation and sea-trial results show this localization/SSP joint inversion performs better than two-step inversion in terms of localization accuracy, agreement with measured SSP variations, and computational efficiency.

  18. Turbulence generation through intense localized sources of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqui, Agustin; Donzis, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms to generate turbulence in controlled conditions have been studied for nearly a century. Most common methods include passive and active grids with a focus on incompressible turbulence. However, little attention has been given to compressible flows, and even less to hypersonic flows, where phenomena such as thermal non-equilibrium can be present. Using intense energy from lasers, extreme molecule velocities can be generated from photo-dissociation. This creates strong localized changes in both the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the flow, which may perturb the flow in a way similar to an active grid to generate turbulence in hypersonic flows. A large database of direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to study the feasibility of such an approach. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, as well as spectral dynamics is used to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence. Local measures of enstrophy and dissipation are studied to diagnose the main mechanisms for energy exchange. As commonly done in compressible flows, dilatational and solenoidal components are separated to understand the effect of acoustics on the development of turbulence. Further results for cases that assimilate laboratory conditions will be discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of AFOSR.

  19. Equivalent charge source model based iterative maximum neighbor weight for sparse EEG source localization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Tian, Yin; Lei, Xu; Hu, Xiao; Yao, Dezhong

    2008-12-01

    How to localize the neural electric activities within brain effectively and precisely from the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings is a critical issue for current study in clinical neurology and cognitive neuroscience. In this paper, based on the charge source model and the iterative re-weighted strategy, proposed is a new maximum neighbor weight based iterative sparse source imaging method, termed as CMOSS (Charge source model based Maximum neighbOr weight Sparse Solution). Different from the weight used in focal underdetermined system solver (FOCUSS) where the weight for each point in the discrete solution space is independently updated in iterations, the new designed weight for each point in each iteration is determined by the source solution of the last iteration at both the point and its neighbors. Using such a new weight, the next iteration may have a bigger chance to rectify the local source location bias existed in the previous iteration solution. The simulation studies with comparison to FOCUSS and LORETA for various source configurations were conducted on a realistic 3-shell head model, and the results confirmed the validation of CMOSS for sparse EEG source localization. Finally, CMOSS was applied to localize sources elicited in a visual stimuli experiment, and the result was consistent with those source areas involved in visual processing reported in previous studies.

  20. Sparse cortical source localization using spatio-temporal atoms.

    PubMed

    Korats, Gundars; Ranta, Radu; Le Cam, Steven; Louis-Dorr, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of sparse localization of cortical sources from scalp EEG recordings. Localization algorithms use propagation model under spatial and/or temporal constraints, but their performance highly depends on the data signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this work we propose a dictionary based sparse localization method which uses a data driven spatio-temporal dictionary to reconstruct the measurements using Single Best Replacement (SBR) and Continuation Single Best Replacement (CSBR) algorithms. We tested and compared our methods with the well-known MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC algorithms on simulated realistic data. Tests were carried out for different noise levels. The results show that our method has a strong advantage over MUSIC-type methods in case of synchronized sources. PMID:26737185

  1. Brain source localization based on fast fully adaptive approach.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Maryam; Reilly, James P

    2012-01-01

    In the electroencephalogram (EEG) or magnetoencephalogram (MEG) context, brain source localization (beamforming) methods often fail when the number of observations is small. This is particularly true when measuring evoked potentials, especially when the number of electrodes is large. Due to the nonstationarity of the EEG/MEG, an adaptive capability is desirable. Previous work has addressed these issues by reducing the adaptive degrees of freedom (DoFs). This paper develops and tests a new multistage adaptive processing for brain source localization that has been previously used for radar statistical signal processing application with uniform linear antenna array. This processing, referred to as the fast fully adaptive (FFA) approach, could significantly reduce the required sample support and computational complexity, while still processing all available DoFs. The performance improvement offered by the FFA approach in comparison to the fully adaptive minimum variance beamforming (MVB) with limited data is demonstrated by bootstrapping simulated data to evaluate the variability of the source location.

  2. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic acoustic transducers using distributed point source method.

    PubMed

    Eskandarzade, M; Kundu, T; Liebeaux, N; Placko, D; Mobadersani, F

    2010-05-01

    In spite of many advances in analytical and numerical modeling techniques for solving different engineering problems, an efficient solution technique for wave propagation modeling of an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) system is still missing. Distributed point source method (DPSM) is a newly developed semi-analytical technique developed since 2000 by Placko and Kundu (2007) [12] that is very powerful and straightforward for solving various engineering problems, including acoustic and electromagnetic modeling problems. In this study DPSM has been employed to model the Lorentz type EMAT with a meander line and flat spiral type coil. The problem of wave propagation has been solved and eddy currents and Lorentz forces have been calculated. The displacement field has been obtained as well. While modeling the Lorentz force the effect of dynamic magnetic field has been considered that most current analyses ignore. Results from this analysis have been compared with the finite element method (FEM) based predictions. It should be noted that with the current state of knowledge this problem can be solved only by FEM.

  3. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Tsysar, Sergey A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors. PMID:26428789

  4. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields

    PubMed Central

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors. PMID:26428789

  5. Deciphering acoustic emission signals in drought stressed branches: the missing link between source and sensor

    PubMed Central

    Vergeynst, Lidewei L.; Sause, Markus G. R.; Hamstad, Marvin A.; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    When drought occurs in plants, acoustic emission (AE) signals can be detected, but the actual causes of these signals are still unknown. By analyzing the waveforms of the measured signals, it should, however, be possible to trace the characteristics of the AE source and get information about the underlying physiological processes. A problem encountered during this analysis is that the waveform changes significantly from source to sensor and lack of knowledge on wave propagation impedes research progress made in this field. We used finite element modeling and the well-known pencil lead break source to investigate wave propagation in a branch. A cylindrical rod of polyvinyl chloride was first used to identify the theoretical propagation modes. Two wave propagation modes could be distinguished and we used the finite element model to interpret their behavior in terms of source position for both the PVC rod and a wooden rod. Both wave propagation modes were also identified in drying-induced signals from woody branches, and we used the obtained insights to provide recommendations for further AE research in plant science. PMID:26191070

  6. Source localization of turboshaft engine broadband noise using a three-sensor coherence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacodon, Daniel; Lewy, Serge

    2015-03-01

    Turboshaft engines can become the main source of helicopter noise at takeoff. Inlet radiation mainly comes from the compressor tones, but aft radiation is more intricate: turbine tones usually are above the audible frequency range and do not contribute to the weighted sound levels; jet is secondary and radiates low noise levels. A broadband component is the most annoying but its sources are not well known (it is called internal or core noise). Present study was made in the framework of the European project TEENI (Turboshaft Engine Exhaust Noise Identification). Its main objective was to localize the broadband sources in order to better reduce them. Several diagnostic techniques were implemented by the various TEENI partners. As regards ONERA, a first attempt at separating sources was made in the past with Turbomeca using a three-signal coherence method (TSM) to reject background non-acoustic noise. The main difficulty when using TSM is the assessment of the frequency range where the results are valid. This drawback has been circumvented in the TSM implemented in TEENI. Measurements were made on a highly instrumented Ardiden turboshaft engine in the Turbomeca open-air test bench. Two engine powers (approach and takeoff) were selected to apply TSM. Two internal pressure probes were located in various cross-sections, either behind the combustion chamber (CC), the high-pressure turbine (HPT), the free-turbine first stage (TL), or in four nozzle sections. The third transducer was a far-field microphone located around the maximum of radiation, at 120° from the intake centerline. The key result is that coherence increases from CC to HPT and TL, then decreases in the nozzle up to the exit. Pressure fluctuations from HPT and TL are very coherent with the far-field acoustic spectra up to 700 Hz. They are thus the main acoustic source and can be attributed to indirect combustion noise (accuracy decreases above 700 Hz because coherence is lower, but far-field sound spectra

  7. Effective mass density based topology optimization of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials for bandgap maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiong Wei; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-11-01

    Because effective material properties are essential concepts in the analyses of wave phenomena in metamaterials, they may also be utilized in the optimal design of metamaterials. In this work, we propose a topology optimization method directly using the Effective Mass Density (EMD) concept to maximize the first bandgaps of two-dimensional solid Locally Resonant Acoustic Metamaterials (LRAMs). When the first bandgap is characterized by the negative EMD, the bandgap maximization can be formulated efficiently as a topology optimization problem to broaden the frequency zone of the negative EMD values. In this work, EMD is calculated by considering the macroscopic isotropy of LRAMs in the long wavelength limit. To facilitate the analytical sensitivity analysis, we propose an elaborate calculation scheme of EMD. A sensitivity averaging technique is also suggested to guarantee the macroscopically isotropic behavior of the LRAMs. In the present study, the coating layer interfacing the core and the matrix of a ternary LRAM is chosen as the design region because it significantly influences the bandgap. By considering several numerical examples, the validity of this method is verified, and the effects of the mass constraint ratios on the optimized results are also investigated.

  8. Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST): Online ICA and source localization.

    PubMed

    Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Makeig, Scott; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-01-01

    The Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a noninvasive functional brain activity recording method that shows promise for becoming a 3-D cortical imaging modality with high temporal resolution. Currently, most of the tools developed for EEG analysis focus mainly on offline processing. This study introduces and demonstrates the Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), an extension to the widely distributed EEGLAB environment. REST allows blind source separation of EEG data in real-time using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis (ORICA), plus near real-time localization of separated sources. Two source localization methods are available to fit equivalent current dipoles or estimate spatial source distributions of selected sources. Selected measures of raw EEG data or component activations (e.g. time series of the data, spectral changes over time, equivalent current dipoles, etc.) can be visualized in near real-time. Finally, this study demonstrates the accuracy and functionality of REST with data from two experiments and discusses some relevant applications.

  9. Minimum variance brain source localization for short data sequences.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Maryam; Reilly, James P; Hasey, Gary

    2014-02-01

    In the electroencephalogram (EEG) or magnetoencephalogram (MEG) context, brain source localization methods that rely on estimating second-order statistics often fail when the number of samples of the recorded data sequences is small in comparison to the number of electrodes. This condition is particularly relevant when measuring evoked potentials. Due to the correlated background EEG/MEG signal, an adaptive approach to localization is desirable. Previous work has addressed these issues by reducing the adaptive degrees of freedom (DoFs). This reduction results in decreased resolution and accuracy of the estimated source configuration. This paper develops and tests a new multistage adaptive processing technique based on the minimum variance beamformer for brain source localization that has been previously used in the radar statistical signal processing context. This processing, referred to as the fast fully adaptive (FFA) approach, can significantly reduce the required sample support, while still preserving all available DoFs. To demonstrate the performance of the FFA approach in the limited data scenario, simulation and experimental results are compared with two previous beamforming approaches; i.e., the fully adaptive minimum variance beamforming method and the beamspace beamforming method. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FFA method can localize all types of brain activity more accurately than the other approaches with limited data.

  10. Source localization using recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1998-03-01

    A new method for source localization is described that is based on a modification of the well known multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm. In classical MUSIC, the array manifold vector is projected onto an estimate of the signal subspace, but errors in the estimate can make location of multiple sources difficult. Recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC uses each successively located source to form an intermediate array gain matrix, and projects both the array manifold and the signal subspace estimate into its orthogonal complement. The MUSIC projection is then performed in this reduced subspace. Using the metric of principal angles, the authors describe a general form of the RAP-MUSIC algorithm for the case of diversely polarized sources. Through a uniform linear array simulation, the authors demonstrate the improved Monte Carlo performance of RAP-MUSIC relative to MUSIC and two other sequential subspace methods, S and IES-MUSIC.

  11. A Numerical Investigation of Turbine Noise Source Hierarchy and Its Acoustic Transmission Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the relative importance of the various turbine noise generation mechanisms and the characteristics of the turbine acoustic transmission loss are essential ingredients in developing robust reduced-order models for predicting the turbine noise signature. A computationally based investigation has been undertaken to help guide the development of a turbine noise prediction capability that does not rely on empiricism. The investigation relies on highly detailed numerical simulations of the unsteady flowfield inside a modern high-pressure turbine (HPT). The simulations are developed using TURBO, which is an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) code capable of multi-stage simulations. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, to determine an estimate of the relative importance of the contributions to the coherent part of the acoustic signature of a turbine from the three potential sources of turbine noise generation, namely, blade-row viscous interaction, potential field interaction, and entropic source associated with the interaction of the blade rows with the temperature nonuniformities caused by the incomplete mixing of the hot fluid and the cooling flow. Second, to develop an understanding of the turbine acoustic transmission characteristics and to assess the applicability of existing empirical and analytical transmission loss models to realistic geometries and flow conditions for modern turbine designs. The investigation so far has concentrated on two simulations: (1) a single-stage HPT and (2) a two-stage HPT and the associated inter-turbine duct/strut segment. The simulations are designed to resolve up to the second harmonic of the blade passing frequency tone in accordance with accepted rules for second order solvers like TURBO. The calculations include blade and vane cooling flows and a radial profile of pressure and temperature at the turbine inlet. The calculation can be modified later to include the combustor pattern factor at the

  12. Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Gil; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. G. Averbuch, C. Price Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel Infrasound is one of the four Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty technologies for monitoring nuclear explosions. This technology measures the acoustic waves generated by the explosions followed by their propagation through the atmosphere. There are also natural phenomena that can act as an infrasound sources like sprites, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. The infrasound waves generated from theses phenomena can also be detected by the infrasound arrays. In order to study the behavior of these waves, i.e. the physics of wave propagation in the atmosphere, their evolution and their trajectories, numerical methods are required. This presentation will deal with the evolution of acoustic waves generated by underground sources (earthquakes and underground explosions). A 2D Spectral elements formulation for lithosphere-atmosphere coupling will be presented. The formulation includes the elastic wave equation for the seismic waves and the momentum, mass and state equations for the acoustic waves in a moving stratified atmosphere. The coupling of the two media is made by boundary conditions that ensures the continuity of traction and velocity (displacement) in the normal component to the interface. This work has several objectives. The first is to study the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. The second is to derive transmission coefficients for the energy flux with respect to the seismic magnitude and earth density. The third will be the generation of seismic waves from acoustic waves in the atmosphere. Is it possible?

  13. Localization of source with unknown amplitude using IPMC sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulsadda, Ahmad T.; Zhang, Feitian; Tan, Xiaobo

    2011-04-01

    The lateral line system, consisting of arrays of neuromasts functioning as flow sensors, is an important sensory organ for fish that enables them to detect predators, locate preys, perform rheotaxis, and coordinate schooling. Creating artificial lateral line systems is of significant interest since it will provide a new sensing mechanism for control and coordination of underwater robots and vehicles. In this paper we propose recursive algorithms for localizing a vibrating sphere, also known as a dipole source, based on measurements from an array of flow sensors. A dipole source is frequently used in the study of biological lateral lines, as a surrogate for underwater motion sources such as a flapping fish fin. We first formulate a nonlinear estimation problem based on an analytical model for the dipole-generated flow field. Two algorithms are presented to estimate both the source location and the vibration amplitude, one based on the least squares method and the other based on the Newton-Raphson method. Simulation results show that both methods deliver comparable performance in source localization. A prototype of artificial lateral line system comprising four ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) sensors is built, and experimental results are further presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of IPMC lateral line systems and the proposed estimation algorithms.

  14. Information-Driven Active Audio-Visual Source Localization.

    PubMed

    Schult, Niclas; Reineking, Thomas; Kluss, Thorsten; Zetzsche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for sensorimotor audio-visual source localization on a mobile robot. We utilize a particle filter for the combination of audio-visual information and for the temporal integration of consecutive measurements. Although the system only measures the current direction of the source, the position of the source can be estimated because the robot is able to move and can therefore obtain measurements from different directions. These actions by the robot successively reduce uncertainty about the source's position. An information gain mechanism is used for selecting the most informative actions in order to minimize the number of actions required to achieve accurate and precise position estimates in azimuth and distance. We show that this mechanism is an efficient solution to the action selection problem for source localization, and that it is able to produce precise position estimates despite simplified unisensory preprocessing. Because of the robot's mobility, this approach is suitable for use in complex and cluttered environments. We present qualitative and quantitative results of the system's performance and discuss possible areas of application. PMID:26327619

  15. Local finite time Lyapunov exponent, local sampling and probabilistic source and destination regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, A. E.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2015-05-01

    The time-varying finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is a powerful Lagrangian concept widely used for describing large-scale flow patterns and transport phenomena. However, field experiments usually have modest scales. Therefore, it is necessary to bridge between the powerful concept of FTLE and (local) field experiments. In this paper a new interpretation of the local FTLE, the time series of a FTLE field at a fixed location, is proposed. This concept can practically assist in field experiments where samples are collected at a fixed location and it is necessary to attribute long distance transport phenomena and location of source points to the characteristic variation of the sampled particles. Also, results of this study have the potential to aid in planning of optimal local sampling of passive particles for maximal diversity monitoring of assemblages of microorganisms. Assuming a deterministic flow field, one can use the proposed theorem to (i) estimate the differential distances between the source (or destination) points of the collected (or released) particles when consecutive sampling (or releasing) is performed at a fixed location, (ii) estimate the local FTLE as a function of known differential distances between the source (or destination) points. In addition to the deterministic flows, the more realistic case of unresolved turbulence and low resolution flow data that yield the probabilistic source (or destination) regions are studied. It is shown that similar to deterministic flows, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) separate probabilistic source (or destination) regions corresponding to consecutive collected (or released) particles.

  16. Local finite-time Lyapunov exponent, local sampling and probabilistic source and destination regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, A. E.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2015-11-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is a powerful Lagrangian concept widely used for describing large-scale flow patterns and transport phenomena. However, field experiments usually have modest scales. Therefore, it is necessary to bridge the gap between the concept of FTLE and field experiments. In this paper, two independent observations are discussed: (i) approximation of the local FTLE time series at a fixed location as a function of known distances between the destination (or source) points of released (or collected) particles and local velocity, and (ii) estimation of the distances between the destination (or source) points of the released (or collected) particles when consecutive release (or sampling) events are performed at a fixed location. These two observations lay the groundwork for an ansatz methodology that can practically assist in field experiments where consecutive samples are collected at a fixed location, and it is desirable to attribute source locations to the collected particles, and also in planning of optimal local sampling of passive particles for maximal diversity monitoring of atmospheric assemblages of microorganisms. In addition to deterministic flows, the more realistic case of unresolved turbulence and low-resolution flow data that yield probabilistic source (or destination) regions are studied. It is shown that, similar to deterministic flows, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and local FTLE can describe the separation of probabilistic source (or destination) regions corresponding to consecutively collected (or released) particles.

  17. Source Localization using Stochastic Approximation and Least Squares Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sahyoun, Samir S.; Djouadi, Seddik M.; Qi, Hairong; Drira, Anis

    2009-03-05

    This paper presents two approaches to locate the source of a chemical plume; Nonlinear Least Squares and Stochastic Approximation (SA) algorithms. Concentration levels of the chemical measured by special sensors are used to locate this source. Non-linear Least Squares technique is applied at different noise levels and compared with the localization using SA. For a noise corrupted data collected from a distributed set of chemical sensors, we show that SA methods are more efficient than Least Squares method. SA methods are often better at coping with noisy input information than other search methods.

  18. High Power Local Oscillator Sources for 1-2 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Thomas, Bertrand; Lin, Robert; Maestrini, Alain; Ward, John; Schlecht, Erich; Gill, John; Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Maiwald, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Recent results from the Heterodyne Instrument for Far-Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Telescope have confirmed the usefulness of high resolution spectroscopic data for a better understanding of our Universe. This paper will explore the current status of tunable local oscillator sources beyond HIFI and provide demonstration of how power combining of GaAs Schottky diodes can be used to increase both power and upper operating frequency for heterodyne receivers. Availability of power levels greater than 1 watt in the W-band now makes it possible to design a 1900 GHz source with more than 100 microwatts of expected output power.

  19. Inverse source localization for EEG using system identification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanthopoulos, Petros; Yatsenko, Vitaliy; Kammerdiner, Alla; Pardalos, Panos M.

    2007-11-01

    The reconstruction of the brain current sources from scalp electric recordings (Electroen-cephalogram) also known as the inverse source localization problem is a highly underdetermined problem in the field of computational neuroscience, and this problem still remains open . In this chapter we propose an alternative formulation for the inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem based on optimization theory. For simulation purposes, a three shell realistic head model based on an averaged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) segmentation and Boundary Element method (BEM) is constructed. System identification methodology is employed in order to determine the parameters of the system. In the last stage the inverse problem is solved using the computed forward model.

  20. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 2; Scattering Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This second volume of Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code provides the scattering plots referenced by Volume 1. There are 648 plots. Half are for the 8750 rpm "high speed" operating condition and the other half are for the 7031 rpm "mid speed" operating condition.

  1. Integration of Acoustical Information in the Perception of Impacted Sound Sources: The Role of Information Accuracy and Exploitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Bruno L.; Rocchesso, Davide; McAdams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Sound sources are perceived by integrating information from multiple acoustical features. The factors influencing the integration of information are largely unknown. We measured how the perceptual weighting of different features varies with the accuracy of information and with a listener's ability to exploit it. Participants judged the hardness of…

  2. Acoustic source characteristics, across-formant integration, and speech intelligibility under competitive conditions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brian; Summers, Robert J; Bailey, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    An important aspect of speech perception is the ability to group or select formants using cues in the acoustic source characteristics--for example, fundamental frequency (F0) differences between formants promote their segregation. This study explored the role of more radical differences in source characteristics. Three-formant (F1+F2+F3) synthetic speech analogues were derived from natural sentences. In Experiment 1, F1+F3 were generated by passing a harmonic glottal source (F0 = 140 Hz) through second-order resonators (H1+H3); in Experiment 2, F1+F3 were tonal (sine-wave) analogues (T1+T3). F2 could take either form (H2 or T2). In some conditions, the target formants were presented alone, either monaurally or dichotically (left ear = F1+F3; right ear = F2). In others, they were accompanied by a competitor for F2 (F1+F2C+F3; F2), which listeners must reject to optimize recognition. Competitors (H2C or T2C) were created using the time-reversed frequency and amplitude contours of F2. Dichotic presentation of F2 and F2C ensured that the impact of the competitor arose primarily through informational masking. In the absence of F2C, the effect of a source mismatch between F1+F3 and F2 was relatively modest. When F2C was present, intelligibility was lowest when F2 was tonal and F2C was harmonic, irrespective of which type matched F1+F3. This finding suggests that source type and context, rather than similarity, govern the phonetic contribution of a formant. It is proposed that wideband harmonic analogues are more effective informational maskers than narrowband tonal analogues, and so become dominant in across-frequency integration of phonetic information when placed in competition. PMID:25751040

  3. Variational Bayesian localization of EEG sources with generalized Gaussian priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, J. M.; Lopez, A.; Molina, R.; Katsaggelos, A. K.

    2012-11-01

    Although in the last decades the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging has grown in popularity as a tool for the structural analysis of the brain, including MRI, fMRI and recently DTI, the ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) is, still today, an interesting technique for the understanding of brain organization and function. The main reason for this is that the EEG is a direct measure of brain bioelectrical activity, and such activity can be monitorized in the millisecond time window. For some situations and cognitive scenarios, such fine temporal resolution might suffice for some aspects of brain function; however, the EEG spatial resolution is very poor since it is based on a small number of scalp recordings, thus turning the source localization problem into an ill-posed one in which infinite possibilities exist for the localization of the neuronal generators. This is an old problem in computational neuroimaging; indeed, many methods have been proposed to overcome this localization. Here, by performing a Variational Bayesian Inference procedure with a generalized Gaussian prior, we come out with an algorithm that performs simultaneously the estimation of both sources and model parameters. The novelty for the inclusion of the generalized Gaussian prior allows to control the smoothness degree of the estimated sources. Finally, the suggested algorithm is validated on simulated data.

  4. Improved Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization for regional infrasound

    DOE PAGES

    Blom, Philip S.; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-10-20

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) methodology is examined and simplified providing a generalized method of estimating the source location and time for an infrasonic event and the mathematical framework is used therein. The likelihood function describing an infrasonic detection used in BISL has been redefined to include the von Mises distribution developed in directional statistics and propagation-based, physically derived celerity-range and azimuth deviation models. Frameworks for constructing propagation-based celerity-range and azimuth deviation statistics are presented to demonstrate how stochastic propagation modelling methods can be used to improve the precision and accuracy of the posterior probability density function describing themore » source localization. Infrasonic signals recorded at a number of arrays in the western United States produced by rocket motor detonations at the Utah Test and Training Range are used to demonstrate the application of the new mathematical framework and to quantify the improvement obtained by using the stochastic propagation modelling methods. Moreover, using propagation-based priors, the spatial and temporal confidence bounds of the source decreased by more than 40 per cent in all cases and by as much as 80 per cent in one case. Further, the accuracy of the estimates remained high, keeping the ground truth within the 99 per cent confidence bounds for all cases.« less

  5. Information-Driven Active Audio-Visual Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    Schult, Niclas; Reineking, Thomas; Kluss, Thorsten; Zetzsche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for sensorimotor audio-visual source localization on a mobile robot. We utilize a particle filter for the combination of audio-visual information and for the temporal integration of consecutive measurements. Although the system only measures the current direction of the source, the position of the source can be estimated because the robot is able to move and can therefore obtain measurements from different directions. These actions by the robot successively reduce uncertainty about the source’s position. An information gain mechanism is used for selecting the most informative actions in order to minimize the number of actions required to achieve accurate and precise position estimates in azimuth and distance. We show that this mechanism is an efficient solution to the action selection problem for source localization, and that it is able to produce precise position estimates despite simplified unisensory preprocessing. Because of the robot’s mobility, this approach is suitable for use in complex and cluttered environments. We present qualitative and quantitative results of the system’s performance and discuss possible areas of application. PMID:26327619

  6. Improved Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization for regional infrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Blom, Philip S.; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-10-20

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) methodology is examined and simplified providing a generalized method of estimating the source location and time for an infrasonic event and the mathematical framework is used therein. The likelihood function describing an infrasonic detection used in BISL has been redefined to include the von Mises distribution developed in directional statistics and propagation-based, physically derived celerity-range and azimuth deviation models. Frameworks for constructing propagation-based celerity-range and azimuth deviation statistics are presented to demonstrate how stochastic propagation modelling methods can be used to improve the precision and accuracy of the posterior probability density function describing the source localization. Infrasonic signals recorded at a number of arrays in the western United States produced by rocket motor detonations at the Utah Test and Training Range are used to demonstrate the application of the new mathematical framework and to quantify the improvement obtained by using the stochastic propagation modelling methods. Moreover, using propagation-based priors, the spatial and temporal confidence bounds of the source decreased by more than 40 per cent in all cases and by as much as 80 per cent in one case. Further, the accuracy of the estimates remained high, keeping the ground truth within the 99 per cent confidence bounds for all cases.

  7. Improved Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization for regional infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Philip S.; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    The mathematical framework used in the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) methodology is examined and simplified providing a generalized method of estimating the source location and time for an infrasonic event. The likelihood function describing an infrasonic detection used in BISL has been redefined to include the von Mises distribution developed in directional statistics and propagation-based, physically derived celerity-range and azimuth deviation models. Frameworks for constructing propagation-based celerity-range and azimuth deviation statistics are presented to demonstrate how stochastic propagation modelling methods can be used to improve the precision and accuracy of the posterior probability density function describing the source localization. Infrasonic signals recorded at a number of arrays in the western United States produced by rocket motor detonations at the Utah Test and Training Range are used to demonstrate the application of the new mathematical framework and to quantify the improvement obtained by using the stochastic propagation modelling methods. Using propagation-based priors, the spatial and temporal confidence bounds of the source decreased by more than 40 per cent in all cases and by as much as 80 per cent in one case. Further, the accuracy of the estimates remained high, keeping the ground truth within the 99 per cent confidence bounds for all cases.

  8. Sources and characteristics of acoustic emissions from mechanically stressed geologic granular media — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Cohen, Denis; Or, Dani

    2012-05-01

    The formation of cracks and emergence of shearing planes and other modes of rapid macroscopic failure in geologic granular media involve numerous grain scale mechanical interactions often generating high frequency (kHz) elastic waves, referred to as acoustic emissions (AE). These acoustic signals have been used primarily for monitoring and characterizing fatigue and progressive failure in engineered systems, with only a few applications concerning geologic granular media reported in the literature. Similar to the monitoring of seismic events preceding an earthquake, AE may offer a means for non-invasive, in-situ, assessment of mechanical precursors associated with imminent landslides or other types of rapid mass movements (debris flows, rock falls, snow avalanches, glacier stick-slip events). Despite diverse applications and potential usefulness, a systematic description of the AE method and its relevance to mechanical processes in Earth sciences is lacking. This review is aimed at providing a sound foundation for linking observed AE with various micro-mechanical failure events in geologic granular materials, not only for monitoring of triggering events preceding mass mobilization, but also as a non-invasive tool in its own right for probing the rich spectrum of mechanical processes at scales ranging from a single grain to a hillslope. We review first studies reporting use of AE for monitoring of failure in various geologic materials, and describe AE generating source mechanisms in mechanically stressed geologic media (e.g., frictional sliding, micro-crackling, particle collisions, rupture of water bridges, etc.) including AE statistical features, such as frequency content and occurrence probabilities. We summarize available AE sensors and measurement principles. The high sampling rates of advanced AE systems enable detection of numerous discrete failure events within a volume and thus provide access to statistical descriptions of progressive collapse of systems

  9. Periodic shock-emission from acoustically driven cavitation clouds: a source of the subharmonic signal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Keith; Tapia-Siles, Cecilia; Gerold, Bjoern; Postema, Michiel; Cochran, Sandy; Cuschieri, Alfred; Prentice, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Single clouds of cavitation bubbles, driven by 254kHz focused ultrasound at pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.48-1.22MPa, have been observed via high-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 1×10(6) frames per second. Clouds underwent repetitive growth, oscillation and collapse (GOC) cycles, with shock-waves emitted periodically at the instant of collapse during each cycle. The frequency of cloud collapse, and coincident shock-emission, was primarily dependent on the intensity of the focused ultrasound driving the activity. The lowest peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.48MPa generated shock-waves with an average period of 7.9±0.5μs, corresponding to a frequency of f0/2, half-harmonic to the fundamental driving. Increasing the intensity gave rise to GOC cycles and shock-emission periods of 11.8±0.3, 15.8±0.3, 19.8±0.2μs, at pressure amplitudes of 0.64, 0.92 and 1.22MPa, corresponding to the higher-order subharmonics of f0/3, f0/4 and f0/5, respectively. Parallel passive acoustic detection, filtered for the fundamental driving, revealed features that correlated temporally to the shock-emissions observed via high-speed imaging, p(two-tailed) < 0.01 (r=0.996, taken over all data). Subtracting the isolated acoustic shock profiles from the raw signal collected from the detector, demonstrated the removal of subharmonic spectral peaks, in the frequency domain. The larger cavitation clouds (>200μm diameter, at maximum inflation), that developed under insonations of peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes >1.0MPa, emitted shock-waves with two or more fronts suggesting non-uniform collapse of the cloud. The observations indicate that periodic shock-emissions from acoustically driven cavitation clouds provide a source for the cavitation subharmonic signal, and that shock structure may be used to study intra-cloud dynamics at sub-microsecond timescales.

  10. EEG and MEG source localization using recursively applied (RAP) MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    The multiple signal characterization (MUSIC) algorithm locates multiple asynchronous dipolar sources from electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. A signal subspace is estimated from the data, then the algorithm scans a single dipole model through a three-dimensional head volume and computes projections onto this subspace. To locate the sources, the user must search the head volume for local peaks in the projection metric. Here we describe a novel extension of this approach which we refer to as RAP (Recursively APplied) MUSIC. This new procedure automatically extracts the locations of the sources through a recursive use of subspace projections, which uses the metric of principal correlations as a multidimensional form of correlation analysis between the model subspace and the data subspace. The dipolar orientations, a form of `diverse polarization,` are easily extracted using the associated principal vectors.

  11. 4-D imaging of seepage in earthen embankments with time-lapse inversion of self-potential data constrained by acoustic emissions localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, J. B.; Revil, A.; Planes, T.; Mooney, M. A.; Koelewijn, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    New methods are required to combine the information contained in the passive electrical and seismic signals to detect, localize and monitor hydromechanical disturbances in porous media. We propose a field experiment showing how passive seismic and electrical data can be combined together to detect a preferential flow path associated with internal erosion in a Earth dam. Continuous passive seismic and electrical (self-potential) monitoring data were recorded during a 7-d full-scale levee (earthen embankment) failure test, conducted in Booneschans, Netherlands in 2012. Spatially coherent acoustic emissions events and the development of a self-potential anomaly, associated with induced concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena, were identified and imaged near the downstream toe of the embankment, in an area that subsequently developed a series of concentrated water flows and sand boils, and where liquefaction of the embankment toe eventually developed. We present a new 4-D grid-search algorithm for acoustic emissions localization in both time and space, and the application of the localization results to add spatially varying constraints to time-lapse 3-D modelling of self-potential data in the terms of source current localization. Seismic signal localization results are utilized to build a set of time-invariant yet spatially varying model weights used for the inversion of the self-potential data. Results from the combination of these two passive techniques show results that are more consistent in terms of focused ground water flow with respect to visual observation on the embankment. This approach to geophysical monitoring of earthen embankments provides an improved approach for early detection and imaging of the development of embankment defects associated with concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena. The same approach can be used to detect various types of hydromechanical disturbances at larger scales.

  12. Ultra-directional source of longitudinal acoustic waves based on a two-dimensional solid/solid phononic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Morvan, B.; Tinel, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Vasseur, J. O.; Hladky-Hennion, A.-C.; Swinteck, N.; Deymier, P. A.

    2014-12-07

    Phononic crystals (PC) can be used to control the dispersion properties of acoustic waves, which are essential to direct their propagation. We use a PC-based two-dimensional solid/solid composite to demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the spatial filtering of a monochromatic non-directional wave source and its emission in a surrounding water medium as an ultra-directional beam with narrow angular distribution. The phenomenon relies on square-shaped equifrequency contours (EFC) enabling self-collimation of acoustic waves within the phononic crystal. Additionally, the angular width of collimated beams is controlled via the EFC size-shrinking when increasing frequency.

  13. Extension of the angular spectrum method to calculate pressure from a spherically curved acoustic source.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Urvi; Christensen, Douglas A

    2011-11-01

    The angular spectrum method is an accurate and computationally efficient method for modeling acoustic wave propagation. The use of the typical 2D fast Fourier transform algorithm makes this a fast technique but it requires that the source pressure (or velocity) be specified on a plane. Here the angular spectrum method is extended to calculate pressure from a spherical transducer-as used extensively in applications such as magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery-to a plane. The approach, called the Ring-Bessel technique, decomposes the curved source into circular rings of increasing radii, each ring a different distance from the intermediate plane, and calculates the angular spectrum of each ring using a Fourier series. Each angular spectrum is then propagated to the intermediate plane where all the propagated angular spectra are summed to obtain the pressure on the plane; subsequent plane-to-plane propagation can be achieved using the traditional angular spectrum method. Since the Ring-Bessel calculations are carried out in the frequency domain, it reduces calculation times by a factor of approximately 24 compared to the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld method and about 82 compared to the Field II technique, while maintaining accuracies of better than 96% as judged by those methods for cases of both solid and phased-array transducers.

  14. Sound field separation technique based on equivalent source method and its application in nearfield acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Chen, Xin-Zhao; Chen, Jian

    2008-03-01

    A technique for separating sound fields using two closely spaced parallel measurement surfaces and based on equivalent source method is proposed. The method can separate wave components crossing two measurement surfaces in opposite directions, which makes nearfield acoustic holography (NAH) applications in a field where there exist sources on the two sides of the hologram surface, in a reverberant field or in a scattered field, possible. The method is flexible in applications, simple in computation, and very easy to implement. The measurement surfaces can be arbitrarily shaped, and they are not restricted to be regular as in the traditional field separation technique. And, because the method performs field separation calculations directly in the spatial domain-not in the wave number domain--it avoids the errors and limitations (the window effects, etc.) associated with the traditional field separation technique based on the spatial Fourier transform method. In the paper, a theoretical description is first given, and the performance of the proposed field separation technique and its application in NAH are then evaluated through experiments.

  15. Localization of chemical sources using e. coli chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Timothy; Nguyen, Hoa; Nickels, Kevin; Frasch, Duncan; Basagaoglu, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    This paper furthers the application of chemotaxis to small-scale robots by simulating a system that localizes a chemical source in a dynamic fluid environment. This type of system responds to a chemical stimulus by mimicking, for example, the way that E. Coli bacteria move toward attractants (nutrients) and away from repellents. E. Coli use the intracellular signaling pathway to process the temporal change in the chemical concentration to determine if the cells should run or tumble. Previous work has shown that this process can be simulated with robots and used to localize chemical sources based upon a fixed nutrient gradient. Our work furthers this study by simulating the injection of an effluent of chemical at a specified location in an environment and uses computational fluid dynamics to model the interactions of the robot with the fluid while performing chemotaxis. The interactions between the chemical and fluid are also modelled with the advection diffusion equation to determine the concentration gradient. This method allows us to compute, over a lattice, the chemical concentration at all points and feed these results into an existing E. Coli controller for the robot, which results in the robot executing a tumble or a run according to a probabilistic formula. By simulating the robot in this complex environment, our work facilitates refinement of the chemotaxis controller while proving the ability of chemotactic robots to localize specific chemicals in environments that more closely resemble those encountered in the wide-ranging types of locations in which this robotic system might be deployed.

  16. Connecting earthquake source products to local tsunami warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgar, D.; Allen, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Issuing warning of a tsunami in advance of its arrival to the coastlines immediately adjacent to large earthquakes remains a challenging problem. The heterogeneous development state of regional geophysical monitoring infrastructure across subduction zones worldwide means that a flexible approach to warning, capable of ingesting multiple data types and earthquake source products, is the most appealing. We will present results from the study of 3 recent large events that have been observed with diverse geophysical measurements; the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-oki, the 2010 Mw8.8 Maule and 2014 Mw8.2 Iquique events. First, we will show that earthquake slip models derived from combination of land (GPS and strong motion) as well as off-shore (tide gauges, ocean-bottom pressure, and GPS buoy) can be coupled to tsunami propagation models to produce simulations that closely match the measured run-up at the local coastlines. Using these models as a baseline for validation we will demonstrate a methodology that takes advantage of simpler, but more readily available earthquake source products such as rapid point-source magnitude estimates from coastal GPS observations and regional moment tensors. We will show that while trading-off precision for speed, these simpler earthquake source models produce inundation forecasts reliable enough to be used for warning within minutes of earthquake onset. Most subduction zones around the world already have some geophysical infrastructure and are producing some form of real-time earthquake source product, our results strongly argue that by coupling these data products to tsunami propagation models local tsunami warning is possible at most subduction zones with already available infrastructure.

  17. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements Made on a Williams International FJ44 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Horvath, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire noise source localization data on a full-scale Williams International FJ44 turbofan engine. Data were acquired with the array at three different locations relative to the engine, two on the side and one in front of the engine. At the two side locations the planar microphone array was parallel to the engine centerline; at the front location the array was perpendicular to the engine centerline. At each of the three locations, data were acquired at eleven different engine operating conditions ranging from engine idle to maximum (take off) speed. Data obtained with the array off to the side of the engine were spatially filtered to separate the inlet and nozzle noise. Tones occurring in the inlet and nozzle spectra were traced to the low and high speed spools within the engine. The phased array data indicate that the Inflow Control Device (ICD) used during this test was not acoustically transparent; instead, some of the noise emanating from the inlet reflected off of the inlet lip of the ICD. This reflection is a source of error for far field noise measurements made during the test. The data also indicate that a total temperature rake in the inlet of the engine is a source of fan noise.

  18. High-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator for enhanced acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-05-01

    A high-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator (Cr-PCR) coupled with an electromechanical Helmholtz resonator (EMHR) is proposed to improve acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting. Owing to the strongly directional wave-scattering effect of the cross-plate corners, strong confinement of acoustic waves emerges. Consequently, the proposed Cr-PCR structure exhibits ∼353.5 times higher Q value and ∼6.1 times greater maximum pressure amplification than the phononic crystal resonator (Cy-PCR) (consisting of cylindrical scatterers) of the same size. Furthermore, the harvester using the proposed Cr-PCR and the EMHR has ∼22 times greater maximum output-power volume density than the previous harvester using Cy-PCR and EMHR structures.

  19. Field Trial of Distributed Acoustic Sensing Using Active Sources at Garner Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. F.; Lord, N. E.; Chalari, A.; Lancelle, C.; Baldwin, J. A.; Castongia, E.; Fratta, D.; Nigbor, R. L.; Karaulanov, R.

    2014-12-01

    An optical fiber Distributed Acoustic Sensor array was deployed in a shallow trench at the site of the Garner Valley Downhole Array (GVDA) in southern California. The site was operated as a collaborator of the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) by UCSB. The fiber-optic cable layout approximated a rectangle whose dimensions were roughly 160 meters by 80 meters. The layout included two subdiagonals to provide a variety of orientations of the cable relative to source locations. The study included different seismic sources deployed at a number of surveyed positions: a 45 kN shear shaker operated at the site by NEES@UCLA, a portable 450 N shaker, a small Vibroseis truck, and hammer blows on a steel plate to map cable locations. Several dozen separate tests were recorded in which each test typically included ten repeats. The data were utilized for several studies. First, the characteristics of the recorded signals were analyzed for directivity and sensitivity of the cable response (Lancelle et al., 2014, this meeting). The DAS system recorded dynamic ground events in the direction of the cable and hence comparisons with geophones required signal processing. The one-meter spacing of DAS traces could be well correlated over distances of a few meters. Second, swept-sine sources were used to obtain surface-wave velocity dispersion to determine near-surface shear-wave velocity distribution using Multispectral Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) (Baldwin et al., 2014, this meeting). The results were in good agreement with previous Vibroseis results at the site (Stokoe et al. 2004). Third, a new method for time-frequency filtering was developed for extracting the surface-wave phase velocities from uncorrelated receiver traces (Lord et al., 2014, this meeting).

  20. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammers, Jürgen; Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank; Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Jon Shah, N.

    2014-05-01

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-Tc SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-Tc SQUID-based MEG systems.

  1. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dammers, Jürgen Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank; Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Jon Shah, N.

    2014-05-26

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-T{sub c} SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-T{sub c} SQUID-based MEG systems.

  2. Artificial neural networks optimization method for radioactive source localization

    SciTech Connect

    Wacholder, E.; Elias, E.; Merlis, Y.

    1995-05-01

    An optimization artificial neural networks model is developed for solving the ill-posed inverse transport problem associated with localizing radioactive sources in a medium with known properties and dimensions. The model is based on the recurrent (or feedback) Hopfield network with fixed weights. The source distribution is determined based on the response of a limited number of external detectors of known spatial deployment in conjunction with a radiation transport model. The algorithm is tested and evaluated for a large number of simulated two-dimensional cases. Computations are carried out at different noise levels to account for statistical errors encountered in engineering applications. The sensitivity to noise is found to depend on the number of detectors and on their spatial deployment. A pretest empirical procedure is, therefore, suggested for determining an effective arrangement of detectors for a given problem.

  3. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-11-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  4. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  5. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A; Carlson, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  6. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore » using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  7. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A; Carlson, Thomas J

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  8. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  9. Wavelet-based localization of oscillatory sources from magnetoencephalography data.

    PubMed

    Lina, J M; Chowdhury, R; Lemay, E; Kobayashi, E; Grova, C

    2014-08-01

    Transient brain oscillatory activities recorded with Eelectroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) are characteristic features in physiological and pathological processes. This study is aimed at describing, evaluating, and illustrating with clinical data a new method for localizing the sources of oscillatory cortical activity recorded by MEG. The method combines time-frequency representation and an entropic regularization technique in a common framework, assuming that brain activity is sparse in time and space. Spatial sparsity relies on the assumption that brain activity is organized among cortical parcels. Sparsity in time is achieved by transposing the inverse problem in the wavelet representation, for both data and sources. We propose an estimator of the wavelet coefficients of the sources based on the maximum entropy on the mean (MEM) principle. The full dynamics of the sources is obtained from the inverse wavelet transform, and principal component analysis of the reconstructed time courses is applied to extract oscillatory components. This methodology is evaluated using realistic simulations of single-trial signals, combining fast and sudden discharges (spike) along with bursts of oscillating activity. The method is finally illustrated with a clinical application using MEG data acquired on a patient with a right orbitofrontal epilepsy.

  10. Combining bayesian source imaging with equivalent dipole approach to solve the intracranial EEG source localization problem.

    PubMed

    Le Cam, Steven; Caune, Vairis; Ranta, Radu; Korats, Gundars; Louis-Dorr, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    The brain source localization problem has been extensively studied in the past years, yielding a large panel of methodologies, each bringing their own strengths and weaknesses. Combining several of these approaches might help in enhancing their respective performance. Our study is carried out in the particular context of intracranial recordings, with the objective to explain the measurements based on a reduced number of dipolar activities. We take benefit of the sparse nature of the Bayesian approaches to separate the noise from the source space, and to distinguish between several source contributions on the electrodes. This first step provides accurate estimates of the dipole projections, which can be used as an entry to an equivalent current dipole fitting procedure. We demonstrate on simulations that the localization results are significantly enhanced by this post-processing step when up to five dipoles are activated simultaneously.

  11. Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST): Online ICA and source localization.

    PubMed

    Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Makeig, Scott; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-08-01

    The Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a noninvasive functional brain activity recording method that shows promise for becoming a 3-D cortical imaging modality with high temporal resolution. Currently, most of the tools developed for EEG analysis focus mainly on offline processing. This study introduces and demonstrates the Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), an extension to the widely distributed EEGLAB environment. REST allows blind source separation of EEG data in real-time using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis (ORICA), plus near real-time localization of separated sources. Two source localization methods are available to fit equivalent current dipoles or estimate spatial source distributions of selected sources. Selected measures of raw EEG data or component activations (e.g. time series of the data, spectral changes over time, equivalent current dipoles, etc.) can be visualized in near real-time. Finally, this study demonstrates the accuracy and functionality of REST with data from two experiments and discusses some relevant applications. PMID:26737199

  12. An impact source localization technique for a nuclear power plant by using sensors of different types.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Chul; Park, Jin-Ho; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, a loose part monitoring system (LPMS) provides information on the location and the mass of a loosened or detached metal impacted onto the inner surface of the primary pressure boundary. Typically, accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a reactor vessel to localize the impact location caused by the impact of metallic substances on the reactor system. However, in some cases, the number of accelerometers is not sufficient to estimate the impact location precisely. In such a case, one of useful methods is to utilize other types of sensor that can measure the vibration of the reactor structure. For example, acoustic emission (AE) sensors are installed on the reactor structure to detect leakage or cracks on the primary pressure boundary. However, accelerometers and AE sensors have a different frequency range. The frequency of interest of AE sensors is higher than that of accelerometers. In this paper, we propose a method of impact source localization by using both accelerometer signals and AE signals, simultaneously. The main concept of impact location estimation is based on the arrival time difference of the impact stress wave between different sensor locations. However, it is difficult to find the arrival time difference between sensors, because the primary frequency ranges of accelerometers and AE sensors are different. To overcome the problem, we used phase delays of an envelope of impact signals. This is because the impact signals from the accelerometer and the AE sensor are similar in the whole shape (envelope). To verify the proposed method, we have performed experiments for a reactor mock-up model and a real nuclear power plant. The experimental results demonstrate that we can enhance the reliability and precision of the impact source localization. Therefore, if the proposed method is applied to a nuclear power plant, we can obtain the effect of additional installed sensors.

  13. Local tsunamis and distributed slip at the source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Dmowska, R.

    1999-01-01

    Variations in the local tsunami wave field are examined in relation to heterogeneous slip distributions that are characteristic of many shallow subduction zone earthquakes. Assumptions inherent in calculating the coseismic vertical displacement field that defines the initial condition for tsunami propagation are examined. By comparing the seafloor displacement from uniform slip to that from an ideal static crack, we demonstrate that dip-directed slip variations significantly affect the initial cross-sectional wave profile. Because of the hydrodynamic stability of tsunami wave forms, these effects directly impact estimates of maximum runup from the local tsunami. In most cases, an assumption of uniform slip in the dip direction significantly underestimates the maximum amplitude and leading wave steepness of the local tsunami. Whereas dip-directed slip variations affect the initial wave profile, strike-directed slip variations result in wavefront-parallel changes in amplitude that are largely preserved during propagation from the source region toward shore, owing to the effects of refraction. Tests of discretizing slip distributions indicate that small fault surface elements of dimensions similar to the source depth can acceptably approximate the vertical displacement field in comparison to continuous slip distributions. Crack models for tsunamis generated by shallow subduction zone earthquakes indicate that a rupture intersecting the free surface results in approximately twice the average slip. Therefore, the observation of higher slip associated with tsunami earthquakes relative to typical subduction zone earthquakes of the same magnitude suggests that tsunami earthquakes involve rupture of the seafloor, whereas rupture of deeper subduction zone earthquakes may be imbedded and not reach the seafloor.

  14. Use of the swim bladder and lateral line in near-field sound source localization by fish.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Allison B; Zeddies, David G; Fay, Richard R; Brown, Andrew D; Alderks, Peter W; Bhandiwad, Ashwin A; Mohr, Robert A; Gray, Michael D; Rogers, Peter H; Sisneros, Joseph A

    2014-06-15

    We investigated the roles of the swim bladder and the lateral line system in sound localization behavior by the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus). Reproductive female midshipman underwent either surgical deflation of the swim bladder or cryoablation of the lateral line and were then tested in a monopolar sound source localization task. Fish with nominally 'deflated' swim bladders performed similar to sham-deflated controls; however, post-experiment evaluation of swim bladder deflation revealed that a majority of 'deflated' fish (88%, seven of the eight fish) that exhibited positive phonotaxis had partially inflated swim bladders. In total, 95% (21/22) of fish that localized the source had at least partially inflated swim bladders, indicating that pressure reception is likely required for sound source localization. In lateral line experiments, no difference was observed in the proportion of females exhibiting positive phonotaxis with ablated (37%) versus sham-ablated (47%) lateral line systems. These data suggest that the lateral line system is likely not required for sound source localization, although this system may be important for fine-tuning the approach to the sound source. We found that midshipman can solve the 180 deg ambiguity of source direction in the shallow water of our test tank, which is similar to their nesting environment. We also found that the potential directional cues (phase relationship between pressure and particle motion) in shallow water differs from a theoretical free-field. Therefore, the general question of how fish use acoustic pressure cues to solve the 180 deg ambiguity of source direction from the particle motion vector remains unresolved.

  15. On the selection of loads in the multiload method for measuring the acoustic source parameters of duct systems.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seung-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2002-03-01

    The in-duct source can be characterized by two acoustical parameters such as the source strength and the source impedance, which permit the prediction of radiated sound pressure or insertion loss of the whole duct system. One-port acoustic characteristics of an in-duct source can be measured by the multiload method using an overdetermined set of open pipes or side-branch pipes with different lengths as applied loads. The input data, viz. load pressure and load impedance, are usually contaminated by measurement error in the actual measurements, which result in errors in the calculated source parameters. In this paper, the effects of the errors in the input data on the results have been studied numerically, varying the number of loads and their impedances in order to determine what combination of the loads will yield the best result. It is noted that, frequently, only a set of open pipes is used when applying the multiload method to the internal combustion engine sources. A set of pipe lengths, which cause the calculated results to be least sensitive to the input data error, can be found when using open pipe loads. The present work is intended to produce guidelines for preparing an appropriate load set in order to obtain accurate source properties of fluid machines.

  16. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms.

    PubMed

    Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Nilsson, Erling

    2015-09-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued and angle-dependent boundary conditions. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle-dependent boundary conditions. It furthermore describes how a pressure impulse response is obtained from the energy-based acoustical radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber ceiling. Results from the full model are compared with results from other simulation tools and with measurements. The comparisons of the full model are done for real-valued and angle-independent surface properties. The proposed model agrees well with both the measured results and the alternative theories, and furthermore shows a more realistic spatial variation than energy-based methods due to the fact that interference is considered. PMID:26428783

  17. Regional versus Local Sources of aerosols over Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleanthous, Savvas; Nicolaou, Panagiota; Theodosi, Christina; Zarmpas, Pavlos; Christofides, Ioannis; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2013-04-01

    Long term monitoring of PM concentrations in Cyprus reported the occurrence of a significant number of PM exceedances above the limits set by EU legislation and point out the need for abatement strategies. To address these critical issues, mass and chemical composition of daily PM10 aerosol samples were collected at a suburban (Limassol; LIM RES), a natural background site (EMEP site, Ayia Marina) and an urban center (Nicosia, NIC TRA) from January 2010 to December 2010. By considering the chemical composition measured at EMEP as representative of the regional background, the contribution of local sources at both NIC TRA and LIM RES sites can be also estimated. In total, "local" ions account for 1.7 and 2.4 μg m-3, i.e 33 and 48% of the total ionic mass recorded in NIC TRA and LIM RES. Sea salt attained levels of 2.3 ± 1.2 μg m-3, 1.9 ± 1.3 μg m-3 and 3.5 ± 2.3 μg m-3, contributing up to 10, 7 and 11% of the PM10 mass measured at EMEP, NIC TRA and LIM RES, respectively. The local concentrations of OC and EC were equal to 3.3±1.1 μg m-3 and 3.2±1.3 μg m-3 for NIC TRA and 1.70±0.03 μg m-3 and 1.39±0.42 μg m-3 for LIM RES relative to the values measured at the EMEP site. The high EC concentrations in NIC TRA underline the major role of traffic-related emissions. As expected for the natural background site, OC/EC ratio equals 4.84, a strong indicator of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Whereas in the urban and suburban sites, the OC/EC ratio is lower ranging from 1.46 to 1.84, denoting significant influence from fossil fuel primary emissions in the studied areas. Considering that dust at EMEP is due to "regional" dust, the dust measured at both traffic related sites is the sum of "regional" and "local dust", the second most probably originating from soil dust and car/road abrasion. The "local dust" at NIC TRA and LIM RES accounted for 28% and 21% of the total PM10 mass, whilst regional dust at EMEP of 45%. The temporal variation of "local dust

  18. Concurrent identification of aero-acoustic scattering and noise sources at a flow duct singularity in low Mach number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovardi, Carlo; Jaensch, Stefan; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A numerical method to concurrently characterize both aeroacoustic scattering and noise sources at a duct singularity is presented. This approach combines Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with techniques of System Identification (SI): In a first step, a highly resolved LES with external broadband acoustic excitation is carried out. Subsequently, time series data extracted from the LES are post-processed by means of SI to model both acoustic propagation and noise generation. The present work studies the aero-acoustic characteristics of an orifice placed in a duct at low flow Mach numbers with the "LES-SI" method. Parametric SI based on the Box-Jenkins mathematical structure is employed, with a prediction error approach that utilizes correlation analysis of the output residuals to avoid overfitting. Uncertainties of model parameters due to the finite length of times series are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. Numerical results for acoustic scattering matrices and power spectral densities of broad-band noise are validated against experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies below the cut-off frequency of the duct.

  19. Investigation of acoustic gravity waves created by anomalous heat sources: experiments and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    We have been investigating high-power radio wave-induced acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) at Gakona, Alaska, using the High-frequency Active Aurora Research Program (HAARP) heating facility (i.e. HF heater) and extensive diagnostic instruments. This work was aimed at performing a controlled study of the space plasma turbulence triggered by the AGWs originating from anomalous heat sources, as observed in our earlier experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico (Pradipta 2007 MS Thesis MIT Press, Cambridge, MA). The HF heater operated in continuous wave (CW) O-mode can heat ionospheric plasmas effectively to yield a depleted magnetic flux tube as rising plasma bubbles (Lee et al 1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 579). Two processes are responsible for the depletion of the magnetic flux tube: (i) thermal expansion and (ii) chemical reactions caused by heated ions. The depleted plasmas create large density gradients that can augment spread F processes via generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (Lee et al 1999 Geophys. Res. Lett. 26 37). It is thus expected that the temperature of neutral particles in the heated ionospheric region can be increased. Such a heat source in the neutral atmosphere may potentially generate AGWs in the form of traveling ionospheric plasma disturbances (TIPDs). We should point out that these TIPDs have features distinctively different from electric and magnetic field (ExB) drifts of HF wave-induced large-scale non-propagating plasma structures. Moreover, it was noted in our recent study of naturally occurring AGW-induced TIDs that only large-scale AGWs can propagate upward to reach higher altitudes. Thus, in our Gakona experiments we select optimum heating schemes for HF wave-induced AGWs that can be distinguished from the naturally occurring ones. The generation and propagation of AGWs are monitored by MUIR (Modular Ultra high-frequency Ionospheric Radar), Digisonde and GPS/low-earth-orbit satellites. Our theoretical and experimental studies have shown that

  20. Sources and Radiation Patterns of Volcano-Acoustic Signals Investigated with Field-Scale Chemical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the processes that give rise to complex acoustic signals during volcanic blasts by monitoring buried chemical explosions with infrasound and audio range microphones, strong motion sensors, and high speed imagery. Acoustic waveforms vary with scaled depth of burial (SDOB, units in meters per cube root of joules), ranging from high amplitude, impulsive, gas expansion dominated signals at low SDOB to low amplitude, longer duration, ground motion dominated signals at high SDOB. Typically, the sudden upward acceleration of the substrate above the blast produces the first acoustic arrival, followed by a second pulse due to the eruption of pressurized gas at the surface. Occasionally, a third overpressure occurs when displaced material decelerates upon impact with the ground. The transition between ground motion dominated and gas release dominated acoustics ranges between 0.0038-0.0018 SDOB, respectively. For example, one explosion registering an SDOB=0.0031 produced two overpressure pulses of approximately equal amplitude, one due to ground motion, the other to gas release. Recorded volcano infrasound has also identified distinct ground motion and gas release components during explosions at Sakurajima, Santiaguito, and Karymsky volcanoes. Our results indicate that infrasound records may provide a proxy for the depth and energy of these explosions. Furthermore, while magma fragmentation models indicate the possibility of several explosions during a single vulcanian eruption (Alidibirov, Bull Volc., 1994), our results suggest that a single explosion can also produce complex acoustic signals. Thus acoustic records alone cannot be used to distinguish between single explosions and multiple closely-spaced blasts at volcanoes. Results from a series of lateral blasts during the 2014 field experiment further indicates whether vent geometry can produce directional acoustic radiation patterns like those observed at Tungarahua volcano (Kim et al., GJI, 2012). Beside

  1. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  2. Near-Field Source Localization Using a Special Cumulant Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Han; Wei, Gang

    A new near-field source localization algorithm based on a uniform linear array was proposed. The proposed algorithm estimates each parameter separately but does not need pairing parameters. It can be divided into two important steps. The first step is bearing-related electric angle estimation based on the ESPRIT algorithm by constructing a special cumulant matrix. The second step is the other electric angle estimation based on the 1-D MUSIC spectrum. It offers much lower computational complexity than the traditional near-field 2-D MUSIC algorithm and has better performance than the high-order ESPRIT algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithm is close to the Cramer-Rao Bound (CRB).

  3. Investigation of model based beamforming and Bayesian inversion signal processing methods for seismic localization of underground sources.

    PubMed

    Oh, Geok Lian; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-08-01

    Techniques have been studied for the localization of an underground source with seismic interrogation signals. Much of the work has involved defining either a P-wave acoustic model or a dispersive surface wave model to the received signal and applying the time-delay processing technique and frequency-wavenumber processing to determine the location of the underground tunnel. Considering the case of determining the location of an underground tunnel, this paper proposed two physical models, the acoustic approximation ray tracing model and the finite difference time domain three-dimensional (3D) elastic wave model to represent the received seismic signal. Two localization algorithms, beamforming and Bayesian inversion, are developed for each physical model. The beam-forming algorithms implemented are the modified time-and-delay beamformer and the F-K beamformer. Inversion is posed as an optimization problem to estimate the unknown position variable using the described physical forward models. The proposed four methodologies are demonstrated and compared using seismic signals recorded by geophones set up on ground surface generated by a surface seismic excitation. The examples show that for field data, inversion for localization is most advantageous when the forward model completely describe all the elastic wave components as is the case of the FDTD 3D elastic model.

  4. Small arm fire acoustic detection and localization systems: gunfire detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzier, Alain; Cadavid, Sandra

    2005-05-01

    The Gunfire Detection System (GDS) is an acoustic passive sensor designed to rapidly detect, locate, and report on hostile fire from small arms upon detection of a blast wave from a bullet exiting the gun barrel and/or the supersonic wave of the bullet. Upon the detection of the muzzle blast and/or the acoustic shock wave caused by the moving bullet the GDS notifies the user and displays the azimuth, elevation and range to the gunfire origin (shooter). This information allows the GDS user to swiftly move, return fire or take other appropriate action. The paper presented examines the militarization process of a Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) item and provides lessons learned.

  5. Non-contact acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation: Generation of a pulse sound source with a small amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Inoue, Tatsuo; Umenai, Koh

    2014-09-01

    A method to generate a pulse sound source for acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation with a plasma plume is discussed. Irradiating a solid surface with a laser beam expands a high-temperature plasma plume composed of free electrons, ionized atoms, etc. at a high velocity throughout ambient air. The shockwave generated by the plasma plume becomes the pulse sound source. A laser ablation sound source has two features. Because laser ablation is induced when the laser fluence reaches 1012-1014 W/m2, which is less than that for laser-induced breakdown (1015 W/m2), laser ablation can generate a lower sound pressure, and the sound source has a hemispherical radiation pattern on the surface where laser ablation is generated. Additionally, another feature is that laser-induced breakdown sound sources can fluctuate, whereas laser ablation sound sources do not because laser ablation is produced at a laser beam-irradiation point. We validate this laser ablation method for acoustic tests by comparing the measured and theoretical resonant frequencies of an impedance tube.

  6. Bulk microstructure and local elastic properties of carbon nanocomposites studied by impulse acoustic microscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V.; Petronyuk, Yu.; Morokov, E.; Chernozatonskii, L.; Kuzhir, P.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.; Bellucci, S.; Bistarelli, S.; Mastrucci, M.; Tabacchioni, I.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk microstructure and elastic properties of epoxy-nanocarbon nanocomposites for diverse types and different content of carbon nanofiller has been studied by using impulse acoustic microscopy technique. It has been shown occurrence of various types of mesoscopic structure formed by nanoparticles inside the bulk of nanocomposite materials, including nanoparticle conglomerates and nanoparticle aerogel systems. In spite of the bulk microstructure, nanocarbon composites demonstrate elastic uniformity and negligible influence of nanofiller on elastic properties of carbon nanocomposite materials.

  7. Water defluoridation using Malawi’s locally sourced gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamba, W. R. L.; Sajidu, S. M.; Thole, B.; Mwatseteza, J. F.

    Free fluoride levels above the WHO guideline maximum value of 1.5 mg/l have been reported in several parts of Malawi. Dental fluorosis has also been observed in the same areas such that search for local defluoridation techniques has become important in the country. The present research intended to determine the potential of using Malawi gypsum in defluoridation, identify the best pre-treatment of the gypsum and optimum conditions under which effective water defluoridation with the gypsum may be obtained. Laboratory experiments were carried out to explore defluoridation of drinking water using locally sourced gypsum and gypsum calcined at high temperatures. A 400 °C calcined phase of gypsum gave the highest defluoridation capacity of 67.80% compared to raw (uncalcined) gypsum, 200, 300 and 500 °C calcined phases. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern of the 400 °C phase revealed existence of less crystalline CaSO 4 that was thought to be responsible for such relatively high defluoridation capacity. The dependence of the fluoride removal by the 400 °C calcined phase on other drinking water quality parameters was assessed by simple correlation analysis. Reaction kinetics and mechanisms of fluoride removal by the materials were also investigated. It was found that ion exchange was the dominant mechanism through which fluoride was removed from water by the materials.

  8. Sourcing semiclassical gravity from spontaneously localized quantum matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilloy, Antoine; Diósi, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    The possibility that a classical space-time and quantum matter cohabit at the deepest level, i.e., the possibility of having a fundamental and not phenomenological semiclassical gravity, is often disregarded for lack of a good candidate theory. The standard semiclassical theory suffers from fundamental inconsistencies (e.g., Schrödinger cat sources, faster-than-light communication and violation of the Born rule) which can only be ignored in simple typical situations. We harness the power of spontaneous localization models, historically constructed to solve the measurement problem in quantum mechanics, to build a consistent theory of (stochastic) semiclassical gravity in the Newtonian limit. Our model makes quantitative and potentially testable predictions: we recover the Newtonian pair potential up to a short distance cutoff (hence, we predict no one-particle self-interaction) and uncover an additional gravitational decoherence term which depends on the specifics of the underlying spontaneous localization model considered. We hint at a possible program to go past the Newtonian limit, towards a consistent general relativistic semiclassical gravity.

  9. Acoustic and Seismic Modalities for Unattended Ground Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Elbring, G.J.; Ladd, M.D.; McDonald, T.S.; Sleefe, G.E.

    1999-03-31

    In this paper, we have presented the relative advantages and complementary aspects of acoustic and seismic ground sensors. A detailed description of both acoustic and seismic ground sensing methods has been provided. Acoustic and seismic phenomenology including source mechanisms, propagation paths, attenuation, and sensing have been discussed in detail. The effects of seismo-acoustic and acousto-seismic interactions as well as recommendations for minimizing seismic/acoustic cross talk have been highlighted. We have shown representative acoustic and seismic ground sensor data to illustrate the advantages and complementary aspects of the two modalities. The data illustrate that seismic transducers often respond to acoustic excitation through acousto-seismic coupling. Based on these results, we discussed the implications of this phenomenology on the detection, identification, and localization objectives of unattended ground sensors. We have concluded with a methodology for selecting the preferred modality (acoustic and/or seismic) for a particular application.

  10. Comparison of Acoustic Impedance Eduction Techniques for Locally-Reacting Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.; Watson, W. R.

    2003-01-01

    Typical acoustic liners used in current aircraft inlets and aft-fan ducts consist of some type of perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. A number of techniques for determining the acoustic impedance of these locallyreacting liners have been developed over the last five decades. In addition, a number of models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of locallyreacting liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information together with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess the noise absorption provided by these liners. These prediction models have incorporated the results from databases acquired with specific impedance eduction techniques. Thus, while these prediction models are acceptable for liners that are similar to those tested in these databases, their application to new liner configurations must be viewed with caution. The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a comparison of impedance eduction techniques that have been implemented at various aerospace research laboratories in the United States (NASA Langley Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines, B. F. Goodrich and Boeing). A secondary purpose is to provide data for liner configurations that extend the porosity range beyond that which has been previously used in common aircraft engine nacelles. Two sets of liners were designed to study the effects of three parameters: perforate hole diameter, facesheet thickness and porosity. These two sets of liners were constructed for testing in each of the laboratories listed above. The first set of liners was designed to fit into the NASA Langley and Boeing test facilities. The second set was designed to fit into the General Electric Aircraft Engines and B. F. Goodrich test facilities. By using the same parent material, both sets of liners were identical to within the limits of material and fabrication variability. Baseline data were obtained in the normal incidence impedance tubes at NASA Langley and B. F

  11. Influence of skull modeling approaches on EEG source localization.

    PubMed

    Montes-Restrepo, Victoria; van Mierlo, Pieter; Strobbe, Gregor; Staelens, Steven; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Hallez, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalographic source localization (ESL) relies on an accurate model representing the human head for the computation of the forward solution. In this head model, the skull is of utmost importance due to its complex geometry and low conductivity compared to the other tissues inside the head. We investigated the influence of using different skull modeling approaches on ESL. These approaches, consisting in skull conductivity and geometry modeling simplifications, make use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images to generate seven different head models. A head model with an accurately segmented skull from CT images, including spongy and compact bone compartments as well as some air-filled cavities, was used as the reference model. EEG simulations were performed for a configuration of 32 and 128 electrodes, and for both noiseless and noisy data. The results show that skull geometry simplifications have a larger effect on ESL than those of the conductivity modeling. This suggests that accurate skull modeling is important in order to achieve reliable results for ESL that are useful in a clinical environment. We recommend the following guidelines to be taken into account for skull modeling in the generation of subject-specific head models: (i) If CT images are available, i.e., if the geometry of the skull and its different tissue types can be accurately segmented, the conductivity should be modeled as isotropic heterogeneous. The spongy bone might be segmented as an erosion of the compact bone; (ii) when only MR images are available, the skull base should be represented as accurately as possible and the conductivity can be modeled as isotropic heterogeneous, segmenting the spongy bone directly from the MR image; (iii) a large number of EEG electrodes should be used to obtain high spatial sampling, which reduces the localization errors at realistic noise levels.

  12. Test of acoustic tone source and propulsion performance of C8A Buffalo suppressor nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, C. C.; Harkonen, D. L.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented for a static acoustic and propulsion performance ground test conducted at the Boeing hot nozzle facility on the C8A Buffalo noise suppressor nozzle. Various methods to remove a nozzle-associated 2000-Hz tone are evaluated. Results of testing this rectangular-array lobed nozzle for propulsion performance and acoustic directivity are reported. Recommendations for future nozzle modifications and further testing are included. Appendix A contains the test plan. Appendix B presents the test log. Appendix C contains plots of the one-third octave sound pressure levels recorded during the test. Appendix D describes the acoustic data recording and reduction systems. The performance data is tabulated in Appendix E.

  13. openPSTD: The open source pseudospectral time-domain method for acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornikx, Maarten; Krijnen, Thomas; van Harten, Louis

    2016-06-01

    An open source implementation of the Fourier pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) method for computing the propagation of sound is presented, which is geared towards applications in the built environment. Being a wave-based method, PSTD captures phenomena like diffraction, but maintains efficiency in processing time and memory usage as it allows to spatially sample close to the Nyquist criterion, thus keeping both the required spatial and temporal resolution coarse. In the implementation it has been opted to model the physical geometry as a composition of rectangular two-dimensional subdomains, hence initially restricting the implementation to orthogonal and two-dimensional situations. The strategy of using subdomains divides the problem domain into local subsets, which enables the simulation software to be built according to Object-Oriented Programming best practices and allows room for further computational parallelization. The software is built using the open source components, Blender, Numpy and Python, and has been published under an open source license itself as well. For accelerating the software, an option has been included to accelerate the calculations by a partial implementation of the code on the Graphical Processing Unit (GPU), which increases the throughput by up to fifteen times. The details of the implementation are reported, as well as the accuracy of the code.

  14. Earthquake Source Process from a Tide-Gauge and Hydro-Acoustic Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    A nearly 450-km-long rupture along the Nazca - South America plate interface, between Pichilemu (33.8°S) and the Arauco Peninsula (37.8°S) was responsible for the large earthquake (Mw=8.8) that took place in south-central Chile on 27 February 2010 at 03:34 (local time). Because of the location of the activated fault, a significant tsunami was generated which caused 156 deaths and 25 missing. Maximum run-ups of the generated tsunami reached 28 m in the neighborhood of Constitución. The most unusual feature of this tsunami was its long duration, it lasted more than 4 and a half hours at tide gages located close to the source region. A triad of hydrophone sensors, part of the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, recorded the complete source process and later phases until the arrival of the tsunami that destroyed the facility. The hydroacoustic station at Juan Fernandez Island, placed around 500-600 km away from the rupture region together with a tide gauge recorder, captured some characteristics of the source processes as well as later arrivals, which have been interpreted as T phases generated by the rupture itself. The possibility of an induced landslide producing an anomalous signal is being investigated.

  15. local alternative sources for cogeneration combined heat and power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agll, Abdulhakim Amer

    Global demand for energy continues to grow while countries around the globe race to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions by implementing policy measures and advancing technology. Sustainability has become an important issue in transportation and infrastructure development projects. While several agencies are trying to incorporate a range of sustainability measures in their goals and missions, only a few planning agencies have been able to implement these policies and they are far from perfect. The low rate of success in implementing sustainable policies is primarily due to incomplete understanding of the system and the interaction between various elements of the system. The conventional planning efforts focuses mainly on performance measures pertaining to the system and its impact on the environment but seldom on the social and economic impacts. The objective of this study is to use clean and alternative energy can be produced from many sources, and even use existing materials for energy generation. One such pathway is using wastewater, animal and organic waste, or landfills to create biogas for energy production. There are three tasks for this study. In topic one evaluated the energy saving that produced from combined hydrogen, heat, and power and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by using local sustainable energy at the Missouri S&T campus to reduce energy consumption and fossil fuel usage. Second topic aimed to estimate energy recovery and power generation from alternative energy source by using Rankin steam cycle from municipal solid waste at Benghazi-Libya. And the last task is in progress. The results for topics one and two have been presented.

  16. Acoustic emission descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, Franciszek; Malecki, Ignacy

    The authors present selected problems associated with acoustic emission interpreted as a physical phenomenon and as a measurement technique. The authors examine point sources of acoustic emission in isotropic, homogeneous linearly elastic media of different shapes. In the case of an unbounded medium the authors give the analytical form of the stress field and the wave shift field of the acoustic emission. In the case of a medium which is unbounded plate the authors give a form for the equations which is suitable for numerical calculation of the changes over time of selected acoustic emission values. For acoustic emission as a measurement technique, the authors represent the output signal as the resultant of a mechanical input value which describes the source, the transient function of the medium, and the transient function of specific components of the measurement loop. As an effect of this notation, the authors introduce the distinction between an acoustic measurement signal and an acoustic measurement impulse. The authors define the basic parameters of an arbitrary impulse. The authors extensively discuss the signal functions of acoustic emission impulses and acoustic emission signals defined in this article as acoustic emission descriptors (or signal functions of acoustic emission impulses) and advanced acoustic emission descriptors (which are either descriptors associated with acoustic emission applications or the signal functions of acoustic emission signals). The article also contains the results of experimental research on three different problems in which acoustic emission descriptors associated with acoustic emission pulses, acoustic emission applications, and acoustic emission signals are used. These problems are respectively: a problem of the amplitude-load characteristics of acoustic emission pulses in carbon samples subjected to compound uniaxial compression, the use of acoustic emission to predict the durability characteristics of conveyor belts, and

  17. Nonlinear simulations of particle source effects on edge localized mode

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Wang, Z. H.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of particle source (PS) with different intensities and located positions on Edge Localized Mode (ELM) are systematically studied with BOUT++ code. The results show the ELM size strongly decreases with increasing the PS intensity once the PS is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal. The effects of PS on ELM depend on the located position of PS. When it is located at the top of the pedestal, peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes can extract more free energy from the pressure gradient and grow up to be a large filament at the initial crash phase and the broadening of mode spectrum can be suppressed by PS, which leads to more energy loss. When it is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal, the extraction of free energy by P-B modes can be suppressed, and a small filament is generated. During the turbulence transport phase, the broader mode spectrum suppresses the turbulence transport when PS is located in the middle, while the zonal flow plays an important role in damping the turbulence transport when PS is located at the bottom.

  18. Loss of control during instrumental learning: a source localization study.

    PubMed

    Diener, Carsten; Kuehner, Christine; Flor, Herta

    2010-04-01

    This study used multi-channel electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate cortical correlates of response-outcome contingency appraisal as indexed by the postimperative negative variation (PINV) during instrumental learning. PINV data were subjected to standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) for source localization. Forty-six healthy adult persons underwent a forewarned S1-S2 paradigm where response-outcome contingencies varied in three consecutive conditions. Initially subjects could control aversive stimulation by a correct behavioral response followed by loss of control and subsequent restitution of control. Throughout the experiment, reaction times, errors, ratings of controllability, arousal, emotional valence and helplessness were assessed. Topographical EEG analyses showed that in particular frontal PINV magnitudes covaried with the experimental manipulation. Loss of control induced extensive response-outcome uncertainty accompanied by a fronto-central PINV maximum. sLORETA functional analyses of the PINV revealed that dependent on the experimental conditions frontal, temporal and parietal areas seem to be related to PINV formation. In particular during loss of control, between-conditions sLORETA comparisons found Brodmann Area 24 in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to be associated with PINV generation, which was confirmed by correlational analyses. These results provide further evidence for the role of the ACC in detecting response conflict and its involvement in the generation of the PINV.

  19. Acoustic Emission tomography based on simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to visualize the damage source location in Q235B steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Xu, Feiyun; Xu, Bingsheng

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) tomography based on Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART), which combines the traditional location algorithm with the SART algorithm by using AE events as its signal sources, is a new visualization method for inspecting and locating the internal damages in the structure. In this paper, the proposed method is applied to examine and visualize two man-made damage source locations in the Q235B steel plate to validate its effectiveness. Firstly, the Q235B steel plate with two holes specimen is fabricated and the pencil lead break (PLB) signal is taken as the exciting source for AE tomography.Secondly, A 6-step description of the SART algorithm is provided and the three dimensional(3D)image contained the damage source locations is visualized by using the proposed algorithm in terms of a locally varying wave velocity distribution. It is shown that the AE tomography based on SART has great potential in the application of structure damage detection. Finally, to further improve the quality of 3D imaging, the Median Filter and the Adaptive Median Filter are used to reduce the noises resulting from AE tomography. The experiment results indicate that Median Filter is the optimal method to remove Salt & Pepper noises.

  20. Acoustic emissions of digital data video projectors- Investigating noise sources and their change during product aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Michael Shane

    2005-09-01

    Acoustic emission testing continues to be a growing part of IT and telecommunication product design, as product noise is increasingly becoming a differentiator in the marketplace. This is especially true for digital/video display companies, such as InFocus Corporation, considering the market shift of these products to the home entertainment consumer as retail prices drop and performance factors increase. Projectors and displays using Digital Light Processing(tm) [DLP(tm)] technology incorporate a device known as a ColorWheel(tm) to generate the colors displayed at each pixel in the image. These ColorWheel(tm) devices spin at very high speeds and can generate high-frequency tones not typically heard in liquid crystal displays and other display technologies. Also, acoustic emission testing typically occurs at the beginning of product life and is a measure of acoustic energy emitted at this point in the lifecycle. Since the product is designed to be used over a long period of time, there is concern as to whether the acoustic emissions change over the lifecycle of the product, whether these changes will result in a level of nuisance to the average customer, and does this nuisance begin to develop prior to the intended lifetime of the product.

  1. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (<10 km) and provided reasonable yield estimates (<˜30% error) in the presence of realistic topography and atmospheric structure. The presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  2. Mountain chickadees from different elevations sing different songs: acoustic adaptation, temporal drift or signal of local adaptation?

    PubMed

    Branch, Carrie L; Pravosudov, Vladimir V

    2015-04-01

    Song in songbirds is widely thought to function in mate choice and male-male competition. Song is also phenotypically plastic and typically learned from local adults; therefore, it varies across geographical space and can serve as a cue for an individual's location of origin, with females commonly preferring males from their respective location. Geographical variation in song dialect may reflect acoustic adaptation to different environments and/or serve as a signal of local adaptation. In montane environments, environmental differences can occur over an elevation gradient, favouring local adaptations across small spatial scales. We tested whether food caching mountain chickadees, known to exhibit elevation-related differences in food caching intensity, spatial memory and the hippocampus, also sing different dialects despite continuous distribution and close proximity. Male songs were collected from high and low elevations at two different mountains (separated by 35 km) to test whether song differs between elevations and/or between adjacent populations at each mountain. Song structure varied significantly between high and low elevation adjacent populations from the same mountain and between populations from different mountains at the same elevations, despite a continuous distribution across each mountain slope. These results suggest that elevation-related differences in song structure in chickadees might serve as a signal for local adaptation.

  3. Mountain chickadees from different elevations sing different songs: acoustic adaptation, temporal drift or signal of local adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Carrie L.; Pravosudov, Vladimir V.

    2015-01-01

    Song in songbirds is widely thought to function in mate choice and male–male competition. Song is also phenotypically plastic and typically learned from local adults; therefore, it varies across geographical space and can serve as a cue for an individual's location of origin, with females commonly preferring males from their respective location. Geographical variation in song dialect may reflect acoustic adaptation to different environments and/or serve as a signal of local adaptation. In montane environments, environmental differences can occur over an elevation gradient, favouring local adaptations across small spatial scales. We tested whether food caching mountain chickadees, known to exhibit elevation-related differences in food caching intensity, spatial memory and the hippocampus, also sing different dialects despite continuous distribution and close proximity. Male songs were collected from high and low elevations at two different mountains (separated by 35 km) to test whether song differs between elevations and/or between adjacent populations at each mountain. Song structure varied significantly between high and low elevation adjacent populations from the same mountain and between populations from different mountains at the same elevations, despite a continuous distribution across each mountain slope. These results suggest that elevation-related differences in song structure in chickadees might serve as a signal for local adaptation. PMID:26064641

  4. Benthic microbial fuel cell as direct power source for an acoustic modem and seawater oxygen/temperature sensor system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanming; Radachowsky, Sage E; Wolf, Michael; Nielsen, Mark E; Girguis, Peter R; Reimers, Clare E

    2011-06-01

    Supported by the natural potential difference between anoxic sediment and oxic seawater, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) promise to be ideal power sources for certain low-power marine sensors and communication devices. In this study a chambered BMFC with a 0.25 m(2) footprint was used to power an acoustic modem interfaced with an oceanographic sensor that measures dissolved oxygen and temperature. The experiment was conducted in Yaquina Bay, Oregon over 50 days. Several improvements were made in the BMFC design and power management system based on lessons learned from earlier prototypes. The energy was harvested by a dynamic gain charge pump circuit that maintains a desired point on the BMFC's power curve and stores the energy in a 200 F supercapacitor. The system also used an ultralow power microcontroller and quartz clock to read the oxygen/temperature sensor hourly, store data with a time stamp, and perform daily polarizations. Data records were transmitted to the surface by the acoustic modem every 1-5 days after receiving an acoustic prompt from a surface hydrophone. After jump-starting energy production with supplemental macroalgae placed in the BMFC's anode chamber, the average power density of the BMFC adjusted to 44 mW/m(2) of seafloor area which is better than past demonstrations at this site. The highest power density was 158 mW/m(2), and the useful energy produced and stored was ≥ 1.7 times the energy required to operate the system. PMID:21545151

  5. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements of an F404 Nozzle Plume at Both Full and Model Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Bridges, James E.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire jet noise source localization data on both a full-scale F404-GE-F400 engine and on a 1/4th scale model of a F400 series nozzle. The full-scale engine test data show the location of the dominant noise sources in the jet plume as a function of frequency for the engine in both baseline (no chevron) and chevron configurations. Data are presented for the engine operating both with and without afterburners. Based on lessons learned during this test, a set of recommendations are provided regarding how the phased array measurement system could be modified in order to obtain more useful acoustic source localization data on high-performance military engines in the future. The data obtained on the 1/4th scale F400 series nozzle provide useful insights regarding the full-scale engine jet noise source mechanisms, and document some of the differences associated with testing at model-scale versus fullscale.

  6. Long-range acoustic detection and localization of blue whale calls in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Stafford, K M; Fox, C G; Clark, D S

    1998-12-01

    Analysis of acoustic signals recorded from the U.S. Navy's SOund SUrveillance System (SOSUS) was used to detect and locate blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) calls offshore in the northeast Pacific. The long, low-frequency components of these calls are characteristic of calls recorded in the presence of blue whales elsewhere in the world. Mean values for frequency and time characteristics from field-recorded blue whale calls were used to develop a simple matched filter for detecting such calls in noisy time series. The matched filter was applied to signals from three different SOSUS arrays off the coast of the Pacific Northwest to detect and associate individual calls from the same animal on the different arrays. A U.S. Navy maritime patrol aircraft was directed to an area where blue whale calls had been detected on SOSUS using these methods, and the presence of vocalizing blue whale was confirmed at the site with field recordings from sonobuoys.

  7. Acoustic Emission Source Location in Unidirectional Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastic Plates Using Virtually Trained Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G.; Lopresto, V.; Leone, C.; Papa, I.

    2010-06-02

    Acoustic emission source location in a unidirectional carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate was attempted employing Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technology. The acoustic emission events were produced by a lead break, and the response wave received by piezoelectric sensors, type VS150-M resonant at 150 kHz. The waves were detected by a Vallen AMSY4 eight-channel instrumentation. The time of arrival, determined through the conventional threshold crossing technique, was used to measure the dependence of wave velocity on fibre orientation. A simple empirical formula, relying on classical lamination and suggested by wave propagation theory, was able to accurately model the experimental trend. Based on the formula, virtual training and testing data sets were generated for the case of a plate monitored by three transducers, and adopted to select two potentially effective ANN architectures. For final validation, experimental tests were carried out, positioning the source at predetermined points evenly distributed within the plate area. A very satisfactory correlation was found between the actual source locations and the ANN predictions.

  8. Fan Noise Prediction System Development: Source/Radiation Field Coupling and Workstation Conversion for the Acoustic Radiation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    The Acoustic Radiation Code (ARC) is a finite element program used on the IBM mainframe to predict far-field acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. In this report, requirements for developers of internal aerodynamic codes regarding use of their program output an input for the ARC are discussed. More specifically, the particular input needed from the Bolt, Beranek and Newman/Pratt and Whitney (turbofan source noise generation) Code (BBN/PWC) is described. In a separate analysis, a method of coupling the source and radiation models, that recognizes waves crossing the interface in both directions, has been derived. A preliminary version of the coupled code has been developed and used for initial evaluation of coupling issues. Results thus far have shown that reflection from the inlet is sufficient to indicate that full coupling of the source and radiation fields is needed for accurate noise predictions ' Also, for this contract, the ARC has been modified for use on the Sun and Silicon Graphics Iris UNIX workstations. Changes and additions involved in this effort are described in an appendix.

  9. Acoustic Emission Source Location in Unidirectional Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastic Plates Using Virtually Trained Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprino, G.; Lopresto, V.; Leone, C.; Papa, I.

    2010-06-01

    Acoustic emission source location in a unidirectional carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate was attempted employing Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technology. The acoustic emission events were produced by a lead break, and the response wave received by piezoelectric sensors, type VS150-M resonant at 150 kHz. The waves were detected by a Vallen AMSY4 eight-channel instrumentation. The time of arrival, determined through the conventional threshold crossing technique, was used to measure the dependence of wave velocity on fibre orientation. A simple empirical formula, relying on classical lamination and suggested by wave propagation theory, was able to accurately model the experimental trend. Based on the formula, virtual training and testing data sets were generated for the case of a plate monitored by three transducers, and adopted to select two potentially effective ANN architectures. For final validation, experimental tests were carried out, positioning the source at predetermined points evenly distributed within the plate area. A very satisfactory correlation was found between the actual source locations and the ANN predictions.

  10. Study on the Non-contact Acoustic Inspection Method for Concrete Structures by using Strong Ultrasonic Sound source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Uechi, Itsuki; Sugimoto, Kazuko; Utagawa, Noriyuki; Katakura, Kageyoshi

    Hammering test is widely used to inspect the defects in concrete structures. However, this method has a major difficulty in inspect at high-places, such as a tunnel ceiling or a bridge girder. Moreover, its detection accuracy is dependent on a tester's experience. Therefore, we study about the non-contact acoustic inspection method of the concrete structure using the air borne sound wave and a laser Doppler vibrometer. In this method, the concrete surface is excited by air-borne sound wave emitted with a long range acoustic device (LRAD), and the vibration velocity on the concrete surface is measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer. A defect part is detected by the same flexural resonance as the hammer method. It is already shown clearly that detection of a defect can be performed from a long distance of 5 m or more using a concrete test object. Moreover, it is shown that a real concrete structure can also be applied. However, when the conventional LRAD was used as a sound source, there were problems, such as restrictions of a measurement angle and the surrounding noise. In order to solve these problems, basic examination which used the strong ultrasonic wave sound source was carried out. In the experiment, the concrete test object which includes an imitation defect from 5-m distance was used. From the experimental result, when the ultrasonic sound source was used, restrictions of a measurement angle become less severe and it was shown that circumference noise also falls dramatically.

  11. Local elastic modulus of RF sputtered HfO{sub 2} thin film by atomic force acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jena, S. Tokas, R. B. Sarkar, P. Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.; Misal, J. S.; Rao, K. D.

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) is a useful nondestructive technique for measurement of local elastic modulus of materials at nano-scale spatial resolution by measuring the contact resonance spectra for higher order modes of the AFM cantilever. The elastic modulus of RF sputtered HfO{sub 2} thin film has been measured quantitatively, using reference approach in which measurements are performed on the test and reference samples. Using AFAM, the measured elastic modulus of the HfO{sub 2} thin film is 223±27 GPa, which is in agreement with the literature value of 220±40 GPa for atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} thin film using nanoindentation technique.

  12. Source motion detection, estimation, and compensation for underwater acoustics inversion by wideband ambiguity lag-Doppler filtering.

    PubMed

    Josso, Nicolas F; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric

    2010-12-01

    Acoustic channel properties in a shallow water environment with moving source and receiver are difficult to investigate. In fact, when the source-receiver relative position changes, the underwater environment causes multipath and Doppler scale changes on the transmitted signal over low-to-medium frequencies (300 Hz-20 kHz). This is the result of a combination of multiple paths propagation, source and receiver motions, as well as sea surface motion or water column fast changes. This paper investigates underwater acoustic channel properties in a shallow water (up to 150 m depth) and moving source-receiver conditions using extracted time-scale features of the propagation channel model for low-to-medium frequencies. An average impulse response of one transmission is estimated using the physical characteristics of propagation and the wideband ambiguity plane. Since a different Doppler scale should be considered for each propagating signal, a time-warping filtering method is proposed to estimate the channel time delay and Doppler scale attributes for each propagating path. The proposed method enables the estimation of motion-compensated impulse responses, where different Doppler scaling factors are considered for the different time delays. It was validated for channel profiles using real data from the BASE'07 experiment conducted by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Undersea Research Center in the shallow water environment of the Malta Plateau, South Sicily. This paper provides a contribution to many field applications including passive ocean tomography with unknown natural sources position and movement. Another example is active ocean tomography where sources motion enables to rapidly cover one operational area for rapid environmental assessment and hydrophones may be drifting in order to avoid additional flow noise.

  13. Locating Acoustic Events Based on Large-Scale Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yungeun; Ahn, Junho; Cha, Hojung

    2009-01-01

    Research on acoustic source localization is actively being conducted to enhance accuracy and coverage. However, the performance is inherently limited due to the use of expensive sensor nodes and inefficient communication methods. This paper proposes an acoustic source localization algorithm for a large area that uses low-cost sensor nodes. The proposed mechanism efficiently handles multiple acoustic sources by removing false-positive errors that arise from the different propagation ranges of radio and sound. Extensive outdoor experiments with real hardware validated that the proposed mechanism could localize four acoustic sources within a 3 m error in a 60 m by 60 m area, where conventional systems could hardly achieve similar performance. PMID:22303155

  14. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth. PMID:27610323

  15. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth.

  16. Changes in Humpback Whale Song Occurrence in Response to an Acoustic Source 200 km Away

    PubMed Central

    Risch, Denise; Corkeron, Peter J.; Ellison, William T.; Van Parijs, Sofie M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of underwater anthropogenic sound on marine mammals is of increasing concern. Here we show that humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) song in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS) was reduced, concurrent with transmissions of an Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment approximately 200 km away. We detected the OAWRS experiment in SBNMS during an 11 day period in autumn 2006. We compared the occurrence of song for 11 days before, during and after the experiment with song over the same 33 calendar days in two later years. Using a quasi-Poisson generalized linear model (GLM), we demonstrate a significant difference in the number of minutes with detected song between periods and years. The lack of humpback whale song during the OAWRS experiment was the most substantial signal in the data. Our findings demonstrate the greatest published distance over which anthropogenic sound has been shown to affect vocalizing baleen whales, and the first time that active acoustic fisheries technology has been shown to have this effect. The suitability of Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing technology for in-situ, long term monitoring of marine ecosystems should be considered, bearing in mind its possible effects on non-target species, in particular protected species. PMID:22253769

  17. Remote ballistic emplacement of an electro-optical and acoustic target detection and localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Aaron; Mellini, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled non line of sight (NLOS) and beyond line of sight (BLOS) environments is critical in the asymmetric battlefield of future conflicts. The ability to detect and accurately locate hostile forces in difficult terrain or urban environments can dramatically increase the survivability and effectiveness of dismounted soldiers, especially when they are limited to the resources available only to the small unit. The Sensor Mortar Network (SMortarNet) is a 60mm Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mortar designed to give the Squad near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled NLOS environments. SMortarNet is designed to track targets both acoustically and electro optically and can fuse tracks between, the acoustic, EO, and magnetic modalities on board. The system is linked to other mortar nodes and the user via a masterless frequency hopping spread spectrum ad-hoc mesh radio network. This paper will discuss SMortarNet in the context of a squad level dismounted soldier, its technical capabilities, and its benefit to the small unit Warfighter. The challenges with ballistic remote emplacement of sensitive components and the on board signal processing capabilities of the system will also be covered. The paper will also address how the sensor network can be integrated with existing soldier infrastructure, such as the NettWarrior platform, for rapid transition to soldier systems. Networks of low power sensors can have many forms, but the more practical networks for warfighters are ad hoc radio-based systems that can be rapidly deployed and can leverage a range of assets available at a given time. The low power long life networks typically have limited bandwidth and may have unreliable communication depending on the network health, which makes autonomous sensors a critical component of the network. SMortarNet reduces data to key information features at the sensor itself. The smart sensing approach enables

  18. Fire Source Localization Based on Distributed Temperature Sensing by a Dual-Line Optical Fiber System.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Yang, Shuang; Li, Jun; Sigrist, Markus W; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for localizing a fire source using an optical fiber distributed temperature sensor system. A section of two parallel optical fibers employed as the sensing element is installed near the ceiling of a closed room in which the fire source is located. By measuring the temperature of hot air flows, the problem of three-dimensional fire source localization is transformed to two dimensions. The method of the source location is verified with experiments using burning alcohol as fire source, and it is demonstrated that the method represents a robust and reliable technique for localizing a fire source also for long sensing ranges. PMID:27275822

  19. Fire Source Localization Based on Distributed Temperature Sensing by a Dual-Line Optical Fiber System.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Yang, Shuang; Li, Jun; Sigrist, Markus W; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-06-06

    We propose a method for localizing a fire source using an optical fiber distributed temperature sensor system. A section of two parallel optical fibers employed as the sensing element is installed near the ceiling of a closed room in which the fire source is located. By measuring the temperature of hot air flows, the problem of three-dimensional fire source localization is transformed to two dimensions. The method of the source location is verified with experiments using burning alcohol as fire source, and it is demonstrated that the method represents a robust and reliable technique for localizing a fire source also for long sensing ranges.

  20. Fire Source Localization Based on Distributed Temperature Sensing by a Dual-Line Optical Fiber System

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Yang, Shuang; Li, Jun; Sigrist, Markus W.; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for localizing a fire source using an optical fiber distributed temperature sensor system. A section of two parallel optical fibers employed as the sensing element is installed near the ceiling of a closed room in which the fire source is located. By measuring the temperature of hot air flows, the problem of three-dimensional fire source localization is transformed to two dimensions. The method of the source location is verified with experiments using burning alcohol as fire source, and it is demonstrated that the method represents a robust and reliable technique for localizing a fire source also for long sensing ranges. PMID:27275822

  1. REMOVING BARYON-ACOUSTIC-OSCILLATION PEAK SHIFTS WITH LOCAL DENSITY TRANSFORMS

    SciTech Connect

    McCullagh, Nuala; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2013-01-20

    Large-scale bulk flows in the universe distort the initial density field, broadening the baryon-acoustic-oscillation (BAO) feature that was imprinted when baryons were strongly coupled to photons. Additionally, there is a small shift inward in the peak of the conventional overdensity correlation function, a mass-weighted statistic. This shift occurs when high-density peaks move toward each other. We explore whether this shift can be removed by applying to the density field a transform (such as a logarithm) that gives fairer statistical weight to fluctuations in underdense regions. Using configuration-space perturbation theory in the Zel'dovich approximation, we find that the log-density correlation function shows a much smaller inward shift in the position of the BAO peak at low redshift than is seen in the overdensity correlation function. We also show that if the initial, Lagrangian density of matter parcels could be estimated at their Eulerian positions, giving a displaced-initial-density field, its peak shift would be even smaller. In fact, a transformed field that accentuates underdensities, such as the reciprocal of the density, pushes the peak the other way, outward. In our model, these shifts in the peak position can be attributed to shift terms, involving the derivative of the linear correlation function, that entirely vanish in this displaced-initial-density field.

  2. Local Innovation: A Neglected Source of Economic Self-Sufficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayson, James E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the potential importance of indigenous innovation in developing countries and its possibilities for encouraging local economic advancement. Examples are presented to show how local innovations in some African countries such as Kenya and Nairobi can improve the macro-economy of the nation. (HM)

  3. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  4. Analysis of localization methods for unintended emitting sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzey, Nurbanu; Ghasr, Mohammad T.; Jagannathan, S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of localization and tracking of unintended emissions from electronic devices using computer simulations. The available localization and tracking methods assume that the device is in the far-field region of the array. However, the received power of unintended emissions is very low and, therefore, requires near-field techniques. In the near-field, the performance of far-field schemes degrades since they ignore the effect of range on phase characteristics. Computer simulation results for localization and tracking methods developed by the authors are summarized to analyze the effects of near and far-field regions.

  5. Open Source Communities in Technical Writing: Local Exigence, Global Extensibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Trey; Gresham, Morgan; McCracken, Jill

    2011-01-01

    By offering open-source software (OSS)-based networks as an affordable technology alternative, we partnered with a nonprofit community organization. In this article, we narrate the client-based experiences of this partnership, highlighting the ways in which OSS and open-source culture (OSC) transformed our students' and our own expectations of…

  6. Simple Database Construction: Using Local Sources of Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, D. Timothy; Reineke, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Different simple and inexpensive ways of building a database using common computer software and data from local newspaper are presented. Creating one's own database provides an opportunity to discuss ethical issues in data collection as well as data integrity.

  7. Transported vs. local contributions from secondary and biomass burning sources to PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bong Mann; Seo, Jihoon; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Ji Yi; Kim, Yumi

    2016-11-01

    The concentration of fine particulates in Seoul, Korea has been lowered over the past 10 years, as a result of the city's efforts in implementing environmental control measures. Yet, the particulate concentration level in Seoul remains high as compared to other urban areas globally. In order to further improve fine particulate air quality in the Korea region and design a more effective control strategy, enhanced understanding of the sources and contribution of fine particulates along with their chemical compositions is necessary. In turn, relative contributions from local and transported sources on Seoul need to be established, as this city is particularly influenced by sources from upwind geographic areas. In this study, PM2.5 monitoring was conducted in Seoul from October 2012 to September 2013. PM2.5 mass concentrations, ions, metals, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water soluble OC (WSOC), humic-like substances of carbon (HULIS-C), and 85 organic compounds were chemically analyzed. The multivariate receptor model SMP was applied to the PM2.5 data, which then identified nine sources and estimated their source compositions as well as source contributions. Prior studies have identified and quantified the transported and local sources. However, no prior studies have distinguished contributions of an individual source between transported contribution and locally produced contribution. We differentiated transported secondary and biomass burning sources from the locally produced secondary and biomass burning sources, which was supported with potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis. Of the total secondary source contribution, 32% was attributed to transported secondary sources, and 68% was attributed to locally formed secondary sources. Meanwhile, the contribution from the transported biomass burning source was revealed as 59% of the total biomass burning contribution, which was 1.5 times higher than that of the local biomass burning source

  8. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

    2008-06-01

    The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods. PMID:18537362

  9. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

    2008-06-01

    The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods.

  10. Fluorescent Microspheres as Point Sources: A Localization Study.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jerry; Lee, Taiyoon; Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2015-01-01

    The localization of fluorescent microspheres is often employed for drift correction and image registration in single molecule microscopy, and is commonly carried out by fitting a point spread function to the image of the given microsphere. The mismatch between the point spread function and the image of the microsphere, however, calls into question the suitability of this localization approach. To investigate this issue, we subject both simulated and experimental microsphere image data to a maximum likelihood estimator that localizes a microsphere by fitting an Airy pattern to its image, and assess the suitability of the approach by evaluating the ability of the estimator to recover the true location of the microsphere with the best possible accuracy as determined based on the Cramér-Rao lower bound. Assessing against criteria based on the standard errors of the mean and the variance for an ideal estimator of the microsphere's location, we find that microspheres up to 100 nm in diameter can in general be localized using a fixed width Airy pattern, and that microspheres as large as 1 μm in diameter can in general be localized using a floated width Airy pattern. PMID:26218251

  11. Fluorescent Microspheres as Point Sources: A Localization Study

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jerry; Lee, Taiyoon; Ward, E. Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2015-01-01

    The localization of fluorescent microspheres is often employed for drift correction and image registration in single molecule microscopy, and is commonly carried out by fitting a point spread function to the image of the given microsphere. The mismatch between the point spread function and the image of the microsphere, however, calls into question the suitability of this localization approach. To investigate this issue, we subject both simulated and experimental microsphere image data to a maximum likelihood estimator that localizes a microsphere by fitting an Airy pattern to its image, and assess the suitability of the approach by evaluating the ability of the estimator to recover the true location of the microsphere with the best possible accuracy as determined based on the Cramér-Rao lower bound. Assessing against criteria based on the standard errors of the mean and the variance for an ideal estimator of the microsphere’s location, we find that microspheres up to 100 nm in diameter can in general be localized using a fixed width Airy pattern, and that microspheres as large as 1 μm in diameter can in general be localized using a floated width Airy pattern. PMID:26218251

  12. An investigation of acoustic beam patterns for the sonar localization problem using a beam based method.

    PubMed

    Guarato, Francesco; Windmill, James; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerald

    2013-06-01

    Target localization can be accomplished through an ultrasonic sonar system equipped with an emitter and two receivers. Time of flight of the sonar echoes allows the calculation of the distance of the target. The orientation can be estimated from knowledge of the beam pattern of the receivers and the ratio, in the frequency domain, between the emitted and the received signals after compensation for distance effects and air absorption. The localization method is described and, as its performance strongly depends on the beam pattern, the search of the most appropriate sonar receiver in order to ensure the highest accuracy of target orientation estimations is developed in this paper. The structure designs considered are inspired by the ear shapes of some bat species. Parameters like flare rate, truncation angle, and tragus are considered in the design of the receiver structures. Simulations of the localization method allow us to state which combination of those parameters could provide the best real world implementation. Simulation results show the estimates of target orientations are, in the worst case, 2° with SNR = 50 dB using the receiver structure chosen for a potential practical implementation of a sonar system.

  13. Explosion Source Location Study Using Collocated Acoustic and Seismic Networks in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V.; Gitterman, Y.; Arrowsmith, S.; Ben-Horin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    infrasonic phases of the two distant arrays; 2) a standard robust grid-search location procedure based on phase picks and a constant celerity for a phase (tropospheric or stratospheric) was applied; 3) a joint coordinate grid-search procedure using array waveforms and phase picks was tested, 4) the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) method, incorporating semi-empirical model-based prior information, was modified for array+network configuration and applied to the ground-truth events. For this purpose we accumulated data of the former observations of the air-to-ground infrasonic phases to compute station specific ground-truth Celerity-Range Histograms (ssgtCRH) and/or model-based CRH (mbCRH), which allow to essentially improve the location results. For building the mbCRH the local meteo-data and the ray-tracing modeling in 3 available azimuth ranges, accounting seasonal variations of winds directivity (quadrants North:315-45, South: 135-225, East 45-135) have been used.

  14. Tracking Coherent Structures and Source Localization in Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Hsieh, Ani; Schwartz, Ira; Yecko, Philip

    There has been a steady increase in the deployment of autonomous underwater and surface vehicles for applications such as ocean monitoring, tracking of marine processes, and forecasting contaminant transport. The underwater environment poses unique challenges since robots must operate in a communication and localization-limited environment where their dynamics are tightly coupled with the environmental dynamics. This work presents current efforts in understanding the impact of geophysical fluid dynamics on underwater vehicle control and autonomy. The focus of the talk is on the use of collaborative vehicles to track Lagrangian coherent structures and to localize contaminant spills. Research supported by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.

  15. Inversion of Atmospheric Tracer Measurements, Localization of Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issartel, J.-P.; Cabrit, B.; Hourdin, F.; Idelkadi, A.

    When abnormal concentrations of a pollutant are observed in the atmosphere, the question of its origin arises immediately. The radioactivity from Tchernobyl was de- tected in Sweden before the accident was announced. This situation emphasizes the psychological, political and medical stakes of a rapid identification of sources. In tech- nical terms, most industrial sources can be modeled as a fixed point at ground level with undetermined duration. The classical method of identification involves the cal- culation of a backtrajectory departing from the detector with an upstream integration of the wind field. We were first involved in such questions as we evaluated the ef- ficiency of the international monitoring network planned in the frame of the Com- prehensive Test Ban Treaty. We propose a new approach of backtracking based upon the use of retroplumes associated to available measurements. Firstly the retroplume is related to inverse transport processes, describing quantitatively how the air in a sam- ple originates from regions that are all the more extended and diffuse as we go back far in the past. Secondly it clarifies the sensibility of the measurement with respect to all potential sources. It is therefore calculated by adjoint equations including of course diffusive processes. Thirdly, the statistical interpretation, valid as far as sin- gle particles are concerned, should not be used to investigate the position and date of a macroscopic source. In that case, the retroplume rather induces a straightforward constraint between the intensity of the source and its position. When more than one measurements are available, including zero valued measurements, the source satisfies the same number of linear relations tightly related to the retroplumes. This system of linear relations can be handled through the simplex algorithm in order to make the above intensity-position correlation more restrictive. This method enables to manage in a quantitative manner the

  16. Effect of liposomal local therapy on salivary glands in acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hofauer, Benedikt; Mansour, Naglaa; Heiser, Clemens; Straßen, Ulrich; Bas, Murat; Knopf, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging as a monitoring tool for the effect of a liposomal local therapy in patients with dry mouth symptoms due to primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Fifty patients with pSS, diagnosed according to the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) criteria, were included. Clinical data were collected, and sonographic examination including ARFI imaging of the parotid and submandibular glands was performed. Subjective symptoms were evaluated via visual analogue scales (VAS), and the unstimulated whole salivary flow was measured. After a two-month period of liposomal local therapy, sonographic examination was repeated and both subjective and objective symptoms were re-evaluated. Before local treatment, the mean ARFI value of parotid glands was 2.96 m/s (SD 0.97). Mean ARFI value of the submandibular glands was 2.09 m/s (SD 0.71). After the two-month treatment period, a significant decline of ARFI values in the parotid glands to a value of 2.34 m/s (SD 0.70, p < 0.001) could be observed. The submandibular glands did not show any significant change. Further, a significant reduction of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms could be observed (p = 0.0001). With the application of ARFI imaging, a decline in parotid gland stiffness could be observed in patients with primary Sjögren's Syndrome accompanied by a significant improvement of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms. The seromucous submandibular glands did not show any changes compared to the serous parotid glands.

  17. Effect of liposomal local therapy on salivary glands in acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hofauer, Benedikt; Mansour, Naglaa; Heiser, Clemens; Straßen, Ulrich; Bas, Murat; Knopf, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging as a monitoring tool for the effect of a liposomal local therapy in patients with dry mouth symptoms due to primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Fifty patients with pSS, diagnosed according to the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) criteria, were included. Clinical data were collected, and sonographic examination including ARFI imaging of the parotid and submandibular glands was performed. Subjective symptoms were evaluated via visual analogue scales (VAS), and the unstimulated whole salivary flow was measured. After a two-month period of liposomal local therapy, sonographic examination was repeated and both subjective and objective symptoms were re-evaluated. Before local treatment, the mean ARFI value of parotid glands was 2.96 m/s (SD 0.97). Mean ARFI value of the submandibular glands was 2.09 m/s (SD 0.71). After the two-month treatment period, a significant decline of ARFI values in the parotid glands to a value of 2.34 m/s (SD 0.70, p < 0.001) could be observed. The submandibular glands did not show any significant change. Further, a significant reduction of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms could be observed (p = 0.0001). With the application of ARFI imaging, a decline in parotid gland stiffness could be observed in patients with primary Sjögren's Syndrome accompanied by a significant improvement of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms. The seromucous submandibular glands did not show any changes compared to the serous parotid glands. PMID:27572326

  18. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes II: simulation for Spallation Neutron Sources and planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Baik, Kyungmin; Leighton, Timothy G

    2011-08-01

    This paper uses a finite element method (FEM) to compare predictions of the attenuation and sound speeds of acoustic modes in a fluid-filled pipe with those of the analytical model presented in the first paper in this series. It explains why, when the predictions of the earlier paper were compared with experimental data from a water-filled PMMA pipe, the uncertainties and agreement for attenuation data were worse than those for sound speed data. Having validated the FEM approach in this way, the versatility of FEM is thereafter demonstrated by modeling two practical applications which are beyond the analysis of the earlier paper. These applications model propagation in the mercury-filled steel pipework of the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee), and in a long-standing design for acoustic sensors for use on planetary probes. The results show that strong coupling between the fluid and the solid walls means that erroneous interpretations are made of the data if they assume that the sound speed and attenuation in the fluid in the pipe are the same as those that would be measured in an infinite volume of identical fluid, assumptions which are common when such data have previously been interpreted. PMID:21877784

  19. A fast Monte Carlo algorithm for source localization on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaskar, Ameya; Lu, Yue M.

    2013-09-01

    Epidemic models on networks have long been studied by biologists and social sciences to determine the steady state levels of an infection on a network. Recently, however, several authors have begun considering the more difficult problem of estimating the source of an infection given information about its behavior some time after the initial infection. In this paper, we describe a technique to estimate the source of an infection on a general graph based on observations from a small set of observers during a fixed time window at some unknown time after the initial infection. We describe an alternate representation for the susceptible-infected (SI) infection model based on geodesic distances on a randomly-weighted version of the graph; this representation allows us to exploit fast algorithms to compute geodesic distances to estimate the marginal distributions for each observer and compute a pseudo-likelihood function that is maximized to find the source.

  20. Source Localization of Eeg Signals during Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing Z.; Yao, Bing; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Karakasis, Chris; Brown, Robert W.; Yue, Guang H.

    2003-10-01

    In this study we determined sources of EEG signals during a fatigue process involving intermittent maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). In the fatigue motor task, subjects consecutively performed 200 trials of handgrip MVCs, each lasted 2 s, followed by a 5-s rest. In the control task, subjects performed the same task but the rest time was 28 s, and there was also a 5-min rest after each 40 trials so that fatigue effect was minimized. EEG signals were recorded along with handgrip force and EMG data. Current dipole model was applied to determine the signal sources in a three-sphere homogeneous head frame. Effects of fatigue on the signal source were determined. The results showed no significant changes in dipole strength and orientation but significant larger movement ranges in the dipole location during the fatigue process than during the control, indicating fatigue-related rotation of the center of cortical activation.

  1. Coupled High Speed Imaging and Seismo-Acoustic Recordings of Strombolian Explosions at Etna, July 2014: Implications for Source Processes and Signal Inversions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.; Ricci, T.; Andronico, D.; Kueppers, U.; Cannata, A.; Sesterhenn, J.; Spina, L.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and acoustic surveillance is routinely performed at several persistent activity volcanoes worldwide. However, interpretation of the signals associated with explosive activity is still equivocal, due to both source variability and the intrinsically limited information carried by the waves. Comparison and cross-correlation of the geophysical quantities with other information in general and visual recording in particular is therefore actively sought. At Etna (Italy) in July 2014, short-lived Strombolian explosions ejected bomb- to lapilli-sized, molten pyroclasts at a remarkably repeatable time interval of about two seconds, offering a rare occasion to systematically investigate the seismic and acoustic fields radiated by this common volcanic source. We deployed FAMoUS (FAst, MUltiparametric Setup for the study of explosive activity) at 260 meters from the vents, recording more than 60 explosions in thermal and visible high-speed videos (50 to 500 frames per second) and broadband seismic and acoustic instruments (1 to 10000 Hz for the acoustic and from 0.01 to 30 Hz for the seismic). Analysis of this dataset highlights nonlinear relationships between the exit velocity and mass of ejecta and the amplitude and frequency of the acoustic signals. It also allows comparing different methods to estimate source depth, and to validate existing theory on the coupling of airwaves with ground motion.

  2. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 1; Analysis and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a study of rotor and stator scattering using the SOURCE3D Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. SOURCE3D is a quasi-three-dimensional computer program that uses three-dimensional acoustics and two-dimensional cascade load response theory to calculate rotor and stator modal reflection and transmission (scattering) coefficients. SOURCE3D is at the core of the TFaNS (Theoretical Fan Noise Design/Prediction System), developed for NASA, which provides complete fully coupled (inlet, rotor, stator, exit) noise solutions for turbofan engines. The reason for studying scattering is that we must first understand the behavior of the individual scattering coefficients provided by SOURCE3D, before eventually understanding the more complicated predictions from TFaNS. To study scattering, we have derived a large number of scattering curves for vane and blade rows. The curves are plots of output wave power divided by input wave power (in dB units) versus vane/blade ratio. Some of these plots are shown in this report. All of the plots are provided in a separate volume. To assist in understanding the plots, formulas have been derived for special vane/blade ratios for which wavefronts are either parallel or normal to rotor or stator chords. From the plots, we have found that, for the most part, there was strong transmission and weak reflection over most of the vane/blade ratio range for the stator. For the rotor, there was little transmission loss.

  3. Acoustic emission source location and damage detection in a metallic structure using a graph-theory-based geodesic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadharan, R.; Prasanna, G.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2009-11-01

    A geodesic-based approach using Lamb waves is proposed to locate the acoustic emission (AE) source and damage in an isotropic metallic structure. In the case of the AE (passive) technique, the elastic waves take the shortest path from the source to the sensor array distributed in the structure. The geodesics are computed on the meshed surface of the structure using graph theory based on Dijkstra's algorithm. By propagating the waves in reverse virtually from these sensors along the geodesic path and by locating the first intersection point of these waves, one can get the AE source location. The same approach is extended for detection of damage in a structure. The wave response matrix of the given sensor configuration for the healthy and the damaged structure is obtained experimentally. The healthy and damage response matrix is compared and their difference gives the information about the reflection of waves from the damage. These waves are backpropagated from the sensors and the above method is used to locate the damage by finding the point where intersection of geodesics occurs. In this work, the geodesic approach is shown to be suitable to obtain a practicable source location solution in a more general set-up on any arbitrary surface containing finite discontinuities. Experiments were conducted on aluminum specimens of simple and complex geometry to validate this new method.

  4. Experimental study of noise sources and acoustic propagation in a turbofan model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, S.; Canard-Caruana, S.; Julliard, J.

    1990-10-01

    Experimental studies of the acoustic radiation of subsonic fans mainly due to blade and vane presure fluctuations were performed in the SNECMA 5C2 compressor anechoic facility. A brief description of the test rig is presented noting that the CA5 turbojet engine model fan has a diameter of 47 cm, 48 blades, and a nominal rotation speed of 12,600 rpm. The two chief experiments discussed are the measurement of blade and vane pressure fluctuations by thin-film transducers and the spinning mode analysis of the sound field propagating in the intake duct. Several examples of applications are discussed, and it is shown that an inflow control device, as expected, reduces the aerodynamic disturbances by about 10 dB. Rotor-stator interaction tones are determined by the modal analysis, and it is found that a duct lining with a length of one duct radius could give an insertion loss up to 20 dB in flight.

  5. Error bounds for MEG and EEG source localization

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C. |; Spencer, M.E. |; Leahy, R.M.; Lewis, P.S.

    1992-12-01

    Localization error bounds are presented for both EEG and MEG as graphical error contours for a 37 sensor arrangement. Both one and two dipole cases were examined for all possible dipole orientations and locations within a head quadrant. The results show a strong dependence on absolute dipole location and orientation. The results also show that fusion of the EEG and MEG measurements into a combined model reduces the lower bound. A Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to check the tightness of the bounds for a selected case. The simple head model, the white and relatively low power noise, and the few relatively strong dipoles were all selected in this study as optimistic conditions to establish possibly fundamental resolution limits for any localization effort.

  6. Error bounds for MEG and EEG source localization

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. Los Alamos National Lab., NM ); Spencer, M.E. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. TRW Space and Defense, One Space Park, Redondo Beach, CA ); Leahy, R.M. (University of Southern Californ

    1992-01-01

    Localization error bounds are presented for both EEG and MEG as graphical error contours for a 37 sensor arrangement. Both one and two dipole cases were examined for all possible dipole orientations and locations within a head quadrant. The results show a strong dependence on absolute dipole location and orientation. The results also show that fusion of the EEG and MEG measurements into a combined model reduces the lower bound. A Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to check the tightness of the bounds for a selected case. The simple head model, the white and relatively low power noise, and the few relatively strong dipoles were all selected in this study as optimistic conditions to establish possibly fundamental resolution limits for any localization effort.

  7. Investigation of the robustness of time reversal acoustics in solid media through the reconstruction of temporally symmetric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffa, M.; Anderson, B. E.; Guyer, R. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Johnson, P. A.

    2008-04-01

    We investigate some of the limitations of time reversal acoustics (TRA) in solid media with transducers attached to the surface. In particular, we consider the limitations due to the finite size of the transducers and elastic wave propagation. Using a theoretical approach, numerical simulations and validation from laboratory ultrasound experiments, we find that finite size transducers and the existence of longitudinal and shear waves play significant roles in perturbing the time reversal process. Despite these limitations, we show that TRA in solids is very robust, providing the means to reconstruct the main features of the source signal. The analysis of TRA retro-focusing properties in solid specimens is of foremost importance for the development of new non-destructive evaluation techniques.

  8. Localization of non-stationary sources of electromagnetic radiation with the aid of phasometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mersov, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of localizing sources of electromagnetic radiation by measurement of the time of passage of the radiation or the measurement of its phase at various points of cosmic space, at which are located satellite observatories is examined. Algorithms are proposed for localization using two, three, and four astronomical observatories. The precision of the localization and several partial results of practical significance are deduced.

  9. Treatment of acoustic fluid-structure interaction by Localized Lagrange Multipliers and comparison to alternative interface coupling methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Sprague, Michael A.; Ross, Michael R.; Park, K. C.

    2008-11-01

    This paper is a sequel on the topic of localized Lagrange multipliers (LLM) for applications of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between finite-element models of an acoustic fluid and an elastic structure. The prequel paper formulated the spatial-discretization methods, the LLM interface treatment, the time-marching partitioned analysis procedures, and the application to 1D benchmark problems. Here, we expand on formulation aspects required for successful application to more realistic 2D and 3D problems. Additional topics include duality relations at the fluid-structure interface, partitioned vibration analysis, reduced-order modeling, handling of curved interface surfaces, and comparison of LLM with other coupling methods. Emphasis is given to non-matching fluid-structure meshes. We present benchmark examples that illustrate the benefits and drawbacks of competing interface treatments. Realistic application problems involving the seismic response of two existing dams are considered. These include 2D modal analyses of the Koyna gravity dam, transient-response analyses of that dam with and without reduced-order modeling, incorporation of nonlinear cavitation effects, and the 3D transient-response analysis of the Morrow Point arch dam.

  10. Signal/Image Processing of Acoustic Flaw Signatures for Detection and Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Meyer, A W

    2001-06-01

    The timely, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of critical optics in high energy, pulsed laser experiments is a crucial analysis that must be performed for the experiment to be successful. Failure to detect flaws of critical sizes in vacuum-loaded optical windows can result in a catastrophic failure jeopardizing the safety of both personnel and costly equipment. We discuss the development of signal/image processing techniques to both detect critical flaws and locate their position on the window. The data measured from two Orthogonal arrays of narrow beamwidth ultrasonic transducers are preprocessed using a model-based scheme based on the Green's function of the medium providing individual channel signatures. These signatures are then transformed to the two-dimensional image space using a power-based estimator. A 2D-replicant is then constructed based on the underlying physics of the material along with the geometry of the window. Correlating the replicant with the enhanced power image leads to the optimal 2D-matched filter solution detecting and localizing the flaw. Controlled experimental results on machined flaws are discussed.

  11. Precipitation Recycling and the Vertical Distribution of Local and Remote Sources of Water for Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is defined as the amount of water that evaporates from a region that precipitates within the same region. This is also interpreted as the local source of water for precipitation. In this study, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation have been diagnosed through the use of passive constituent tracers that represent regional evaporative sources along with their transport and precipitation. We will discuss the differences between this method and the simpler bulk diagnostic approach to precipitation recycling. A summer seasonal simulation has been analyzed for the regional sources of the United States Great Plains precipitation. While the tropical Atlantic Ocean (including the Gulf of Mexico) and the local continental sources of precipitation are most dominant, the vertically integrated column of water contains substantial water content originating from the Northern Pacific Ocean, which is not precipitated. The vertical profiles of regional water sources indicate that local Great Plains source of water dominates the lower troposphere, predominantly in the PBL. However, the Pacific Ocean source is dominant over a large portion of the middle to upper troposphere. The influence of the tropical Atlantic Ocean is reasonably uniform throughout the column. While the results are not unexpected given the formulation of the model's convective parameterization, the analysis provides a quantitative assessment of the impact of local evaporation on the occurrence of convective precipitation in the GCM. Further, these results suggest that local source of water is not well mixed throughout the vertical column.

  12. Passive Localization of Mixed Far-Field and Near-Field Sources without Estimating the Number of Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Tao, Haihong; Rao, Xuan; Su, Jia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for the localization of mixed far-field sources (FFSs) and near-field sources (NFSs) without estimating the source number. Firstly, the algorithm decouples the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation from the range estimation by exploiting fourth-order spatial-temporal cumulants of the observed data. Based on the joint diagonalization structure of multiple spatial-temporal cumulant matrices, a new one-dimensional (1-D) spatial spectrum function is derived to generate the DOA estimates of both FFSs and NFSs. Then, the FFSs and NFSs are identified and the range parameters of NFSs are determined via beamforming technique. Compared with traditional mixed sources localization algorithms, the proposed algorithm avoids the performance deterioration induced by erroneous source number estimation. Furthermore, it has a higher resolution capability and improves the estimation accuracy. Computer simulations are implemented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:25668212

  13. Normalization and source separation of acoustic emission signals for condition monitoring and fault detection of multi-cylinder diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiliang; Lin, Tian Ran; Tan, Andy C. C.

    2015-12-01

    A signal processing technique is presented in this paper to normalize and separate the source of non-linear acoustic emission (AE) signals of a multi-cylinder diesel engine for condition monitoring applications and fault detection. The normalization technique presented in the paper overcomes the long-existing non-linearity problem of AE sensors so that responses measured by different AE sensors can be quantitatively analysed and compared. A source separation algorithm is also developed in the paper to separate the mixture of the normalized AE signals produced by a multi-cylinder diesel engine by utilising the system parameters (i.e., wave attenuation constant and the arrival time delay) of AE wave propagation determined by a standard pencil lead break test on the engine cylinder head. It is shown that the source separation algorithm is able to separate the signal interference of adjacent cylinders from the monitored cylinder once the wave attenuation constant and the arrival time delay along the propagation path are known. The algorithm is particularly useful in the application of AE technique for condition monitoring of small-size diesel engines where signal interference from the neighbouring cylinders is strong.

  14. Reconstruction of normal velocity distribution at the face of an ultrasound source in liquid on the base of acoustic waveform measurements along a surface in front of the source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuriy A.; Morozov, Andrey V.

    2002-05-01

    Normal velocity distribution along a vibrating surface is an important characteristic of any acoustic source. When it is known, the acoustic pressure field can be predicted using Rayleigh integral or similar approach. However, up to now there are no reliable methods of the velocity distribution measurement in liquids or solids. Due to strong acousto-optic interaction in condensed medium, the well-developed laser vibrometers can be employed only when the transducer is contacting vacuum or gas. In this work a novel method is developed and tested for evaluation of the velocity distribution along the vibrating surface of a piezoceramic transducer in liquid. The technique consists of measuring acoustic wave amplitude and phase along a surface surrounding the source, changing the sign of the phase, and theoretically backpropagating it to the source using the Rayleigh integral. The method was studied numerically and tested experimentally. The acoustic field of ultrasound source was registered using a needle hydrophone, which was scanned along a plane surface in front of the transducer. It is shown that the proposed approach enables accurate detection of the normal velocity. The method can be used for a wide variety of acoustically radiating structures. [Work supported by CRDF, NIH-Fogarty, and RFBR.

  15. Matrix kernels for MEG and EEG source localization and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S.; Leahy, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    The most widely used model for electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) assumes a quasi-static approximation of Maxwell`s equations and a piecewise homogeneous conductor model. Both models contain an incremental field element that linearly relates an incremental source element (current dipole) to the field or voltage at a distant point. The explicit form of the field element is dependent on the head modeling assumptions and sensor configuration. Proper characterization of this incremental element is crucial to the inverse problem. The field element can be partitioned into the product of a vector dependent on sensor characteristics and a matrix kernel dependent only on head modeling assumptions. We present here the matrix kernels for the general boundary element model (BEM) and for MEG spherical models. We show how these kernels are easily interchanged in a linear algebraic framework that includes sensor specifics such as orientation and gradiometer configuration. We then describe how this kernel is easily applied to ``gain`` or ``transfer`` matrices used in multiple dipole and source imaging models.

  16. Refined multiload method for measuring acoustical source characteristics of an intake or exhaust system

    PubMed

    Jang; Ih

    2000-06-01

    The one-port source characteristics in a duct system, viz., source impedance and strength, can be determined by using the four-load method. In this paper, to avoid the instability problem of the conventional four-load method, a new formulation for the multiload method has been proposed, which employs an error function based on the linear, time-invariant source model. It is shown that the method is less sensitive to input errors compared to the previous methods. For a 10% input error, the proposed method yields a relative error in the source resistance that is about 1/100 times smaller than for the conventional method. The effectiveness of the present method is demonstrated by two test examples, a loudspeaker and a blower, each operating in a duct. It is observed that the conventional and least-squares methods result in large errors, whereas the present method yields far better agreement with the actual source parameters, as measured by the direct method. The present method is then used to obtain the source parameters on the exhaust side of an operating internal combustion engine. The radiated sound spectrum from the exhaust opening is predicted by using the measured source parameters and the calculated result agrees very well with the measured one.

  17. Nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Aoutou, Kamel; Younsi, Smain; Amour, Rabia

    2009-07-15

    The problem of nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves involving the dynamics of mobile cold positrons is addressed. A theoretical work is presented to show their existence and possible realization in a simple four-component plasma model. The results should be useful for the understanding of the localized structures that may occur in space and laboratory plasmas as new sources of cold positrons are now well developed.

  18. Deconvolution for the localization of sound sources using a circular microphone array.

    PubMed

    Tiana-Roig, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-09-01

    During the last decade, the aeroacoustic community has examined various methods based on deconvolution to improve the visualization of acoustic fields scanned with planar sparse arrays of microphones. These methods assume that the beamforming map in an observation plane can be approximated by a convolution of the distribution of the actual sources and the beamformer's point-spread function, defined as the beamformer's response to a point source. By deconvolving the resulting map, the resolution is improved, and the side-lobes effect is reduced or even eliminated compared to conventional beamforming. Even though these methods were originally designed for planar sparse arrays, in the present study, they are adapted to uniform circular arrays for mapping the sound over 360°. This geometry has the advantage that the beamforming output is practically independent of the focusing direction, meaning that the beamformer's point-spread function is shift-invariant. This makes it possible to apply computationally efficient deconvolution algorithms that consist of spectral procedures in the entire region of interest, such as the deconvolution approach for the mapping of the acoustic sources 2, the Fourier-based non-negative least squares, and the Richardson-Lucy. This investigation examines the matter with computer simulations and measurements. PMID:23967939

  19. Coded moderator approach for fast neutron source detection and localization at standoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littell, Jennifer; Lukosi, Eric; Hayward, Jason; Milburn, Robert; Rowan, Allen

    2015-06-01

    Considering the need for directional sensing at standoff for some security applications and scenarios where a neutron source may be shielded by high Z material that nearly eliminates the source gamma flux, this work focuses on investigating the feasibility of using thermal neutron sensitive boron straw detectors for fast neutron source detection and localization. We utilized MCNPX simulations to demonstrate that, through surrounding the boron straw detectors by a HDPE coded moderator, a source-detector orientation-specific response enables potential 1D source localization in a high neutron detection efficiency design. An initial test algorithm has been developed in order to confirm the viability of this detector system's localization capabilities which resulted in identification of a 1 MeV neutron source with a strength equivalent to 8 kg WGPu at 50 m standoff within ±11°.

  20. A new experimental method for the determination of the effective orifice area based on the acoustical source term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, L.; Knapp, Y.; Pibarot, P.; Bertrand, E.; Garcia, D.; Durand, L. G.; Rieu, R.

    2005-12-01

    The effective orifice area (EOA) is the most commonly used parameter to assess the severity of aortic valve stenosis as well as the performance of valve substitutes. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) may be used for in vitro estimation of valve EOA. In the present study, we propose a new and simple method based on Howe’s developments of Lighthill’s aero-acoustic theory. This method is based on an acoustical source term (AST) to estimate the EOA from the transvalvular flow velocity measurements obtained by PIV. The EOAs measured by the AST method downstream of three sharp-edged orifices were in excellent agreement with the EOAs predicted from the potential flow theory used as the reference method in this study. Moreover, the AST method was more accurate than other conventional PIV methods based on streamlines, inflexion point or vorticity to predict the theoretical EOAs. The superiority of the AST method is likely due to the nonlinear form of the AST. There was also an excellent agreement between the EOAs measured by the AST method downstream of the three sharp-edged orifices as well as downstream of a bioprosthetic valve with those obtained by the conventional clinical method based on Doppler-echocardiographic measurements of transvalvular velocity. The results of this study suggest that this new simple PIV method provides an accurate estimation of the aortic valve flow EOA. This new method may thus be used as a reference method to estimate the EOA in experimental investigation of the performance of valve substitutes and to validate Doppler-echocardiographic measurements under various physiologic and pathologic flow conditions.

  1. PADF electromagnetic source localization using extremum seeking control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa A.; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2014-10-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are a significant technology attracting considerable research interest. Recent advances in wireless communications and electronics have enabled the development of low-cost, low-power and multi-functional sensors that are small in size and communicate over short distances. Most WSN applications require knowing or measuring locations of thousands of sensors accurately. For example, sensing data without knowing the sensor location is often meaningless. Locations of sensor nodes are fundamental to providing location stamps, locating and tracking objects, forming clusters, and facilitating routing. This research focused on the modeling and implementation of distributed, mobile radar sensor networks. In particular, we worked on the problem of Position-Adaptive Direction Finding (PADF), to determine the location of a non- collaborative transmitter, possibly hidden within a structure, by using a team of cooperative intelligent sensor networks. Position-Adaptive radar concepts have been formulated and investigated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) within the past few years. In this paper, we present the simulation performance analysis on the application aspect. We apply Extremum Seeking Control (ESC) schemes by using the swarm seeking problem, where the goal is to design a control law for each individual sensor that can minimize the error metric by adapting the sensor positions in real-time, thereby minimizing the unknown estimation error. As a result we achieved source seeking and collision avoidance of the entire group of the sensor positions.

  2. Reconstruction of lightning channel geometry by localizing thunder sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodhika, J. A. P.; Dharmarathna, W. G. D.; Fernando, Mahendra; Cooray, Vernon

    2013-09-01

    Thunder is generated as a result of a shock wave created by sudden expansion of air in the lightning channel due to high temperature variations. Even though the highest amplitudes of thunder signatures are generated at the return stroke stage, thunder signals generated at other events such as preliminary breakdown pulses also can be of amplitudes which are large enough to record using a sensitive system. In this study, it was attempted to reconstruct the lightning channel geometry of cloud and ground flashes by locating the temporal and spatial variations of thunder sources. Six lightning flashes were reconstructed using the recorded thunder signatures. Possible effects due to atmospheric conditions were neglected. Numerical calculations suggest that the time resolution of the recorded signal and 10 ms-1error in speed of sound leads to 2% and 3% errors, respectively, in the calculated coordinates. Reconstructed channel geometries for cloud and ground flashes agreed with the visual observations. Results suggest that the lightning channel can be successfully reconstructed using this technique.

  3. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aileen

    spatial wind noise filtering hoses or pipes. The grid was within the distance limits of a single gauge's normal hose array, and data were used to perform a spatial noise correlation study. The highest correlation values were not found in the lower frequencies as anticipated, owing to a lack of sources in the lower range and the uncorrelated nature of wind noise. The highest values, with cross-correlation averages between 0.4 and 0.7 from 3 to 17 m between gauges, were found at night from 10 and 20 Hz due to a continuous local noise source and low wind. Data from the larger array were used to identify continuous and impulsive signals in the area that comprise the ambient noise field. Ground truth infrasound and acoustic, time and location data were taken for a highway site, a wind farm, and a natural gas compressor. Close-range sound data were taken with a single IML "traveler" gauge. Spectrograms and spectrum peaks were used to identify their source signatures. Two regional location techniques were also tested with data from the large array by using a propane cannon as a controlled, impulsive source. A comparison is presented of the Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm (MUSIC) to a simple, quadratic, circular wavefront algorithm. MUSIC was unable to effectively separate noise and source eignenvalues and eigenvectors due to spatial aliasing of the propane cannon signal and a lack of incoherent noise. Only 33 out of 80 usable shots were located by MUSIC within 100 m. Future work with the algorithm should focus on location of impulsive and continuous signals with development of methods for accurate separation of signal and noise eigenvectors in the presence of coherent noise and possible spatial aliasing. The circular wavefront algorithm performed better with our specific dataset and successfully located 70 out of 80 propane cannon shots within 100 m of the original location, 66 of which were within 20 m. This method has low computation requirements, making it well

  4. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aileen

    spatial wind noise filtering hoses or pipes. The grid was within the distance limits of a single gauge's normal hose array, and data were used to perform a spatial noise correlation study. The highest correlation values were not found in the lower frequencies as anticipated, owing to a lack of sources in the lower range and the uncorrelated nature of wind noise. The highest values, with cross-correlation averages between 0.4 and 0.7 from 3 to 17 m between gauges, were found at night from 10 and 20 Hz due to a continuous local noise source and low wind. Data from the larger array were used to identify continuous and impulsive signals in the area that comprise the ambient noise field. Ground truth infrasound and acoustic, time and location data were taken for a highway site, a wind farm, and a natural gas compressor. Close-range sound data were taken with a single IML "traveler" gauge. Spectrograms and spectrum peaks were used to identify their source signatures. Two regional location techniques were also tested with data from the large array by using a propane cannon as a controlled, impulsive source. A comparison is presented of the Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm (MUSIC) to a simple, quadratic, circular wavefront algorithm. MUSIC was unable to effectively separate noise and source eignenvalues and eigenvectors due to spatial aliasing of the propane cannon signal and a lack of incoherent noise. Only 33 out of 80 usable shots were located by MUSIC within 100 m. Future work with the algorithm should focus on location of impulsive and continuous signals with development of methods for accurate separation of signal and noise eigenvectors in the presence of coherent noise and possible spatial aliasing. The circular wavefront algorithm performed better with our specific dataset and successfully located 70 out of 80 propane cannon shots within 100 m of the original location, 66 of which were within 20 m. This method has low computation requirements, making it well

  5. High temperature acoustic and hybrid microwave/acoustic levitators for materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin

    1990-01-01

    The physical acoustics group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a single mode acoustic levitator technique for advanced containerless materials processing. The technique was successfully demonstrated in ground based studies to temperatures of about 1000 C in a uniform temperature furnace environment and to temperatures of about 1500 C using laser beams to locally heat the sample. Researchers are evaluating microwaves as a more efficient means than lasers for locally heating a positioned sample. Recent tests of a prototype single mode hybrid microwave/acoustic levitator successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using microwave power as a heating source. The potential advantages of combining acoustic positioning forces and microwave heating for containerless processing investigations are presented in outline form.

  6. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew D.; Beemer, Brianne T.; Greene, Nathaniel T.; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G. Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  7. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew D; Beemer, Brianne T; Greene, Nathaniel T; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  8. Reactive searching and infotaxis in odor source localization.

    PubMed

    Voges, Nicole; Chaffiol, Antoine; Lucas, Philippe; Martinez, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    Male moths aiming to locate pheromone-releasing females rely on stimulus-adapted search maneuvers complicated by a discontinuous distribution of pheromone patches. They alternate sequences of upwind surge when perceiving the pheromone and cross- or downwind casting when the odor is lost. We compare four search strategies: three reactive versus one cognitive. The former consist of pre-programmed movement sequences triggered by pheromone detections while the latter uses Bayesian inference to build spatial probability maps. Based on the analysis of triphasic responses of antennal lobe neurons (On, inhibition, Off), we propose three reactive strategies. One combines upwind surge (representing the On response to a pheromone detection) and spiral casting, only. The other two additionally include crosswind (zigzag) casting representing the Off phase. As cognitive strategy we use the infotaxis algorithm which was developed for searching in a turbulent medium. Detection events in the electroantennogram of a moth attached to a robot indirectly control this cyborg, depending on the strategy in use. The recorded trajectories are analyzed with regard to success rates, efficiency, and other features. In addition, we qualitatively compare our robotic trajectories to behavioral search paths. Reactive searching is more efficient (yielding shorter trajectories) for higher pheromone doses whereas cognitive searching works better for lower doses. With respect to our experimental conditions (2 m from starting position to pheromone source), reactive searching with crosswind zigzag yields the shortest trajectories (for comparable success rates). Assuming that the neuronal Off response represents a short-term memory, zigzagging is an efficient movement to relocate a recently lost pheromone plume. Accordingly, such reactive strategies offer an interesting alternative to complex cognitive searching.

  9. Reactive Searching and Infotaxis in Odor Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    Voges, Nicole; Chaffiol, Antoine; Lucas, Philippe; Martinez, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Male moths aiming to locate pheromone-releasing females rely on stimulus-adapted search maneuvers complicated by a discontinuous distribution of pheromone patches. They alternate sequences of upwind surge when perceiving the pheromone and cross- or downwind casting when the odor is lost. We compare four search strategies: three reactive versus one cognitive. The former consist of pre-programmed movement sequences triggered by pheromone detections while the latter uses Bayesian inference to build spatial probability maps. Based on the analysis of triphasic responses of antennal lobe neurons (On, inhibition, Off), we propose three reactive strategies. One combines upwind surge (representing the On response to a pheromone detection) and spiral casting, only. The other two additionally include crosswind (zigzag) casting representing the Off phase. As cognitive strategy we use the infotaxis algorithm which was developed for searching in a turbulent medium. Detection events in the electroantennogram of a moth attached to a robot indirectly control this cyborg, depending on the strategy in use. The recorded trajectories are analyzed with regard to success rates, efficiency, and other features. In addition, we qualitatively compare our robotic trajectories to behavioral search paths. Reactive searching is more efficient (yielding shorter trajectories) for higher pheromone doses whereas cognitive searching works better for lower doses. With respect to our experimental conditions (2 m from starting position to pheromone source), reactive searching with crosswind zigzag yields the shortest trajectories (for comparable success rates). Assuming that the neuronal Off response represents a short-term memory, zigzagging is an efficient movement to relocate a recently lost pheromone plume. Accordingly, such reactive strategies offer an interesting alternative to complex cognitive searching. PMID:25330317

  10. Radioactive source localization inside pipes using a long-range alpha detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue-Mei; Tuo, Xian-Guo; Li, Zhe; Liu, Ming-Zhe; Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Dong, Xiang-Long; Li, Ping-Chuan

    2013-08-01

    Long-range alpha detectors (LRADs) are attracting much attention in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities because of some problems in obtaining source positions on an interior surface during pipe decommissioning. By utilizing the characteristic that LRAD detects alphas by collecting air-driving ions, this article applies a method to localize the radioactive source by ions' fluid property. By obtaining the ion travel time and the airspeed distribution in the pipe, the source position can be determined. Thus this method overcomes the ion's lack of periodic characteristics. Experimental results indicate that this method can approximately localize the source inside the pipe. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. "Closing the Loop": Overcoming barriers to locally sourcing food in Fort Collins, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental sustainability has become a focal point for many communities in recent years, and restaurants are seeking creative ways to become more sustainable. As many chefs realize, sourcing food locally is an important step towards sustainability and towards building a healthy, resilient community. Review of literature on sustainability in restaurants and the local food movement revealed that chefs face many barriers to sourcing their food locally, but that there are also many solutions for overcoming these barriers that chefs are in the early stages of exploring. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to identify barriers to local sourcing and investigate how some restaurants are working to overcome those barriers in the city of Fort Collins, Colorado. To do this, interviews were conducted with four subjects who guide purchasing decisions for restaurants in Fort Collins. Two of these restaurants have created successful solutions and are able to source most of their food locally. The other two are interested in and working towards sourcing locally but have not yet been able to overcome barriers, and therefore only source a few local items. Findings show that there are four barriers and nine solutions commonly identified by each of the subjects. The research found differences between those who source most of their food locally and those who have not made as much progress in local sourcing. Based on these results, two solution flowcharts were created, one for primary barriers and one for secondary barriers, for restaurants to assess where they are in the local food chain and how they can more successfully source food locally. As there are few explicit connections between this research question and climate change, it is important to consider the implicit connections that motivate and justify this research. The question of whether or not greenhouse gas emissions are lower for locally sourced food is a topic of much debate, and while there are major developments

  12. Seismic augmentation of acoustic monitoring of mortar fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas S.

    2007-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center participated in a joint ARL-NATO TG-53 field experiment and data collect at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ in early November 2005. Seismic and acoustic signatures from both muzzle blasts and impacts of small arms fire and artillery were recorded using 7 seismic arrays and 3 acoustic arrays. Arrays comprised of 12 seismic and 12 acoustic sensors each were located from 700 m to 18 km from gun positions. Preliminary analysis of signatures attributed to 60mm, 81mm, 120 mm mortars recorded at a seismic-acoustic array 1.1 km from gun position are presented. Seismic and acoustic array f-k analysis is performed to detect and characterize the source signature. Horizontal seismic data are analyzed to determine efficacy of a seismic discriminant for mortar and artillery sources. Rotation of North and East seismic components to radial and transverse components relative to the source-receiver path provide maximum surface wave amplitude on the transverse component. Angles of rotation agree well with f-k analysis of both seismic and acoustic signals. The spectral energy of the rotated transverse surface wave is observable on the all caliber of mortars at a distance of 1.1 km and is a reliable source discriminant for mortar sources at this distance. In a step towards automation, travel time stencils using local seismic and acoustic velocities are applied to seismic data for analysis and determination of source characteristics.

  13. Application of pattern recognition techniques to the identification of aerospace acoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.; Obrien, Walter F.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    1988-01-01

    A pattern recognition system was developed that successfully recognizes simulated spectra of five different types of transportation noise sources. The system generates hyperplanes during a training stage to separate the classes and correctly classify unknown patterns in classification mode. A feature selector in the system reduces a large number of features to a smaller optimal set, maximizing performance and minimizing computation.

  14. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  15. 3D source localization of interictal spikes in epilepsy patients with MRI lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Worrell, Gregory A.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; He, Bin

    2006-08-01

    The present study aims to accurately localize epileptogenic regions which are responsible for epileptic activities in epilepsy patients by means of a new subspace source localization approach, i.e. first principle vectors (FINE), using scalp EEG recordings. Computer simulations were first performed to assess source localization accuracy of FINE in the clinical electrode set-up. The source localization results from FINE were compared with the results from a classic subspace source localization approach, i.e. MUSIC, and their differences were tested statistically using the paired t-test. Other factors influencing the source localization accuracy were assessed statistically by ANOVA. The interictal epileptiform spike data from three adult epilepsy patients with medically intractable partial epilepsy and well-defined symptomatic MRI lesions were then studied using both FINE and MUSIC. The comparison between the electrical sources estimated by the subspace source localization approaches and MRI lesions was made through the coregistration between the EEG recordings and MRI scans. The accuracy of estimations made by FINE and MUSIC was also evaluated and compared by R2 statistic, which was used to indicate the goodness-of-fit of the estimated sources to the scalp EEG recordings. The three-concentric-spheres head volume conductor model was built for each patient with three spheres of different radii which takes the individual head size and skull thickness into consideration. The results from computer simulations indicate that the improvement of source spatial resolvability and localization accuracy of FINE as compared with MUSIC is significant when simulated sources are closely spaced, deep, or signal-to-noise ratio is low in a clinical electrode set-up. The interictal electrical generators estimated by FINE and MUSIC are in concordance with the patients' structural abnormality, i.e. MRI lesions, in all three patients. The higher R2 values achieved by FINE than MUSIC

  16. Improvement of acoustic fall detection using Kinect depth sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Banerjee, Tanvi; Popescu, Mihail; Skubic, Marjorie

    2013-01-01

    The latest acoustic fall detection system (acoustic FADE) has achieved encouraging results on real-world dataset. However, the acoustic FADE device is difficult to be deployed in real environment due to its large size. In addition, the estimation accuracy of sound source localization (SSL) and direction of arrival (DOA) becomes much lower in multi-interference environment, which will potentially result in the distortion of the source signal using beamforming (BF). Microsoft Kinect is used in this paper to address these issues by measuring source position using the depth sensor. We employ robust minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) adaptive BF (ABF) to take advantage of well-estimated source position for acoustic FADE. A significant reduction of false alarms and improvement of detection rate are both achieved using the proposed fusion strategy on real-world data.

  17. Techniques for detection and localization of weak hippocampal and medial frontal sources using beamformers in MEG.

    PubMed

    Mills, Travis; Lalancette, Marc; Moses, Sandra N; Taylor, Margot J; Quraan, Maher A

    2012-07-01

    Magnetoencephalography provides precise information about the temporal dynamics of brain activation and is an ideal tool for investigating rapid cognitive processing. However, in many cognitive paradigms visual stimuli are used, which evoke strong brain responses (typically 40-100 nAm in V1) that may impede the detection of weaker activations of interest. This is particularly a concern when beamformer algorithms are used for source analysis, due to artefacts such as "leakage" of activation from the primary visual sources into other regions. We have previously shown (Quraan et al. 2011) that we can effectively reduce leakage patterns and detect weak hippocampal sources by subtracting the functional images derived from the experimental task and a control task with similar stimulus parameters. In this study we assess the performance of three different subtraction techniques. In the first technique we follow the same post-localization subtraction procedures as in our previous work. In the second and third techniques, we subtract the sensor data obtained from the experimental and control paradigms prior to source localization. Using simulated signals embedded in real data, we show that when beamformers are used, subtraction prior to source localization allows for the detection of weaker sources and higher localization accuracy. The improvement in localization accuracy exceeded 10 mm at low signal-to-noise ratios, and sources down to below 5 nAm were detected. We applied our techniques to empirical data acquired with two different paradigms designed to evoke hippocampal and frontal activations, and demonstrated our ability to detect robust activations in both regions with substantial improvements over image subtraction. We conclude that removal of the common-mode dominant sources through data subtraction prior to localization further improves the beamformer's ability to project the n-channel sensor-space data to reveal weak sources of interest and allows more accurate

  18. Decomposition of frequency characteristics of acoustic emission signals for different types of partial discharges sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, F.; Gacek, Z.; Paduch, P.

    2006-11-01

    The problem touched in the article is decomposition of frequency characteristic of AE signals into elementary form of three-parametrical Gauss function. At the first stage, for modelled curves in form of sum of three-parametrical Gauss peaks, accordance of modelled curve and a curve resulting from a solutions obtained using method with dynamic windows, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, genetic algorithms and differential evolution algorithm are discussed. It is founded that analyses carried out by means differential evolution algorithm are effective and the computer system served an analysis of AE signal frequency characteristics was constructed. Decomposition of frequency characteristics for selected AE signals coming from modelled PD sources using different ends of the bushing, and real PD sources in generator coil bars are carried out.

  19. A precedence effect resolves phantom sound source illusions in the parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Norman; Elias, Damian O.; Mason, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Localizing individual sound sources under reverberant environmental conditions can be a challenge when the original source and its acoustic reflections arrive at the ears simultaneously from different paths that convey ambiguous directional information. The acoustic parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea (Diptera: Tachinidae) relies on a pair of ears exquisitely sensitive to sound direction to localize the 5-kHz tone pulsatile calling song of their host crickets. In nature, flies are expected to encounter a complex sound field with multiple sources and their reflections from acoustic clutter potentially masking temporal information relevant to source recognition and localization. In field experiments, O. ochracea were lured onto a test arena and subjected to small random acoustic asymmetries between 2 simultaneous sources. Most flies successfully localize a single source but some localize a ‘phantom’ source that is a summed effect of both source locations. Such misdirected phonotaxis can be elicited reliably in laboratory experiments that present symmetric acoustic stimulation. By varying onset delay between 2 sources, we test whether hyperacute directional hearing in O. ochracea can function to exploit small time differences to determine source location. Selective localization depends on both the relative timing and location of competing sources. Flies preferred phonotaxis to a forward source. With small onset disparities within a 10-ms temporal window of attention, flies selectively localize the leading source while the lagging source has minimal influence on orientation. These results demonstrate the precedence effect as a mechanism to overcome phantom source illusions that arise from acoustic reflections or competing sources. PMID:19332794

  20. SoundCompass: a distributed MEMS microphone array-based sensor for sound source localization.

    PubMed

    Tiete, Jelmer; Domínguez, Federico; da Silva, Bruno; Segers, Laurent; Steenhaut, Kris; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-23

    Sound source localization is a well-researched subject with applications ranging from localizing sniper fire in urban battlefields to cataloging wildlife in rural areas. One critical application is the localization of noise pollution sources in urban environments, due to an increasing body of evidence linking noise pollution to adverse effects on human health. Current noise mapping techniques often fail to accurately identify noise pollution sources, because they rely on the interpolation of a limited number of scattered sound sensors. Aiming to produce accurate noise pollution maps, we developed the SoundCompass, a low-cost sound sensor capable of measuring local noise levels and sound field directionality. Our first prototype is composed of a sensor array of 52 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microphones, an inertial measuring unit and a low-power field-programmable gate array (FPGA). This article presents the SoundCompass's hardware and firmware design together with a data fusion technique that exploits the sensing capabilities of the SoundCompass in a wireless sensor network to localize noise pollution sources. Live tests produced a sound source localization accuracy of a few centimeters in a 25-m2 anechoic chamber, while simulation results accurately located up to five broadband sound sources in a 10,000-m2 open field.

  1. SoundCompass: A Distributed MEMS Microphone Array-Based Sensor for Sound Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    Tiete, Jelmer; Domínguez, Federico; da Silva, Bruno; Segers, Laurent; Steenhaut, Kris; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is a well-researched subject with applications ranging from localizing sniper fire in urban battlefields to cataloging wildlife in rural areas. One critical application is the localization of noise pollution sources in urban environments, due to an increasing body of evidence linking noise pollution to adverse effects on human health. Current noise mapping techniques often fail to accurately identify noise pollution sources, because they rely on the interpolation of a limited number of scattered sound sensors. Aiming to produce accurate noise pollution maps, we developed the SoundCompass, a low-cost sound sensor capable of measuring local noise levels and sound field directionality. Our first prototype is composed of a sensor array of 52 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microphones, an inertial measuring unit and a low-power field-programmable gate array (FPGA). This article presents the SoundCompass’s hardware and firmware design together with a data fusion technique that exploits the sensing capabilities of the SoundCompass in a wireless sensor network to localize noise pollution sources. Live tests produced a sound source localization accuracy of a few centimeters in a 25-m2 anechoic chamber, while simulation results accurately located up to five broadband sound sources in a 10,000-m2 open field. PMID:24463431

  2. A source array for generating higher order acoustic modes in circular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyerman, B. R.; Reethof, G.

    1976-01-01

    A unique source array has been developed for the generation of both spinning and non-spinning higher order modes in a circular duct. The array consists of two concentric rings of sources. Through individual control of the response of each element, the array provided phase and amplitude control in the radial as well as circumferential directions. Radial modes shapes were measured in a 12-inch diameter anechoically-terminated hollow duct. These modes could be generated at their cut-off frequency and throughout a frequency range extending to the cut-off frequency for the next higher order radial mode. Comparisons are given between theory and experiment for the generation of specific modes. The radial dependence of the measured mode shapes was enhanced considerably by the design of this array. The results indicate a significant improvement over previous mode generation mechanisms. The contamination of the generated mode by additional spurious modes is also considered for variations between individual elements within the source array.

  3. Study of noise sources in a subsonic fan using measured blade pressures and acoustic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Sources of noise in a 1.4 m (4.6 ft) diameter subsonic tip speed propulsive fan running statically outdoors are studied using a combination of techniques. Signals measured with pressure transducers on a rotor blade are plotted in a format showing the space-time history of inlet distortion. Study of these plots visually and with statistical correlation analysis confirms that the inlet flow contains long, thin eddies of turbulence. Turbulence generated in the boundary layer of the shroud upstream of the rotor tips was not found to be an important noise source. Fan noise is diagnosed by computing narrowband spectra of rotor and stator sound power and comparing these with measured sound power spectra. Rotor noise is computed from spectra of the measured blade pressures and stator noise is computed using the author's stator noise theory. It is concluded that the rotor and stator sources contribute about equally at frequencies in the vicinity of the first three harmonics of blade passing frequency. At higher frequencies, the stator contribution diminishes rapidly and the rotor/inlet turbulence mechanism dominates. Two parametric studies are performed by using the rotor noise calculation procedure which was correlated with test. In the first study, the effects on noise spectrum and directivity are calculated for changes in turbulence properties, rotational Mach number, number of blades, and stagger angle. In the second study the influences of design tip speed and blade number on noise are evaluated.

  4. Urban Space as a Primary Source: Local History and Historical Thinking in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how local history can be used by teachers to help develop historical thinking skills such as source analysis, the collection of data, and the creation of historical arguments. Using New York City as a case study, this article argues that urban spaces and local communities provide historical evidence that can be read and…

  5. Acoustic Database for Turbofan Engine Core-Noise Sources. I; Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Grant

    2015-01-01

    were processed using software that accounts for the effects of convective and conductive heat transfer. The software was developed under previous NASA sponsored programs. Compensated temperature spectra and compensated time histories corresponding to the dynamic temperature of the gas stream were generated. Auto-spectral and cross-spectral analyses of the data were performed to investigate spectral features, acoustic circumferential mode content, signal coherence, and time delays. The dynamic temperature data exhibit a wideband and fairly flat spectral content. The temperature spectra do not change substantially with operating speed. The pressure spectra in the combustor and ITD exhibit generally similar shapes and amplitudes, making it difficult to identify any features that suggest the presence of indirect combustion noise. Cross-spectral analysis reveal a strong correlation between pressure and temperature fluctuations in the ITD, but little correlation between temperature fluctuations at the entrance of the HPT and pressure fluctuations downstream of it. Temperature fluctuations at the entrance of the low pressure turbine were an order of magnitude smaller than those at the entrance to the high pressure turbine. Time delay analysis of the temperature fluctuations in the combustor was inconclusive, perhaps due to the substantial mixing that occurs between the upstream and downstream locations. Time delay analysis of the temperature fluctuations in the ITD indicate that they convect at the mean flow speed. Analysis of the data did not reveal any convincing indications of the presence of indirect combustion noise. However, this analysis has been preliminary and additional exploration of the data is recommended including the use of more sophisticated signal processing to explore subtle issues that have been revealed but which are not yet fully understood or explained.

  6. Source localization of narrow band signals in multipath environments, with application to marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtierra, Robert Daniel

    Passive acoustic localization has benefited from many major developments and has become an increasingly important focus point in marine mammal research. Several challenges still remain. This work seeks to address several of these challenges such as tracking the calling depths of baleen whales. In this work, data from an array of widely spaced Marine Acoustic Recording Units (MARUs) was used to achieve three dimensional localization by combining the methods Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) and Direct-Reflected Time Difference of Arrival (DRTD) along with a newly developed autocorrelation technique. TDOA was applied to data for two dimensional (latitude and longitude) localization and depth was resolved using DRTD. Previously, DRTD had been limited to pulsed broadband signals, such as sperm whale or dolphin echolocation, where individual direct and reflected signals are separated in time. Due to the length of typical baleen whale vocalizations, individual multipath signal arrivals can overlap making time differences of arrival difficult to resolve. This problem can be solved using an autocorrelation, which can extract reflection information from overlapping signals. To establish this technique, a derivation was made to model the autocorrelation of a direct signal and its overlapping reflection. The model was exploited to derive performance limits allowing for prediction of the minimum resolvable direct-reflected time difference for a known signal type. The dependence on signal parameters (sweep rate, call duration) was also investigated. The model was then verified using both recorded and simulated data from two analysis cases for North Atlantic right whales (NARWs, Eubalaena glacialis) and humpback whales (Megaptera noveaengliae). The newly developed autocorrelation technique was then combined with DRTD and tested using data from playback transmissions to localize an acoustic transducer at a known depth and location. The combined DRTD-autocorrelation methods

  7. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10-9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10-11 τ-1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  8. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24,000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad(2)/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10(-9) at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10(-11) τ(-1/2) up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  9. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  10. Localizing Cortical Sources of Event-Related Potentials in Infants' Covert Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, John E.

    2005-01-01

    This study used cortical source analysis to locate potential cortical sources of event-related potentials (ERPs) during covert orienting in infants aged 14 and 20 weeks. The infants were tested in a spatial cueing procedure. The reaction time to localize the target showed response facilitation for valid trials relative to invalid or neutral…

  11. Nonlinear wave fronts and ionospheric irregularities observed by HF sounding over a powerful acoustic source

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, E.; Rickel, D.; Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM )

    1989-06-01

    Different wave fronts affected by significant nonlinearities have been observed in the ionosphere by a pulsed HF sounding experiment at a distance of 38 km from the source point of a 4800-kg ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) explosion on the ground. These wave fronts are revealed by partial reflections of the radio sounding waves. A small-scale irregular structure has been generated by a first wave front at the level of a sporadic E layer which characterized the ionosphere at the time of the experiment. The time scale of these fluctuations is about 1 to 2 s; its lifetime is about 2 min. Similar irregularities were also observed at the level of a second wave front in the F region. This structure appears also as diffusion on a continuous wave sounding at horizontal distances of the order of 200 km from the source. In contrast, a third front unaffected by irregularities may originate from the lowest layers of the ionosphere or from a supersonic wave front propagating at the base of the thermosphere. The origin of these structures is discussed. 14 refs.

  12. Nonlinear wave fronts and ionospheric irregularities observed by HF sounding over a powerful acoustic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Elisabeth; Rickel, Dwight

    1989-06-01

    Different wave fronts affected by significant nonlinearities have been observed in the ionosphere by a pulsed HF sounding experiment at a distance of 38 km from the source point of a 4800-kg ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) explosion on the ground. These wave fronts are revealed by partial reflections of the radio sounding waves. A small-scale irregular structure has been generated by a first wave front at the level of a sporadic E layer which characterized the ionosphere at the time of the experiment. The time scale of these fluctuations is about 1 to 2 s; its lifetime is about 2 min. Similar irregularities were also observed at the level of a second wave front in the F region. This structure appears also as diffusion on a continuous wave sounding at horizontal distances of the order of 200 km from the source. In contrast, a third front unaffected by irregularities may originate from the lowest layers of the ionosphere or from a supersonic wave front propagating at the base of the thermosphere. The origin of these structures is discussed.

  13. Generation of Acoustic Signals from Buried Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, J. L.; Reinke, R.; Waxler, R.; Lenox, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Buried explosions generate both seismic and acoustic signals. The mechanism for the acoustic generation is generally assumed to be large ground motions above the source region that cause atmospheric pressure disturbances which can propagate locally or regionally depending on source size and weather conditions. In order to better understand the factors that control acoustic generation from buried explosions, we conducted a series of 200 lb explosions detonated in and above the dry alluvium and limestones of Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. In this experiment, nicknamed HUMBLE REDWOOD III, we detonated charges at heights of burst of 2 m (no crater) and depths of burst of 7 m (fully confined). The seismic and acoustic signals were recorded on a network of near-source (< 90 m) co-located accelerometer and overpressure sensors, circular rings of acoustic sensors at 0.3 and 1 km, and multiple seismic and infrasound sensors at local-to-regional distances. Near-source acoustic signals for the 200 lb buried explosion in limestone show an impulsive, short-duration (0.04 s) initial peak, followed by a broad duration (0.3 s) negative pressure trough, and finally a second positive pulse (0.18 s duration). The entire width of the acoustic signal generated by this small buried explosion is 0.5 s and results in a 2 Hz peak in spectral energy. High-velocity wind conditions quickly attenuate the signal with few observations beyond 1 km. We have attempted to model these acoustic waveforms by estimating near-source ground motion using synthetic spall seismograms. Spall seismograms have similar characteristics as the observed acoustics and usually include an initial positive motion P wave, followed by -1 g acceleration due to the ballistic free fall of the near surface rock units, and ends with positive accelerations due to "slapdown" of the material. Spall seismograms were synthesized using emplacement media parameters and high-speed video observations of the surface movements. We present a

  14. Blind source separation based on time-frequency morphological characteristics for rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xiukun

    2016-06-01

    Separation of the components of rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects is essential in obtaining the structural characteristics of such objects. To overcome the problem of rigid structures appearing to have the same spectral structure in the time domain, time-frequency Blind Source Separation (BSS) can be used in combination with image morphology to separate the rigid scattering components of different objects. Based on a highlight model, the separation of the rigid scattering structure of objects with time-frequency distribution is deduced. Using a morphological filter, different characteristics in a Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) observed for single auto term and cross terms can be simplified to remove any cross-term interference. By selecting time and frequency points of the auto terms signal, the accuracy of BSS can be improved. An experimental simulation has been used, with changes in the pulse width of the transmitted signal, the relative amplitude and the time delay parameter, in order to analyzing the feasibility of this new method. Simulation results show that the new method is not only able to separate rigid scattering components, but can also separate the components when elastic scattering and rigid scattering exist at the same time. Experimental results confirm that the new method can be used in separating the rigid scattering structure of underwater objects.

  15. The Effects of Localized Sources on the Formation of Lunar Sodium Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Wook; Kim, S.; Lee, D.

    2012-10-01

    The sodium exosphere is a common phenomenon of the planets and the satellites of the solar system. Mercury, the Moon, and Io, are of observational interest due to the their prominence of the exospheres. In particular, Mercury has been known to have complicated local sodium sources (e.g., Potter and Killen, 2011). Although such a local source has not been reported for the Moon, we present a preliminary diagnosic simulation considering different source productions of the lunar surface depending on the local concentrations of sodium. Future coronagraph observations on the low altitudinal regions of the Moon will provide important observational constraints on the sources. #Reference Potter, A.E. and Killen, R.M. Sodium velocity maps on Mercury, vol. 6, EPSC-DPS2011-337, 2011

  16. Opto-acoustic measurement of the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media: 2. On the possibility of light absorption coefficient measurement in a turbid medium from the amplitude of the opto-acoustic signal

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Barskaya, M I; Podymova, N B; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2009-09-30

    The second part of this work describes the experimental technique of measuring the local light absorption in turbid media. The technique is based on the measurement of the amplitude of an opto-acoustic (OA) signal excited in a turbid medium under the condition of one-sided access to the object under study. An OA transducer is developed to perform the proposed measurement procedure. Experiments are conducted for the turbid media with different optical properties (light absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) and for different diameters of the incident laser beam. It is found that the laser beam diameter can be chosen so that the dependences of the measured OA signal amplitude on the light absorption coefficient coincide upon varying the reduced scattering coefficient by more than twice. The obtained numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the OA method is applicable for measuring the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media, for example, in biological tissues. (measurement of parametrs of laser radiation)

  17. On the Vertical Distribution of Local and Remote Sources of Water for Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2001-01-01

    The vertical distribution of local and remote sources of water for precipitation and total column water over the United States are evaluated in a general circulation model simulation. The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) general circulation model (GCM) includes passive constituent tracers to determine the geographical sources of the water in the column. Results show that the local percentage of precipitable water and local percentage of precipitation can be very different. The transport of water vapor from remote oceanic sources at mid and upper levels is important to the total water in the column over the central United States, while the access of locally evaporated water in convective precipitation processes is important to the local precipitation ratio. This result resembles the conceptual formulation of the convective parameterization. However, the formulations of simple models of precipitation recycling include the assumption that the ratio of the local water in the column is equal to the ratio of the local precipitation. The present results demonstrate the uncertainty in that assumption, as locally evaporated water is more concentrated near the surface.

  18. Three-dimensional localization of low activity gamma-ray sources in real-time scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2016-03-01

    Radioactive source localization plays an important role in tracking radiation threats in homeland security tasks. Its real-time application requires computationally efficient and reasonably accurate algorithms even with limited data to support detection with minimum uncertainty. This paper describes a statistic-based grid-refinement method for backtracing the position of a gamma-ray source in a three-dimensional domain in real-time. The developed algorithm used measurements from various known detector positions to localize the source. This algorithm is based on an inverse-square relationship between source intensity at a detector and the distance from the source to the detector. The domain discretization was developed and implemented in MATLAB. The algorithm was tested and verified from simulation results of an ideal case of a point source in non-attenuating medium. Subsequently, an experimental validation of the algorithm was performed to determine the suitability of deploying this scheme in real-time scenarios. Using the measurements from five known detector positions and for a measurement time of 3 min, the source position was estimated with an accuracy of approximately 53 cm. The accuracy improved and stabilized to approximately 25 cm for higher measurement times. It was concluded that the error in source localization was primarily due to detection uncertainties. In verification and experimental validation of the algorithm, the distance between 137Cs source and any detector position was between 0.84 m and 1.77 m. The results were also compared with the least squares method. Since the discretization algorithm was validated with a weak source, it is expected that it can localize the source of higher activity in real-time. It is believed that for the same physical placement of source and detectors, a source of approximate activity 0.61-0.92 mCi can be localized in real-time with 1 s of measurement time and same accuracy. The accuracy and computational efficiency

  19. Laser fiber source implemented with a resonator Sagnac for fiber optic acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Romero, G. E.; Pinzón-Escobar, E. F.

    2013-11-01

    Two innovative laser scanning prototypes have been developed at ENEA for diagnostics of large surfaces relevant to monumental cultural heritage. The first, based on amplitude modulation technique in the visible, is a trichromatic (Red /Green /Blue) imaging topologic radar (RGB-ITR) specialized to collect high resolution 3D models. After proper color calibration, it allows for hyper-realistic rendering of colored features on painted surfaces and for precise localization of irregularities. The second is a line scanning system, working either in reflectance or laser induced fluorescence mode, capable of fast 2D monochromatic images acquisition on up to 90 different spectral channels in the visible/UV range, which was developed to investigate the presence of different substances onto the painted surface. Data collected during former field campaigns on frescos by means each scanning system will be reported and discussed extracting information of interest to conservators by means of specific data processing methodologies and respective software tools. Recent results relevant to paints of the Assumption on slate and canvas by Scipione Pulzone named "il Gaetano" collected in two churches in Rome (San Silvestro al Quirinale, Bandini chapel; Santa Caterina dei Funari, Solano della Vetera Chapel) from the late XVI century are presented in order to demonstrate the increased diagnostic capabilities coming from data integration. From combination of reflectance data from both instruments, the first true remote differential colorimetry has been implemented, giving a chance to test the color quality in the future from the archived images.

  20. Comparison of Methods for Identifying Noise Sources in Far-Field Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenney, Andrew; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Three different methods of extracting intermittent wave packets from unstructured background within complex time series signals were analyzed and compared. The algorithms are denoted ``cross correlation,'' ``denoising,'' and ``TFLE (Time-Frequency-Lag event)'' methods respectively. All three methods utilize Mexican Hat or Morlet wavelets for the transformation of time domain signals into time-frequency domain signals. Within the denoising and cross correlation algorithms, events are identified through comparison of high energy excerpts of each signal captured by individual far-field microphones, while the TFLE algorithm simply defines events by their contributions to positive correlation values. The goal of this analysis is to quantify the advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods. The results lend themselves to determining the validity of these methods as noise source identification algorithms to be used in jet noise characterization. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL; and by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering REU Program at SU.

  1. Seismo-acoustic analysis of the ocean swell sources observed with Romanian infrasound array and seismic stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Grecu, Bogdan; Popa, Mihaela

    2015-04-01

    Romanian Plostina infrasound array (IPLOR) is deployed in the central part of the country, in Vrancea region. Presently, IPLOR array configuration includes 6 elements equipped with Chaparral Physics sensors and with aperture of about 2.5 km. For the purpose of assessing the IPLOR performance in observing various types of infrasound sources, over five years of data (since June 2009 to present) were processed. Signal interactive analysis was performed using WinPMCC software. The detection results show that the station response was gradually improved, as the number of array elements increased from three to six, and wind noise reduction conditions were enhanced. A larger number of detected signals and a better array resolution at lower frequency were noticed as well. Microbaroms - the interaction of ocean swell with the atmosphere - represent a relevant type of infrasonic source present in the IPLOR detection plots, for which the signal characterization has been enhanced with the array upgrading process. IPLOR detection capability related to this energetic long-period infrasound waves, which propagate over large distances, shows an alternating behavior, being strongly influenced by the upper atmospheric winds, i.e. seasonally dependent stratospheric winds. The ocean swell can be considered as a seismo-acoustic source, leaving an imprint on both seismic and infrasonic recordings. The interaction with the atmosphere generates infrasound (microbarom), while the interaction with the sea floor emits seismic signal (microseism). Microbaroms have a sinusoidal wave character with a dominant period of 5 s. Due to low damping at this period in stratospheric wave duct, microbaroms are observed over large distance ranges up to a few thousand kilometres. Microseisms occur as an increasing of seismic background noise between 2 and 20 s; in this range, primary and secondary peaks, at 5 and 14 s, are observed. Common broad-band seismic data, recorded with Romanian dense seismic

  2. Contaminant point source localization error estimates as functions of data quantity and model quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott K.; Vesselinov, Velimir V.

    2016-10-01

    We develop empirically-grounded error envelopes for localization of a point contamination release event in the saturated zone of a previously uncharacterized heterogeneous aquifer into which a number of plume-intercepting wells have been drilled. We assume that flow direction in the aquifer is known exactly and velocity is known to within a factor of two of our best guess from well observations prior to source identification. Other aquifer and source parameters must be estimated by interpretation of well breakthrough data via the advection-dispersion equation. We employ high performance computing to generate numerous random realizations of aquifer parameters and well locations, simulate well breakthrough data, and then employ unsupervised machine optimization techniques to estimate the most likely spatial (or space-time) location of the source. Tabulating the accuracy of these estimates from the multiple realizations, we relate the size of 90% and 95% confidence envelopes to the data quantity (number of wells) and model quality (fidelity of ADE interpretation model to actual concentrations in a heterogeneous aquifer with channelized flow). We find that for purely spatial localization of the contaminant source, increased data quantities can make up for reduced model quality. For space-time localization, we find similar qualitative behavior, but significantly degraded spatial localization reliability and less improvement from extra data collection. Since the space-time source localization problem is much more challenging, we also tried a multiple-initial-guess optimization strategy. This greatly enhanced performance, but gains from additional data collection remained limited.

  3. EEG based brain source localization comparison of sLORETA and eLORETA.

    PubMed

    Jatoi, Munsif Ali; Kamel, Nidal; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Faye, Ibrahima

    2014-12-01

    Human brain generates electromagnetic signals during certain activation inside the brain. The localization of the active sources which are responsible for such activation is termed as brain source localization. This process of source estimation with the help of EEG which is also known as EEG inverse problem is helpful to understand physiological, pathological, mental, functional abnormalities and cognitive behaviour of the brain. This understanding leads for the specification for diagnoses of various brain disorders such as epilepsy and tumour. Different approaches are devised to exactly localize the active sources with minimum localization error, less complexity and more validation which include minimum norm, low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA), standardized LORETA, exact LORETA, Multiple Signal classifier, focal under determined system solution etc. This paper discusses and compares the ability of localizing the sources for two low resolution methods i.e., sLORETA and eLORETA respectively. The ERP data with visual stimulus is used for comparison at four different time instants for both methods (sLORETA and eLORETA) and then corresponding activation in terms of scalp map, slice view and cortex map is discussed.

  4. Groundwater seepage landscapes from distant and local sources in experiments and on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, W. A.; McLelland, S. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Murphy, B. J.; Hauber, E.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    Valleys with theater-shaped heads can form due to the seepage of groundwater and as a result of knickpoint (waterfall) erosion generated by overland flow. This ambiguity in the mechanism of formation hampers the interpretation of such valleys on Mars, particularly since there is limited knowledge of material properties. Moreover, the hydrological implications of a groundwater or surface water origin are important for our understanding of the evolution of surface features on Mars, and a quantification of valley morphologies at the landscape scale may provide diagnostic insights on the formative hydrological conditions. However, flow patterns and the resulting landscapes produced by different sources of groundwater are poorly understood. We aim to improve the understanding of the formation of entire valley landscapes through seepage processes from different groundwater sources that will provide a framework of landscape metrics for the interpretation of such systems. We study groundwater seepage from a distant source of groundwater and from infiltration of local precipitation in a series of sandbox experiments and combine our results with previous experiments and observations of the Martian surface. Key results are that groundwater flow piracy acts on valleys fed by a distant groundwater source and results in a sparsely dissected landscape of many small and a few large valleys. In contrast, valleys fed by a local groundwater source, i.e., nearby infiltration, result in a densely dissected landscape. In addition, valleys fed by a distant groundwater source grow towards that source, while valleys with a local source grow in a broad range of directions and have a strong tendency to bifurcate, particularly on flatter surfaces. We consider these results with respect to two Martian cases: Louros Valles shows properties of seepage by a local source of groundwater and Nirgal Vallis shows evidence of a distant source, which we interpret as groundwater flow from Tharsis.

  5. Rapid tsunami models and earthquake source parameters: Far-field and local applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid tsunami models have recently been developed to forecast far-field tsunami amplitudes from initial earthquake information (magnitude and hypocenter). Earthquake source parameters that directly affect tsunami generation as used in rapid tsunami models are examined, with particular attention to local versus far-field application of those models. First, validity of the assumption that the focal mechanism and type of faulting for tsunamigenic earthquakes is similar in a given region can be evaluated by measuring the seismic consistency of past events. Second, the assumption that slip occurs uniformly over an area of rupture will most often underestimate the amplitude and leading-wave steepness of the local tsunami. Third, sometimes large magnitude earthquakes will exhibit a high degree of spatial heterogeneity such that tsunami sources will be composed of distinct sub-events that can cause constructive and destructive interference in the wavefield away from the source. Using a stochastic source model, it is demonstrated that local tsunami amplitudes vary by as much as a factor of two or more, depending on the local bathymetry. If other earthquake source parameters such as focal depth or shear modulus are varied in addition to the slip distribution patterns, even greater uncertainty in local tsunami amplitude is expected for earthquakes of similar magnitude. Because of the short amount of time available to issue local warnings and because of the high degree of uncertainty associated with local, model-based forecasts as suggested by this study, direct wave height observations and a strong public education and preparedness program are critical for those regions near suspected tsunami sources.

  6. Joint Inversion of Earthquake Source Parameters with local and teleseismic body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Ni, S.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    In the classical source parameter inversion algorithm of CAP (Cut and Paste method, by Zhao and Helmberger), waveform data at near distances (typically less than 500km) are partitioned into Pnl and surface waves to account for uncertainties in the crustal models and different amplitude weight of body and surface waves. The classical CAP algorithms have proven effective for resolving source parameters (focal mechanisms, depth and moment) for earthquakes well recorded on relatively dense seismic network. However for regions covered with sparse stations, it is challenging to achieve precise source parameters . In this case, a moderate earthquake of ~M6 is usually recorded on only one or two local stations with epicentral distances less than 500 km. Fortunately, an earthquake of ~M6 can be well recorded on global seismic networks. Since the ray paths for teleseismic and local body waves sample different portions of the focal sphere, combination of teleseismic and local body wave data helps constrain source parameters better. Here we present a new CAP mothod (CAPjoint), which emploits both teleseismic body waveforms (P and SH waves) and local waveforms (Pnl, Rayleigh and Love waves) to determine source parameters. For an earthquake in Nevada that is well recorded with dense local network (USArray stations), we compare the results from CAPjoint with those from the traditional CAP method involving only of local waveforms , and explore the efficiency with bootstraping statistics to prove the results derived by CAPjoint are stable and reliable. Even with one local station included in joint inversion, accuracy of source parameters such as moment and strike can be much better improved.

  7. Dyke leakage localization and hydraulic permeability estimation through self-potential and hydro-acoustic measurements: Self-potential 'abacus' diagram for hydraulic permeability estimation and uncertainty computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolève, A.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Grangeon, J.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we propose the combination of two geophysical techniques, which we have applied to a dyke located in southeastern France that has a visible downstream flood area: the self-potential (SP) and hydro-acoustic methods. These methods are sensitive to two different types of signals: electric signals and water-soil pressure disturbances, respectively. The advantages of the SP technique lie in the high rate of data acquisition, which allows assessment of long dykes, and direct diagnosis in terms of leakage area delimitation and quantification. Coupled with punctual hydro-acoustic cartography, a leakage position can be precisely located, therefore allowing specific remediation decisions with regard to the results of the geophysical investigation. Here, the precise localization of leakage from an earth dyke has been identified using SP and hydro-acoustic signals, with the permeability of the preferential fluid flow area estimated by forward SP modeling. Moreover, we propose a general 'abacus' diagram for the estimation of hydraulic permeability of dyke leakage according to the magnitude of over water SP anomalies and the associated uncertainty.

  8. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1991-08-27

    Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation. 9 figures.

  9. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation.

  10. A Numerical Investigation of Turbine Noise Source Hierarchy and Its Acoustic Transmission Characteristics: Proof-of-Concept Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2008-01-01

    A CFD-based simulation of single-stage turbine was done using the TURBO code to assess its viability for determining acoustic transmission through blade rows. Temporal and spectral analysis of the unsteady pressure data from the numerical simulations showed the allowable Tyler-Sofrin modes that are consistent with expectations. This indicated that high-fidelity acoustic transmission calculations are feasible with TURBO.

  11. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating conical broadcast signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A method of interrogating a formation includes generating a conical acoustic signal, at a first frequency--a second conical acoustic signal at a second frequency each in the between approximately 500 Hz and 500 kHz such that the signals intersect in a desired intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving, a difference signal returning to the borehole resulting from a non-linear mixing of the signals in a mixing zone within the intersection volume.

  12. Preliminary Work for Modeling the Propellers of an Aircraft as a Noise Source in an Acoustic Boundary Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Lyle, Karen H.; Burley, Casey L.

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm for generating appropriate velocity boundary conditions for an acoustic boundary element analysis from the kinematics of an operating propeller is presented. It constitutes the initial phase of Integrating sophisticated rotorcraft models into a conventional boundary element analysis. Currently, the pressure field is computed by a linear approximation. An initial validation of the developed process was performed by comparing numerical results to test data for the external acoustic pressure on the surface of a tilt-rotor aircraft for one flight condition.

  13. Improved localization accuracy in magnetic source imaging using a 3-D laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Bardouille, Timothy; Krishnamurthy, Santosh V; Hajra, Sujoy Ghosh; D'Arcy, Ryan C N

    2012-12-01

    Brain source localization accuracy in magnetoencephalography (MEG) requires accuracy in both digitizing anatomical landmarks and coregistering to anatomical magnetic resonance images (MRI). We compared the source localization accuracy and MEG-MRI coregistration accuracy of two head digitization systems-a laser scanner and the current standard electromagnetic digitization system (Polhemus)-using a calibrated phantom and human data. When compared using the calibrated phantom, surface and source localization accuracy for data acquired with the laser scanner improved over the Polhemus by 141% and 132%, respectively. Laser scan digitization reduced MEG source localization error by 1.38 mm on average. In human participants, a laser scan of the face generated a 1000-fold more points per unit time than the Polhemus head digitization. An automated surface-matching algorithm improved the accuracy of MEG-MRI coregistration over the equivalent manual procedure. Simulations showed that the laser scan coverage could be reduced to an area around the eyes only while maintaining coregistration accuracy, suggesting that acquisition time can be substantially reduced. Our results show that the laser scanner can both reduce setup time and improve localization accuracy, in comparison to the Polhemus digitization system.

  14. A biomimetic coupled circuit based microphone array for sound source localization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huping; Xu, Xiangyuan; Jia, Han; Guan, Luyang; Bao, Ming

    2015-09-01

    An equivalent analog circuit is designed to mimic the coupled ears of the fly Ormia ochracea for sound source localization. This coupled circuit receives two signals with tiny phase difference from a space closed two-microphone array, and produces two signals with obvious intensity difference. The response sensitivity can be adjusted through the coupled circuit parameters. The directional characteristics of the coupled circuit have been demonstrated in the experiment. The miniature microphone array can localize the sound source with low computational burden by using the intensity difference. This system has significant advantages in various applications where the array size is limited. PMID:26428825

  15. A biomimetic coupled circuit based microphone array for sound source localization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huping; Xu, Xiangyuan; Jia, Han; Guan, Luyang; Bao, Ming

    2015-09-01

    An equivalent analog circuit is designed to mimic the coupled ears of the fly Ormia ochracea for sound source localization. This coupled circuit receives two signals with tiny phase difference from a space closed two-microphone array, and produces two signals with obvious intensity difference. The response sensitivity can be adjusted through the coupled circuit parameters. The directional characteristics of the coupled circuit have been demonstrated in the experiment. The miniature microphone array can localize the sound source with low computational burden by using the intensity difference. This system has significant advantages in various applications where the array size is limited.

  16. Particle swarm optimization and its application in MEG source localization using single time sliced data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juan; Liu, Chenglian; Guo, Yongning

    2014-10-01

    The estimation of neural active sources from the magnetoencephalography (MEG) data is a very critical issue for both clinical neurology and brain functions research. A widely accepted source-modeling technique for MEG involves calculating a set of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs). Depth in the brain is one of difficulties in MEG source localization. Particle swarm optimization(PSO) is widely used to solve various optimization problems. In this paper we discuss its ability and robustness to find the global optimum in different depths of the brain when using single equivalent current dipole (sECD) model and single time sliced data. The results show that PSO is an effective global optimization to MEG source localization when given one dipole in different depths.

  17. Focusing of the lowest-order antisymmetric Lamb mode behind a gradient-index acoustic metalens with local resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Bonello, Bernard; Boyko, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the focusing of the lowest-order antisymmetric Lamb mode (A0) behind a positive gradient-index (GRIN) acoustic metalens consisting of air holes drilled in a silicon plate with silicon pillars erected on one face of the lens. We have analyzed the focusing in the near field as the result of the coupling between the flexural resonant mode of the pillars and the vibration mode of the air/silicon phononic crystal. We highlight the role played by the polarization coherence between the resonant mode and the vibration of the plate. We demonstrate both numerically and experimentally the focusing behind the lens over a spot less than half a wavelength, paving a way for performance of acoustic lenses beyond the diffraction limit. Our findings can be easily extended to other types of elastic wave.

  18. Influence of head models on neuromagnetic fields and inverse source localizations

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Ceon; Haueisen, Jens; Schimpf, Paul H

    2006-01-01

    Background The magnetoencephalograms (MEGs) are mainly due to the source currents. However, there is a significant contribution to MEGs from the volume currents. The structure of the anatomical surfaces, e.g., gray and white matter, could severely influence the flow of volume currents in a head model. This, in turn, will also influence the MEGs and the inverse source localizations. This was examined in detail with three different human head models. Methods Three finite element head models constructed from segmented MR images of an adult male subject were used for this study. These models were: (1) Model 1: full model with eleven tissues that included detailed structure of the scalp, hard and soft skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter and other prominent tissues, (2) the Model 2 was derived from the Model 1 in which the conductivity of gray matter was set equal to the white matter, i.e., a ten tissuetype model, (3) the Model 3 consisted of scalp, hard skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter, i.e., a five tissue-type model. The lead fields and MEGs due to dipolar sources in the motor cortex were computed for all three models. The dipolar sources were oriented normal to the cortical surface and had a dipole moment of 100 μA meter. The inverse source localizations were performed with an exhaustive search pattern in the motor cortex area. A set of 100 trial inverse runs was made covering the 3 cm cube motor cortex area in a random fashion. The Model 1 was used as a reference model. Results The reference model (Model 1), as expected, performed best in localizing the sources in the motor cortex area. The Model 3 performed the worst. The mean source localization errors (MLEs) of the Model 3 were larger than the Model 1 or 2. The contour plots of the magnetic fields on top of the head were also different for all three models. The magnetic fields due to source currents were larger in magnitude as compared to the magnetic fields of volume currents. Discussion These results

  19. Time reversal for localization of sources of infrasound signals in a windy stratified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lonzaga, Joel B

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal is used for localizing sources of recorded infrasound signals propagating in a windy, stratified atmosphere. Due to the convective effect of the background flow, the back-azimuths of the recorded signals can be substantially different from the source back-azimuth, posing a significant difficulty in source localization. The back-propagated signals are characterized by negative group velocities from which the source back-azimuth and source-to-receiver (STR) distance can be estimated using the apparent back-azimuths and trace velocities of the signals. The method is applied to several distinct infrasound arrivals recorded by two arrays in the Netherlands. The infrasound signals were generated by the Buncefield oil depot explosion in the U.K. in December 2005. Analyses show that the method can be used to substantially enhance estimates of the source back-azimuth and the STR distance. In one of the arrays, for instance, the deviations between the measured back-azimuths of the signals and the known source back-azimuth are quite large (-1° to -7°), whereas the deviations between the predicted and known source back-azimuths are small with an absolute mean value of <1°. Furthermore, the predicted STR distance is off only by <5% of the known STR distance. PMID:27369127

  20. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  1. Paired MEG data set source localization using recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC.

    PubMed

    Ermer, J J; Mosher, J C; Huang, M; Leahy, R M

    2000-09-01

    An important class of experiments in functional brain mapping involves collecting pairs of data corresponding to separate "Task" and "Control" conditions. The data are then analyzed to determine what activity occurs during the Task experiment but not in the Control. Here we describe a new method for processing paired magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data sets using our recursively applied and projected multiple signal classification (RAP-MUSIC) algorithm. In this method the signal subspace of the Task data is projected against the orthogonal complement of the Control data signal subspace to obtain a subspace which describes spatial activity unique to the Task. A RAP-MUSIC localization search is then performed on this projected data to localize the sources which are active in the Task but not in the Control data. In addition to dipolar sources, effective blocking of more complex sources, e.g., multiple synchronously activated dipoles or synchronously activated distributed source activity, is possible since these topographies are well-described by the Control data signal subspace. Unlike previously published methods, the proposed method is shown to be effective in situations where the time series associated with Control and Task activity possess significant cross correlation. The method also allows for straightforward determination of the estimated time series of the localized target sources. A multiepoch MEG simulation and a phantom experiment are presented to demonstrate the ability of this method to successfully identify sources and their time series in the Task data.

  2. Generation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in Ionospheric HF Heating Experiments: Simulating Large-Scale Natural Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, Rezy

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence in the ionospheric layer. The main hypothesis is that, the thermal gradients associated with the heat wave fronts could act as a source of powerful AGW capable of triggering ionospheric plasma turbulence over extensive areas. In our investigations, first we are going to examine a case study of the summer 2006 North American heat wave event. Our examination of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) data over the North American sector reveals a quite noticeable increase in the level of daily plasma density fluctuations during the summer 2006 heat wave period. Comparison with the summer 2005 and summer 2007 data further confirms that the observed increase of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the summer 2006 heat wave period was not simply a regular seasonal phenomenon. Furthermore, a series of field experiments had been carried out at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in order to physically simulate the process of AGW/TID generation by large-scale thermal gradients in the ionosphere. In these ionospheric HF heating experiments, we create some time-varying artificial thermal gradients at an altitude of 200--300 km above the Earth's surface using vertically-transmitted amplitude-modulated 0-mode HF heater waves. For our experiments, a number of radio diagnostic instruments had been utilized to detect the characteristic signatures of heater-generated AGW/TID. So far, we have been able to obtain several affirmative indications that some artificial AGW/TID are indeed being radiated out from the heated plasma volume during the HAARP-AGW experiments. Based on the experimental evidence, we may conclude that it is certainly quite plausible for large-scale thermal gradients associated with severe heat wave

  3. Source localization precision of the superconducting imaging-surface meg system

    SciTech Connect

    Matlachov, A. N.; Espy, M. A.; Volegov, P.; Flynn, E. R.; Maharajh, K.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    A unique whole-head Magnetoencephalography (MEG) system incorporating a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) has been designed and built at Los Alamos with the goal of dramatically improving source localization accuracy while mitigating limitations of current systems (e.g. low signal-to-noise, cost, bulk). Magnetoencephalography (MEG) measures the weak magnetic fields emanating from the brain as a direct consequence of the neuronal currents resulting from brain function[1]. The extraordinarily weak magnetic fields are measured by an array of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) sensors. The position and vector characteristics of these neuronal sources can be estimated from the inverse solution of the field distribution at the surface of the head. In addition, MEG temporal resolution is unsurpassed by any other method currently used for brain imaging. Although MEG source reconstruction is limited by solutions of the electromagnetic inverse problem, constraints used for source localization produce reliable results. The Los Alamos SIS-MEG system[2] is based on the principal that fields from nearby sources measured by a SQUID sensor array while the SIS shields the sensor array from distant noise fields. In general, Meissner currents flow in the surface of superconductors, preventing any significant penetration of magnetic fields. A hemispherical SIS with a brim, or helmet, surrounds the SQUID sensor array largely sheilding the SQUIDs from sources outside the helmet while measuring fields from nearby sources within the helmet. We have implemented a finite element model (FEM) description of the SIS using the exact as-built geometry to accurately describe how the SIS impacts the forward physics of source models. The FEM is used to calculate the distribution of Meissner currents in the complicated surface geometry of the SIS such that B=0 at the surface. This model of the forward physics is described elsewhere in these proceedings [3]. In this paper, we

  4. Wave field characterization for non-destructive assessment of elastic properties using laser-acoustic sources in fluids and eye related tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windisch, T.; Schubert, F.; Köhler, B.; Spörl, E.

    2010-03-01

    The age-related changes in the visco-elastic properties of the human lens are discussed with respect to presbyopia for a long time. All known measurement techniques are based on extracted lenses or are damaging the tissue. Hence, in vivo studies of lens hardness are not possible at the moment. To close this gap in lens diagnostics this project deals with an approach for a non-contact laser-acoustic characterization technique. Laser-generated wave fronts are reflected by the tissue interfaces and are also affected by the visco-elastic properties of the lens tissue. After propagating through the eye, these waves are recorded as corneal vibrations by laser vibrometry. A systematic analysis of amplitude and phase of these signals and the wave generation process shall give information about the interface locations and the tissues viscoelastic properties. Our recent studies on extracted porcine eyes proved that laser-acoustic sources can be systematically used for non-contacting generation and recording of ultrasound inside the human eye. Furthermore, a specific numerical model provides important contributions to the understanding of the complex wave propagation process. Measurements of the acoustic sources support this approach. Future investigations are scheduled to answer the question, whether this novel technique can be directly used during a laser surgery for monitoring purposes and if a purely diagnostic approach, e.g. by excitation in the aqueous humor, is also possible. In both cases, this technique offers a promising approach for non-contact ultrasound based eye diagnostics.

  5. Separation of Main and Tail Rotor Noise Sources from Ground-Based Acoustic Measurements Using Time-Domain De-Dopplerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of separating the contributions of helicopter main and tail rotor noise sources is presented, making use of ground-based acoustic measurements. The method employs time-domain de-Dopplerization to transform the acoustic pressure time-history data collected from an array of ground-based microphones to the equivalent time-history signals observed by an array of virtual inflight microphones traveling with the helicopter. The now-stationary signals observed by the virtual microphones are then periodically averaged with the main and tail rotor once per revolution triggers. The averaging process suppresses noise which is not periodic with the respective rotor, allowing for the separation of main and tail rotor pressure time-histories. The averaged measurements are then interpolated across the range of directivity angles captured by the microphone array in order to generate separate acoustic hemispheres for the main and tail rotor noise sources. The new method is successfully applied to ground-based microphone measurements of a Bell 206B3 helicopter and demonstrates the strong directivity characteristics of harmonic noise radiation from both the main and tail rotors of that helicopter.

  6. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  7. Localization of a continuous CO2 leak from an isotropic flat-surface structure using acoustic emission detection and near-field beamforming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Cui, Xiwang; Guo, Miao; Han, Xiaojuan

    2016-11-01

    Seal capacity is of great importance for the safety operation of pressurized vessels. It is crucial to locate the leak hole timely and accurately for reasons of safety and maintenance. This paper presents the principle and application of a linear acoustic emission sensor array and a near-field beamforming technique to identify the location of a continuous CO2 leak from an isotropic flat-surface structure on a pressurized vessel in the carbon capture and storage system. Acoustic signals generated by the leak hole are collected using a linear high-frequency sensor array. Time-frequency analysis and a narrow-band filtering technique are deployed to extract effective information about the leak. The impacts of various factors on the performance of the localization technique are simulated, compared and discussed, including the number of sensors, distance between the leak hole and sensor array and spacing between adjacent sensors. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory-scale test rig to assess the effectiveness and operability of the proposed method. The results obtained suggest that the proposed method is capable of providing accurate and reliable localization of a continuous CO2 leak.

  8. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  9. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques.

  10. Contributions of local and regional sources of NO x to ozone concentrations in Southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2011-06-01

    The Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with a modified SAPRC-99 photochemical mechanism was used to investigate the contributions of local and upwind NO x sources to O 3 concentrations in Southeast Texas during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) from August 25 to September 5, 2000. Contributions from eight different local NO x source types and eight different source regions to the 8-h average daytime O 3 concentrations from 1100 to 1800 CST (referred to as AD O 3 hereafter) are determined. Both diesel engines and highway gasoline vehicles account for 25 ppb of AD O 3 in the urban Houston area. NO x from natural gas combustion produces 35 ppb of AD O 3 in the industrial area of Houston. Contributions from industrial sources and coal combustion to AD O 3 have comparatively less broad spatial distribution with maximum values of 14 ppb and 20 ppb, respectively. Although the local sources are the most important sources, upwind sources have non-negligible influences (20-50%) on AD O 3 in the entire domain, with a maximum of 50 ppb in rural and coastal areas and 20 ppb in urban and industrial areas. To probe the origins of upwind sources contributions, NO x emissions in the entire eastern United States are divided into eight different regions and their contributions to O 3 concentrations in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) and Beaumont-Port Arthur (BPA) areas are determined. Among the various NO x source regions resolved in this study, other Texas counties near the HGB and BPA areas and southeastern states are the most important non-local sources of O 3. Under favorable transport conditions, emissions from neighbor states and northeastern states could also contribute to non-negligible O 3 concentrations (7-15%) in the HGB and BPA areas. This indicates that in addition to reduce local emissions, regional NO x emission controls, especially from the neighbor counties and states, are also necessary to improve O 3 air quality in Southeast Texas.

  11. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Robert L. Quarles, Darrin D. Dantin and James C. Moore. 2004. Evaluation of a Coastal Golf Complex as a Local and Watershed Source of Bioavailable Contaminants. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 48(3-4):254-262. (ERL,GB 1183).

    Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacte...

  12. Spin current source based on a quantum point contact with local spin-orbit interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, M. P.; Szafran, B.

    2013-11-11

    Proposal for construction of a source of spin-polarized current based on quantum point contact (QPC) with local spin-orbit interaction is presented. We show that spin-orbit interaction present within the narrowing acts like a spin filter. The spin polarization of the current is discussed as a function of the Fermi energy and the width of the QPC.

  13. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-01-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  14. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.