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Sample records for acoustic startle probes

  1. Cocaine: effects on acoustic startle and startle elicited electrically from the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Harty, T P; Davis, M

    1985-01-01

    Startle-like responses can be elicited by single pulse electrical stimulation of nuclei within the acoustic startle pathway. Compared with acoustically-elicited startle, this technique provides a method for localizing the ultimate sites of action of a drug that affects the acoustic startle response. Strychnine (1 mg/kg) increased both acoustically-elicited startle and startle elicited from the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), the first central nucleus in the acoustic startle pathway. In contrast, cocaine (10 mg/kg) increased acoustically-elicited startle but depressed VCN-elicited startle. These results suggest that cocaine increases startle by acting on sensory rather than final motor systems and are discussed in relation to the putative effect of cocaine on dopamine neurotransmission and the involvement of dopamine in sensorimotor reactivity. PMID:3001807

  2. Effects of selected anticholinergics on acoustic startle response in rats.

    PubMed

    Sipos, M L; Burchnell, V; Galbicka, G

    2001-12-01

    The present study compared the effects of the anticholinergics aprophen hydrochloride, atropine sulfate, azaprophen hydrochloride, benactyzine hydrochloride, biperiden hydrochloride, diazepam, procyclidine hydrochloride, scopolamine hydrobromide and trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride on acoustic startle response in rats. Peak startle amplitude, latency to peak startle amplitude and prepulse inhibition following 100- and 120-dB tones were recorded 15 min following drug administration in food-restricted rats. Aprophen, atropine, azaprophen, benactyzine, biperiden and scopolamine significantly increased peak startle amplitude and decreased latency to peak startle amplitude following 100-dB pulses. In contrast, only biperiden increased peak startle amplitude following 120-dB pulses, whereas atropine and trihexyphenidyl decreased latency to peak startle amplitude following 120-dB pulses. Benactyzine decreased prepulse inhibition following both 100- and 120-dB pulses, whereas both biperiden and scopolamine decreased prepulse inhibition following 120-dB pulses. Acoustic startle response measures were effective in differentiating the effects of anticholinergic compounds. The comparison of drug effects on the acoustic startle response may be useful in selecting efficacious anticholinergic drug therapies with a minimal range of side-effects. In addition, these data may be useful in down-selecting the number of anticholinergic drugs that need to be tested in comparison studies involving more complex behavioral tests. PMID:11920928

  3. The Influence of Stuttering Severity on Acoustic Startle Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, John B.; Finan, Donald S.; Ramig, Peter R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the potential impact of stuttering severity, as measured by the Perceptions of Stuttering Inventory (Woolf, 1967) on acoustic startle responses. Method: Three groups, consisting of 10 nonstuttering adults, 9 mild stutterering adults, and 11 moderate/severe stutterering adults, were presented with identical 95-dB…

  4. Lipopolysaccharide does not affect acoustic startle reflex in mice.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Blaszczyk, Janusz; Sadowski, Bogdan; Sliwa, Adam T; Wolak, Patrycja; Tymosiak-Zielinska, Agnieszka; Lisowski, Pawel; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) evokes in rodents an adaptive sickness behavior. It also produces changes in stress hormones secretion and activity of brain serotonergic and noradrenergic systems that have been implicated in stress responses, fear, and anxiety. Acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is regarded as a protective behavioral response that is enhanced in threatening situations or following an aversive event, and it can be modulated by physiological and emotional state of an animal. Effects of intraperitoneal injections of LPS on ASR, prepulse inhibition (PPI), locomotor activity in open field, and blood plasma corticosterone concentration were studied in lines of mice that display high (HA line) or low (LA line) swim stress-induced analgesia and also differ in emotional behaviors, including the magnitude of ASR. In both lines LPS produced robust sickness behavior, as evidenced by a decrease in locomotion and body weight, and an increase in corticosterone concentration. However, in neither line LPS injections affected responses to acoustic stimuli as assessed by the ASR and PPI magnitudes. The findings suggest that in sickness behavior induced by LPS the protective responses to salient environmental stimuli are not impaired. The significance of this finding for the concept of sickness behavior is discussed. PMID:17651939

  5. Baseline and Modulated Acoustic Startle Responses in Adolescent Girls with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschitz, Deborah S.; Mayes, Linda M.; Rasmusson, Ann M.; Anyan, Walter; Billingslea, Eileen; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Southwick, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess baseline and modulated acoustic startle responses in adolescent girls with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Twenty-eight adolescent girls with PTSD and 23 healthy control girls were recruited for participation in the study. Acoustic stimuli were bursts of white noise of 104 dB presented biaurally through…

  6. Combined prenatal and chronic postnatal vitamin D deficiency in rats impairs prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle.

    PubMed

    Burne, Thomas H J; Féron, François; Brown, Jillanne; Eyles, Darryl W; McGrath, John J; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2004-06-01

    There is growing evidence that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is involved in normal brain development. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of prenatal and postnatal hypovitaminosis D on prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle in adult rats. We compared six groups of rats: control rats with normal vitamin D throughout life and normal litter size (Litter); control rats with normal vitamin D but with a reduced litter size of two (Control); offspring from reduced litters of vitamin D deplete mothers who were repleted at birth (Birth), repleted at weaning (Weaning) or remained on a deplete diet until 10 weeks of age (Life); or control rats that were placed on a vitamin D-deficient diet from 5 to 10 weeks of age (Adult). All rats were tested in acoustic startle chambers at 5 and 10 weeks of age for acoustic startle responses and for PPI. There were no significant group differences at 5 weeks of age on the acoustic startle response or on PPI. At 10 weeks of age, rats in the Life group only had impaired PPI despite having normal acoustic startle responses. We conclude that combined prenatal and chronic postnatal hypovitaminosis D, but not early life hypovitaminosis D, alters PPI. PMID:15178159

  7. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of acoustic startle eye blink and affectively modulated startle response: A genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    VAIDYANATHAN, UMA; MALONE, STEPHEN M.; MILLER, MICHAEL B.; McGUE, MATT; IACONO, WILLIAM G.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic startle responses have been studied extensively in relation to individual differences and psychopathology. We examined three indices of the blink response in a picture-viewing paradigm—overall startle magnitude across all picture types, and aversive and pleasant modulation scores—in 3,323 twins and parents. Biometric models and molecular genetic analyses showed that half the variance in overall startle was due to additive genetic effects. No single nucleotide polymorphism was genome-wide significant, but GRIK3 did produce a significant effect when examined as part of a candidate gene set. In contrast, emotion modulation scores showed little evidence of heritability in either biometric or molecular genetic analyses. However, in a genome-wide scan, PARP14 did produce a significant effect for aversive modulation. We conclude that, although overall startle retains potential as an endophenotype, emotion-modulated startle does not. PMID:25387708

  8. Acoustic startle responses and temperament in individuals who stutter.

    PubMed

    Guitar, Barry

    2003-02-01

    Fourteen individuals who stutter and 14 individuals who do not stutter were presented with 10 bursts of white noise to assess the magnitude of their eyeblink responses as a measure of temperament. Both the magnitude of the eyeblink response to the initial noise burst and the mean of the 10 responses were significantly greater for the stuttering group. The Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis (R. M. Taylor & L P. Morrison, 1996) did not distinguish between the two groups, but informal follow-up statistics indicated that the Nervous subscale showed a significant group difference. Scores on this subscale were also significantly positively correlated with the magnitude of the startle response. A discriminant analysis demonstrated that although both the startle response and the nervous trait differentiated the two groups, the startle response measures were more powerful in making this differentiation.

  9. Habituation of the acoustic and the tactile startle responses in mice: two independent sensory processes.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Peter K D; Carl, Thomas D; Plappert, Claudia F

    2004-10-01

    To test whether habituation is specific to the stimulus modality, the authors analyzed cross-habituation between the tactile startle response' (TSR) and the acoustic startle response (ASR). The acoustic artifacts of airpuffs used to elicit the TSR were reduced by using a silencer and were effectively masked by background noise of 90-100 dB sound-pressure level. ASR was elicited by 14-kHz tones. TSR and ASR habituated in DBA and BALB mice: both the TSR and ASR habituated to a greater extent in DBA mice than in BALB mice. In both strains, habituation of the TSR did not generalize to the ASR, and vice versa. From this, the authors concluded that habituation of startle is located in the sensory afferent branches of the pathway.

  10. Stuttering and Sensory Gating: A Study of Acoustic Startle Prepulse Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, Per A.

    2006-01-01

    It was hypothesized that stuttering may be related to impaired sensory gating, leading to overflow of superfluous disturbing auditory feedback and breakdown of the speech sequence. This hypothesis was tested using the "acoustic startle prepulse inhibition" (PPI) paradigm. A group of 22 adults with developmental stuttering were compared with…

  11. Dissociative identity disorder and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Karl Yngvar; Flaten, Magne Arve; Elden, Åke; Holte, Arne

    2008-01-01

    A group of persons with dissociative identity disorder (DID) was compared with a group of persons with other dissociative disorders, and a group of nondiagnosed controls with regard to prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex. The findings suggest maladaptive attentional processes at a controlled level, but not at a preattentive automatic level, in persons with DID. The prepulse occupied more controlled attentional resources in the DID group compared with the other two groups. Preattentive automatic processing, on the other hand, was normal in the DID group. Moreover, startle reflexes did not habituate in the DID group. In conclusion, increased PPI and delayed habituation is consistent with increased vigilance in individuals with DID. The present findings of reduced habituation of startle reflexes and increased PPI in persons with DID suggest the operation of a voluntary process that directs attention away from unpleasant or threatening stimuli. Aberrant voluntary attentional processes may thus be a defining characteristic in DID. PMID:18830396

  12. Dissociative identity disorder and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex.

    PubMed

    Dale, Karl Yngvar; Flaten, Magne Arve; Elden, Ake; Holte, Arne

    2008-06-01

    A group of persons with dissociative identity disorder (DID) was compared with a group of persons with other dissociative disorders, and a group of nondiagnosed controls with regard to prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex. The findings suggest maladaptive attentional processes at a controlled level, but not at a preattentive automatic level, in persons with DID. The prepulse occupied more controlled attentional resources in the DID group compared with the other two groups. Preattentive automatic processing, on the other hand, was normal in the DID group. Moreover, startle reflexes did not habituate in the DID group. In conclusion, increased PPI and delayed habituation is consistent with increased vigilance in individuals with DID. The present findings of reduced habituation of startle reflexes and increased PPI in persons with DID suggest the operation of a voluntary process that directs attention away from unpleasant or threatening stimuli. Aberrant voluntary attentional processes may thus be a defining characteristic in DID.

  13. Prepulse Inhibition of the Acoustic Startle Reflex in High Functioning Autism

    PubMed Central

    Gruendler, Theo O. J.; Vogeley, Kai; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Kuhn, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background High functioning autism is an autism spectrum disorder that is characterized by deficits in social interaction and communication as well as repetitive and restrictive behavior while intelligence and general cognitive functioning are preserved. According to the weak central coherence account, individuals with autism tend to process information detail-focused at the expense of global form. This processing bias might be reflected by deficits in sensorimotor gating, a mechanism that prevents overstimulation during the transformation of sensory input into motor action. Prepulse inhibition is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating, which indicates an extensive attenuation of the startle reflex that occurs when a startling pulse is preceded by a weaker stimulus, the prepulse. Methods In the present study, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle was compared between 17 adults with high functioning autism and 17 sex-, age-, and intelligence-matched controls by means of electromyography. Results Results indicate that participants with high functioning autism exhibited significantly higher startle amplitudes than the control group. However, groups did not differ with regard to PPI or habituation of startle. Discussion These findings challenge the results of two previous studies that reported prepulse inhibition deficits in high-functioning autism and suggest that sensorimotor gating is only impaired in certain subgroups with autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24643088

  14. Repeated low-dose exposures to sarin, soman, or VX affect acoustic startle in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Smith, C D; Lee, R B; Moran, A V; Sipos, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are known to cause behavioral abnormalities in cases of human exposures and in animal models. The behavioral consequences of single exposures to CWNAs that cause observable toxic signs are particularly well characterized in animals; however, less is known regarding repeated smaller exposures that may or may not cause observable toxic signs. In the current study, guinea pigs were exposed to fractions (0.1, 0.2, or 0.4) of a medial lethal dose (LD50) of sarin, soman, or VX for two weeks. On each exposure day, and for a post-exposure period, acoustic startle response (ASR) was measured in each animal. Although relatively few studies use guinea pigs to measure behavior, this species is ideal for CWNA-related experiments because their levels of carboxylesterases closely mimic those of humans, unlike rats or mice. Results showed that the 0.4 LD50 doses of soman and VX transiently increased peak startle amplitude by the second week of injections, with amplitude returning to baseline by the second week post-exposure. Sarin also increased peak startle amplitude independent of week. Latencies to peak startle and PPI were affected by agent exposure but not consistently among the three agents. Most of the changes in startle responses returned to baseline following the cessation of exposures. These data suggest that doses of CWNAs not known to produce observable toxic signs in guinea pigs can affect behavior in the ASR paradigm. Further, these deficits are transient and usually return to baseline shortly after the end of a two-week exposure period. PMID:26829110

  15. Startle modulation before, during and after exposure to emotional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Dichter, Gabriel S; Tomarken, Andrew J; Baucom, Brian R

    2002-02-01

    Although affective modulation of the startle reflex is a highly replicable effect, the majority of studies have administered startle probes during exposure to affective stimuli. To examine more comprehensively the temporal course of startle potentiation, we assessed blink modulation before, during and immediately after exposure to positive, negative and neutral pictures. During each trial, cues about the affective content of pictures were presented, after which acoustic startle probes were delivered either before picture onset, during picture onset or immediately after picture offset. As expected, we observed a linear relation between picture valence and startle amplitude during picture viewing. Surprisingly, startle amplitude was larger while anticipating pleasant and unpleasant pictures relative to neutral pictures. No significant effects were observed during the offset phase. These results indicate that startle modulation is conditional upon temporal factors linked to stimulus onset and offset.

  16. Long-Lasting Suppression of Acoustic Startle Response after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Roland, Jessica J.; Nadpara, Neil; Pfister, Bryan; Long, Mathew; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Servatius, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acoustic startle response (ASR) is a defensive reflex that is largely ignored unless greatly exaggerated. ASR is suppressed after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), but the effect of mild TBI (mTBI) on ASR has not been investigated. Because the neural circuitry for ASR resides in the pons in all mammals, ASR may be a good measure of brainstem function after mTBI. The present study assessed ASR in Sprague-Dawley rats after mTBI using lateral fluid percussion and compared these effects to those on spatial working memory. mTBI caused a profound, long-lasting suppression of ASR. Both probability of emitting a startle and startle amplitude were diminished. ASR suppression was observed as soon as 1 day after injury and remained suppressed for the duration of the study (21 days after injury). No indication of recovery was observed. mTBI also impaired spatial working memory. In contrast to the suppression of ASR, working memory impairment was transient; memory was impaired 1 and 7 days after injury, but recovered by 21 days. The long-lasting suppression of ASR suggests long-term dysfunction of brainstem neural circuits at a time when forebrain neural circuits responsible for spatial working memory have recovered. These results have important implications for return-to-activity decisions because recovery of cognitive impairments plays an important role in these decisions. PMID:25412226

  17. Repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to sensitisation in subsequent avoidance behaviour and induces fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autonomous reflexes enable animals to respond quickly to potential threats, prevent injury and mediate fight or flight responses. Intense acoustic stimuli with sudden onsets elicit a startle reflex while stimuli of similar intensity but with longer rise times only cause a cardiac defence response. In laboratory settings, habituation appears to affect all of these reflexes so that the response amplitude generally decreases with repeated exposure to the stimulus. The startle reflex has become a model system for the study of the neural basis of simple learning processes and emotional processing and is often used as a diagnostic tool in medical applications. However, previous studies did not allow animals to avoid the stimulus and the evolutionary function and long-term behavioural consequences of repeated startling remain speculative. In this study we investigate the follow-up behaviour associated with the startle reflex in wild-captured animals using an experimental setup that allows individuals to exhibit avoidance behaviour. Results We present evidence that repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to rapid and pronounced sensitisation of sustained spatial avoidance behaviour in grey seals (Halichoerus grypus). Animals developed rapid flight responses, left the exposure pool and showed clear signs of fear conditioning. Once sensitised, seals even avoided a known food source that was close to the sound source. In contrast, animals exposed to non-startling (long rise time) stimuli of the same maximum sound pressure habituated and flight responses waned or were absent from the beginning. The startle threshold of grey seals expressed in units of sensation levels was comparable to thresholds reported for other mammals (93 dB). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the acoustic startle reflex plays a crucial role in mediating flight responses and strongly influences the motivational state of an animal beyond a short-term muscular response by

  18. Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) and gamma valerolactone (GVL): similarities and differences in their effects on the acoustic startle reflex and the conditioned enhancement of startle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, Laureen J; Leavell, Bonita J; Jones, Calleen M; Hepler, Bradford R; Isenschmid, Daniel S; Commissaris, Randall L

    2012-06-01

    Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) is metabolized to gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the body. GHB is a DEA Schedule 1 compound; GBL is a DEA List 1 chemical. Gamma valerolactone (GVL) is the 4-methyl analog of GBL; GVL is metabolized to 4-methyl-GHB; GVL is NOT metabolized to GBL or GHB. The effects of GBL (18.75-150 mg/kg), GVL (200-1600 mg/kg) or vehicle on the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), and the classically-conditioned enhancement of startle, the Startle Anticipated Potentiation of Startle (SAPS) response were studied in male rats. Both compounds produced a dose-dependent reduction of ASR, with GBL 5-7 times more potent than GVL. In contrast, GBL treatment significantly reduced SAPS at doses that exerted only moderate effects on ASR, whereas GVL exerted little or no effect on the SAPS, except at doses that produced pronounced reductions in Noise Alone ASR. In a second experiment, rats were tested for Noise Alone ASR behavior following treatment with a single mid-range dose of GBL (75 mg/kg), GVL (400mg/kg) or vehicle; immediately following startle testing the animals were sacrificed and their brains and blood were collected for determination of GHB, 4-methyl-GHB, GBL and GVL. GHB was found in measurable concentrations in all of the blood specimens and 6 (of 8) of the brain specimens from the GBL-treated subjects. 4-Methyl-GHB was found in measurable concentrations in all of the blood and brain specimens of the GVL-treated subjects; the change in startle amplitude was inversely correlated to the brain concentrations of these compounds. These findings confirm the differences in the metabolic fate of GBL and GVL as pro-drugs for the formation of GHB and 4-methyl-GHB, respectively. Moreover, the dissimilarity in effect profile for GBL and GVL on ASR versus SAPS behaviors suggests that different receptor(s) may be involved in mediating these behavioral effects. PMID:22349589

  19. Methodological optimization of tinnitus assessment using prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, R J; Galazyuk, A V

    2012-11-16

    Recently prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR) became a popular technique for tinnitus assessment in laboratory animals. This method confers a significant advantage over the previously used time-consuming behavioral approaches utilizing basic mechanisms of conditioning. Although this technique has been successfully used to assess tinnitus in different laboratory animals, many of the finer details of this methodology have not been described enough to be replicated, but are critical for tinnitus assessment. Here we provide detail description of key procedures and methodological issues that provide guidance for newcomers with the process of learning to correctly apply gap detection techniques for tinnitus assessment in laboratory animals. The major categories of these issues include: refinement of hardware for best performance, optimization of stimulus parameters, behavioral considerations, and identification of optimal strategies for data analysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tinnitus Neuroscience.

  20. Toxoplasma gondii exposure affects neural processing speed as measured by acoustic startle latency in schizophrenia and controls.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Bradley D; Hubbard, Sydney; Rivera, Hilda N; Wilkins, Patricia P; Fisch, Marylynn C; Hopkins, Myfanwy H; Hasenkamp, Wendy; Gross, Robin; Bliwise, Nancy; Jones, Jeffrey L; Duncan, Erica

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii (TOXO) infection in schizophrenia (SCZ) is elevated compared to controls (odds ratio=2.73). TOXO infection is associated with psychomotor slowing in rodents and non-psychiatric humans. Latency of the acoustic startle response, an index of neural processing speed, is the time it takes for a startling stimulus to elicit the reflexive response through a three-synapse subcortical circuit. We report a significant slowing of latency in TOXO seropositive SCZ vs. seronegative SCZ, and in TOXO seropositive controls vs. seronegative controls. Latency was likewise slower in SCZ subjects than in controls. These findings indicate a slowing of neural processing speed with chronic TOXO infection; the slowest startle latency was seen in the TOXO seropositive SCZ group.

  1. Modality of fear cues affects acoustic startle potentiation but not heart-rate response in patients with dental phobia.

    PubMed

    Wannemüller, André; Sartory, Gudrun; Elsesser, Karin; Lohrmann, Thomas; Jöhren, Hans P

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (SR) has consistently been shown to be enhanced by fear-arousing cross-modal background stimuli in phobics. Intra-modal fear-potentiation of acoustic SR was rarely investigated and generated inconsistent results. The present study compared the acoustic SR to phobia-related sounds with that to phobia-related pictures in 104 dental phobic patients and 22 controls. Acoustic background stimuli were dental treatment noises and birdsong and visual stimuli were dental treatment and neutral control pictures. Background stimuli were presented for 4 s, randomly followed by the administration of the startle stimulus. In addition to SR, heart-rate (HR) was recorded throughout the trials. Irrespective of their content, background pictures elicited greater SR than noises in both groups with a trend for phobic participants to show startle potentiation to phobia-related pictures but not noises. Unlike controls, phobics showed HR acceleration to both dental pictures and noises. HR acceleration of the phobia group was significantly positively correlated with SR in the noise condition only. The acoustic SR to phobia-related noises is likely to be inhibited by prolonged sensorimotor gating.

  2. Modality of fear cues affects acoustic startle potentiation but not heart-rate response in patients with dental phobia

    PubMed Central

    Wannemüller, André; Sartory, Gudrun; Elsesser, Karin; Lohrmann, Thomas; Jöhren, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (SR) has consistently been shown to be enhanced by fear-arousing cross-modal background stimuli in phobics. Intra-modal fear-potentiation of acoustic SR was rarely investigated and generated inconsistent results. The present study compared the acoustic SR to phobia-related sounds with that to phobia-related pictures in 104 dental phobic patients and 22 controls. Acoustic background stimuli were dental treatment noises and birdsong and visual stimuli were dental treatment and neutral control pictures. Background stimuli were presented for 4 s, randomly followed by the administration of the startle stimulus. In addition to SR, heart-rate (HR) was recorded throughout the trials. Irrespective of their content, background pictures elicited greater SR than noises in both groups with a trend for phobic participants to show startle potentiation to phobia-related pictures but not noises. Unlike controls, phobics showed HR acceleration to both dental pictures and noises. HR acceleration of the phobia group was significantly positively correlated with SR in the noise condition only. The acoustic SR to phobia-related noises is likely to be inhibited by prolonged sensorimotor gating. PMID:25774142

  3. Increased sensitization of acoustic startle response in spasmodic mice with a mutation of the glycine receptor alpha1-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Plappert, C F; Pilz, P K; Becker, K; Becker, C M; Schnitzler, H U

    2001-06-01

    The spontaneous mutant mouse spasmodic (spd) carries a missense mutation affecting the glycine receptor alpha1-subunit gene. This results in a decreased binding affinity to glycine. Spd mutants show exaggerated acoustic startle responses (ASR). The present study sought to elucidate whether this increased ASR is due to a changed auditory processing or to stronger motor output resulting from a disinhibited motor system or, alternatively, to changes in modulatory influences on the startle pathway, namely in the mechanisms underlying habituation and sensitization. We found that in homozygous spd/spd mutants the startle threshold was lower, and the recorded slope of input/output (i/o) function, which reflects the relation between sensory input and motor output, was steeper. During repetitive presentation of high sound pressure level (SPL) startle stimuli (25 dB above startle threshold), ASR amplitudes did not decrease in spd/spd mutants as they do in the wildtype. In contrast, ASR amplitudes decreased when low SPL startle stimuli were presented. Footshocks presented after high SPL startle stimuli did not cause a further increase in ASR amplitudes of spd/spd mutants as in the wildtype. In heterozygous spd/+ mutants all these parameters were between those of spd/spd mutants and wildtype mice but closer to those of the wildtype. The steeper slope of i/o function in spd/spd mutants may be caused by both an increased sensory input and an increased motor output. The altered course of ASR amplitudes during repetitive stimulation and the deficit in additional footshock sensitization, however, can only be explained by an increased sensitization level in the spd/spd mutants. In accordance with the "dual process theory" strong sensitization evoked by high SPL startle stimuli supposedly counteracts habituation, leading to a constant high ASR amplitude. Furthermore, additional footshock sensitization is prevented. The increased sensitization level may be due to a change in auditory

  4. Prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex vs. auditory brainstem response for hearing assessment.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, R J; Alghamdi, F; Rosen, M J; Galazyuk, A V

    2016-09-01

    The high prevalence of noise-induced and age-related hearing loss in the general population has warranted the use of animal models to study the etiology of these pathologies. Quick and accurate auditory threshold determination is a prerequisite for experimental manipulations targeting hearing loss in animal models. The standard auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurement is fairly quick and translational across species, but is limited by the need for anesthesia and a lack of perceptual assessment. The goal of this study was to develop a new method of hearing assessment utilizing prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex, a commonly used tool that measures detection thresholds in awake animals, and can be performed on multiple animals simultaneously. We found that in control mice PPI audiometric functions are similar to both ABR and traditional operant conditioning audiograms. The hearing thresholds assessed with PPI audiometry in sound exposed mice were also similar to those detected by ABR thresholds one day after exposure. However, three months after exposure PPI threshold shifts were still evident at and near the frequency of exposure whereas ABR thresholds recovered to the pre-exposed level. In contrast, PPI audiometry and ABR wave one amplitudes detected similar losses. PPI audiometry provides a high throughput automated behavioral screening tool of hearing in awake animals. Overall, PPI audiometry and ABR assessments of the auditory system are robust techniques with distinct advantages and limitations, which when combined, can provide ample information about the functionality of the auditory system. PMID:27349914

  5. [Early social isolation increases aggression and impairs a short-term habituation in acoustic startle reflex in rats].

    PubMed

    Krupina, N A; Khlebnikova, N N; Orlova, I N

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged social isolation in early ontogeny leads to various changes in behavior and cognitive dysfunction in adult rats; however, data on the disorders are contradictory. In the present work, we studied the effects of early social isolation in Wistar rats by indices of psychomotor activity, aggression, anxiety, depression-like behavior, sensorimotor reactivity and short-term habituation of acoustic startle reflex. On the 24th postnatal day, rats were weaned from the dams and housed in individual cages for nine consecutive weeks. Animal behavior was evaluated at the age of one, two and three months. Immediately after weaning from the dam rats in the experimental group did not differ from the control on any of the indices. After four weeks of social isolation, rats showed an increased aggression in the social contact test. In rats isolated for an 8-weeks period, the increase in active non-aggressive contacts with a slight increase in motor activity in the elevated plus maze (E PM) accompanied increased aggression. At any terms of examination, isolated rats did not differ from the control in the anxiety in EPM, in the anxiety-phobic score, which is evaluated in a battery of tests, and in the duration of immobility which characterizes depression in the forced swimming test. Rats isolated for an 8-weeks period increased daily liquid intake by increasing the consumption of sucrose. After nine weeks of isolation, basal startle amplitude and prepulse inhibition that is, the characteristics of sensorimotor gating did not differ from the control, but there was a lack of short-term habituation of the acoustic startle reflex. Based on the data obtained, Wistar rats subjected to prolonged social isolation can be seen as a model of increased aggression with signs of cognitive deficits by indices of non-associative learning in the acoustic startle reflex.

  6. [Early social isolation increases aggression and impairs a short-term habituation in acoustic startle reflex in rats].

    PubMed

    Krupina, N A; Khlebnikova, N N; Orlova, I N

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged social isolation in early ontogeny leads to various changes in behavior and cognitive dysfunction in adult rats; however, data on the disorders are contradictory. In the present work, we studied the effects of early social isolation in Wistar rats by indices of psychomotor activity, aggression, anxiety, depression-like behavior, sensorimotor reactivity and short-term habituation of acoustic startle reflex. On the 24th postnatal day, rats were weaned from the dams and housed in individual cages for nine consecutive weeks. Animal behavior was evaluated at the age of one, two and three months. Immediately after weaning from the dam rats in the experimental group did not differ from the control on any of the indices. After four weeks of social isolation, rats showed an increased aggression in the social contact test. In rats isolated for an 8-weeks period, the increase in active non-aggressive contacts with a slight increase in motor activity in the elevated plus maze (E PM) accompanied increased aggression. At any terms of examination, isolated rats did not differ from the control in the anxiety in EPM, in the anxiety-phobic score, which is evaluated in a battery of tests, and in the duration of immobility which characterizes depression in the forced swimming test. Rats isolated for an 8-weeks period increased daily liquid intake by increasing the consumption of sucrose. After nine weeks of isolation, basal startle amplitude and prepulse inhibition that is, the characteristics of sensorimotor gating did not differ from the control, but there was a lack of short-term habituation of the acoustic startle reflex. Based on the data obtained, Wistar rats subjected to prolonged social isolation can be seen as a model of increased aggression with signs of cognitive deficits by indices of non-associative learning in the acoustic startle reflex. PMID:27116871

  7. Neurochemistry of the afferents to the rat cochlear root nucleus: Possible synaptic modulation of the acoustic startle

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Nieto, R; Horta-Junior, JAC; Castellano, O; Herrero-Turrión, MJ; Rubio, ME; López, DE

    2008-01-01

    Afferents to the primary startle circuit are essential for the elicitation and modulation of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). In the rat, cochlear root neurons (CRNs) comprise the first component of the acoustic startle circuit and play a crucial role in mediating the ASR. Nevertheless, the neurochemical pattern of their afferents remains unclear. To determine the distribution of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, we used confocal microscopy to analyze the immunostaining for vesicular glutamate and GABA transporter proteins (VGLUT1 and VGAT) on retrogradely labeled CRNs. We also used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry to detect and localize specific neurotransmitter receptor subunits in the cochlear root. Our results show differential distributions of VGLUT1- and VGAT-immunoreactive endings around cell bodies and dendrites. The RT-PCR data showed a positive band for several ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, M1- M5 muscarinic receptor subtypes, the glycine receptor α1 subunit (GlyRα1), GABAA, GABAB, and subunits of α2 and β-noradrenergic receptors. By immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that CRN cell bodies exhibit positive immunoreaction for the GluR3 and NR1 glutamate receptor subunits. Cell bodies and dendrites were also positive for M2 and M4, and GlyRα1. Other subunits, such as GluR1 and GluR4 of the AMPA glutamate receptors, were observed in glial cells neighboring unlabeled CRN cell bodies. We further confirmed the existence of noradrenergic afferents onto CRNs from the locus coeruleus by combining tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry and tract-tracing experiments. Our results provide valuable information toward understanding how CRNs might integrate excitatory and inhibitory inputs, and hence how they could elicit and modulate the acoustic startle reflex. PMID:18384963

  8. Dependence of the Startle Response on Temporal and Spectral Characteristics of Acoustic Modulatory Influences in Rats and Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Steube, Natalie; Nowotny, Manuela; Pilz, Peter K. D.; Gaese, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (ASR) and its modulation by non-startling prepulses, presented shortly before the startle-eliciting stimulus, is a broadly applied test paradigm to determine changes in neural processing related to auditory or psychiatric disorders. Modulation by a gap in background noise as a prepulse is especially used for tinnitus assessment. However, the timing and frequency-related aspects of prepulses are not fully understood. The present study aims to investigate temporal and spectral characteristics of acoustic stimuli that modulate the ASR in rats and gerbils. For noise-burst prepulses, inhibition was frequency-independent in gerbils in the test range between 4 and 18 kHz. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) by noise-bursts in rats was constant in a comparable range (8–22 kHz), but lower outside this range. Purely temporal aspects of prepulse–startle-interactions were investigated for gap-prepulses focusing mainly on gap duration. While very short gaps had no (rats) or slightly facilitatory (gerbils) influence on the ASR, longer gaps always had a strong inhibitory effect. Inhibition increased with durations up to 75 ms and remained at a high level of inhibition for durations up to 1000 ms for both, rats and gerbils. Determining spectral influences on gap-prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI) revealed that gerbils were unaffected in the limited frequency range tested (4–18 kHz). The more detailed analysis in rats revealed a variety of frequency-dependent effects. Gaps in pure-tone background elicited constant and high inhibition (around 75%) over a broad frequency range (4–32 kHz). For gaps in noise-bands, on the other hand, a clear frequency-dependency was found: inhibition was around 50% at lower frequencies (6–14 kHz) and around 70% at high frequencies (16–20 kHz). This pattern of frequency-dependency in rats was specifically resulting from the inhibitory effect by the gaps, as revealed by detailed analysis of the underlying startle amplitudes. An

  9. Effects of (+)-methamphetamine on path integration and spatial learning, but not locomotor activity or acoustic startle, align with the stress hyporesponsive period in rats.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, Charles V; Skelton, Matthew R; Grace, Curtis E; Schaefer, Tori L; Graham, Devon L; Braun, Amanda A; Williams, Michael T

    2009-05-01

    Rats treated with (+)-methamphetamine (MA) on postnatal days (P) 11-20 exhibit long-term spatial and path integration (Morris water maze (MWM) and Cincinnati water maze (CWM)) learning deficits whereas those treated on P1-10 do not. MA treatment increases corticosterone release in an age-dependent U-shaped pattern that corresponds to the stress hyporesponsive period (SHRP; P4-15). Here we tested the hypothesis that the cognitive effects induced by MA are associated with treatment that begins within the SHRP. Three treatment regimens were compared, P1-10, P6-15, and P11-20. One male/female pair/litter received 0, 10, or 25mg/kg MA/dose (four doses/day at 2h intervals given s.c. with 19-21 litters/regimen). Locomotor activity and acoustic startle were tested as behaviors not predicted to be associated with the SHRP. Cincinnati and Morris water maze findings were consistent with the hypothesis in that MA-treated animals exposed from P6-15 or P11-20 showed impaired learning compared to those exposed from P1-10; however, on probe trials in the Morris water maze, MA-induced memory impairments were not regimen-specific and were contributed to by all treatment regimens. All MA treatment regimens induced reductions in locomotor activity and acoustic startle facilitation as expected. No differential effect on prepulse trials was seen suggesting no impairment in sensory gating. Cognitive deficits from neonatal MA treatment are associated with the SHRP and may be the product of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation during critical periods of brain development.

  10. Probing Prejudice with Startle Eyeblink Modification: A Marker of Attention, Emotion, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Vanman, Eric J.; Ryan, John P.; Pedersen, William C.; Ito, Tiffany A.

    2015-01-01

    In social neuroscience research, startle eyeblink modification can serve as a marker of emotion, but it is less clear whether it can also serve as a marker of prejudice. In Experiment 1, 30 White students viewed photographs of White and Black targets while the startle eyeblink reflex and facial EMG from the brow and cheek regions were recorded. Prejudice was related to facial EMG activity, but not to startle modification, which instead appeared to index attention to race. To test further whether racial categorizations are associated with differential attention, a dual-task paradigm was used in Experiment 2. Fifty-four White and fifty-five Black participants responded more slowly to a tone presented when viewing a racial outgroup member or a negative stimulus, indicating that both draw more attention than ingroup members or positive stimuli. We conclude that startle modification is useful to index differential attention to groups when intergroup threat is low. PMID:26023325

  11. Investigation of Stimulus-Response Compatibility Using a Startling Acoustic Stimulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslovat, Dana; Carlsen, Anthony N.; Franks, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the processes underlying stimulus-response compatibility by using a lateralized auditory stimulus in a simple and choice reaction time (RT) paradigm. Participants were asked to make either a left or right key lift in response to either a control (80dB) or startling (124dB) stimulus presented to either the left ear, right ear, or…

  12. Effects of cold pressor stress on the human startle response.

    PubMed

    Deuter, Christian E; Kuehl, Linn K; Blumenthal, Terry D; Schulz, André; Oitzl, Melly S; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Both emotion and attention are known to influence the startle response. Stress influences emotion and attention, but the impact of stress on the human startle response remains unclear. We used an established physiological stressor, the Cold Pressor Test (CPT), to induce stress in a non-clinical human sample (24 student participants) in a within-subjects design. Autonomic (heart rate and skin conductance) and somatic (eye blink) responses to acoustic startle probes were measured during a pre-stress baseline, during a three minutes stress intervention, and during the subsequent recovery period. Startle skin conductance and heart rate responses were facilitated during stress. Compared to baseline, startle eye blink responses were not affected during the intervention but were diminished afterwards. These data describe a new and unique startle response pattern during stress: facilitation of autonomic stress responses but no such facilitation of somatic startle eye blink responses. The absence of an effect of stress on startle eye blink responsiveness may illustrate the importance of guaranteeing uninterrupted visual input during periods of stress. PMID:23166784

  13. Effects of cold pressor stress on the human startle response.

    PubMed

    Deuter, Christian E; Kuehl, Linn K; Blumenthal, Terry D; Schulz, André; Oitzl, Melly S; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Both emotion and attention are known to influence the startle response. Stress influences emotion and attention, but the impact of stress on the human startle response remains unclear. We used an established physiological stressor, the Cold Pressor Test (CPT), to induce stress in a non-clinical human sample (24 student participants) in a within-subjects design. Autonomic (heart rate and skin conductance) and somatic (eye blink) responses to acoustic startle probes were measured during a pre-stress baseline, during a three minutes stress intervention, and during the subsequent recovery period. Startle skin conductance and heart rate responses were facilitated during stress. Compared to baseline, startle eye blink responses were not affected during the intervention but were diminished afterwards. These data describe a new and unique startle response pattern during stress: facilitation of autonomic stress responses but no such facilitation of somatic startle eye blink responses. The absence of an effect of stress on startle eye blink responsiveness may illustrate the importance of guaranteeing uninterrupted visual input during periods of stress.

  14. Relationship of the Acoustic Startle Response and Its Modulation to Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Typical Development Children and Those with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Komatsu, Sahoko; Nakahachi, Takayuki; Ogino, Kazuo; Kamio, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Auditory hyper-reactivity is a common sensory-perceptual abnormality in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which interrupts behavioral adaptation. We investigated acoustic startle response (ASR) modulations in 17 children with ASD and 27 with typical development (TD). Compared to TD, children with ASD had larger ASR magnitude to weak stimuli and…

  15. History of chronic stress modifies acute stress-evoked fear memory and acoustic startle in male rats.

    PubMed

    Schmeltzer, Sarah N; Vollmer, Lauren L; Rush, Jennifer E; Weinert, Mychal; Dolgas, Charles M; Sah, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Chronicity of trauma exposure plays an important role in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Thus, exposure to multiple traumas on a chronic scale leads to worse outcomes than acute events. The rationale for the current study was to investigate the effects of a single adverse event versus the same event on a background of chronic stress. We hypothesized that a history of chronic stress would lead to worse behavioral outcomes than a single event alone. Male rats (n = 14/group) were exposed to either a single traumatic event in the form of electric foot shocks (acute shock, AS), or to footshocks on a background of chronic stress (chronic variable stress-shock, CVS-S). PTSD-relevant behaviors (fear memory and acoustic startle responses) were measured following 7 d recovery. In line with our hypothesis, CVS-S elicited significant increases in fear acquisition and conditioning versus the AS group. Unexpectedly, CVS-S elicited reduced startle reactivity to an acoustic stimulus in comparison with the AS group. Significant increase in FosB/ΔFosB-like immunostaining was observed in the dentate gyrus, basolateral amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex of CVS-S rats. Assessments of neuropeptide Y (NPY), a stress-regulatory transmitter associated with chronic PTSD, revealed selective reduction in the hippocampus of CVS-S rats. Collectively, our data show that cumulative stress potentiates delayed fear memory and impacts defensive responding. Altered neuronal activation in forebrain limbic regions and reduced NPY may contribute to these phenomena. Our preclinical studies support clinical findings reporting worse PTSD outcomes stemming from cumulative traumatization in contrast to acute trauma.

  16. Evidence for a response preparation bottleneck during dual-task performance: effect of a startling acoustic stimulus on the psychological refractory period.

    PubMed

    Maslovat, Dana; Chua, Romeo; Spencer, Hunter C; Forgaard, Christopher J; Carlsen, Anthony N; Franks, Ian M

    2013-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the mechanism associated with dual-task interference in a psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm. We used a simple reaction time paradigm consisting of a vocal response (R1) and key-lift task (R2) with a stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between 100ms and 1500ms. On selected trials we implemented a startling acoustic stimulus concurrent with the second stimulus to determine if we could involuntarily trigger the second response. Our results indicated that the PRP delay in the second response was present for both control and startle trials at short SOAs, suggesting the second response was not prepared in advance. These results support a response preparation bottleneck and can be explained via a neural activation model of preparation. In addition, we found that the reflexive startle activation was reduced in the dual-task condition for all SOAs, a result we attribute to prepulse inhibition associated with dual-task processing.

  17. Origin and function of short-latency inputs to the neural substrates underlying the acoustic startle reflex

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Nieto, Ricardo; Horta-Júnior, José de Anchieta C.; Castellano, Orlando; Millian-Morell, Lymarie; Rubio, Maria E.; López, Dolores E.

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is a survival mechanism of alarm, which rapidly alerts the organism to a sudden loud auditory stimulus. In rats, the primary ASR circuit encompasses three serially connected structures: cochlear root neurons (CRNs), neurons in the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC), and motoneurons in the medulla and spinal cord. It is well-established that both CRNs and PnC neurons receive short-latency auditory inputs to mediate the ASR. Here, we investigated the anatomical origin and functional role of these inputs using a multidisciplinary approach that combines morphological, electrophysiological and behavioral techniques. Anterograde tracer injections into the cochlea suggest that CRNs somata and dendrites receive inputs depending, respectively, on their basal or apical cochlear origin. Confocal colocalization experiments demonstrated that these cochlear inputs are immunopositive for the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1). Using extracellular recordings in vivo followed by subsequent tracer injections, we investigated the response of PnC neurons after contra-, ipsi-, and bilateral acoustic stimulation and identified the source of their auditory afferents. Our results showed that the binaural firing rate of PnC neurons was higher than the monaural, exhibiting higher spike discharges with contralateral than ipsilateral acoustic stimulations. Our histological analysis confirmed the CRNs as the principal source of short-latency acoustic inputs, and indicated that other areas of the cochlear nucleus complex are not likely to innervate PnC. Behaviorally, we observed a strong reduction of ASR amplitude in monaural earplugged rats that corresponds with the binaural summation process shown in our electrophysiological findings. Our study contributes to understand better the role of neuronal mechanisms in auditory alerting behaviors and provides strong evidence that the CRNs-PnC pathway mediates fast neurotransmission and binaural summation

  18. Acoustic startle reactivity while processing reward-related food cues during food deprivation: evidence from women in different menstrual cycle phases and men.

    PubMed

    Ferreira de Sá, Diana S; Plein, Debora E; Schulz, André; Oitzl, Melly S; Blumenthal, Terry D; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that food deprivation enhances the acoustic startle reflex when it is elicited during presentation of visual food cues. Frustrative nonreward may explain this effect, since visual food cues are also rated to be more appetitive and arousing during food deprivation. However, the impact of menstrual cycle and sex on this effect remains unclear, and it is also not known whether this effect is influenced by hunger and motivation to eat. According to a within-study design, 20 healthy women in different menstrual cycle phases and 14 healthy men participated twice, in normal and food-deprived conditions. After 18  h of food deprivation, acoustic startle was attenuated by appetitive nonfood foreground pictures, but enhanced by presentation of food pictures. No differences between menstrual cycle phases and sexes appeared. The effect correlated with hunger changes, suggesting that motivational factors play a role.

  19. Modulation of the N170 with Classical Conditioning: The Use of Emotional Imagery and Acoustic Startle in Healthy and Depressed Participants.

    PubMed

    Camfield, David A; Mills, Jessica; Kornfeld, Emma J; Croft, Rodney J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that classical conditioning may be capable of modulating early sensory processing in the human brain, and that there may be differences in the magnitude of the conditioned changes for individuals with major depressive disorder. The effect of conditioning on the N170 event-related potential was investigated using neutral faces as conditioned stimuli (CS+) and emotional imagery and acoustic startle as unconditioned stimuli (UCS). In the first experiment, electroencephalogram was recorded from 24 undergraduate students (M = 21.07 years, SD = 3.38 years) under the following conditions: (i) CS+/aversive imagery, (ii) CS+/aversive imagery and acoustic startle, (iii) CS+/acoustic startle, and (iv) CS+/pleasant imagery. The amplitude of the N170 was enhanced following conditioning with aversive imagery as well as acoustic startle. In the second experiment, 26 healthy control participants were tested (17 females and 9 males, age M = 25.97 years, SD = 9.42) together with 18 depressed participants (13 females and 5 males, age M = 23.26 years, SD = 4.01) and three conditions were used: CS+/aversive imagery, CS+/pleasant imagery, and CS-. N170 amplitude at P7 was increased for the CS+/aversive condition in comparison to CS- in the conditioning blocks versus baseline. No differences between depressed and healthy participants were found. Across both experiments, evaluative conditioning was absent. It was concluded that aversive UCS are capable of modulating early sensory processing of faces, although further research is also warranted in regards to positive UCS. PMID:27445773

  20. Modulation of the N170 with Classical Conditioning: The Use of Emotional Imagery and Acoustic Startle in Healthy and Depressed Participants

    PubMed Central

    Camfield, David A.; Mills, Jessica; Kornfeld, Emma J.; Croft, Rodney J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that classical conditioning may be capable of modulating early sensory processing in the human brain, and that there may be differences in the magnitude of the conditioned changes for individuals with major depressive disorder. The effect of conditioning on the N170 event-related potential was investigated using neutral faces as conditioned stimuli (CS+) and emotional imagery and acoustic startle as unconditioned stimuli (UCS). In the first experiment, electroencephalogram was recorded from 24 undergraduate students (M = 21.07 years, SD = 3.38 years) under the following conditions: (i) CS+/aversive imagery, (ii) CS+/aversive imagery and acoustic startle, (iii) CS+/acoustic startle, and (iv) CS+/pleasant imagery. The amplitude of the N170 was enhanced following conditioning with aversive imagery as well as acoustic startle. In the second experiment, 26 healthy control participants were tested (17 females and 9 males, age M = 25.97 years, SD = 9.42) together with 18 depressed participants (13 females and 5 males, age M = 23.26 years, SD = 4.01) and three conditions were used: CS+/aversive imagery, CS+/pleasant imagery, and CS-. N170 amplitude at P7 was increased for the CS+/aversive condition in comparison to CS- in the conditioning blocks versus baseline. No differences between depressed and healthy participants were found. Across both experiments, evaluative conditioning was absent. It was concluded that aversive UCS are capable of modulating early sensory processing of faces, although further research is also warranted in regards to positive UCS. PMID:27445773

  1. Modulation of the N170 with Classical Conditioning: The Use of Emotional Imagery and Acoustic Startle in Healthy and Depressed Participants.

    PubMed

    Camfield, David A; Mills, Jessica; Kornfeld, Emma J; Croft, Rodney J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that classical conditioning may be capable of modulating early sensory processing in the human brain, and that there may be differences in the magnitude of the conditioned changes for individuals with major depressive disorder. The effect of conditioning on the N170 event-related potential was investigated using neutral faces as conditioned stimuli (CS+) and emotional imagery and acoustic startle as unconditioned stimuli (UCS). In the first experiment, electroencephalogram was recorded from 24 undergraduate students (M = 21.07 years, SD = 3.38 years) under the following conditions: (i) CS+/aversive imagery, (ii) CS+/aversive imagery and acoustic startle, (iii) CS+/acoustic startle, and (iv) CS+/pleasant imagery. The amplitude of the N170 was enhanced following conditioning with aversive imagery as well as acoustic startle. In the second experiment, 26 healthy control participants were tested (17 females and 9 males, age M = 25.97 years, SD = 9.42) together with 18 depressed participants (13 females and 5 males, age M = 23.26 years, SD = 4.01) and three conditions were used: CS+/aversive imagery, CS+/pleasant imagery, and CS-. N170 amplitude at P7 was increased for the CS+/aversive condition in comparison to CS- in the conditioning blocks versus baseline. No differences between depressed and healthy participants were found. Across both experiments, evaluative conditioning was absent. It was concluded that aversive UCS are capable of modulating early sensory processing of faces, although further research is also warranted in regards to positive UCS.

  2. Age- and Sex-Dependent Effects of Footshock Stress on Subsequent Alcohol Drinking and Acoustic Startle Behavior in Mice Selectively Bred for High-Alcohol Preference

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Julia A.; Barrenha, Gustavo D.; Hughes, Matthew L.; Keuneke, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to stress during adolescence is known to be a risk factor for alcohol-use and anxiety disorders. This study examined the effects of footshock stress during adolescence on subsequent alcohol drinking in male and female mice selectively bred for high-alcohol preference (HAP1 lines). Acoustic startle responses and prepulse inhibition (PPI) were also assessed in the absence of, and immediately following, subsequent footshock stress exposures to determine whether a prior history of footshock stress during adolescence would produce enduring effects on anxiety-related behavior and sensorimotor gating. Methods Alcohol-nav̈ve, adolescent (male, n = 27; female, n = 23) and adult (male, n = 30; female, n = 30) HAP1 mice were randomly assigned to a stress or no stress group. The study consisted of 5 phases: (1) 10 consecutive days of exposure to a 30-minute footshock session, (2) 1 startle test, (3) one 30-minute footshock session immediately followed by 1 startle test, (4) 30 days of free-choice alcohol consumption, and (5) one 30-minute footshock session immediately followed by 1 startle test. Results Footshock stress exposure during adolescence, but not adulthood, robustly increased alcohol drinking behavior in both male and female HAP1 mice. Before alcohol drinking, females in both the adolescent and adult stress groups showed greater startle in phases 2 and 3; whereas males in the adolescent stress group showed greater startle only in phase 3. After alcohol drinking, in phase 5, enhanced startle was no longer apparent in any stress group. Males in the adult stress group showed reduced startle in phases 2 and 5. PPI was generally unchanged, except that males in the adolescent stress group showed increased PPI in phase 3 and females in the adolescent stress group showed decreased PPI in phase 5. Conclusions Adolescent HAP1 mice appear to be more vulnerable to the effects of footshock stress than adult mice, as manifested by increased alcohol drinking

  3. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  4. Different Effects of Startling Acoustic Stimuli (SAS) on TMS-Induced Responses at Rest and during Sustained Voluntary Contraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Li, Shengai; Zhou, Ping; Li, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a habituated startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) can cause a transient suppression of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during light muscle contraction. However, it is still unknown whether this phenomenon persists when at rest or during a sustained voluntary contraction task. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a conditioning SAS has different effects. TMS was delivered to the hot spot for the left biceps on 11 subjects at rest both with and without a conditioning SAS. Of the 11subjects, 9 also had TMS delivered during isometric flexion of the left elbow, also with and without a conditioning SAS. TMS-induced MEPs, TMS-induced force, and silent periods were used to determine the effect of conditioning SAS. Consistent with previous findings, TMS-induced MEPs were smaller with a conditioning SAS (0.49 ± 0.37 mV) as compared without the SAS (0.69 ± 0.52 mV) at rest. However, a conditioning SAS during the voluntary contraction tasks resulted in a significant shortening of the MEP silent period (187.22 ± 22.99 ms with SAS vs. 200.56 ± 29.71 ms without SAS) without any changes in the amplitude of the MEP (1.37 ± 0.9 mV with SAS V.S. 1.32 ± 0.92 mV without SAS) or the TMS-induced force (3.11 ± 2.03 N-m with SAS V.S. 3.62 ± 1.33 N-m without SAS). Our results provide novel evidence that a conditioning SAS has different effects on the excitability of the motor cortex when at rest or during sustained voluntary contractions.

  5. Different Effects of Startling Acoustic Stimuli (SAS) on TMS-Induced Responses at Rest and during Sustained Voluntary Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Li, Shengai; Zhou, Ping; Li, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a habituated startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) can cause a transient suppression of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during light muscle contraction. However, it is still unknown whether this phenomenon persists when at rest or during a sustained voluntary contraction task. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a conditioning SAS has different effects. TMS was delivered to the hot spot for the left biceps on 11 subjects at rest both with and without a conditioning SAS. Of the 11subjects, 9 also had TMS delivered during isometric flexion of the left elbow, also with and without a conditioning SAS. TMS-induced MEPs, TMS-induced force, and silent periods were used to determine the effect of conditioning SAS. Consistent with previous findings, TMS-induced MEPs were smaller with a conditioning SAS (0.49 ± 0.37 mV) as compared without the SAS (0.69 ± 0.52 mV) at rest. However, a conditioning SAS during the voluntary contraction tasks resulted in a significant shortening of the MEP silent period (187.22 ± 22.99 ms with SAS vs. 200.56 ± 29.71 ms without SAS) without any changes in the amplitude of the MEP (1.37 ± 0.9 mV with SAS V.S. 1.32 ± 0.92 mV without SAS) or the TMS-induced force (3.11 ± 2.03 N-m with SAS V.S. 3.62 ± 1.33 N-m without SAS). Our results provide novel evidence that a conditioning SAS has different effects on the excitability of the motor cortex when at rest or during sustained voluntary contractions. PMID:27547181

  6. Different Effects of Startling Acoustic Stimuli (SAS) on TMS-Induced Responses at Rest and during Sustained Voluntary Contraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Li, Shengai; Zhou, Ping; Li, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a habituated startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) can cause a transient suppression of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during light muscle contraction. However, it is still unknown whether this phenomenon persists when at rest or during a sustained voluntary contraction task. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a conditioning SAS has different effects. TMS was delivered to the hot spot for the left biceps on 11 subjects at rest both with and without a conditioning SAS. Of the 11subjects, 9 also had TMS delivered during isometric flexion of the left elbow, also with and without a conditioning SAS. TMS-induced MEPs, TMS-induced force, and silent periods were used to determine the effect of conditioning SAS. Consistent with previous findings, TMS-induced MEPs were smaller with a conditioning SAS (0.49 ± 0.37 mV) as compared without the SAS (0.69 ± 0.52 mV) at rest. However, a conditioning SAS during the voluntary contraction tasks resulted in a significant shortening of the MEP silent period (187.22 ± 22.99 ms with SAS vs. 200.56 ± 29.71 ms without SAS) without any changes in the amplitude of the MEP (1.37 ± 0.9 mV with SAS V.S. 1.32 ± 0.92 mV without SAS) or the TMS-induced force (3.11 ± 2.03 N-m with SAS V.S. 3.62 ± 1.33 N-m without SAS). Our results provide novel evidence that a conditioning SAS has different effects on the excitability of the motor cortex when at rest or during sustained voluntary contractions. PMID:27547181

  7. Effects of smoking on the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition in smokers with and without posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vrana, Scott R.; Calhoun, Patrick S.; McClernon, F. Joseph; Dennis, Michelle F.; Lee, Sherman T.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Cigarette smokers smoke in part because nicotine helps regulate attention. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex is a measure of early attentional gating that is reduced in abstinent smokers and in groups with attention regulation difficulties. Attention difficulties are found in people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Objectives The aim of this study is to assess whether smoking and abstinence differentially affect the startle response and PPI in smokers with and without PTSD. Methods Startle response and PPI (prepulses at 60, 120, or 240 ms) were measured in smokers with (N=39) and without (N=61) PTSD, while smoking and again while abstinent. Results Participants with PTSD produced both larger magnitude and faster latency startle responses than controls. Across groups, PPI was greater when smoking than when abstinent. The PTSD and control group exhibited different patterns of PPI across prepulse intervals when smoking and when abstinent. Older age was associated with reduced PPI, but only when abstinent from smoking. Conclusions The effects of PTSD on startle magnitude and of smoking on PPI replicate earlier studies. The different pattern of PPI exhibited in PTSD and control groups across prepulse intervals, while smoking and abstinent suggests that previous research on smoking and PPI has been limited by not including longer prepulse intervals, and that nicotine may affect the time course as well as increasing the level of PPI. The reduced PPI among older participants during abstinence suggests that nicotine may play a role in maintaining attention in older smokers, which may motivate continued smoking in older individuals. PMID:23828156

  8. Short-term selective breeding for high and low prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response; pharmacological characterization and QTL mapping in the selected lines.

    PubMed

    Hitzemann, Robert; Malmanger, Barry; Belknap, John; Darakjian, Priscila; McWeeney, Shannon

    2008-10-01

    Selective breeding offers several important advantages over using inbred strain panels in detecting genetically correlated traits to the selection phenotype. The purpose of the current study was to selectively breed for prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response (ASR), to pharmacologically and behaviorally characterize the selected lines and to use the lines for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Starting with heterogeneous stock mice formed by crossing the C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, BALB/cJ and LP/J inbred strains and using a short-term selective breeding strategy, animals were selected for High and Low PPI. The selection phenotype was the 80 dB prepulse tone (15 dB above the background noise). After five generations of selection, the High and Low lines differed significantly (78.1 +/- 3.1 vs. 45.2 +/- 3.9 [percent inhibition], p < 0.00001). The effects of haloperidol and MK-801 on PPI were not different between the High and Low lines. However, at the highest dose tested (10 mg/kg), the High line was more sensitive than the Low line to the disruptive PPI effects of methamphetamine. The lines did not differ in terms of basal activity or methamphetamine-induced changes in locomotor activity. The High and Low lines were genotyped using a panel of 768 SNPs. Significant QTLs (LOD > 10) were detected on chromosomes 11 and 16 that appeared similar to those detected previously [Hitzemann, R., Bell, J., Rasmussen, E., McCaughran, J. Mapping the genes for the acoustic startle response (ASR) and prepulse inhibition of the ASR in the BXD recombinant inbred series: effect of high-frequency hearing loss and cochlear pathology. In: Willott JF, editor. Handbook of mouse auditory research: From behavior to molecular biology. New York: CRC Press; 2001, p. 441-455.; Petryshen, T. L, Kirby, A., Hammer, R.P. Jr, Purcell, S., O'Leary, S.B., Singer, J.B., et al. Two quantitative trait loci for prepulse inhibition of startle identified on mouse chromosome 16 using chromosome

  9. Fluorocarbon nanodrops as acoustic temperature probes.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Paul A; Smith, William S; Borden, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    This work investigated the use of superheated fluorocarbon nanodrops for ultrasound thermal imaging and the use of mixed fluorocarbons for tuning thermal and acoustic thresholds for vaporization. Droplets were fabricated by condensing phospholipid-coated microbubbles containing C3F8 and C4F10 mixed at various molar ratios. Vaporization temperatures first were measured in a closed system by optical transmission following either isothermal pressure release or isobaric heating. The vaporization temperature was found to depend linearly on the percentage of C4F10 in the droplet core, indicating excellent tunability under these fluorocarbon-saturated conditions. Vaporization temperatures were then measured in an open system using contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging, where it was found that the mixed droplets behaved like pure C4F10 drops. Additionally, the critical mechanical index for vaporization was measured at the limits of therapeutic hyperthermia (37 and 60 °C), and again the mixed droplets were found to behave like pure C4F10 drops. These results suggested that C3F8 preferentially dissolves out of the droplet core in open systems, as shown by a simple mass transfer model of multicomponent droplet dissolution. Finally, proof-of-concept was shown that pure C4F10 nanodrops can be used as an acoustic temperature probe. Overall, these results not only demonstrate the potential of superheated fluorocarbon emulsions for sonothermetry but also point to the limits of tunability for fluorocarbon mixtures owing to preferential release of the more soluble species to the atmosphere.

  10. Acoustics of the piezo-electric pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustical properties of a piezoelectric device are reported for measuring the pressure in the plasma flow from an MPD arc. A description and analysis of the acoustical behavior in a piezoelectric probe is presented for impedance matching and damping. The experimental results are presented in a set of oscillographic records.

  11. Modulation of the blink reflex and P3 component of the startle response during an interoceptive challenge.

    PubMed

    Alius, Manuela G; Pané-Farré, Christiane A; Löw, Andreas; Hamm, Alfons O

    2015-01-01

    The blink reflex component of the startle response is potentiated during processing of exteroceptive unpleasant stimuli. In contrast, blink magnitudes are often inhibited during interoceptive challenges. We measured respiration, blink magnitudes, and the P3 component to the acoustic startle probes in 34 participants while breathing against a mild resistance (mask-with-tubing) compared to breathing with no mask. Breathing through a mask with tubing resulted in increased inspiratory resistance as indicated by increased flow rate and tidal volume, a compensatory breathing pattern. Blink magnitudes to probes presented during the mask-with-tubing condition were inhibited compared to no-mask. Likewise, the probe P3 component was smaller during breathing through a mild resistance. These data suggest that startle inhibition during interoceptive challenges might be due to a shift in attention towards the mildly unpleasant interoceptive stimuli.

  12. Unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiduo; Fernández Comesaña, Daniel; Carrillo Pousa, Graciano; Yang, Yixin; Xu, Lingji

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the foundations of a unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient. Highly directional characteristics play a key role in reducing the influence of undesired acoustic sources. These characteristics can be achieved by using multiple acoustic sensors in a spatial gradient arrangement. Two particle velocity sensors possessing the figure eight directivity pattern were used in a first-order gradient configuration to yield a unidirectional probe that can reject most excitations originating from both sides and the rear. The effects of key parameters are thoroughly discussed, and the proposed theory is validated in practice. PMID:27369169

  13. Nondestructive acoustic electric field probe apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a nondestructive acoustic electric field probe and its method of use. A source of acoustic pulses of arbitrary but selected shape is placed in an oil bath along with material to be tested across which a voltage is disposed and means for receiving acoustic pulses after they have passed through the material. The received pulses are compared with voltage changes across the material occurring while acoustic pulses pass through it and analysis is made thereof to determine preselected characteristics of the material.

  14. Probing Acoustic Nonlinearity by Mixing Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David Howard; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2000-07-01

    Measurement methods aimed at determining material properties through nonlinear wave propagation are sensitive to artifacts caused by background nonlinearities inherent in the ultrasonic generation and detection methods. The focus of this paper is to describe our investigation of nonlinear mixing of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) as a means to decrease sensitivity to background nonlinearity and increase spatial sensitivity to acoustic nonlinearity induced by material microstructure.

  15. Prediction and perception: Defensive startle modulation.

    PubMed

    Sege, Christopher T; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Previous research indicates that predictive cues can dampen subsequent defensive reactions. The present study investigated whether effects of cuing are specific to aversive stimuli, using modulation of the blink startle reflex as a measure of emotional reactivity. Participants viewed pictures depicting violence, romance/erotica, or mundane content. On half of all trials, a cue (color) predicted the content of the upcoming picture; on the remaining trials, scenes were presented without a cue. Acoustic startle probes were presented during picture viewing on trials with predictive cues and trials without a cue. Replicating previous studies, blink reflexes elicited when viewing violent pictures that had not been preceded by a cue were potentiated compared to uncued mundane scenes, and reflexes were attenuated when viewing scenes of erotica/romance that had not been cued. On the other hand, reflex potentiation when viewing scenes of violence (relative to mundane scenes) was eliminated when these pictures were preceded by a predictive cue, whereas scenes of romance prompted reliable reflex attenuation regardless of whether pictures were cued or not. Taken together, the data suggest that cuing elicits an anticipatory coping process that is specific to aversive stimuli.

  16. Prediction and perception: Defensive startle modulation.

    PubMed

    Sege, Christopher T; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Previous research indicates that predictive cues can dampen subsequent defensive reactions. The present study investigated whether effects of cuing are specific to aversive stimuli, using modulation of the blink startle reflex as a measure of emotional reactivity. Participants viewed pictures depicting violence, romance/erotica, or mundane content. On half of all trials, a cue (color) predicted the content of the upcoming picture; on the remaining trials, scenes were presented without a cue. Acoustic startle probes were presented during picture viewing on trials with predictive cues and trials without a cue. Replicating previous studies, blink reflexes elicited when viewing violent pictures that had not been preceded by a cue were potentiated compared to uncued mundane scenes, and reflexes were attenuated when viewing scenes of erotica/romance that had not been cued. On the other hand, reflex potentiation when viewing scenes of violence (relative to mundane scenes) was eliminated when these pictures were preceded by a predictive cue, whereas scenes of romance prompted reliable reflex attenuation regardless of whether pictures were cued or not. Taken together, the data suggest that cuing elicits an anticipatory coping process that is specific to aversive stimuli. PMID:26399464

  17. The serotonin transporter gene and startle response during nicotine deprivation.

    PubMed

    Minnix, Jennifer A; Robinson, Jason D; Lam, Cho Y; Carter, Brian L; Foreman, Jennifer E; Vandenbergh, David J; Tomlinson, Gail E; Wetter, David W; Cinciripini, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Affective startle probe methodology was used to examine the effects of nicotine administration and deprivation on emotional processes among individuals carrying at least one s allele versus those with the l/l genotype of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine (Serotonin) Transporter Linked Polymorphic Region, 5-HTTLPR in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene [solute ligand carrier family 6 member A4 (SLC6A4) or SERT]. Smokers (n=84) completed four laboratory sessions crossing deprivation (12-h deprived vs. non-deprived) with nicotine spray (nicotine vs. placebo). Participants viewed affective pictures (positive, negative, neutral) while acoustic startle probes were administered. We found that smokers with the l/l genotype showed significantly greater suppression of the startle response when provided with nicotine vs. placebo than those with the s/s or s/l genotypes. The results suggest that l/l smokers, who may have higher levels of the serotonin transporter and more rapid synaptic serotonin clearance, experience substantial reduction in activation of the defensive system when exposed to nicotine.

  18. Developmental Trajectories of Auditory Cortex Synaptic Structures and Gap-Prepulse Inhibition of Acoustic Startle Between Early Adolescence and Young Adulthood in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Caitlin E; Erickson, Susan L; Fish, Kenneth N; Thiels, Edda; Penzes, Peter; Sweet, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Cortical excitatory and inhibitory synapses are disrupted in schizophrenia, the symptoms of which often emerge during adolescence, when cortical excitatory synapses undergo pruning. In auditory cortex, a brain region implicated in schizophrenia, little is known about the development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses between early adolescence and young adulthood, and how these changes impact auditory cortex function. We used immunohistochemistry and quantitative fluorescence microscopy to quantify dendritic spines and GAD65-expressing inhibitory boutons in auditory cortex of early adolescent, late adolescent, and young adult mice. Numbers of spines decreased between early adolescence and young adulthood, during which time responses increased in an auditory cortex-dependent sensory task, silent gap-prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (gap-PPI). Within-bouton GAD65 protein and GAD65-expressing bouton numbers decreased between late adolescence and young adulthood, a delay in onset relative to spine and gap-PPI changes. In mice lacking the spine protein kalirin, there were no significant changes in spine number, within-bouton GAD65 protein, or gap-PPI between adolescence and young adulthood. These results illustrate developmental changes in auditory cortex spines, inhibitory boutons, and auditory cortex function between adolescence and young adulthood, and provide insights into how disrupted adolescent neurodevelopment could contribute to auditory cortex synapse pathology and auditory impairments.

  19. Behavioral consequences of radiation exposure to simulated space radiation in the C57BL/6 mouse: open field, rotorod, and acoustic startle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecaut, Michael J.; Haerich, Paul; Zuccarelli, Cara N.; Smith, Anna L.; Zendejas, Eric D.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate the consequences of exposure to proton radiation, such as might occur for astronauts during space flight. C57BL/6 mice were exposed, either with or without 15-g/cm2 aluminum shielding, to 0-, 3-, or 4-Gy proton irradiation mimicking features of a solar particle event. Irradiation produced transient direct deficits in open-field exploratory behavior and acoustic startle habituation. Rotorod performance at 18 rpm was impaired by exposure to proton radiation and was impaired at 26 rpm, but only for mice irradiated with shielding and at the 4-Gy dose. Long-term (>2 weeks) indirect deficits in open-field activity appeared as a result of impaired experiential encoding immediately following exposure. A 2-week recovery prior to testing decreased most of the direct effects of exposure, with only rotorod performance at 26 rpm being impaired. These results suggest that the performance deficits may have been mediated by radiation damage to hippocampal, cerebellar, and possibly, forebrain dopaminergic function.

  20. Acoustic Properties of Lens Materials for Ultrasonic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hideji; Nakaya, Chitose; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Kondo, Toshio; Ishikawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    The acoustic velocities and densities of 20 types of commercial rubber have been measured at a frequency of 2 MHz at room temperature, and they are evaluated in terms of their application to an acoustic lens or an acoustic window of probes of an ultrasonic diagnostic instrument. Fluorosilicone rubber and phoshazene rubber have lower acoustic velocities than the human body, and they have excellent impedance matching with the human body. Both the acoustic velocities and densities of butadiene rubber, polybutadiene rubber, acrylic rubber and polyurethane match those of the human body. It is also described that rubber having good impedance matching with the human body can be fabricated by adjusting the volume fraction of the added filler.

  1. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-17

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis. PMID:26715211

  2. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-17

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis.

  3. Nicotine blocks apomorphine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle in rats: possible involvement of central nicotinic alpha7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Suemaru, Katsuya; Yasuda, Kayo; Umeda, Kenta; Araki, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Choshi, Tominari; Hibino, Satoshi; Gomita, Yutaka

    2004-07-01

    Nicotine has been reported to normalize deficits in auditory sensory gating in the cases of schizophrenia, suggesting an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in attentional abnormalities. However, the mechanism remains unclear. The present study investigated the effects of nicotine on the disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response induced by apomorphine or phencyclidine in rats. Over the dose range tested, nicotine (0.05-1 mg kg(-1), s.c.) did not disrupt PPI. Neither methyllycaconitine (0.5-5 mg kg(-1), s.c.), an alpha(7) nicotinic receptor antagonist, nor dihydro-beta-erythroidine (0.5-2 mg kg(-1), s.c.), an alpha(4)beta(2) nicotinic receptor antagonist, had any effect on PPI. Nicotine (0.01-0.2 mg kg(-1), s.c.) dose-dependently reversed the disruption of PPI induced by apomorphine (1 mg kg(-1), s.c.), but had no effect on the disruption of PPI induced by phencyclidine (2 mg kg(-1), s.c.). The reversal of apomorphine-induced PPI disruption by nicotine (0.2 mg kg(-1)) was eliminated by mecamylamine (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), but not by hexamethonium (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.), indicating the involvement of central nicotinic receptors. The antagonistic action of nicotine on apomorphine-induced PPI disruption was dose-dependently blocked by methyllycaconitine (1 and 2 mg kg(-1), s.c.). However, dihydro-beta-erythroidine (1 and 2 mg kg(-1), s.c.) had no effect. These results suggest that nicotine reverses the disruption of apomorphine-induced PPI through central alpha(7) nicotinic receptors.

  4. Cardiac Modulation of Startle: Effects on Eye Blink and Higher Cognitive Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Andre; Reichert, Carolin F.; Richter, Steffen; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Blumenthal, Terry D.; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac cycle time has been shown to affect pre-attentive brainstem startle processes, such as the magnitude of acoustically evoked reflexive startle eye blinks. These effects were attributed to baro-afferent feedback mechanisms. However, it remains unclear whether cardiac cycle time plays a role in higher startle-related cognitive processes, as…

  5. Acoustic Probe for Solid-Gas-Liquid Suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, Ashok

    2003-09-14

    The primary objective of the research project during the first funding period was to develop an acoustic probe to measure volume percent solids in solid-liquid slurries in the presence of small amounts of gas bubbles. This problem was addressed because of the great need for a non-invasive, accurate and reliable method for solids monitoring in liquid slurries in the presence of radiolytically generated gases throughout the DOE complex. These measurements are necessary during mobilization of salts and sediments in tanks, transport of these slurries in transfer lines to processing facilities across a site, and, in some instances, during high level waste processing. Although acoustic probes have been commonly used for monitoring flows in single-phase fluids (McLeod, 1967), their application to monitor two-phase mixtures has not yet fully realized its potential. A number of investigators in recent years have therefore been involved in developing probes for measuring the volume fractions in liquid solid suspensions (Atkinson and Kytomaa, 1993; Greenwood et al., 1993; Martin et al., 1995) and in liquid-liquid suspensions (Bonnet and Tavlarides, 1987; Tavlarides and Bonnet, 1988, Yi and Tavlarides, 1990; Tsouris and Tavlarides, 1993, Tsouris et al., 1995). In particular, Atkinson and Kytomaa (1993) showed that the acoustic technique can be used to determine both the velocity and the volume fraction of solids while Martin et al. (1995) and Spelt et al. (1999) showed that the acoustic probe can also be used to obtain information on the size distribution of the particles. In a recent testing of in-line slurry monitors with radioactive slurries suspended with Pulsair Mixers (Hylton & Bayne, 1999), an acoustic probe did not compare well with other instruments most probably due to presence of entrained gases and improper acoustic frequency range of interrogation. The work of the investigators cited has established the potential of the acoustic probe for characterizing

  6. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  7. Micromachined fiber optic Fabry-Perot underwater acoustic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuyin; Shao, Zhengzheng; Hu, Zhengliang; Luo, Hong; Xie, Jiehui; Hu, Yongming

    2014-08-01

    One of the most important branches in the development trend of the traditional fiber optic physical sensor is the miniaturization of sensor structure. Miniature fiber optic sensor can realize point measurement, and then to develop sensor networks to achieve quasi-distributed or distributed sensing as well as line measurement to area monitoring, which will greatly extend the application area of fiber optic sensors. The development of MEMS technology brings a light path to address the problems brought by the procedure of sensor miniaturization. Sensors manufactured by MEMS technology possess the advantages of small volume, light weight, easy fabricated and low cost. In this paper, a fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric underwater acoustic probe utilizing micromachined diaphragm collaborated with fiber optic technology and MEMS technology has been designed and implemented to actualize underwater acoustic sensing. Diaphragm with central embossment, where the embossment is used to anti-hydrostatic pressure which would largely deflect the diaphragm that induce interferometric fringe fading, has been made by double-sided etching of silicon on insulator. By bonding the acoustic-sensitive diaphragm as well as a cleaved fiber end in ferrule with an outer sleeve, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer has been constructed. The sensor has been interrogated by quadrature-point control method and tested in field-stable acoustic standing wave tube. Results have been shown that the recovered signal detected by the sensor coincided well with the corresponding transmitted signal and the sensitivity response was flat in frequency range from 10 Hz to 2kHz with the value about -154.6 dB re. 1/μPa. It has been manifest that the designed sensor could be used as an underwater acoustic probe.

  8. Acoustic remote probing of the environment. [atmospheric and underwater acoustic data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pijanowski, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Atmospheric acoustic probes located either at shore locations near the Chesapeake Bay or on large surface buoys could obtain profiles of wind velocity and turbulence and the temperature and humidity of the atmosphere. At or near the buoy locations, underwater probes located on the bottom could be used to profile current velocity, density, and turbulence and also to determine tide level, wave height, spectrum, and direction. The physical parameter profiles at these earth-surface stations could be used with surface observations by satellite. The most obvious use of data from such a network is to verify and calibrate models of energy exchange between the water of the Bay and the atmosphere.

  9. Acoustic probe for solid-gas-liquid suspensions. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, A.S.; Greenwood, M.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The proposed research will develop an acoustic probe for monitoring particle size and volume fraction in slurries in the absence and presence of gas. The goals are to commission and verify the probe components and system operation, develop theory for the forward and inverse problems for acoustic wave propagation through a three phase medium, and experimentally verify the theoretical analysis. The acoustic probe will permit measurement of solid content in gas-liquid-solid waste slurries in tanks across the DOE complex.'

  10. Pressure probe and hot-film probe rsponses to acoustic excitation in mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Jones, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the relative responses of a hot-film probe and a pressure probe positioned in a flow duct carrying mean flow and progressive acoustic waves. The response of each probe was compared with that of a condenser-type microphone flush mounted in the duct wall for flow Mach numbers up to about 0.5. The response of the pressure probe was less than that of the flush-mounted microphone by not more than about 2.1 dB at the highest centerline Mach number. This decreased response of the probe can likely be attributed to flow-induced impedance changes at the probe sensor orifices. The response of the hot-film probe, expressed in terms of fluctuating pressure, was greater than that of the flush-mounted microphone by as much as 6.0 dB at the two higher centerline Mach numbers. Removal of the contribution from fluctuating temperature in the hot-film analytical model greatly improved the agreement between the two transducer responses.

  11. Cytotoxic lesion of the medial prefrontal cortex abolishes the partial reinforcement extinction effect, attenuates prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and induces transient hyperlocomotion, while sparing spontaneous object recognition memory in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yee, B K

    2000-01-01

    The partial reinforcement extinction effect refers to the increase in resistance to extinction of an operant response acquired under partial reinforcement relative to that acquired under continuous reinforcement. Prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response refers to the reduction in startle reactivity towards an intense acoustic pulse stimulus when it is shortly preceded by a weak prepulse stimulus. These two behavioural phenomena appear to be related to different forms of attentional processes. While the prepulse inhibition effect reflects an inherent early attentional gating mechanism, the partial reinforcement extinction effect is believed to involve the development of acquired inattention, i.e. the latter requires the animals to learn about what to and what not to attend. Impairments in prepulse inhibition and the partial reinforcement extinction effect have been independently linked to the neuropsychology of attentional dysfunctions seen in schizophrenia. The proposed neural substrates underlying these behaviourial phenomena also appear to overlap considerably: both focus on the nucleus accumbens and emphasize the functional importance of its limbic afferents, including that originating from the medial prefrontal cortex, on accumbal output/activity. The present study demonstrated that cytotoxic medial prefrontal cortex lesions which typically damaged the prelimbic, the infralimbic and the dorsal anterior cingulate areas could lead to the abolition of the partial reinforcement extinction effect and the attenuation of prepulse inhibition. The lesions also resulted in a transient elevation of spontaneous locomotor activity. In contrast, the same lesions spared performance in a spontaneous object recognition memory test, in which the lesioned animals displayed normal preference for a novel object when the novel object was presented in conjunction with a familiar object seen 10 min earlier within an open field arena. The present results lend support to the

  12. Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

  13. Affect modulated startle in schizophrenia: subjective experience matters.

    PubMed

    Dominelli, Rachelle M; Boggs, Jennifer M; Bolbecker, Amanda R; O'Donnell, Brian F; Hetrick, William P; Brenner, Colleen A

    2014-12-15

    Data suggests that emotion reactivity as measured by the affect-modulated startle paradigm in those with schizophrenia (SZ) may be similar to healthy controls (HC). However, normative classification of the stimuli may not accurately reflect emotional experience, especially for those with SZ. To examine this possibility, the present study measured the affect-modulated startle response with images classified according to both normative and subjective ratings. Seventeen HC and 17 SZ completed an image viewing task during which startle probes were presented, followed by subjective valence and arousal ratings. Both groups exhibited inhibited startle responses to positive images, intermediate startle amplitudes to neutral images, and potentiated startle amplitudes to negative images. SZ rated the positive images as less positive than HC. When images were reclassified based on subjective valence ratings, both groups' startle magnitudes increased in response to subjectively rated positive images and decreased to subjectively rated neutral images. The number of trials classified into each valence condition suggested a tendency for SZ to classify neutral images as negative more often than HC. Overall, these findings suggest that affective stimuli modulate the startle response in HC and SZ in similar ways, but subjective emotional experience may differ in those with schizophrenia.

  14. Role of nicotinic receptors in the lateral habenula in the attenuation of amphetamine-induced prepulse inhibition deficits of the acoustic startle response in rats

    PubMed Central

    Larrauri, José A.; Burke, Dennis A.; Hall, Brandon J.; Levin, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Prepulse inhibition (PPI) refers to the reduction of the startle response magnitude when a startling stimulus is closely preceded by a weak stimulus. PPI is commonly used to measure sensorimotor gating. In rats, the PPI reduction induced by the dopamine-agonist apomorphine can be reversed by systemic administration of nicotine. A high concentration of nicotinic receptors is found in the lateral habenula (LHb), an epithalamic structure with efferent projections to brain regions involved in the modulation of PPI, which has been shown to regulate the activity of midbrain dopamine neurons. Objectives The prospective role of nicotinic receptors in the LHb in the regulation of PPI was assessed in this study, using different pharmacological models of sensorimotor gating deficits. Methods Interactions between systemic amphetamine and haloperidol and intra-LHb infusions of mecamylamine (10 µg/side) or nicotine (30 µg/side) on PPI were analyzed in Experiments 1 and 2. Intra-LHb infusions of different nicotine doses (25, and 50 µg/side) and their interactions with systemic administration of amphetamine or dizocilpine on PPI were examined in Experiments 3 and 4. Results Infusions of nicotine into the LHb dose-dependently attenuated amphetamine-induced PPI deficits, but had no effect on PPI disruptions caused by dizocilpine. Intra-LHb mecamylamine infusions did not affect PPI nor interact with dopaminergic manipulations. Conclusions These results are congruent with previous reports of systemic nicotine effects on PPI, suggesting a role of the LHb in the attenuation of sensorimotor gating deficits caused by the hyperactivity of dopamine systems. PMID:25912180

  15. The Gap-Startle Paradigm for Tinnitus Screening in Animal Models: Limitations and Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Lobarinas, Edward; Hayes, Sarah H.; Allman, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, Turner and colleagues (Behav Neurosci, 120:188–195) introduced the gap-startle paradigm as a high-throughput method for tinnitus screening in rats. Under this paradigm, gap detection ability was assessed by determining the level of inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex produced by a short silent gap inserted in an otherwise continuous background sound prior to a loud startling stimulus. Animals with tinnitus were expected to show impaired gap detection ability (i.e., lack of inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex) if the background sound containing the gap was qualitatively similar to the tinnitus pitch. Thus, for the gap-startle paradigm to be a valid tool to screen for tinnitus, a robust startle response from which to inhibit must be present. Because recent studies have demonstrated that the acoustic startle reflex could be dramatically reduced following noise exposure, we endeavored to 1) modify the gap-startle paradigm to be more resilient in the presence of hearing loss, and 2) evaluate whether a reduction in startle reactivity could confound the interpretation of gap prepulse inhibition and lead to errors in screening for tinnitus. In the first experiment, the traditional broadband noise (BBN) startle stimulus was replaced by a bandpass noise in which the sound energy was concentrated in the lower frequencies (5–10 kHz) in order to maintain audibility of the startle stimulus after unilateral high frequency noise exposure (16 kHz). However, rats still showed a 57% reduction in startle amplitude to the bandpass noise post-noise exposure. A follow-up experiment on a separate group of rats with transiently-induced conductive hearing loss revealed that startle reactivity was better preserved when the BBN startle stimulus was replaced by a rapid airpuff to the back of the rats neck. Furthermore, it was found that transient unilateral conductive hearing loss, which was not likely to induce tinnitus, caused an impairment in gap prepulse inhibition

  16. Affective modulation of eyeblink startle with reward and threat.

    PubMed

    Skolnick, Alexander I; Davidson, Richard I

    2002-11-01

    An emotion-modulated acoustic startle paradigm for inducing positive and negative affect was used to address pregoal and postgoal affect. Participants played a computerized lottery task in which they chose digits that could match a subsequently displayed, random set of numbers. In the positive conditions, matches led to monetary rewards. In the negative condition, matches led to an aversive noise blast. In three experiments, we found eyeblink startle magnitude was potentiated just prior to feedback concerning reward outcome, suppressed following the feedback that a monetary reward was won, and potentiated when threatened with an aversive noise. When presented with a 0%, 45%, 90%, or 100% chance of winning, higher probabilities suppressed startle response after feedback whereas the 45% trials did not. These data indicate that postgoal positive affect (winning reward) reliably suppressed the startle response whereas pregoal positive affect did not.

  17. ENU-mutagenesis mice with a non-synonymous mutation in Grin1 exhibit abnormal anxiety-like behaviors, impaired fear memory, and decreased acoustic startle response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Grin1 (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, NMDA1) gene expresses a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that is considered to play an important role in excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and brain development. Grin1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In our previous study, we examined an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-generated mutant mouse strain (Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+) that has a non-synonymous mutation in Grin1. These mutant mice showed hyperactivity, increased novelty-seeking to objects, and abnormal social interactions. Therefore, Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+ mice may serve as a potential animal model of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, other behavioral characteristics related to these disorders, such as working memory function and sensorimotor gating, have not been fully explored in these mutant mice. In this study, to further investigate the behavioral phenotypes of Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+ mice, we subjected them to a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. Results There was no significant difference in nociception between Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+ and wild-type mice. The mutants did not display any abnormalities in the Porsolt forced swim and tail suspension tests. We confirmed the previous observations that the locomotor activity of these mutant mice increased in the open field and home cage activity tests. They displayed abnormal anxiety-like behaviors in the light/dark transition and the elevated plus maze tests. Both contextual and cued fear memory were severely deficient in the fear conditioning test. The mutant mice exhibited slightly impaired working memory in the eight-arm radial maze test. The startle amplitude was markedly decreased in Grin1Rgsc174/Grin1+ mice, whereas no significant differences between genotypes were detected in the prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. The mutant mice showed no obvious

  18. An improved approach to separating startle data from noise

    PubMed Central

    Grimsley, Calum A; Longenecker, Ryan J; Rosen, Merri J; Young, Jesse W; Grimsley, Jasmine M; Galazyuk, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    Background The acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is a rapid, involuntary movement to sound, found in many species. The ASR can be modulated by external stimuli and internal state, making it a useful tool in many disciplines. ASR data collection and interpretation varies greatly across laboratories making comparisons a challenge New method Here we investigate the animal movement associated with a startle in mouse (CBA/CaJ). Movements were simultaneously captured with high-speed video and a piezoelectric startle plate. We also use simple mathematical extrapolations to convert startle data (force) into center of mass displacement (“height”), which incorporates the animal’s mass. Results Startle plate force data revealed a stereotype waveform associated with a startle that contained three distinct peaks. This waveform allowed researchers to separate trials into ‘startles’ and ‘no-startles’ (termed ‘manual classification). Fleiss’ kappa and Krippendorff’s alpha (0.865 for both) indicate very good levels of agreement between researchers. Further work uses this waveform to develop an automated startle classifier. The automated classifier compares favorably with manual classification. A two-way ANOVA reveals no significant difference in the magnitude of the 3 peaks as classified by the manual and automated methods (P1: p=0.526, N1: p=0.488, P2: p=0.529). Comparison with existing method(s) The ability of the automated classifier was compared with three other commonly used classification methods; the automated classifier far outperformed these methods. Conclusions The improvements made allow researchers to automatically separate startle data from noise, and normalize for an individual animal’s mass. These steps ease inter-animal and inter-laboratory comparisons of startle data. PMID:26165984

  19. Effect of facial self-resemblance on the startle response and subjective ratings of erotic stimuli in heterosexual men.

    PubMed

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Deuter, Christian E; Kuehl, Linn K; Schulz, Andre; Blumenthal, Terry D; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2011-10-01

    Cues of kinship are predicted to increase prosocial behavior due to the benefits of inclusive fitness, but to decrease approach motivation due to the potential costs of inbreeding. Previous studies have shown that facial resemblance, a putative cue of kinship, increases prosocial behavior. However, the effects of facial resemblance on mating preferences are equivocal, with some studies finding that facial resemblance decreases sexual attractiveness ratings, while other studies show that individuals choose mates partly on the basis of similarity. To further investigate this issue, a psychophysiological measure of affective processing, the startle response, was used in this study, assuming that differences in approach motivation to erotic pictures will modulate startle. Male volunteers (n = 30) viewed 30 pictures of erotic female nudes while startle eyeblink responses were elicited by acoustic noise probes. The female nude pictures were digitally altered so that the face either resembled the male participant or another participant, or were not altered. Non-nude neutral pictures were also included. Importantly, the digital alteration was undetected by the participants. Erotic pictures were rated as being pleasant and clearly reduced startle eyeblink magnitude as compared to neutral pictures. Participants showed greater startle inhibition to self-resembling than to other-resembling or non-manipulated female nude pictures, but subjective pleasure and arousal ratings did not differ among the three erotic picture categories. Our data suggest that visual facial resemblance of opposite-sex nudes increases approach motivation in men, and that this effect was not due to their conscious evaluation of the erotic stimuli. PMID:20814814

  20. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  1. Surface acoustic wave-assisted scanning probe microscopy—a summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Elastic properties of nanoscopic materials, structures and thin films are important parameters controlling their growth, as well as their optical and electronic properties. Acoustic microscopy is a well-established method for elastic imaging. In order to overcome its micrometer-scale diffraction-limited lateral resolution, scanning probe microscopy-based acoustic near-field techniques have been developed. Among the acoustic modes used for microscopy, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are especially suited for probing very small and thin objects due to their localization in the vicinity of the surface. Moreover, the study of SAWs is crucial for the design of frequency filter devices as well as for fundamental physical studies, for instance, the probing of composite fermions in two-dimensional electron systems. This review discusses the capabilities and limitations of SAW-based scanning probe microscopy techniques. Particular emphasis is laid on the review of surface acoustic waves and their interaction with elastic inhomogeneities. Scattering, diffraction and wave localization phenomena will be discussed in detail. Finally, the possibilities for quantitative acoustic microscopy of objects on the nanoscale, as well as practical applications, are presented.

  2. Simultaneous EMG-fMRI during startle inhibition in monosymptomatic enuresis--an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Juergensen, Sebastian; Wunberg, David; Wolff, Stephan; Eggert, Paul; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is growing that monosymptomatic enuresis (ME) is a maturational disorder of the central nervous system with a lack of arousal and lacking inhibition of the micturition reflex. Previous studies have shown a significant reduction of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle in children with enuresis. However, it is still unclear whether the abnormal PPI in enuresis is based on an inhibitory deficit at brainstem or cortical level. Nine children with ME and ten healthy children were investigated using simultaneous recording of EMG from the M. orbicularis oculi and functional MRI. The experimental paradigm consisted of acoustic startle stimulation, with startle-alone stimuli and prepulse-startle combinations. Functional MRI data were processed using multiple regression and parametric modulation with startle amplitudes as a parameter. Neither patients with enuresis nor healthy children revealed measurable PPI in the MRI scanner. Startle stimuli caused equal hemodynamic changes in the acoustic cortex, medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex in both groups. The amplitude of startle correlated with more prominent BOLD signal changes in the anterior cingulate cortex in healthy subjects than in patients with ME. This pronounced frontal activation in healthy controls was related to the PPI condition, indicating that the prefrontal cortex of healthy children was activated more strongly to inhibit startle than in patients with ME. In conclusion, apart from the possibility that recordings of PPI inside the MRI scanner may be compromised by methodological problems, the results of this study suggest that high cortical control mechanisms at the prefrontal level are relevant for the pathogenesis of ME.

  3. Oxytocin Reduces Background Anxiety in a Fear-Potentiated Startle Paradigm: Peripheral vs Central Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Luke W; Missig, Galen; Schulkin, Jay; Rosen, Jeffrey B

    2011-01-01

    Oxytocin is known to have anti-anxiety and anti-stress effects. Using a fear-potentiated startle paradigm in rats, we previously demonstrated that subcutaneously administered oxytocin suppressed acoustic startle following fear conditioning compared with startle before fear conditioning (termed background anxiety), but did not have an effect on cue-specific fear-potentiated startle. The findings suggest oxytocin reduces background anxiety, an anxious state not directly related to cue-specific fear, but sustained beyond the immediate threat. The goal of the present study was to compare the effects of centrally and peripherally administered oxytocin on background anxiety and cue-specific fear. Male rats were given oxytocin either subcutaneously (SC) or intracerebroventricularly (ICV) into the lateral ventricles before fear-potentiated startle testing. Oxytocin doses of 0.01 and 0.1 μg/kg SC reduced background anxiety. ICV administration of oxytocin at doses from 0.002 to 20 μg oxytocin had no effect on background anxiety or cue-specific fear-potentiated startle. The 20 μg ICV dose of oxytocin did reduce acoustic startle in non-fear conditioned rats. These studies indicate that oxytocin is potent and effective in reducing background anxiety when delivered peripherally, but not when delivered into the cerebroventricular system. Oxytocin given systemically may have anti-anxiety properties that are particularly germane to the hypervigilance and exaggerated startle typically seen in many anxiety and mental health disorder patients. PMID:21796104

  4. Prenatal immune challenge in rats: altered responses to dopaminergic and glutamatergic agents, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle, and reduced route-based learning as a function of maternal body weight gain after prenatal exposure to poly IC.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, Charles V; Graham, Devon L; Braun, Amanda A; Schaefer, Tori L; Skelton, Matthew R; Richtand, Neil M; Williams, Michael T

    2012-08-01

    Prenatal maternal immune activation has been used to test the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia. Most of the data are in mouse models; far less is available for rats. We previously showed that maternal weight change in response to the immune activator polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) in rats differentially affects offspring. Therefore, we treated gravid Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats i.p. on embryonic day 14 with 8 mg/kg of Poly IC or Saline. The Poly IC group was divided into those that lost or gained the least weight, Poly IC (L), versus those that gained the most weight, Poly IC (H), following treatment. The study design controlled for litter size, litter sampling, sex distribution, and test experience. We found no effects of Poly IC on elevated zero maze, open-field activity, object burying, light-dark test, straight channel swimming, Morris water maze spatial acquisition, reversal, or shift navigation or spatial working or reference memory, or conditioned contextual or cued fear or latent inhibition. The Poly IC (H) group showed a significant decrease in the rate of route-based learning when visible cues were unavailable in the Cincinnati water maze and reduced prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle in females, but not males. The Poly IC (L) group exhibited altered responses to acute pharmacological challenges: exaggerated hyperactivity in response to (+)-amphetamine and an attenuated hyperactivity in response to MK-801. This model did not exhibit the cognitive, or latent inhibition deficits reported in Poly IC-treated rats but showed changes in response to drugs acting on neurotransmitter systems implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (dopaminergic hyperfunction and glutamatergic hypofunction).

  5. Multifrequency acoustics as a probe of mesoscopic blood coagulation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Adarsh; Rajendran, Gokulnath; Ercole, Ari; Seshia, Ashwin

    2016-08-01

    Coagulation is a complex enzymatic polymerisation cascade. Disordered coagulation is common in medicine and may be life-threatening yet clinical assays are typically bulky and/or provide an incomplete picture of clot mechanical evolution. We present the adaptation of an in-plane acoustic wave device: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation at multiple harmonics to determine the time-evolution of mesoscale mechanical properties of clot formation in vitro. This approach is sensitive to changes in surface and bulk clot structure in various models of induced coagulopathy. Furthermore, we are able to show that clot formation at surfaces has different kinetics and mechanical strength to that in the bulk, which may have implications for the design of bioprosthetic materials. The "Multifrequency acoustics" approach thus enables unique capability to portray biological processes concerning blood coagulation.

  6. Whispering-gallery acoustic sensing: Characterization of mesoscopic films and scanning probe microscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, Andres H.; Li, Nan; Fernandez, Rodolfo; Wang, Xiaohua; Nordstrom, Richard; Padigi, S. K.

    2011-09-01

    Full understanding of the physics underlying the striking changes in viscoelasticity, relaxation time, and phase transitions that mesoscopic fluid-like films undergo at solid-liquid interfaces, or under confinement between two sliding solid boundaries, constitutes one of the major challenges in condensed matter physics. Their role in the imaging process of solid substrates by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is also currently controversial. Aiming at improving the reliability and versatility of instrumentation dedicated to characterize mesoscopic films, a noninvasive whispering-gallery acoustic sensing (WGAS) technique is introduced; its application as feedback control in SPM is also demonstrated. To illustrate its working principle and potential merits, WGAS has been integrated into a SPM that uses a sharp tip attached to an electrically driven 32-kHz piezoelectric tuning fork (TF), the latter also tighten to the operating microscope's frame. Such TF-based SPMs typically monitor the TF's state of motion by electrical means, hence subjected to the effects caused by the inherent capacitance of the device (i.e., electrical resonance differing from the probe's mechanical resonance). Instead, the novelty of WGAS resides in exploiting the already existent microscope's frame as an acoustic cavity (its few centimeter-sized perimeter closely matching the operating acoustic wavelength) where standing-waves (generated by the nanometer-sized oscillations of the TF's tines) are sensitively detected by an acoustic transducer (the latter judiciously placed around the microscope's frame perimeter for attaining maximum detection). This way, WGAS is able to remote monitoring, via acoustic means, the nanometer-sized amplitude motion of the TF's tines. (This remote-detection method resembles the ability to hear faint, but still clear, levels of sound at the galleries of a cathedral, despite the extraordinary distance location of the sound source.) In applications aiming at

  7. The effects of probe-tone frequency on the acoustic-reflex growth function.

    PubMed

    Lutolf, John J; O'Malley, Honor; Silman, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic-reflex growth functions (ARGFs) were obtained from 20 normal-hearing listeners. Contralateral acoustic reflexes (ARs) were elicited with pure tones of 2000 Hz. The magnitude of changes in static compliant susceptance (BA) and conductance (GA) were monitored with probe-tone frequencies of 226 Hz, 678 Hz and 1000 Hz. ARGFs were obtained with six combinations of probe-tone frequency/admittance component: 226 Hz BA, 226 Hz GA, 678 Hz BA, 678 Hz GA, 1000 Hz BA, and 1000 Hz GA. Peak conductance (GA) and susceptance (BA) ARs were largest within the 678 Hz GA and 1000 Hz BAARGFs, respectively. Among high-frequency probe tones, the patterns of AR growth were larger and less variable for the 678 Hz GA ARGF and the 1000 Hz BA ARGF as determined by the magnitude of their linear (b1) and quadratic (b2) polynomial coefficients and the value of their squared correlation coefficients (R2).

  8. Local probing of propagating acoustic waves in a gigahertz echo chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Santos, Paulo V.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2012-04-01

    In the same way that micro-mechanical resonators resemble guitar strings and drums, surface acoustic waves resemble the sound these instruments produce, but moving over a solid surface rather than through air. In contrast with oscillations in suspended resonators, such propagating mechanical waves have not before been studied near the quantum mechanical limits. Here, we demonstrate local probing of surface acoustic waves with a displacement sensitivity of 30amRMSHz-1/2 and detection sensitivity on the single-phonon level after averaging, at a frequency of 932MHz. Our probe is a piezoelectrically coupled single-electron transistor, which is sufficiently fast, non-destructive and localized to enable us to track pulses echoing back and forth in a long acoustic cavity, self-interfering and ringing the cavity up and down. We project that strong coupling to quantum circuits will enable new experiments, and hybrids using the unique features of surface acoustic waves. Prospects include quantum investigations of phonon-phonon interactions, and acoustic coupling to superconducting qubits for which we present favourable estimates.

  9. Precise Wireless Triggering System for Anemometers with Long-Baseline Acoustic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoto Wakatsuki,; Shin Kinjo,; Jun Takarada,; Koichi Mizutani,

    2010-07-01

    A wireless triggering system for acoustic anemometers using an acoustic probe with a long baseline is investigated. Acoustic probes for measuring micrometeorologic parameters, such as temperature and wind velocity, are used as noncontact and nondestructive methods. The acoustic probe with a long baseline was previously proposed by the authors and investigated to form a sensing grid system for micrometeorologic measurement. The authors have also partially investigated a wireless sensing grid using a wireless local-area network (LAN). However, because of the synchronization problem between sensor nodes, the trigger line has been left wired. In this paper, the problem of synchronization is solved by investigating a wireless triggering system using frequency modulated (FM) radio waves. The primitive triggering system of FM radio waves has some instability on time synchronization depending on such the communication environment as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To overcome the influence of the instability, a cross-correlation method is adopted to the triggering system. As a result, the time synchronization errors of the trigger system were reduced by up to one tenth. In addition, not only the instability problem but also other larger errors are compensated by the proposed system in an experimental wind velocity measurement.

  10. Low acoustic attenuation silicone rubber lens for medical ultrasonic array probe.

    PubMed

    Itsumi, Kazuhiro; Hosono, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Noriko; Yamashita, Yohachi John

    2009-04-01

    Effects of heavy density (rho = 9.2 x 10(3) kg/m(3)) Yb(2)O(3) fine dopant (16 nm in diameter) on the acoustic properties of a high-temperature-vulcanization (HTV) silicone rubber have been investigated, to develop a new acoustic lens material with a low acoustic attenuation (alpha) for the medical array probe application. The HTV silicone rubber has advantages in that it shows a lower alpha than that of a room-temperature-vulcanization (RTV) silicone rubber and it can be mixed by applying shear stress, using roll-milling equipment. Roll-milling time dependence of the HTV silicone rubber indicates that the alpha is closely affected by the dispersion of nanopowders in the rubber matrix. The 8 vol% Yb(2)O(3)-doped HTV silicone rubber mixed for 30 min showed the lowest alpha of 0.73 dB/mm MHz with an acoustic impedance [AI = sound speed (c) x density (rho)] of 1.43 x 10(6) kg/m(2)s at 37 degrees C. Moreover, simulation results reveal that a 5 MHz linear probe using the HTV silicone rubber doped with Yb(2)O(3) powder showed relative sensitivity around 2.6 to 3.0 dB higher than a probe using RTV silicone rubber doped with Yb(2)O(3) powder or SiO2-doped conventional silicone rubber for the ultrasonic medical application. PMID:19406717

  11. Probing thermomechanics at the nanoscale: impulsively excited pseudosurface acoustic waves in hypersonic phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Damiano; Travagliati, Marco; Siemens, Mark E; Li, Qing; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Ferrini, Gabriele; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Banfi, Francesco

    2011-10-12

    High-frequency surface acoustic waves can be generated by ultrafast laser excitation of nanoscale patterned surfaces. Here we study this phenomenon in the hypersonic frequency limit. By modeling the thermomechanics from first-principles, we calculate the system's initial heat-driven impulsive response and follow its time evolution. A scheme is introduced to quantitatively access frequencies and lifetimes of the composite system's excited eigenmodes. A spectral decomposition of the calculated response on the eigemodes of the system reveals asymmetric resonances that result from the coupling between surface and bulk acoustic modes. This finding allows evaluation of impulsively excited pseudosurface acoustic wave frequencies and lifetimes and expands our understanding of the scattering of surface waves in mesoscale metamaterials. The model is successfully benchmarked against time-resolved optical diffraction measurements performed on one-dimensional and two-dimensional surface phononic crystals, probed using light at extreme ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths.

  12. Probing Thermomechanics at the Nanoscale: Impulsively Excited Pseudosurface Acoustic Waves in Hypersonic Phononic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    High-frequency surface acoustic waves can be generated by ultrafast laser excitation of nanoscale patterned surfaces. Here we study this phenomenon in the hypersonic frequency limit. By modeling the thermomechanics from first-principles, we calculate the system’s initial heat-driven impulsive response and follow its time evolution. A scheme is introduced to quantitatively access frequencies and lifetimes of the composite system’s excited eigenmodes. A spectral decomposition of the calculated response on the eigemodes of the system reveals asymmetric resonances that result from the coupling between surface and bulk acoustic modes. This finding allows evaluation of impulsively excited pseudosurface acoustic wave frequencies and lifetimes and expands our understanding of the scattering of surface waves in mesoscale metamaterials. The model is successfully benchmarked against time-resolved optical diffraction measurements performed on one-dimensional and two-dimensional surface phononic crystals, probed using light at extreme ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths. PMID:21910426

  13. Acoustic wave absorption as a probe of dynamical geometrical response of fractional quantum Hall liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun

    2016-04-01

    We show that an acoustic crystalline wave gives rise to an effect similar to that of a gravitational wave to an electron gas. Applying this idea to a two-dimensional electron gas in the fractional quantum Hall regime, this allows for experimental study of its intra-Landau level dynamical response in the long-wavelength limit. To study such response we generalize Haldane's geometrical description of fractional quantum Hall states to situations where the external metric is time dependent. We show that such time-dependent metric (generated by acoustic wave) couples to collective modes of the system, including a quadrapolar mode at long wavelength, and magnetoroton at finite wavelength. Energies of these modes can be revealed in spectroscopic measurements, controlled by strain-induced Fermi velocity anisotropy. We argue that such geometrical probe provides a potentially highly useful alternative probe of quantum Hall liquids, in addition to the usual electromagnetic response.

  14. Meditation and the Startle Response: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Robert W.; Ekman, Paul; Ricard, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    The effects of two kinds of meditation (open presence and focused) on the facial and physiological aspects of the defensive response to an aversive startle stimulus were studied in a Buddhist monk with approximately 40 years of meditation experience. The participant was exposed to a 115 db, 100 ms acoustic startle stimulus under the two meditation conditions, a distraction condition (to control for cognitive and attentional load) and an unanticipated condition (startle presented without warning or instruction). A completely counterbalanced 24-trial single-subject design was used, with each condition repeated six times. Most aspects of the participant’s responses in the unanticipated condition did not differ from those of a comparison group of 12 age-matched male controls. Both kinds of meditation produced physiological and facial responses to the startle that were smaller than in the distraction condition. Within meditation conditions, open presence meditation produced smaller physiological and facial responses than focused meditation. These results from a single highly expert meditator indicate that these two kinds of meditation can differentially alter the magnitude of a primitive defensive response. PMID:22506498

  15. Empirically based comparisons of the reliability and validity of common quantification approaches for eyeblink startle potentiation in humans.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Daniel E; Starr, Mark J; Shackman, Alexander J; Curtin, John J

    2015-12-01

    Startle potentiation is a well-validated translational measure of negative affect. Startle potentiation is widely used in clinical and affective science, and there are multiple approaches for its quantification. The three most commonly used approaches quantify startle potentiation as the increase in startle response from a neutral to threat condition based on (1) raw potentiation, (2) standardized potentiation, or (3) percent-change potentiation. These three quantification approaches may yield qualitatively different conclusions about effects of independent variables (IVs) on affect when within- or between-group differences exist for startle response in the neutral condition. Accordingly, we directly compared these quantification approaches in a shock-threat task using four IVs known to influence startle response in the no-threat condition: probe intensity, time (i.e., habituation), alcohol administration, and individual differences in general startle reactivity measured at baseline. We confirmed the expected effects of time, alcohol, and general startle reactivity on affect using self-reported fear/anxiety as a criterion. The percent-change approach displayed apparent artifact across all four IVs, which raises substantial concerns about its validity. Both raw and standardized potentiation approaches were stable across probe intensity and time, which supports their validity. However, only raw potentiation displayed effects that were consistent with a priori specifications and/or the self-report criterion for the effects of alcohol and general startle reactivity. Supplemental analyses of reliability and validity for each approach provided additional evidence in support of raw potentiation.

  16. Empirically based comparisons of the reliability and validity of common quantification approaches for eyeblink startle potentiation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Daniel E.; Starr, Mark J.; Shackman, Alexander J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Startle potentiation is a well‐validated translational measure of negative affect. Startle potentiation is widely used in clinical and affective science, and there are multiple approaches for its quantification. The three most commonly used approaches quantify startle potentiation as the increase in startle response from a neutral to threat condition based on (1) raw potentiation, (2) standardized potentiation, or (3) percent‐change potentiation. These three quantification approaches may yield qualitatively different conclusions about effects of independent variables (IVs) on affect when within‐ or between‐group differences exist for startle response in the neutral condition. Accordingly, we directly compared these quantification approaches in a shock‐threat task using four IVs known to influence startle response in the no‐threat condition: probe intensity, time (i.e., habituation), alcohol administration, and individual differences in general startle reactivity measured at baseline. We confirmed the expected effects of time, alcohol, and general startle reactivity on affect using self‐reported fear/anxiety as a criterion. The percent‐change approach displayed apparent artifact across all four IVs, which raises substantial concerns about its validity. Both raw and standardized potentiation approaches were stable across probe intensity and time, which supports their validity. However, only raw potentiation displayed effects that were consistent with a priori specifications and/or the self‐report criterion for the effects of alcohol and general startle reactivity. Supplemental analyses of reliability and validity for each approach provided additional evidence in support of raw potentiation. PMID:26372120

  17. Acupuncture Affects Autonomic and Endocrine but Not Behavioural Responses Induced by Startle in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Villas-Boas, Julia Dias; Dias, Daniel Penteado Martins; Trigo, Pablo Ignacio; Almeida, Norma Aparecida dos Santos; de Almeida, Fernando Queiroz; de Medeiros, Magda Alves

    2015-01-01

    Startle is a fast response elicited by sudden acoustic, tactile, or visual stimuli in a variety of animals and in humans. As the magnitude of startle response can be modulated by external and internal variables, it can be a useful tool to study reaction to stress. Our study evaluated whether acupuncture can change cardiac autonomic modulation (heart rate variability); and behavioural (reactivity) and endocrine (cortisol levels) parameters in response to startle. Brazilian Sport horses (n = 6) were subjected to a model of startle in which an umbrella was abruptly opened near the horse. Before startle, the horses were subjected to a 20-minute session of acupuncture in acupoints GV1, HT7, GV20, and BL52 (ACUP) and in nonpoints (NP) or left undisturbed (CTL). For analysis of the heart rate variability, ultrashort-term (64 s) heart rate series were interpolated (4 Hz) and divided into 256-point segments and the spectra integrated into low (LF; 0.01–0.07 Hz; index of sympathetic modulation) and high (HF; 0.07–0.50 Hz; index of parasympathetic modulation) frequency bands. Acupuncture (ACUP) changed the sympathovagal balance with a shift towards parasympathetic modulation, reducing the prompt startle-induced increase in LF/HF and reducing cortisol levels 30 min after startle. However, acupuncture elicited no changes in behavioural parameters. PMID:26413116

  18. Effect of stress and attention on startle response and prepulse inhibition.

    PubMed

    De la Casa, Luis Gonzalo; Mena, Auxiliadora; Ruiz-Salas, Juan Carlos

    2016-10-15

    The startle reflex magnitude can be modulated when a weak stimulus is presented before the onset of the startle stimulus, a phenomenon termed prepulse inhibition (PPI). Previous research has demonstrated that emotional processes can modulate PPI and startle intensity, but the available evidence is inconclusive. In order to obtain additional evidence in this domain, we conducted two experiments intended to analyze the effect of induced stress and attentional load on PPI and startle magnitude. Specifically, in Experiment 1 we used a between subject strategy to evaluate the effect on startle response and PPI magnitude of performing a difficult task intended to induce stress in the participants, as compared to a group exposed to a control task. In Experiment 2 we evaluated the effect of diverting attention from the acoustic stimulus on startle and PPI intensity. The results seem to indicate that induced stress can reduce PPI, and that startle reflex intensity is reduced when attention is directed away from the auditory stimulus that induces the reflex.

  19. Longterm-habituation of the startle response in mice is stimulus modality, but not context specific

    PubMed Central

    Pilz, Peter K. D.; Arnold, Stephan W.; Rischawy, Anja T.; Plappert, Claudia F.

    2014-01-01

    In mice, the specificity of longterm-habituation (LTH) of startle was tested in two experiments. In two strains of mice (C57Bl/6 and C3H) there was pronounced LTH over 10 days of acoustic stimulation in two different contexts of startle measurement. (We found LTH to be greater after stimulation with 14 kHz sine stimuli compared to noise or tactile stimuli). A change of context showed LTH to be independent of context, i.e., startle LTH in mice is a non-associative learning process. In the second experiment, 9 days of acoustic or tactile stimulation were given to C57B/6 mice. Both stimulus modalities produced LTH. When on the 10th day stimuli of the other modality were given, in both cases the long term habituated group showed no lower startle amplitude than a non-stimulated control group. This indicates LTH is stimulus-modality specific. Altogether, our results show that in mice—very similar to rats—LTH of startle is stimulus modality, but not context specific. In addition we found two indications that the LTH action site is on the sensory branch of the startle circuit. PMID:24409126

  20. Hydrocortisone Suppression of the Fear-potentiated Startle Response and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; McKinney, Ann E.; Kanter, Fredrick S.; Korte, Kristina J.; Lovallo, William R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of oral administration of 20 mg hydrocortisone on baseline and fear-potentiated startle in 63 male veterans with or without PTSD. The procedure was based on a two-session, within-subject design in which acoustic startle eyeblink responses were recorded during intervals of threat or no threat of electric shock. Results showed that the magnitude of the difference between startle responses recorded during anticipation of imminent shock compared to “safe” periods was reduced after hydrocortisone administration relative to placebo. This effect did not vary as a function of PTSD group nor were there were any significant group differences in other indices startle amplitude. Findings suggest that the acute elevations in systemic cortisol produced by hydrocortisone administration may have fear-inhibiting effects. This finding may have implications for understanding the role of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis function in vulnerability and resilience to traumatic stress. PMID:21269779

  1. Emotion Potentiated Startle in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, Elizabeth C.; Cordeiro, Lisa; Chavez, Alyssa D.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Hessl, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Social avoidance and anxiety are prevalent in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and are potentially mediated by the amygdala, a brain region critical for social behavior. Unfortunately, fMRI investigation of the amygdala in FXS is limited by the difficulties experienced by intellectually impaired and anxious participants. We investigated the relationship between social avoidance and emotion-potentiated startle, a probe of amygdala activation, in children and adolescents with FXS, developmental disability without FXS (DD), and typical development. Individuals with FXS or DD demonstrated significantly reduced potentiation to fearful faces than a typically developing control group (p<.05). However, among individuals with FXS, social avoidance correlated positively with fearful-face potentiation (p<.05). This suggests that general intellectual disability blunts amygdalar response, but differential amygdala responsiveness to social stimuli contributes to phenotypic variability among individuals with FXS. PMID:24816942

  2. Two-bubble acoustic tweezing cytometry for biomechanical probing and stimulation of cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Sun, Yubing; Gudur, Madhu S R; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Wu, Ziqi; Fu, Jianping; Deng, Cheri X

    2015-01-01

    The study of mechanotransduction relies on tools that are capable of applying mechanical forces to elicit and assess cellular responses. Here we report a new (to our knowledge) technique, called two-bubble acoustic tweezing cytometry (TB-ATC), for generating spatiotemporally controlled subcellular mechanical forces on live cells by acoustic actuation of paired microbubbles targeted to the cell adhesion receptor integrin. By measuring the ultrasound-induced activities of cell-bound microbubbles and the actin cytoskeleton contractile force responses, we determine that TB-ATC elicits mechanoresponsive cellular changes via cyclic, paired displacements of integrin-bound microbubbles driven by the attractive secondary acoustic radiation force (sARF) between the bubbles in an ultrasound field. We demonstrate the feasibility of dual-mode TB-ATC for both subcellular probing and mechanical stimulation. By exploiting the robust and unique interaction of ultrasound with microbubbles, TB-ATC provides distinct advantages for experimentation and quantification of applied forces and cellular responses for biomechanical probing and stimulation of cells.

  3. Two-Bubble Acoustic Tweezing Cytometry for Biomechanical Probing and Stimulation of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Sun, Yubing; Gudur, Madhu S.R.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Wu, Ziqi; Fu, Jianping; Deng, Cheri X.

    2015-01-01

    The study of mechanotransduction relies on tools that are capable of applying mechanical forces to elicit and assess cellular responses. Here we report a new (to our knowledge) technique, called two-bubble acoustic tweezing cytometry (TB-ATC), for generating spatiotemporally controlled subcellular mechanical forces on live cells by acoustic actuation of paired microbubbles targeted to the cell adhesion receptor integrin. By measuring the ultrasound-induced activities of cell-bound microbubbles and the actin cytoskeleton contractile force responses, we determine that TB-ATC elicits mechanoresponsive cellular changes via cyclic, paired displacements of integrin-bound microbubbles driven by the attractive secondary acoustic radiation force (sARF) between the bubbles in an ultrasound field. We demonstrate the feasibility of dual-mode TB-ATC for both subcellular probing and mechanical stimulation. By exploiting the robust and unique interaction of ultrasound with microbubbles, TB-ATC provides distinct advantages for experimentation and quantification of applied forces and cellular responses for biomechanical probing and stimulation of cells. PMID:25564850

  4. Effects of REM sleep deprivation on sensorimotor gating and startle habituation in rats: role of social isolation in early development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-An; Liu, Yia-Ping; Tung, Che-Se; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Huang, San-Yuan

    2014-07-11

    The present study examined the role of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on sensorimotor gating function in a developmentally rodent model of schizophrenic-spectrum disorders. Startle magnitude, prepulse inhibition (PPI) and startle habituation in an acoustic startle test were measured after 72-h of REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) in 14-week-old rats that were reared in one of the following conditions: control social interaction, 2-week isolation, and continuous isolation, since weaning. The results showed that REMSD significantly inhibited rats' PPI in socially controlled rats, and rats in two isolation groups appeared less sensitive to REMSD. After REMSD, startle habituation was significantly reduced in continuous-isolated rats but not in 2-week-isolated rats. These data indicate that REM sleep is essential for PPI; REMSD inhibits startle habituation in rats with continuous social isolation. In addition, social interaction, in early life or for the whole life, functions differently to the sensorimotor gating.

  5. Observations of liver cancer cells in scanning probe acoustic microscope: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiaoyue; Xi, Qing; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM) can be used to acquire the morphology image as well as the non-destructive internal structures acoustic image. However, the observations of the morphology image as well as the internal structures acoustic image of liver cancer cells in SPAM are few. In this paper, we cultured 4 different types of liver cancer cells on the silicon wafer and coverslip to observe their morphology images as well as acoustic images in SPAM, and made a preliminary study of the 8 types of cells specimens (hereinafter referred to as the silicon specimens and coverslips specimens). The experimental measurement results showed that some cellular pseudopodium were observed in the morphology images of the coverslip specimens while no such cellular pseupodium were appeared in the morphology images of the silicon specimens, which concluded that the living liver cancer cells were less likely to grow on the silicon wafer. SPAM provides a rapid and sensitive visual method for studying the morphology and internal structures of the cancer cells. The proposed method can be also used to obtain the morphology and internal information in both solid and soft material wafers, such as silicon and cells, with the resolution of nanometer scale.

  6. Probing the Raman-active acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles with extraordinary spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Skyler; Gelfand, Ryan M.; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots, viruses, DNA and all other nanoparticles have acoustic vibrations that can act as ‘fingerprints’ to identify their shape, size and mechanical properties, yet high-resolution Raman spectroscopy in this low-energy range has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy to measure the Raman-active vibrations of single isolated nanoparticles in the 0.1-10 cm-1 range with ˜0.05 cm-1 resolution, to resolve peak splitting from material anisotropy and to probe the low-frequency modes of biomolecules. EAR employs a nanoaperture laser tweezer that can select particles of interest and manipulate them once identified. We therefore believe that this nanotechnology will enable expanded capabilities for the study of nanoparticles in the materials and life sciences.

  7. Acoustic Attenuation Probe for Fermion Superfluidity in Ultracold-Atom Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudio, Sergio; Mihaila, Bogdan; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Timmermans, Eddy; Bedell, Kevin S.

    2007-03-16

    Dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC's), currently used to cool fermionic atoms in atom traps, can also probe the superfluidity of these fermions. The damping rate of BEC-acoustic excitations (phonon modes), measured in the middle of the trap as a function of the phonon momentum, yields an unambiguous signature of BCS-like superfluidity, provides a measurement of the superfluid gap parameter, and gives an estimate of the size of the Cooper pairs in the BEC-BCS crossover regime. We also predict kinks in the momentum dependence of the damping rate which can reveal detailed information about the fermion quasiparticle dispersion relation.

  8. Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Partha Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu; Phukan, Arindam

    2014-05-15

    The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

  9. Deficits in startle-evoked arm movements increase with impairment following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Honeycutt, Claire Fletcher; Perreault, Eric Jon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The startle reflex elicits involuntary release of planned movements (startReact). Following stroke, startReact flexion movements are intact but startReact extension movements are impaired by task-inappropriate flexor activity impeding arm extension. Our objective was to quantify deficits in startReact elbow extension movements, particularly how these deficits are influenced by impairment. Methods Data were collected in 8 stroke survivors performing elbow extension following two non-startling acoustic stimuli representing “get ready” and “go” respectively. Randomly, the “go” was replaced with a startling acoustic stimulus. We hypothesized that task-inappropriate flexor activity originates from unsuppressed classic startle reflex. We expected that increasing damage to the cortex (increasing impairment) would relate to increasing task-inappropriate flexor activity causing poor elbow extension movement and target acquisition. Results Task-inappropriate flexor activity increased with impairment resulting in larger flexion deflections away from the subjects’ intended target corresponding to decreased target acquisition. Conclusions We conclude that the task-inappropriate flexor activity likely results from cortical or corticospinal damage leading to an unsuppressed or hypermetric classic startle reflex that interrupts startReact elbow extension. Significance Given startReact’s functional role in compensation during environmental disturbances, our results may have important implications for our understanding deficits in stroke survivor’s response to unexpected environmental disturbances. PMID:24411525

  10. Fear-potentiated startle processing in humans: Parallel fMRI and orbicularis EMG assessment during cue conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Katja; Neubert, Jörg; Pfannmöller, Jörg; Lotze, Martin; Hamm, Alfons O; Wendt, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Studying neural networks and behavioral indices such as potentiated startle responses during fear conditioning has a long tradition in both animal and human research. However, most of the studies in humans do not link startle potentiation and neural activity during fear acquisition and extinction. Therefore, we examined startle blink responses measured with electromyography (EMG) and brain activity measured with functional MRI simultaneously during differential conditioning. Furthermore, we combined these behavioral fear indices with brain network activity by analyzing the brain activity evoked by the startle probe stimulus presented during conditioned visual threat and safety cues as well as in the absence of visual stimulation. In line with previous research, we found a fear-induced potentiation of the startle blink responses when elicited during a conditioned threat stimulus and a rapid decline of amygdala activity after an initial differentiation of threat and safety cues in early acquisition trials. Increased activation during processing of threat cues was also found in the anterior insula, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the periaqueductal gray (PAG). More importantly, our results depict an increase of brain activity to probes presented during threatening in comparison to safety cues indicating an involvement of the anterior insula, the ACC, the thalamus, and the PAG in fear-potentiated startle processing during early extinction trials. Our study underlines that parallel assessment of fear-potentiated startle in fMRI paradigms can provide a helpful method to investigate common and distinct processing pathways in humans and animals and, thus, contributes to translational research.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Silicone Rubber Acoustic Lens Material Doped with Fine Zinc Oxide Powders for Ultrasonic Medical Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Noriko; Yohachi; Yamashita; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2009-07-01

    The mechanical properties of high-temperature-vulcanization silicone (Q) rubber doped with zinc oxide (ZnO) fine powders have been investigated to develop an acoustic lens material with high reliability. The ZnO-doped Q rubber with an acoustic impedance (Z) of 1.46×106 kg·m-2·s-1 showed a tear strength of 43 N/mm and an elongation of 560%. These mechanical property values were about 3 times higher than those of conventional acoustic Q lens materials. The ZnO-doped Q rubbers also showed a lower abrasion loss. These superior characteristics are attributable to the microstructure with fewer origins of breaks; few pores and spherical fine ZnO powder. The high mechanical properties of ZnO-doped Q rubber acoustic lenses enable higher performance during long-life and safe operation during diagnosis using medical array probe applications.

  12. Self-Characterization of Commercial Ultrasound Probes in Transmission Acoustic Inverse Scattering: Transducer Model and Volume Integral Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Mark; Verweij, Sacha A. M.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    A self-contained source characterization method for commercial ultrasound probes in transmission acoustic inverse scattering is derived and experimentally tested. The method is based on modified scattered field volume integral equations that are linked to the source-scattering transducer model. The source-scattering parameters are estimated via pair-wise transducer measurements and the nonlinear inversion of an acoustic propagation model that is derived. This combination creates a formal link between the transducer characterization and the inverse scattering algorithm. The method is tested with two commercial ultrasound probes in a transmission geometry including provisions for estimating the probe locations and aligning a robotic rotator. The transducer characterization results show that the nonlinear inversion fit the measured data well. The transducer calibration and inverse scattering algorithm are tested on simple targets. Initial images show that the recovered contrasts are physically consistent with expected values. PMID:24569251

  13. Expression of freezing and fear-potentiated startle during sustained fear in mice.

    PubMed

    Daldrup, T; Remmes, J; Lesting, J; Gaburro, S; Fendt, M; Meuth, P; Kloke, V; Pape, H-C; Seidenbecher, T

    2015-03-01

    Fear-potentiated acoustic startle paradigms have been used to investigate phasic and sustained components of conditioned fear in rats and humans. This study describes a novel training protocol to assess phasic and sustained fear in freely behaving C57BL/6J mice, using freezing and/or fear-potentiated startle as measures of fear, thereby, if needed, allowing in vivo application of various techniques, such as optogenetics, electrophysiology and pharmacological intervention, in freely behaving animals. An auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm, with pseudo-randomized conditioned-unconditioned stimulus presentations at various durations, is combined with repetitive brief auditory white noise burst presentations during fear memory retrieval 24 h after fear conditioning. Major findings are that (1) a motion sensitive platform built on mechano-electrical transducers enables measurement of startle responses in freely behaving mice, (2) absence or presence of startle stimuli during retrieval as well as unpredictability of a given threat determine phasic and sustained fear response profiles and (3) both freezing and startle responses indicate phasic and sustained components of behavioral fear, with sustained freezing reflecting unpredictability of conditioned stimulus (CS)/unconditioned stimulus (US) pairings. This paradigm and available genetically modified mouse lines will pave the way for investigation of the molecular and neural mechanisms relating to the transition from phasic to sustained fear.

  14. Degraded expression of learned feedforward control in movements released by startle.

    PubMed

    Wright, Zachary A; Carlsen, Anthony N; MacKinnon, Colum D; Patton, James L

    2015-08-01

    Recent work has shown that preplanned motor programs can be rapidly released via fast conducting pathways using a startling acoustic stimulus. Our question was whether the startle-elicited response might also release a recently learned internal model, which draws on experience to predict and compensate for expected perturbations in a feedforward manner. Our initial investigation using adaptation to robotically produced forces showed some evidence of this, but the results were potentially confounded by co-contraction caused by startle. In this study, we eliminated this confound by asking subjects to make reaching movements in the presence of a visual distortion. Results show that a startle stimulus (1) decreased performance of the recently learned task and (2) reduced after-effect magnitude. Since the recall of learned control was reduced, but not eliminated during startle trials, we suggest that multiple neural centers (cortical and subcortical) are involved in such learning and adaptation. These findings have implications for motor training in areas such as piloting, teleoperation, sports, and rehabilitation.

  15. The CRH1 antagonist GSK561679 increases human fear but not anxiety as assessed by startle.

    PubMed

    Grillon, Christian; Hale, Elizabeth; Lieberman, Lynne; Davis, Andrew; Pine, Daniel S; Ernst, Monique

    2015-03-13

    Fear to predictable threat and anxiety to unpredictable threat reflect distinct processes mediated by different brain structures, the central nucleus of the amygdala and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), respectively. This study tested the hypothesis that the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF1) antagonist GSK561679 differentially reduces anxiety but increases fear in humans. A total of 31 healthy females received each of four treatments: placebo, 50 mg GSK561679 (low-GSK), 400 mg GSK561679 (high-GSK), and 1 mg alprazolam in a crossover design. Participants were exposed to three conditions during each of the four treatments. The three conditions included one in which predictable aversive shocks were signaled by a cue, a second during which shocks were administered unpredictably, and a third condition without shock. Fear and anxiety were assessed using the acoustic startle reflex. High-GSK had no effect on startle potentiation during unpredictable threat (anxiety) but increased startle potentiation during the predictable condition (fear). Low-GSK did not affect startle potentiation across conditions. Consistent with previous findings, alprazolam reduced startle potentiation during unpredictable threat but not during predictable threat. The increased fear by high-GSK replicates animal findings and suggests a lift of the inhibitory effect of the BNST on the amygdala by the CRF1 antagonist.

  16. Multiple-pass laser beam deflection probe for detection of acoustic and weak shock waves in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaci, Janez; Možina, Janez

    1995-09-01

    We examine a novel laser beam deflection arrangement for detection of acoustic and weak shock waves in fluids. Novelty of the arrangement is folding of the probe beam by two parallel plane mirrors in such a way that the probe beam passes the wave propagation region several times before it reaches the deflection-detecting photodetector. In this way the probed wave interacts with several segments of the probing beam in sequence. A single oscilloscope trace of the photodetector output thus gives us the possibility to study the evolution of the probed wave at several distances from the source. To demonstrate the potentials of the arrangement we present wave forms of spherical blast waves detected in air during laser ablation of solid samples. We also discuss a simple theoretical model that qualitatively explains the most characteristic features of this arrangement.

  17. Nanoscale thermal, acoustic, and magnetic dynamics probed with soft x-ray light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, Mark E.

    This thesis discusses the application of coherent, ultrafast beams of soft x-ray light from high-order harmonic generation (HHG) to study thermal, acoustic, and magnetic processes in nanostructures. This short-wavelength light is a uniquely powerful probe of surface dynamics since it has both a very short wavelength and duration. First, this thesis reports the first observation and quantitative measurements of the transition from diffusive to ballistic thermal transport for the case of heat flow away from a heated nanostructure into a bulk substrate. This measurement provides insight into the fundamentals of thermal energy transport away from nanoscale hot spots, and demonstrates a fundamental limit to the energy dissipation capability of nanostructures. Further, we propose a straightforward correction to the Fourier law for heat diffusion, necessary for thermal management in nanoelectronics, nano-enabled energy systems, nanomanufacturing, and nanomedicine. Second, this work discusses dynamic measurements of ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAW) and the first SAW dispersion measurement in a nanostructured system. These results are directly applicable to adhesion and thickness diagnostics of very thin films. Finally, this thesis reports the first use of light from HHG to study magnetic orientation. Using the transverse magneto-optic Kerr effect and soft x-ray light near the M-absorption edges of Fe, Co, and Ni, magnetic asymmetries up to 8% are observed from thin Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) films. This signal is 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that observed using optical methods, showing great promise for dynamic imaging of domain flipping at the 100 nm level.

  18. Acoustic probe for solid-gas-liquid suspensions. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    'Acoustic probes have shown promise to be quite effective in determining the solid content in solid-liquid suspensions. However, the presence of small amounts of gas in the waste slurries stored in tanks across the DOE complex prevents straightforward application for characterization of these slurries. The proposed research will develop an acoustic probe for monitoring particle size and volume fraction in slurries in the absence and the presence of gas bubbles. Theoretical Analysis Accomplished: Attenuation of sound waves depends on the size distribution of the solids and the volume fraction of solids. These can in principle be calculated from attenuation measured over a range of frequencies. However, small amounts of bubbles distort the measured attenuation. A typical result from theoretical analysis for the attenuation of solid- gas-liquid systems is given in Figure 1. The total attenuation of a sound wave v(o) equals the sum of contributions by a large number of ''bins'' of particle sizes. This notion yields the following equation for the (hitherto) unknown number density of solid particles as a function of particle radius N(a): j k(o,a)N(a)da = v(o), where the kernel k(o,a) is obtained from analysis. If N(a) is given, the above equation is used to calculate the attenuation v(o). This is referred to as solving the ''forward problem''. Solving for N(a) with v(o) given is the ''inverse problem''. A complication that one faces when trying to solve the inverse problem is that the stated problem is mathematically ill-posed, i.e., small fluctuations in v(o) cause large fluctuations in the result for the number density. Therefore the problem needs to be ''regularized'', i.e., the stated problem needs to be changed slightly such as to make it well-posed. This has been done by others for gas-liquid systems in the past. This approach is currently being applied in the present project to solid-liquid systems. As is shown in Figure 2, it successfully recovers the number

  19. Child maltreatment, callous-unemotional traits, and defensive responding in high-risk children: An investigation of emotion-modulated startle response.

    PubMed

    Dackis, Melissa N; Rogosch, Fred A; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-11-01

    Child maltreatment is associated with disruptions in physiological arousal, emotion regulation, and defensive responses to cues of threat and distress, as well as increased risk for callous unemotional (CU) traits and externalizing behavior. Developmental models of CU traits have focused on biological and genetic risk factors that contribute to hypoarousal and antisocial behavior, but have focused less on environmental influences (Blair, 2004; Daversa, 2010; Hare, Frazell, & Cox, 1978; Krueger, 2000; Shirtcliff et al., 2009; Viding, Fontaine, & McCrory, 2012). The aim of the present investigation was to measure the independent and combined effects of child maltreatment and high CU traits on emotion-modulated startle response in children. Participants consisted of 132 low-income maltreated (n = 60) and nonmaltreated (n = 72) children between 8 and 12 years old who attended a summer camp program. Acoustic startle response (ASR) was elicited in response to a 110-dB 50-ms probe while children viewed a slideshow of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS images. Maltreatment status was assessed through examination of Department of Human Services records. CU traits were measured using counselor reports from the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional Traits (Frick, 2004), and conduct problems were measured using counselor and child self-report. We found no significant differences in emotion-modulated startle in the overall sample. However, significant differences in ASR by maltreatment status, maltreatment subtype, and level of CU traits were apparent. Results indicated differential physiological responses for maltreated and nonmaltreated children based on CU traits, including a pathway of hypoarousal for nonmaltreated/high CU children that differed markedly from a more normative physiological trajectory for maltreated/high CU children. Further, we found heightened ASR for emotionally and physically neglected children with high CU and elevated antisocial behavior in these

  20. Child Maltreatment, Callous-Unemotional Traits, and Defensive Responding In High-Risk Children: An Investigation of Emotion-Modulated Startle Response

    PubMed Central

    Dackis, Melissa N.; Rogosch, Fred A.; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment is associated with disruptions in physiological arousal, emotion regulation, and defensive responses to cues of threat and distress, as well as increased risk for callous unemotional (CU) traits and externalizing behavior. Developmental models of callous unemotional (CU) traits have focused on biological and genetic risk factors that contribute to hypoarousal and antisocial behavior, but have focused less on environmental influences (Blair, 2004; Daversa, 2010; Hare, Frazell, & Cox, 1978; Krueger, 2000; Shirtcliff et al., 2009; Viding, Fontaine, & McCrory, 2012). The aim of the present investigation was to measure the independent and combined effects of child maltreatment and high CU trait on emotion-modulated startle (EMS) response in children. Participants consisted of 132 low-income maltreated (n = 60) and nonmaltreated (n = 72) children between 8–12 years old who attended a summer camp program. Acoustic startle response (ASR) was elicited in response to a 110-dB 50-ms probe while children viewed a slideshow of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS images. Maltreatment status was assessed through examination of Department of Human Services records. CU traits were measured using counselor reports from the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional Traits (ICU; Frick, 2004), and conduct problems were measured using counselor and child self-report. We found no significant differences in emotion-modulated startle in the overall sample. However, significant differences in ASR by maltreatment status, maltreatment subtype, and level of CU traits were apparent. Results indicated differential physiological responses for maltreated and nonmaltreated children based on CU traits, including a pathway of hypoarousal for nonmaltreated/high CU children that differed markedly from a more normative physiological trajectory for maltreated/high CU children. Further, we found heightened ASR for emotionally and physically neglected children with high CU and elevated

  1. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  2. Impaired conditioned fear response and startle reactivity in epinephrine deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Mate; Ziegler, Michael; Sun, Ping; Gresack, Jodi; Risbrough, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Norepinephrine and epinephrine signaling is thought to facilitate cognitive processes related to emotional events and heightened arousal, however, the specific role of epinephrine in these processes is less known. To investigate the selective impact of epinephrine on arousal and fear-related memory retrieval, mice unable to synthesize epinephrine (phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase knockout, PNMT-KO) were tested in context and cued fear conditioning. To assess the role of epinephrine in other cognitive and arousal-based behaviors these mice were also tested for acoustic startle, prepulse inhibition, novel object recognition and open field activity. Our results show that compared to wild-type (WT) mice, PNMT-KO mice displayed reduced context fear but normal cued fear. Mice exhibited normal memory performance in the short-term version of the novel object recognition task suggesting PNMT mice exhibit more selective memory effects on highly emotional and/or long term memories. Similarly, open field activity was unaffected by epinephrine deficiency, suggesting differences in freezing are not related to changes in overall anxiety or exploratory drive. Startle reactivity to acoustic pulses was reduced in PNMT-KO mice while prepulse inhibition was increased. These findings provide further evidence for a selective role of epinephrine in contextual fear learning, and support its potential role in acoustic startle. PMID:23268986

  3. Effects of Ceramic Nanopowder Dopants on Acoustic Attenuation Properties of Silicone Rubber Lens for Medical Echo Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yohachi (John); Hosono, Yasuharu; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2007-07-01

    The effects of fine ceramic powder dopants, namely, TiO2, Al2O3, BaSO4, Fe2O3, ZrO2, and Yb2O3 with primary particle sizes of 16-100 nm, on the acoustic properties of silicone rubber have been investigated, in order to develop an acoustic lens material for medical echo probes with a low acoustic attenuation (α). Silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder having a high density (ρ) of 9.2× 103 kg/m3 and an average particle size of 16 nm showed a lower acoustic attenuation than silicone rubber doped with other powders. The materials showed ρ=1.54× 103 kg/m3, a sound velocity (c)=882 m/s, an acoustic impedance ρ\\cdot c (Z)=1.36× 106 kg m-2 s-1, and an acoustic attenuation α=0.93 dB mm-1 MHz-1 at 37 °C. Silicone rubber doped with Fe2O3 powder having ρ=5.2× 103 kg/m3 and an average particle size of 30 nm showed the highest α=2.36 dB mm-1 MHz-1 and Z=1.47× 106 kg m-2 s-1. Microstructure observation of the rubber by scanning microscopy revealed that the α of the powder-doped rubber is not only determined by the primary particle size of the powders but also by the dispersion and agglomeration of the secondary particles in the rubber matrix. The discovery of the process parameter required to reduce the α of the nanopowder-doped silicone rubber has an important practical consequence.

  4. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  5. Sub-10 nm Ytterbium Oxide Nanopowder-doped Silicone Rubber Acoustic Lens Material for Medical Echo Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yohachi (John); Hosono, Yasuharu; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2007-09-01

    The effects of 8-nm-Yb2O3-nanopowders dopant, on the physical and acoustical properties of high-temperature-vulcanization (HTV) silicone (Q) rubber have been investigated, to develop a low acoustic attenuation (α) lens material for medical array probes. A 35 wt % (6 vol %) Yb2O3-doped HTV Q rubber showed a sound velocity (c) = 867 m/s, an acoustic impedance (Z) = 1.36× 106 kg\\cdotm-2\\cdots-1, an acoustic attenuation α = 0.66 dB\\cdotmm-1\\cdotMHz-1, and an α-figure of merits (FOM) (α× c) = 574 at 37 °C. The α-FOM value with Z = 1.36× 106 kg\\cdotm-2\\cdots-1 for a Q rubber lens material is the lowest attenuation ever reported. Microstructure observation revealed that the low-α rubber showed a uniform Yb2O3 nanopowder distribution in the rubber matrix.

  6. The use of waveguide acoustic probes for void fraction measurement in the evaporator of BN-350-Type reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, V.I.; Nigmatulin, B.I.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper deals with some results of the experimental studies which have been carried out to investigate the steam generation dynamics in the Field tubes of sodium-water evaporators used in the BN-350 reactors. The void fraction measurements have been taken with the aid of waveguide acoustic transducers manufactured in accordance with a specially designed technology (waveguide acoustic transducers-WAT technology). Presented in this paper also the transducer design and calibration methods, as well as the diagram showing transducers arrengment in the evaporator. The transducers under test featured a waveguide of about 4 m in length and a 200-mm long sensitive element (probe). Besides, this paper specifies the void fraction data obtained through measurements in diverse points of the evaporator. The studies revealed that the period of observed fluctuations in the void fraction amounted to few seconds and was largely dependent on the level of water in the evaporator.

  7. Performance, Thermal, and Vibration Qualification Testing of Zetec Acoustic Transducers, Model Z0002659-2, Sondicator Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, G; Gemberling, S; Lavietes, A

    2006-03-10

    This report is a result of Qualification Test Plan No.001 prepared by Anthony Lavietes. The Qualification Test Plan outlines a list of requirements for thermal and vibrational testing of Zetac's Z0002659-2 Sondicator Probe acoustic transducers (hereafter called ''transducers''). The Zetec transducers are used in a system that employs an array of 7 acoustic transducers. Qualification testing of these transducers was required since they are a modified version of a standard catalog item from the manufacturer. This report documents the thermal, vibrational, and performance testing that was performed on a sampling of these transducers in order to qualify them for flight. A total of 14 transducers were tested. All 14 passed qualification testing with no failures.

  8. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and α 2 adrenergic receptors mediate heroin withdrawal-potentiated startle in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Paula E; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F

    2013-09-01

    Anxiety is one of the early symptoms of opioid withdrawal and contributes to continued drug use and relapse. The acoustic startle response (ASR) is a component of anxiety that has been shown to increase during opioid withdrawal in both humans and animals. We investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and norepinephrine (NE), two key mediators of the brain stress system, on acute heroin withdrawal-potentiated ASR. Rats injected with heroin (2 mg/kg s.c.) displayed an increased ASR when tested 4 h after heroin treatment. A similar increase in ASR was found in rats 10-20 h into withdrawal from extended access (12 h) to i.v. heroin self-administration, a model that captures several aspects of heroin addiction in humans. Both the α 2 adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine (10 μg/kg s.c.) and CRF1 receptor antagonist N,N-bis(2-methoxyethyl)-3-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidin-7-amine (MPZP; 20 mg/kg s.c.) blocked heroin withdrawal-potentiated startle. To investigate the relationship between CRF1 and α 2 adrenergic receptors in the potentiation of the ASR, we tested the effect of MPZP on yohimbine (1.25 mg/kg s.c.)-potentiated startle and clonidine on CRF (2 μg i.c.v.)-potentiated startle. Clonidine blocked CRF-potentiated startle, whereas MPZP partially attenuated but did not reverse yohimbine-potentiated startle, suggesting that CRF may drive NE release to potentiate startle. These results suggest that CRF1 and α 2 receptors play an important role in the heightened anxiety-like behaviour observed during acute withdrawal from heroin, possibly via CRF inducing the release of NE in stress-related brain regions.

  9. Synaptic depression and short-term habituation are located in the sensory part of the mammalian startle pathway

    PubMed Central

    Simons-Weidenmaier, Nadine S; Weber, Maruschka; Plappert, Claudia F; Pilz, Peter KD; Schmid, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    Background Short-term habituation of the startle response represents an elementary form of learning in mammals. The underlying mechanism is located within the primary startle pathway, presumably at sensory synapses on giant neurons in the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC). Short trains of action potentials in sensory afferent fibers induce depression of synaptic responses in PnC giant neurons, a phenomenon that has been proposed to be the cellular correlate for short-term habituation. We address here the question whether both this synaptic depression and the short-term habituation of the startle response are localized at the presynaptic terminals of sensory afferents. If this is confirmed, it would imply that these processes take place prior to multimodal signal integration, rather than occurring at postsynaptic sites on PnC giant neurons that directly drive motor neurons. Results Patch-clamp recordings in vitro were combined with behavioral experiments; synaptic depression was specific for the input pathway stimulated and did not affect signals elicited by other sensory afferents. Concordant with this, short-term habituation of the acoustic startle response in behavioral experiments did not influence tactile startle response amplitudes and vice versa. Further electrophysiological analysis showed that the passive properties of the postsynaptic neuron were unchanged but revealed some alterations in short-term plasticity during depression. Moreover, depression was induced only by trains of presynaptic action potentials and not by single pulses. There was no evidence for transmitter receptor desensitization. In summary, the data indicates that the synaptic depression mechanism is located presynaptically. Conclusion Our electrophysiological and behavioral data strongly indicate that synaptic depression in the PnC as well as short-term habituation are located in the sensory part of the startle pathway, namely at the axon terminals of sensory afferents in the Pn

  10. Emotional processing and rTMS: does inhibitory theta burst stimulation affect the human startle reflex?

    PubMed

    Vennewald, Nadja; Winter, Bernward; Limburg, Karina; Diemer, Julia; Notzon, Swantje; Fohrbeck, Inga; Arolt, Volker; Domschke, Katharina; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) enables the local and non-invasive modulation of cortical activity and has proved to achieve antidepressant effects. To a lesser extent, rTMS is investigated as a treatment option for anxiety disorders. As the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala represent key components of human emotion regulation, we investigated how prefrontally applied rTMS affects the responsiveness of the subcortical amygdala during a fear-relevant study paradigm to examine potential cortico-limbic effects. Sham-controlled, randomised inhibitory rTMS (continuous theta burst stimulation, TBS) was applied to 102 healthy subjects (female = 54) over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Subsequently, the emotion-potentiated (unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant International Affective Picture System pictures) acoustic startle response was investigated. Subjective anxiety ratings (anxiety sensitivity, trait and state anxiety) were considered. Picture category affected the startle magnitude as expected for both TBS intervention groups (highest startle response for unpleasant, lowest for pleasant pictures). However, no modulatory effects of TBS on startle potentiation were discerned. No significant interaction effects of TBS intervention, subjective anxiety ratings, and gender were identified. Interestingly, startle habituation was influenced by TBS intervention on a trend-level, with verum TBS leading to an accelerated habituation. We found no evidence for the hypothesis that prefrontal inhibitory TBS affects the responsiveness of the amygdala during the presentation of emotionally relevant stimuli in healthy subjects. Instead, we found accelerated habituation under verum TBS on a statistical trend-level. Hence, some preliminary hints for modulatory effects of inhibitory TBS on basic learning mechanisms could be found.

  11. Generalization of fear-potentiated startle in the presence of auditory cues: a parametric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Norrholm, Seth Davin; Jovanovic, Tanja; Briscione, Maria A.; Anderson, Kemp M.; Kwon, Cliffe K.; Warren, Victor T.; Bosshardt, Lauren; Bradley, Bekh

    2014-01-01

    Intense fear responses observed in trauma-, stressor-, and anxiety-related disorders can be elicited by a wide range of stimuli similar to those that were present during the traumatic event. The present study investigated the experimental utility of fear-potentiated startle paradigms to study this phenomenon, known as stimulus generalization, in healthy volunteers. Fear-potentiated startle refers to a relative increase in the acoustic startle response to a previously neutral stimulus that has been paired with an aversive stimulus. Specifically, in Experiment 1 an auditory pure tone (500 Hz) was used as the conditioned stimulus (CS+) and was reinforced with an unconditioned stimulus (US), an airblast to the larynx. A distinct tone (4000 Hz) was used as the nonreinforced stimulus (CS−) and was never paired with an airblast. Twenty-four hours later subjects underwent Re-training followed by a Generalization test, during which subjects were exposed to a range of generalization stimuli (GS) (250, 1000, 2000, 4000, 8000 Hz). In order to further examine the point at which fear no longer generalizes, a follow-up experiment (Experiment 2) was performed where a 4000 Hz pure tone was used as the CS+, and during the Generalization test, 2000 and 8000 Hz were used as GS. In both Experiment 1 and 2 there was significant discrimination in US expectancy responses on all stimuli during the Generalization Test, indicating the stimuli were perceptually distinct. In Experiment 1, participants showed similar levels of fear-potentiated startle to the GS that were adjacent to the CS+, and discriminated between stimuli that were 2 or more degrees from the CS+. Experiment 2 demonstrated no fear-potentiated startle generalization. The current study is the first to use auditory cues to test generalization of conditioned fear responses; such cues may be especially relevant to combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) where much of the traumatic exposure may involve sounds. PMID:25368559

  12. Instruction-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch reflex is associated with indicators of startle

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Vengateswaran J.; Honeycutt, Claire F.; Shemmell, Jonathan; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Long-latency responses elicited by postural perturbation are modulated by how a subject is instructed to respond to the perturbation, yet the neural pathways responsible for this modulation remain unclear. The goal of this study was to determine if instruction-dependent modulation is associated with activity in brainstem pathways contributing to startle. Our hypothesis was that elbow perturbations can evoked startle, indicated by activity in the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). Perturbation responses were compared to those elicited by a loud acoustic stimulus, known to elicit startle. Postural perturbations and startling acoustic stimuli both evoked SCM activity, but only when a ballistic elbow extension movement was planned. Both stimuli triggered SCM activity with the same probability. When SCM activity was present, there was an associated early onset of triceps EMG, as required for the planned movement. This early EMG onset occurred at a time often attributed to long-latency stretch reflexes (75-100ms). The nature of the perturbation-triggered EMG (excitatory or inhibitory) was independent of the perturbation direction (flexion or extension) indicating that it was not a feedback response appropriate for returning the limb to its original position. The net EMG response to perturbations delivered after a movement had been planned could be explained as the sum of a stretch reflex opposing the perturbation and a startle-evoked response associated with the prepared movement. These results demonstrate that rapid perturbations can trigger early release of a planned ballistic movement, and that this release is associated with activity in the brainstem pathways contributing to startle reflexes. PMID:23811739

  13. Modulation of Prepulse Inhibition and Startle Reflex by Emotions: A Comparison between Young and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Le Duc, Jolyanne; Fournier, Philippe; Hébert, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether or not the acoustic startle response and sensorimotor gating may be modulated by emotions differentially between young and older adults. Two groups of participants (mean age Young: 24 years old; Elderly: 63.6 years old) were presented with three types of auditory stimuli (Startle alone, High or Low frequency Prepulse) while viewing pleasant, neutral, or unpleasant images. Electromyographic activity of the eyeblink response was measured. Results show that older adults displayed diminished eyeblink responses whereas younger adults displayed enhanced eyeblink responses when viewing negative images. Sensorimotor gating also differed between young and older adults, with enhanced sensorimotor gating abilities while viewing positive pictures in older adults and diminished abilities while viewing negative pictures among younger adults. These results argue in favor of a differential emotional influence on the sensorimotor abilities of young and older adults, with a positivity bias among the latter.

  14. Modulation of Prepulse Inhibition and Startle Reflex by Emotions: A Comparison between Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Le Duc, Jolyanne; Fournier, Philippe; Hébert, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether or not the acoustic startle response and sensorimotor gating may be modulated by emotions differentially between young and older adults. Two groups of participants (mean age Young: 24 years old; Elderly: 63.6 years old) were presented with three types of auditory stimuli (Startle alone, High or Low frequency Prepulse) while viewing pleasant, neutral, or unpleasant images. Electromyographic activity of the eyeblink response was measured. Results show that older adults displayed diminished eyeblink responses whereas younger adults displayed enhanced eyeblink responses when viewing negative images. Sensorimotor gating also differed between young and older adults, with enhanced sensorimotor gating abilities while viewing positive pictures in older adults and diminished abilities while viewing negative pictures among younger adults. These results argue in favor of a differential emotional influence on the sensorimotor abilities of young and older adults, with a positivity bias among the latter. PMID:26941643

  15. Modulation of Prepulse Inhibition and Startle Reflex by Emotions: A Comparison between Young and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Le Duc, Jolyanne; Fournier, Philippe; Hébert, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether or not the acoustic startle response and sensorimotor gating may be modulated by emotions differentially between young and older adults. Two groups of participants (mean age Young: 24 years old; Elderly: 63.6 years old) were presented with three types of auditory stimuli (Startle alone, High or Low frequency Prepulse) while viewing pleasant, neutral, or unpleasant images. Electromyographic activity of the eyeblink response was measured. Results show that older adults displayed diminished eyeblink responses whereas younger adults displayed enhanced eyeblink responses when viewing negative images. Sensorimotor gating also differed between young and older adults, with enhanced sensorimotor gating abilities while viewing positive pictures in older adults and diminished abilities while viewing negative pictures among younger adults. These results argue in favor of a differential emotional influence on the sensorimotor abilities of young and older adults, with a positivity bias among the latter. PMID:26941643

  16. Passive probing of the sound fixing and ranging channel with hydro-acoustic observations from ridge earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Evers, Läslo G; Snellen, Mirjam

    2015-04-01

    The International Monitoring System includes a hydro-acoustic part to verify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Besides explosive signals, monitoring stations also detect acoustic waves from earthquakes that travel through the SOund Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel. The travel times of such detections are listed in the Reviewed Event Bulletin, which is statistically evaluated for the stations located in the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans. The celerities of ridge earthquakes are calculated to build up a homogeneous data-set, based on similar source mechanisms. The celerity is defined as the epicentral distance divided by the travel time. The global characteristics of these celerities can be well understood in terms of temperature variations in the SOFAR channel. A detailed velocity profile has been retrieved for the Atlantic Ocean where large differences (14 m/s) are found between the southern and northern parts of the basin. Propagation modeling with normal modes supports these findings, which shows that the celerity gives an estimate of the sound speed in the SOFAR channel. These results compare remarkably well with those from active experiments, showing the ability of passively probing the SOFAR channel with hydro-acoustic waves from earthquake sources.

  17. Passive probing of the sound fixing and ranging channel with hydro-acoustic observations from ridge earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Evers, Läslo G; Snellen, Mirjam

    2015-04-01

    The International Monitoring System includes a hydro-acoustic part to verify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Besides explosive signals, monitoring stations also detect acoustic waves from earthquakes that travel through the SOund Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel. The travel times of such detections are listed in the Reviewed Event Bulletin, which is statistically evaluated for the stations located in the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans. The celerities of ridge earthquakes are calculated to build up a homogeneous data-set, based on similar source mechanisms. The celerity is defined as the epicentral distance divided by the travel time. The global characteristics of these celerities can be well understood in terms of temperature variations in the SOFAR channel. A detailed velocity profile has been retrieved for the Atlantic Ocean where large differences (14 m/s) are found between the southern and northern parts of the basin. Propagation modeling with normal modes supports these findings, which shows that the celerity gives an estimate of the sound speed in the SOFAR channel. These results compare remarkably well with those from active experiments, showing the ability of passively probing the SOFAR channel with hydro-acoustic waves from earthquake sources. PMID:25920862

  18. Probing elasticity at the nanoscale: Terahertz acoustic vibration of small metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Juvé, Vincent; Crut, Aurélien; Maioli, Paolo; Pellarin, Michel; Broyer, Michel; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2010-05-12

    The acoustic response of surface-controlled metal (Pt) nanoparticles is investigated in the small size range, between 1.3 and 3 nm (i.e., 75-950 atoms), using time-resolved spectroscopy. Acoustic vibration of the nanoparticles is demonstrated, with frequencies ranging from 1.1 to 2.6 THz, opening the way to the development of THz acoustic resonators. The frequencies, measured with a noncontact optical method, are in excellent agreement with the prediction of a macroscopic approach based on the continuous elastic model, together with the bulk material elastic constants. This demonstrates the validity of this model at the nanoscale and the weak impact of size reduction on the elastic properties of a material, even for nanoparticles formed by less than 100 atoms.

  19. Startling sweet temptations: hedonic chocolate deprivation modulates experience, eating behavior, and eyeblink startle.

    PubMed

    Blechert, Jens; Naumann, Eva; Schmitz, Julian; Herbert, Beate M; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2014-01-01

    Many individuals restrict their food intake to prevent weight gain. This restriction has both homeostatic and hedonic effects but their relative contribution is currently unclear. To isolate hedonic effects of food restriction, we exposed regular chocolate eaters to one week of chocolate deprivation but otherwise regular eating. Before and after this hedonic deprivation, participants viewed images of chocolate and images of high-calorie but non-chocolate containing foods, while experiential, behavioral and eyeblink startle responses were measured. Compared to satiety, hedonic deprivation triggered increased chocolate wanting, liking, and chocolate consumption but also feelings of frustration and startle potentiation during the intertrial intervals. Deprivation was further characterized by startle inhibition during both chocolate and food images relative to the intertrial intervals. Individuals who responded with frustration to the manipulation and those who scored high on a questionnaire of impulsivity showed more relative startle inhibition. The results reveal the profound effects of hedonic deprivation on experiential, behavioral and attentional/appetitive response systems and underscore the role of individual differences and state variables for startle modulation. Implications for dieting research and practice as well as for eating and weight disorders are discussed.

  20. Full bandwidth calibration procedure for acoustic probes containing a pressure and particle velocity sensor.

    PubMed

    Basten, Tom G H; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of acoustic particle velocity sensors is still difficult due to the lack of standardized sensors to compare with. Recently it is shown by Jacobsen and Jaud [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 830-837 (2006)] that it is possible to calibrate a sound pressure and particle velocity sensor in free field conditions at higher frequencies. This is done by using the known acoustic impedance at a certain distance of a spherical loudspeaker. When the sound pressure is measured with a calibrated reference microphone, the particle velocity can be calculated from the known impedance and the measured pressure. At lower frequencies, this approach gives unreliable results. The method is now extended to lower frequencies by measuring the acoustic pressure inside the spherical source. At lower frequencies, the sound pressure inside the sphere is proportional to the movement of the loudspeaker membrane. If the movement is known, the particle velocity in front of the loudspeaker can be derived. This low frequency approach is combined with the high frequency approach giving a full bandwidth calibration procedure which can be used in free field conditions using a single calibration setup. The calibration results are compared with results obtained with a standing wave tube.

  1. Miniature probe for mechanical properties of vascular lesions using acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; He, Youmin; Yu, Mingyue; Li, Rui; Zhu, Jiang; Dai, Cuixia; Piao, Zhonglie; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-03-01

    Changes in tissue biomechanical properties often signify the onset and progression of diseases, such as in determining the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. Acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography (ARF-OCE) has been used in the detection of tissue elasticity to obtain high-resolution elasticity maps. We have developed a probe-based ARF-OCE technology that utilizes a miniature 10 MHz ring ultrasonic transducer for excitation and Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detection. The transducer has a small hole in the center for the OCT light to propagate through. This allows for a confocal stress field and light detection within a small region for high sensitivity and localized excitation. This device is a front-facing probe that is only 3.5 mm in diameter and it is the smallest ARF-OCE catheter to the best of our knowledge. We have tested the feasibility of the probe by measuring the point displacement of an agarose tissue-mimicking phantom using different ARF excitation voltages. Small displacement values ranging from 30 nm to 90 nm have been detected and are shown to be directly proportional to the excitation voltage as expected. We are currently working on obtaining 2D images using a scanning mechanism. We will be testing to capture 2D elastograms of phantoms to further verify feasibility, and eventually characterize the mechanical properties of cardiovascular tissue. With its high portability and sensitivity, this novel technology can be applied to the diagnosis and characterization of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques.

  2. The gap-startle paradigm to assess auditory temporal processing: Bridging animal and human research.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Philippe; Hébert, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    The gap-prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) paradigm is the primary test used in animal research to identify gap detection thresholds and impairment. When a silent gap is presented shortly before a loud startling stimulus, the startle reflex is inhibited and the extent of inhibition is assumed to reflect detection. Here, we applied the same paradigm in humans. One hundred and fifty-seven normal-hearing participants were tested using one of five gap durations (5, 25, 50, 100, 200 ms) in one of the following two paradigms-gap-embedded in or gap-following-the continuous background noise. The duration-inhibition relationship was observable for both conditions but followed different patterns. In the gap-embedded paradigm, GPIAS increased significantly with gap duration up to 50 ms and then more slowly up to 200 ms (trend only). In contrast, in the gap-following paradigm, significant inhibition-different from 0--was observable only at gap durations from 50 to 200 ms. The finding that different patterns are found depending on gap position within the background noise is compatible with distinct mechanisms underlying each of the two paradigms. PMID:26841102

  3. Versatility of fear-potentiated startle paradigms for assessing human conditioned fear extinction and return of fear.

    PubMed

    Norrholm, Seth D; Anderson, Kemp M; Olin, Ilana W; Jovanovic, Tanja; Kwon, Cliffe; Warren, Victor T; McCarthy, Alexander; Bosshardt, Lauren; Sabree, Justin; Duncan, Erica J; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Bradley, Bekh

    2011-01-01

    Fear conditioning methodologies have often been employed as testable models for assessing learned fear responses in individuals with anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and specific phobia. One frequently used paradigm is measurement of the acoustic startle reflex under conditions that mimic anxiogenic and fear-related conditions. For example, fear-potentiated startle is the relative increase in the frequency or magnitude of the acoustic startle reflex in the presence of a previously neutral cue (e.g., colored shape; termed the conditioned stimulus or CS+) that has been repeatedly paired with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (e.g., airblast to the larynx). Our group has recently used fear-potentiated startle paradigms to demonstrate impaired fear extinction in civilian and combat populations with PTSD. In the current study, we examined the use of either auditory or visual CSs in a fear extinction protocol that we have validated and applied to human clinical conditions. This represents an important translational bridge in that numerous animal studies of fear extinction, upon which much of the human work is based, have employed the use of auditory CSs as opposed to visual CSs. Participants in both the auditory and visual groups displayed robust fear-potentiated startle to the CS+, clear discrimination between the reinforced CS+ and non-reinforced CS-, significant extinction to the previously reinforced CS+, and marked spontaneous recovery. We discuss the current results as they relate to future investigations of PTSD-related impairments in fear processing in populations with diverse medical and psychiatric histories.

  4. Transverse mechanical properties of cell walls of single living plant cells probed by laser-generated acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, Atef; Dehoux, Thomas; Audoin, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of plant cell wall is crucial to understand tissue dynamics. However, the exact symmetry of the mechanical properties of this anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite remains uncertain. For this reason, biologically relevant measurements of the stiffness coefficients on individual living cells are a challenge. For this purpose, we have developed the single-cell optoacoustic nanoprobe (SCOPE) technique, which uses laser-generated acoustic waves to probe the stiffness, thickness and viscosity of live single-cell subcompartments. This all-optical technique offers a sub-micrometer lateral resolution, nanometer in-depth resolution, and allows the non-contact measurement of the mechanical properties of live turgid tissues without any assumption of mechanical symmetry. SCOPE experiments reveal that single-cell wall transverse stiffness in the direction perpendicular to the epidermis layer of onion cells is close to that of cellulose. This observation demonstrates that cellulose microfibrils are the main load-bearing structure in this direction, and suggests strong bonding of microfibrils by hemicelluloses. Altogether our measurement of the viscosity at high frequencies suggests that the rheology of the wall is dominated by glass-like dynamics. From a comparison with literature, we attribute this behavior to the influence of the pectin matrix. SCOPE's ability to unravel cell rheology and cell anisotropy defines a new class of experiments to enlighten cell nano-mechanics.

  5. Transverse mechanical properties of cell walls of single living plant cells probed by laser-generated acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, Atef; Dehoux, Thomas; Audoin, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of plant cell wall is crucial to understand tissue dynamics. However, the exact symmetry of the mechanical properties of this anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite remains uncertain. For this reason, biologically relevant measurements of the stiffness coefficients on individual living cells are a challenge. For this purpose, we have developed the single-cell optoacoustic nanoprobe (SCOPE) technique, which uses laser-generated acoustic waves to probe the stiffness, thickness and viscosity of live single-cell subcompartments. This all-optical technique offers a sub-micrometer lateral resolution, nanometer in-depth resolution, and allows the non-contact measurement of the mechanical properties of live turgid tissues without any assumption of mechanical symmetry. SCOPE experiments reveal that single-cell wall transverse stiffness in the direction perpendicular to the epidermis layer of onion cells is close to that of cellulose. This observation demonstrates that cellulose microfibrils are the main load-bearing structure in this direction, and suggests strong bonding of microfibrils by hemicelluloses. Altogether our measurement of the viscosity at high frequencies suggests that the rheology of the wall is dominated by glass-like dynamics. From a comparison with literature, we attribute this behavior to the influence of the pectin matrix. SCOPE's ability to unravel cell rheology and cell anisotropy defines a new class of experiments to enlighten cell nano-mechanics. PMID:24615232

  6. Wideband spherically focused PVDF acoustic sources for calibration of ultrasound hydrophone probes.

    PubMed

    Selfridge, A; Lewin, P A

    2000-01-01

    Several broadband sources have been developed for the purpose of calibrating hydrophones. The specific configuration described is intended for the calibration of hydrophones In a frequency range of 1 to 40 MHz. All devices used 25 /spl mu/m film of PVDF bonded to a matched backing. Two had radii of curvatures (ROC) of 25.4 and 127 mm with f numbers of 3.8 and 19, respectively. Their active element diameter was 0.28 in (6.60 mm). The active diameter of the third source used was 25 mm, and it had an ROC of 254 mm and an f number of 10. The use of a focused element minimized frequency-dependent diffraction effects, resulting in a smooth variation of acoustic pressure at the focus from 1 to 40 MHz. Also, using a focused PVDF source permitted calibrations above 20 MHz without resorting to harmonic generation via nonlinear propagation. PMID:18238683

  7. Acoustic phonons in chrysotile asbestos probed by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Kumzerov, Yu. A,; Alatas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic phonons in an individual, oriented fiber of chrysotile asbestos (chemical formula Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) were observed at room temperature in the inelastic x-ray measurement with a very high (meV) resolution. The x-ray scattering vector was aligned along [1 0 0] direction of the reciprocal lattice, nearly parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The latter coincides with [1 0 0] direction of the direct lattice and the axes of the nano-channels. The data were analyzed using a damped harmonic oscillator model. Analysis of the phonon dispersion in the first Brillouin zone yielded the longitudinal sound velocity of (9200 {+-} 600) m/s.

  8. Age-related affective modulation of the startle eyeblink response: older adults startle most when viewing positive pictures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Michelle C; Courtney, Christopher G; Mather, Mara; Dawson, Michael E; Davison, Gerald C

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies reveal age by valence interactions in attention and memory, such that older adults focus relatively more on positive and relatively less on negative stimuli than younger adults. In the current study, eyeblink startle response was used to measure differences in emotional reactivity to images that were equally arousing to both age groups. Viewing positive and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System had opposite effects on startle modulation for older and younger adults. Younger adults showed the typical startle blink pattern, with potentiated startle when viewing negative pictures compared to positive pictures. Older adults, on the other hand, showed the opposite pattern, with potentiated startle when viewing positive pictures compared to viewing negative and neutral pictures. Potential underlying mechanisms for this interaction are evaluated. This pattern suggests that, compared with younger adults, older adults are more likely to spontaneously suppress responses to negative stimuli and process positive stimuli more deeply.

  9. Planning of Ballistic Movement following Stroke: Insights from the Startle Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Honeycutt, Claire Fletcher; Perreault, Eric Jon

    2012-01-01

    Following stroke, reaching movements are slow, segmented, and variable. It is unclear if these deficits result from a poorly constructed movement plan or an inability to voluntarily execute an appropriate plan. The acoustic startle reflex provides a means to initiate a motor plan involuntarily. In the presence of a movement plan, startling acoustic stimulus triggers non-voluntary early execution of planned movement, a phenomenon known as the startReact response. In unimpaired individuals, the startReact response is identical to a voluntarily initiated movement, except that it is elicited 30–40 ms. As the startReact response is thought to be mediated by brainstem pathways, we hypothesized that the startReact response is intact in stroke subjects. If startReact is intact, it may be possible to elicit more task-appropriate patterns of muscle activation than can be elicited voluntarily. We found that startReact responses were intact following stroke. Responses were initiated as rapidly as those in unimpaired subjects, and with muscle coordination patterns resembling those seen during unimpaired volitional movements. Results were striking for elbow flexion movements, which demonstrated no significant differences between the startReact responses elicited in our stroke and unimpaired subject groups. The results during planned extension movements were less straightforward for stroke subjects, since the startReact response exhibited task inappropriate activity in the flexors. This inappropriate activity diminished over time. This adaptation suggests that the inappropriate activity was transient in nature and not related to the underlying movement plan. We hypothesize that the task-inappropriate flexor activity during extension results from an inability to suppress the classic startle reflex, which primarily influences flexor muscles and adapts rapidly with successive stimuli. These results indicate that stroke subjects are capable of planning ballistic elbow movements

  10. Startle activation is additive with voluntary cortical activation irrespective of stimulus modality.

    PubMed

    Maslovat, Dana; Drummond, Neil M; Carter, Michael J; Carlsen, Anthony N

    2015-10-01

    When a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) is presented during a simple reaction time (RT) task, it can trigger the prepared response through an involuntary initiation pathway. Previous research modelling the effects of presenting a SAS at various intervals following a non-startling auditory imperative signal (IS) suggested that involuntary initiation-related neural activation is additive with the voluntary initiation processes. The current study tested the predictions of this additive model when the SAS and IS are of different modalities by using a visual rather than auditory go-signal. Because voluntary RT latencies are delayed for visual stimuli compared to acoustic stimuli, it was hypothesised that the time course of additive activation would be similarly delayed. Participants performed 150 RT trials requiring a targeted 20° wrist extension task with a SAS presented 0-125 ms following a visual go-signal. Results were not different to those predicted by an additive model (p=0.979), yet were significantly different to those predicted by a horse-race model (p=0.037), indicating a joint contribution of voluntary and involuntary activation, even when the IS and SAS are of different modalities. Furthermore, the results indicated that voluntary RT differences due to stimulus modality are attributable to processes that occur prior to the increase in initiation-related activation.

  11. Assessment of Startle Response and Its Prepulse Inhibition Using Posturography: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Polechoński, Jacek; Juras, Grzegorz; Słomka, Kajetan; Błaszczyk, Janusz; Małecki, Andrzej; Nawrocka, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using static posturography in the assessment of sensorimotor gating. Subjects and Methods. Fourteen subjects took part in the experiment. The inhibitory mechanisms of startle reflex were used as the measure of sensorimotor gating. It was evoked by a strong acoustic stimulus (106 dB SPL, 40 ms) which was preceded by the weaker similar signal (80 dB SPL, 20 ms). A stabilographic platform was used to measure sensorimotor gating. Results. Results of static posturography show that the postural sway caused by the reaction to a strong acoustic stimulus is significantly smaller when this stimulus is preceded by the signal of lower intensity (prepulse). Such assessment is only possible in eyes open conditions. Conclusions. Static posturography can be simple and effective method used for diagnosis of sensorimotor gating in humans. PMID:27314041

  12. The ‘sixth sense’ of ultrasound: probing nonlinear elasticity with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzina, Bojan B.; Dontsov, Egor V.; Urban, Matthew W.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2015-05-01

    Prompted by a recent finding that the magnitude of the acoustic radiation force (ARF) in isotropic tissue-like solids depends linearly on a particular third-order modulus of elasticity—hereon denoted by C, this study investigates the possibility of estimating C from the amplitude of the ARF-generated shear waves. The featured coefficient of nonlinear elasticity, which captures the incipient nonlinear interaction between the volumetric and deviatoric modes of deformation, has so far received only a limited attention in the context of soft tissues due to the fact that the latter are often approximated as (i) fluid-like when considering ultrasound waves, and (ii) incompressible under static deformations. On establishing the analytical and computational platform for the proposed sensing methodology, the study proceeds with applying the prototype technique toward estimating via ARF the third-order modulus C in a series of tissue-mimicking phantoms. To help validate the concept and its implementation, the germane third-order modulus is independently estimated in each phantom via an established technique known as acoustoelasticity. The C-estimates obtained respectively via acoustoelasticity and the new theory of ARF show a significant degree of consistency. The key features of the new sensing methodology are that: (a) it requires no external deformation of a material other than that produced by the ARF, and (b) it estimates the nonlinear C-modulus locally, over the focal region of an ultrasound beam—where the shear waves are being generated.

  13. Combining AFM and Acoustic Probes to Reveal Changes in the Elastic Stiffness Tensor of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Zhao, Xuegen; Carisey, Alex; Ballestrem, Christoph; Derby, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how the elastic stiffness of a cell affects its communication with its environment is of fundamental importance for the understanding of tissue integrity in health and disease. For stiffness measurements, it has been customary to quote a single parameter quantity, e.g., Young’s modulus, rather than the minimum of two terms of the stiffness tensor required by elasticity theory. In this study, we use two independent methods (acoustic microscopy and atomic force microscopy nanoindentation) to characterize the elastic properties of a cell and thus determine two independent elastic constants. This allows us to explore in detail how the mechanical properties of cells change in response to signaling pathways that are known to regulate the cell’s cytoskeleton. In particular, we demonstrate that altering the tensioning of actin filaments in NIH3T3 cells has a strong influence on the cell's shear modulus but leaves its bulk modulus unchanged. In contrast, altering the polymerization state of actin filaments influences bulk and shear modulus in a similar manner. In addition, we can use the data to directly determine the Poisson ratio of a cell and show that in all cases studied, it is less than, but very close to, 0.5 in value. PMID:25296302

  14. STS-70 Discovery launch startling the birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Startled birds scatter as the stillness of a summer morning is broken by a giant's roar. The Space Shuttle Discovery thundered into space from launch Pad 39-B at 9:41:55:078 a.m. EDT. STS-70 is the 70th Shuttle flight overall, the 21st for Discovery (OV- 103), and the fourth Shuttle flight in 1995. On board for the nearly eight-day mission are a crew of five: Commander Terence 'Tom' Hendricks; Pilot Kevin R. Kregel; and Mission Specialists Nancy Jane Currie, Donald A. Thomas and Mary Ellen Weber. The crew's primary objective is to deploy the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-G (TDRS-G), which will join a constellation of other TDRS spacecraft already on orbit.

  15. Prepulse inhibition predicts working memory performance whilst startle habituation predicts spatial reference memory retention in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Singer, Philipp; Hauser, Jonas; Llano Lopez, Luis; Peleg-Raibstein, Daria; Feldon, Joram; Gargiulo, Pascual A; Yee, Benjamin K

    2013-04-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex refers to the attenuation of the startle response to an intense pulse stimulus when it is shortly preceded by a weak non-startling prepulse stimulus. It is a well-established high-throughput translational measure of pre-attentive sensory gating, and its impairment is detected in several neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia. It has been hypothesized that PPI might be associated with, or predictive of, cognitive deficiency in such diseases, and therefore provide an efficient assay for screening drugs with potential pro-cognitive efficacy. Free from any predetermined disease model, the present study evaluated in a homogeneous cohort of inbred C57BL/6 mice the presence of a statistical link between PPI expression and cognitive performance. Performance indices in a spatial reference memory test and a working memory test conducted in the Morris water maze, and contextual fear conditioning were correlated against pre-existing baseline PPI expression. A specific correlative link between working memory and PPI induced by weak (but not strong) prepulse was revealed. In addition, a correlation between habituation of the startle reflex and reference memory was identified for the first time: a stronger overt habituation effect was associated with superior spatial search accuracy. The PPI paradigm thus provides two independent predictors of dissociable cognitive traits in normal C57BL/6 mice; and they might serve as potential markers for high-throughput evaluation of potential cognitive enhancers, especially in the context of schizophrenia where deficits in startle habituation and PPI co-exist.

  16. Effects of brain-derived and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors on startle response and disrupted prepulse inhibition in mice of DBA/2J inbred strain.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Bazovkina, Daria V; Morozova, Maryana V; Popova, Nina K

    2013-08-29

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI), the reduction in acoustic startle reflex when it is preceded by weak prepulse stimuli, is a measure of critical to normal brain functioning sensorimotor gating. PPI deficit was shown in a variety of psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, and in DBA/2J mouse strain. In the current study, we examined the effects of brain-derived (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived (GDNF) neurotrophic factors on acoustic startle response and PPI in DBA/2J mice. It was found that BDNF (300 ng, i.c.v.) significantly increased amplitude of startle response and restored disrupted PPI in 7 days after acute administration. GDNF (800 ng, i.c.v.) did not produce significant alteration neither in amplitude of startle response nor in PPI in DBA/2J mice. The reversal effect of BDNF on PPI deficit was unusually long-lasting: significant increase in PPI was found 1.5 months after single acute BDNF administration. Long-term ameliorative effect BDNF on disrupted PPI suggested the implication of epigenetic mechanism in BDNF action on neurogenesis. BDNF rather than GDNF could be a perspective drug for the treatment of sensorimotor gating impairments.

  17. Individual Differences in Fear Potentiated Startle in Behaviorally Inhibited Children

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Tyson V.; Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany; Fox, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament characterized during early childhood by increased fearfulness to novelty, social reticence to unfamiliar peers, and heightened risk for the development of anxiety. Heightened startle responses to safety cues have been found among behaviorally inhibited adolescents who have an anxiety disorder suggesting that this measure may serve as a biomarker for the development of anxiety amongst this risk population. However, it is unknown if these aberrant startle patterns emerge prior to the manifestation of anxiety in this temperament group. The current study examined potentiated startle in 7-year-old children characterized with BI early in life. High behaviorally inhibited children displayed increased startle magnitude to safety cues, particularly during the first half of the task, and faster startle responses compared to low behaviorally inhibited children. These findings suggest that aberrant startle responses are apparent in behaviorally inhibited children during early childhood prior to the onset of a disorder and may serve as a possible endophenotype for the development of anxiety PMID:23341151

  18. The Role of Neuropeptide Y in the Expression and Extinction of Fear-Potentiated Startle

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Alisa R.; Yang, Yong; Ressler, Kerry J.; Davis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are a promising target for novel treatments for anxiety and other psychiatric disorders and neuropeptide Y (NPY) has emerged as a key component of anxiolytic circuits in the brain. For this reason, we have evaluated the role of NPY in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of NPY inhibits both baseline acoustic startle and the expression of fear-potentiated startle. Infusion of NPY (10 pmol/side) into the basolateral, but not the medial, nucleus of the amygdala reproduced the i.c.v. effect. Central administration of NPY (10 μg) also enhanced within-session extinction of fear-potentiated startle. This finding, coupled with the growing body of literature correlating NPY with resilience in humans, led us to the hypothesis that NPY may enhance the extinction of conditioned fear. When NPY (10 μg) is administered i.c.v. prior to extinction training, extinction retention for both the contextual and cued components of conditioned fear is enhanced when tested 48 hours later off drug. Additionally, we found that intra-basolateral amygdala administration of the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO 3304 (200 pmol/side) prior to extinction training led to a profound deficit in extinction retention. This is the first evidence that NPY facilitates and an NPY antagonist blocks the extinction of conditioned fear. We believe that the role of NPY in the extinction of conditioned fear may, at least in part, explain the mechanism underlying the association between NPY and psychobiological resilience in humans. PMID:19036961

  19. Role of bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and amygdala AMPA receptors in the development and expression of context conditioning and sensitization of startle by prior shock.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael; Walker, David L

    2014-11-01

    A core symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder is hyper-arousal-manifest in part by increases in the amplitude of the acoustic startle reflex. Gewirtz et al. (Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 22:625-648, 1998) found that, in rats, persistent shock-induced startle increases were prevented by pre-test electrolytic lesions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). We used reversible inactivation to determine if similar effects reflect actions on (a) BNST neurons themselves versus fibers-of-passage, (b) the development versus expression of such increases, and (c) associative fear versus non-associative sensitization. Twenty-four hours after the last of three shock sessions, startle was markedly enhanced when rats were tested in a non-shock context. These increases decayed over the course of several days. Decay was unaffected by context exposure, and elevated startle was restored when rats were tested for the first time in the original shock context. Thus, both associative and non-associative components could be measured under different conditions. Pre-test intra-BNST infusions of the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (3 μg/side) blocked the non-associative (as did infusions into the basolateral amygdala) but not the associative component, whereas pre-shock infusions disrupted both. NBQX did not affect baseline startle or shock reactivity. These results indicate that AMPA receptors in or very near to the BNST are critical for the expression and development of non-associative shock-induced startle sensitization, and also for context fear conditioning, but not context fear expression. More generally, they suggest that treatments targeting the BNST may be clinically useful for treating trauma-related hyper-arousal and perhaps for retarding its development.

  20. Reheating the universe once more: the dissipation of acoustic waves as a novel probe of primordial inhomogeneities on even smaller scales.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2014-08-01

    We provide a simple but robust bound on the primordial curvature perturbation in the range 10(4)  Mpc(-1)acoustic oscillations by the Silk damping after primordial nucleosynthesis but before the redshift z∼2×10(6) and reheat the photon bath without invoking cosmic microwave background distortions. This acoustic reheating results in the decrease of the baryon-photon ratio. By combining independent measurements probing the nucleosynthesis era and around the recombination epoch, we find an upper bound on the amplitude of the curvature perturbation over the above wave number range as P(ζ)<0.06. Implications for supermassive black holes are also discussed.

  1. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision.

    PubMed

    Goavec-Mérou, G; Chrétien, N; Friedt, J-M; Sandoz, P; Martin, G; Lenczner, M; Ballandras, S

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates. PMID:24517814

  2. Reheating the universe once more: the dissipation of acoustic waves as a novel probe of primordial inhomogeneities on even smaller scales.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2014-08-01

    We provide a simple but robust bound on the primordial curvature perturbation in the range 10(4)  Mpc(-1)acoustic oscillations by the Silk damping after primordial nucleosynthesis but before the redshift z∼2×10(6) and reheat the photon bath without invoking cosmic microwave background distortions. This acoustic reheating results in the decrease of the baryon-photon ratio. By combining independent measurements probing the nucleosynthesis era and around the recombination epoch, we find an upper bound on the amplitude of the curvature perturbation over the above wave number range as P(ζ)<0.06. Implications for supermassive black holes are also discussed. PMID:25148314

  3. Reheating the Universe Once More: The Dissipation of Acoustic Waves as a Novel Probe of Primordial Inhomogeneities on Even Smaller Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2014-08-01

    We provide a simple but robust bound on the primordial curvature perturbation in the range 104 Mpc-1acoustic oscillations by the Silk damping after primordial nucleosynthesis but before the redshift z˜2×106 and reheat the photon bath without invoking cosmic microwave background distortions. This acoustic reheating results in the decrease of the baryon-photon ratio. By combining independent measurements probing the nucleosynthesis era and around the recombination epoch, we find an upper bound on the amplitude of the curvature perturbation over the above wave number range as Pζ<0.06. Implications for supermassive black holes are also discussed.

  4. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: Demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goavec-Mérou, G.; Chrétien, N.; Friedt, J.-M.; Sandoz, P.; Martin, G.; Lenczner, M.; Ballandras, S.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates.

  5. Effects of age, but not sex, on elevated startle during withdrawal from acute morphine in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Radke, Anna K; Gewirtz, Jonathan C; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2015-08-01

    Investigations into animal models of drug withdrawal have largely found that emotional signs of withdrawal (e.g. anxiety, anhedonia, and aversion) in adolescents are experienced earlier and less severely than in their adult counterparts. The majority of these reports have examined withdrawal from ethanol or nicotine. To expand our knowledge about the emotional withdrawal state in adolescent rats, we used potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex after an acute dose of morphine (10 mg/kg, subcutaneously) as a measure of opiate withdrawal. Startle was measured at four time points after morphine injection (2, 3, 4, and 5 h) in 28-day-old and 90-day-old male and female rats. The results of this experiment revealed that peak potentiation of the startle reflex occurred at 3 h in the adolescent rats and at 5 h in the adult rats, and that the magnitude of withdrawal was larger in the adults. No sex differences were observed. Overall, these results affirm that, similar to withdrawal from ethanol and nicotine, opiate withdrawal signs are less severe in adolescent than in adult rats.

  6. Effects of age, but not sex, on elevated startle during withdrawal from acute morphine in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Anna K.; Gewirtz, Jonathan C.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into animal models of drug withdrawal have largely found that emotional signs of withdrawal (e.g., anxiety, anhedonia, and aversion) in adolescents are experienced earlier and less severely than in their adult counterparts. The majority of these reports have examined withdrawal from ethanol or nicotine. In order to expand our knowledge about the emotional withdrawal state in adolescent rats, we used potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex after an acute dose of morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) as a measure of opioid withdrawal. Startle was measured at four time points after morphine injection (2, 3, 4, and 5 h) in 28 and 90 day old male and female rats. The results of this experiment revealed that peak potentiation of the startle reflex occurred at 3 h in the adolescent rats and at 5 h in the adult rats, and that the magnitude of withdrawal was larger in the adults. No sex differences were observed. Overall, these results affirm that, similar to withdrawal from ethanol and nicotine, opiate withdrawal signs are less severe in adolescent than in adult rats. PMID:26154436

  7. Effects of fine metal oxide particle dopant on the acoustic properties of silicone rubber lens for medical array probe.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Yasuharu; Yamashita, Yohachi; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2007-08-01

    The effects of fine metal oxide particles, particularly those of high-density elements (7.7 to 9.7 x 10(3) kg/m3), on the acoustic properties of silicone rubber have been investigated in order to develop an acoustic lens with a low acoustic attenuation. Silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder having nanoparticle size of 16 nm showed a lower acoustic attenuation than silicone rubber doped with powders of CeO2, Bi2O3, Lu2O3 and HfO2. The silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder showed a sound speed of 0.88 km/s, an acoustic impedance of 1.35 x 10(6) kg/m2s, an acoustic attenuation of 0.93 dB/mmMHz, and a Shore A hardness of 55 at 37 degrees C. Although typical silicone rubber doped with SiO2 (2.6 x 10(3) kg/m3) shows a sound speed of about 1.00 km/s, heavy metal oxide particles decreased the sound velocities to lower than 0.93 km/s. Therefore, an acoustic lens of silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder provides increased sensitivity because it realizes a thinner acoustic lens than is conventionally used due to its low sound speed. Moreover, it has an advantage in that a focus point is not changed when the acoustic lens is pressed to a human body due to its reasonable hardness.

  8. Cardiac modulation of startle is altered in depersonalization-/derealization disorder: Evidence for impaired brainstem representation of baro-afferent neural traffic.

    PubMed

    Schulz, André; Matthey, Jan Hendrik; Vögele, Claus; Schaan, Violetta; Schächinger, Hartmut; Adler, Julia; Beutel, Manfred E; Michal, Matthias

    2016-06-30

    Patients with depersonalization-/derealization disorder (DPD) show altered heartbeat-evoked brain potentials, which are considered psychophysiological indicators of cortical representation of visceral-afferent neural signals. The aim of the current investigation was to clarify whether the impaired CNS representation of visceral-afferent neural signals in DPD is restricted to the cortical level or is also present in sub-cortical structures. We used cardiac modulation of startle (CMS) to assess baro-afferent signal transmission at brainstem level in 22 DPD and 23 healthy control individuals. The CMS paradigm involved acoustic startle stimuli (105dB(A), 50ms) elicited 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500ms after a cardiac R-wave. In healthy control individuals, we observed lower startle responses at 100 and 300ms than at 0 and 400ms after an R-wave. In DPD patients, no effect of the cardiac cycle on startle response magnitude was found. We conclude that the representation of visceral-afferent neural signals at brainstem level may be deficient in DPD. This effect may be due to increased peripheral sympathetic tone or to dysregulated signal processing at brainstem level. PMID:27078753

  9. Motivated attention and prepulse inhibition of startle in rats: using conditioned reinforcers as prepulses.

    PubMed

    Baschnagel, Joseph S; Hawk, Larry W; Colder, Craig R; Richards, Jerry B

    2007-12-01

    In humans, prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle is greater during attended prestimuli than it is during ignored prestimuli, whereas in rats, most work has focused on passive PPI, which does not require attention. In the work described in this article, researchers developed a paradigm to assess attentional modification of PPI in rats using motivationally salient prepulses. Water-deprived rats were either conditioned to attend to a conditioned stimulus (CS; 1-s, 7-dB increase in white noise) paired with water (CS(+) group), or they received uncorrelated presentations of white noise and water (CS0 group). After 10 conditioning sessions, startle probes (50 ms, 115 dB) were introduced, with the CS serving as a continuous prepulse. Three experiments examined PPI across a range of prepulse intensities (4-10 dB) and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs; 30-960 ms). PPI was consistently reduced in the CS(+) group, particularly with a 10-dB prepulse and a 60-ms SOA. Thus, PPI in rats differed between attended and ignored prestimuli, but the effect was reversed in the results of research with humans. A fourth study eliminated the group difference by reversing the CS-water contingency. Methodological and motivational hypotheses regarding the current findings are discussed.

  10. The effect of choice on the physiology of emotion: An affective startle modulation study

    PubMed Central

    Genevsky, Alexander; Gard, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The affective startle modulation task has been an important measure in understanding physiological aspects of emotion and motivational responses. Research utilizing this method has relied primarily on a ‘passive’ viewing paradigm, which stands in contrast to everyday life where much of emotion and motivation involves some active choice or agency. The present study investigated the role of choice on the physiology of emotion. Eighty-four participants were randomized into ‘choice’ (n=44) or ‘no-choice’ (n=40) groups distinguished by the ability to choose between stimuli. EMG eye blink responses were recorded in both anticipation and stimulus viewing. Results indicated a significant attenuation of the startle magnitude in choice condition trials (relative to no-choice) across all picture categories and probe times. We interpret these findings as an indication that the act of choice may decrease one’s defensive response, or conversely, lacking choice may heighten the defensive response. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:22285891

  11. Use of acoustic wave travel-time measurements to probe the near-surface layers of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Osaki, Y.; Shibahashi, H.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The variation of solar p-mode travel times with cyclic frequency nu is shown to provide information on both the radial variation of the acoustic potential and the depth of the effective source of the oscillations. Observed travel-time data for waves with frequency lower than the acoustic cutoff frequency for the solar atmosphere (approximately equals 5.5 mHz) are inverted to yield the local acoustic cutoff frequency nu(sub c) as a function of depth in the outer convection zone and lower atmosphere of the Sun. The data for waves with nu greater than 5.5 mHz are used to show that the source of the p-mode oscillations lies approximately 100 km beneath the base of the photosphere. This depth is deeper than that determined using a standard mixing-length calculation.

  12. Emotion-modulated startle in psychopathy: Clarifying familiar effects

    PubMed Central

    Baskin-Sommers, Arielle R.; Curtin, John J.; Newman, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of psychopathic individuals is thought to reflect a core fear deficit that prevents these individuals from appreciating the consequences of their choices and actions. However, growing evidence suggests that psychopathy-related emotion deficits are moderated by attention and, thus, may not reflect a reduced capacity for emotion responding. The present study attempts to reconcile this attention perspective with one of the most cited findings in psychopathy, which reports emotion-modulated startle deficits among psychopathic individuals during picture viewing. In this study, we evaluate the potential effects of a putative attention bottleneck on the emotion processing of psychopathic offenders during picture viewing by manipulating picture familiarity and examining emotion-modulated startle and late positive potential (LPP). As predicted, psychopathic individuals displayed the classic deficit in emotion-modulated startle during novel pictures, but they showed no deficit in emotion-modulated startle during familiar pictures. Conversely, results for LPP responses revealed psychopathy-related differences during familiar pictures and no psychopathy-related differences during novel pictures. Important differences related to the two Factors of psychopathy are also discussed. Overall, the results of this study not only highlight the differential importance of perceptual load on emotion processing in psychopathy, but also raise interesting questions about the varied effects of attention on psychopathy-related emotion deficits. PMID:23356218

  13. Eye Blink Startle Responses in Behaviorally Inhibited and Uninhibited Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Brakel, Anna M. L.; Muris, Peter; Derks, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the startle reflex as a physiological marker of behavioral inhibition. Participants were 7 to 12-year-old children who had been previously identified as inhibited or uninhibited as part of an ongoing longitudinal study on the role of behavioral inhibition in the development of anxiety disorders. Analysis of their scores…

  14. The startle response and toxicology: Methods, use and interpretation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The startle response (SR) is a sensory-evoked motor reflex that has been used successfully in toxicology for decades. Advantages of this procedure include: rapidly objective measurement of a defined neural circuit, measurement of habituation of the response, and a high potential ...

  15. Forward acoustic masking enhances the auditory brainstem response in a diotic, but not dichotic, paradigm in salicylate-induced tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Lin

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that forward acoustic masking can enhance the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in rats treated with a high dose of sodium salicylate (NaSal), a tinnitus inducer, when tested in open acoustic field (Liu and Chen, 2012, Brain Research 1485, 88-94). In the present study, we first replicated this experiment in closed acoustic field under two conditions: (1) the forward masker and the probe were presented to both ears (diotic paradigm); (2) the forward masker was presented to one ear and the probe to the other ear (dichotic paradigm). We found that only when the stimuli were presented by using the diotic, rather than the dichotic, paradigm could forward acoustic masking enhance the ABR in the rat treated with NaSal (300 mg/kg). The enhancement was obvious for ABR waves II and IV, but not for wave I, indicating a central origin. The enhancement occurred at the high frequencies (16, 24, 32 kHz) at which the animals demonstrated a tinnitus-like behavior as revealed by using the gap prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle paradigm. We then administered vigabatrin, a GABA transaminase inhibitor, in the animals to suppress NaSal-induced tinnitus. The vigabatrin treatment successfully prevented forward acoustic masking from enhancing the ABR. These findings demonstrate that the observed enhancement of ABRs by forward acoustic masking originates in the central auditory pathway ipsilateral to the stimulated ear. We propose that the enhancement is closely associated with NaSal-induced tinnitus. PMID:25668125

  16. Deficient aversive-potentiated startle and the triarchic model of psychopathy: The role of boldness.

    PubMed

    Esteller, Àngels; Poy, Rosario; Moltó, Javier

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of the phenotypic domains of boldness, meanness, and disinhibition of the triarchic conceptualization of psychopathy (Patrick, Fowles, & Krueger, 2009) to deficient aversive-potentiated startle in a mixed-gender sample of 180 undergraduates. Eyeblink responses to noise probes were recorded during a passive picture-viewing task (erotica, neutral, threat, and mutilation). Deficient threat vs. neutral potentiation was uniquely related to increased boldness scores, thus suggesting that the diminished defensive reaction to aversive stimulation is specifically linked to the charm, social potency and venturesomeness features of psychopathy (boldness), but not to features such as callousness, coldheartedness and cruelty traits (meanness), even though both phenotypes theoretically share the same underlying low-fear disposition. Our findings provide further evidence of the differential association between distinct psychopathy components and deficits in defensive reactivity and strongly support the validity of the triarchic model of psychopathy in disentangling the etiology of this personality disorder.

  17. Deficient aversive-potentiated startle and the triarchic model of psychopathy: The role of boldness.

    PubMed

    Esteller, Àngels; Poy, Rosario; Moltó, Javier

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of the phenotypic domains of boldness, meanness, and disinhibition of the triarchic conceptualization of psychopathy (Patrick, Fowles, & Krueger, 2009) to deficient aversive-potentiated startle in a mixed-gender sample of 180 undergraduates. Eyeblink responses to noise probes were recorded during a passive picture-viewing task (erotica, neutral, threat, and mutilation). Deficient threat vs. neutral potentiation was uniquely related to increased boldness scores, thus suggesting that the diminished defensive reaction to aversive stimulation is specifically linked to the charm, social potency and venturesomeness features of psychopathy (boldness), but not to features such as callousness, coldheartedness and cruelty traits (meanness), even though both phenotypes theoretically share the same underlying low-fear disposition. Our findings provide further evidence of the differential association between distinct psychopathy components and deficits in defensive reactivity and strongly support the validity of the triarchic model of psychopathy in disentangling the etiology of this personality disorder. PMID:27033014

  18. Effects of Ytterbium Oxide Nanopowder Particle Size on the Acoustic Properties of Silicone Rubber Lens for Medical Echo Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohachi; Yamashita; Hosono, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Noriko; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2008-05-01

    The effects of Yb2O3 powder particle size, namely, 2000, 16, and 8 nm, on the physical and acoustic properties of a high-temperature-vulcanization (HTV) silicone (Q) rubber have been investigated in order to develop an acoustic lens material with a low sound velocity (c) and acoustic attenuation coefficient (α). The Yb2O3-doped HTV Q rubber with the large particle size of 2000 nm showed a density (ρ) of 1.6×103 kg/m3, with c = 828 m/s, characteristic acoustic impedance (Z) = 1.32×106 kg·m-2·s-1, α= 1.32 dB·mm-1·MHz-1, and an α-figure of merit (FOM) (α×c) of 1090 at 5 MHz at 37 °C. For the Yb2O3-doped Q rubber with the small particle size of 8 nm, ρ= 1.57×103 kg/m3, c = 864 m/s, Z = 1.36×106 kg·m-2·s-1, α= 0.68 dB·mm-1·MHz-1, and α-FOM = 590. The 16 nm Yb2O3-doped Q rubber had intermediate values of α= 0.88 dB·mm-1·MHz-1 and α-FOM = 760. These results show that there is a clear dopant particle size dependence on the acoustic properties of Yb2O3-doped HTV Q rubbers. The 8-nm-doped HTV Q rubber also showed an excellent mechanical properties for practical application. Microstructure observation revealed that the low-α rubber shows a uniform Yb2O3 nanopowder distribution in the HTV Q rubber matrix.

  19. The involvement of ventral tegmental area cholinergic muscarinic receptors in classically conditioned fear expression as measured with fear-potentiated startle.

    PubMed

    Greba, Q; Munro, L J; Kokkinidis, L

    2000-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contribute to the complex amygdala-based neurocircuitry that mediates fear-motivated behaviors. Because of acetylcholine's (ACh) role in DA neuronal activation, the involvement of VTA cholinergic muscarinic receptors in Pavlovian conditioned fear responding was evaluated in the present study. Fear-potentiated startle was used to assess the effects of intraVTA infused methylscopolamine on conditioned fear performance in laboratory rats. Application of this nonspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist to VTA neurons was observed to inhibit the ability of a conditioned stimulus (CS) previously paired with footshock to enhance the amplitude of the acoustic startle reflex. Doses of methylscopolamine that blocked conditioned fear expression did not alter baseline sensorimotor responding. These results identify ACh neurotransmission in the VTA as a potential excitatory mechanism underlying the fear-arousing properties of threatening environmental stimuli.

  20. Evolution of a Communication System by Sensory Exploitation of Startle Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Schöneich, Stefan; Robillard, Tony; Hedwig, Berthold

    2015-12-21

    New communication signals can evolve by sensory exploitation if signaling taps into preexisting sensory biases in receivers [1, 2]. For mate attraction, signals are typically similar to attractive environmental cues like food [3-6], which amplifies their attractiveness to mates, as opposed to aversive stimuli like predator cues. Female field crickets approach the low-frequency calling song of males, whereas they avoid high-frequency sounds like predatory bat calls [7]. In one group of crickets (Eneopterinae: Lebinthini), however, males produce exceptionally high-frequency calling songs in the range of bat calls [8], a surprising signal in the context of mate attraction. We found that female lebinthines, instead of approaching singing males, produce vibrational responses after male calls, and males track the source of vibrations to find females. We also demonstrate that field cricket species closely related to the Lebinthini show an acoustic startle response to high-frequency sounds that generates substrate vibrations similar to those produced by female lebinthine crickets. Therefore, the startle response is the most likely evolutionary origin of the female lebinthine vibrational signal. In field crickets, the brain receives activity from two auditory interneurons; AN1 tuned to male calling song controls positive phonotaxis, and AN2 tuned to high-frequency bat calls triggers negative phonotaxis [9, 10]. In lebinthine crickets, however, we found that auditory ascending neurons are only tuned to high-frequency sounds, and their tuning matches the thresholds for female vibrational signals. Our results demonstrate how sensory exploitation of anti-predator behavior can evolve into a communication system that benefits both senders and receivers. PMID:26687622

  1. Evolution of a Communication System by Sensory Exploitation of Startle Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Schöneich, Stefan; Robillard, Tony; Hedwig, Berthold

    2015-12-21

    New communication signals can evolve by sensory exploitation if signaling taps into preexisting sensory biases in receivers [1, 2]. For mate attraction, signals are typically similar to attractive environmental cues like food [3-6], which amplifies their attractiveness to mates, as opposed to aversive stimuli like predator cues. Female field crickets approach the low-frequency calling song of males, whereas they avoid high-frequency sounds like predatory bat calls [7]. In one group of crickets (Eneopterinae: Lebinthini), however, males produce exceptionally high-frequency calling songs in the range of bat calls [8], a surprising signal in the context of mate attraction. We found that female lebinthines, instead of approaching singing males, produce vibrational responses after male calls, and males track the source of vibrations to find females. We also demonstrate that field cricket species closely related to the Lebinthini show an acoustic startle response to high-frequency sounds that generates substrate vibrations similar to those produced by female lebinthine crickets. Therefore, the startle response is the most likely evolutionary origin of the female lebinthine vibrational signal. In field crickets, the brain receives activity from two auditory interneurons; AN1 tuned to male calling song controls positive phonotaxis, and AN2 tuned to high-frequency bat calls triggers negative phonotaxis [9, 10]. In lebinthine crickets, however, we found that auditory ascending neurons are only tuned to high-frequency sounds, and their tuning matches the thresholds for female vibrational signals. Our results demonstrate how sensory exploitation of anti-predator behavior can evolve into a communication system that benefits both senders and receivers.

  2. Modulation of the startle reflex by pleasant and unpleasant music.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mathieu; Mailhot, Jean-Philippe; Gosselin, Nathalie; Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The issue of emotional feelings to music is the object of a classic debate in music psychology. Emotivists argue that emotions are really felt in response to music, whereas cognitivists believe that music is only representative of emotions. Psychophysiological recordings of emotional feelings to music might help to resolve the debate, but past studies have failed to show clear and consistent differences between musical excerpts of different emotional valence. Here, we compared the effects of pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts on the startle eye blink reflex and associated body markers (such as the corrugator and zygomatic activity, skin conductance level and heart rate). The startle eye blink amplitude was larger and its latency was shorter during unpleasant compared with pleasant music, suggesting that the defensive emotional system was indeed modulated by music. Corrugator activity was also enhanced during unpleasant music, whereas skin conductance level was higher for pleasant excerpts. The startle reflex was the response that contributed the most in distinguishing pleasant and unpleasant music. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that emotions were felt in response to music, supporting the emotivist stance. PMID:18725255

  3. Startle auditory stimuli enhance the performance of fast dynamic contractions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Acero, Rafael M

    2014-01-01

    Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD) are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS); a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS); and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS). Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training.

  4. Startle Auditory Stimuli Enhance the Performance of Fast Dynamic Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Acero, Rafael M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD) are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS); a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS); and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS). Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training. PMID:24489967

  5. Modulation of the startle reflex by pleasant and unpleasant music.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mathieu; Mailhot, Jean-Philippe; Gosselin, Nathalie; Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The issue of emotional feelings to music is the object of a classic debate in music psychology. Emotivists argue that emotions are really felt in response to music, whereas cognitivists believe that music is only representative of emotions. Psychophysiological recordings of emotional feelings to music might help to resolve the debate, but past studies have failed to show clear and consistent differences between musical excerpts of different emotional valence. Here, we compared the effects of pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts on the startle eye blink reflex and associated body markers (such as the corrugator and zygomatic activity, skin conductance level and heart rate). The startle eye blink amplitude was larger and its latency was shorter during unpleasant compared with pleasant music, suggesting that the defensive emotional system was indeed modulated by music. Corrugator activity was also enhanced during unpleasant music, whereas skin conductance level was higher for pleasant excerpts. The startle reflex was the response that contributed the most in distinguishing pleasant and unpleasant music. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that emotions were felt in response to music, supporting the emotivist stance.

  6. Diminished appetitive startle modulation following targeted inhibition of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Hurlemann, René; Arndt, Stephan; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Reul, Juergen; Maier, Wolfgang; Scheele, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    From an evolutionary perspective the startle eye-blink response forms an integral part of the human avoidance behavioral repertoire and is typically diminished by pleasant emotional states. In major depressive disorder (MDD) appetitive motivation is impaired, evident in a reduced interference of positive emotion with the startle response. Given the pivotal role of frontostriatal neurocircuitry in orchestrating appetitive motivation, we hypothesized that inhibitory transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) would reduce appetitive neuromodulation in a manner similar to MDD. Based on a pre-TMS functional MRI (fMRI) experiment we selected the left dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices as target regions for subsequent sham-controlled inhibitory theta-burst TMS (TBS) in 40 healthy male volunteers. Consistent with our hypothesis, between-group comparisons revealed a TBS-induced inhibition of appetitive neuromodulation, manifest in a diminished startle response suppression by hedonic stimuli. Collectively, our results suggest that functional integrity of left dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex is critical for mediating a pleasure-induced down-regulation of avoidance responses which may protect the brain from a depressogenic preponderance of defensive stress. PMID:25752944

  7. Mescaline increases startle responding equally in normal and raphe-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Geyer, M A; Rose, G J; Petersen, L R

    1979-02-01

    To test the possible involvement of serotonin-containing cells of the midbrain in mediating the effects of mescaline on startle responding, electrolytic lesions were made in either the dorsal or median raphe nucleus in rats. Decreases in either striatal or hippocampal tryptophan hydroxylase activity confirmed the effectiveness of the lesions. One week later, startle was measured in response to 30 air-puff stimuli for each rat. Median, but not dorsal, raphe lesions increased startle magnitudes throughout the test session. The following day each group was divided into matched halves and were given 60 trials, 30 minutes after intraperitoneal injection of either saline or 10 mg/kg mescaline. Despite the large differences in baseline startle among the groups, mescaline produced comparable 25% increases in startle magnitudes in both sham- and raphe-lesioned animals. This result fails to support the hypothesis that increased startle responding produced by mescaline is mediated by the midbrain raphe nuclei.

  8. Genetic Control of Startle Behavior in Medaka Fish

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboko, Satomi; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Shinya, Minori; Suehiro, Yuji; Okuyama, Teruhiro; Shimada, Atsuko; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Kubo, Takeo; Takeuchi, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are thought to generate intraspecific behavioral diversities, both within and among populations. The mechanisms underlying genetic control of behavioral properties, however, remain unclear in wild-type vertebrates, including humans. To explore this issue, we used diverse inbred strains of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) established from the same and different local populations. Medaka exhibit a startle response to a visual stimulus (extinction of illumination) by rapidly bending their bodies (C-start) 20-ms after the stimulus presentation. We measured the rates of the response to repeated stimuli (1-s interval, 40 times) among four inbred strains, HNI-I, HNI-II, HO5, and Hd-rR-II1, and quantified two properties of the startle response: sensitivity (response rate to the first stimulus) and attenuation of the response probability with repeated stimulus presentation. Among the four strains, the greatest differences in these properties were detected between HNI-II and Hd-rR-II1. HNI-II exhibited high sensitivity (approximately 80%) and no attenuation, while Hd-rR-II1 exhibited low sensitivity (approximately 50%) and almost complete attenuation after only five stimulus presentations. Our findings suggested behavioral diversity of the startle response within a local population as well as among different populations. Linkage analysis with F2 progeny between HNI-II and Hd-rR-II1 detected quantitative trait loci (QTL) highly related to attenuation, but not to sensitivity, with a maximum logarithm of odds score of 11.82 on linkage group 16. The three genotypes (homozygous for HNI-II and Hd-rR-II1 alleles, and heterozygous) at the marker nearest the QTL correlated with attenuation. Our findings are the first to suggest that a single genomic region might be sufficient to generate individual differences in startle behavior between wild-type strains. Further identification of genetic polymorphisms that define the behavioral trait will contribute to our

  9. Affective Modulation of the Startle Response among Children at High and Low Risk for Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kujawa, Autumn; Glenn, Catherine R.; Hajcak, Greg; Klein, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying early markers of risk for anxiety disorders in children may aid in understanding underlying mechanisms and informing prevention efforts. Affective modulation of the startle response indexes sensitivity to pleasant and unpleasant environmental contexts and has been shown to relate to anxiety, yet the extent to which abnormalities in affect-modulated startle reflect vulnerability for anxiety disorders in children has yet to be examined. The current study assessed the effects of parental psychopathology on affective modulation of startle in offspring. Methods Nine-year-old children (N=144) with no history of anxiety or depressive disorders completed a passive picture viewing task in which eye blink startle responses were measured during the presentation of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant images. Results Maternal anxiety was associated with distinct patterns of affective modulation of startle in offspring, such that children with maternal histories of anxiety showed potentiation of the startle response while viewing unpleasant images, but not attenuation during pleasant images, whereas children with no maternal history of anxiety exhibited attenuation of the startle response during pleasant images, but did not exhibit unpleasant potentiation—even when controlling for child symptoms of anxiety and depression. No effects of maternal depression or paternal psychopathology were observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that both enhanced startle responses in unpleasant conditions and failure to inhibit startle responses in pleasant conditions may reflect early-emerging vulnerabilities that contribute to the later development of anxiety disorders. PMID:25913397

  10. Line-focus probe excitation of Scholte acoustic waves at the liquid-loaded surfaces of periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A.G.; Vines, R.E.; Wolfe, J.P.

    1999-10-01

    A model is introduced to explain our observation of Scholte-like ultrasonic waves traveling at the water-loaded surfaces of solids with periodically varying properties. The observations pertain to two two-dimensional superlattices: a laminated solid of alternating 0.5-mm-thick layers of aluminum and a polymer, and a hexagonal array of polymer rods of lattice spacing 1 mm in an aluminum matrix. The surface waves are generated and detected by line focus acoustic lenses aligned parallel to each other, and separated by varying distances. The acoustic fields of these lenses may be considered a superposition of plain bulk waves with wave normals contained within the angular apertures of the lenses. For homogeneous solids, phase matching constraints do not allow the Scholte wave to be coupled into with an experimental configuration of this type. This is not true for a spatially periodic solid, where coupling between bulk waves and the Scholte surface wave takes place through Umklapp processes involving a change in the wave-vector component parallel to the surface by a reciprocal lattice vector. In the experiments, the source pulse is broadband, extending up to about 6 MHz, whereas the spectrum of the observed Scholte wave is peaked at around 4 and 4.5 MHz for the layered solid and hexagonal lattice, respectively. We attribute this to a resonance in the surface response of the solid, possibly associated with a critical point in the dispersion relation of the superlattice. On rotating the solid about its surface normal, the Scholte wave displays dramatic variation in phase arrival time and, to a lesser extent, also group arrival time. This variation is well accounted for by our model. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Visualization of Protease Activity In Vivo Using an Activatable Photo-Acoustic Imaging Probe Based on CuS Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Nie, Liming; Sun, Xiaolian; Cheng, Liang; Wu, Chenxi; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we for the first time report a novel activatable photoacoustic (PA) imaging nano-probe for in vivo detection of cancer-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). A black hole quencher 3 (BHQ3) which absorbs red light is conjugated to near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles via a MMP-cleavable peptide linker. The obtained CuS-peptide-BHQ3 (CPQ) nano-probe exhibits two distinctive absorption peaks at 630 nm and 930 nm. Inside the tumor microenviorment where MMPs present, the MMP-sensitive peptide would be cleaved, releasing BHQ3 from the CuS nanoparticles, the former of which as a small molecule is then rapidly cleared out from the tumor, whereas the latter of which as large nanoparticles would retain inside the tumor for a much longer period of time. As the result, the PA signal at 680 nm which is contributed by BHQ3 would be quickly diminished while that at 930 nm would be largely retained. The PA signal ratio of 680 nm / 930 nm could thus serve as an in vivo indicator of MMPs activity inside the tumor. Our work presents a novel strategy of in vivo sensing of MMPs based on PA imaging, which should offer remarkably improved detection depth compared with traditional optical imaging techniques. PMID:24465271

  12. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  13. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  14. Stochastic dislocation kinetics and fractal structures in deforming metals probed by acoustic emission and surface topography measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, A.; Yasnikov, I. S.; Estrin, Y.

    2014-06-21

    We demonstrate that the fractal dimension (FD) of the dislocation population in a deforming material is an important quantitative characteristic of the evolution of the dislocation structure. Thus, we show that peaking of FD signifies a nearing loss of uniformity of plastic flow and the onset of strain localization. Two techniques were employed to determine FD: (i) inspection of surface morphology of the deforming crystal by white light interferometry and (ii) monitoring of acoustic emission (AE) during uniaxial tensile deformation. A connection between the AE characteristics and the fractal dimension determined from surface topography measurements was established. As a common platform for the two methods, the dislocation density evolution in the bulk was used. The relations found made it possible to identify the occurrence of a peak in the median frequency of AE as a harbinger of plastic instability leading to necking. It is suggested that access to the fractal dimension provided by AE measurements and by surface topography analysis makes these techniques important tools for monitoring the evolution of the dislocation structure during plastic deformation—both as stand-alone methods and especially when used in tandem.

  15. SIGNIFICANT FOREGROUND UNRELATED NON-ACOUSTIC ANISOTROPY ON THE 1 DEGREE SCALE IN WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE 5-YEAR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bizhu; Zhang Shuangnan; Lieu, Richard; Wakker, Bart

    2010-01-01

    The spectral variation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as observed by WMAP was tested using foreground reduced WMAP5 data, by producing subtraction maps at the 1 deg. angular resolution between the two cosmological bands of V and W, for masked sky areas that avoid the Galactic disk. The resulting V - W map revealed a non-acoustic signal over and above the WMAP5 pixel noise, with two main properties. First, it possesses quadrupole power at the approx1 muK level which may be attributed to foreground residuals. Second, it fluctuates also at all values of l> 2, especially on the 1 deg. scale (200 approx< l approx< 300). The behavior is random and symmetrical about zero temperature with an rms approx7 muK, or 10% of the maximum CMB anisotropy, which would require a 'cosmic conspiracy' among the foreground components if it is a consequence of their existence. Both anomalies must be properly diagnosed and corrected if 'precision' cosmology is the claim. The second anomaly is, however, more interesting because it opens the question on whether the CMB anisotropy genuinely represents primordial density seeds.

  16. Examining habituation of the startle reflex with the reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Angel; Aluja, Anton; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2016-10-01

    The habituation of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR) was examined concerning individual differences in sensitivity to punishment (PUN) and sensitivity to reward (REW), within the general framework of the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) of personality. Two hypotheses derived from the RST were evaluated: the separable subsystems hypothesis and the joint subsystems hypothesis. In addition, we examined the direction of the relationship of PUN and REW with the habituation of the ASR. A habituation segment of electromyography recordings of the orbicularis oculi was assessed with an unconditional latent curve model. In accordance with the RST hypotheses, the relationship of PUN and REW on the habituation process was assessed with two conditional latent curve models. There was higher support for the separable subsystems hypothesis. In addition, PUN and REW related with the habituation trajectory of the ASR in the expected directions. Higher levels of PUN and lower levels of REW related with a slower habituation of the ASR, whereas lower levels of PUN and higher levels of REW related with a faster habituation of the ASR. PMID:27401960

  17. Examining habituation of the startle reflex with the reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Angel; Aluja, Anton; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2016-10-01

    The habituation of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR) was examined concerning individual differences in sensitivity to punishment (PUN) and sensitivity to reward (REW), within the general framework of the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) of personality. Two hypotheses derived from the RST were evaluated: the separable subsystems hypothesis and the joint subsystems hypothesis. In addition, we examined the direction of the relationship of PUN and REW with the habituation of the ASR. A habituation segment of electromyography recordings of the orbicularis oculi was assessed with an unconditional latent curve model. In accordance with the RST hypotheses, the relationship of PUN and REW on the habituation process was assessed with two conditional latent curve models. There was higher support for the separable subsystems hypothesis. In addition, PUN and REW related with the habituation trajectory of the ASR in the expected directions. Higher levels of PUN and lower levels of REW related with a slower habituation of the ASR, whereas lower levels of PUN and higher levels of REW related with a faster habituation of the ASR.

  18. Immediate and long-lasting effects of chronic stress in the prepubertal age on the startle reflex.

    PubMed

    Maslova, Larissa N; Bulygina, Veta V; Popova, Nina K

    The immediate and long-lasting effects of two models of chronic stress during the prepubertal period of life (21-32 days) on the acoustic startle response (ASR) were studied in outbred Wistar normotensives and rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension (ISIAH) derived from them. Chronic variable stress (CVS) and repeated handling were used as chronic treatment. The obtained data showed a significantly attenuated ASR and a greater magnitude of prepulse inhibition (PPI) in juvenile and adult ISIAH compared to Wistar rats. The immediate effects of prolonged stress on the ASR were genotype-dependent. Young ISIAH rats exposed to both types of prepubertal stimulation had higher ASR than the age-matched controls. No significant stress-induced changes in the ASR were found in young Wistar rats. The long-lasting consequences of prolonged prepubertal stress were similar in the two strains and were determined by the specificity of stress stimulation: chronic handling had no effect on the ASR, while CVS enhanced it. The long-lasting effect of CVS experienced in prepubertal life appears to produce ASR changes similar to those seen in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The magnitude of PPI increased from early age to adulthood and it was tolerant to environmental influences. The two rat strains did not differ in the rate of short-term habituation to repeated acoustic stimuli, which was unaffected by prepubertal stress. Evidence was obtained indicating that genetic and environmental background in childhood may contribute to the truncation of the startle response.

  19. Genetic and environmental influences on emotion-modulated startle reflex: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Anokhin, Andrey P; Golosheykin, Simon; Heath, Andrew C

    2007-01-01

    Emotion-modulated startle reflex is an important indicator of traitlike differences in affective processing implicated in the biological basis of personality and psychopathology. This study examined heritability of startle modulation by affective pictures in 66 pairs of monozygotic and 57 pairs of dizygotic female twins. Consistent with previous studies, startle magnitude was significantly influenced by emotional valence of the picture (positive < neutral < negative). Absolute response magnitude showed high heritability in all three valence conditions (59-61%); however, there were no significant genetic influences on the amount of startle modulation. Thus, our data do not support the hypothesis that emotion-modulated startle can serve as an indicator of genetically transmitted individual differences in affective processing.

  20. Startle response and prepulse inhibition modulation by positive- and negative-induced affect.

    PubMed

    De la Casa, Luis Gonzalo; Mena, Auxiliadora; Puentes, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    The startle response, a set of reflex behaviours intended to prepare the organism to face a potentially threatening stimulus, can be modulated by several factors as, for example, changes in affective state, or previous presentation of a weak stimulus (a phenomenon termed Pre-Pulse Inhibition [PPI]). In this paper we analyse whether the induction of positive or negative affective states in the participants modulates the startle response and the PPI phenomenon. The results revealed a decrease of the startle response and an increase of the PPI effect when registered while the participants were exposed to pleasant images (Experiment 1), and an increase of the startle response and of the PPI effect when they were exposed to a video-clip of unpleasant content (Experiment 2). These data are interpreted considering that changes in affective states correlate with changes in the startle reflex intensity, but changes in PPI might be the result of an attentional process.

  1. Emotion regulation of the affect-modulated startle reflex during different picture categories.

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, Annette; McGregor, Victoria; Pauli, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies on emotion regulation of the startle reflex found an increase in startle amplitude from down-, to non-, to up-regulation for pleasant and unpleasant stimuli. We wanted to clarify whether this regulation effect remains stable for different picture categories within pleasant and unpleasant picture sets. We assessed startle amplitude of 31 participants during down-, non-, or up-regulation of feelings elicited by pleasant erotic and adventure and unpleasant victim and threat pictures. Startle amplitude was smaller during adventure and erotic compared to victim and threat pictures and increased from down-, to non-, to up-regulation independently of the picture category. Results indicate that the motivational priming effect on startle modulation elicited by different picture categories is independent of emotion regulation instructions. In addition, the emotion regulation effect is independent of motivational priming effects. PMID:26061976

  2. Whiplash evokes descending muscle recruitment and sympathetic responses characteristic of startle

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Daniel WH; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Whiplash injuries are the most common injuries following rear-end collisions. During a rear-end collision, the human muscle response consists of both a postural and a startle response that may exacerbate injury. However, most previous studies only assessed the presence of startle using data collected from the neck muscles and head/neck kinematics. The startle response also evokes a descending pattern of muscle recruitment and changes in autonomic activity. Here we examined the recruitment of axial and appendicular muscles along with autonomic responses to confirm whether these other features of a startle response were present during the first exposure to a whiplash perturbation. Ten subjects experienced a single whiplash perturbation while recording electromyography, electrocardiogram, and electrodermal responses. All subjects exhibited a descending pattern of muscle recruitment, and increasing heart rate and electrodermal responses following the collision. Our results provide further support that the startle response is a component of the response to whiplash collisions. PMID:24932015

  3. Startle response and prepulse inhibition modulation by positive- and negative-induced affect.

    PubMed

    De la Casa, Luis Gonzalo; Mena, Auxiliadora; Puentes, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    The startle response, a set of reflex behaviours intended to prepare the organism to face a potentially threatening stimulus, can be modulated by several factors as, for example, changes in affective state, or previous presentation of a weak stimulus (a phenomenon termed Pre-Pulse Inhibition [PPI]). In this paper we analyse whether the induction of positive or negative affective states in the participants modulates the startle response and the PPI phenomenon. The results revealed a decrease of the startle response and an increase of the PPI effect when registered while the participants were exposed to pleasant images (Experiment 1), and an increase of the startle response and of the PPI effect when they were exposed to a video-clip of unpleasant content (Experiment 2). These data are interpreted considering that changes in affective states correlate with changes in the startle reflex intensity, but changes in PPI might be the result of an attentional process. PMID:24188916

  4. Whiplash evokes descending muscle recruitment and sympathetic responses characteristic of startle.

    PubMed

    Mang, Daniel Wh; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    Whiplash injuries are the most common injuries following rear-end collisions. During a rear-end collision, the human muscle response consists of both a postural and a startle response that may exacerbate injury. However, most previous studies only assessed the presence of startle using data collected from the neck muscles and head/neck kinematics. The startle response also evokes a descending pattern of muscle recruitment and changes in autonomic activity. Here we examined the recruitment of axial and appendicular muscles along with autonomic responses to confirm whether these other features of a startle response were present during the first exposure to a whiplash perturbation. Ten subjects experienced a single whiplash perturbation while recording electromyography, electrocardiogram, and electrodermal responses. All subjects exhibited a descending pattern of muscle recruitment, and increasing heart rate and electrodermal responses following the collision. Our results provide further support that the startle response is a component of the response to whiplash collisions.

  5. Defensive eye-blink startle responses in a human experimental model of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, Verity; Wickens, Robin; Bamford, Susan; Baldwin, David S; Garner, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Inhalation of low concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) triggers anxious behaviours in rodents via chemosensors in the amygdala, and increases anxiety, autonomic arousal and hypervigilance in healthy humans. However, it is not known whether CO2 inhalation modulates defensive behaviours coordinated by this network in humans. We examined the effect of 7.5% CO2 challenge on the defensive eye-blink startle response. A total of 27 healthy volunteers completed an affective startle task during inhalation of 7.5% CO2 and air. The magnitude and latency of startle eye-blinks were recorded whilst participants viewed aversive and neutral pictures. We found that 7.5% CO2 increased state anxiety and raised concurrent measures of skin conductance and heart rate (HR). CO2 challenge did not increase startle magnitude, but slowed the onset of startle eye-blinks. The effect of CO2 challenge on HR covaried with its effects on both subjective anxiety and startle latency. Our findings are discussed with reference to startle profiles during conditions of interoceptive threat, increased cognitive load and in populations characterised by anxiety, compared with acute fear and panic. PMID:24899597

  6. Heart rate, startle response, and intrusive trauma memories

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Ying; Marca, Roberto La; Steptoe, Andrew; Brewin, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    The current study adopted the trauma film paradigm to examine potential moderators affecting heart rate (HR) as an indicator of peritraumatic psychological states and as a predictor of intrusive memories. We replicated previous findings that perifilm HR decreases predicted the development of intrusive images and further showed this effect to be specific to images rather than thoughts, and to detail rather than gist recognition memory. Moreover, a group of individuals showing both an atypical sudden reduction in HR after a startle stimulus and higher trait dissociation was identified. Only among these individuals was lower perifilm HR found to indicate higher state dissociation, fear, and anxiety, along with reduced vividness of intrusions. The current findings emphasize how peritraumatic physiological responses relate to emotional reactions and intrusive memory. The moderating role of individual difference in stress defense style was highlighted. PMID:24397333

  7. STS-70 Discovery launch startled birds at ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Startled birds scatter as the stillness of a summer morning is broken by a giant's roar. The Space Shuttle Discovery thundered into space from launch Pad 39-B at 9:41:55:078 a.m. EDT. STS-70 is the 70th Shuttle flight overall, the 21st for Discovery (OV- 103), and the fourth Shuttle flight in 1995. On board for the nearly eight-day mission are a crew of five: Commander Terence 'Tom' Hendricks; Pilot Kevin R. Kregel; and Mission Specialists Nancy Jane Currie, Donald A. Thomas and Mary Ellen Weber. The crew's primary objective is to deploy the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-G (TDRS-G), which will join a constellation of other TDRS spacecraft already on orbit.

  8. Development of a model of startle resulting from exposure to sonic booms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew J.

    Aircraft manufacturers believe that it is possible to create supersonic business jets that would have quieter sonic booms than those that lead to the current ban on overland commercial supersonic flight over the US. In order to assess if the impact of these "low booms" is acceptable to the public, new human subject testing must occur. In recent studies, it was found that subjects' judgments of annoyance were highly correlated to judgments of startle and were unable to be fully explained by loudness judgments alone. However, this experiment utilized earphones for playback, which was unable to reproduce low frequencies (< 25 Hz) well. Building upon this study, an additional semantic differential experiment was conducted using a sonic boom simulator for playback which could reproduce these frequency components. Results of both experiments were similar and again it was found that average startle and annoyance ratings were highly correlated and that statistics of time-varying loudness were highly correlated with subjects' responses. However, it was unclear if subjects' judgments of startle corresponded to physiological responses associated with startle. To examine if physiological responses associated with startle were evoked by the low booms, two studies were conducted; a pilot study and a repeatability study. While physiological responses associated with startle were evoked by low booms, startle responses were found to have occurred infrequently. However, subjects' judgments of startle were found to be correlated with physiological responses and to have less day-to-day and subject to-subject variance. Candidate startle models were estimated from data obtained from an experiment where subjects' judged the startle evoked by a series of low amplitude sonic booms and boom-like noises. These candidate startle models were then tested in an additional study which used a more diverse set of stimuli. It was found that a linear model consisting of the maximum long-term Moore

  9. Startle Modification and P50 Gating in Schizophrenia Patients and Controls: Russian Population.

    PubMed

    Storozheva, Zinaida I; Kirenskaya, Anna V; Novototsky-Vlasov, Vladimir Y; Telesheva, Klavdia Y; Pletnikov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Prepulse modification of the acoustic startle response (ASR) and P50 gating are potential neurophysiological endophenotypes of schizophrenia and may be used in the construction of valid clinical biomarkers. Such approach requires a large amount of data obtained in the representative samples from different gender, socio-typological and ethnic groups, replicating studies using the similar protocols and meta-analyses. This is a replication study of ASR and the first study of P50 suppression in Russian patients with schizophrenia (n = 28) and healthy controls (n = 25). ASR and P50 were estimated according to standard protocols. Patients exhibited increased baseline ASR latency (d = 0.35, p = .026) and reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI) at 60 ms interval (d = 0.39, p = .003) and 120 ms interval (d = 0.37, p = .005) relative to controls. In the P50 test patients displayed greater S2 response amplitude (d = 0.24, p = .036) and deficit of P50 suppression (d = 0.43, p = .001). No correlations of PPI and P50 suppression were found in both groups. Only in controls prepulse ASR facilitation (at 2500 ms interval) positively correlated with P50 suppression (r = -.514, p = .013). In patients PPI displayed significant correlations with Difficulty in abstract thinking (N5: r = -.49, p = .005) and Hallucination (P3: r = .40, p = .036) PANSS scales. Logistic regression showed that the combination of PPI and P50 suppression could serve as a diagnostic predictor. Obtained results demonstrated that both PPI and P50 could be regarded as potential schizophrenia biomarkers in Russian population. PMID:26936103

  10. In vivo Ca2+ imaging reveals that decreased dendritic excitability drives startle habituation

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Kurt C.; Granato, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Exposure to repetitive startling stimuli induces habitation, a simple form of learning. Despite its simplicity, the precise cellular mechanisms by which repeated stimulation converts a robust behavioral response to behavioral indifference are unclear. Here, we use head-restrained zebrafish larvae to monitor subcellular Ca2+ dynamics in Mauthner neurons, the startle command neurons, during startle habituation in vivo. Using the Ca2+ reporter GCaMP6s we find that the amplitude of Ca2+ signals in the lateral dendrite of the Mauthner neuron determines startle probability and that depression of this dendritic activity rather than downstream inhibition mediates short-term habituation mediates glycine and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dependent short-term habituation. Combined, our results suggest a model for habituation learning in which increased inhibitory drive from feedforward inhibitory neurons combined with decreased excitatory input from auditory afferents decreases dendritic and Mauthner neuron excitability. PMID:26655893

  11. Affective startle potentiation in juvenile offenders: the role of conduct problems and psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Syngelaki, Eva M; Fairchild, Graeme; Moore, Simon C; Savage, Justin C; van Goozen, Stephanie H M

    2013-01-01

    Emotion processing difficulties are observed in antisocial individuals exhibiting serious antisocial behavior. This study examined emotion processing in 40 male juvenile offenders (JOs) and 52 male controls by measuring startle reflex responses to aversive sounds during the passive viewing of affective and neutral images. JOs as a group exhibited reduced startle-elicited blinks across all slide categories compared to normal controls. Moreover, within the offender group those with more conduct disorder symptoms and higher levels of psychopathic traits displayed reduced startle amplitudes compared to lower-scoring offenders. The finding that startle magnitudes were inversely related to severity of conduct problems supports a dimensional or continuous approach to understanding externalizing disorders. Reductions in amygdala activity could lead to blunted startle magnitudes. The current findings not only provide further evidence that antisocial children have a general defensive motivational system dysfunction and present with impairments in neural systems that subserve emotion processing, but also show for the first time that those with more severe conduct problems have reduced startle responses compared to those who are less severely affected. The implications of these findings for interventions with JOs are discussed.

  12. Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and its attentional modulation in the human S-ketamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) models of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Heekeren, K; Neukirch, A; Daumann, J; Stoll, M; Obradovic, M; Kovar, K-A; Geyer, M A; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E

    2007-05-01

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit diminished prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex and deficits in the attentional modulation of PPI. Pharmacological challenges with hallucinogens are used as models for psychosis in both humans and animals. Remarkably, in contrast to the findings in schizophrenic patients and in animal hallucinogen models of psychosis, previous studies with healthy volunteers demonstrated increased levels of PPI after administration of low to moderate doses of either the antiglutamatergic hallucinogen ketamine or the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of moderate and high doses of the serotonergic hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist S-ketamine on PPI and its attentional modulation in humans. Fifteen healthy volunteers were included in a double-blind cross-over study with two doses of DMT and S-ketamine. Effects on PPI and its attentional modulation were investigated. Nine subjects completed both experimental days with the two doses of both drugs. S-ketamine increased PPI in both dosages, whereas DMT had no significant effects on PPI. S-ketamine decreased and DMT tended to decrease startle magnitude. There were no significant effects of either drug on the attentional modulation of PPI. In human experimental hallucinogen psychoses, and even with high, clearly psychotogenic doses of DMT or S-ketamine, healthy subjects failed to exhibit the predicted attenuation of PPI. In contrast, PPI was augmented and the startle magnitude was decreased after S-ketamine. These data point to important differences between human hallucinogen models and both animal hallucinogen models of psychosis and naturally occurring schizophrenia.

  13. Worrying affects associative fear learning: a startle fear conditioning study.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Femke J; Kindt, Merel

    2012-01-01

    A valuable experimental model for the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders is that they originate from a learned association between an intrinsically non-aversive event (Conditioned Stimulus, CS) and an anticipated disaster (Unconditioned Stimulus, UCS). Most anxiety disorders, however, do not evolve from a traumatic experience. Insights from neuroscience show that memory can be modified post-learning, which may elucidate how pathological fear can develop after relatively mild aversive events. Worrying--a process frequently observed in anxiety disorders--is a potential candidate to strengthen the formation of fear memory after learning. Here we tested in a discriminative fear conditioning procedure whether worry strengthens associative fear memory. Participants were randomly assigned to either a Worry (n = 23) or Control condition (n = 25). After fear acquisition, the participants in the Worry condition processed six worrisome questions regarding the personal aversive consequences of an electric stimulus (UCS), whereas the Control condition received difficult but neutral questions. Subsequently, extinction, reinstatement and re-extinction of fear were tested. Conditioned responding was measured by fear-potentiated startle (FPS), skin conductance (SCR) and UCS expectancy ratings. Our main results demonstrate that worrying resulted in increased fear responses (FPS) to both the feared stimulus (CS(+)) and the originally safe stimulus (CS(-)), whereas FPS remained unchanged in the Control condition. In addition, worrying impaired both extinction and re-extinction learning of UCS expectancy. The implication of our findings is that they show how worry may contribute to the development of anxiety disorders by affecting associative fear learning.

  14. DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY ALTERS THE AMPLITUDE OF THE ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose: The thyroid hormone (TH) system is one of the targets of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Since TH is essential for proper brain development, disruption by exposure to chemicals during development can result in adverse neurological outcomes. Previous studies revealed th...

  15. Stuttering in Adults: The Acoustic Startle Response, Temperamental Traits, and Biological Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, Per A.; Risberg, Jarl

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between stuttering and a range of variables of possible relevance, with the main focus on neuromuscular reactivity, and anxiety. The explorative analysis also included temperament, biochemical variables, heredity, preonset lesions, and altered auditory feedback (AAF). An increased level of…

  16. Hypnotizability, Hypnosis and Prepulse Inhibition of the Startle Reflex in Healthy Women: An ERP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Russo, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    A working model of the neurophysiology of hypnosis suggests that highly hypnotizable individuals (HHs) have more effective frontal attentional systems implementing control, monitoring performance, and inhibiting unwanted stimuli from conscious awareness, than low hypnotizable individuals (LHs). Recent studies, using prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory startle reflex (ASR), suggest that HHs, in the waking condition, may show reduced sensory gating although they may selectively attend and disattend different stimuli. Using a within subject design and a strict subject selection procedure, in waking and hypnosis conditions we tested whether HHs compared to LHs showed a significantly lower inhibition of the ASR and startle-related brain activity in both time and intracerebral source localization domains. HHs, as compared to LH participants, exhibited (a) longer latency of the eyeblink startle reflex, (b) reduced N100 responses to startle stimuli, and (c) higher PPI of eyeblink startle and of the P200 and P300 waves. Hypnosis yielded smaller N100 waves to startle stimuli and greater PPI of this component than in the waking condition. sLORETA analysis revealed that, for the N100 (107 msec) elicited during startle trials, HHs had a smaller activation in the left parietal lobe (BA2/40) than LHs. Auditory pulses of pulse-with prepulse trials in HHs yielded less activity of the P300 (280 msec) wave than LHs, in the cingulate and posterior cingulate gyrus (BA23/31). The present results, on the whole, are in the opposite direction to PPI findings on hypnotizability previously reported in the literature. These results provide support to the neuropsychophysiological model that HHs have more effective sensory integration and gating (or filtering) of irrelevant stimuli than LHs. PMID:24278150

  17. Photoacoustic imaging of small organic molecule-based photoacoustic probe in subcutaneous tumor using P(VDF-TrFE) acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Takeshi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Ishihara, Miya

    2015-03-01

    The P(VDF-TrFE) sensor which had uniform sensitivity in a frequency range of 2.9 - 19.6 MHz was developed for multispectral photoacoustic imaging (MS-PAI). A small organic molecule-based PA probe synthesized by our group had the absorption maximum at 530 nm and was used as a contrast agent. The PA probe was designed to have low quantum yield. Therefore, the PA probe efficiently converted absorbed optical energies to PA signals. The probe was injected in subcutaneous tumor of mice. Then, the subcutaneous tumor was imaged in vivo by using P(VDF-TrFE) sensor. MS-PAI successfully discriminated the probe signals from background signals produced from endogenous optical absorbers such as hemoglobin. The probe detectability of the P(VDF-TrFE) sensor was evaluated and then compared with that of lead zirconium titanate (PZT) sensors. The P(VDF-TrFE) sensor imaged the tumor more clearly than the PZT sensor with central frequency of 20 MHz, especially when the probe was accumulated in the tumor with low concentration. That was because the low-concentrated probe generated PA signals with low frequency. MS-PAI using P(VDF-TrFE) sensor which can detect PA signals with wide range of frequency is able to image various distribution of the probe and is superior to that using PZT sensor which detects PA signals with narrow frequency range.

  18. Startle provoked epileptic seizures:features in 19 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Manford, M R; Fish, D R; Shorvon, S D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To define the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with startle provoked epileptic seizures (SPES). METHODS--Nineteen patients were identified during the course of a larger study of clinical seizure patterns. A witnessed seizure account was obtained in all patients; interictal EEG in 18, video-EEG-telemetry in eight, CT in 18, and high resolution MRI in eight. RESULTS--The onset of SPES was in childhood or adolescence in 14 of 19 patients. It was preceded by exclusively spontaneous seizures in nine patients and SPES had been replaced by exclusively spontaneous seizures in two patients. Sudden noise was the main triggering stimulus and somatosensory and visual stimuli were also effective in some patients. The clinical seizure pattern involved asymmetric tonic posturing in 16 of 19 patients. Focal neurological signs were present in nine patients, mental retardation in six, and 10 were clinically normal. Ictal scalp EEG showed a clear seizure discharge in only one patient with a tonic seizure pattern; over the lateral frontal electrodes contralateral to the posturing limbs. Brain CT showed a porencephalic cyst in three patients, focal frontal atrophy in one, and generalised atrophy in one. Brain MRI was undertaken in five normal subjects and three neurologically impaired patients, six with normal CT. It showed a porencephalic cyst in one patient. In six patients, there were dysplastic lesions. They affected the lateral premotor cortex in three patients and the perisylvian cortex in three patients, one with bilateral perisylvian abnormality. CONCLUSIONS--SPES are more frequent than is generally appreciated. They may be transient and occur relatively commonly without fixed deficit, by contrast with previous reports. The imaging abnormalities identified in those without diffuse cerebral damage suggest that SPES are often due to occult congenital lesions and that the lateral premotor and perisylvian cortices are important in this phenomenon. Images

  19. Developmental lead exposure causes startle response deficits in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rice, Clinton; Ghorai, Jugal K; Zalewski, Kathryn; Weber, Daniel N

    2011-10-01

    Lead (Pb(2+)) exposure continues to be an important concern for fish populations. Research is required to assess the long-term behavioral effects of low-level concentrations of Pb(2+) and the physiological mechanisms that control those behaviors. Newly fertilized zebrafish embryos (<2h post fertilization; hpf) were exposed to one of three concentrations of lead (as PbCl(2)): 0, 10, or 30 nM until 24 hpf. (1) Response to a mechanosensory stimulus: Individual larvae (168 hpf) were tested for response to a directional, mechanical stimulus. The tap frequency was adjusted to either 1 or 4 taps/s. Startle response was recorded at 1000 fps. Larvae responded in a concentration-dependent pattern for latency to reaction, maximum turn velocity, time to reach V(max) and escape time. With increasing exposure concentrations, a larger number of larvae failed to respond to even the initial tap and, for those that did respond, ceased responding earlier than control larvae. These differences were more pronounced at a frequency of 4 taps/s. (2) Response to a visual stimulus: Fish, exposed as embryos (2-24 hpf) to Pb(2+) (0-10 μM) were tested as adults under low light conditions (≈ 60 μW/m(2)) for visual responses to a rotating black bar. Visual responses were significantly degraded at Pb(2+) concentrations of 30 nM. These data suggest that zebrafish are viable models for short- and long-term sensorimotor deficits induced by acute, low-level developmental Pb(2+) exposures.

  20. Immobility and hyperthermia in the tail suspension test: association with the Porsolt test and the reflex startle reaction in 11 inbred mouse strains and the effects of genetic knockout of MAO A.

    PubMed

    Popova, N K; Tibeikina, M A

    2010-06-01

    Immobility and hyperthermia induced by unavoidable stress imposed by the tail suspension test (TST) and the acoustic startle reaction were assessed in mice of 11 inbred strains and in Tg8 mice, which have genetic knockout of MAO A. Sharp genotypic differences in immobility were seen, while there was no correlation with the hyperthermic response to the TST. A correlation was found between the extent of immobility in the TST and the startle reaction. Studies of 11 strains of mice revealed a positive correlation between the duration of immobility in the TST and the Porsolt "despair test." Genetic knockout of MAO A, one of the key enzymes in catecholamine and serotonin metabolism in the brain, weakened the startle reaction and TST-induced hyperthermia but had no significant effect on the immobility of Tg8 mice, which provides evidence of differences in the neurochemical regulation of these reactions. These data provide grounds for using the TST as a "dry" Porsolt test and identify TST-induced hyperthermia as a model for reactions to unavoidable stress.

  1. Distinct Contributions of Median Raphe Nucleus to Contextual Fear Conditioning and Fear-Potentiated Startle

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. C. B.; Cruz, A. P. M.; Avanzi, V.; Landeira-Fernandez, J.; Brandão, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Ascending 5-HT projections from the median raphe nucleus (MRN), probably to the hippocampus, are implicated in the acquisition of contextual fear (background stimuli), as assessed by freezing behavior. Foreground cues like light, used as a conditioned stimulus (CS) in classical fear conditioning, also cause freezing through thalamic transmission to the amygdala. As the MRN projects to the hippocampus and amygdala, the role of this raphe nucleus in fear conditioning to explicit cues remains to be explained. Here we analyzed the behavior of rats with MRN electrolytic lesions in a contextual conditioning situation and in a fear-potentiated startle procedure. The animals received MRN electrolytic lesions either before or on the day after two consecutive training sessions in which they were submitted to 10 conditioning trials, each in an experimental chamber (same context) where they. received foot-shocks (0.6 mA, 1 sec) paired to a 4-sec light CS. Seven to ten days later, the animals were submitted to testing sessions for assessing conditioned fear when they were placed for five shocks, and the duration of contextual freezing was recorded. The animals were then submitted to a fear-potentiated startle in response to a 4-sec light-CS, followed by white noise (100 dB, 50 ms). Control rats (sham) tested in the same context showed more freezing than did rats with pre- or post-training MRN lesions. Startle was clearly potentiated in the presence of light CS in the sham-lesioned animals. Whereas pretraining lesions reduced both freezing and fear-potentiated startle, the post-training lesions reduced only freezing to context, without changing the fear-potentiated startle. In a second experiment, neurotoxic lesions of the MRN with local injections of N-methyl-D-aspartate or the activation of 5-HT1A somatodendritic auto-receptors of the MRN by microinjections of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy- 2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) before the training sessions also

  2. Startle reflex hyporeactivity in Parkinson's disease: an emotion-specific or arousal-modulated deficit?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K.M.; Okun, M.S.; Marsiske, M.; Fennell, E.B.; Bowers, D.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) demonstrate reduced psychophysiologic reactivity to unpleasant pictures as indexed by diminished startle eyeblink magnitude (Bowers et al., 2006). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that this hyporeactivity was primarily driven by diminished reactivity to fear-eliciting stimuli as opposed to other types of aversive pictures. This hypothesis was based on previous evidence suggesting amygdalar abnormalities in PD patients coupled with the known role of the amygdala in fear processing. To test this hypothesis, 24 patients with Parkinson's disease and 24 controls viewed standardized sets of emotional pictures that depicted fear, disgust (mutilations, contaminations), pleasant, and neutral contents. Startle eyeblinks were elicited while subjects viewed these emotional pictures. Results did not support the hypothesis of a specific deficit to fear pictures. Instead, the PD patients had reduced reactivity to mutilation pictures relative to other types of negative pictures in the context of normal subjective ratings. Further analyses revealed that controls displayed a pattern of increased startle eyeblink magnitude for “high arousal” versus “low arousal” negative pictures, regardless of picture category, whereas startle eyeblink magnitude in the PD group did not vary by arousal level. These results suggest that previous findings of decreased aversion-modulated startle is driven by reduced reactivity to highly arousing negative stimuli rather than to a specific category (i.e., fear or disgust) of emotion stimuli. PMID:19428424

  3. Tracking the startle response of guppies Poecilia reticulata in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Vanesyan, A; Rodd, F H; Ryu, W S

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of startle behaviours of guppies Poecilia reticulata, in dyads or alone, from two populations that show distinct differences in shoaling behaviour was performed. During the first few seconds after a startling stimulus, changes in behaviour, which could be critical if an individual is to survive a predatory attack, and the interactions between pairs of P. reticulata were examined. The enhanced social interactions immediately after the stimulus, as a proxy for shoaling behaviour, and their dissipation were quantified. Social (individuals tested in dyads) v. asocial (tested alone) responses to the startling stimulus were also compared. The three-dimensional reconstruction, from a two-camera, high-frame-rate tracking system allowed for the tracking of the individuals' speed and speed recovery and, for P. reticulata in dyads, interindividual distance and orientation. For the dyads from the high-predation population, the closer the individuals were to each other, the more likely they were to be parallel, but no correlation was found for the low-predation P. reticulata. The startle response of P. reticulata comprised the following sequence: freezing, darting and skittering and recovery to pre-stimulus swimming behaviour. Upon repeated encounters with the stimulus, a reduced shoaling and startle response was observed, although the rate of reduction was faster in P. reticulata from the high-predation population than those from the low-predation population. The results are discussed in light of what is known about the anti-predator behaviour of this species.

  4. Tracking the startle response of guppies Poecilia reticulata in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Vanesyan, A; Rodd, F H; Ryu, W S

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of startle behaviours of guppies Poecilia reticulata, in dyads or alone, from two populations that show distinct differences in shoaling behaviour was performed. During the first few seconds after a startling stimulus, changes in behaviour, which could be critical if an individual is to survive a predatory attack, and the interactions between pairs of P. reticulata were examined. The enhanced social interactions immediately after the stimulus, as a proxy for shoaling behaviour, and their dissipation were quantified. Social (individuals tested in dyads) v. asocial (tested alone) responses to the startling stimulus were also compared. The three-dimensional reconstruction, from a two-camera, high-frame-rate tracking system allowed for the tracking of the individuals' speed and speed recovery and, for P. reticulata in dyads, interindividual distance and orientation. For the dyads from the high-predation population, the closer the individuals were to each other, the more likely they were to be parallel, but no correlation was found for the low-predation P. reticulata. The startle response of P. reticulata comprised the following sequence: freezing, darting and skittering and recovery to pre-stimulus swimming behaviour. Upon repeated encounters with the stimulus, a reduced shoaling and startle response was observed, although the rate of reduction was faster in P. reticulata from the high-predation population than those from the low-predation population. The results are discussed in light of what is known about the anti-predator behaviour of this species. PMID:26376772

  5. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  6. Association between violent behaviour and impaired prepulse inhibition of the startle response in antisocial personality disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Veena; Das, Mrigen; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Zachariah, Elizabeth; Barkataki, Ian; Howlett, Michael; Sharma, Tonmoy

    2005-03-01

    Violent behaviour has a strong association with antisocial personality disorder (APD) and schizophrenia. Although developments in the understanding of socio-environmental factors associated with violence should not be ignored, advances in prevention and treatment of violent behaviour would benefit by improved understanding of its neurobiological and cognitive basis. The authors, therefore, investigated prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response in APD and schizophrenia in relation to a history of serious violence. The neural substrates of PPI, especially the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus and basal ganglia, are implicated in violence as well as in APD and schizophrenia. The study included four groups: (i) patients with APD and a history of violence, (ii) patients with schizophrenia and a history of violence, (iii) patients with schizophrenia without a history of violence, and (iv) healthy subjects with no history of violence or a mental disorder. All subjects were assessed identically on acoustic PPI. Compared to healthy subjects, significantly reduced PPI occurred in APD, violent schizophrenia and non-violent schizophrenia patients. Although PPI did not significantly differentiate the three clinical groups, high ratings of violence were modestly associated with reduced PPI across the entire study sample. Violent patients with impulsive and premeditated violence showed comparable PPI. The association between violent behaviour and impaired PPI suggests that neural structures and functions underlying PPI are implicated in (inhibition of) violence.

  7. Fear conditioning of SCR but not the startle reflex requires conscious discrimination of threat and safety.

    PubMed

    Sevenster, Dieuwke; Beckers, Tom; Kindt, Merel

    2014-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence as to whether awareness is required for conditioning of the skin conductance response (SCR). Recently, Schultz and Helmstetter (2010) reported SCR conditioning in contingency unaware participants by using difficult to discriminate stimuli. These findings are in stark contrast with other observations in human fear conditioning research, showing that SCR predominantly reflects contingency learning. Therefore, we repeated the study by Schultz and Helmstetter and additionally measured conditioning of the startle response, which seems to be less sensitive to declarative knowledge than SCR. While we solely observed SCR conditioning in participants who reported awareness of the contingencies (n = 16) and not in the unaware participants (n = 18), we observed startle conditioning irrespective of awareness. We conclude that SCR but not startle conditioning depends on conscious discriminative fear learning.

  8. Isolation rearing of mice induces deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle response.

    PubMed

    Varty, Geoffrey B; Powell, Susan B; Lehmann-Masten, Virginia; Buell, Mahalah R; Geyer, Mark A

    2006-04-25

    Male 129T2 and C57BL/6J mice were housed either in groups of three (socials) or singly (isolates) at weaning. Six and seven weeks later, prepulse inhibition (PPI), startle reactivity, and locomotor activity (LMA) were measured. Isolation-reared mice of both strains exhibited PPI deficits compared to socially reared controls in at least one of the two PPI test sessions. Isolation rearing had no effect on startle reactivity or habituation and only 129T2 isolates exhibited increased LMA. Isolation rearing induced locomotor hyperactivity and PPI deficits in mice and may be an effective developmental manipulation to use in combination with studies of genetically altered mice.

  9. Modulation of the startle reflex across time by unpleasant pictures distinguishes dysphoric from non-dysphoric women.

    PubMed

    Taubitz, Lauren E; Robinson, Jordan S; Larson, Christine L

    2013-02-01

    While several investigators have examined differences in affective startle modulation between individuals with and without Major Depressive Disorder, fewer researchers have evaluated the time course of this response, particularly in dysphoric individuals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate emotion modulation of the startle reflex during and after the presentation of affective pictures in dysphoric and non-dysphoric women. Dysphoric subjects showed attenuated startle for unpleasant compared to neutral pictures 1.5s post-stimulus onset relative to non-dysphoric subjects and potentiated startle for unpleasant compared to neutral pictures 3s post-stimulus offset. These findings extend the literature on the time course of affective startle modulation in dysphoria, and mirror results of studies in which other psychophysiological responses were examined in this population with regard to negative emotion.

  10. Evidence of Fearlessness in Behaviourally Disordered Children: A Study on Startle Reflex Modulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Snoek, Heddeke; Matthys, Walter; van Rossum, Inge; van Engeland, Herman

    2004-01-01

    Background: Patterns of low heart rate, skin conductance and cortisol seem to characterise children with disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD). Until now, the startle paradigm has not been used in DBD children. We investigated whether DBD children, like adult psychopaths, process emotional stimuli in an abnormal way. Method: Twenty-one DBD and 33…

  11. Neural Systems Involved in Fear and Anxiety Measured with Fear-Potentiated Startle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A good deal is now known about the neural circuitry involved in how conditioned fear can augment a simple reflex (fear-potentiated startle). This involves visual or auditory as well as shock pathways that project via the thalamus and perirhinal or insular cortex to the basolateral amygdala (BLA). The BLA projects to the central (CeA) and medial…

  12. Effects of the hallucinogen psilocybin on habituation and prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex in humans.

    PubMed

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E; Heekeren, K; Thelen, B; Lindenblatt, H; Kovar, K A; Sass, H; Geyer, M A

    1998-11-01

    Schizophrenic patients exhibit deficits in indices of sensorimotor gating, such as habituation and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex. Hallucinogenic drug-induced states are putative models for the early and acute stages of schizophrenic and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Hallucinogenic drugs have been shown to disrupt PPI and/or retard habituation of the startle reflex in animal models of schizophrenia, consistent with the view of hallucinogen-induced states as 'model psychoses'. We evaluated the effects of the hallucinogen psilocybin on PPI and habituation of the startle reflex in a double-blind, placebo-controlled human study with 12 healthy subjects. In contrast to animal studies, in our small human sample, psilocybin increased PPI, while having no clear effect on habituation (n = 6). These findings must be considered preliminary because several factors, including dose regimens and experimental parameters, may influence the results of studies on startle plasticity. Further investigations both with psychotic patients in different stages of the disease and with human and animal models of schizophrenia are needed in order to explore the effects of hallucinogens on sensorimotor gating and the relationship between information processing in hallucinogenic drug-induced states and the naturally occurring psychoses.

  13. Conditioned Fear Extinction and Reinstatement in a Human Fear-Potentiated Startle Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrholm, Seth D.; Jovanovic, Tanja; Vervliet, Bram; Myers, Karyn M.; Davis, Michael; Rothbaum, Barbara O.; Duncan, Erica J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze fear extinction and reinstatement in humans using fear-potentiated startle. Participants were fear conditioned using a simple discrimination procedure with colored lights as the conditioned stimuli (CSs) and an airblast to the throat as the unconditioned stimulus (US). Participants were extinguished 24 h…

  14. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  15. Fast and singular muscle responses initiate the startle response of Pantodon buchholzi (Osteoglossomorpha).

    PubMed

    Starosciak, A K; Kalola, R P; Perkins, K P; Riley, J A; Saidel, W M

    2008-01-01

    The startle response of Pantodon buchholzi, the African butterfly fish, is a complete or incomplete ballistic jump resulting from abduction of the pectoral fins. This study analyzed the neuromuscular basis for such a jump by recording in vivo electromyograms (emgs) from the muscles of abduction, the muscularis abductor superficialis (MAS) and the muscularis abductor profundus (MAP). The motor neurons innervating the MAS muscle were localized by retrograde transport of biocytin. The latency between stimulus and the evoked emg in the MAS was less than 5 ms; the latency of the MAP was about 6.5 ms. A single emg was recorded per jump. High speed video demonstrated that onset of a startle movement began within 10 ms of the onset of fin abduction. The emg associated with this movement is short (<2 ms) and followed by a variably-shaped, slower and smaller potential of 10-30 ms duration. The brief period between stimulus and startle response of Pantodon suggests a Mauthner neuron-related response, only with the behavior occurring in the vertical plane. The MAS may act only in a startle response, whereas the MAP might have a role in other behaviors. Elicited jumping habituates after a single trial. Electrophysiological evidence is presented indicating that the innervating motor neurons are suppressed for seconds following a stimulus. The neurons innervating the MAS are located at the medullary-spinal cord junction and possess an average radius of approximately 17.9 mum. These fish have been historically described as 'fresh water' flying fish. As a single emg occurs per startle response, repetitive pectoral activity generating flying cannot be supported. Pantodon 'flight' is ballistic.

  16. Fast and singular muscle responses initiate the startle response of Pantodon buchholzi (Osteoglossomorpha).

    PubMed

    Starosciak, A K; Kalola, R P; Perkins, K P; Riley, J A; Saidel, W M

    2008-01-01

    The startle response of Pantodon buchholzi, the African butterfly fish, is a complete or incomplete ballistic jump resulting from abduction of the pectoral fins. This study analyzed the neuromuscular basis for such a jump by recording in vivo electromyograms (emgs) from the muscles of abduction, the muscularis abductor superficialis (MAS) and the muscularis abductor profundus (MAP). The motor neurons innervating the MAS muscle were localized by retrograde transport of biocytin. The latency between stimulus and the evoked emg in the MAS was less than 5 ms; the latency of the MAP was about 6.5 ms. A single emg was recorded per jump. High speed video demonstrated that onset of a startle movement began within 10 ms of the onset of fin abduction. The emg associated with this movement is short (<2 ms) and followed by a variably-shaped, slower and smaller potential of 10-30 ms duration. The brief period between stimulus and startle response of Pantodon suggests a Mauthner neuron-related response, only with the behavior occurring in the vertical plane. The MAS may act only in a startle response, whereas the MAP might have a role in other behaviors. Elicited jumping habituates after a single trial. Electrophysiological evidence is presented indicating that the innervating motor neurons are suppressed for seconds following a stimulus. The neurons innervating the MAS are located at the medullary-spinal cord junction and possess an average radius of approximately 17.9 mum. These fish have been historically described as 'fresh water' flying fish. As a single emg occurs per startle response, repetitive pectoral activity generating flying cannot be supported. Pantodon 'flight' is ballistic. PMID:18032886

  17. Prospective Prediction of PTSD Symptoms Using Fear Potentiated Auditory Startle Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pole, Nnamdi; Neylan, Thomas C.; Otte, Christian; Henn-Hasse, Clare; Metzler, Thomas J.; Marmar, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Background PTSD has been most consistently associated with exaggerated physiological reactivity to startling sounds when such sounds occur in threatening contexts. There is conflicting evidence about whether startle hyperreactivity is a pre-existing vulnerability factor for PTSD or an acquired result of post-trauma neural sensitization. Until now, there have been no prospective studies of physiological reactivity to startling sounds in threatening contexts as predictors of PTSD symptoms. Methods One hundred and thirty-eight police academy cadets without current psychopathology were exposed to repeated 106 dB startling sounds under increasing (low, medium, or high) threat of mild electric shock while their eyeblink electromyogram, skin conductance, heart rate, and subjective fear responses were recorded. Measures of response habituation were also calculated. Following one year of exposure to police-related trauma, these participants were assessed for PTSD symptom severity. Results After accounting for other baseline variables that were predictive of PTSD symptom severity (age and general psychiatric distress), more severe PTSD symptoms were prospectively and independently predicted by the following startle measures: greater subjective fear under low threat, greater skin conductance under high threat, and slower skin conductance habituation. Conclusions These results imply that hypersensitivity to contextual threat (indexed by greater fear under low threat), elevated sympathetic nervous system reactivity to explicit threat (indexed by larger responses under high threat), and failure to adapt to repeated aversive stimuli (evidenced by slower habituation) are all unique pre-existing vulnerability factors for greater PTSD symptom severity following traumatic stress exposure. These measures may eventually prove useful for preventing PTSD. PMID:18722593

  18. Asians demonstrate reduced sensitivity to unpredictable threat: a preliminary startle investigation using genetic ancestry in a multiethnic sample.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brady D; Bishop, Jeffrey R; Sarapas, Casey; Kittles, Rick A; Shankman, Stewart A

    2014-06-01

    Research has indicated that individuals of Asian descent, relative to other racial groups, demonstrate reduced emotional responding and lower prevalence rates of several anxiety disorders. It is unclear though whether these group differences extend to biomarkers of anxiety disorders and whether genetic differences play a role. This study compared self-identified Caucasian, Latino, and Asian persons (total N = 174) on startle response during a baseline period and while anticipating unpredictable threat-a putative biomarker for certain anxiety disorders--as well as predictable threat. In addition, the association between genetic ancestry and startle response was examined within each racial group to determine potential genetic influences on responding. For the baseline period, Asian participants exhibited a smaller startle response relative to Caucasian and Latino participants, who did not differ. Within each racial group, genetic ancestry was associated with baseline startle. Furthermore, genetic ancestry mediated racial group differences in baseline startle. For the threat conditions, a Race × Condition interaction indicated that Asian participants exhibited reduced startle potentiation to unpredictable, but not predicable, threat relative to Caucasian and Latino participants, who did not differ. However, genetic ancestry was not associated with threat-potentiated startle in any racial group. This study adds to the growing literature on racial differences in emotional responding and provides preliminary evidence suggesting that genetic ancestry may play an important role. Moreover, reduced sensitivity to unpredictable threat may reflect a mechanism for why individuals of Asian descent are at less risk for particular anxiety disorders relative to other racial groups.

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  20. Attention, heart rate, and startle response during exposure to trauma-relevant pictures: a comparison of recent trauma victims and patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Elsesser, Karin; Sartory, Gudrun; Tackenberg, Axel

    2004-05-01

    Victims of a recent trauma were compared with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients and healthy controls to assess whether a specific anxiety response and an attentional bias were evident initially or only in chronic PTSD. Heart rate (HR) and startle response were measured, and a dot-probe task was carried out using trauma-relevant pictures. Severely affected recent trauma victims and chronic PTSD patients showed HR acceleration to trauma-related material, which was the only significant group difference. A bias away from trauma-related material was related to severity of intrusions in recent trauma victims, and the bias toward trauma-related material increased with amplitude of the HR response in PTSD patients. A specific anxiety reaction is present initially in severely affected trauma victims.

  1. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  2. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  3. Prenatal IV Nicotine Exposure Produces a Sex Difference in Sensorimotor Gating of the Auditory Startle Reflex in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Ryan T.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Harrod, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with auditory processing deficits in children; these effects have been confirmed with animal models of continuous high-dose prenatal nicotine exposure. The present experiments utilized a novel, low-dose, intermittent, intravenous (IV) gestational nicotine exposure model to investigate potential deficits on the preattentive process of sensorimotor gating, as indexed by prepulse inhibition (PPI), in preweanling and adult rat offspring. Pregnant dams received bolus IV injections of nicotine (0.05 mg/kg/injection) 3x/day on gestational days 8–21. Auditory and tactile stimulus modalities were probed with tone and air puff prepulse stimuli, respectively. These prepulse stimuli preceded a 100 dB(A) startle tone by six different interstimulus intervals (ISIs; 0, 8, 40, 80, 120, 4000 ms) to define a curve of response inhibition. The magnitude of PPI increased with age, from 59 to 81% inhibition. Preweanlings (PND 14 and 18) and adults (PND 75) gestationally exposed to nicotine exhibited altered startle responding relative to controls, but the nature of the deficit became more localized at later ages. The entire curve of response inhibition in preweanlings exposed to prenatal nicotine (PND 14) was shifted up relative to controls, and notably, did not interact with prepulse stimulus modality, suggesting a generalized increased sensorimotor responsiveness as a function of prenatal nicotine. At PND 18, a shift in the response curve across all ISIs was again noted, but varied as a function of prepulse stimulus modality; the increased sensorimotor responsiveness was specific to the auditory, but not tactile, sensory modality. In adulthood, male and females animals prenatally exposed to nicotine were differentially sensitive to modulation by the ISIs, relative to control male and female animals. Specifically, despite robust PPI, adult females exposed to gestational nicotine were relatively insensitive to changes in ISI from 8–120

  4. Development of an accelerometer-based underwater acoustic intensity sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang; Gabrielson, Thomas B; Lauchle, Gerald C

    2004-12-01

    An underwater acoustic intensity sensor is described. This sensor derives acoustic intensity from simultaneous, co-located measurement of the acoustic pressure and one component of the acoustic particle acceleration vector. The sensor consists of a pressure transducer in the form of a hollow piezoceramic cylinder and a pair of miniature accelerometers mounted inside the cylinder. Since this sensor derives acoustic intensity from measurement of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle acceleration, it is called a p-a intensity probe. The sensor is ballasted to be nearly neutrally buoyant. It is desirable for the accelerometers to measure only the rigid body motion of the assembled probe and for the effective centers of the pressure sensor and accelerometer to be coincident. This is achieved by symmetric disposition of a pair of accelerometers inside the ceramic cylinder. The response of the intensity probe is determined by comparison with a reference hydrophone in a predominantly reactive acoustic field.

  5. Fmrp is required for the establishment of the startle response during the critical period of auditory development.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seong-Wook; Platholi, Jimcy; Flaherty, Maria Sol; Fu, Weimin; Kottmann, Andreas H; Toth, Miklos

    2006-09-19

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the absence of the FMR-1 gene product FMRP. In addition to the hallmark cognitive defect, other symptoms are also apparent including hyperactivity, seizures and sensory abnormalities including a characteristic increase in sensitivity to auditory, tactile, visual, and olfactory stimuli. Fragile X is a developmental disorder with the first symptoms apparent in the first year of life but little is known about the role of FMRP in developmental processes. The sensory hyperreactivity of fragile X can be reproduced in fmr-1 knockout (KO) mice evident as abnormal audiogenic startle response and increased audiogenic seizure susceptibility. Here, we studied the onset and emergence of the startle deficit in fmr-1 KO mice during development. The startle response was first detectable at the end of the 2nd postnatal week in wild-type mice. The amplitude of startle response showed a substantial increase until the 4th postnatal week followed by a further but moderate increase up to adulthood. Expression of the fmr1 gene was detectable in the startle circuit before the onset and throughout the development of the startle response. Although the onset and amplitude of the startle response were not altered in fmr1 KO mice until the 3rd-4th postnatal week, beyond this age it failed to develop further resulting in an overall response deficit in adult KO mice. This indicates that although Fmrp is dispensable at the initial steps of startle response development, it is necessary for the full development of the response.

  6. The human startle reflex and alcohol cue reactivity: effects of early versus late abstinence.

    PubMed

    Saladin, Michael E; Drobes, David J; Coffey, Scott F; Libet, Julian M

    2002-06-01

    This study investigated the human eyeblink startle reflex as a measure of alcohol cue reactivity. Alcohol-dependent participants early (n = 36) and late (n = 34) in abstinence received presentations of alcohol and water cues. Consistent with previous research, greater salivation and higher ratings of urge to drink occurred in response to the alcohol cues. Differential salivary and urge responding to alcohol versus water cues did not vary as a function of abstinence duration. Of special interest was the finding that startle response magnitudes were relatively elevated to alcohol cues, but only in individuals early in abstinence. Affective ratings of alcohol cues suggested that alcohol cues were perceived as aversive. Methodological and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

  7. COMMUNALITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN FEAR POTENTIATION BETWEEN CARDIAC DEFENSE AND EYE-BLINK STARTLE

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, María B.; Guerra, Pedro; Muñoz, Miguel A.; Mata, José Luís; Bradley, Margaret M.; Lang, Peter J.; Vila, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    This study examines similarities and differences in fear potentiation between two protective reflexes: cardiac defense and eye-blink startle. Women reporting intense fear of animals but low fear of blood or intense fear of blood but low fear of animals viewed pictures depicting blood or the feared animal for 6 s in 2 separate trials in counterbalanced order. An intense burst of white noise, able to elicit both a cardiac defense response and a reflexive startle blink, was presented 3.5 s after picture onset. Both cardiac and blink responses were potentiated when highly fearful individuals viewed fearful pictures. However, differences appeared concerning picture order. This pattern of results indicates communalities and differences among protective reflexes that are relevant for understanding the dynamics of emotional reflex modulation. PMID:19572906

  8. Affective modulation of the startle reflex and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality: The role of sensitivity to reward.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Angel; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated differences in the amplitude of startle reflex and Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) personality variables of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). We hypothesized that subjects with higher scores in SR would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to pleasant pictures than lower scores, while higher scores in SP would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to unpleasant pictures than subjects with lower scores in this dimension. The sample consisted of 112 healthy female undergraduate psychology students. Personality was assessed using the short version of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ). Laboratory anxiety was controlled by the State Anxiety Inventory. The startle blink reflex was recorded electromyographically (EMG) from the right orbicularis oculi muscle as a response to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures. Subjects higher in SR obtained a significant higher startle reflex response in pleasant pictures than lower scorers (48.48 vs 46.28, p<0.012). Subjects with higher scores in SP showed a light tendency of higher startle responses in unpleasant pictures in a non-parametric local regression graphical analysis (LOESS). The findings shed light on the relationships among the impulsive-disinhibited personality, including sensitivity to reward and emotions evoked through pictures of emotional content.

  9. Affective modulation of the startle reflex and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality: The role of sensitivity to reward.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Angel; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated differences in the amplitude of startle reflex and Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) personality variables of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). We hypothesized that subjects with higher scores in SR would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to pleasant pictures than lower scores, while higher scores in SP would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to unpleasant pictures than subjects with lower scores in this dimension. The sample consisted of 112 healthy female undergraduate psychology students. Personality was assessed using the short version of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ). Laboratory anxiety was controlled by the State Anxiety Inventory. The startle blink reflex was recorded electromyographically (EMG) from the right orbicularis oculi muscle as a response to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures. Subjects higher in SR obtained a significant higher startle reflex response in pleasant pictures than lower scorers (48.48 vs 46.28, p<0.012). Subjects with higher scores in SP showed a light tendency of higher startle responses in unpleasant pictures in a non-parametric local regression graphical analysis (LOESS). The findings shed light on the relationships among the impulsive-disinhibited personality, including sensitivity to reward and emotions evoked through pictures of emotional content. PMID:25447471

  10. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  11. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  12. No Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on Fear-Potentiated Startle in Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baas, Johanna M. P.; Klumpers, Floris; Mantione, Mariska H.; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke C.; Schuurman, P. Richard; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating therapy refractory obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Given the close proximity of the stimulation site to the stria terminalis (BNST), we hypothesized that the striking decrease in anxiety symptoms following DBS could be the result of the modulation of contextual anxiety. However, the effect of DBS in this region on contextual anxiety is as of yet unknown. Thus, the current study investigated the effect of DBS on contextual anxiety in an experimental threat of shock paradigm. Eight patients with DBS treatment for severe OCD were tested in a double-blind crossover design with randomly assigned 2-week periods of active and sham stimulation. DBS resulted in significant decrease of obsessive–compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and depression. However, even though the threat manipulation resulted in a clear context-potentiated startle effect, none of the parameters derived from the startle recordings was modulated by the DBS. This suggests that DBS in the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating anxiety symptoms of OCD without modulating the startle circuitry. We hypothesize that the anxiety symptoms present in OCD are likely distinct from the pathological brain circuits in defensive states of other anxiety disorders. PMID:25249953

  13. No impact of deep brain stimulation on fear-potentiated startle in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Baas, Johanna M P; Klumpers, Floris; Mantione, Mariska H; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke C; Schuurman, P Richard; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating therapy refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Given the close proximity of the stimulation site to the stria terminalis (BNST), we hypothesized that the striking decrease in anxiety symptoms following DBS could be the result of the modulation of contextual anxiety. However, the effect of DBS in this region on contextual anxiety is as of yet unknown. Thus, the current study investigated the effect of DBS on contextual anxiety in an experimental threat of shock paradigm. Eight patients with DBS treatment for severe OCD were tested in a double-blind crossover design with randomly assigned 2-week periods of active and sham stimulation. DBS resulted in significant decrease of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and depression. However, even though the threat manipulation resulted in a clear context-potentiated startle effect, none of the parameters derived from the startle recordings was modulated by the DBS. This suggests that DBS in the ventral internal capsule is effective in treating anxiety symptoms of OCD without modulating the startle circuitry. We hypothesize that the anxiety symptoms present in OCD are likely distinct from the pathological brain circuits in defensive states of other anxiety disorders. PMID:25249953

  14. Risk for eating disorders modulates startle-responses to body words.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Cornelia; Kübler, Andrea; Vögele, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Body image disturbances are core symptoms of eating disorders (EDs). Recent evidence suggests that changes in body image may occur prior to ED onset and are not restricted to in-vivo exposure (e.g. mirror image), but also evident during presentation of abstract cues such as body shape and weight-related words. In the present study startle modulation, heart rate and subjective evaluations were examined during reading of body words and neutral words in 41 student female volunteers screened for risk of EDs. The aim was to determine if responses to body words are attributable to a general negativity bias regardless of ED risk or if activated, ED relevant negative body schemas facilitate priming of defensive responses. Heart rate and word ratings differed between body words and neutral words in the whole female sample, supporting a general processing bias for body weight and shape-related concepts in young women regardless of ED risk. Startle modulation was specifically related to eating disorder symptoms, as was indicated by significant positive correlations with self-reported body dissatisfaction. These results emphasize the relevance of examining body schema representations as a function of ED risk across different levels of responding. Peripheral-physiological measures such as the startle reflex could possibly be used as predictors of females' risk for developing EDs in the future.

  15. Acoustical Measurement Of Furnace Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Simple probes withstand severe conditions, yet give spatially-resolved temperature readings. Prototype acoustical system developed to measure temperatures from ambient to 1,800 degree F in such structures as large industrial lime kilns and recovery-boiler furnaces. Pulses of sound reflected from obstructions in sensing tube. Speed of sound and temperature in each segment deduced from travel times of pulses.

  16. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  17. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  18. Emotional effects of startling background music during reading news reports: The moderating influence of dispositional BIS and BAS sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Ravaja, Niklas; Kallinen, Kari

    2004-07-01

    We examined the moderating influence of dispositional behavioral inhibition system (BIS) and behavioral activation system (BAS) sensitivities on the relationship of startling background music with emotion-related subjective and physiological responses elicited during reading news reports, and with memory performance among 26 adult men and women. Physiological parameters measured were respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), electrodermal activity (EDA), and facial electromyography (EMG). The results showed that, among high BAS individuals, news stories with startling background music were rated as more interesting and elicited higher zygomatic EMG activity and RSA than news stories with non-startling music. Among low BAS individuals, news stories with startling background music were rated as less pleasant and more arousing and prompted higher EDA. No BIS-related effects or effects on memory were found. Startling background music may have adverse (e.g., negative arousal) or beneficial effects (e.g., a positive emotional state and stronger positive engagement) depending on dispositional BAS sensitivity of an individual. Actual or potential applications of this research include the personalization of media presentations when using modern media and communications technologies.

  19. Murine startle mutant Nmf11 affects the structural stability of the glycine receptor and increases deactivation

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Megan E.; Caley, Alex; Gielen, Marc C.; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Hyperekplexia or startle disease is a serious neurological condition affecting newborn children and usually involves dysfunctional glycinergic neurotransmission.Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are major mediators of inhibition in the spinal cord and brainstem.A missense mutation, replacing asparagine (N) with lysine (K), at position 46 in the GlyR α1 subunit induced hyperekplexia following a reduction in the potency of the transmitter glycine; this resulted from a rapid deactivation of the agonist current at mutant GlyRs.These effects of N46K were rescued by mutating a juxtaposed residue, N61 on binding Loop D, suggesting these two asparagines may interact.Asparagine 46 is considered to be important for the structural stability of the subunit interface and glycine binding site, and its mutation represents a new mechanism by which GlyR dysfunction induces startle disease. Abstract Dysfunctional glycinergic inhibitory transmission underlies the debilitating neurological condition, hyperekplexia, which is characterised by exaggerated startle reflexes, muscle hypertonia and apnoea. Here we investigated the N46K missense mutation in the GlyR α1 subunit gene found in the ethylnitrosourea (ENU) murine mutant, Nmf11, which causes reduced body size, evoked tremor, seizures, muscle stiffness, and morbidity by postnatal day 21. Introducing the N46K mutation into recombinant GlyR α1 homomeric receptors, expressed in HEK cells, reduced the potencies of glycine, β‐alanine and taurine by 9‐, 6‐ and 3‐fold respectively, and that of the competitive antagonist strychnine by 15‐fold. Replacing N46 with hydrophobic, charged or polar residues revealed that the amide moiety of asparagine was crucial for GlyR activation. Co‐mutating N61, located on a neighbouring β loop to N46, rescued the wild‐type phenotype depending on the amino acid charge. Single‐channel recording identified that burst length for the N46K mutant was reduced and fast agonist application

  20. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  1. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  2. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  3. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  4. Affect-modulated startle: interactive influence of catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype and childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Klauke, Benedikt; Winter, Bernward; Gajewska, Agnes; Zwanzger, Peter; Reif, Andreas; Herrmann, Martin J; Dlugos, Andrea; Warrings, Bodo; Jacob, Christian; Mühlberger, Andreas; Arolt, Volker; Pauli, Paul; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of emotion-related disorders such as anxiety or affective disorders is considered to be complex with an interaction of biological and environmental factors. Particular evidence has accumulated for alterations in the dopaminergic and noradrenergic system--partly conferred by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene variation--for the adenosinergic system as well as for early life trauma to constitute risk factors for those conditions. Applying a multi-level approach, in a sample of 95 healthy adults, we investigated effects of the functional COMT Val158Met polymorphism, caffeine as an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist (300 mg in a placebo-controlled intervention design) and childhood maltreatment (CTQ) as well as their interaction on the affect-modulated startle response as a neurobiologically founded defensive reflex potentially related to fear- and distress-related disorders. COMT val/val genotype significantly increased startle magnitude in response to unpleasant stimuli, while met/met homozygotes showed a blunted startle response to aversive pictures. Furthermore, significant gene-environment interaction of COMT Val158Met genotype with CTQ was discerned with more maltreatment being associated with higher startle potentiation in val/val subjects but not in met carriers. No main effect of or interaction effects with caffeine were observed. Results indicate a main as well as a GxE effect of the COMT Val158Met variant and childhood maltreatment on the affect-modulated startle reflex, supporting a complex pathogenetic model of the affect-modulated startle reflex as a basic neurobiological defensive reflex potentially related to anxiety and affective disorders.

  5. Affect-Modulated Startle: Interactive Influence of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Val158Met Genotype and Childhood Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Benedikt; Winter, Bernward; Gajewska, Agnes; Zwanzger, Peter; Reif, Andreas; Herrmann, Martin J.; Dlugos, Andrea; Warrings, Bodo; Jacob, Christian; Mühlberger, Andreas; Arolt, Volker; Pauli, Paul; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of emotion-related disorders such as anxiety or affective disorders is considered to be complex with an interaction of biological and environmental factors. Particular evidence has accumulated for alterations in the dopaminergic and noradrenergic system – partly conferred by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene variation – for the adenosinergic system as well as for early life trauma to constitute risk factors for those conditions. Applying a multi-level approach, in a sample of 95 healthy adults, we investigated effects of the functional COMT Val158Met polymorphism, caffeine as an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist (300 mg in a placebo-controlled intervention design) and childhood maltreatment (CTQ) as well as their interaction on the affect-modulated startle response as a neurobiologically founded defensive reflex potentially related to fear- and distress-related disorders. COMT val/val genotype significantly increased startle magnitude in response to unpleasant stimuli, while met/met homozygotes showed a blunted startle response to aversive pictures. Furthermore, significant gene-environment interaction of COMT Val158Met genotype with CTQ was discerned with more maltreatment being associated with higher startle potentiation in val/val subjects but not in met carriers. No main effect of or interaction effects with caffeine were observed. Results indicate a main as well as a GxE effect of the COMT Val158Met variant and childhood maltreatment on the affect-modulated startle reflex, supporting a complex pathogenetic model of the affect-modulated startle reflex as a basic neurobiological defensive reflex potentially related to anxiety and affective disorders. PMID:22745815

  6. Neurological effects on startle response and escape from predation by medaka exposed to organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.; Drummond, R.; Hammermeister, D.; Bradbury, S.

    1995-12-31

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and behavioral studies were performed on juvenile Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to representative neurotoxic organic chemicals at sublethal concentrations. Non-invasive recordings were made of the electrical impulses generated within giant neuronal Mauthner cells, associated interneurons or motoneurons, and musculature, all of which initiate the startle or escape response in fish. Timing in milliseconds between these electrical sequelae was measured for each fish before and at 24 and 48 hours exposure to a chemical. Also noted was the number of startle responses to number of stimuli ratio (R/S). Other groups of medaka were fed to bluegills and consumption times recorded to assess their ability to escape predation. These results were compared to neurophysiological effect levels. Phenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, chlorpyrifos, fenvalerate, and 1-octanol impaired the ability of medaka to escape predation at all concentrations. Medaka were more susceptible to predation in high concentrations of carbaryl and strychnine, but less susceptible at low concentrations, whereas the reverse was true for endosulfan. The variety of neurological effects detected at these concentrations suggest that different mechanisms may be responsible. Phenol and strychnine affected Mauthner cell to motoneuron transmission, chlorpyrifos and carbaryl showed neuromuscular effects, and R/S was affected by most chemicals. Although a variety of neurotoxic mechanisms were examined, the exposure threshold for significant effects for each specific compound was found to be consistent for both the neurophysiological and behavioral endpoints.

  7. Aversive Startle Potentiation and Fear Pathology: Mediating Role of Threat Sensitivity and Moderating Impact of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, James R.; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced startle during exposure to unpleasant cues (aversive startle potentiation; ASP) appears in the RDoC matrix as a physiological index of acute threat response. Increased ASP has been linked to focal fear disorders and to scale measures of dispositional fearfulness (i.e., threat sensitivity; THT+). However, some studies have reported reduced ASP for fear pathology accompanied by major depressive disorder (MDD) or pervasive distress. The current study evaluated whether (a) THT+ as indexed by reported dispositional fearfulness mediates the relationship between fear disorders (when unaccompanied by depression) and ASP, and (b) depression moderates relations of THT+ and fear disorders with ASP. Fear disorder participants without MDD showed enhanced ASP whereas those with MDD (or other distress conditions) showed evidence of reduced ASP. Continuous THT+ scores also predicted ASP, and this association: (a) was likewise moderated by depression/distress, and (b) accounted for the relationship between ASP and fear pathology without MDD. These findings point to a role for the RDoC construct of acute threat, operationalized dispositionally, in enhanced ASP shown by individuals with fear pathology unaccompanied by distress pathology. PMID:25448265

  8. Alcohol selectively reduces anxiety but not fear: Startle response during unpredictable vs. predictable threat

    PubMed Central

    Moberg, Christine A.; Curtin, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent theory and empirical research has suggested that fear and anxiety are distinct processes with separable neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, a laboratory procedure has been developed to manipulate fear vs. anxiety independently via administration of predictable or unpredictable electric shock, respectively. Benzodiazepines appear to selectively reduce anxiety but not fear in this procedure. The primary aim of this experiment was to determine if alcohol produced a similar selective reduction in anxiety. Intoxicated (target blood alcohol concentration of 0.08%) and non-intoxicated participants viewed a series of colored squares separated by variable inter-trial intervals (ITI) in three conditions. In the predictable shock condition, shocks were administered contingently during every square. In the unpredictable shock condition, shocks were administered non-contingently during both squares and ITIs. In the no-shock condition, no shocks were administered at any time. Alcohol significantly reduced startle potentiation during cues signaling unpredictable but not predictable shock, consistent with the thesis that alcohol selectively reduces anxiety but not fear. In addition, alcohol’s effect on startle potentiation during unpredictable shock was mediated by vigilance. This anxiolytic effect may clarify the nature of alcohol’s reinforcing effects in social and problem drinkers. PMID:19413408

  9. Startle Response to Unpredictable Threat in Comorbid Panic Disorder and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Gorka, Stephanie M.; Nelson, Brady D.; Shankman, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the adverse consequences of comorbid panic disorder (PD) and alcohol dependence (AD) are well-established, relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying their co-occurrence. Several researchers have postulated that alcohol's ability to dampen response to unpredictable threat may be an important motivational factor in comorbid PD and AD. To date, no research has examined these processes using a clinical sample and it is unclear whether individuals with PD and AD evidence different reactivity to unpredictable threat relative to individuals with PD-only. Methods The aim of the current study was to examine differences in aversive responding during predictable and unpredictable threat-of-shock in three groups of individuals with: 1) current PD and remitted AD (PD and AD), 2) current PD but no lifetime diagnosis of AD (PD-only), and 3) no lifetime diagnoses of PD or AD (controls). Aversive responding was assessed using a well-established electromyography (EMG) startle paradigm. Results Results indicated that PD and AD individuals evidenced greater startle potentiation during unpredictable (but not predictable) threat relative to controls and PD-only individuals (who did not differ). Conclusions These findings suggest that heightened reactivity to unpredictable threat may be an important process in PD and AD comorbidity and a possible key motivational factor underlying engagement in alcohol use. PMID:23465734

  10. Alcohol selectively reduces anxiety but not fear: startle response during unpredictable versus predictable threat.

    PubMed

    Moberg, Christine A; Curtin, John J

    2009-05-01

    Recent theory and empirical research have suggested that fear and anxiety are distinct processes with separable neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, a laboratory procedure has been developed to manipulate fear versus anxiety independently via administration of predictable or unpredictable electric shock, respectively. Benzodiazepines appear to selectively reduce anxiety but not fear in this procedure. The primary aim of this experiment was to determine if alcohol produced a similar selective reduction in anxiety. Intoxicated (target blood alcohol concentration of .08%) and nonintoxicated participants viewed a series of colored squares separated by variable intertrial intervals (ITIs) in 3 conditions. In the predictable shock condition, shocks were administered contingently during every square. In the unpredictable shock condition, shocks were administered noncontingently during both squares and ITIs. In the no-shock condition, no shocks were administered at any time. Alcohol significantly reduced startle potentiation during cues signaling unpredictable but not predictable shock, consistent with the thesis that alcohol selectively reduces anxiety but not fear. In addition, alcohol's effect on startle potentiation during unpredictable shock was mediated by vigilance. This anxiolytic effect may clarify the nature of alcohol's reinforcing effects in social and problem drinkers.

  11. Clarifying the role of defensive reactivity deficits in psychopathy and antisocial personality using startle reflex methodology.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Hall, Jason R; Patrick, Christopher J; Bernat, Edward M

    2011-02-01

    Prior research has demonstrated deficits in defensive reactivity (indexed by potentiation of the startle blink reflex) in psychopathic individuals. However, the basis of this association remains unclear, as diagnostic criteria for psychopathy encompass two distinct phenotypic components that may reflect differing neurobiological mechanisms-an affective-interpersonal component and an antisocial deviance component. Likewise, the role of defensive response deficits in antisocial personality disorder (APD), a related but distinct syndrome, remains to be clarified. In the current study, the authors examined affective priming deficits in relation to factors of psychopathy and symptoms of APD using startle reflex methods in 108 adult male prisoners. Deficits in blink reflex potentiation during aversive picture viewing were found in relation to the affective-interpersonal (Factor 1) component of psychopathy, and to a lesser extent in relation to the antisocial deviance (Factor 2) component of psychopathy and symptoms of APD-but only as a function of their overlap with affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy. These findings provide clear evidence that deficits in defensive reactivity are linked specifically to the affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy and not to the antisocial deviance features represented most strongly in APD.

  12. Aversive startle potentiation and fear pathology: Mediating role of threat sensitivity and moderating impact of depression.

    PubMed

    Yancey, James R; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Patrick, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Enhanced startle reactivity during exposure to unpleasant cues (aversive startle potentiation; ASP) appears in the RDoC matrix as a physiological index of acute threat response. Increased ASP has been linked to focal fear disorders and to scale measures of dispositional fearfulness (i.e., threat sensitivity; THT+). However, some studies have reported reduced ASP for fear pathology accompanied by major depressive disorder (MDD) or pervasive distress. The current study evaluated whether (a) THT+ as indexed by reported dispositional fearfulness mediates the relationship between fear disorders (when unaccompanied by depression) and ASP, and (b) depression moderates relations of THT+ and fear disorders with ASP. Fear disorder participants without MDD showed enhanced ASP whereas those with MDD (or other distress conditions) showed evidence of reduced ASP. Continuous THT+ scores also predicted ASP, and this association: (a) was likewise moderated by depression/distress, and (b) accounted for the relationship between ASP and fear pathology without MDD. These findings point to a role for the RDoC construct of acute threat, operationalized dispositionally, in enhanced ASP shown by individuals with fear pathology unaccompanied by distress pathology.

  13. Acoustic startle/escape reactions in tethered flying locusts: motor patterns and wing kinematics underlying intentional steering.

    PubMed

    Dawson, J W; Leung, F-H; Robertson, R M

    2004-07-01

    We simultaneously recorded flight muscle activity and wing kinematics in tethered, flying locusts to determine the relationship between asymmetric depressor muscle activation and the kinematics of the stroke reversal at the onset of wing depression during attempted intentional steering manoeuvres. High-frequency, pulsed sounds produced bilateral asymmetries in forewing direct depressor muscles (M97, 98, 99) that were positively correlated with asymmetric forewing depression and asymmetries in stroke reversal timing. Bilateral asymmetries in hindwing depressor muscles (M127 and M128 but not M129) were positively correlated with asymmetric hindwing depression and asymmetries in the timing of the hindwing stroke reversal; M129 was negatively correlated with these shifts. Hindwing depressor asymmetries and wing kinematic changes were smaller and shifted in opposite direction than corresponding measurements of the forewings. These findings suggest that intentional steering manoeuvres employ bulk shifts in depressor muscle timing that affect the timing of the stroke reversals thereby establishing asymmetric wing depression. Finally, we found indications that locusts may actively control the timing of forewing rotation and speculate this may be a mechanism for generating steering torques. These effects would act in concert with forces generated by asymmetric wing depression and angle of attack to establish rapid changes in direction. PMID:15127218

  14. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  15. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  16. Acoustic temperature measurement in a rocket noise field.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Jarom H; Gee, Kent L; Ellsworth, John E

    2010-05-01

    A 1 μm diameter platinum wire resistance thermometer has been used to measure temperature fluctuations generated during a static GEM-60 rocket motor test. Exact and small-signal relationships between acoustic pressure and acoustic temperature are derived in order to compare the temperature probe output with that of a 3.18 mm diameter condenser microphone. After preliminary plane wave tests yielded good agreement between the transducers within the temperature probe's ∼2 kHz bandwidth, comparison between the temperature probe and microphone data during the motor firing show that the ±∼3 K acoustic temperature fluctuations are a significant contributor to the total temperature variations.

  17. Meclizine enhancement of sensorimotor gating in healthy male subjects with high startle responses and low prepulse inhibition.

    PubMed

    Larrauri, José A; Kelley, Lisalynn D; Jenkins, Mason R; Westman, Eric C; Schmajuk, Nestor A; Rosenthal, M Zachary; Levin, Edward D

    2014-02-01

    Histamine H1 receptor systems have been shown in animal studies to have important roles in the reversal of sensorimotor gating deficits, as measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI). H1-antagonist treatment attenuates the PPI impairments caused by either blockade of NMDA glutamate receptors or facilitation of dopamine transmission. The current experiment brought the investigation of H1 effects on sensorimotor gating to human studies. The effects of the histamine H1 antagonist meclizine on the startle response and PPI were investigated in healthy male subjects with high baseline startle responses and low PPI levels. Meclizine was administered to participants (n=24) using a within-subjects design with each participant receiving 0, 12.5, and 25 mg of meclizine in a counterbalanced order. Startle response, PPI, heart rate response, galvanic skin response, and changes in self-report ratings of alertness levels and affective states (arousal and valence) were assessed. When compared with the control (placebo) condition, the two doses of meclizine analyzed (12.5 and 25 mg) produced significant increases in PPI without affecting the magnitude of the startle response or other physiological variables. Meclizine also caused a significant increase in overall self-reported arousal levels, which was not correlated with the observed increase in PPI. These results are in agreement with previous reports in the animal literature and suggest that H1 antagonists may have beneficial effects in the treatment of subjects with compromised sensorimotor gating and enhanced motor responses to sensory stimuli. PMID:24045586

  18. Meclizine Enhancement of Sensorimotor Gating in Healthy Male Subjects with High Startle Responses and Low Prepulse Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Larrauri, José A; Kelley, Lisalynn D; Jenkins, Mason R; Westman, Eric C; Schmajuk, Nestor A; Rosenthal, M Zachary; Levin, Edward D

    2014-01-01

    Histamine H1 receptor systems have been shown in animal studies to have important roles in the reversal of sensorimotor gating deficits, as measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI). H1-antagonist treatment attenuates the PPI impairments caused by either blockade of NMDA glutamate receptors or facilitation of dopamine transmission. The current experiment brought the investigation of H1 effects on sensorimotor gating to human studies. The effects of the histamine H1 antagonist meclizine on the startle response and PPI were investigated in healthy male subjects with high baseline startle responses and low PPI levels. Meclizine was administered to participants (n=24) using a within-subjects design with each participant receiving 0, 12.5, and 25 mg of meclizine in a counterbalanced order. Startle response, PPI, heart rate response, galvanic skin response, and changes in self-report ratings of alertness levels and affective states (arousal and valence) were assessed. When compared with the control (placebo) condition, the two doses of meclizine analyzed (12.5 and 25 mg) produced significant increases in PPI without affecting the magnitude of the startle response or other physiological variables. Meclizine also caused a significant increase in overall self-reported arousal levels, which was not correlated with the observed increase in PPI. These results are in agreement with previous reports in the animal literature and suggest that H1 antagonists may have beneficial effects in the treatment of subjects with compromised sensorimotor gating and enhanced motor responses to sensory stimuli. PMID:24045586

  19. Contextual-Specificity of Short-Delay Extinction in Humans: Renewal of Fear-Potentiated Startle in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Ruben P.; Johnson, Linda; Grillon, Christian

    2007-01-01

    A recent fear-potentiated startle study in rodents suggested that extinction was not context dependent when extinction was conducted after a short delay following acquisition, suggesting that extinction can lead to erasure of fear learning in some circumstances. The main objective of this study was to attempt to replicate these findings in humans…

  20. Becoming the center of attention in social anxiety disorder: Startle reactivity to a virtual audience during speech anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Brian R.; Heller, Randi; Biggs, Arter; Pine, Daniel S.; Grillon, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Objective A detailed understanding of how individuals diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD) respond physiologically under social-evaluative threat is lacking. We aimed to isolate the specific components of public speaking that trigger fear in vulnerable individuals and best discriminate among SAD and healthy individuals. Method Sixteen individuals diagnosed with SAD and 16 healthy individuals were asked to prepare and deliver a short speech in a virtual reality (VR) environment. The VR environment simulated standing center stage before a live audience and allowed us to gradually introduce social cues during speech anticipation. Startle eye-blink responses were elicited periodically by white noise bursts presented during anticipation, speech delivery, and recovery in VR, as well as outside VR during an initial habituation phase. Results SAD individuals reported greater distress and state anxiety than healthy individuals across the entire procedure (ps < .005). Analyses of startle reactivity revealed a robust group difference during speech anticipation in VR, specifically as audience members directed their eye gaze and turned their attention toward participants (p < .05, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusions The VR environment is sufficiently realistic to provoke fear and anxiety in individuals highly vulnerable to socially threatening situations. SAD individuals showed potentiated startle, indicative of a strong phasic fear response, specifically when they perceived themselves as occupying the focus of others' attention as speech time approached. Potentiated startle under social-evaluative threat indexes SAD-related fear of negative evaluation. PMID:21034683

  1. Variation in acoustic overstimulation changes tinnitus characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, L; Schauen, A; Abendroth, S; Gaese, B H; Nowotny, M

    2015-12-01

    Tinnitus often occurs after exposure to loud noise. This raises the question of whether repeated exposure to noise increases the risk of developing tinnitus. We thus studied tinnitus development after repeated acoustic overstimulation using startle and auditory brainstem-response techniques applied to Mongolian gerbils. Noise with bandwidths ranging from 0.25 up to 0.5 oct were used for repeated acoustic overstimulation. Auditory brainstem response measurements revealed similar threshold shifts in both groups of up to about 30 dB directly after the acoustic overstimulation. We identified an upper limit in threshold values, which was independent of the baseline values before the noise exposure. Several weeks after the acoustic overstimulation, animals with the noise bandwidth of 0.25 oct showed a permanent threshold shift, while animals of the group with the 0.5-oct noise band featured only a temporary threshold shift. We thus conclude that the threshold shift directly after noise exposure cannot be used as an indicator for the upcoming threshold level several weeks later. By using behavioral measurements, we investigated the frequency-dependent development of tinnitus-related changes in both groups and one group with 1-oct noise bandwidth. The number of animals that show tinnitus-related changes was highest in animals that received noise with the bandwidth 0.5 oct. This number was, in contrast to the number of animals in the 0.25-oct bandwidth, not significantly increased after repeated overstimulation. The frequency distribution of tinnitus-related changes ranged from 4 to 20 kHz. In the group with the narrow-band noise (0.25 oct) changes center at one frequency range from 10 to 12 kHz. In the group with the broader noise band (0.5 oct), however, two peaks at 8-10 kHz and at 16-18 kHz were found, which suggests that different mechanisms underlie the tinnitus development.

  2. Proteomics tools reveal startlingly high amounts of oxytocin in plasma and serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Johnsen, Elin; Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Seip, Knut Fredrik; Maclean, Evan L.; Gesquiere, Laurence R.; Leknes, Siri; Lundanes, Elsa; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2016-08-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) is associated with a plethora of social behaviors, and is a key topic at the intersection of psychology and biology. However, tools for measuring OT are still not fully developed. We describe a robust nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) platform for measuring the total amount of OT in human plasma/serum. OT binds strongly to plasma proteins, but a reduction/alkylation (R/A) procedure breaks this bond, enabling ample detection of total OT. The method (R/A + robust nanoLC-MS) was used to determine total OT plasma/serum levels to startlingly high concentrations (high pg/mL-ng/mL). Similar results were obtained when combining R/A and ELISA. Compared to measuring free OT, measuring total OT can have advantages in e.g. biomarker studies.

  3. Reactions to sonic booms: a report of two studies and a general evaluation of startle effects.

    PubMed

    Thackray, R I; Touchstone, R M; Bailey, J P

    1975-04-01

    Two separate studies are reported. The first attempted to determine a sonic boom level below which startle would not occurr. Subjects were exposed indoors to six simulated sonic booms having outside overpressures of 50, 30, and 16 N/m-2 (inside levels of 74, 71, and 65 dBA). Approximately 20% of the subjects gave small arm-hand responses to the two higher exposure levels, while none responded to the lowest level. In the second study, subjects were exposed indoors to a series of 12 simulated booms in order to assess habituation effects. Outside overpressures were 130 and 50 N/m-2 (indoor levels of 81 and 72 dBA). Significant, but not complete, habituation occurred to booms of both levels. Autonomic and eyeblink responses, as well as ratings of annoyance, were obtained in both studies. The final section summarizes the expected behavioral, autonomic, and subjective effects of exposure to various levels of sonic booms. PMID:1147871

  4. Proteomics tools reveal startlingly high amounts of oxytocin in plasma and serum

    PubMed Central

    Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Johnsen, Elin; Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Seip, Knut Fredrik; MacLean, Evan L.; Gesquiere, Laurence R.; Leknes, Siri; Lundanes, Elsa; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) is associated with a plethora of social behaviors, and is a key topic at the intersection of psychology and biology. However, tools for measuring OT are still not fully developed. We describe a robust nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) platform for measuring the total amount of OT in human plasma/serum. OT binds strongly to plasma proteins, but a reduction/alkylation (R/A) procedure breaks this bond, enabling ample detection of total OT. The method (R/A + robust nanoLC-MS) was used to determine total OT plasma/serum levels to startlingly high concentrations (high pg/mL-ng/mL). Similar results were obtained when combining R/A and ELISA. Compared to measuring free OT, measuring total OT can have advantages in e.g. biomarker studies. PMID:27528413

  5. Proteomics tools reveal startlingly high amounts of oxytocin in plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Johnsen, Elin; Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Seip, Knut Fredrik; MacLean, Evan L; Gesquiere, Laurence R; Leknes, Siri; Lundanes, Elsa; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) is associated with a plethora of social behaviors, and is a key topic at the intersection of psychology and biology. However, tools for measuring OT are still not fully developed. We describe a robust nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) platform for measuring the total amount of OT in human plasma/serum. OT binds strongly to plasma proteins, but a reduction/alkylation (R/A) procedure breaks this bond, enabling ample detection of total OT. The method (R/A + robust nanoLC-MS) was used to determine total OT plasma/serum levels to startlingly high concentrations (high pg/mL-ng/mL). Similar results were obtained when combining R/A and ELISA. Compared to measuring free OT, measuring total OT can have advantages in e.g. biomarker studies. PMID:27528413

  6. Facial Expression Recognition, Fear Conditioning, and Startle Modulation in Female Subjects with Conduct Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fairchild, Graeme; Stobbe, Yvette; van Goozen, Stephanie H.M.; Calder, Andrew J.; Goodyer, Ian M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent behavioral and psychophysiological studies have provided converging evidence for emotional dysfunction in conduct disorder (CD). Most of these studies focused on male subjects and little is known about emotional processing in female subjects with CD. Our primary aim was to characterize explicit and implicit aspects of emotion function to determine whether deficits in these processes are present in girls with CD. Methods Female adolescents with CD (n = 25) and control subjects with no history of severe antisocial behavior and no current psychiatric disorder (n = 30) completed tasks measuring facial expression and facial identity recognition, differential autonomic conditioning, and affective modulation of the startle reflex by picture valence. Results Compared with control subjects, participants with CD showed impaired recognition of anger and disgust but no differences in facial identity recognition. Impaired sadness recognition was observed in CD participants high in psychopathic traits relative to those lower in psychopathic traits. Participants with CD displayed reduced skin conductance responses to an aversive unconditioned stimulus and impaired autonomic discrimination between the conditioned stimuli, indicating impaired fear conditioning. Participants with CD also showed reduced startle magnitudes across picture valence types, but there were no significant group differences in the pattern of affective modulation. Conclusions Adolescent female subjects with CD exhibited deficits in explicit and implicit tests of emotion function and reduced autonomic responsiveness across different output systems. There were, however, no differences in emotional reactivity. These findings suggest that emotional recognition and learning are impaired in female subjects with CD, consistent with results previously obtained in male subjects with CD. PMID:20447616

  7. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  8. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  9. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  10. Self-report and startle-based measures of emotional reactions to body image cues as predictors of Drive for Thinness and Body Dissatisfaction in female college students.

    PubMed

    Spresser, Carrie D; Keune, Kristen M; Filion, Diane L; Lundgren, Jennifer D

    2012-03-01

    The purpose was to compare self-report and psychophysiological assessment techniques in the measurement of emotional response to body image cues. Female college students (n=53; % Caucasian=53.6; M body mass index=26.1 kg/m²) completed the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-3) and viewed photos of themselves both unaltered and morphed to simulate weight gain. Response to the photos was assessed by self-report and the affect modulated startle paradigm. EDI-3 Drive for Thinness (DT) and Body Dissatisfaction (BD) scale scores were correlated with startled amplitude for the largest simulated weight gain photo. Startle eye blink amplitude predicted more variance in DT and BD subscales than self-reported response to the image. The affect modulated startle paradigm may provide unique information in the assessment of eating disorder symptomatology that cannot be captured via self-report techniques, and has potential to inform evaluation of treatment outcomes of eating and body image disorders.

  11. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  12. The pivotal role of the supplementary motor area in startle epilepsy as demonstrated by SEEG epileptogenicity maps.

    PubMed

    Job, Anne-Sophie; De Palma, Luca; Principe, Alessandro; Hoffmann, Dominique; Minotti, Lorella; Chabardès, Stephan; David, Olivier; Kahane, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Startle seizures belong to reflex epilepsy syndromes. They usually occur in patients with mental deficiency and showing widely extended cortical lesions, often involving the sensorimotor area. Here we report three cases who did not fulfill these criteria, and in whom stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) recordings demonstrated the prominent involvement of the supplementary motor area (SMA). Visual analysis was complemented by time-frequency analysis of SEEG signals using a neuroimaging approach (Epileptogenicity Maps), which showed at seizure onset a significant increase of high frequency oscillations (HFOs, 60-100 Hz) over the premotor and prefrontal areas. Critically, in all cases, the SMA showed ictal HFOs at seizure onset and was included in the surgical resection. All patients became seizure-free after surgery, and histopathological examinations showed no specific lesion. These cases suggest the prominent but not exclusive role of SMA in startle seizures, and highlight the fact that surgery can be considered even in the absence of any magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesion.

  13. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  14. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  15. ADORA2A Gene Variation, Caffeine, and Emotional Processing: A Multi-level Interaction on Startle Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Domschke, Katharina; Gajewska, Agnieszka; Winter, Bernward; Herrmann, Martin J; Warrings, Bodo; Mühlberger, Andreas; Wosnitza, Katherina; Glotzbach, Evelyn; Conzelmann, Annette; Dlugos, Andrea; Fobker, Manfred; Jacob, Christian; Arolt, Volker; Reif, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    There is converging evidence for genetic, biochemical, and neuropsychological factors to increase the risk for anxiety and anxiety disorders. The pathogenesis of anxiety disorders is assumed to be influenced by a complex interaction of these individual risk factors on several levels, affecting intermediate phenotypes of anxiety such as the startle reflex. Thus, in the present double-blind, placebo-controlled study we attempted to paradigmatically investigate a multi-level pathogenetic model of anxiety by testing the effect of 300 mg caffeine citrate as an antagonist at the adenosine A2A receptor vs placebo on the emotion-potentiated (unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant International Affective Picture System pictures) startle reflex in 110 healthy individuals (male=56, female=54) stratified for the adenosine A2A receptor (ADORA2A) 1976T>C polymorphism (rs5751876). In addition to the expected main effect of picture category (highest startle amplitude for unpleasant, lowest for pleasant pictures) groups across all ADORA2A 1976T>C genotype and intervention (caffeine vs placebo) groups, an interaction effect of genotype, intervention, and picture category was discerned: In ADORA2A 1976TT risk genotype carriers, highest startle magnitudes were observed after caffeine administration in response to unpleasant pictures, with this effect arising particularly from the female subgroup. Our data point to a complex, multi-level, and potentially gender-specific pathogenetic model of anxiety, with genetic and biochemical factors interactively increasing the risk of maladaptive emotional processing and thereby possibly also anxiety disorders. The present findings may eventually aid in improving primary and secondary prevention by sharpening the risk profiles of anxiety-prone individuals. PMID:22012471

  16. Glycine and GABAA receptors mediate tonic and phasic inhibitory processes that contribute to prepulse inhibition in the goldfish startle network

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Paul C. P.; Preuss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is understood as a sensorimotor gating process that attenuates sensory flow to the startle pathway during early stages (20–1000 ms) of information processing. Here, we applied in vivo electrophysiology and pharmacology to determine if PPI is mediated by glycine receptors (GlyRs) and/or GABAA receptors (GABAARs) in the goldfish auditory startle circuit. Specifically, we used selective antagonists to dissect the contributions of target receptors on sound-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) recorded in the neurons that initiate startle, the Mauthner-cells (M-cell). We found that strychnine, a GlyR antagonist, disrupted a fast-activated (5 ms) and rapidly (<50 ms) decaying (feed-forward) inhibitory process that contributes to PPI at 20 ms prepulse/pulse inter-stimulus intervals (ISI). Additionally we observed increases of the evoked postsynaptic potential (PSP) peak amplitude (+87.43 ± 21.53%, N = 9) and duration (+204 ± 48.91%, N = 9). In contrast, treatment with bicuculline, a GABAAR antagonist, caused a general reduction in PPI across all tested interstimulus intervals (ISIs) (20–500 ms). Bicuculline also increased PSP peak amplitude (+133.8 ± 10.3%, N = 5) and PSP duration (+284.95 ± 65.64%, N = 5). Treatment with either antagonist also tonically increased post-synaptic excitability in the M-cells, reflected by an increase in the magnitude of antidromically-evoked action potentials (APs) by 15.07 ± 3.21%, N = 7 and 16.23 ± 7.08%, N = 5 for strychnine and bicuculline, respectively. These results suggest that GABAARs and GlyRs are functionally segregated to short- and longer-lasting sound-evoked (phasic) inhibitory processes that contribute to PPI, with the mediation of tonic inhibition by both receptor systems being critical for gain control within the M-cell startle circuit. PMID:25852486

  17. Prediction of Acoustic Noise in Switched Reluctance Motor Drives

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, CJ; Fahimi, B

    2014-03-01

    Prediction of acoustic noise distribution generated by electric machines has become an integral part of design and control in noise sensitive applications. This paper presents a fast and precise acoustic noise imaging technique for switched reluctance machines (SRMs). This method is based on distribution of radial vibration in the stator frame of the SRM. Radial vibration of the stator frame, at a network of probing points, is computed using input phase current and phase voltage waveforms. Sequentially, the acceleration of the probing network will be expanded to predict full acceleration on the stator frame surface, using which acoustic noise emission caused by the stator can be calculated using the boundary element method.

  18. Persistence of pain induced by startle and forehead cooling after sympathetic blockade in patients with complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, P; Finch, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: Stimuli arousing sympathetic activity can increase ratings of clinical pain in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Objective: To determine whether the increase in pain is mediated by peripheral sympathetic activity. Methods: The effect of sympathetic ganglion blockade on pain evoked by a startle stimulus and cooling the forehead was investigated in 36 CRPS patients. Results: Loss of vasoconstrictor reflexes and warming of the limb indicated that sympathetic blockade was effective in 26 cases. Before sympathetic blockade, pain increased in 12 of these 26 patients when they were startled. Pain increased in seven of the 12 patients and in another five cases when their forehead was cooled. As expected, pain that increased during sympathetic arousal generally subsided in patients with signs of sympathetic blockade. However, pain still increased in three of 12 of patients after the startle stimulus and in six of 12 of patients during forehead cooling, despite indisputable sympathetic blockade. Conclusions: These findings suggest that stimuli arousing sympathetic activity act by a central process to exacerbate pain in some patients, independent of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. This may account for the lack of effect of peripheral sympathetic blockade on pain in some CRPS patients. PMID:14707316

  19. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  20. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  1. Long-lived coherent traveling acoustic pulses induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jincheng; Guo, Chunlei

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we systematically study the generation and propagation of coherent acoustic pulses in a metal-dielectric system using a two-color femtosecond pump-probe technique at different probe angles. A long-lived acoustic oscillation is observed in a borosilicate glass coated with gold and shows different attenuations and amplitude at different probe wavelengths. Our study demonstrates that the two-color optical pump-probe technique can be used as a noninvasive tool to study acoustic properties of dielectric materials.

  2. Visual Complexity Attenuates Emotional Processing in Psychopathy: Implications for Fear-Potentiated Startle Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Sadeh, Naomi; Verona, Edelyn

    2012-01-01

    A long-standing debate is the extent to which psychopathy is characterized by a fundamental deficit in attention or emotion. We tested the hypothesis that the interplay of emotional and attentional systems is critical for understanding processing deficits in psychopathy. Sixty-three offenders were assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and fear-potentiated startle (FPS) were collected while participants viewed pictures selected to disentangle an existing confound between perceptual complexity and emotional content in the pictures typically used to study fear deficits in psychopathy. As predicted, picture complexity moderated emotional processing deficits. Specifically, the affective-interpersonal features of psychopathy were associated with greater allocation of attentional resources to processing emotional stimuli at initial perception (visual N1) but only when picture stimuli were visually-complex. Despite this, results for the late positive potential indicated that emotional pictures were less attentionally engaging and held less motivational significance for individuals high in affective-interpersonal traits. This deficient negative emotional processing was observed later in their reduced defensive fear reactivity (FPS) to high-complexity unpleasant pictures. In contrast, the impulsive-antisocial features of psychopathy were associated with decreased sensitivity to picture complexity (visual N1) and unrelated to emotional processing as assessed by ERP and FPS. These findings are the first to demonstrate that picture complexity moderates FPS deficits and implicate the interplay of attention and emotional systems as deficient in psychopathy. PMID:22187225

  3. The effects of flow on schooling Devario aequipinnatus: school structure, startle response and information transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chicoli, A.; Butail, S.; Lun, Y.; Bak-Coleman, J.; Coombs, S.; Paley, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    To assess how flow affects school structure and threat detection, startle response rates of solitary and small groups of giant danio Devario aequipinnatus were compared to visual looming stimuli in flow and no-flow conditions. The instantaneous position and heading of each D. aequipinnatus were extracted from high-speed videos. Behavioural results indicate that (1) school structure is altered in flow such that D. aequipinnatus orient upstream while spanning out in a crosswise direction, (2) the probability of at least one D. aequipinnatus detecting the visual looming stimulus is higher in flow than no flow for both solitary D. aequipinnatus and groups of eight D. aequipinnatus, however, (3) the probability of three or more individuals responding is higher in no flow than flow. Taken together, these results indicate a higher probability of stimulus detection in flow but a higher probability of internal transmission of information in no flow. Finally, results were well predicted by a computational model of collective fright response that included the probability of direct detection (based on signal detection theory) and indirect detection (i.e. via interactions between group members) of threatening stimuli. This model provides a new theoretical framework for analysing the collective transfer of information among groups of fishes and other organisms. PMID:24773538

  4. Depletion of serotonin in the basolateral amygdala elevates glutamate receptors and facilitates fear-potentiated startle

    PubMed Central

    Tran, L; Lasher, B K; Young, K A; Keele, N B

    2013-01-01

    Our previous experiments demonstrated that systemic depletion of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), similar to levels reported in patients with emotional disorders, enhanced glutamateric activity in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) and potentiated fear behaviors. However, the effects of isolated depletion of 5-HT in the LA, and the molecular mechanisms underlying enhanced glutamatergic activity are unknown. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that depletion of 5-HT in the LA induces increased fear behavior, and concomitantly enhances glutamate receptor (GluR) expression. Bilateral infusions of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (4 μg per side) into the LA produced a regional reduction of serotonergic fibers, resulting in decreased 5-HT concentrations. The induction of low 5-HT in the LA elevated fear-potentiated startle, with a parallel increase in GluR1 mRNA and GluR1 protein expression. These findings suggest that low 5-HT concentrations in the LA may facilitate fear behavior through enhanced GluR-mediated mechanisms. Moreover, our data support a relationship between 5-HT and glutamate in psychopathologies. PMID:24002084

  5. Acoustic emission descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, Franciszek; Malecki, Ignacy

    The authors present selected problems associated with acoustic emission interpreted as a physical phenomenon and as a measurement technique. The authors examine point sources of acoustic emission in isotropic, homogeneous linearly elastic media of different shapes. In the case of an unbounded medium the authors give the analytical form of the stress field and the wave shift field of the acoustic emission. In the case of a medium which is unbounded plate the authors give a form for the equations which is suitable for numerical calculation of the changes over time of selected acoustic emission values. For acoustic emission as a measurement technique, the authors represent the output signal as the resultant of a mechanical input value which describes the source, the transient function of the medium, and the transient function of specific components of the measurement loop. As an effect of this notation, the authors introduce the distinction between an acoustic measurement signal and an acoustic measurement impulse. The authors define the basic parameters of an arbitrary impulse. The authors extensively discuss the signal functions of acoustic emission impulses and acoustic emission signals defined in this article as acoustic emission descriptors (or signal functions of acoustic emission impulses) and advanced acoustic emission descriptors (which are either descriptors associated with acoustic emission applications or the signal functions of acoustic emission signals). The article also contains the results of experimental research on three different problems in which acoustic emission descriptors associated with acoustic emission pulses, acoustic emission applications, and acoustic emission signals are used. These problems are respectively: a problem of the amplitude-load characteristics of acoustic emission pulses in carbon samples subjected to compound uniaxial compression, the use of acoustic emission to predict the durability characteristics of conveyor belts, and

  6. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  7. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  8. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  9. Distance Probes of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D' Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosely, S. E.

    2015-03-15

    We present the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). This document summarizes the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  10. Extinction of fear-potentiated startle: blockade by infusion of an NMDA antagonist into the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Falls, W A; Miserendino, M J; Davis, M

    1992-03-01

    Data derived from in vitro preparations indicate that NMDA receptors play a critical role in synaptic plasticity in the CNS. More recently, in vivo pharmacological manipulations have suggested that an NMDA-dependent process may be involved in specific forms of behavioral plasticity. All of the work thus far has focused on the possible role of NMDA receptors in the acquisition of responses. However, there are many examples in the behavioral literature of learning-induced changes that involve the reduction or elimination of a previously acquired response. Experimental extinction is a primary example of the elimination of a learned response. Experimental extinction is well described in the behavioral literature, but has not received the same attention in the neurobiological literature. As a result, the neural mechanisms that underlie this important form of learning are not at all understood. In the present experiments, the fear-potentiated startle paradigm was employed to begin to investigate neural mechanisms of extinction. The results show that infusion of the NMDA antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) into the amygdala, a limbic structure known to be important for fear conditioning, dose-dependently blocked extinction of conditioned fear. Control experiments showed that the blockade of extinction was neither the result of the permanent disruption of amygdaloid function nor the result of decreased sensitivity of the animals to the conditioned stimulus. Infusion of AP5 into the interpositus nucleus of the cerebellum, a control site, did not block extinction. Finally, intra-amygdala infusion of a selected dose of the non-NMDA antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione did not block extinction of conditioned fear. These results, together with a previous report from our laboratory (Miserendino et al., 1990), demonstrate the importance of the amygdala in the elaboration of conditioned fear and suggest that an NMDA-dependent process might underlie the

  11. The impact of early neglect on defensive and appetitive physiology during the pubertal transition: a study of startle and postauricular reflexes.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Karina; Johnson, Anna E; Loman, Michelle M; Lafavor, Theresa; Moua, Bao; Gunnar, Megan R

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the effect of early neglect on defensive and appetitive physiology during puberty. Emotion-modulated reflexes, eye-blink startle (defensive) and postauricular (appetitive), were measured in 12-to-13-year-old internationally adopted youth (from foster care or from institutional settings) and compared to non-adopted US born controls. Startle Reflex: adopted youth displayed lower overall startle amplitude across all valences and startle potentiation to negative images was negatively related to severity of pre-adoption neglect. Postauricular reflex (PAR): adopted youth showed larger PAR magnitude across all valences. Puberty: adopted youth showed diminished PAR potentiation to positive images and startle potentiation during mid/late puberty versus the opposite pattern in not-adopted. Early neglect was associated with blunted fast defensive reflexes and heightened fast appetitive reflexes. After puberty, early neglected youth showed physiological hyporeactivity to threatening and appetitive stimuli versus heightened reactivity in not adopted youth. Behavioral correlates in this sample and possible neurodevelopmental mechanisms of psychophysiological differences are discussed.

  12. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  13. Neural circuits containing olfactory neurons are involved in the prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex in rats

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Haichen; He, Xiaobin; Zhou, Ting; Shi, Xi; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhijian; Qiao, Yuehua; Xu, Fuqiang; Hu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, have been associated with olfactory dysfunction and abnormalities in the prepulse inhibition (PPI) response to a startle reflex. However, whether these two abnormalities could be related is unclear. The present investigations were designed to determine whether theblockage of olfactory sensory input by zinc sulfate infusion in the olfactory naris (0.5 ml, 0.17 M, ZnE) can disturb the PPI response. Furthermore, a bilateral microinjection of lidocaine/MK801 in the olfactory bulb (OB) was administered to examine whether the blockage of olfactory sensory input could impair the PPI response. To identify the neural projection between olfaction and PPI-related areas, trans-synaptic retrograde tracing with the recombinant pseudorabies virus (PRV) was used. Our results demonstrated that blockage of olfactory sensory input could disturb olfactory behavior. In the function studies, we demonstrated that blockage of olfactory sensory input could impair the pre-pulse inhibition of the startle response following decreased c-Fos expression in relevant brain regions during the PPI responses. Furthermore, similar and more robust findings indicated that blockage of olfactory sensory input by microinjection of lidocaine/MK801 in the OB could impair the PPI response. In the circuit-level studies, we demonstrated that trans-synaptic retrograde tracing with PRV exhibited a large portion of labeled neurons in several regions of the olfactory cortices from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg). Thus, these data suggest that the olfactory system participates in the PPI regulating fields and plays a role in the pre-pulse inhibition of the startle response in rats. PMID:25859195

  14. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  15. Cannabidiol, among Other Cannabinoid Drugs, Modulates Prepulse Inhibition of Startle in the SHR Animal Model: Implications for Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peres, Fernanda F; Levin, Raquel; Almeida, Valéria; Zuardi, Antonio W; Hallak, Jaime E; Crippa, José A; Abilio, Vanessa C

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that involves positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Prepulse inhibition of startle reflex (PPI) is a paradigm that assesses the sensorimotor gating functioning and is impaired in schizophrenia patients as well as in animal models of this disorder. Recent data point to the participation of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia. Here, we focus on the effects of cannabinoid drugs on the PPI deficit of animal models of schizophrenia, with greater focus on the SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) strain, and on the future prospects resulting from these findings. PMID:27667973

  16. Cannabidiol, among Other Cannabinoid Drugs, Modulates Prepulse Inhibition of Startle in the SHR Animal Model: Implications for Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Fernanda F.; Levin, Raquel; Almeida, Valéria; Zuardi, Antonio W.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Crippa, José A.; Abilio, Vanessa C.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that involves positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Prepulse inhibition of startle reflex (PPI) is a paradigm that assesses the sensorimotor gating functioning and is impaired in schizophrenia patients as well as in animal models of this disorder. Recent data point to the participation of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia. Here, we focus on the effects of cannabinoid drugs on the PPI deficit of animal models of schizophrenia, with greater focus on the SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) strain, and on the future prospects resulting from these findings.

  17. Cannabidiol, among Other Cannabinoid Drugs, Modulates Prepulse Inhibition of Startle in the SHR Animal Model: Implications for Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Fernanda F.; Levin, Raquel; Almeida, Valéria; Zuardi, Antonio W.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Crippa, José A.; Abilio, Vanessa C.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that involves positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Prepulse inhibition of startle reflex (PPI) is a paradigm that assesses the sensorimotor gating functioning and is impaired in schizophrenia patients as well as in animal models of this disorder. Recent data point to the participation of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia. Here, we focus on the effects of cannabinoid drugs on the PPI deficit of animal models of schizophrenia, with greater focus on the SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) strain, and on the future prospects resulting from these findings. PMID:27667973

  18. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  19. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...

  20. "Glass fairies" and "bone children": adolescents and young adults with anorexia nervosa show positive reactions towards extremely emaciated body pictures measured by the startle reflex paradigm.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Valeska A; Schneider, Nora; Grünewald, Barbara; Kienast, Thorsten; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Korte, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the emotional processing of extremely emaciated body cues in adolescents and young adults with (n  =  36) and without (n =  36) anorexia nervosa (AN), introducing a new picture type, which was taken from websites that promote extreme thinness and is targeted specifically at adolescents interested in extreme thinness. A startle reflex paradigm was used for implicit reactions, while a self-assessment instrument was used for subjective responses. We found a significant group difference with a startle inhibition (appetitive response) among the patients and a startle potentiation (aversive response) among the controls, whereas no such difference for subjective measures was found. The results are in contrast to previous studies, which proposed a general failure to activate the appetitive motivational system in AN, but in keeping with findings from other addictions, where the same response pattern has been found. Implications for prevention and therapy are discussed.

  1. Effect of Seated Trunk Posture on Eye Blink Startle and Subjective Experience: Comparing Flexion, Neutral Upright Posture, and Extension of Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ceunen, Erik; Zaman, Jonas; Vlaeyen, Johan W. S.; Dankaerts, Wim; Van Diest, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Postures are known to be able to affect emotion and motivation. Much less is known about whether (affective) modulation of eye blink startle occurs following specific postures. The objective of the current study was to explore this. Participants in the present study were requested to assume three different sitting postures: with the spine flexed (slouched), neutral upright, and extended. Each posture was assumed for four minutes, and was followed by the administration of brief self-report questionnaires before proceeding to the next posture. The same series of postures and measures were repeated prior to ending the experiment. Results indicate that, relative to the other postures, the extended sitting posture was associated with an increased startle, was more unpleasant, arousing, had smaller levels of dominance, induced more discomfort, and was perceived as more difficult. The upright and flexed sitting postures differed in the level of self-reported positive affect, but not in eye blink startle amplitudes. PMID:24516664

  2. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  4. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  5. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  6. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  7. AX+, BX- discrimination learning in the fear-potentiated startle paradigm: possible relevance to inhibitory fear learning in extinction.

    PubMed

    Myers, Karyn M; Davis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The neural mechanisms of fear suppression most commonly are studied through the use of extinction, a behavioral procedure in which a feared stimulus (i.e., one previously paired with shock) is nonreinforced repeatedly, leading to a reduction or elimination of the fear response. Although extinction is perhaps the most convenient index of fear inhibition, a great deal of behavioral work suggests that postextinction training conditioned stimuli are both excitatory and inhibitory, making it difficult to determine whether a neural manipulation affects inhibition, excitation, or some combination thereof. For this reason we sought to develop a behavioral procedure that would render a stimulus primarily inhibitory while at the same time avoiding some of the issues raised by the traditional conditioned inhibition paradigm, namely second-order conditioning, external inhibition, and configural learning. Using the fear-potentiated startle paradigm, we adapted an AX+, BX- training procedure in which stimuli A and X were presented simultaneously and paired with shock, and stimuli B and X were presented simultaneously in the absence of shock. In testing, high levels of fear-potentiated startle were seen in the presence of A and AX and much lower levels were seen in the presence of B and AB, as would be predicted if stimulus B were a conditioned inhibitor. We believe this method is a viable alternative to the traditional conditioned inhibition training procedure and will be useful for studying the neural mechanisms of fear inhibition.

  8. Prospective Associations between Emotion Dysregulation and Fear-Potentiated Startle: The Moderating Effect of Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Seligowski, Antonia V.; Lee, Daniel J.; Miron, Lynsey R.; Orcutt, Holly K.; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emotion dysregulation has been implicated in the negative outcomes following trauma exposure. A proposed biomarker of emotion dysregulation, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), has demonstrated associations with trauma-related phenomena, such as the fear-potentiated startle (FPS) response. The current study aimed to examine the prospective association between emotion dysregulation and RSA and FPS several years following trauma exposure. Methods: Participants were 131 women exposed to a campus mass shooting on February 14, 2008. Pre-shooting emotion dysregulation was assessed in 2006–2008. Startle response, measured by orbicularis oculi electromyography (EMG), and RSA were gathered during an FPS paradigm conducted from 2012 to 2015. Results: No significant associations among emotion dysregulation, RSA, and FPS emerged among the full sample. However, emotion dysregulation predicted FPS during both acquisition (r = 0.40, p < 0.05) and extinction (r = 0.57, p < 0.01) among individuals with high resting RSA. Conclusions: Findings suggest that pre-shooting emotion dysregulation is a potent predictor of FPS several years following potential trauma exposure, and this association varies by RSA level. Results emphasize the importance of examining autonomic regulation in the association between emotion dysregulation and recovery from trauma exposure. PMID:27199871

  9. Unidirectional startle responses and disrupted left-right coordination of motor behaviors in robo3 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Harold A.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Granato, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Roundabout (Robo) family of receptors and their Slit ligands play well-established roles in axonal guidance, including in humans where horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is caused by mutations in the robo3 gene. While significant progress has been made towards understanding the mechanism by which Robo receptors establish commissural projections in the central nervous system, less is known about how these projections contribute to neural circuits mediating behavior. Here we report cloning of the zebrafish behavioral mutant twitch twice and show that twitch twice encodes robo3. We demonstrate that in mutant hindbrains the axons of an identified pair of neurons, the Mauthner cells, fail to cross the midline. The Mauthner neurons are essential for the startle response, and in twitch twice/robo3 mutants misguidance of the Mauthner axons results in a unidirectional startle response. Moreover, we show that twitch twice mutants exhibit normal visual acuity but display defects in horizontal eye movements, suggesting a specific and critical role for twitch twice/robo3 in sensory guided behavior. PMID:19496826

  10. Acoustic temperature measurement in a rocket noise field.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Jarom H; Gee, Kent L; Ellsworth, John E

    2010-05-01

    A 1 μm diameter platinum wire resistance thermometer has been used to measure temperature fluctuations generated during a static GEM-60 rocket motor test. Exact and small-signal relationships between acoustic pressure and acoustic temperature are derived in order to compare the temperature probe output with that of a 3.18 mm diameter condenser microphone. After preliminary plane wave tests yielded good agreement between the transducers within the temperature probe's ∼2 kHz bandwidth, comparison between the temperature probe and microphone data during the motor firing show that the ±∼3 K acoustic temperature fluctuations are a significant contributor to the total temperature variations. PMID:21117711

  11. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

  12. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension. PMID:19418043

  13. Mechanical perturbations applied during impending movement evoke startle-like responses

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Vengateswaran J.; Shemmell, Jonathan B.; Perreault, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Stretch reflexes have been considered one of the simplest circuits in the human nervous system. Yet, their role is controversial given that they assist or resist an imposed perturbation depending on the task instruction. Evidence shows that a loud acoustic stimulus applied prior to an impending movement elicits a movement-direction dependent muscle activity. In our study, we found that a perturbation can also trigger this early onset of movement, if applied during movement preparation. These responses were also perturbation direction dependent. This suggests an interaction of between the limb-stabilizing stretch reflexes and the voluntary activity. PMID:19963543

  14. Rapid recovery following short-term acoustic disturbance in two fish species

    PubMed Central

    Bruintjes, Rick; Purser, Julia; Everley, Kirsty A.; Mangan, Stephanie; Simpson, Stephen D.; Radford, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    Noise from human activities is known to impact organisms in a variety of taxa, but most experimental studies on the behavioural effects of noise have focused on examining responses associated with the period of actual exposure. Unlike most pollutants, acoustic noise is generally short-lived, usually dissipating quickly after the source is turned off or leaves the area. In a series of experiments, we use established experimental paradigms to examine how fish behaviour and physiology are affected, both during short-term (2 min) exposure to playback of recordings of anthropogenic noise sources and in the immediate aftermath of noise exposure. We considered the anti-predator response and ventilation rate of juvenile European eels (Anguilla anguilla) and ventilation rate of juvenile European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax). As previously found, additional-noise exposure decreased eel anti-predator responses, increased startle latency and increased ventilation rate relative to ambient-noise-exposed controls. Our results show for the first time that those effects quickly dissipated; eels showed rapid recovery of startle responses and startle latency, and rapid albeit incomplete recovery of ventilation rate in the 2 min after noise cessation. Seabass in both laboratory and open-water conditions showed an increased ventilation rate during playback of additional noise compared with ambient conditions. However, within 2 min of noise cessation, ventilation rate showed complete recovery to levels equivalent to ambient-exposed control individuals. Care should be taken in generalizing these rapid-recovery results, as individuals might have accrued other costs during noise exposure and other species might show different recovery times. Nonetheless, our results from two different fish species provide tentative cause for optimism with respect to recovery following short-duration noise exposure, and suggest that considering periods following noise exposures could be important

  15. Rapid recovery following short-term acoustic disturbance in two fish species.

    PubMed

    Bruintjes, Rick; Purser, Julia; Everley, Kirsty A; Mangan, Stephanie; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Noise from human activities is known to impact organisms in a variety of taxa, but most experimental studies on the behavioural effects of noise have focused on examining responses associated with the period of actual exposure. Unlike most pollutants, acoustic noise is generally short-lived, usually dissipating quickly after the source is turned off or leaves the area. In a series of experiments, we use established experimental paradigms to examine how fish behaviour and physiology are affected, both during short-term (2 min) exposure to playback of recordings of anthropogenic noise sources and in the immediate aftermath of noise exposure. We considered the anti-predator response and ventilation rate of juvenile European eels (Anguilla anguilla) and ventilation rate of juvenile European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax). As previously found, additional-noise exposure decreased eel anti-predator responses, increased startle latency and increased ventilation rate relative to ambient-noise-exposed controls. Our results show for the first time that those effects quickly dissipated; eels showed rapid recovery of startle responses and startle latency, and rapid albeit incomplete recovery of ventilation rate in the 2 min after noise cessation. Seabass in both laboratory and open-water conditions showed an increased ventilation rate during playback of additional noise compared with ambient conditions. However, within 2 min of noise cessation, ventilation rate showed complete recovery to levels equivalent to ambient-exposed control individuals. Care should be taken in generalizing these rapid-recovery results, as individuals might have accrued other costs during noise exposure and other species might show different recovery times. Nonetheless, our results from two different fish species provide tentative cause for optimism with respect to recovery following short-duration noise exposure, and suggest that considering periods following noise exposures could be important

  16. [INVITED] Laser generation and detection of ultrafast shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeril, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the up-to-date findings related to ultrafast shear acoustic waves. Recent progress obtained for the laser generation and detection of picosecond shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids is reviewed. Examples in which the transverse isotropic symmetry of the sample structure is broken in order to permit shear acoustic wave generation through sudden laser heating are described in detail. Alternative photo-induced mechanisms for ultrafast shear acoustic generation in metals, semiconductors, insulators, magnetostrictive, piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are reviewed as well. With reference to key experiments, an all-optical technique employed to probe longitudinal and shear structural dynamics in the GHz frequency range in ultra-thin liquid films is described. This technique, based on specific ultrafast shear acoustic transducers, has opened new perspectives that will be discussed for ultrafast shear acoustic probing of viscoelastic liquids at the nanometer scale.

  17. Differential effects of subchronic phencyclidine on anxiety in the light-enhanced startle-, light/dark exploration- and open field tests.

    PubMed

    Enkel, Thomas; Thomas, Mara; Bartsch, Dusan

    2013-04-15

    Subchronic treatment with the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) is a valuable approach to model the symptomatology of schizophrenia, a multi-facetted psychiatric disorder, in rodents. We addressed the question whether subchronic PCP (scPCP) treatment (5 mg/kg bidaily for 7 days) would affect anxiety in rats, since contradictory findings have been reported so far. Anxiety-like behaviour was assessed using the light-enhanced startle paradigm (LES), a method which measures the effect of the natural aversion to light on the startle reflex and does not depend on motivated behaviour or exploratory drive. For comparison, anxiety-like behaviour was measured in the light-dark exploration test (LDT) and in an open field environment (OFT). The scPCP-treatment did not affect baseline startle reactivity or light-enhanced startle, suggesting normal anxiety levels in treated animals. Further, normal anxiety-like behaviour was also found in the OFT. In the LDT, scPCP treated rats displayed shorter latencies to enter the lit compartment and shuttled more between the dark and lit compartments, behaviours indicative of decreased anxiety and/or increased exploratory activity. Our findings therefore suggest that the effects of scPCP-treatment on anxiety-like behaviour are task-dependent and recommend the additional use of tests independent from exploratory drive or other motivated behaviours, such as the LES paradigm.

  18. White matter microstructure of the uncinate fasciculus is associated with subthreshold posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and fear potentiated startle during early extinction in recently deployed Service Members.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Michelle E; Jovanovic, Tanja; Pham, Dzung; Leaman, Suzanne; Highland, Krista B; Norrholm, Seth Davin; Roy, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Early intervention following combat deployment has the potential to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but there is a need for greater understanding of the factors that contribute to PTSD symptom progression. This study investigated: (1) fear-potentiated startle during a fear extinction, (2) white matter microstructure, and (3) PTSD symptom severity, in 48 recently deployed service members (SMs) who did not have sufficient PTSD symptoms to meet criteria for a clinical diagnosis. Electromyography startle during a conditional discrimination paradigm, diffusion tensor imaging, and the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale were assessed in a cohort of SMs within 2 months after their return from Iraq or Afghanistan. Significant correlations were found between left uncinate fasciculus (UF) white matter tract integrity and total PTSD symptoms, r=-0.343, p=0.018; the left UF and hyperarousal symptoms, r=-0.29, p=0.047; right UF integrity and total PTSD symptoms r=-0.3371, p=0.01; right UF integrity and hyperarousal symptoms r=-0.332, p=0.023; left UF and startle during early extinction, r=.31, p=0.033. Our results indicate that compromise of UF tract frontal-limbic connections are associated with greater PTSD symptom severity and lower startle response during extinction. In a subthreshold population, such a relationship between brain structure, physiological reactivity, and behavioral expression may reveal vulnerabilities that could have significant implications for PTSD symptom development. PMID:26923670

  19. Reflectance measurement validation using acoustic horns.

    PubMed

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M; Neely, Stephen T

    2015-10-01

    Variability in wideband acoustic reflectance (and absorbance) measurements adversely affects the clinical utility of reflectance for diagnosis of middle-ear disorders. A reflectance standard would encourage consistency across different measurement systems and help identify calibration related issues. Theoretical equations exist for the reflectance of finite-length exponential, conical, and parabolic acoustic horns. Reflectance measurements were repeatedly made in each of these three horn shapes and the results were compared to the corresponding theoretical reflectance. A method is described of adjusting acoustic impedance measurements to compensate for spreading of the wave front that propagates from the small diameter sound port of the probe to the larger diameter of the acoustic cavity. Agreement between measured and theoretical reflectance was less than 1 dB at most frequencies in the range from 0.2 to 10 kHz. Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.95 between measured and theoretical time-domain reflectance within the flare region of the horns. The agreement suggests that the distributed reflectance of acoustic horns may be useful for validating reflectance measurements made in human ear canals; however, refinements to reflectance measurement methods may still be needed.

  20. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Project PROBE Leg I - Report and archive of multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter , CTD/XBT and GPS navigation data collected during USGS Cruise 02051 (NOAA Cruise RB0208) Puerto Rico Trench September 24, 2002 to September 30, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Worley, Charles R.; Smith, Shep; Stepka, Thomas; Williams, Glynn F.

    2006-01-01

    On September 24-30, 2002, six days of scientific surveying to map a section of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT) took place aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Ron Brown. The cruise was funded by NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration. Multibeam bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data were collected over an area of about 25,000 sq. km of the Puerto Rico trench and its vicinity at water depths of 4000-8400 m. Weather conditions during the entire survey were good; there were light to moderate winds and 1-2 foot swells experiencing minor chop. The roll and pitch of the ship's interaction with the ocean were not conspicuous. Cruise participants included personnel from USGS, NOAA, and University of New Hampshire Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping/Joint Hydrographic Center. The cruise resulted in the discovery of a major active strike-slip fault system close to the trench, submarine slides on the descending North American tectonic plate, and an extinct mud volcano, which was cut by the strike-slip fault system. Another strike-slip fault system closer to Puerto Rico that was previously considered to accommodate much of the relative plate motion appears to be inactive. The seaward continuation of the Mona Rift, a zone of extension between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic that generated a devastating tsunami in 1918, was mapped for the first time.

  2. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  3. Acoustic force mapping in a hybrid acoustic-optical micromanipulation device supporting high resolution optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, Gregor; McDougall, Craig; MacDonald, Michael Peter; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-04-21

    Many applications in the life-sciences demand non-contact manipulation tools for forceful but nevertheless delicate handling of various types of sample. Moreover, the system should support high-resolution optical imaging. Here we present a hybrid acoustic/optical manipulation system which utilizes a transparent transducer, making it compatible with high-NA imaging in a microfluidic environment. The powerful acoustic trapping within a layered resonator, which is suitable for highly parallel particle handling, is complemented by the flexibility and selectivity of holographic optical tweezers, with the specimens being under high quality optical monitoring at all times. The dual acoustic/optical nature of the system lends itself to optically measure the exact acoustic force map, by means of direct force measurements on an optically trapped particle. For applications with (ultra-)high demand on the precision of the force measurements, the position of the objective used for the high-NA imaging may have significant influence on the acoustic force map in the probe chamber. We have characterized this influence experimentally and the findings were confirmed by model simulations. We show that it is possible to design the chamber and to choose the operating point in such a way as to avoid perturbations due to the objective lens. Moreover, we found that measuring the electrical impedance of the transducer provides an easy indicator for the acoustic resonances. PMID:27025398

  4. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  5. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  6. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  7. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  8. Coherent acoustic phonon oscillation accompanied with backward acoustic pulse below exciton resonance in a ZnO epifilm on oxide-buffered Si(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ja-Hon; Shen, Yu-Kai; Liu, Wei-Rein; Lu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Yao-Hui; Chang, Chun-peng; Lee, Wei-Chin; Hong, Minghwei; Kwo, Jueinai-Raynien; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Unlike coherent acoustic phonons (CAPs) generated from heat induced thermal stress by the coated Au film, we demonstrated the oscillation from c-ZnO epitaxial film on oxide buffered Si through a degenerate pump-probe technique. As the excited photon energy was set below the exciton resonance, the electronic stress that resulted from defect resonance was used to induce acoustic wave. The damped oscillation revealed a superposition of a high frequency and long decay CAP signal with a backward propagating acoustic pulse which was generated by the absorption of the penetrated pump beam at the Si surface and selected by the ZnO layer as the acoustic resonator.

  9. Coherent acoustic phonon oscillation accompanied with backward acoustic pulse below exciton resonance in a ZnO epifilm on oxide-buffered Si(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ja-Hon; Shen, Yu-Kai; Liu, Wei-Rein; Lu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Yao-Hui; Chang, Chun-peng; Lee, Wei-Chin; Hong, Minghwei; Kwo, Jueinai-Raynien; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Unlike coherent acoustic phonons (CAPs) generated from heat induced thermal stress by the coated Au film, we demonstrated the oscillation from c-ZnO epitaxial film on oxide buffered Si through a degenerate pump–probe technique. As the excited photon energy was set below the exciton resonance, the electronic stress that resulted from defect resonance was used to induce acoustic wave. The damped oscillation revealed a superposition of a high frequency and long decay CAP signal with a backward propagating acoustic pulse which was generated by the absorption of the penetrated pump beam at the Si surface and selected by the ZnO layer as the acoustic resonator.

  10. Acoustic Levitator Maintains Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transducer loading characteristics allow resonance tracked at high temperature. Acoustic-levitation chamber length automatically adjusted to maintain resonance at constant acoustic frequency as temperature changes. Developed for containerless processing of materials at high temperatures, system does not rely on microphones as resonance sensors, since microphones are difficult to fabricate for use at temperatures above 500 degrees C. Instead, system uses acoustic transducer itself as sensor.

  11. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  12. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  13. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  14. Error analysis and implementation issues for energy density probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locey, Lance L.; Woolford, Brady L.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2001-05-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the utility of acoustic energy density measurements as a means to gain a greater understanding of acoustic fields. Three spherical energy density probe designs are under development. The first probe design has three orthogonal pairs of surface mounted microphones. The second probe design utilizes a similarly sized sphere with four surface mounted microphones. The four microphones are located at the origin and unit vectors of a Cartesian coordinate system, where the origin and the tips of the three unit vectors all lie on the surface of the sphere. The third probe design consists of a similarly sized sphere, again with four surface microphones, each placed at the vertices of a regular tetrahedron. The sensing elements of all three probes are Panasonic electret microphones. The work presented here will expand on previously reported work, and address bias errors, spherical scattering effects, and practical implementation issues. [Work supported by NASA.

  15. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  16. Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams

    DOEpatents

    Beattie, Alan G.; Bohon, W. Mark

    1993-01-01

    The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

  17. Visualizing coherent phonon propagation in the 100 GHz range: A broadband picosecond acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontecorvo, Emanuele; Ortolani, Michele; Polli, Dario; Ferretti, Marco; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Cerullo, Giulio; Scopigno, Tullio

    2011-01-01

    Building on a 1 kHz amplified Ti:sapphire laser source, we developed a novel pump-probe setup for broadband picosecond acoustics using a white-light continuum probe coupled to an optical multichannel analyzer. The system allows one to access, in a single measurement, acoustic parameters such as sound velocity and attenuation all over the bandwidth of the acoustic wave-packet launched by the pump pulse. We use the setup to measure the sound attenuation in fused silica and observe a dynamic crossover occurring at ≈170 GHz.

  18. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  19. Introduction to acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Possa, G.

    1983-01-01

    Typical acoustic emission signal characteristics are described and techniques which localize the signal source by processing the acoustic delay data from multiple sensors are discussed. The instrumentation, which includes sensors, amplifiers, pulse counters, a minicomputer and output devices is examined. Applications are reviewed.

  20. In-ice acoustic positioning system for the Enceladus Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Ruth; EnEx Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    The IceMole, a combination of melting and drilling probe, which is able to move and steer through ice and take samples while doing so, can be used to install instruments in ice. In addition to the inertial navigation system, the ice-craft will be equipped with an acoustic positioning system, composed of receivers in the probe itself and several emitters (pinger) on the glacier surface. It will determine the position of the IceMole by measuring the signal propagation time and trilateration, which requires a solid knowledge of the propagation of acoustic signals in ice. A method to determine these properties during the operation of the IceMole will be developed. Here we will give an overview over the goals of the project and the design of the IceMole. We will present the status of the development of the acoustic positioning system and show the results of simulations on the positioning accuracy.

  1. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  2. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  3. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  4. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques.

  5. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  6. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  7. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  8. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  9. Development of the Acoustically Evoked Behavioral Response in Larval Plainfin Midshipman Fish, Porichthys notatus

    PubMed Central

    Alderks, Peter W.; Sisneros, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    The ontogeny of hearing in fishes has become a major interest among bioacoustics researchers studying fish behavior and sensory ecology. Most fish begin to detect acoustic stimuli during the larval stage which can be important for navigation, predator avoidance and settlement, however relatively little is known about the hearing capabilities of larval fishes. We characterized the acoustically evoked behavioral response (AEBR) in the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, and used this innate startle-like response to characterize this species' auditory capability during larval development. Age and size of larval midshipman were highly correlated (r2 = 0.92). The AEBR was first observed in larvae at 1.4 cm TL. At a size ≥1.8 cm TL, all larvae responded to a broadband stimulus of 154 dB re1 µPa or −15.2 dB re 1 g (z-axis). Lowest AEBR thresholds were 140–150 dB re 1 µPa or −33 to −23 dB re 1 g for frequencies below 225 Hz. Larval fish with size ranges of 1.9–2.4 cm TL had significantly lower best evoked frequencies than the other tested size groups. We also investigated the development of the lateral line organ and its function in mediating the AEBR. The lateral line organ is likely involved in mediating the AEBR but not necessary to evoke the startle-like response. The midshipman auditory and lateral line systems are functional during early development when the larvae are in the nest and the auditory system appears to have similar tuning characteristics throughout all life history stages. PMID:24340003

  10. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  11. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  12. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  13. Contextual fear conditioning in virtual reality is affected by 5HTTLPR and NPSR1 polymorphisms: effects on fear-potentiated startle

    PubMed Central

    Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta; Reif, Andreas; Ewald, Heike; Tröger, Christian; Baumann, Christian; Deckert, Jürgen; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) and neuropeptide S (NPS) systems are discussed as important genetic modulators of fear and sustained anxiety contributing to the etiology of anxiety disorders. Sustained anxiety is a crucial characteristic of most anxiety disorders which likely develops through contextual fear conditioning. This study investigated if and how genetic alterations of the 5-HT and the NPS systems as well as their interaction modulate contextual fear conditioning; specifically, function polymorphic variants in the genes coding for the 5-HT transporter (5HTT) and the NPS receptor (NPSR1) were studied. A large group of healthy volunteers was therefore stratified for 5HTTLPR (S+ vs. LL carriers) and NPSR1 rs324981 (T+ vs. AA carriers) polymorphisms resulting in four genotype groups (S+/T+, S+/AA, LL/T+, LL/AA) of 20 participants each. All participants underwent contextual fear conditioning and extinction using a virtual reality (VR) paradigm. During acquisition, one virtual office room (anxiety context, CXT+) was paired with an unpredictable electric stimulus (unconditioned stimulus, US), whereas another virtual office room was not paired with any US (safety context, CXT−). During extinction no US was administered. Anxiety responses were quantified by fear-potentiated startle and ratings. Most importantly, we found a gene × gene interaction on fear-potentiated startle. Only carriers of both risk alleles (S+/T+) exhibited higher startle responses in CXT+ compared to CXT−. In contrast, anxiety ratings were only influenced by the NPSR1 polymorphism with AA carriers showing higher anxiety ratings in CXT+ as compared to CXT−. Our results speak in favor of a two level account of fear conditioning with diverging effects on implicit vs. explicit fear responses. Enhanced contextual fear conditioning as reflected in potentiated startle responses may be an endophenotype for anxiety disorders. PMID:23630477

  14. Evidence that Illness-Compatible Cues Are Rewarding in Women Recovered from Anorexia Nervosa: A Study of the Effects of Dopamine Depletion on Eye-Blink Startle Responses

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Caitlin B.; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Giel, Katrin E.; Campbell, Iain C.; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    In anorexia nervosa (AN), motivational salience is attributed to illness-compatible cues (e.g., underweight and active female bodies) and this is hypothesised to involve dopaminergic reward circuitry. We investigated the effects of reducing dopamine (DA) transmission on the motivational processing of AN-compatible cues in women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15). This involved the acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD) procedure and a startle eye-blink modulation (SEM) task. In a balanced amino acid state, AN REC showed an increased appetitive response (decreased startle potentiation) to illness-compatible cues (underweight and active female body pictures (relative to neutral and non-active cues, respectively)). The HC had an aversive response (increased startle potentiation) to the same illness-compatible stimuli (relative to neutral cues). Importantly, these effects, which may be taken to resemble symptoms observed in the acute stage of illness and healthy behaviour respectively, were not present when DA was depleted. Thus, AN REC implicitly appraised underweight and exercise cues as more rewarding than did HC and the process may, in part, be DA-dependent. It is proposed that the positive motivational salience attributed to cues of emaciation and physical activity is, in part, mediated by dopaminergic reward processes and this contributes to illness pathology. These observations are consistent with the proposal that, in AN, aberrant reward-based learning contributes to the development of habituation of AN-compatible behaviours. PMID:27764214

  15. Calibration of acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Robert

    2006-05-26

    This article reviews the appropriate stimulus parameters (click duration, toneburst envelope) that should be used when eliciting auditory brainstem responses from mice. Equipment specifications required to calibrate these acoustic transients are discussed. Several methods of calibrating the level of acoustic transients are presented, including the measurement of peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) and peak sound pressure level (pSPL). It is hoped that those who collect auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice will begin to use standardized methods of acoustic calibration, so that hearing thresholds across mouse strains obtained in different laboratories can more readily be compared.

  16. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  17. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  18. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  19. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  20. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  1. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  2. Embodying approach motivation: body posture influences startle eyeblink and event-related potential responses to appetitive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Price, Tom F; Dieckman, Laurtiz W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2012-07-01

    Past research suggested that the motivational significance of images influences reflexive and electrocortical responses to those images (Briggs and Martin, 2009; Gard et al., 2007; Schupp et al., 2004), with erotica often exerting the largest effects for appetitive pictures (Grillon and Baas, 2003; Weinberg and Hajcak, 2010). This research paradigm, however, compares responses to different types of images (e.g., erotica vs. exciting sports scenes). This past motivational interpretation, therefore, would be further supported by experiments wherein appetitive picture content is held constant and motivational states are manipulated with a different method. In the present experiment, we tested the hypothesis that changes in physical postures associated with approach motivation influences reflexive and electrocortical responses to appetitive stimuli. Past research has suggested that bodily manipulations (e.g., facial expressions) play a role in emotion- and motivation-related physiology (Ekman and Davidson, 1993; Levenson et al., 1990). Extending these results, leaning forward (associated with a heightened urge to approach stimuli) relative to reclining (associated with less of an urge to approach stimuli) caused participants to have smaller startle eyeblink responses during appetitive, but not neutral, picture viewing. Leaning relative to reclining also caused participants to have larger LPPs to appetitive but not neutral pictures, and influenced ERPs as early as 100ms into stimulus viewing. This evidence suggests that body postures associated with approach motivation causally influence basic reflexive and electrocortical reactions to appetitive emotive stimuli. PMID:22522185

  3. Gradients of Fear Potentiated Startle During Generalization, Extinction, and Extinction Recall--and Their Relations With Worry.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Jonathan P; Hajcak, Greg

    2015-09-01

    It is well established that fear conditioning plays a role in the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Moreover, abnormalities in fear generalization, extinction, and extinction recall have also been associated with anxiety. The present study used a generalization paradigm to examine fear processing during phases of generalization, extinction, and extinction recall. Specifically, participants were shocked following a CS+ and were also presented with stimuli that ranged in perceptual similarity to the CS+ (i.e., 20%, 40%, or 60% smaller or larger than the CS+) during a fear generalization phase. Participants were also presented with the same stimuli during an extinction phase and an extinction recall phase 1week later; no shocks were presented during extinction or recall. Lastly, participants completed self-report measures of worry and trait anxiety. Results indicated that fear potentiated startle (FPS) to the CS+ and GS±20% shapes was present in generalization and extinction, suggesting that fear generalization persisted into extinction. FPS to the CS+ was also evident 1 week later during extinction recall. Higher levels of worry were associated with greater FPS to the CS+ during generalization and extinction phases. Moreover, individuals high in worry had fear response gradients that were steeper during both generalization and extinction. This suggests that high levels of worry are associated with greater discriminative fear conditioning to threatening compared to safe stimuli and less fear generalization to perceptually similar stimuli.

  4. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  5. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  6. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  7. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platinum Sponsors More from this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  9. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  10. Multimode Acoustic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M.

    1985-01-01

    There is a need for high temperature containerless processing facilities that can efficiently position and manipulate molten samples in the reduced gravity environment of space. The goal of the research is to develop sophisticated high temperature manipulation capabilities such as selection of arbitrary axes rotation and rapid sample cooling. This program will investigate new classes of acoustic levitation in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical geometries. The program tasks include calculating theoretical expressions of the acoustic forces in these geometries for the excitation of up to three acoustic modes (multimodes). These calculations are used to: (1) determine those acoustic modes that produce stable levitation, (2) isolate the levitation and rotation capabilities to produce more than one axis of rotation, and (3) develop methods to translate samples down long tube cylindrical chambers. Experimental levitators will then be constructed to verify the stable levitation and rotation predictions of the models.

  11. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  12. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  13. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  14. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  15. Predator Stress-Induced CRF Release Causes Enduring Sensitization of Basolateral Amygdala Norepinephrine Systems that Promote PTSD-Like Startle Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Rajbhandari, Abha K.

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains unclear. Intense stress promotes PTSD, which has been associated with exaggerated startle and deficient sensorimotor gating. Here, we examined the long-term sequelae of a rodent model of traumatic stress (repeated predator exposure) on amygdala systems that modulate startle and prepulse inhibition (PPI), an operational measure of sensorimotor gating. We show in rodents that repeated psychogenic stress (predator) induces long-lasting sensitization of basolateral amygdala (BLA) noradrenergic (NE) receptors (α1) via a corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF-R1)-dependent mechanism, and that these CRF1 and NE α1 receptors are highly colocalized on presumptive excitatory output projection neurons of the BLA. A profile identical to that seen with predator exposure was produced in nonstressed rats by intra-BLA infusions of CRF (200 ng/0.5 μl), but not by repeated NE infusions (20 μg/0.5 μl). Infusions into the adjacent central nucleus of amygdala had no effect. Importantly, the predator stress- or CRF-induced sensitization of BLA manifested as heightened startle and PPI deficits in response to subsequent subthreshold NE system challenges (with intra-BLA infusions of 0.3 μg/0.5 μl NE), up to 1 month after stress. This profile of effects closely resembles aspects of PTSD. Hence, we reveal a discrete neural pathway mediating the enhancement of NE system function seen in PTSD, and we offer a model for characterizing potential new treatments that may work by modulating this BLA circuitry. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The present findings reveal a novel and discrete neural substrate that could underlie certain core deficits (startle and prepulse inhibition) that are observed in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is shown here that repeated exposure to a rodent model of traumatic stress (predator exposure) produces a long-lasting sensitization of basolateral amygdala noradrenergic substrates [via a

  16. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (<2000 Hz) acoustic methods for medical diagnosis. Several candidate methods of pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (p<0.0001). The ratio of acoustic energy between low (<220 Hz) and mid (550-770 Hz) frequency bands was significantly different in the control (healthy) and pneumothorax states (p<0.0001). The second approach measured breath sounds in the absence of an external acoustic input. Pneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (p<0.01 for each). Finally, chest percussion was implemented. Pneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  17. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  18. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  19. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  20. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  1. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-08-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for

  2. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  3. Analysis of acoustic and entropy disturbances in a hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilden, Thomas; Schröder, Wolfgang; Ali, Syed Raza Christopher; Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Wu, Jie; Radespiel, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel noise in a Mach 5.9 Ludwieg tube is determined by two methods, a newly developed cone-probe-DNS method and a reliable hot-wire-Pitot-probe method. The new method combines pressure and heat flux measurements using a cone probe and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The modal analysis is based on transfer functions obtained by the DNS to link the measured quantities to the tunnel noise. The measurements are performed for several unit-Reynolds numbers in the range of 5 ṡ 106 ≤ Re/m ≤ 16 ṡ 106 and probe positions to identify the sensitivities of tunnel noise. The DNS solutions show similar response mechanisms of the cone probe to incident acoustic and entropy waves which leads to high condition numbers of the transfer matrix such that a unique relationship between response and source mechanism can be only determined by neglecting the contribution of the non-acoustic modes to the pressure and heat flux fluctuations. The results of the cone-probe-DNS method are compared to a modal analysis based on the hot-wire-Pitot-probe method which provides reliable results in the frequency range less than 50 kHz. In this low frequency range the findings of the two different mode analyses agree well. At higher frequencies, the newly developed cone-probe-DNS method is still valid. The tunnel noise is dominated by the acoustic mode, since the entropy mode is lower by one order of magnitude and the vorticity mode can be neglected. The acoustic mode is approximately 0.5% at 30 kHz and the cone-probe-DNS data illustrate the acoustic mode to decrease and to asymptotically approach 0.2%.

  4. Picosecond acoustics at 30 GHz in the nucleus of an osteoblast cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audoin, B.; Ducousso, M.; Dehoux, T.; Chollet, C.; Zouani, O.; Chanseau, C.; Durrieu, M.-C.

    2011-03-01

    We use femtosecond laser pulses absorbed in a metallic transducer, namely the picosecond ultrasonics technique, for the remote optical generation and detection of GHz acoustic frequencies in single cells by pump-probe sampling. Samples are MC3T3 cells adhering on a TiAl4V alloy substrate. Both pump and probe beams are focused at the cell/transducer interface. The pump absorption yields a temperature rise in the absorbing substrate and a picosecond acoustic pulse is generated through the thermoelastic effect. The probe beam is partially reflected from the metallic interface and partially scattered by the acoustic wavefront propagating in the transparent cell. The change of reflectivity of the cell is measured as a function of the pump-probe time delay. Interferences arise from the two probe contributions causing the so-called Brillouin oscillations. Optical phase variations due to acoustic-induced changes in cell thickness are simultaneously measured. The result of a semi-analytical calculation is fitted to the experimental data. Acoustic frequencies are detected at 30 GHz in the nucleus of single osteoblast cells.

  5. Taking advantage of acoustic inhomogeneities in photoacoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Anabela; Handschin, Charles; Riedinger, Christophe; Piasecki, Julien; Mensah, Serge; Litman, Amélie; Akhouayri, Hassan

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic offers promising perspectives in probing and imaging subsurface optically absorbing structures in biological tissues. The optical uence absorbed is partly dissipated into heat accompanied with microdilatations that generate acoustic pressure waves, the intensity which is related to the amount of fluuence absorbed. Hence the photoacoustic signal measured offers access, at least potentially, to a local monitoring of the absorption coefficient, in 3D if tomographic measurements are considered. However, due to both the diffusing and absorbing nature of the surrounding tissues, the major part of the uence is deposited locally at the periphery of the tissue, generating an intense acoustic pressure wave that may hide relevant photoacoustic signals. Experimental strategies have been developed in order to measure exclusively the photoacoustic waves generated by the structure of interest (orthogonal illumination and detection). Temporal or more sophisticated filters (wavelets) can also be applied. However, the measurement of this primary acoustic wave carries a lot of information about the acoustically inhomogeneous nature of the medium. We propose a protocol that includes the processing of this primary intense acoustic wave, leading to the quantification of the surrounding medium sound speed, and, if appropriate to an acoustical parametric image of the heterogeneities. This information is then included as prior knowledge in the photoacoustic reconstruction scheme to improve the localization and quantification.

  6. Acoustic Imaging in Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Sun, Ming-Tsung; LaBonte, Barry; Chen, Huei-Ru; Yeh, Sheng-Jen; Team, The TON

    1999-04-01

    The time-variant acoustic signal at a point in the solar interior can be constructed from observations at the surface, based on the knowledge of how acoustic waves travel in the Sun: the time-distance relation of the p-modes. The basic principle and properties of this imaging technique are discussed in detail. The helioseismic data used in this study were taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON). The time series of observed acoustic signals on the solar surface is treated as a phased array. The time-distance relation provides the phase information among the phased array elements. The signal at any location at any time can be reconstructed by summing the observed signal at array elements in phase and with a proper normalization. The time series of the constructed acoustic signal contains information on frequency, phase, and intensity. We use the constructed intensity to obtain three-dimensional acoustic absorption images. The features in the absorption images correlate with the magnetic field in the active region. The vertical extension of absorption features in the active region is smaller in images constructed with shorter wavelengths. This indicates that the vertical resolution of the three-dimensional images depends on the range of modes used in constructing the signal. The actual depths of the absorption features in the active region may be smaller than those shown in the three-dimensional images.

  7. [Acoustic characteristics of classrooms].

    PubMed

    Koszarny, Zbigniew; Chyla, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Quality and usefulness of school rooms for transmission of verbal information depends on the two basic parameters: form and quantity of the reverberation time, and profitable line measurements of school rooms from the acoustic point of view. An analysis of the above-mentioned parameters in 48 class rooms and two gymnasiums in schools, which were built in different periods, shows that the most important problem is connected with too long reverberation time and inappropriate acoustic proportions. In schools built in the 1970s, the length of reverberation time is mostly within a low frequency band, while in schools built contemporarily, the maximum length of disappearance time takes place in a quite wide band of 250-2000 Hz. This exceeds optimal values for that kind of rooms at least twice, and five times in the newly built school. A long reverberation time is connected with a low acoustic absorption of school rooms. Moreover, school rooms are characterised by inappropriate acoustic proportions. The classrooms, in their relation to the height, are too long and too wide. It is connected with deterioration of the transmission of verbal information. The data show that this transmission is unequal. Automatically, it leads to a speech disturbance and difficulties with understanding. There is the need for adaptation of school rooms through increase of an acoustic absorption.

  8. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  9. X-ray motion analysis of the vertebral column during the startle response in striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Nowroozi, B N; Brainerd, E L

    2013-08-01

    Whole-body stiffness has a substantial impact on propulsive wave speed during axial undulatory locomotion in fishes. The connective tissues of the vertebral column may contribute to body stiffness, but without mechanical and kinematic analysis it is unclear whether the in vivo range of motion of intervertebral joints (IVJs) is great enough to stress IVJ tissues, thus generating stiffness. The present study used 2D videoradiography and 3D X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to quantify vertebral kinematics during the startle response in striped bass (Morone saxatilis). X-ray video revealed two distinct patterns of bending: pattern I begins in the abdominal region and then proceeds to maximum IVJ angles in the caudal region, whereas pattern II begins in the cervical region and proceeds to maximum IVJ angles in the abdominal and then the caudal joints. In pattern II bends, the cervical joints exhibit a greater in vivo range of motion than previously reported in other species. XROMM analysis of caudal IVJs suggests primarily lateral bending: mean axial and dorsoventral rotations were less than 2 deg and inconsistent across 51 sequences analyzed from five individuals, whereas mean maximum lateral bending angles were 10.4±3.57 deg. These angles, combined with previous investigations of mechanical properties, reveal that the maximum angles all occur within the neutral zone of bending, indicating that little stress is experienced about the joint. This suggests that the IVJs of striped bass are quite compliant and likely do not contribute significantly to whole-body stiffness or elastic recoil during swimming in vivo. PMID:23842627

  10. X-ray motion analysis of the vertebral column during the startle response in striped bass, Morone saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Nowroozi, B N; Brainerd, E L

    2013-08-01

    Whole-body stiffness has a substantial impact on propulsive wave speed during axial undulatory locomotion in fishes. The connective tissues of the vertebral column may contribute to body stiffness, but without mechanical and kinematic analysis it is unclear whether the in vivo range of motion of intervertebral joints (IVJs) is great enough to stress IVJ tissues, thus generating stiffness. The present study used 2D videoradiography and 3D X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to quantify vertebral kinematics during the startle response in striped bass (Morone saxatilis). X-ray video revealed two distinct patterns of bending: pattern I begins in the abdominal region and then proceeds to maximum IVJ angles in the caudal region, whereas pattern II begins in the cervical region and proceeds to maximum IVJ angles in the abdominal and then the caudal joints. In pattern II bends, the cervical joints exhibit a greater in vivo range of motion than previously reported in other species. XROMM analysis of caudal IVJs suggests primarily lateral bending: mean axial and dorsoventral rotations were less than 2 deg and inconsistent across 51 sequences analyzed from five individuals, whereas mean maximum lateral bending angles were 10.4±3.57 deg. These angles, combined with previous investigations of mechanical properties, reveal that the maximum angles all occur within the neutral zone of bending, indicating that little stress is experienced about the joint. This suggests that the IVJs of striped bass are quite compliant and likely do not contribute significantly to whole-body stiffness or elastic recoil during swimming in vivo.

  11. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  12. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  13. Acoustic particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which uses acoustic energy to separate particles of different sizes, densities, or the like. The method includes applying acoustic energy resonant to a chamber containing a liquid of gaseous medium to set up a standing wave pattern that includes a force potential well wherein particles within the well are urged towards the center, or position of minimum force potential. A group of particles to be separated is placed in the chamber, while a non-acoustic force such as gravity is applied, so that the particles separate with the larger or denser particles moving away from the center of the well to a position near its edge and progressively smaller lighter particles moving progressively closer to the center of the well. Particles are removed from different positions within the well, so that particles are separated according to the positions they occupy in the well.

  14. Acoustic Levitation Containerless Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.; Rey, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    This research program consists of the development of acoustic containerless processing systems with applications in the areas of research in material sciences, as well as the production of new materials, solid forms with novel and unusual microstructures, fusion target spheres, and improved optical fibers. Efforts have been focused on the containerless processing at high temperatures for producing new kinds of glasses. Also, some development has occurred in the areas of containerlessly supporting liquids at room temperature, with applications in studies of fluid dynamics, potential undercooling of liquids, etc. The high temperature area holds the greatest promise for producing new kinds of glasses and ceramics, new alloys, and possibly unusual structural shapes, such as very uniform hollow glass shells for fusion target applications. High temperature acoustic levitation required for containerless processing has been demonstrated in low-g environments as well as in ground-based experiments. Future activities include continued development of the signals axis acoustic levitator.

  15. Acoustic energy shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A suspended mass is shaped by melting all or a selected portion of the mass and applying acoustic energy in varying amounts to different portions of the mass. In one technique for forming an optical waveguide slug, a mass of oval section is suspended and only a portion along the middle of the cross-section is heated to a largely fluid consistency. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite edges of the oval mass to press the unheated opposite edge portions together so as to form bulges at the middle of the mass. In another technique for forming a ribbon of silicon for constructing solar cells, a cylindrical thread of silicon is drawn from a molten mass of silicon, and acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the molten thread to flatten it into a ribbon.

  16. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  17. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  18. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  19. Nanoparticle Probes for Structural and Functional Photoacoustic Molecular Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haobin; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging. In addition, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), a method based on the photoacoustic effect, is widely recognized as a robust modality to evaluate the structure and function of biological tissues with high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution. The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity. This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development. PMID:26609534

  20. Optoacoustic probe for prostate cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Valeriy G.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2002-11-01

    The optoacoustic probe for prostate cancer detection was developed and tested. The 10-ns pulses of the YAG:Nd laser were delivered by an optical fiber with a turning mirror at its tip. A fiber tip was placed above an ultrasonic array which was employed for the detection of acoustic transients excited inside prostate tissue. The increased infrared light absorption inside prostate tumors resulted in acoustic pulses with enhanced peak pressure providing 200%-300% optoacoustic contrast. The transducer array and the optical fiber were wrapped inside a 20-mm diameter thin cylindrical shell filled with ultrasonic gel transparent for infrared radiation. Each acoustic transducer was made of 0.05-mm thick PVDF film with dimensions of 1 mm x12 mm. The frequency bandwidth of transducer array provided 0.3-mm axial in-depth resolution. The lateral resolution is defined by the array length and was estimated as 0.8-mm for 32-element array with 1-mm gap between transducers. Transducer sensitivity of 0.05 mV/Pa allowed the detection of 2-mm tumor located at 50 mm depth. The optoacoustic probe performance was evaluated via the acquisition of two-dimensional optoacoustic images of small absorbing spheres in prostate-tissue phantoms. [Work supported by NIH and FIRCA grants.

  1. Confined Mesoscopic Fluid-like Films Analyzed with Frequency Modulation and Acoustic Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Rodriguez, Rodolfo

    Complete understanding of the physics underlying the changes in viscoelasticity, relaxation time, and phase transitions that mesoscopic fluid-like systems undergo at solid-liquid interfaces or under confinement remains one of the major challenges in condensed matter physics. Moreover, studies of confined mesoscopic fluid films are relevant to technological areas like adhesion, wetting processes and nanotribology. This thesis addresses the interaction between two sliding solids interfaces separated by a nanometer sized gap, with emphasis on the role of the mesoscopic fluid film trapped between them. For this purpose we integrated two acoustic techniques, recently introduced by our group, into a sub-nanometer precision and thermal drift corrected scanning probe microscope (SPM): the shear-force/acoustic near-field Microscope (SANM) and the whispering gallery acoustic sensing (WGAS). The SANM monitors the sound waves originating in the probe-layer interaction while the motion of the probe is monitored by the WGAS. Additionally, we decouple the interaction forces by using frequency modulation and measure the local tunneling current to help establish the location of the substrate. Our results show a strong correlation between the elastic component of the probe's interaction and the SANM amplitude, as well as between the phase lag response of the fluid relative to the probe's excitation (represented by the SANM phase) and the onset of the probe-sample contact region. Frequency modulation SANM-WGAS brings a new acoustic sensing mechanism to the challenging characterization of fluid-like physical systems at the nanometer scale.

  2. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  3. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  4. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  5. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  6. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  7. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  8. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  9. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  10. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  11. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  12. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  13. Interpreting picosecond acoustics in the case of low interface stiffness.

    PubMed

    Hohensee, Gregory T; Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Losego, Mark D; Cahill, David G

    2012-11-01

    Analysis of data acquired in time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) experiments requires accurate measurements of the thickness of the metal film optical transducer that absorbs energy from the pump optical pulse and provides a temperature dependent reflectivity that is interrogated by the probe optical pulse. This thickness measurement is typically accomplished using picosecond acoustics. The presence of contaminants and native oxides at the interface between the sample and transducer often produce a picosecond acoustics signal that is difficult to interpret. We describe heuristics for addressing this common difficulty in interpreting picosecond acoustic data. The use of these heuristics can reduce the propagation of uncertainties and improve the accuracy of TDTR measurements of thermal transport properties.

  14. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  15. Bloch oscillations of THz acoustic phonons in coupled nanocavity structures.

    PubMed

    Lanzillotti-Kimura, N D; Fainstein, A; Perrin, B; Jusserand, B; Mauguin, O; Largeau, L; Lemaître, A

    2010-05-14

    Nanophononic Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders have been recently predicted to exist in specifically tailored structures formed by coupled nanocavities. Using pump-probe coherent phonon generation techniques we demonstrate that Bloch oscillations of terahertz acoustic phonons can be directly generated and probed in these complex nanostructures. In addition, by Fourier transforming the time traces we had access to the proper eigenmodes in the frequency domain, thus evidencing the related Wannier-Stark ladder. The observed Bloch oscillation dynamics are compared with simulations based on a model description of the coherent phonon generation and photoelastic detection processes.

  16. Acoustics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    This paper explores the issues associated with poor acoustics within schools. Additionally, it suggests remedies for existing buildings and those under renovation, as well as concerns for new construction. The paper discusses the effects of unwanted noise on students in terms of physiological, motivational, and cognitive influences. Issues are…

  17. Improved acoustic levitation apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berge, L. H.; Johnson, J. L.; Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Concave driver and reflector enhance and shape levitation forces in acoustic resonance system. Single-mode standing-wave pattern is focused by ring element situated between driver and reflector. Concave surfaces increase levitating forces up to factor of 6 as opposed to conventional flat surfaces, making it possible to suspend heavier objects.

  18. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  19. Acoustic leak detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, M.J.

    1993-08-03

    An acoustic leak detection system is described for determining the location of leaks in storage tanks, comprising: (a) sensor means for detecting a leak signal; (b) data acquisition means for digitizing and storing leak signals meeting preset criterion; and (c) analysis means for analyzing the digitized signals and computing the location of the source of the leak signals.

  20. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  1. Teaching acoustics online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Andrew; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2003-10-01

    We teach an introductory course in musical acoustics using a Blackboard. Students in this course can access audio and video materials as well as printed materials on our course website. All homework is submitted online, as are tests and examinations. The students also have the opportunity to use synchronous and asynchronous chat rooms to discuss the course with each other or with the instructors.

  2. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, themore » sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.« less

  3. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, the sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.

  4. Holograms for acoustics.

    PubMed

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound. PMID:27652563

  5. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  6. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  7. Laser Acoustic Microstructure Analysis at the Micron and Nanometer Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Hurley, David Howard

    2002-05-01

    Laser acoustic approaches to investigating the interaction of elastic waves with microstructure in materials is presented that probe both the micron and nanometer length scales. At the micron length scale, a full-field imaging approach is described that provides quantitative measurement of amplitude and phase of the out-of-plane acoustical motion at GHz frequencies. Specific lateral acoustic modes can be identified in addition to the primary thickness mode with spatial resolution sufficient to image wavelengths as small as 4.5 microns.

  8. Temporal characteristics of surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell, J. R.; Ward, M. B.; Shields, A. J.; Atkinson, P.; Bremner, S. P.; Anderson, D.; Kataoka, M.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2007-07-01

    Short radio frequency pulses were used to study the surface-acoustic-wave-driven light emission from a molecular beam epitaxy regrown GaAs /AlGaAs lateral p-n junction. The luminescence provides a fast probe of the signals arriving at the junction allowing the authors to temporally separate the effect of the surface-acoustic-wave from pickup of the free space electromagnetic wave. Oscillations in the light intensity are resolved at the resonant frequency of the transducer, suggesting that the surface-acoustic-wave is transporting electrons across the junction in packets.

  9. Influence of Acoustic Field Structure on Polarization Characteristics of Acousto-optic Interaction in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromets, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    Influence of acoustic field structure on polarization characteristics of acousto-optic interaction is investigated. It is shown that inhomogeneity of acoustic field and mechanism of ultrasound excitation causes changes in values of acousto-optic figure of merit for ordinary and extraordinary light beams in comparison with theoretic values. The theoretic values were derived under assumption that acoustic wave is homogeneous. Experimental analysis was carried out in acousto-optic cell based on lithium niobate crystal where the acoustic wave propagates at the angle 13 degrees to Z axis of the crystal. We used three different methods of ultrasound generation in the crystal: by means of external piezotransducer, by interdigital transducer and by two sets of electrodes placed on top of the crystal surface. In the latter case, the first pair of the electrodes was directed along X crystal axis, while the second pair of the electrodes was directed orthogonally to X crystal axis and the direction of ultrasound. Obtained values for diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary polarized optical beams were qualitatively different which may be caused by spatial inhomogeneity of the generated acoustic waves in the crystal. Structure of acoustic field generated by these sets of electrodes was examined by laser probing. We performed the analysis of the acoustic field intensity using acousto-optic method. A relation of diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary light waves was measured during each iteration of the laser probing.

  10. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  11. Design and testing of hardware improvements of an acoustic sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.

    1985-06-01

    The application of lasers in military communications and weapons systems accentuate the need for instruments capable of measuring the fine dynamic structure of the atmosphere. One of the most useful tools available for the probing of the atmosphere is the acoustic sounder. Commercial grade acoustic sounders, such as the Aeroviroment model number 300 cannot collect atmospheric data with the quality needed for laser propagation research. The usable range of the Aerovironment model 300 acoustic sounder is less than 500 meters. Many laser systems need atmospheric information at altitudes of 1 to 2 kilometers and higher. The objective of this thesis was to upgrade an existing acoustic sounder to increase the range and improve the quality of the receiver-processor. A serious deficiency of the Aerovironment model number 300 is the poor coupling of the acoustic transducer to the feedhorn. This thesis involved a complete redesign and experimental test of the transducer feedhorn using two different horn styles as well as making the horn removable and easily changeable.

  12. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  13. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  14. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  15. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  16. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  17. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions. PMID:27586767

  18. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system. PMID:24836252

  19. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  20. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  1. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  2. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  3. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  4. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  5. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  6. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient. PMID:27106299

  7. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  8. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  9. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip. PMID:27661695

  10. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  11. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  12. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  13. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  14. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  15. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-09-16

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids.

  16. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids. PMID:27633351

  17. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids. PMID:27633351

  18. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids.

  19. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  20. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  1. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  2. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  3. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  4. Ion Acoustic Modes in Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Nicholas; Monaco, Guilio; White, Thomas; Gregori, Gianluca; Graham, Peter; Fletcher, Luke; Appel, Karen; Tschentscher, Thomas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Philip; Zastrau, Ulf; Doeppner, Tilo; Gericke, Dirk; Lepape, Sebastien; Ma, Tammy; Pak, Art; Schropp, Andreas; Glenzer, Siegfried; Hastings, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    We present results that, for the first time, show scattering from ion acoustic modes in warm dense matter, representing an unprecedented level of energy resolution in the study of dense plasmas. The experiment was carried out at the LCLS facility in California on an aluminum sample at 7 g/cc and 5 eV. Using an X-ray probe at 8 keV, shifted peaks at +/-150 meV were observed. Although the energy shifts from interactions with the acoustic waves agree with predicted values from DFT-MD models, a central (elastic) peak was also observed, which did not appear in modelled spectra and may be due to the finite timescale of the simulation. Data fitting with a hydrodynamic form has proved able to match the observed spectrum, and provide measurements of some thermodynamic properties of the system, which mostly agree with predicted values. Suggest for further experiments to determine the cause of the disparity are also given.

  5. Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    The Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig (SHJAR), located in the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, was commissioned in 2001 to test jet noise reduction concepts at low technology readiness levels (TRL 1-3) and develop advanced measurement techniques. The first series of tests on the SHJAR were designed to prove its capabilities and establish the quality of the jet noise data produced. Towards this goal, a methodology was employed dividing all noise sources into three categories: background noise, jet noise, and rig noise. Background noise was directly measured. Jet noise and rig noise were separated by using the distance and velocity scaling properties of jet noise. Effectively, any noise source that did not follow these rules of jet noise was labeled as rig noise. This method led to the identification of a high frequency noise source related to the Reynolds number. Experiments using boundary layer treatment and hot wire probes documented this noise source and its removal, allowing clean testing of low Reynolds number jets. Other tests performed characterized the amplitude and frequency of the valve noise, confirmed the location of the acoustic far field, and documented the background noise levels under several conditions. Finally, a full set of baseline data was acquired. This paper contains the methodology and test results used to verify the quality of the SHJAR rig.

  6. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  7. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  8. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  9. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  10. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  11. Waveguide Calibrator for Multi-Element Probe Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    A calibrator, referred to as the spider design, can be used to calibrate probes incorporating multiple acoustic sensing elements. The application is an acoustic energy density probe, although the calibrator can be used for other types of acoustic probes. The calibrator relies on the use of acoustic waveguide technology to produce the same acoustic field at each of the sensing elements. As a result, the sensing elements can be separated from each other, but still calibrated through use of the acoustic waveguides. Standard calibration techniques involve placement of an individual microphone into a small cavity with a known, uniform pressure to perform the calibration. If a cavity is manufactured with sufficient size to insert the energy density probe, it has been found that a uniform pressure field can only be created at very low frequencies, due to the size of the probe. The size of the energy density probe prevents one from having the same pressure at each microphone in a cavity, due to the wave effects. The "spider" design probe is effective in calibrating multiple microphones separated from each other. The spider design ensures that the same wave effects exist for each microphone, each with an indivdual sound path. The calibrator s speaker is mounted at one end of a 14-cm-long and 4.1-cm diameter small plane-wave tube. This length was chosen so that the first evanescent cross mode of the plane-wave tube would be attenuated by about 90 dB, thus leaving just the plane wave at the termination plane of the tube. The tube terminates with a small, acrylic plate with five holes placed symmetrically about the axis of the speaker. Four ports are included for the four microphones on the probe. The fifth port is included for the pre-calibrated reference microphone. The ports in the acrylic plate are in turn connected to the probe sensing elements via flexible PVC tubes. These five tubes are the same length, so the acoustic wave effects are the same in each tube. The

  12. Threshold received sound pressure levels of single 1-2 kHz and 6-7 kHz up-sweeps and down-sweeps causing startle responses in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Steen, Nele; Gransier, Robin; Wensveen, Paul J; de Jong, Christ A F

    2012-03-01

    Mid-frequency and low-frequency sonar systems produce frequency-modulated sweeps which may affect harbor porpoises. To study the effect of sweeps on behavioral responses (specifically "startle" responses, which we define as sudden changes in swimming speed and/or direction), a harbor porpoise in a large pool was exposed to three pairs of sweeps: a 1-2 kHz up-sweep was compared with a 2-1 kHz down-sweep, both with and without harmonics, and a 6-7 kHz up-sweep was compared with a 7-6 kHz down-sweep without harmonics. Sweeps were presented at five spatially averaged received levels (mRLs; 6 dB steps; identical for the up-sweep and down-sweep of each pair). During sweep presentation, startle responses were recorded. There was no difference in the mRLs causing startle responses for up-sweeps and down-sweeps within frequency pairs. For 1-2 kHz sweeps without harmonics, a 50% startle response rate occurred at mRLs of 133 dB re 1 μPa; for 1-2 kHz sweeps with strong harmonics at 99 dB re 1 μPa; for 6-7 kHz sweeps without harmonics at 101 dB re 1 μPa. Low-frequency (1-2 kHz) active naval sonar systems without harmonics can therefore operate at higher source levels than mid-frequency (6-7 kHz) active sonar systems without harmonics, with similar startle effects on porpoises.

  13. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  14. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  15. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  16. The acoustics of snoring.

    PubMed

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (<500 Hz) and corresponds to a fundamental frequency with associated harmonics. The pitch of snoring is determined by vibration of the soft palate, while nonpalatal snoring is more 'noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as

  17. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  18. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  19. Numerical predictions in acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1992-01-01

    Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) involves the calculation of the sound produced by a flow as well as the underlying flowfield itself from first principles. This paper describes the numerical challenges of CAA and recent research efforts to overcome these challenges. In addition, it includes the benefits of CAA in removing restrictions of linearity, single frequency, constant parameters, low Mach numbers, etc. found in standard acoustic analyses as well as means for evaluating the validity of these numerical approaches. Finally, numerous applications of CAA to both classical as well as modern problems of concern to the aerospace industry are presented.

  20. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.