Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic streaming flow

  1. Convective Heat Transfer in Acoustic Streaming Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Convective heat transfer due to acoustic streaming has been studied in the absence of an imposed mean flow. The work is motivated by the need to design and control the thermal features of a suitable experimental rig for the containerless processing of materials by heat treatment of acoustically levitated alloy samples at near zero-gravity. First the problem of heat transfer from an isolated sphere (in a standing sound field) is explored in detail. The streaming Reynolds number, Rs, which characterizes the resulting steady flows, is determined from the acoustic signal. A scale analysis is used to ascertain the importance of buoyancy and viscous dissipation. The steady velocity and temperature fields are determined using asymptotic techniques and numerical methods for the limiting cases of Rs<<1 and Rsgg1. Working correlations for the average Nusselt number are obtained for a wide range of Prandtl numbers. A simple experiment is conducted to verify the predictions for the more relevant case of Rsgg1. The acoustic levitation chamber itself is modelled as a Kundt tube (supporting a plane axial standing sound wave) with insulated side-wall and isothermal end-walls. Analytical solution techniques are used to determine the steady fields close to the tube walls. For the steady recirculatory transport in the core, the numerical solver PHOENICS is adopted for the solution of the complete elliptic form of the governing equations. A study of the effects of a range of acoustic and geometric parameters on the flow and heat transfer is performed and Nusselt number correlations are obtained for air. PHOENICS is also used to study the effects of variable fluid properties and axial side-wall conduction (coupled with radiation). The role of normal/reduced gravity is assessed and suggestions made for terrestrial testing of the levitation apparatus. Finally, with the sample located at a node in the levitation chamber, the effect of the interaction of the streaming flows (on the sphere

  2. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  3. Acoustic Streaming in Microgravity: Flow Stability and Heat Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for drops and bubbles levitated in a liquid host, with particular attention given to the effect of shape oscillations and capillary waves on the local flow fields. Some preliminary results are also presented on the use of streaming flows for the control of evaporation rate and rotation of electrostatically levitated droplets in 1 g. The results demonstrate the potential for the technological application of acoustic methods to active control of forced convection in microgravity.

  4. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  5. Acoustic streaming field structure. Part II. Examples that include boundary-driven flow.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Charles

    2012-01-01

    In this paper three simple acoustic streaming problems are presented and solved. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the use of a previously published streaming model by Bradley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100(3), 1399-1408 (1996)] and illustrate, with concrete examples, some of the features of streaming flows that were predicted by the general model. In particular, the problems are intended to demonstrate cases in which the streaming field boundary condition at the face of the radiator has a nontrivial lateral dc velocity component. Such a boundary condition drives a steady solenoidal flow just like a laterally translating boundary drives Couette flow.

  6. Convection and fluidization in oscillatory granular flows: The role of acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Convection and fluidization phenomena in vibrated granular beds have attracted a strong interest from the physics community since the last decade of the past century. As early reported by Faraday, the convective flow of large inertia particles in vibrated beds exhibits enigmatic features such as frictional weakening and the unexpected influence of the interstitial gas. At sufficiently intense vibration intensities surface patterns appear bearing a stunning resemblance with the surface ripples (Faraday waves) observed for low-viscosity liquids, which suggests that the granular bed transits into a liquid-like fluidization regime despite the large inertia of the particles. In his 1831 seminal paper, Faraday described also the development of circulation air currents in the vicinity of vibrating plates. This phenomenon (acoustic streaming) is well known in acoustics and hydrodynamics and occurs whenever energy is dissipated by viscous losses at any oscillating boundary. The main argument of the present paper is that acoustic streaming might develop on the surface of the large inertia particles in the vibrated granular bed. As a consequence, the drag force on the particles subjected to an oscillatory viscous flow is notably enhanced. Thus, acoustic streaming could play an important role in enhancing convection and fluidization of vibrated granular beds, which has been overlooked in previous studies. The same mechanism might be relevant to geological events such as fluidization of landslides and soil liquefaction by earthquakes and sound waves. PMID:26123774

  7. Convection and fluidization in oscillatory granular flows: The role of acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Convection and fluidization phenomena in vibrated granular beds have attracted a strong interest from the physics community since the last decade of the past century. As early reported by Faraday, the convective flow of large inertia particles in vibrated beds exhibits enigmatic features such as frictional weakening and the unexpected influence of the interstitial gas. At sufficiently intense vibration intensities surface patterns appear bearing a stunning resemblance with the surface ripples (Faraday waves) observed for low-viscosity liquids, which suggests that the granular bed transits into a liquid-like fluidization regime despite the large inertia of the particles. In his 1831 seminal paper, Faraday described also the development of circulation air currents in the vicinity of vibrating plates. This phenomenon (acoustic streaming) is well known in acoustics and hydrodynamics and occurs whenever energy is dissipated by viscous losses at any oscillating boundary. The main argument of the present paper is that acoustic streaming might develop on the surface of the large inertia particles in the vibrated granular bed. As a consequence, the drag force on the particles subjected to an oscillatory viscous flow is notably enhanced. Thus, acoustic streaming could play an important role in enhancing convection and fluidization of vibrated granular beds, which has been overlooked in previous studies. The same mechanism might be relevant to geological events such as fluidization of landslides and soil liquefaction by earthquakes and sound waves.

  8. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery.

  9. Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing

    SciTech Connect

    Kotas, Charlotte W; Rogers, Peter; Yoda, Minami

    2011-01-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

  10. Flow patterns and transport in Rayleigh surface acoustic wave streaming: combined finite element method and raytracing numerics versus experiments.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, Thomas; Gogel, Daniel; Kostur, Marcin; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-01

    This work presents an approach for determining the streaming patterns that are generated by Rayleigh surface acoustic waves in arbitrary 3-D geometries by finite element method (FEM) simulations. An efficient raytracing algorithm is applied on the acoustic subproblem to avoid the unbearable memory demands and computational time of a conventional FEM acoustics simulation in 3-D. The acoustic streaming interaction is modeled by a body force term in the Stokes equation. In comparisons between experiments and simulated flow patterns, we demonstrate the quality of the proposed technique. PMID:18986877

  11. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow

    PubMed Central

    Sou, In Mei; Layman, Christopher N.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  12. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow.

    PubMed

    Sou, In Mei; Allen, John S; Layman, Christopher N; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2011-11-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  13. Acoustic streaming of a sharp edge.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Zhou, Jianbo; Yalamanchili, Satish

    2014-07-01

    Anomalous acoustic streaming is observed emanating from sharp edges of solid bodies that are vibrating in fluids. The streaming velocities can be orders of magnitude higher than expected from the Rayleigh streaming at similar amplitudes of vibration. Acoustic velocity of fluid relative to a solid body diverges at a sharp edge, giving rise to a localized time-independent body force acting on the fluid. This force results in a formation of a localized jet. Two-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to predict acoustic streaming for low amplitude vibration using two methods: (1) Steady-state solution utilizing perturbation theory and (2) direct transient solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Both analyses agree with each other and correctly predict the streaming of a sharp-edged vibrating blade measured experimentally. The origin of the streaming can be attributed to the centrifugal force of the acoustic fluid flow around a sharp edge. The dependence of this acoustic streaming on frequency and velocity is examined using dimensional analysis. The dependence law is devised and confirmed by numerical simulations.

  14. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  15. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  16. Cyclones and attractive streaming generated by acoustical vortices.

    PubMed

    Riaud, Antoine; Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bou Matar, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Acoustical and optical vortices have attracted great interest due to their ability to capture and manipulate particles with the use of radiation pressure. Here we show that acoustical vortices can also induce axial vortical flow reminiscent of cyclones, whose topology can be controlled by adjusting the properties of the acoustical beam. In confined geometry, the phase singularity enables generating "attractive streaming" with the flow directed toward the transducer. This opens perspectives for contactless vortical flow control.

  17. Investigation of acoustic streaming patterns around oscillating sharp edges

    PubMed Central

    Nama, Nitesh; Huang, Po-Hsun; Huang, Tony Jun; Costanzo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Oscillating sharp edges have been employed to achieve rapid and homogeneous mixing in microchannels using acoustic streaming. Here we use a perturbation approach to study the flow around oscillating sharp edges in a microchannel. This work extends prior experimental studies to numerically characterize the effect of various parameters on the acoustically induced flow. Our numerical results match well with the experimental results. We investigated multiple device parameters such as the tip angle, oscillation amplitude, and channel dimensions. Our results indicate that, due to the inherent nonlinearity of acoustic streaming, the channel dimensions could significantly impact the flow patterns and device performance. PMID:24903475

  18. Frequency effects on the scale and behavior of acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Dentry, Michael B; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic streaming underpins an exciting range of fluid manipulation phenomena of rapidly growing significance in microfluidics, where the streaming often assumes the form of a steady, laminar jet emanating from the device surface, driven by the attenuation of acoustic energy within the beam of sound propagating through the liquid. The frequencies used to drive such phenomena are often chosen ad hoc to accommodate fabrication and material issues. In this work, we seek a better understanding of the effects of sound frequency and power on acoustic streaming. We present and, using surface acoustic waves, experimentally verify a laminar jet model that is based on the turbulent jet model of Lighthill, which is appropriate for acoustic streaming seen at micro- to nanoscales, between 20 and 936 MHz and over a broad range of input power. Our model eliminates the critically problematic acoustic source singularity present in Lighthill's model, replacing it with a finite emission area and enabling determination of the streaming velocity close to the source. At high acoustic power P (and hence high jet Reynolds numbers ReJ associated with fast streaming), the laminar jet model predicts a one-half power dependence (U∼P1/2∼ ReJ) similar to the turbulent jet model. However, the laminar model may also be applied to jets produced at low powers-and hence low jet Reynolds numbers ReJ-where a linear relationship between the beam power and streaming velocity exists: U∼P∼ReJ2. The ability of the laminar jet model to predict the acoustic streaming behavior across a broad range of frequencies and power provides a useful tool in the analysis of microfluidics devices, explaining peculiar observations made by several researchers in the literature. In particular, by elucidating the effects of frequency on the scale of acoustically driven flows, we show that the choice of frequency is a vitally important consideration in the design of small-scale devices employing acoustic streaming

  19. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  20. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  1. Experimental Acoustic Velocity Measurements in a Tidally Affected Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storm, J.B.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) constructed a continuous steamgaging station on the tidally affected Escatawpa River at Interstate 10 near Orange Grove, Mississippi, in August 2001. The gage collects water quantity parameters of stage and stream velocity, and water quality parameters of water temperature, specific conductance, and salinity. Data are transmitted to the local USGS office via the GOES satellite and are presented on a near real-time web page. Due to tidal effects, the stream has multiple flow regimes which include downstream, bi-directional, and reverse flows. Advances in acoustic technology have made it possible to gage streams of this nature where conventional methods have been unsuccessful. An experimental mount was designed in an attempt to recognize, describe, and quantify these flow regimes by using acoustic Doppler equipment.

  2. Acoustic Investigation of Jet Mixing Noise in Dual Stream Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Dahl, Milo D.

    2012-01-01

    In an earlier study, a prediction model for jet noise in dual stream jets was proposed that is founded on velocity scaling laws in single stream jets and similarity features of the mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy in dual stream flows. The model forms a composite spectrum from four component single-stream jets each believed to represent noise-generation from a distinct region in the actual flow. While the methodology worked effectively at conditions considered earlier, recent examination of acoustic data at some unconventional conditions indicate that further improvements are necessary in order to expand the range of applicability of the model. The present work demonstrates how these predictions compare with experimental data gathered by NASA and industry for the purpose of examining the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of such nozzles for a wide range of core and fan stream conditions. Of particular interest are jets with inverted velocity and temperature profiles and the appearance of a second spectral peak at small aft angles to the jet under such conditions. It is shown that a four-component spectrum succeeds in modeling the second peak when the aft angle refraction effects are properly incorporated into the model. A tradeoff of noise emission takes place between two turbulent regions identified as transition and fully mixed regions as the fan stream velocity exceeds that of the core stream. The effect of nozzle discharge coefficients will also be discussed.

  3. Acoustic streaming and Sun's meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    A vast number of physical processes involving oscillations of a bounded viscous fluid are relevantly influenced by acoustic streaming. When this happens a steady circulation of fluid develops in a thin boundary adjacent to the interface. Some examples are refracted sound waves, a fluid inside a spherical cavity undergoing torsional oscillations or a pulsating liquid droplet. Steady streaming around circular interfaces consists of a hemispherically symmetric recirculation of fluid from the equatorial plane to the polar axes closely resembling the meridional circulation pattern observed in the Sun's convection zone that determines the solar cycle. In this paper, it is argued that the acoustic pulsations exhibited by the Sun would lead to acoustic streaming in the boundary of the convection zone. A simple estimation using a typical dominant frequency of 3 mHz and the observed surface oscillation amplitude yields a steady streaming velocity us ∼ 10 m s‑1, which is on the order of the meridional circulation velocity observed in the Sun's convection zone.

  4. Acoustic streaming and Sun's meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    A vast number of physical processes involving oscillations of a bounded viscous fluid are relevantly influenced by acoustic streaming. When this happens a steady circulation of fluid develops in a thin boundary adjacent to the interface. Some examples are refracted sound waves, a fluid inside a spherical cavity undergoing torsional oscillations or a pulsating liquid droplet. Steady streaming around circular interfaces consists of a hemispherically symmetric recirculation of fluid from the equatorial plane to the polar axes closely resembling the meridional circulation pattern observed in the Sun's convection zone that determines the solar cycle. In this paper, it is argued that the acoustic pulsations exhibited by the Sun would lead to acoustic streaming in the boundary of the convection zone. A simple estimation using a typical dominant frequency of 3 mHz and the observed surface oscillation amplitude yields a steady streaming velocity us ˜ 10 m s‑1, which is on the order of the meridional circulation velocity observed in the Sun's convection zone.

  5. Acoustic streaming and Sun's meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    A vast number of physical processes involving oscillations of a bounded viscous fluid are relevantly influenced by acoustic streaming. When this happens a steady circulation of fluid develops in a thin boundary adjacent to the interface. Some examples are refracted sound waves, a fluid inside a spherical cavity undergoing torsional oscillations or a pulsating liquid droplet. Steady streaming around circular interfaces consists of a hemispherically symmetric recirculation of fluid from the equatorial plane to the polar axes closely resembling the meridional circulation pattern observed in the Sun's convection zone that determines the solar cycle. In this paper, it is argued that the acoustic pulsations exhibited by the Sun would lead to acoustic streaming in the boundary of the convection zone. A simple estimation using a typical dominant frequency of 3 mHz and the observed surface oscillation amplitude yields a steady streaming velocity us ˜ 10 m s-1, which is on the order of the meridional circulation velocity observed in the Sun's convection zone.

  6. Flow profiling of a surface-acoustic-wave nanopump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttenberg, Z.; Rathgeber, A.; Keller, S.; Rädler, J. O.; Wixforth, A.; Kostur, M.; Schindler, M.; Talkner, P.

    2004-11-01

    The flow profile in a capillary gap and the pumping efficiency of an acoustic micropump employing surface acoustic waves is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Ultrasonic surface waves on a piezoelectric substrate strongly couple to a thin liquid layer and generate a quadrupolar streaming pattern within the fluid. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy as complementary tools to investigate the resulting flow profile. The velocity was found to depend on the applied power approximately linearly and to decrease with the inverse third power of the distance from the ultrasound generator on the chip. The found properties reveal acoustic streaming as a promising tool for the controlled agitation during microarray hybridization.

  7. Acoustic streaming in resonant viscous microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Within the field of lab-on-a-chip systems large efforts are devoted to the development of onchip tools for particle handling and mixing in viscosity-dominated microflows. One technology involves ultrasound with frequencies in the MHz range, which leads to wavelengths of the order of 10-4-10-3 m suitable for mm-sized microchambers. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing acoustofluidic equations, second-order effects will induce steady forces to fluids and suspended particles through the effects known as acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure. We present the basic perturbation approach for treating these effects in systems at resonance, where the amplitudes are maximized. The first-order eigenmodes are used as source terms for the time-averaged viscous second-order equations. The theory is applied to explain experimental results on aqueous microbead solutions in silicon-glass microchips [1].[1] S. M. Hags"ater, T. Glasdam Jensen, H. Bruus and J. P. Kutter.Acoustic resonances in microfluidic chips: full-image micro-PIV experiments and numerical simulations. Lab Chip, 2007, DOI: 10.1039/b704864e.

  8. Effective mixing strategies with microbubble streaming flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    Homogeneous mixing of chemical/biological samples and reagents is one of the essential preparation steps for lab-on-a-chip systems. As effective Stokes flows driven by fast time scale oscillatory flows, microbubble streaming flows are a tool uniquely positioned between passive and active mixing approaches. Guided by thorough theoretical understanding of the flows and of micromixing itself, we investigate various designs of microbubble mixers, employing two key strategies: (a) introducing controlled unsteadiness in the acoustic driving pattern, e.g. by duty-cycling and driving frequency modulation, and (b) optimizing the arrangement of multiple bubbles, such as the number, position, and orientation of the microbubbles, particularly to generate 3D chaotic flow patterns. Both of these approaches significantly improve mixing over that of previous steady 2D bubble micro-mixers, and the strategies can be combined for greater effect. Current address: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology

  9. Experimental study of streaming flows associated with ultrasonic levitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Robey, J. L.

    1994-11-01

    Steady-state acoustic streaming flow patterns have been observed during the operation of a variety of resonant single-axis ultrasonic levitators in a gaseous environment and in the 20-37 kHz frequency range. Light sheet illumination and scattering from smoke particles have revealed primary streaming flows which display different characteristics at low and high sound pressure levels. Secondary macroscopic streaming cells around levitated samples are superimposed on the primary streaming flow pattern generated by the standing wave. These recorded flows are quite reproducible, and are qualitatively the same for a variety of levitator physical geometries. An onset of flow instability can also be recorded in nonisothermal systems, such as levitated spot-heated samples when the resonance conditions are not exactly satisfied. A preliminary qualitative interpretation of these experimental results is presented in terms of the superposition of three discrete sets of circulation cells operating on different spatial scales. These relevant length scales are the acoustic wavelength, the levitated sample size, and finally the acoustic boundary layer thickness. This approach fails, however, to explain the streaming flow-field morphology around liquid drops levitated on Earth. Observation of the interaction between the flows cells and the levitated samples also suggests the existence of a steady-state torque induced by the streaming flows.

  10. Evaluation of the successive approximations method for acoustic streaming numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-05-01

    This work evaluates the successive approximations method commonly used to predict acoustic streaming by comparing it with a direct method. The successive approximations method solves both the acoustic wave propagation and acoustic streaming by solving the first and second order Navier-Stokes equations, ignoring the first order convective effects. This method was applied to acoustic streaming in a 2D domain and the results were compared with results from the direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The velocity results showed qualitative agreement between both methods, which indicates that the successive approximations method can describe the formation of flows with recirculation. However, a large quantitative deviation was observed between the two methods. Further analysis showed that the successive approximation method solution is sensitive to the initial flow field. The direct method showed that the instantaneous flow field changes significantly due to reflections and wave interference. It was also found that convective effects contribute significantly to the wave propagation pattern. These effects must be taken into account when solving the acoustic streaming problems, since it affects the global flow. By adequately calculating the initial condition for first order step, the acoustic streaming prediction by the successive approximations method can be improved significantly.

  11. Evaluation of the successive approximations method for acoustic streaming numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-05-01

    This work evaluates the successive approximations method commonly used to predict acoustic streaming by comparing it with a direct method. The successive approximations method solves both the acoustic wave propagation and acoustic streaming by solving the first and second order Navier-Stokes equations, ignoring the first order convective effects. This method was applied to acoustic streaming in a 2D domain and the results were compared with results from the direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The velocity results showed qualitative agreement between both methods, which indicates that the successive approximations method can describe the formation of flows with recirculation. However, a large quantitative deviation was observed between the two methods. Further analysis showed that the successive approximation method solution is sensitive to the initial flow field. The direct method showed that the instantaneous flow field changes significantly due to reflections and wave interference. It was also found that convective effects contribute significantly to the wave propagation pattern. These effects must be taken into account when solving the acoustic streaming problems, since it affects the global flow. By adequately calculating the initial condition for first order step, the acoustic streaming prediction by the successive approximations method can be improved significantly. PMID:27250122

  12. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  13. Droplet Manipulation Using Acoustic Streaming Induced by a Vibrating Membrane.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang Van; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple method for on-demand manipulation of aqueous droplets in oil. With numerical simulations and experiments, we show that a vibrating membrane can produce acoustic streaming. By making use of this vortical flow, we manage to repulse the droplets away from the membrane edges. Then, by simply aligning the membrane at 45° to the flow, the droplets can be forced to follow the membrane's boundaries, thus steering them across streamlines and even between different oil types. We also characterize the repulsion and steering effect with various excitation voltages at different water and oil flow rates. The maximum steering frequency we have achieved is 165 Hz. The system is extremely robust and reliable: the same membrane can be reused after many days and with different oils and/or surfactants at the same operating frequency. PMID:27119623

  14. Droplet Manipulation Using Acoustic Streaming Induced by a Vibrating Membrane.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang Van; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple method for on-demand manipulation of aqueous droplets in oil. With numerical simulations and experiments, we show that a vibrating membrane can produce acoustic streaming. By making use of this vortical flow, we manage to repulse the droplets away from the membrane edges. Then, by simply aligning the membrane at 45° to the flow, the droplets can be forced to follow the membrane's boundaries, thus steering them across streamlines and even between different oil types. We also characterize the repulsion and steering effect with various excitation voltages at different water and oil flow rates. The maximum steering frequency we have achieved is 165 Hz. The system is extremely robust and reliable: the same membrane can be reused after many days and with different oils and/or surfactants at the same operating frequency.

  15. Experimental and analytical investigation of acoustic streaming generated by standing ultrasonic waves in an open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, K.; Loh, B.-G.; Lee, D.-R.

    2007-12-01

    Acoustic streaming patterns, velocity fields, which is induced by a cylindrical ultrasonic exciter vibrating at 28.4kHz in an open physical boundaries, is analytically and experimentally investigated using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). Induced acoustic streaming patterns and velocity fields for the gaps of 18mm at which the irrotational tangential velocity becomes a maximum, resulting in a substantial increase in the acoustic streaming velocity and pronounced visualization of streaming patterns between the vibrator and quiescent glass plate are presented. The overall air flow patterns at the gaps of 24, 30, 36mm are similar to the gap of 18 mm but as the gap increases the frequency of occurrence and irregularity of vortices in the gap appear to increase. The symmetric definite steady circular flow with local vortices is observed. The maximum streaming velocity measured stands at 0.16 cm/s with a vibration amplitude of 50 micrometers. Theoretical analysis indicates that the pattern of air flow in the gap is determined by the top and bottom limiting velocities induced by acoustic streaming within the Stokes boundary layer and that the streaming pattern is symmetrical with respect to the center axis of the vibrator by reason of symmetry. The comparison between the experimental data and the theoretical estimation based on Nyborg and Jackson is performed.

  16. Nanoliter-droplet acoustic streaming via ultra high frequency surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Richie J; Travagliati, Marco; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-08-01

    The relevant length scales in sub-nanometer amplitude surface acoustic wave-driven acoustic streaming are demonstrated. We demonstrate the absence of any physical limitations preventing the downscaling of SAW-driven internal streaming to nanoliter microreactors and beyond by extending SAW microfluidics up to operating frequencies in the GHz range. This method is applied to nanoliter scale fluid mixing.

  17. Diversity of acoustic streaming in a rectangular acoustofluidic field.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Hu, Junhui

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of acoustic streaming field in a 2D rectangular chamber with a traveling wave and using water as the acoustic medium is numerically investigated by the finite element method. It is found that the working frequency, the vibration excitation source length, and the distance and phase difference between two separated symmetric vibration excitation sources can cause the diversity in the acoustic streaming pattern. It is also found that a small object in the acoustic field results in an additional eddy, and affects the eddy size in the acoustic streaming field. In addition, the computation results show that with an increase of the acoustic medium's temperature, the speed of the main acoustic streaming decreases first and then increases, and the angular velocity of the corner eddies increases monotonously, which can be clearly explained by the change of the acoustic dissipation factor and shearing viscosity of the acoustic medium with temperature. Commercialized FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics is used to implement the computation tasks, which makes our method very easy to use. And the computation method is partially verified by an established analytical solution.

  18. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  19. Numerical and theoretical analysis of beam vibration induced acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qun

    The purpose of this research is to numerically and analytically investigate the acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer, which are induced by a beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms. Analytical results show that the beam vibrating in standing waveforms scatters the acoustic waves into the free space, which have a larger attenuation coefficient and longer propagating traveling wavelength than those of the plane wave. In contrast to a constant Reynolds stress in the plane wave, the Reynolds stress generated by such acoustic wave is expected to drive the free space streaming away from the anti-nodes and towards nodes of the standing wave vibration. The sonic and ultrasonic streamings within the channel between the vibrating beam and a parallel stationary beam are also investigated. The acoustic streaming is utilized to cool the stationary beam, which has either a heat source attached to it or subjected to a uniform heat flux. The sonic streaming is found to be mainly the boundary layer streaming dominating the whole channel while the ultrasonic streaming is clearly composed of two boundary layer streamings near both beams and a core region streaming, which is driven by the streaming velocity at the edge of the boundary layer near the vibrating beam. The standing wave vibration of the beam induces acoustic streaming in a series of counterclockwise eddies, which is directed away from the anti-nodes and towards the nodes. The magnitude of the sonic streaming is proportional to o2A 2 while that of the ultrasonic streaming is proportional to o 3/2A2. Numerical results show that the acoustic streaming induced by the beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms has almost the same cooling efficiency for the heat source and the heat flux cases although the flow and temperature fields within the channel are different. The hysteresis of the ultrasonic streaming flow patterns associated with the change of the aspect ratio of the channel

  20. Acoustic streaming in the transducer plane in ultrasonic particle manipulation devices.

    PubMed

    Lei, Junjun; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Hill, Martyn

    2013-06-01

    In acoustofluidic manipulation and sorting devices, Rayleigh streaming flows are typically found in addition to the acoustic radiation forces. However, experimental work from various groups has described acoustic streaming that occurs in planar devices in a plane parallel to the transducer face. This is typically a four-quadrant streaming pattern with the circulation parallel to the transducer. Understanding its origins is essential for creating designs that limit or control this phenomenon. The cause of this kind of streaming pattern has not been previously explained as it is different from the well-known classical streaming patterns such as Rayleigh streaming and Eckart streaming, whose circulation planes are generally perpendicular to the face of the acoustic transducer. In order to gain insight into these patterns we present a numerical method based on Nyborg's limiting velocity boundary condition that includes terms ignored in the Rayleigh analysis, and verify its predictions against experimental PIV results in a simple device. The results show that the modelled particle trajectories match those found experimentally. Analysis of the dominant terms in the driving equations shows that the origin of this kind of streaming pattern is related to the circulation of the acoustic intensity.

  1. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts. PMID:26764815

  2. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q , the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v1≪cs for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v1≪cs/Q . Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  3. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  4. Theoretical and experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a porous material.

    PubMed

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Schraven, Arthur; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material has been made. Particular attention was paid to the phenomenon of acoustic streaming of the liquid in the porous material due to the damping of the acoustic waves. The experiments were performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. A microphone was used to measure the damping of the waves in the porous material and also temperature and pressure measurements in the flowing liquid inside the cores were carried out. To model the acoustic streaming effect Darcy's law was extended with a source term representing the momentum transfer from the acoustic waves to the liquid. The model predictions for the pressure distribution inside the core under acoustic streaming conditions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  5. An acoustic streaming instability in thermoacoustic devices utilizing jet pumps.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, S; Swift, G W

    2003-03-01

    Thermoacoustic-Stirling hybrid engines and feedback pulse tube refrigerators can utilize jet pumps to suppress streaming that would otherwise cause large heat leaks and reduced efficiency. It is desirable to use jet pumps to suppress streaming because they do not introduce moving parts such as bellows or membranes. In most cases, this form of streaming suppression works reliably. However, in some cases, the streaming suppression has been found to be unstable. Using a simple model of the acoustics in the regenerators and jet pumps of these devices, a stability criterion is derived that predicts when jet pumps can reliably suppress streaming. PMID:12656366

  6. The acoustics of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimskii-Korsakov, A. V.

    Papers are presented on such topics as the excitation of sound by small perturbations of entropy and vorticity in spatially nonuniform flows of a compressible ideal gas; the aeroacoustic characteristics of acoustically excited jets; the noise intensity and spectrum in a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate; sound refraction in a turbulent shear flow; and the spectrum of spatial correlations of turbulent pressure pulsations at a wall at high Reynolds numbers. Consideration is also given to a comparative study of the acoustic fields of air and helium jets at subsonic outflow speeds; the effect of external boundary layer flow on jet-noise characteristics; wing-profile noise in turbulent flow; sound emission from an unsteady boundary layer; and the sound-field characteristics of a moving source (with application to aircraft-noise analysis). The effect of a sound field on coherent structures in turbulent flow, aerodynamic forces causing fan vibration and noise, and a silencer for a jet-aircraft powerplant are also examined. For individual items see A84-28803 to A84-28820

  7. Direct calculation of acoustic streaming including the boundary layer phenomena in an ultrasonic air pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2012-05-01

    Direct finite difference fluid simulation of acoustic streaming on the fine-meshed three-dimensiona model by graphics processing unit (GPU)-oriented calculation array is discussed. Airflows due to the acoustic traveling wave are induced when an intense sound field is generated in a gap between a bending transducer and a reflector. Calculation results showed good agreement with the measurements in the pressure distribution. In addition to that, several flow-vortices were observed near the boundary of the reflector and the transducer, which have been often discussed in acoustic tube near the boundary, and have never been observed in the calculation in the ultrasonic air pump of this type.

  8. Simulation of nonlinear Westervelt equation for the investigation of acoustic streaming and nonlinear propagation effects.

    PubMed

    Solovchuk, Maxim; Sheu, Tony W H; Thiriet, Marc

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the influence of blood flow on temperature distribution during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumors. A three-dimensional acoustic-thermal-hydrodynamic coupling model is developed to compute the temperature field in the hepatic cancerous region. The model is based on the nonlinear Westervelt equation, bioheat equations for the perfused tissue and blood flow domains. The nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations are employed to describe the flow in large blood vessels. The effect of acoustic streaming is also taken into account in the present HIFU simulation study. A simulation of the Westervelt equation requires a prohibitively large amount of computer resources. Therefore a sixth-order accurate acoustic scheme in three-point stencil was developed for effectively solving the nonlinear wave equation. Results show that focused ultrasound beam with the peak intensity 2470 W/cm(2) can induce acoustic streaming velocities up to 75 cm/s in the vessel with a diameter of 3 mm. The predicted temperature difference for the cases considered with and without acoustic streaming effect is 13.5 °C or 81% on the blood vessel wall for the vein. Tumor necrosis was studied in a region close to major vessels. The theoretical feasibility to safely necrotize the tumors close to major hepatic arteries and veins was shown. PMID:24180802

  9. Fast acoustic streaming in standing waves: generation of an additional outer streaming cell.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Daru, Virginie; Bailliet, Hélène; Moreau, Solène; Valière, Jean-Christophe; Baltean-Carlès, Diana; Weisman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Rayleigh streaming in a cylindrical acoustic standing waveguide is studied both experimentally and numerically for nonlinear Reynolds numbers from 1 to 30 [Re(NL)=(U0/c0)(2)(R/δν)(2), with U0 the acoustic velocity amplitude at the velocity antinode, c0 the speed of sound, R the tube radius, and δν the acoustic boundary layer thickness]. Streaming velocity is measured by means of laser Doppler velocimetry in a cylindrical resonator filled with air at atmospheric pressure at high intensity sound levels. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically with high resolution finite difference schemes. The resonator is excited by shaking it along the axis at imposed frequency. Results of measurements and of numerical calculation are compared with results given in the literature and with each other. As expected, the axial streaming velocity measured and calculated agrees reasonably well with the slow streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for fast streaming (ReNL>1). Both experimental and numerical results show that when ReNL is increased, the center of the outer streaming cells are pushed toward the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes.

  10. Acoustofluidics 16: acoustics streaming near liquid-gas interfaces: drops and bubbles.

    PubMed

    Sadhal, S S

    2012-08-21

    In this sixteenth part of the series on "Acoustofluidics-exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation," we continue our discussion on the analytical aspects of the streaming phenomenon. In particular, the use of the singular perturbation technique for this class of problems is delineated with a set of examples where fluid-fluid interaction takes place. In this category, we focus on drops and bubbles, and deal specifically with the effect of interfacial mobility on the streaming flow. PMID:22776990

  11. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming.

  12. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect.

  13. Acoustic streaming, fluid mixing, and particle transport by a Gaussian ultrasound beam in a cylindrical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.; Wu, Junru

    2015-10-01

    A computational study is reported of the acoustic streaming flow field generated by a Gaussian ultrasound beam propagating normally toward the end wall of a cylindrical container. Particular focus is given to examining the effectiveness of the acoustic streaming flow for fluid mixing within the container, for deposition of particles in suspension onto the bottom surface, and for particle suspension from the bottom surface back into the flow field. The flow field is assumed to be axisymmetric with the ultrasound transducer oriented parallel to the cylinder axis and normal to the bottom surface of the container, which we refer to as the impingement surface. Reflection of the sound from the impingement surface and sound absorption within the material at the container bottom are both accounted for in the computation. The computation also accounts for thermal buoyancy force due to ultrasonic heating of the impingement surface, but over the time period considered in the current simulations, the flow is found to be dominated by the acoustic streaming force, with only moderate effect of buoyancy force.

  14. Acoustic streaming, fluid mixing, and particle transport by a Gaussian ultrasound beam in a cylindrical container

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.; Wu, Junru

    2015-10-15

    A computational study is reported of the acoustic streaming flow field generated by a Gaussian ultrasound beam propagating normally toward the end wall of a cylindrical container. Particular focus is given to examining the effectiveness of the acoustic streaming flow for fluid mixing within the container, for deposition of particles in suspension onto the bottom surface, and for particle suspension from the bottom surface back into the flow field. The flow field is assumed to be axisymmetric with the ultrasound transducer oriented parallel to the cylinder axis and normal to the bottom surface of the container, which we refer to as the impingement surface. Reflection of the sound from the impingement surface and sound absorption within the material at the container bottom are both accounted for in the computation. The computation also accounts for thermal buoyancy force due to ultrasonic heating of the impingement surface, but over the time period considered in the current simulations, the flow is found to be dominated by the acoustic streaming force, with only moderate effect of buoyancy force.

  15. Quenching of acoustic bandgaps by flow noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnady, T.; Elsabbagh, A.; Akl, W.; Mohamady, O.; Garcia-Chocano, V. M.; Torrent, D.; Cervera, F.; Sánchez-Dehesa, J.

    2009-03-01

    We report an experimental study of acoustic effects produced by wind impinging on noise barriers based on two-dimensional sonic crystals with square symmetry. We found that the attenuation strength of sonic-crystal bandgaps decreases for increasing values of flow speed. A quenching of the acoustic bandgap appears at a certain speed value that depends of the barrier filling ratio. For increasing values of flow speed, the data indicate that the barrier becomes a sound source because of its interaction with the wind. We conclude that flow noise should be taken into account in designing acoustic barriers based on sonic crystals.

  16. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  17. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application: Single stream nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Brausch, J. F.; Janardan, B. A.; Balsa, T. F.; Knott, P. R.; Pickup, N.

    1984-01-01

    A technology base for the thermal acoustic shield concept as a noise suppression device for single stream exhaust nozzles was developed. Acoustic data for 314 test points for 9 scale model nozzle configurations were obtained. Five of these configurations employed an unsuppressed annular plug core jet and the remaining four nozzles employed a 32 chute suppressor core nozzle. Influence of simulated flight and selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables on the acoustic behavior of the thermal acoustic shield was determined. Laser velocimeter and aerodynamic measurements were employed to yield valuable diagnostic information regarding the flow field characteristics of these nozzles. An existing theoretical aeroacoustic prediction method was modified to predict the acoustic characteristics of partial thermal acoustic shields.

  18. An acoustic travel time method for continuous velocity monitoring in shallow tidal streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Nistor, Ioan; Sharifi, Soroosh

    2013-08-01

    Long-term variations of streamflow in a tidal channel were measured using a Fluvial Acoustic Tomography (FAT) system through one transmission path. FAT is an innovative acoustic technology that utilizes the time-of-travel method to determine velocity between two points from multiple ray paths that traverse the entire cross-section of stream. Due to high spatial variability of flow distribution stationary ADCP measurements were not likely to yield true section-averaged flow velocity and moving-boat ADCP method was therefore used to provide reference data. As such, two short-term moving boat ADCP campaigns were carried out by the authors. In the first campaign, a couple of acoustic stations were added to the FAT system in order to resolve flow angularity in addition to the mean velocity. Comparing the FAT results with corresponding ADCP section-averaged flow direction and velocity indicated remarkable consistency. Second campaign was designed to capture the influence of salt wedge intrusion on the sound propagation pattern. It was found that FAT velocity measurements bias high if acoustic stations lay inside the cooler freshwater layer. Ray-tracing hindcasts suggest that installing acoustic stations inside the salt wedge may significantly improve function of output of the system. Comparing salinities evaluated from long-term FAT travel time records with nodal salinity measurements provided by conductivity-temperature sensors reveals the potential ability of FAT in measuring salt flux.

  19. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  20. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane.

    PubMed

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10 μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming flow, while the motion of the largest particles is dominated by the acoustic radiation force. For all particle sizes we predict theoretically how much of the particle velocity is due to radiation and streaming, respectively. These predictions include corrections for particle-wall interactions and ultrasonic thermoviscous effects and match our measurements within the experimental uncertainty. Finally, we predict theoretically and confirm experimentally that the ratio between the acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced particle velocities is proportional to the actuation frequency, the acoustic contrast factor, and the square of the particle size, while it is inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity.

  1. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  2. Peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Peak-flow annual exceedance probabilities, also called probability-percent chance flow estimates, and regional regression equations are provided describing the peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate peak-flow data. Analysis of Virginia peak-flow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating unregulated peak flow of gaged and ungaged streams. Station peak-flow characteristics identified by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows to a Log Pearson Type III frequency distribution yield annual exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.4292, 0.2, 0.1, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.002 for 476 streamgaging stations. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression model equations for six physiographic regions to estimate regional annual exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted peak-flow values that combine annual exceedance probabilities computed from gaging station data and from regional regression equations provide improved peak-flow estimates. Text, figures, and lists are provided summarizing selected peak-flow sites, delineated physiographic regions, peak-flow estimates, basin characteristics, regional regression model equations, error estimates, definitions, data sources, and candidate regression model equations. This study supersedes previous studies of peak flows in Virginia.

  3. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  4. Flow-frequency characteristics of Vermont streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    The safe and economical design of infrastructure in and near waterways and the effective management of flood-hazard areas require information on streamflow that may not be readily available. This report provides estimates of flow-frequency characteristics for gaged streams in Vermont and describes methods for estimating flow-frequency characteristics for ungaged streams. The flow-frequency characteristics investigated are the magnitude of peak discharges at recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years, and the magnitude of daily-mean discharges exceeded 25, 50, and 75 percent of the time. Peak-flow frequency characteristics for gaged streams were computed following the guidelines in Bulletin 17B of the U.S. Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data. To determine the peak-flow exceedance probabilities at stream-gaging stations in Vermont, a new generalized skew coefficient map for the State was developed. This new map has greater resolution and more current data than the existing National map. The standard error of the new map is 0.269. Two methods of extending streamflow record were applied to improve estimates of peak-flow frequency for streams with short flow records (10 to 15 years) in small drainage areas (sites less than 15 square miles). In the first method, a two-station comparison, data from a long-record site was used to adjust the frequency characteristics at the short-record site. This method was applied to 31 crest-stage gages--stations at which only instantaneous peak discharges are determined--in Vermont. The second method used rainfall-runoff modeling. Precipitation and evapotranspiration data from 1948 to 1999 for numerous climate data-collection sites were used as input to a model to simulate flows at 10 stream-gaging stations in Vermont. Also, methods are described to estimate flow-frequency characteristics for ungaged and unregulated rural streams in Vermont. The peak-flow estimating methods were developed by generalized

  5. Nonlinear acoustic streaming in straight and tapered tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Brian C.

    In thermoacoustic and Stirling devices such as the pulse-tube refrigerator, efficiency is diminished by the formation of a second-order mean velocity known as Rayleigh streaming. This flow emerges from the interaction of the working gas with the wall of the tube in a thin boundary layer. Recent studies have suggested that streaming velocity can be decreased in a tube by tapering it slightly. This research investigates that claim through the development of a numerical model of Rayleigh streaming in variously tapered tubes. It is found that the numerical simulation of streaming in a straight tube compares well with theory, and the application of different thermal boundary conditions at the tube wall shows that for pressurized helium, inner streaming vortices which appear near an adiabatic tube wall do not develop near an isothermal wall. An order analysis indicates that the temperature dependence of viscosity and thermal conductivity contributes appreciably to an accurate numerical model of streaming. Comparison of Rayleigh streaming in tapered tubes shows the effects of taper angle on the circulation and velocity of the mean flow.

  6. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation. PMID:27058069

  7. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  8. Characterization of Three-Stream Jet Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Flow-field measurements were conducted on single-, dual- and three-stream jets using two-component and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow-field measurements complimented previous acoustic measurements. The exhaust system consisted of externally-plugged, externally-mixed, convergent nozzles. The study used bypass-to-core area ratios equal to 1.0 and 2.5 and tertiary-to-core area ratios equal to 0.6 and 1.0. Axisymmetric and offset tertiary nozzles were investigated for heated and unheated high-subsonic conditions. Centerline velocity decay rates for the single-, dual- and three-stream axisymmetric jets compared well when axial distance was normalized by an equivalent diameter based on the nozzle system total exit area. The tertiary stream had a greater impact on the mean axial velocity for the small bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles than for large bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles. Normalized turbulence intensities were similar for the single-, dual-, and three-stream unheated jets due to the small difference (10 percent) in the core and bypass velocities for the dual-stream jets and the low tertiary velocity (50 percent of the core stream) for the three-stream jets. For heated jet conditions where the bypass velocity was 65 percent of the core velocity, additional regions of high turbulence intensity occurred near the plug tip which were not present for the unheated jets. Offsetting the tertiary stream moved the peak turbulence intensity levels upstream relative to those for all axisymmetric jets investigated.

  9. Characterization of Three-Stream Jet Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Flow-field measurements were conducted on single-, dual- and three-stream jets using two-component and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow-field measurements complimented previous acoustic measurements. The exhaust system consisted of externally-plugged, externally-mixed, convergent nozzles. The study used bypass-to-core area ratios equal to 1.0 and 2.5 and tertiary-to-core area ratios equal to 0.6 and 1.0. Axisymmetric and offset tertiary nozzles were investigated for heated and unheated high-subsonic conditions. Centerline velocity decay rates for the single-, dual- and three-stream axisymmetric jets compared well when axial distance was normalized by an equivalent diameter based on the nozzle system total exit area. The tertiary stream had a greater impact on the mean axial velocity for the small bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles than for large bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles. Normalized turbulence intensities were similar for the single-, dual-, and three-stream unheated jets due to the small difference (10%) in the core and bypass velocities for the dual-stream jets and the low tertiary velocity (50% of the core stream) for the three-stream jets. For heated jet conditions where the bypass velocity was 65% of the core velocity, additional regions of high turbulence intensity occurred near the plug tip which were not present for the unheated jets. Offsetting the tertiary stream moved the peak turbulence intensity levels upstream relative to those for all axisymmetric jets investigated.

  10. Low-flow characteristics of Indiana streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fowler, K.K.; Wilson, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of low-flow characteristics of streams is essential for management of water resources. Low-flow characteristics are presented for 229 continuous-record, streamflow-gaging stations and 285 partial-record stations in Indiana. Low- flow-frequency characteristics were computed for 210 continuous-record stations that had at least 10 years of record, and flow-duration curves were computed for all continuous-record stations. Low-flow-frequency and flow-duration analyses are based on available streamflow records through September 1993. Selected low-flow-frequency curves were computed for annual low flows and seasonal low flows. The four seasons are represented by the 3-month groups of March-May, June-August, September-November, and December- February. The 7-day, 10-year and the 7-day, 2 year low flows were estimated for 285 partial-record stations, which are ungaged sites where streamflow measurements were made at base flow. The same low-flow characteristics were estimated for 19 continuous-record stations where less than 10 years of record were available. Precipitation and geology directly influence the streams in Indiana. Streams in the northern, glaciated part of the State tend to have higher sustained base flows than those in the nonglaciated southern part. Flow at several of the continuous-record gaging stations is affected by some form of regulation or diversion. Low-flow characteristics for continuous-record stations at which flow is affected by regulation are determined using the period of record affected by regulation; natural flows prior to regulation are not used.

  11. Apparatus for focusing flowing gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Nogar, N.S.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-05-20

    Apparatus for focusing gas streams. The principle of hydrodynamic focusing is applied to flowing gas streams in order to provide sample concentration for improved photon and sample utilization in resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis. In a concentric nozzle system, gas samples introduced from the inner nozzle into the converging section of the outer nozzle are focused to streams 50-250-..mu..m in diameter. In some cases diameters of approximately 100-..mu..m are maintained over distances of several centimeters downstream from the exit orifice of the outer nozzle. The sheath gas employed has been observed to further provide a protective covering around the flowing gas sample, thereby isolating the flowing gas sample from possible unwanted reactions with nearby surfaces. A single nozzle variation of the apparatus for achieving hydrodynamic focusing of gas samples is also described.

  12. Low-flow characteristics of Indiana streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of low-flow data for Indiana streams is essential to the planners and developers of water resources for municipal, industrial, and recreational uses in the State. Low-flow data for 219 continuous-record gaging stations through the 1978 water year and for some stations since then are presented in tables and curves. Flow-duration and low-flow-frequency data were estimated or determined for continuous-record stations having more than 10 years of record. In addition, low-flow-frequency data were estimated for 248 partial-record stations. Methods for estimating these data are included in the report. (USGS)

  13. Nonlinear Acoustics Used To Reduce Leakage Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    Leakage and wear are two fundamental problems in all traditional turbine seals that contribute to an engine's inefficiency. The solutions to seal leakage and wear conflict in the conventional design space. Reducing the clearance between the seal and rotating shaft reduces leakage but increases wear because of increased contact incidents. Increasing the clearance to reduce the contact between parts reduces wear but increases parasitic leakage. The goal of this effort is to develop a seal that restricts leakage flow using acoustic pressure while operating in a noncontacting manner, thereby increasing life. In 1996, Dr. Timothy Lucas announced his discovery of a method to produce shock-free high-amplitude pressure waves. For the first time, the formation of large acoustic pressures was possible using dissonant resonators. A pre-prototype acoustic seal developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center exploits this fundamental acoustic discovery: a specially shaped cavity oscillated at the contained fluid's resonant frequency produces high-amplitude acoustic pressure waves of a magnitude approaching those required of today's seals. While the original researchers are continuing their development of acoustic pumps, refrigeration compressors, and electronic thermal management systems using this technology, the goal of researchers at Glenn is to apply these acoustic principles to a revolutionary sealing device. When the acoustic resonator shape is optimized for the sealing device, the flow from a high-pressure cavity to a low-pressure cavity will be restricted by a series of high-amplitude standing pressure waves of higher pressure than the pressure to be sealed. Since the sealing resonator cavity will not touch the adjacent sealing structures, seal wear will be eliminated, improving system life. Under a cooperative agreement between Glenn and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI), an acoustic-based pre-prototype seal was demonstrated for the first time. A pressurized cavity was

  14. Thermal acoustic interaction and flow phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, E. W.; Baroth, E.; Chan, C. K.; Wang, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    In containerless science for material processing, the acoustic fields is used to levitate and to control the position of a heated or cooled sample. The interaction between the temperature and the acoustic fields leads to complicated fluid flow phenomena, resulting in the perturbation of the sample position and the heat transfer process. The physical mechanisms in this thermal-acoustic field were investigated using the technique of holographic interferometry and thermometry. Of particular interest was the heat transfer rate from the sample associated with the sound intensities, normal frequencies of the acoustic standing wave field, and gravitational effects. For metallic spheres with high thermal conductivity, the surface temperature was found to be uniform. The thermal flow phenomenon, which is associated with the circulating flow inside the resonant chamber, was recorded. The heat transfer coefficient at the sample surface was correlated with the acoustic and the gravitational parameters, based on the classical theory of convective heat transfer. These correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer from a spherical object in a zero-gravity environment.

  15. Calculations of rotational flows using stream function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Yam, C.; Tang, K.; Dwyer, H.

    1989-01-01

    The stream function equation is solved for steady two-dimensional (and axisymmetric) rotational flows. Both finite differences and finite volumes discretization techniques are studied, using generalized body fitted coordinates and unstructured staggered grids, respectively. For inviscid transonic flows, a new artificial viscosity scheme which does not produce any artificial vorticity is introduced, for the stability of the mixed flow calculations and for capturing shocks. The solution of Euler equations, in primitive variables, are also considered. The effects of the artificial viscosity and numerical boundary conditions on the total enthalpy and the vorticity distributions are demonstrated.

  16. Acoustic propagation under tidally driven, stratified flow.

    PubMed

    Finette, Steven; Oba, Roger; Shen, Colin; Evans, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Amplitude and phase variability in acoustic fields are simulated within a canonical shelf-break ocean environment using sound speed distributions computed from hydrodynamics. The submesoscale description of the space and time varying environment is physically consistent with tidal forcing of stratified flows over variable bathymetry and includes the generation, evolution and propagation of internal tides and solibores. For selected time periods, two-dimensional acoustic transmission examples are presented for which signal gain degradation is computed between 200 and 500 Hz on vertical arrays positioned both on the shelf and beyond the shelf break. Decorrelation of the field is dominated by the phase contribution and occurs over 2-3 min, with significant recorrelation often noted for selected frequency subbands. Detection range is also determined in this frequency band. Azimuth-time variations in the acoustic field are illustrated for 100 Hz sources by extending the acoustic simulations to three spatial dimensions. The azimuthal and temporal structure of both the depth-averaged transmission loss and temporal correlation of the acoustic fields under different environmental conditions are considered. Depth-averaged transmission loss varies up to 4 dB, depending on a combination of source depth, location relative to the slope and tidally induced volumetric changes in the sound speed distribution. PMID:17550157

  17. Low-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Low-flow annual non-exceedance probabilities (ANEP), called probability-percent chance (P-percent chance) flow estimates, regional regression equations, and transfer methods are provided describing the low-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate streamflow data. Analysis of Virginia streamflow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating low-flow characteristics of gaged and ungaged streams. The 1-, 4-, 7-, and 30-day average streamgaging station low-flow characteristics for 290 long-term, continuous-record, streamgaging stations are determined, adjusted for instances of zero flow using a conditional probability adjustment method, and presented for non-exceedance probabilities of 0.9, 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3, 0.2, 0.1, 0.05, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.005. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression equations to estimate annual non-exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites and are summarized for 290 long-term, continuous-record streamgaging stations, 136 short-term, continuous-record streamgaging stations, and 613 partial-record streamgaging stations. Regional regression equations for six physiographic regions use basin characteristics to estimate 1-, 4-, 7-, and 30-day average low-flow annual non-exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted low-flow values that combine computed streamgaging station low-flow characteristics and annual non-exceedance probabilities from regional regression equations provide improved low-flow estimates. Regression equations developed using the Maintenance of Variance with Extension (MOVE.1) method describe the line of organic correlation (LOC) with an appropriate index site for low-flow characteristics at 136 short-term, continuous-record streamgaging stations and 613 partial-record streamgaging stations. Monthly

  18. Estimating stream discharge using stage and multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, J. B.; Rasmussen, K.; Ledet Jensen, J.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2011-12-01

    For temperate region countries with small or moderately sized streams, such as those in Denmark, seasonal weed growth imposes a significant temporal change of the stage-discharge relation. In the past such problems were often avoided by using hydraulic structures, however, firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations presently. As a consequence, the nonlinear drift in weed density and structure adds a significant uncertainty to the hydrograph. Furthermore, the expected increase in extreme discharge situations due to climate changes in the Northern part of Europe may further violate a stable relation between stage and discharge in streams. Extreme high flow situations cause abrupt rise in stage, and consequently weed can be partly uprooted and partly bend down along the bed, thereby changing the conveyance of the stream. In addition, extreme high flow situations can cause the streams to flood the banks. If these hydraulic changes occur in between direct measurements of discharge they are not detected or accounted for in the stage-discharge relation, and the hydrograph can be significantly biased. The objective of this research is to investigate how both seasonal and short duration changes in weed distribution and abrupt changes in stage are recognized in the stream's velocity gradient. It is examined whether the use of multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry can provide an improved method for hydrograph estimation with lower uncertainty than traditional stage-discharge methods. In this presentation we shall present results from a study where, at two sites in Denmark, the stream velocity field has been mapped by the use of three Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter (ADVM) instruments. The ADVM instruments are mounted in three different depths, continuously measuring horizontal average water velocities. Velocity and stage data are selected from one summer and two winter periods, and a method for converting velocity

  19. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  20. Quasinormal acoustic oscillations in the Michel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverra, Eliana; Morales, Manuel D.; Sarbach, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    We study spherical and nonspherical linear acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow, which describes the steady radial accretion of a perfect fluid into a nonrotating black hole. The dynamics of such perturbations are governed by a scalar wave equation on an effective curved background geometry determined by the acoustic metric, which is constructed from the spacetime metric and the particle density and four-velocity of the fluid. For the problem under consideration in this paper the acoustic metric has the same qualitative features as an asymptotically flat, static and spherically symmetric black hole, and thus it represents a natural astrophysical analogue black hole. As for the case of a scalar field propagating on a Schwarzschild background, we show that acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow exhibit quasinormal oscillations. Based on a new numerical method for determining the solutions of the radial mode equation, we compute the associated frequencies and analyze their dependency on the mass of the black hole, the radius of the sonic horizon and the angular momentum number. Our results for the fundamental frequencies are compared to those obtained from an independent numerical Cauchy evolution, finding good agreement between the two approaches. When the radius of the sonic horizon is large compared to the event horizon radius, we find that the quasinormal frequencies scale approximately like the surface gravity associated with the sonic horizon.

  1. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  2. Intelligent front-end sample preparation tool using acoustic streaming.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Erika J.; McClain, Jaime L.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Edwards, Thayne L.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Branch, Darren W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Anderson, John Mueller; James, Conrad D.; Smith, Gennifer; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel

    2009-09-01

    We have successfully developed a nucleic acid extraction system based on a microacoustic lysis array coupled to an integrated nucleic acid extraction system all on a single cartridge. The microacoustic lysing array is based on 36{sup o} Y cut lithium niobate, which couples bulk acoustic waves (BAW) into the microchannels. The microchannels were fabricated using Mylar laminates and fused silica to form acoustic-fluidic interface cartridges. The transducer array consists of four active elements directed for cell lysis and one optional BAW element for mixing on the cartridge. The lysis system was modeled using one dimensional (1D) transmission line and two dimensional (2D) FEM models. For input powers required to lyse cells, the flow rate dictated the temperature change across the lysing region. From the computational models, a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min produced a temperature rise of 23.2 C and only 6.7 C when flowing at 60 {micro}L/min. The measured temperature changes were 5 C less than the model. The computational models also permitted optimization of the acoustic coupling to the microchannel region and revealed the potential impact of thermal effects if not controlled. Using E. coli, we achieved a lysing efficacy of 49.9 {+-} 29.92 % based on a cell viability assay with a 757.2 % increase in ATP release within 20 seconds of acoustic exposure. A bench-top lysing system required 15-20 minutes operating up to 58 Watts to achieve the same level of cell lysis. We demonstrate that active mixing on the cartridge was critical to maximize binding and release of nucleic acid to the magnetic beads. Using a sol-gel silica bead matrix filled microchannel the extraction efficacy was 40%. The cartridge based magnetic bead system had an extraction efficiency of 19.2%. For an electric field based method that used Nafion films, a nucleic acid extraction efficiency of 66.3 % was achieved at 6 volts DC. For the flow rates we tested (10-50 {micro}L/min), the nucleic acid extraction

  3. Acoustic instability driven by cosmic-ray streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1994-08-01

    We study the linear stability of compressional waves in a medium through which cosmic rays stream at the Alfven speed due to strong coupling with Alfven waves. Acoustic waves can be driven unstable by the cosmic-ray drift, provided that the streaming speed is sufficiently large compared to the thermal sound speed. Two effects can cause instability: (1) the heating of the thermal gas due to the damping of Alfven waves driven unstable by cosmic-ray streaming; and (2) phase shifts in the cosmic-ray pressure perturbation caused by the combination of cosmic-ray streaming and diffusion. The instability does not depend on the magnitude of the background cosmic-ray pressure gradient, and occurs whether or not cosmic-ray diffusion is important relative to streaming. When the cosmic-ray pressure is small compared to the gas pressure, or cosmic-ray diffusion is strong, the instability manifests itself as a weak overstability of slow magnetosonic waves. Larger cosmic-ray pressure gives rise to new hybrid modes, which can be strongly unstable in the limits of both weak and strong cosmic-ray diffusion and in the presence of thermal conduction. Parts of our analysis parallel earlier work by McKenzie & Webb (which were brought to our attention after this paper was accepted for publication), but our treatment of diffusive effects, thermal conduction, and nonlinearities represent significant extensions. Although the linear growth rate of instability is independent of the background cosmic-ray pressure gradient, the onset of nonlinear eff ects does depend on absolute value of DEL (vector differential operator) Pc. At the onset of nonlinearity the fractional amplitude of cosmic-ray pressure perturbations is delta PC/PC approximately (kL) -1 much less than 1, where k is the wavenumber and L is the pressure scale height of the unperturbed cosmic rays. We speculate that the instability may lead to a mode of cosmic-ray transport in which plateaus of uniform cosmic-ray pressure are

  4. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory motion in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. The customary approach to modeling acoustic waves inside a rocket chamber is to apply the classical inhomogeneous wave equation to the combustion gas. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while the acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients in pressure, density, and velocity become large, is a notable region where this approach is not applicable. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. An accurate model of the acoustic behavior within this region where acoustic modes are influenced by the presence of a steady mean flow is required for reliable stability predictions. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, (del squared)(psi) - (lambda/c)(exp 2)(psi) - M(dot)[M(dot)(del)(del(psi))] - 2(lambda(M/c) + (M(dot)del(M))(dot)del(psi)-2(lambda)(psi)[M(dot)del(1/c)]=0 (1) with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and lambda as the complex eigenvalue. French apply the finite volume method to solve the steady flow field within the combustion chamber and nozzle with inviscid walls. The complex eigenvalues and eigenvector are determined with the use of the ARPACK eigensolver. The

  5. Toward Design Guidelines for Stream Restoration Structures: Measuring and Modeling Unsteady Turbulent Flows in Natural Streams with Complex Hydraulic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightbody, A.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Diplas, P.

    2009-12-01

    Despite their widespread application to prevent lateral river migration, stabilize banks, and promote aquatic habitat, shallow transverse flow training structures such as rock vanes and stream barbs lack quantitative design guidelines. Due to the lack of fundamental knowledge about the interaction of the flow field with the sediment bed, existing engineering standards are typically based on various subjective criteria or on cross-sectionally-averaged shear stresses rather than local values. Here, we examine the performance and stability of in-stream structures within a field-scale single-threaded sand-bed meandering stream channel in the newly developed Outdoor StreamLab (OSL) at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL). Before and after the installation of a rock vane along the outer bank of the middle meander bend, high-resolution topography data were obtained for the entire 50-m-long reach at 1-cm spatial scale in the horizontal and sub-millimeter spatial scale in the vertical. In addition, detailed measurements of flow and turbulence were obtained using acoustic Doppler velocimetry at twelve cross-sections focused on the vicinity of the structure. Measurements were repeated at a range of extreme events, including in-bank flows with an approximate flow rate of 44 L/s (1.4 cfs) and bankfull floods with an approximate flow rate of 280 L/s (10 cfs). Under both flow rates, the structure reduced near-bank shear stresses and resulted in both a deeper thalweg and near-bank aggradation. The resulting comprehensive dataset has been used to validate a large eddy simulation carried out by SAFL’s computational fluid dynamics model, the Virtual StreamLab (VSL). This versatile computational framework is able to efficiently simulate 3D unsteady turbulent flows in natural streams with complex in-stream structures and as a result holds promise for the development of much-needed quantitative design guidelines.

  6. Acoustic Flow Monitor System - User Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaHusen, Richard

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Acoustic Flow Monitor (AFM) is a portable system that was designed by the U.S. Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory to detect and monitor debris flows associated with volcanoes. It has been successfully used internationally as part of real-time warning systems in valleys threatened by such flows (Brantley, 1990; Marcial and others, 1996; Lavigne and others, 2000). The AFM system has also been proven to be an effective tool for monitoring some non-volcanic debris flows. This manual is intended to serve as a basic guide for the installation, testing, and maintenance of AFM systems. An overview of how the system works, as well as instructions for installation and guidelines for testing, is included. Interpretation of data is not covered in this manual; rather, the user should refer to the references provided for published examples of AFM data.

  7. Time Reversal Acoustic in a flowing medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Trung Dung; Arora, Manish; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Claus-Dieter Ohl grou Team; DHI Water; Environment (S) Pte. Ltd. Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We explore the effect of flow on time reversal acoustics (TRA). Traditionally, TRA has been studied in static conditions, while a motion of the medium is expected to degrade the spatio-temporal focussing of the sound pulse. Here, we study the effect of the flow with a TRA system at 1MHz. A controlled flow is added between the emitter and receiver. Additional, a metallic plate is utilized to increases the numerical aperture of the emitting transducer. The impulse response of the non-flowing system, is recorded and time reversed. Then, the response of the hydrophone is recorded in presence and absence of the flow. It is found that the time reversed signal focuses on at the hydrophone in both the cases. In the absence of flow, the focus signal is observed to be shifted in the time domain. Furthermore, there is a drop in the peak-to-peak value of the focus signal in the presence of flow. For a flow rate of 3 cm/s (Re ~ 1000), a distinct shift in the time domain and a reduction of the peak is obtained. The results will be discussed and compared with numerical simulation of TRA under flow conditions.

  8. Acoustic signals generated in inclined granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Danielle S.; Jenkins, James T.; Keast, Stephen C.; Sachse, Wolfgang H.

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous avalanching in specific deserts produces a low-frequency sound known as "booming." This creates a puzzle, because avalanches down the face of a dune result in collisions between sand grains that occur at much higher frequencies. Reproducing this phenomenon in the laboratory permits a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms for the generation of such lower frequency acoustic emissions, which may also be relevant to other dry granular flows. Here we report measurements of low-frequency acoustical signals, produced by dried "sounding" sand (sand capable of booming in the desert) flowing down an inclined chute. The amplitude of the signal diminishes over time but reappears upon drying of the sand. We show that the presence of this sound in the experiments may provide supporting evidence for a previously published "waveguide" explanation for booming. Also, we propose a model based on kinetic theory for a sheared inclined flow in which the flowing layer exhibits "breathing" modes superimposed on steady shearing. The predicted oscillation frequency is of a similar order of magnitude as the measurements, indicating that small perturbations can sustain oscillations of a low frequency. However, the frequency is underestimated, which indicates that the stiffness has been underestimated. Also, the model predicts a discrete spectrum of frequencies, instead of the broadband spectrum measured experimentally.

  9. Low-flow characteristics of Florida streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumenik, R.P.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of the low-flow characteristics of Florida streams and rivers is essential in planning for the availability of adequate quantities of water for commercial- and public-water supply, agricultural irrigation, artificial recharge, and the dilution of waste discharge. This report provides low-flow characteristics for 216 continuous-record gaging stations using frequency analysis techniques. Included are low-flow frequency characteristics for 143 unregulated, gaging stations; and sample percentiles for 32 stations that were subject to regulation or diversion, and sample percentiles for 41 stations, regulated and unregulated, that exhibited significant trends in the annual low-flow time series. Estimates of low-flow frequency characteristics are provided for 242 partial-record stations and miscellaneous sites based on correlations with daily mean discharges at continuous-record stations. Low-flow measurement data are available at approximately 1,300 continuous-record gaging stations, partial- record stations and miscellaneous sites. Historic low-flow measurement data are accessible through the U.S. Geological Survey Automatic Data Processing System.

  10. Study of the onset of the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators with pulse ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro, Angelica; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, we introduced pulse mode ultrasound as a new method for reducing and controlling the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators (Hoyos and Castro, 2013). Here, by modifying other parameters such as the resonator geometry and the particle size, we have found a threshold for particle manipulation with ultrasonic standing waves in confined resonators without the influence of the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulse mode ultrasound open the possibility of manipulating particles smaller than 1 μm size.

  11. Ice and thermal cameras for stream flow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Petroselli, Andrea; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Flow measurements are instrumental to establish discharge rating curves and to enable flood risk forecast. Further, they are crucial to study erosion dynamics and to comprehend the organization of drainage networks in natural catchments. Flow observations are typically executed with intrusive instrumentation, such as current meters or acoustic devices. Alternatively, non-intrusive instruments, such as radars and microwave sensors, are applied to estimate surface velocity. Both approaches enable flow measurements over areas of limited extent, and their implementation can be costly. Optical methods, such as large scale particle image velocimetry, have proved beneficial for non-intrusive and spatially-distributed environmental monitoring. In this work, a novel optical-based approach is utilized for surface flow velocity observations based on the combined use of a thermal camera and ice dices. Different from RGB imagery, thermal images are relatively unaffected by illumination conditions and water reflections. Therefore, such high-quality images allow to readily identify and track tracers against the background. Further, the optimal environmental compatibility of ice dices and their relative ease of preparation and storage suggest that the technique can be easily implemented to rapidly characterize surface flows. To demonstrate the validity of the approach, we present a set of experiments performed on the Brenta stream, Italy. In the experimental setup, the axis of the camera is maintained perpendicular with respect to the water surface to circumvent image orthorectification through ground reference points. Small amounts of ice dices are deployed onto the stream water surface during image acquisition. Particle tracers' trajectories are reconstructed off-line by analyzing thermal images with a particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) algorithm. Given the optimal visibility of the tracers and their low seeding density, PTV allows for efficiently following tracers' paths in

  12. Averaged indicators of secondary flow in repeated acoustic Doppler current profiler crossings of bends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Cross-stream velocity was measured in a large river bend at high spatial resolution over three separate survey episodes. A suite of methods for resolving cross-stream velocity distributions was tested on data collected using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the sand-bedded Sacramento River, California. The bend was surveyed with repeated ADCP crossings at eight cross sections during a rising limb of high discharge in February 2004 and twice on recession in March 2004. By translating and interpolating repeated ADCP crossings to planar grids, velocity ensembles at similar positions along irregular boat paths could be averaged. The averaging minimized turbulent fluctuations in streamwise velocities over 1 m/s, enabling the resolution of weaker cross-stream velocities (???15-30 cm/s). Secondary-flow influence on suspended sediment was inferred from a lateral region of acoustic backscatter intensity aligned with outward flow over the point bar. A near-bed decrease in backscatter intensity across the pool corresponded with inward cross-stream flow. These suspension indicators were used to orient averaged velocity grids for unambiguously defining the cross-stream velocity magnitudes. Additional field investigations could test whether the correlation between cross-stream velocity and backscatter intensity patterns results from helical recirculation of suspended sediment to the inside of the bend. These river measurements, consistent with classic and recent laboratory studies, show that ADCP surveys can provide refined views of secondary flow and sediment movement in large rivers.

  13. Improving acoustic streaming effects in fluidic systems by matching SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane layers.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the use of acoustic waves for promoting and improving streaming in tridimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cuvettes of 15mm width×14mm height×2.5mm thickness. The acoustic waves are generated by a 28μm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) - PVDF - piezoelectric transducer in its β phase, actuated at its resonance frequency: 40MHz. The acoustic transmission properties of two materials - SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - were numerically compared. It was concluded that PDMS inhibits, while SU-8 allows, the transmission of the acoustic waves to the propagation medium. Therefore, by simulating the acoustic transmission properties of different materials, it is possible to preview the acoustic behavior in the fluidic system, which allows the optimization of the best layout design, saving costs and time. This work also presents a comparison between numerical and experimental results of acoustic streaming obtained with that β-PVDF transducer in the movement and in the formation of fluid recirculation in tridimensional closed domains. Differences between the numerical and experimental results are credited to the high sensitivity of acoustic streaming to the experimental conditions and to limitations of the numerical method. The reported study contributes for the improvement of simulation models that can be extremely useful for predicting the acoustic effects of new materials in fluidic devices, as well as for optimizing the transducers and matching layers positioning in a fluidic structure. PMID:27044029

  14. Improving acoustic streaming effects in fluidic systems by matching SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane layers.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the use of acoustic waves for promoting and improving streaming in tridimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cuvettes of 15mm width×14mm height×2.5mm thickness. The acoustic waves are generated by a 28μm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) - PVDF - piezoelectric transducer in its β phase, actuated at its resonance frequency: 40MHz. The acoustic transmission properties of two materials - SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - were numerically compared. It was concluded that PDMS inhibits, while SU-8 allows, the transmission of the acoustic waves to the propagation medium. Therefore, by simulating the acoustic transmission properties of different materials, it is possible to preview the acoustic behavior in the fluidic system, which allows the optimization of the best layout design, saving costs and time. This work also presents a comparison between numerical and experimental results of acoustic streaming obtained with that β-PVDF transducer in the movement and in the formation of fluid recirculation in tridimensional closed domains. Differences between the numerical and experimental results are credited to the high sensitivity of acoustic streaming to the experimental conditions and to limitations of the numerical method. The reported study contributes for the improvement of simulation models that can be extremely useful for predicting the acoustic effects of new materials in fluidic devices, as well as for optimizing the transducers and matching layers positioning in a fluidic structure.

  15. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  16. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  17. Streaming Induced by High-Amplitude Acoustic Pulses and its Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starritt, Hazel Catherine

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis investigates some aspects of the nonlinear propagation of high amplitude ultrasound in the context of medical diagnostic applications. Nonlinear propagation occurring in focused diagnostic fields is shown to enhance acoustic streaming in water due to the increased absorption of the high frequency components in the distorted wave. The results of an extensive experimental investigation of streaming in water are presented. The streaming velocities were measured using the technique of hot film anemometry and were found to vary with total acoustic power, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration and pulse pressure amplitude. The velocity in a high amplitude beam was shown to be enhanced typically by a factor of 5 compared with that in a low amplitude beam of the same acoustic power. Measurements of acoustic parameters were made for comparison. The results showed that in a nonlinear field absorption is enhanced in the region immediately on the transducer side of the focus and this region is shown to act as the "source pump" for the stream. The maximum streaming velocities generated by commercial ultrasonic equipment were measured in the fields of pulsed Doppler units, with maximum velocities generated in the fields of scanned imaging beams being an order of magnitude lower. Streams in stationary beams were observed to become established in time periods which are short compared with the "dwell time" of the transducer at a single location in clinical use. The implications of acoustic streaming and the forces associated with it are discussed in the context of the current diagnostic usage of ultrasound. In particular, obstetric applications are considered where the fetus is scanned through a low loss fluid path in which nonlinear propagation and acoustic streaming may occur.

  18. Simulation forecasts complex flow streams from Ekofisk

    SciTech Connect

    Arnes, F.C.; Lillejord, H.

    1996-10-28

    A commercial steady-state process flowsheet simulation program serves as the basis for a rigorous calculation model for predicting produced flow rates from the Ekofisk complex in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. The complex is the center of an extensive gathering system that collects oil and gas streams from several producing fields. Prior to running a production forecast, the simulation model is initiated by matching several years of production. Once the simulation model matches historical production data within acceptable limits, it then is driven by production forecasts from reservoir simulations to develop long-term forecasts of gas, NGL, and oil production. The paper describes the Ekofisk field, the process simulation, implementation of the model, and problems encountered.

  19. Chemical composition of streams during low flow; Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Water samples were collected and stream discharges were measured at 49 sites in Fairfax County, Virginia during a period of low flow in August 1977. In addition, pesticide and metal content of residue on stream-bottom sediments from several major streams in the county were analysed. Waters from the streams in Fairfax County have generally good chemical quality during low flow. One stream in Vienna, Virginia has a high sodium chloride content, suggesting an upstream discharge of salty water. Higher concentrations of dissolved, solids reflect both the effects of geology and urbanization. Streams draining Triassic rocks in the western section of the county are characterized by the greatest natural concentration of dissolved minerals in the water. The concentrations of pesticide and metal residue associated with bottom sediments suggest a low level of pollution in the streams. One site in western Fairfax County contained above-normal levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) in the stream sediments.

  20. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application: Dual stream nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of an unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle and a coannular plug nozzle with a 20-chute outer stream suppressor were experimentally determined. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale model nozzles. Also, aerodynamic measurements of four selected plumes were made with a laser velocimeter. The presence of the 180 deg shield produced different mixing characteristics on the shield side compared to the unshield side because of the reduced mixing with ambient air on the shielded side. This resulted in a stretching of the jet, yielding a higher peak mean velocity up to a length of 10 equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. The 180 deg shield in community orientation around the suppressed coannular plug nozzle yielded acoustic benefit at all observer angles for a simulated takeoff. While the effect of shield-to-outer stream velocity ratio was small at angles up to 120 deg, beyond this angle significant acoustic benefit was realized with a shield-to-outer stream velocity ratio of 0.64.

  1. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, Christian

    2015-04-15

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier–Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier–Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as “true” sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided. - Highlights: • First splitting of non-uniform flows in acoustic and non-acoustic components. • These result leads to a generalisation of sound which is compatible with Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. • A closed equation for the generation and propagation of sound is given.

  2. Acoustic streaming in lithotripsy fields: preliminary observation using a particle image velocimetry method.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Joo; Doh, Doeg Hee; Hwang, Tae Gyu; Cho, Chu Hyun; Paeng, Dong Guk; Rim, Gun Hee; Coleman, A J

    2006-02-01

    This study considers the acoustic streaming in water produced by a lithotripsy pulse. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) method was employed to visualize the acoustic streaming produced by an electromagnetic shock wave generator using video images of the light scattering particles suspended in water. Visualized streaming features including several local peaks and vortexes around or at the beam focus were easily seen with naked eyes over all settings of the lithotripter from 10 to 18 kV. Magnitudes of the peak streaming velocity measured vary in the range of 10-40 mm s(-1) with charging voltage settings. Since the streaming velocity was estimated on the basis of a series of the video images of particles averaged over 1/60s, the time resolution limited by the video frame rate which is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than driving acoustic activities, measured velocities are expected to be underestimated and were shown a similar order of magnitude lower than those calculated from a simple theoretical consideration. Despite such an underestimation, it was shown that, as predicted by theory, the magnitude of the streaming velocity measured by the present PIV method was proportional to acoustic intensity. In particular it has almost a linear correlation with peak negative pressures (r=0.98683, p=0.0018). PMID:16376400

  3. Experimental investigation of shock-cell noise reduction for dual-stream nozzles in simulated flight comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Test nozzles and acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Hoerst, D. J.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Parameters which contribute to supersonic jet shock noise were investigated for the purpose of determining means to reduce such noise generation to acceptable levels. Six dual-stream test nozzles with varying flow passage and plug closure designs were evaluated under simulated flight conditions in an anechoic chamber. All nozzles had combined convergent-divergent or convergent flow passages. Acoustic behavior as a function of nozzle flow passage geometry was measured. The acoustic data consist primarily of 1/3 octave band sound pressure levels and overall sound pressure levels. Detailed schematics and geometric characteristics of the six scale model nozzle configurations and acoustic test point definitions are presented. Tabulation of aerodynamic test conditions and a computer listing of the measured acoustic data are displayed.

  4. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  5. Characterization of acoustic streaming and heating using synchronized infrared thermography and particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Layman, Christopher N; Sou, In Mei; Bartak, Rico; Ray, Chittaranjan; Allen, John S

    2011-09-01

    Real-time measurements of acoustic streaming velocities and surface temperature fields using synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography are reported. Measurements were conducted using a 20 kHz Langevin type acoustic horn mounted vertically in a model sonochemical reactor of either degassed water or a glycerin-water mixture. These dissipative phenomena are found to be sensitive to small variations in the medium viscosity, and a correlation between the heat flux and vorticity was determined for unsteady convective heat transfer.

  6. Regionalization of winter low-flow characteristics of Tennessee streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bingham, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures were developed for estimating winter (December-April) low flows at ungaged stream sites in Tennessee based on surface geology and drainage area size. One set of equations applies to West Tennessee streams, and another set applies to Middle and East Tennessee streams. The equations do not apply to streams where flow is significantly altered by the activities of man. Standard errors of estimate of equations for West Tennessee are 22% - 35% and for middle and East Tennessee 31% - 36%. Statistical analyses indicate that summer low-flow characteristics are the same as annual low-flow characteristics, and that winter low flows are larger than annual low flows. Streamflow-recession indexes, in days per log cycle of decrease in discharge, were used to account for effects of geology on low flow of streams. The indexes in Tennessee range from 32 days/log cycle for clay and shale to 350 days/log cycle for gravel and sand, indicating different aquifer characteristics of the geologic units that contribute to streamflows during periods of no surface runoff. Streamflow-recession rate depends primarily on transmissivity and storage characteristics of the aquifers, and the average distance from stream channels to basin divides. Geology and drainage basin size are the most significant variables affecting low flow in Tennessee streams according to regression analyses. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Global characteristics of stream flow seasonality and variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettinger, M.D.; Diaz, Henry F.

    2000-01-01

    Monthly stream flow series from 1345 sites around the world are used to characterize geographic differences in the seasonality and year-to-year variability of stream flow. Stream flow seasonality varies regionally, depending on the timing of maximum precipitation, evapotranspiration, and contributions from snow and ice. Lags between peaks of precipitation and stream flow vary smoothly from long delays in high-latitude and mountainous regions to short delays in the warmest sectors. Stream flow is most variable from year to year in dry regions of the southwest United States and Mexico, the Sahel, and southern continents, and it varies more (relatively) than precipitation in the same regions. Tropical rivers have the steadiest flows. El Nin??o variations are correlated with stream flow in many parts of the Americas, Europe, and Australia. Many stream flow series from North America, Europe, and the Tropics reflect North Pacific climate, whereas series from the eastern United States, Europe, and tropical South America and Africa reflect North Atlantic climate variations.

  8. Numerical computation of steady-state acoustic disturbances in flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Myers, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    Two time domain methods for computing two dimensional steady-state acoustic disturbances propagating through internal subsonic viscous flow fields in the presence of variable area are investigated. The first method solves the Navier-Stokes equations for the combined steady and acoustic field together and subtracts the steady flow to obtain the acoustic field. The second method solves a system of perturbation equations to obtain the acoustic disturbances, making use of a separate steady flow computation as input to the system. In each case the periodic steady-state acoustic fluctuations are obtained numerically on a supercomputer using a second order unsplit explicit MacCormack predictor-corrector method. Results show that the first method is not very effective for computing acoustic disturbances of even moderate amplitude. It appears that more accurate steady flow algorithms are required for this method to succeed. On the other hand, linear and nonlinear acoustic disturbances extracted from the perturbation approach are shown to exhibit expected behavior for the problems considered. It is also found that inflow boundary conditions for an equivalent uniform duct can be successfully applied to a nonuniform duct to obtain steady-state acoustic disturbances.

  9. Echo-acoustic flow affects flight in bats.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Greiter, Wolfgang; Luksch, Harald; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-06-15

    Flying animals need to react fast to rapid changes in their environment. Visually guided animals use optic flow, generated by their movement through structured environments. Nocturnal bats cannot make use of optic flow, but rely mostly on echolocation. Here, we show that bats exploit echo-acoustic flow to negotiate flight through narrow passages. Specifically, bats' flight between lateral structures is significantly affected by the echo-acoustic salience of those structures, independent of their physical distance. This is true even though echolocation, unlike vision, provides explicit distance cues. Moreover, the bats reduced the echolocation sound levels in stronger flow, probably to compensate for the increased summary target strength of the lateral reflectors. However, bats did not reduce flight velocity under stronger echo-acoustic flow. Our results demonstrate that sensory flow is a ubiquitous principle for flight guidance, independent of the fundamentally different peripheral representation of flow across the senses of vision and echolocation.

  10. Echo-acoustic flow affects flight in bats.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Greiter, Wolfgang; Luksch, Harald; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-06-15

    Flying animals need to react fast to rapid changes in their environment. Visually guided animals use optic flow, generated by their movement through structured environments. Nocturnal bats cannot make use of optic flow, but rely mostly on echolocation. Here, we show that bats exploit echo-acoustic flow to negotiate flight through narrow passages. Specifically, bats' flight between lateral structures is significantly affected by the echo-acoustic salience of those structures, independent of their physical distance. This is true even though echolocation, unlike vision, provides explicit distance cues. Moreover, the bats reduced the echolocation sound levels in stronger flow, probably to compensate for the increased summary target strength of the lateral reflectors. However, bats did not reduce flight velocity under stronger echo-acoustic flow. Our results demonstrate that sensory flow is a ubiquitous principle for flight guidance, independent of the fundamentally different peripheral representation of flow across the senses of vision and echolocation. PMID:27045094

  11. Numerical simulation of 3D boundary-driven acoustic streaming in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lei, Junjun; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-02-01

    This article discusses three-dimensional (3D) boundary-driven streaming in acoustofluidic devices. Firstly, the 3D Rayleigh streaming pattern in a microchannel is simulated and its effect on the movement of microparticles of various sizes is demonstrated. The results obtained from this model show good comparisons with 3D experimental visualisations and demonstrate the fully 3D nature of the acoustic streaming field and the associated acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in acoustofluidic devices. This method is then applied to another acoustofluidic device in order to gain insights into an unusual in-plane streaming pattern. The origin of this streaming has not been fully described and its characteristics cannot be explained from the classical theory of Rayleigh streaming. The simulated in-plane streaming pattern was in good agreement with the experimental visualisation. The mechanism behind it is shown to be related to the active sound intensity field, which supports our previous findings on the mechanism of the in-plane acoustic streaming pattern visualised and modelled in a thin-layered capillary device.

  12. Acoustic monitoring of gas emissions from the seafloor. Part I: quantifying the volumetric flow of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Isabelle; Scalabrin, Carla; Berger, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Three decades of continuous ocean exploration have led us to identify subsurface fluid related processes as a key phenomenon in marine earth science research. The number of seep areas located on the seafloor has been constantly increasing with the use of multi-scale imagery techniques. Due to recent advances in transducer technology and computer processing, multibeam echosounders are now commonly used to detect submarine gas seeps escaping from the seafloor into the water column. A growing number of en- route surveys shows that sites of gas emissions escaping from the seafloor are much more numerous than previously thought. Estimating the temporal variability of the gas flow rate and volumes escaping from the seafloor has thus become a challenge of relevant interest which could be addressed by sea-floor continuous acoustic monitoring. Here, we investigate the feasibility of estimating the volumetric flow rates of gas emissions from horizontal backscattered acoustic signals. Different models based on the acoustic backscattering theory of bubbles are presented. The forward volume backscattering strength and the inversion volumetric flow rate solutions were validated with acoustic measurements from artificial gas flow rates generated in controlled sea-water tank experiments. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to investigate the behavior of the 120-kHz forward solution with respect to model input parameters (horizontal distance between transducer and bubble stream, bubble size distribution and ascent rate). The most sensitive parameter was found to be the distance of the bubble stream which can affect the volume backscattering strength by 20 dB within the horizontal range of 0-200 m. Results were used to derive the detection probability of a bubble stream for a given volume backscattering strength threshold according to different bubble flow rates and horizontal distance.

  13. Controlling acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic heptagonal tweezers with application to cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Bernassau, A L; Glynne-Jones, P; Gesellchen, F; Riehle, M; Hill, M; Cumming, D R S

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force has been demonstrated as a method for manipulating micron-scale particles, but is frequently affected by unwanted streaming. In this paper the streaming in a multi-transducer quasi-standing wave acoustic particle manipulation device is assessed, and found to be dominated by a form of Eckart streaming. The experimentally observed streaming takes the form of two main vortices that have their highest velocity in the region where the standing wave is established. A finite element model is developed that agrees well with experimental results, and shows that the Reynolds stresses that give rise to the fluid motion are strongest in the high velocity region. A technical solution to reduce the streaming is explored that entails the introduction of a biocompatible agar gel layer at the bottom of the chamber so as to reduce the fluid depth and volume. By this means, we reduce the region of fluid that experiences the Reynolds stresses; the viscous drag per unit volume of fluid is also increased. Particle Image Velocimetry data is used to observe the streaming as a function of agar-modified cavity depth. It was found that, in an optimised structure, Eckart streaming could be reduced to negligible levels so that we could make a sonotweezers device with a large working area of up to 13 mm × 13 mm.

  14. Use of acoustic velocity methodology and remote sensing techniques to measure unsteady flow on the lower Yazoo River in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cooper, Lance M.; Davis, Angela A.

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for computing continuous discharge during varied, non-uniform low and medium flows on the Yazoo River at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, using acoustic signal processing and conventional streamgaging techniques. Procedures were also developed to compute locations of discharges during future high flow events when the stream reach is subject to hi-directional and reverse flow caused by rising stages on the Mississippi River using a combination of acoustic equipment and remote sensing technology. A description of the study area is presented. Selected results of these methods are presented for the period from March through September 1997.

  15. Fabrication, Operation and Flow Visualization in Surface-acoustic-wave-driven Acoustic-counterflow Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Travagliati, Marco; Shilton, Richie; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) can be used to drive liquids in portable microfluidic chips via the acoustic counterflow phenomenon. In this video we present the fabrication protocol for a multilayered SAW acoustic counterflow device. The device is fabricated starting from a lithium niobate (LN) substrate onto which two interdigital transducers (IDTs) and appropriate markers are patterned. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel cast on an SU8 master mold is finally bonded on the patterned substrate. Following the fabrication procedure, we show the techniques that allow the characterization and operation of the acoustic counterflow device in order to pump fluids through the PDMS channel grid. We finally present the procedure to visualize liquid flow in the channels. The protocol is used to show on-chip fluid pumping under different flow regimes such as laminar flow and more complicated dynamics characterized by vortices and particle accumulation domains. PMID:24022515

  16. Acoustic streaming effects in megasonic cleaning of EUV photomasks: a continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapila, Vivek; Deymier, Pierre A.; Shende, Hrishikesh; Pandit, Viraj; Raghavan, Srini; Eschbach, Florence O.

    2005-11-01

    Removal of nano-scale contaminant particles from the photomasks is of critical importance to the implementation of EUV lithography for 32nm node. Megasonic cleaning has traditionally been used for photomask cleaning and extensions to sub 50nm particulates removal is being considered as a pattern damage free cleaning approach. Several mechanisms for removal are believed to be active in megasonic cleaning systems, e.g., cavitation, and acoustic streaming (Eckart, Schlichting, and microstreaming). It is often difficult to separate the effects of these individual mechanisms on contamination removal in a conventional experimental setup. Therefore, a theoretical approach is undertaken in this work with a focus on determining the contribution of acoustic streaming in cleaning process. A continuum model is used to describe the interaction between megasonic waves and a substrate (fused silica) immersed in a fluid (water). The model accounts for the viscous nature of the fluid. We calculate the acoustic vibrational modes of the system. These in turn are used to determine the acoustic streaming forces that lead to Schlichting streaming in a narrow acoustic boundary layer at the substrate/fluid interface. These forces are subsequently used to estimate the streaming velocities that may in turn apply a pressure and drag force on the contaminant particles adhering to the substrate. These effects are calculated as a function of angle of incidence, frequency and intensity of the megasonic wave. The relevance of this study is then discussed in the context of the cleaning efficiency and pattern damage in competing megasonic cleaning technologies, such as immersion, and nozzle-based systems.

  17. Flow visualization of acoustic levitation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroth, ED

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic levitation experiments for space applications were performed. Holographic interferometry is being used to study the heat transfer rates on a heated rod enclosed in a 6 cu in chamber. Acoustic waves at levels up to 150 db increased the heating rates to the rod by factors of three to four. High speed real time holographic interferometry was used to measure the boundary layer on the heated rod. Data reduction and digitization of the interferograms are being implemented.

  18. 9. INTAKE STREAM ON GROUND LOOKING WEST AS IT FLOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTAKE STREAM ON GROUND LOOKING WEST AS IT FLOWS DOWNSTREAM TO LAKE MATHEWS, ALL WATER COMING FROM PUMPS. - Colorado River Aqueduct, From Colorado River to Lake Mathews, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

  20. Distributed acoustic receptivity in laminar flow control configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1992-01-01

    A model problem related to distributed receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in laminar flow control (LFC) configurations is studied, within the Orr-Sommerfield framework, by a suitable extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory for receptivity due to localized disturbances on the airfoil surface. The results, thus, complement the earlier work on the receptivity produced by local variations in the surface suction and/or surface admittance. In particular, we show that the cumulative effect of the distributed receptivity can be substantially larger than that of a single, isolated suction strip or slot. Furthermore, even if the receptivity is spread out over very large distances, the most effective contributions come from a relatively short region in vicinity of the lower branch of the neutral stability curve. The length scale of this region is intermediate to that of the mean of these two length scales. Finally, it is found that the receptivity is effectively dominated by a narrow band of Fourier components from the wall-suction and admittance distributions, roughly corresponding to a detuning of less than ten percent with respect to the neutral instability wavenumber at the frequency under consideration. The results suggest that the drop-off in receptivity magnitudes away from the resonant wavenumber is nearly independent of the frequency parameter.

  1. On acoustic wave generation in uniform shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear dynamics of acoustic waves and vortices in uniform shear flow is studied. For flows with very low shear rates, the dynamics of perturbations is adiabatic and can be described by the WKB approximation. However, for flows with moderate and high shear rates the WKB approximation is not appropriate, and alternative analysis shows that two important phenomena occur: acoustic wave over-reflection and wave generation by vortices. The later phenomenon is a known linear mechanisms for sound generation in shear flows, a mechanism that is related to the continuous spectrum that arises in linear shear flow dynamics. A detailed analytical study of these phenomena is performed and the main quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the radiated acoustic field are obtained and analyzed.

  2. Feasibility of using acoustic velocity meters for estimating highly organic suspended-solids concentrations in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Levee 4 canal site below control structure G-88 in the Everglades agricultural area in northwestern Broward County, Florida, to study the relation of acoustic attenuation to suspended-solids concentrations. Acoustic velocity meter and temperature data were obtained with concurrent water samples analyzed for suspended-solids concentrations. Two separate acoustic velocity meter frequencies were used, 200 and 500 kilohertz, to determine the sensitivity of acoustic attenuation to frequency for the measured suspended-solids concentration range. Suspended-solids concentrations for water samples collected at the Levee 4 canal site from July 1993 to September 1994 ranged from 22 to 1,058 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from about 30 to 93 percent. Regression analyses showed that attenuation data from the acoustic velocity meter (automatic gain control) and temperature data alone do not provide enough information to adequately describe the concentrations of suspended solids. However, if velocity is also included as one of the independent variables in the regression model, a satisfactory correlation can be obtained. Thus, it is feasible to use acoustic velocity meter instrumentation to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in streams, even when suspended solids are primarily composed of organic material. Using the most comprehensive data set available for the study (500 kiloherz data), the best fit regression model produces a standard error of 69.7 milligrams per liter, with actual errors ranging from 2 to 128 milligrams per liter. Both acoustic velocity meter transmission frequencies of 200 and 500 hilohertz produced similar results, suggesting that transducers of either frequency could be used to collect attenuation data at the study site. Results indicate that calibration will be required for each acoustic velocity meter system to the unique suspended-solids regime existing at each site. More robust solutions may

  3. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-01-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  4. Simulation of dust streaming in toroidal traps: Stationary flows

    SciTech Connect

    Reichstein, Torben; Piel, Alexander

    2011-08-15

    Molecular-dynamic simulations were performed to study dust motion in a toroidal trap under the influence of the ion drag force driven by a Hall motion of the ions in E x B direction, gravity, inter-particle forces, and friction with the neutral gas. This article is focused on the inhomogeneous stationary streaming motion. Depending on the strength of friction, the spontaneous formation of a stationary shock or a spatial bifurcation into a fast flow and a slow vortex flow is observed. In the quiescent streaming region, the particle flow features a shell structure which undergoes a structural phase transition along the flow direction.

  5. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann formulation for flows with acoustic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chenghai; Pérot, Franck; Zhang, Raoyang; Lew, Phoi-Tack; Mann, Adrien; Gupta, Vinit; Freed, David M.; Staroselsky, Ilya; Chen, Hudong

    2015-10-01

    Porous materials are commonly used in various industrial systems such as ducts, HVAC, hoods, mufflers, in order to introduce acoustic absorption and to reduce the radiated acoustics levels. For problems involving flow-induced noise mechanisms and explicit interactions between turbulent source regions, numerical approaches remain a challenging task involving, on the one hand, the coupling between unsteady flow calculations and acoustics simulations and, on the other hand, the development of advanced and sensitive numerical schemes. In this paper, acoustic materials are explicitly modeled in lattice Boltzmann simulations using equivalent fluid regions having arbitrary porosity and resistivity. Numerical simulations are compared to analytical derivations as well as experiments and semi-empirical models to validate the approach.

  7. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual flow. Comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Test nozzles and acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles The tested nozzles included baseline (unshielded), 180 deg shielded, and 360 deg shielded dual flow coannular plug configurations. The baseline configurations include a high radius ratio unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle and a coanuular plug nozzle and a coannular plug nozzle with a 20-chute outer stream suppressor. The tests were conducted at nozzle temperatures and pressure typical of operating conditions of variable cycle engine.

  8. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier-Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill's acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier-Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as "true" sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided.

  9. Use of acoustic monitoring system for debris flow discharge evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgaro, A. G.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    In 1997 an automated system for monitoring of debris flows has been installed in the Acquabona channel Dolomites, Italy. Induction geophones, with a specific frequency of 10 Hz, measure the amplitude of vertical ground vibrations generated by the passage of a flowing mass along the channel. Continuous acoustic logs and ultrasonic hydrograph recorded at the lower-channel measurement station for the debris flow of August 17, 1998, show a striking correspondence. This correspondence, already observed in different flow sites, is represented by the best fit between flow depth and flow sensor amplitude. Average front velocity for surges, calculated from the signal peak time shift and the distance between the sensors along the flow path, range between 2.00 and 7.7 m/s. As the ultrasonic sensor provides a way to measure the variation of the flow section area with the flow depth, the debris flow peak discharge may be estimated; obtained values of debris flow peak discharge range from 4 and 30 m3/s. Volumes were calculated by integrating instantaneous discharges through the hydrograph and by integrating the geophone log (acoustic flux). Volumes of 13700 m3 and 15500 m3 have been respectively obtained. The slight difference between the two values may result from the fact that acoustic records: i) are sensitive to the high frequencies, typical of the debris flow tails; ii) sum up the contributions sent by the whole flowing mass, while the ecometer detect the flow depth at every time at only one section. As a consequence the rising of the whole geophone log gives a higher value at the integration result. This only acoustic system can give a reasonably proxy for discharge and total volumes involved, which are among the most important parameters for debris flow hazard assessment and planning countermeasures. This methodology can be used in other debris flow sites if they are calibrated by the acoustic characterization of debris, obtained by both seismic surveys and SPT tests, and

  10. Locating groundwater flow in karst by acoustic emission surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.J. Jr.; Clark, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    An acoustic emission survey of Newala Fm. (primarily dolomite) karst has helped to locate subsurface water flow. This survey was performed on the Rock Quarry Dome, Sevier County, Tennessee. A Dresser RS-4 recording seismograph, adjusted to provide a gain of 1000, collected acoustic emission data using Mark Products CN368 vertical geophones with 3-inch spikes. Data was collected for 5-15 second intervals. The geophones were laid out along traverses with 10, 20, or 30-ft spacing and covered with sand bags in locations of high ambient noise. Traverses were laid out: along and across lineaments known to correspond with groundwater flow in natural subsurface channels; across and along a joint-controlled sink suspected of directing groundwater flow; and across a shallow sinkhole located tangentially to the Little Pigeon River and suspected of capturing river water for the groundwater system. Acoustic emissions of channelized flowing groundwater have a characteristic erratic spiked spectral signature. These acoustic emission signatures increase in amplitude and number in the immediate vicinity of the vertical projection of channelized groundwater flow if it occurs within approximately 30 feet of the surface. If the groundwater flow occurs at greater depths the emissions may be offset from the projection of the actual flow, due to propagation of the signal along rock pinnacles or attenuation by residual soils.

  11. MIDDLE GORGE POWER PLANT, OWENS RIVER STREAM FLOWING OVER TAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MIDDLE GORGE POWER PLANT, OWENS RIVER STREAM FLOWING OVER TAIL RACE OF POWER PLANT AND PENSTOCK HEADGATE TO LOWER GORGE CONTROL PLANT. A MINIMAL FLOW OF RIVER WATER IS REQUIRED TO MAINTAIN FISH LIFE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Middle Gorge Power Plant, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy) debris flow monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgaro, A.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys).

  13. Scale Model Acoustic Test Validation of IOP-SS Water Prediction using Loci-STREAM-VoF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). SMAT consists of a 5% scale representation of the ignition overpressure sound-suppression system (IOP-SS) that is being tested to quantify the water flow and induced air entrainment in and around the mobile launcher exhaust hole. This data will be compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the newly developed Loci-STREAM Volume of Fluid (VoF) methods. Compressible and incompressible VoF methods have been formulated, and are currently being used to simulate the water flow of SMAT IOP-SS. The test data will be used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and validate the VoF methods.

  14. Effects of heat exchange and nonlinearity on acoustic streaming in a vibrating cylindrical cavity.

    PubMed

    Gubaidullin, Amir A; Yakovenko, Anna V

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic streaming in a gas filled cylindrical cavity subjected to the vibration effect is investigated numerically. Both thermally insulated walls and constant temperature walls are considered. The range of vibration frequencies from low frequencies, at which the process can be described by an approximate analytical solution, to high frequencies giving rise to strong nonlinear effects is studied. Frequencies lower than the resonant one are chosen, and nonlinearity is achieved due to the large amplitude. The problem is solved in an axisymmetric statement. The dependence of acoustic streaming in narrow channels at vibration frequencies lower than the resonant one on the type of thermal boundary conditions is shown. The streaming vortices' directions of rotation in the case of constant temperature walls are found to be opposite to those in the case of thermally insulated walls. Different nonlinear effects, which increase with the frequency of vibration, are obtained. Nonlinear effects manifesting as the nonuniformity of average temperature, pressure, and density are in turn found to be influencing the streaming velocity and streaming structure.

  15. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  16. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  17. An assessment of low flows in streams in northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armentrout, G.W.; Wilson, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Low flows were assessed and summarized in the following basins in northeastern Wyoming: Little Bighorn, Tongue, Powder, Little Missouri, Belle Fourche, Cheyenne, and Niobrara River, and about 200 river miles of the North Platte River and its tributaries. Only existing data from streamflow stations and miscellaneous observation sites during the period, 1930-80, were used. Data for a few stations in Montana and South Dakota were used in the analysis. Data were available for 56 perennial streams, 38 intermittent streams, and 34 ephemeral streams. The distribution of minimum observed flows of record at all stations and sites and the 7-day, 10-year low flows at mountain stations and main-stem plains stations are shown on a map. Seven day low flows were determined by fitting the log Pearsons Type III distribution to the data; results are tabulated only for the stations with at least 10 years of record that included at least one major drought. Most streams that originate in the foothills and plains have no flow during part of every year, and are typical of much of the study area. For stations on these streams , the frequency of the annual maximum number of consecutive days of no flow was determined, as an indicator of the likelihood of extended periods of no flow or drought. For estimates at ungaged sites on streams in the Bighorn Mountains only, a simple regression of 7-day, 10-year low flow on drainage area has a standard error of 64%, based on 19 stations with drainage areas of 2 to 200 sq mi. The 7-day, 10-year low flow in main-stem streams can be interpolated from graphs of 7-day, 10-year low flow versus distance along the main channel. Additional studies of low flow are needed. The data base, particularly synoptic baseflow information, needs considerable expansion. Also, the use of storage-analysis procedures should be considered as a means of assessing the availability of water in streams that otherwise are fully appropriated or that are ephemeral. (Author 's

  18. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  19. Numerical simulation of acoustofluidic manipulation by radiation forces and acoustic streaming for complex particles.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Philipp; Leibacher, Ivo; Baasch, Thierry; Dual, Jurg

    2015-11-21

    The numerical prediction of acoustofluidic particle motion is of great help for the design, the analysis, and the physical understanding of acoustofluidic devices as it allows for a simple and direct comparison with experimental observations. However, such a numerical setup requires detailed modeling of the acoustofluidic device with all its components and thorough understanding of the acoustofluidic forces inducing the particle motion. In this work, we present a 3D trajectory simulation setup that covers the full spectrum, comprising a time-harmonic device model, an acoustic streaming model of the fluid cavity, a radiation force simulation, and the calculation of the hydrodynamic drag. In order to make quantitatively accurate predictions of the device vibration and the acoustic field, we include the viscous boundary layer damping. Using a semi-analytical method based on Nyborg's calculations, the boundary-driven acoustic streaming is derived directly from the device simulation and takes into account cavity wall vibrations which have often been neglected in the literature. The acoustic radiation forces and the hydrodynamic drag are calculated numerically to handle particles of arbitrary shape, structure, and size. In this way, complex 3D particle translation and rotation inside experimental microdevices can be predicted. We simulate the rotation of a microfiber in an amplitude-modulated 2D field and analyze the results with respect to experimental observations. For a quantitative verification, the motion of an alumina microdisk is compared to a simple experiment. Demonstrating the potential of the simulation setup, we compute the trajectory of a red blood cell inside a realistic microdevice under the simultaneous effects of acoustic streaming and radiation forces. PMID:26448531

  20. Numerical simulation of acoustofluidic manipulation by radiation forces and acoustic streaming for complex particles.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Philipp; Leibacher, Ivo; Baasch, Thierry; Dual, Jurg

    2015-11-21

    The numerical prediction of acoustofluidic particle motion is of great help for the design, the analysis, and the physical understanding of acoustofluidic devices as it allows for a simple and direct comparison with experimental observations. However, such a numerical setup requires detailed modeling of the acoustofluidic device with all its components and thorough understanding of the acoustofluidic forces inducing the particle motion. In this work, we present a 3D trajectory simulation setup that covers the full spectrum, comprising a time-harmonic device model, an acoustic streaming model of the fluid cavity, a radiation force simulation, and the calculation of the hydrodynamic drag. In order to make quantitatively accurate predictions of the device vibration and the acoustic field, we include the viscous boundary layer damping. Using a semi-analytical method based on Nyborg's calculations, the boundary-driven acoustic streaming is derived directly from the device simulation and takes into account cavity wall vibrations which have often been neglected in the literature. The acoustic radiation forces and the hydrodynamic drag are calculated numerically to handle particles of arbitrary shape, structure, and size. In this way, complex 3D particle translation and rotation inside experimental microdevices can be predicted. We simulate the rotation of a microfiber in an amplitude-modulated 2D field and analyze the results with respect to experimental observations. For a quantitative verification, the motion of an alumina microdisk is compared to a simple experiment. Demonstrating the potential of the simulation setup, we compute the trajectory of a red blood cell inside a realistic microdevice under the simultaneous effects of acoustic streaming and radiation forces.

  1. Particle migration and sorting in microbubble streaming flows.

    PubMed

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic driving of semicylindrical microbubbles generates strong streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. We show that in microchannels, these streaming flow patterns can be combined with Poiseuille flows to achieve two distinctive, highly tunable methods for size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles much smaller than the bubble itself. This method allows higher throughput than typical passive sorting techniques, since it does not require the inclusion of device features on the order of the particle size. We propose a simple mechanism, based on channel and flow geometry, which reliably describes and predicts the sorting behavior observed in experiment. It is also shown that an asymptotic theory that incorporates the device geometry and superimposed channel flow accurately models key flow features such as peak speeds and particle trajectories, provided it is appropriately modified to account for 3D effects caused by the axial confinement of the bubble.

  2. Free-Stream Boundaries of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Kistler, Alan L

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an experimental and theoretical study made of the instantaneously sharp and irregular front which is always found to separate turbulent fluid from contiguous "nonturbulent" fluid at a free-stream boundary. This distinct demarcation is known to give an intermittent character to hot-wire signals in the boundary zone. The overall behavior of the front is described statistically in terms of its wrinkle-amplitude growth and its lateral propagation relative to the fluid as functions of downstream coordinate.

  3. Quasi-normal acoustic oscillations in the transonic Bondi flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverra, Eliana; Sarbach, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of nonspherical acoustic perturbations of the transonic Bondi flow, describing the steady radial accretion of a polytropic perfect fluid into a gravity center. The propagation of such perturbations can be described by a wave equation on the curved effective background geometry determined by the acoustic metric introduced by Unruh in the context of experimental black hole evaporation. We show that for the transonic Bondi flow, Unruh's acoustic metric describes an analogue black hole and that the acoustic perturbations undergo quasi-normal oscillations. The associated quasi-normal frequencies are computed and they are proven to scale like the surface gravity of the acoustic black hole. This provides an explanation for results given in an earlier work, where it was shown that the acoustic perturbations of a relativistic fluid accreted by a nonrotating black hole possess quasi-normal modes, and where it was found empirically that the associated frequencies scaled like the surface gravity of the analogue black hole in the limit where the radius of the sonic horizon is much larger than the Schwarzschild radius.

  4. Hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence measurements with acoustic scintillation instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Iorio, D.; Xu, G.

    2009-12-01

    Acoustically derived measurements of hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence were obtained from the active black smoker Dante in the Main Endeavour vent field, using scintillation analysis from one-way transmissions. The scintillation transmitter and receiver array formed a 93 m acoustic path through the buoyant plume 20 m above the structure. The acoustic path was parallel to the valley sidewall where the M2 tidal currents are approximately aligned along ridge due to topographic steering by the valley walls and hence most of the plume displacement is expected to occur along the acoustic path. On one deployment, data were collected for 6.5 weeks and vertical velocities range from 0.1 to 0.2 m/s showing a strong dependence on the spring/neap tidal cycle. The refractive index fluctuations which can be paramaterized in terms of the root-mean-square temperature fluctuations also shows a strong tidal modulation during spring tide.

  5. Optimized open-flow mixing: insights from microbubble streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    Microbubble streaming has been developed into a robust and powerful flow actuation technique in microfluidics. Here, we study it as a paradigmatic system for microfluidic mixing under a continuous throughput of fluid (open-flow mixing), providing a systematic optimization of the device parameters in this practically important situation. Focusing on two-dimensional advective stirring (neglecting diffusion), we show through numerical simulation and analytical theory that mixing in steady streaming vortices becomes ineffective beyond a characteristic time scale, necessitating the introduction of unsteadiness. By duty cycling the streaming, such unsteadiness is introduced in a controlled fashion, leading to exponential refinement of the advection structures. The rate of refinement is then optimized for particular parameters of the time modulation, i.e. a particular combination of times for which the streaming is turned ``on'' and ``off''. The optimized protocol can be understood theoretically using the properties of the streaming vortices and the throughput Poiseuille flow. We can thus infer simple design principles for practical open flow micromixing applications, consistent with experiments. Current Address: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University.

  6. Acoustics of dual-stream high-speed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiasi, Marco Tullio

    2000-10-01

    This work presents the results of noise measurements in high-speed, round jets whose Mach number and velocity simulate the conditions of jet engines at take-off. The Mach number of the jet potential core ranged from 1.27 to 1.77 and the velocity ranged from 550 m/s to 1010 m/s. Most of the jets were silenced with a coflow that prevented the formation of Mach waves, a dominant contribution to supersonic jet noise. This method, called Mach Wave Elimination, relies on the shielding effect of the coflow which makes the motion of the eddies subsonic with respect to the surrounding streams, thus impeding the creation of Mach waves. Schlieren photography and pitot probe surveys were used to detect the principal features and the growth rate of the jets. Microphone measurements were performed inside an anechoic chamber at many positions around the jet exit. The results were corrected for the microphone response and for the effect of human sensitivity to sound. Equal-thrust comparison of different experimental results shows that elimination of Mach waves is very effective in reducing noise in the direction of strongest emission. Except for localized shock-associated components, noise emission was found to be insensitive to nozzle exit pressure and to depend principally on the values of fully-expanded Mach number and velocity in the jet potential core. Jets with a shorter Mach wave emitting region exhibited better noise suppression. Best results were obtained with an eccentric coflow that allows the shear layer of the upper part of the jet to grow naturally while silencing the jet in the downward direction. Coflows are capable of reducing the near-field screech peaks by up to 10 dB in imperfectly-expanded jets. Scaling the experimental results to a fall-size engine shows that eccentric coflows reduce the noise perceived in the direction of peak emission by up to 11 dB. Preliminary analysis of the application of this silencing technique to engine design indicates that Mach

  7. Low-flow, base-flow, and mean-flow regression equations for Pennsylvania streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckey, Marla H.

    2006-01-01

    Low-flow, base-flow, and mean-flow characteristics are an important part of assessing water resources in a watershed. These streamflow characteristics can be used by watershed planners and regulators to determine water availability, water-use allocations, assimilative capacities of streams, and aquatic-habitat needs. Streamflow characteristics are commonly predicted by use of regression equations when a nearby streamflow-gaging station is not available. Regression equations for predicting low-flow, base-flow, and mean-flow characteristics for Pennsylvania streams were developed from data collected at 293 continuous- and partial-record streamflow-gaging stations with flow unaffected by upstream regulation, diversion, or mining. Continuous-record stations used in the regression analysis had 9 years or more of data, and partial-record stations used had seven or more measurements collected during base-flow conditions. The state was divided into five low-flow regions and regional regression equations were developed for the 7-day, 10-year; 7-day, 2-year; 30-day, 10-year; 30-day, 2-year; and 90-day, 10-year low flows using generalized least-squares regression. Statewide regression equations were developed for the 10-year, 25-year, and 50-year base flows using generalized least-squares regression. Statewide regression equations were developed for harmonic mean and mean annual flow using weighted least-squares regression. Basin characteristics found to be significant explanatory variables at the 95-percent confidence level for one or more regression equations were drainage area, basin slope, thickness of soil, stream density, mean annual precipitation, mean elevation, and the percentage of glaciation, carbonate bedrock, forested area, and urban area within a basin. Standard errors of prediction ranged from 33 to 66 percent for the n-day, T-year low flows; 21 to 23 percent for the base flows; and 12 to 38 percent for the mean annual flow and harmonic mean, respectively. The

  8. Flow and congestion control for Internet media streaming applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Shanwei; Walpole, Jonathan; Pu, Calton

    1997-12-01

    The emergence of streaming multimedia players provides users with low latency audio and video content over the Internet. Providing high-quality, best-effort, real-time multimedia content requires adaptive delivery schemes that fairly share the available network bandwidth with reliable data protocols such as TCP. This paper proposes a new flow and congestion control scheme, SCP (streaming control protocol), for real- time streaming of continuous multimedia data across the Internet. The design of SCP arose from several years of experience in building and using adaptive real-time streaming video players. SCP addresses two issues associated with real- time streaming. First, it uses a congestion control policy that allows it to share network bandwidth fairly with both TCP and other SCP streams. Second, it improves smoothness in streaming and ensures low, predictable latency. This distinguishes it from TCP's jittery congestion avoidance policy that is based on linear growth and one-half reduction of its congestion window. In this paper, we present a description of SCP, and an evaluation of it using Internet- based experiments.

  9. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  10. Influence of ultrasound power on acoustic streaming and micro-bubbles formations in a low frequency sono-reactor: mathematical and 3D computational simulation.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of ultrasound power amplitude on liquid behaviour in a low-frequency (24 kHz) sono-reactor. Three types of analysis were employed: (i) mechanical analysis of micro-bubbles formation and their activities/characteristics using mathematical modelling. (ii) Numerical analysis of acoustic streaming, fluid flow pattern, volume fraction of micro-bubbles and turbulence using 3D CFD simulation. (iii) Practical analysis of fluid flow pattern and acoustic streaming under ultrasound irradiation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In mathematical modelling, a lone micro bubble generated under power ultrasound irradiation was mechanistically analysed. Its characteristics were illustrated as a function of bubble radius, internal temperature and pressure (hot spot conditions) and oscillation (pulsation) velocity. The results showed that ultrasound power significantly affected the conditions of hotspots and bubbles oscillation velocity. From the CFD results, it was observed that the total volume of the micro-bubbles increased by about 4.95% with each 100 W-increase in power amplitude. Furthermore, velocity of acoustic streaming increased from 29 to 119 cm/s as power increased, which was in good agreement with the PIV analysis.

  11. Acoustic signal propagation and measurement in natural stream channels for application to surrogate bed load measurements: Halfmoon Creek, Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring sediment-generated noise using submerged hydrophones is a surrogate method for measuring bed load transport in streams with the potential for improving estimates of bed load transport through widespread, inexpensive monitoring. Understanding acoustic signal propagation in natural stream e...

  12. Practical Modeling of Flow Connectivity in Intermittently Flowing Wetlands and Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. J.; Harvey, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Water flow above and below the ground surface are both important contributors to connectivity between intermittently flowing streams, wetlands and downstream waters. The physical controls on discharge and water depth are well represented by rate laws governing flow above and below the sediment interface; however, in the shallow flows of wetlands and streams, there is not necessarily a sharp threshold that determines when surface flow ceases and subsurface flow dominates. Instead there is a gradual transition between flows governed by surface and subsurface flow controls. We examined the effect of microtopography on flow connectivity by measuring and modeling the effect that a decreasing water level has on cross sectional area and tortuosity of surface water flow paths as microtopographic high points emerge above the flow. Several thresholds were determined as functions of the microtopographic distribution, including a major transition where surface flow ceases altogether and the surface water becomes connected by only subsurface flow between pools. We developed a coupled surface and subsurface model of flow connectivity for application in shallow, intermittently flowing wetlands and streams. This one-dimensional model uses a statistical distribution approach to characterize complex microtopography based on limited topographic surveying at appropriate scales. A test application of the model in the Everglades revealed a broad range of transitional conditions associated with relatively easily measured physical features of streams and wetlands.

  13. Investigation of coherent structures generated by acoustic tube in turbulent flow separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xingyu; Geisler, Reinhard; Agocs, Janos; Schröder, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    An acoustic tube was designed in order to control the turbulent flow separation downstream of a backward-facing step. The Reynolds number based on the free-stream velocity and the step height was Re h = 2.0 × 104. As an active flow control device, the acoustic tube generated periodic pressure perturbations at a frequency of f a = 100 Hz, which was close to the most amplified frequency of the shedding instability of the turbulent shear layer. Spanwise vortices rolled up due to the perturbations. 2D-2C particle image velocimetry was used to measure separated shear layer and the reattachment area downstream of the BFS. The flow control results show that the acoustic tube can suppress recirculation regions behind the step and reduce the reattachment length by 43.7 %. The roll-up and pairing processes of the vortices lead to an increase in the total Reynolds shear stress. The coherent structures are extracted by proper orthogonal decomposition and represented by two pairs of modes, of which the coherence is analyzed by the corresponding coefficients. Both the primary and secondary series of vortices are reconstructed as traveling waves with the fundamental frequency f a and the overtone frequency 2 f a, respectively.

  14. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, S. H.; Raptis, A. C.

    1984-05-01

    An apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe is described. It includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  15. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-05-14

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  16. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals in response to said first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  17. Eddies, streams, and convergence zones in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.; Wray, A. A.; Moin, P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies of turbulent shear flows have shown that many of their important kinematical and dynamical properties can be more clearly understood by describing the flows in terms of individual events or streamline patterns. These events or flow regions are studied because they are associated with relatively large contributions to certain average properties of the flow, for example kinetic energy, Reynolds stress, or to particular processes in the flow, such as mixing and chemical reactions, which may be concentrated at locations where streamlines converge for fast chemical reactions (referred to as convergence or C regions), or in recirculating eddying regions for slow chemical reactions. The aim of this project was to use the numerical simulations to develop suitable criteria for defining these eddying or vortical zones. The C and streaming (S) zones were defined in order to define the whole flow field. It is concluded that homogeneous and sheared turbulent flow fields are made up of characteristic flow zones: eddy, C, and S zones. A set of objective criteria were found which describe regions in which the streamlines circulate, converge or diverge, and form high streams of high velocity flow.

  18. Stream flow in Minnesota: Indicator of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Eric V.; Stefan, Heinz G.

    2007-02-01

    SummaryStream flow records (up to the year 2002) from 36 USGS gauging stations in five major river basins of Minnesota were studied. Seven annual stream flow statistics were extracted and analyzed: mean annual flow, 7-day low flow in winter, 7-day low flow in summer, peak flow due to snow melt runoff, peak flow due to rainfall as well as high and extreme flow days (number of days with flow rates greater than the mean plus one or two standard deviations, respectively). The Mann-Kendal non-parametric test was used to detect significant trends over time windows from 90 to 10 years in combination with the Trend Free Pre-Whitening (TFPW) method for correcting time series data for serial correlation. Streamflows in the state of Minnesota have varied over the period of record. Trends differed significantly from one river basin to another, and became more accentuated for shorter time windows. Periodicity was detected in the trends for the Red River of the North, the Mississippi River, and the Minnesota River basins for six of the statistics studied. Periods were on the order of 13-15 and 25 years, and the amplitudes were particularly strong after 1980. Peak flow due to snowmelt, typically the highest flow in each year, appears to be the only streamflow statistic that has not changed at a significant rate. Peak flows due to rainfall events in the summer are increasing, as well as the number of days with higher flows (high flow days). Increases in low flow (base flow) in summer and in winter have been significant. Wetter summers and more frequent snow melt events due to warmer winters are the likely cause. Stream flows in Minnesota reflect observed changes in precipitation with increases in mean annual precipitation, a larger number of intense rainfall events, more days with precipitation and earlier and more frequent snowmelt events. For water resources management the results suggest that the threat of snowmelt flooding has not increased, but floods due to rainfall events

  19. IMPACTS OF LAND USE ON HYDROLOGIC FLOW PERMANENCE IN HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive urbanization in the watershed can alter the stream hydrology by increasing peak runoff frequency and reducing base flows, causing subsequent impairment of stream community structure. In addition, development effectively eliminates some headwater streams, being piped an...

  20. Analysis of transient storage subject to unsteady flow: Diel flow variation in an Antarctic stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Andrews, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Transport of dissolved material in streams and small rivers may be characterized using tracer-dilution methods and solute transport models. Recent studies have quantified stream/substream interactions using models of transient storage. These studies are based on tracer-dilution data obtained during periods of steady flow. We present a modeling framework for the analysis of transient storage in stream systems with unsteady flows. The framework couples a kinematic wave routing model with a solute transport model that includes transient storage. The routing model provides time-varying flows and cross-sectional areas that are used as input to the solute transport model. The modeling framework was used to quantify stream/substream interaction in Huey Creek, an Antarctic stream fed exclusively by glacial meltwater. Analysis of tracer-dilution data indicates that there was substantial interaction between the flowing surface water and the hyporheic (substream) zone. The ratio of storage zone area to stream cross-sectional area (A(s)/A) was >1 in all stream reaches, indicating that the substream area contributing to hyporheic exchange was large relative to stream cross-sectional area. The rate of exchange, as governed by the transient storage exchange coefficient (??), was rapid because of a high stream gradient and porous alluvial materials. Estimates of ?? generally exceed those determined for other small streams. The high degree of hyporheic exchange supports the hypothesis that weathering reactions within the hyporheos account for observed increases in solute concentration with stream length, as noted in other studies of Antarctic streams.

  1. Low-flow characteristics of streams in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    Streamflow data were collected and low-flow characteristics computed for 715 gaged sites in Virginia Annual minimum average 7-consecutive-day flows range from 0 to 2,195 cubic feet per second for a 2-year recurrence interval and from 0 to 1,423 cubic feet per second for a 10-year recurrence interval. Drainage areas range from 0.17 to 7,320 square miles. Existing and discontinued gaged sites are separated into three types: long-term continuous-record sites, short-term continuous-record sites, and partial-record sites. Low-flow characteristics for long-term continuous-record sites are determined from frequency curves of annual minimum average 7-consecutive-day flows . Low-flow characteristics for short-term continuous-record sites are estimated by relating daily mean base-flow discharge values at a short-term site to concurrent daily mean discharge values at nearby long-term continuous-record sites having similar basin characteristics . Low-flow characteristics for partial-record sites are estimated by relating base-flow measurements to daily mean discharge values at long-term continuous-record sites. Information from the continuous-record sites and partial-record sites in Virginia are used to develop two techniques for estimating low-flow characteristics at ungaged sites. A flow-routing method is developed to estimate low-flow values at ungaged sites on gaged streams. Regional regression equations are developed for estimating low-flow values at ungaged sites on ungaged streams. The flow-routing method consists of transferring low-flow characteristics from a gaged site, either upstream or downstream, to a desired ungaged site. A simple drainage-area proration is used to transfer values when there are no major tributaries between the gaged and ungaged sites. Standard errors of estimate for108 test sites are 19 percent of the mean for estimates of low-flow characteristics having a 2-year recurrence interval and 52 percent of the mean for estimates of low-flow

  2. Acoustic streaming enhances the Multicyclic CO2 capture of natural limestone at Ca-looping conditions.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J M; Ebri, J M P; Quintanilla, M A S

    2013-08-20

    The Ca-Looping (CaL) process, based on the multicyclic carbonation/calcination of CaO at high temperatures, is a viable technology to achieve high CO2 capture efficiencies in both precombustion and postcombustion applications. In this paper we show an experimental study on the multicyclic CO2 capture of a natural limestone in a fixed bed at CaL conditions as affected by the application of a high-intensity acoustic field. Our results indicate that sound promotes the efficiency of CO2 sorption in the fast carbonation phase by enhancing the gas-solids mass transfer. The fundamentals of the physical mechanism responsible for this effect (acoustic streaming) as well as the technical feasibility of the proposed technique allows envisaging that sonoprocessing will be beneficial to enhance multicyclic CO2 capture in large-scale applications.

  3. Low-flow characteristics of streams West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friel, E.A.; Embree, W.N.; Jack, A.R.; Atkins, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    Low-flow characteristics of selected streams in West Virginia were determined at continuous-record and partial-record sites. Daily discharges at 100 continuous-record gaging stations on unregulated streams were used to compute selected low-flow frequency values. Estimates of low-flow frequency values at 296 partial-record sites (ones having only discharge measurements) were made using the relation defined by concurrent flows with a continuous-record station. Low-flow characteristics at continuous-record stations were related to drainage area and a variability index to produce equations which can be used to estimate low-flow characteristics at ungaged sites in West Virginia. The State was divided into two hydrologic regions. Drainage area and a streamflow-variability index were determined to be the most significant. The streamflow variability index was computed from duration curves and was used to account for the integrated effects of geology and other hydrologic characteristics. The standard error of estimate for the 7-day low flow with a 2-year recurrence interval is 43% for Region 1 and 57% for Region 2. The standard error of estimate for the 7-day low flow with a 10-year recurrence interval is 82% for Region 1 and 83% for Region 2. (USGS)

  4. Sample stream distortion modeled in continuous-flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, P. H.

    1979-01-01

    Buoyancy-induced disturbances in an electrophoresis-type chamber were investigated. Five tracer streams (latex) were used to visualize the flows while a nine-thermistor array sensed the temperature field. The internal heating to the chamber was provided by a 400 Hz electrical field. Cooling to the chamber was provided on the front and back faces and, in addition, on both chamber side walls. Disturbances to the symmetric base flow in the chamber occurred in the broad plane of the chamber and resulted from the formation of lateral and axial temperature gradients. The effect of these gradients was to retard or increase local flow velocities at different positions in the chamber cross section, which resulted in lateral secondary flows being induced in the broad plane of the chamber. As the adverse temperature gradients increased in magnitude, the critical Rayleigh number was approached and reverse (separated) flow became apparent, which, subsequently, led to the onset of time variant secondary flows.

  5. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  6. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  7. Internal Acoustics of a Pintle Valve with Supercritical Helium Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, Sean R.; Davis, R. Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Large amplitude flow unsteadiness is a common phenomenon within the high flow rate ducts and valves associated with propulsion systems. Boundary layer noise, shear layers and vortex shedding are a few of the many sources of flow oscillations. The presence of lightly damped acoustic modes can organize and amplify these sources of flow perturbation, causing undesirable loading of internal parts. The present study investigates the self-induced acoustic environment within a pintle valve subject to high Reynolds Number flow of helium gas. Experiments were conducted to measure the internal pressure oscillations of the Ares I Launch Abort System (LAS) Attitude Control Motor (ACM) valve. The AGM consists of a solid propellant gas generator with eight pintle valves attached to the aft end. The pintle valve is designed to deliver variable upstream conditions to an attache( converging diverging nozzle. In order to investigate the full range of operating conditions 28 separate tests were conducted with varying pintle position and upstream pressure. Helium gas was utilized in order to closely mimic the speed of sound of the gas generator exhaust, minimizing required scaling during data analysis. The recordec pressure measurements were interrogated to multiple ends. The development of root mean square (RMS) value! versus Reynolds Number and Pintle position are important to creating bounding unsteady load curves for valve internal parts. Spectral analysis was also performed, helping to identify power spectral densities (PSD) of acoustic natural frequencies and boundary layer noise. An interesting and unexpected result was the identification of an acoustic mode within the valve which does not respond until the valve was over 60% open. Further, the response amplitude around this mode can be as large or larger than those associated with lower frequency modes.

  8. Streams of Content, Limited Attention: The Flow of Information through Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Danah

    2010-01-01

    The future of Web 2.0 is about content streams or streams of information. The metaphor implied by "streams" is powerful. The idea is that individuals are living inside the stream: adding to it, consuming it, redirecting it. The goal today is to be attentively aligned--"in flow"--with these information streams, to be aware of information as it…

  9. Tidal controls on the flow of ice streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, Sebastian H. R.; Gudmundsson, G. Hilmar

    2016-05-01

    The flow of many Antarctic ice streams is known to be significantly influenced by tides. In the past, modeling studies have implemented the tidal forces acting on a coupled ice stream/ice shelf system in a number of different ways, but the consequences that this has on the modeled response of ice streams to tides have, until now, not been considered. Here we investigate for the first time differences in model response that are only due to differences in the way tidal forcings are implemented. We find that attempts to simplify the problem by neglecting flexural stresses are generally not valid and forcing models with only changes in ocean back pressure will not capture either the correct amplitudes or length scale.

  10. Coupling airborne laser scanning and acoustic Doppler current profiler data to model stream rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N.; Lyon, S. W.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rating curve enables the translation of water depth into discharge through a reference cross section. Errors in estimating stream channel geometry can therefore result in increased discharge uncertainty. This study investigates coupling national-scale airborne laser scanning (ALS) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) bathymetric survey data for generating stream rating curves. Specifically, stream channel geometries were generated from coupled ALS and ADCP scanning data collected for a well-monitored site located in northern Sweden. These data were used to define the hydraulic geometry required by a physically-based 1-D hydraulic model. The results of our study demonstrate that the effects of potential scanning data errors on the model generated rating curve were less than the uncertainties due to stream gauging measurements and empirical rating curve fitting. Further analysis of the ALS data showed that an overestimation of the streambank elevation (the main scanning data error) was primarily due to vegetation that could be adjusted for through a root-mean-square-error bias correction. We consider these findings encouraging as hydrometric agencies can potentially leverage national-scale ALS and ADCP instrumentation to reduce the cost and effort required for maintaining and establish rating curves at gauging stations.

  11. Effect of the flow state on streaming current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, O.; Nakatani, M.; Yoshida, S.

    2005-12-01

    When fluid flows through a porous medium, charges in the electric double layer are transported, resulting in streaming current. This is the representative mechanism of self-potential widely observed in the field. In the classical Helmholtz-Smoluchowski relation, the streaming current (is) is represented as is=Ccgrad Pp, where Cc is streaming current coefficient and Pp is fluid pressure. Cc depends on hydraulic property of the rock and electrochemical property called zeta potential. In the previous study ( Kuwano et al., 2004, JEPS Joint Meeting) using crushed rock samples, we reported an apparent grain size dependence of zeta potential, which was unexpected from the nature of zeta potential. We set up two hypotheses to explain this effect. One is that new surfaces which have been created by sample crushing may affect the zeta potential. We thought if newly created surfaces have larger zeta potential, samples of smaller grain size would show a larger apparent zeta potential because they have more new surface area. The other is that the flow state may affect the zeta potential. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation, which is used to infer the zeta potential, has been derived assuming laminar flow, which may not be the case for large Reynolds number (high flow rate or large grain size). In the present study, we examined the effect of the flow state on apparent zeta potential. In order to measure how the flow state affects the magnitude of streaming current, measurements need to be conducted for various flow rates and various sizes of particles with the same physico-chemical surface condition. So we chose various sizes of soda-lime glass beads as samples. Grain sizes of the beads are 0.177~0.250 mm (GB200), 0.350~0.500 mm (GB400), and 0.710~0.990 mm (GB800). These samples were soaked in acetone for 12 hours, washed with acetone several times, washed with distilled water and with KCl solution, which was used for background electrolyte in the experiment, and finally soaked

  12. Free-jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual stream nozzles. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Laser velocimeter and suppressor. Base pressure data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles. Aerodynamic laser velocimeter measurements were made for four selected plumes. In addition, static pressure data in the chute base region of the suppressor configurations were obtained to assess the influence of the shield stream on the suppressor base drag.

  13. Characterization and classification of invertebrates as indicators of flow permanence in headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams represent a large proportion of river networks and many have temporary flow. Litigation has questioned whether these streams are jurisdictional under the Clean Water Act. Our goal was to identify indicators of flow permanence by comparing invertebrate assemblage...

  14. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  15. Low-flow characteristics for selected streams in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Wilson, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The management and availability of Indiana’s water resources increase in importance every year. Specifically, information on low-flow characteristics of streams is essential to State water-management agencies. These agencies need low-flow information when working with issues related to irrigation, municipal and industrial water supplies, fish and wildlife protection, and the dilution of waste. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) requires low-flow statistics in order to administer the NPDES permit program. Low-flow-frequency characteristics were computed for 272 continuous-record stations. The information includes low-flow-frequency analysis, flow-duration analysis, and harmonic mean for the continuous-record stations. For those stations affected by some form of regulation, low-flow frequency curves are based on the longest period of homogeneous record under current conditions. Low-flow-frequency values and harmonic mean flow (if sufficient data were available) were estimated for the 166 partial-record stations. Partial-record stations are ungaged sites where streamflow measurements were made at base flow.

  16. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  17. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  18. Flow-structure-acoustic interaction in a human voice model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stefan; Kniesburges, Stefan; Müller, Stefan; Delgado, Antonio; Link, Gerhard; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2009-03-01

    For the investigation of the physical processes of human phonation, inhomogeneous synthetic vocal folds were developed to represent the full fluid-structure-acoustic coupling. They consisted of polyurethane rubber with a stiffness in the range of human vocal folds and were mounted in a channel, shaped like the vocal tract in the supraglottal region. This test facility permitted extensive observations of flow-induced vocal fold vibrations, the periodic flow field, and the acoustic signals in the far field of the channel. Detailed measurements were performed applying particle-image velocimetry, a laser-scanning vibrometer, a microphone, unsteady pressure sensors, and a hot-wire probe, with the aim of identifying the physical mechanisms in human phonation. The results support the existence of the Coanda effect during phonation, with the flow attaching to one vocal fold and separating from the other. This behavior is not linked to one vocal fold and changes stochastically from cycle to cycle. The oscillating flow field generates a tonal sound. The broadband noise is presumed to be caused by the interaction of the asymmetric flow with the downstream-facing surfaces of the vocal folds, analogous to trailing-edge noise. PMID:19275292

  19. Relation of streams, lakes, and wetlands to groundwater flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.

    1999-01-01

    Surface-water bodies are integral parts of groundwater flow systems. Groundwater interacts with surface water in nearly all landscapes, ranging from small streams, lakes, and wetlands in headwater areas to major river valleys and seacoasts. Although it generally is assumed that topographically high areas are groundwater recharge areas and topographically low areas are groundwater discharge areas, this is true primarily for regional flow systems. The superposition of local flow systems associated with surface-water bodies on this regional framework results in complex interactions between groundwater and surface water in all landscapes, regardless of regional topographic position. Hydrologic processes associated with the surface-water bodies themselves, such as seasonally high surface-water levels and evaporation and transpiration of groundwater from around the perimeter of surfacewater bodies, are a major cause of the complex and seasonally dynamic groundwater flow fields associated with surface water. These processes have been documented at research sites in glacial, dune, coastal, mantled karst, and riverine terrains.

  20. Simulation of a hot coaxial jet: Direct noise prediction and flow-acoustics correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogey, Christophe; Barré, Sébastien; Juvé, Daniel; Bailly, Christophe

    2009-03-01

    A coaxial jet originating from parallel coplanar pipe nozzles is computed by a compressible large eddy simulation (LES) using low-dissipation and low-dispersion schemes in order to determine its acoustic field and to study noise generation mechanisms. The jet streams are at high velocities, the primary stream is heated, and the Reynolds number based on the primary velocity and the secondary diameter is around 106. High levels of turbulence intensity are also specified at the nozzle exit. The jet aerodynamic field and the near-pressure field are both obtained directly from the LES. The far-field noise is calculated by solving the linear acoustic equations, from the unsteady LES data on a cylindrical surface surrounding the jet. A good agreement is observed in terms of directivity, levels, and narrow-band spectra with noise measurements carried out during the EU project CoJeN for a coaxial jet displaying same stream velocities and temperatures, coplanar nozzle outlets with identical area ratio, and a high Reynolds number. However, certainly due to differences in the properties of the nozzle-exit boundary layers with respect to the experiment, some unexpected peaks are noticed in the simulation spectra. They are attributed to the development of a Von Kármán street in the inner mixing layer and to vortex pairings in the outer shear layer. High correlation levels are also calculated between the pressure waves radiated in the downstream direction and flow quantities such as axial velocity, vorticity norm, density, and temperature, taken around the end of the primary and secondary potential cores. Noise generation in the coaxial jet therefore appears significant around the end of the two potential cores. These flow regions are characterized by intermittency, a dominant Strouhal number, and variations in the convection velocity as similarly found in single jets. The use of density or temperature to compute flow-noise correlations finally seems appropriate for a heated

  1. Does quantifying antecedent flow conditions improve stream phosphorus export estimation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Stuart; Kiely, Gerard; Morgan, Gerard; O'Halloran, John

    2009-11-01

    SummaryA reliable and economical method for the estimation of nutrient export (e.g. phosphorus) in stream flow from catchments is necessary to quantify the impact of land use or land use change upon aquatic systems. The transport of phosphorus (P) from soil to water is known to impact negatively on water quality. A key observation from studies is that most P export occurs during high stream flow. However, it is not yet clear how flood-antecedent conditions affect the P export during flood events. In this study, the P loss from soil to water as represented by soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in stream waters from three different catchments, varying in land use, scale and location in Ireland was monitored over 1 year. This study examined the role of antecedent stream flow conditions on SRP export and identifies a catchment-specific relationship between SRP flood event load (EL) and a flow ratio (FR). The FR is defined as the ratio of the flood event volume (EV) to the pre-event volume (PEV). The latter is the cumulative flow volume for a number of days preceding the event. This PEV period was found to be longer (average 81 days) in the grassland catchments which were known to be saturated with soil P than in the forested catchments (average 21 days) with minimal soil P. This FR ratio is a measure of the antecedent hydrological state (wet or dry) of the catchment. For SRP for each catchment, a specific relationship between SRP EL and FR was identified. The annual SRP export was estimated, using this ratio and compared with the concentration/discharge ( C/ Q) method. The new flow ratio method was used with data from 12 flood events during the year to estimate an annual export of SRP. For the two grassland catchments in the study, using the FR method, we estimated an SRP export of 1.77 and 0.41 kg ha -1 yr -1. Using the C/ Q method, for the same sites, our estimate of SRP export was 1.70 and 0.50 kg ha -1 yr -1 respectively. The C/ Q method used SRP concentrations

  2. Fast Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Flow and Acoustic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, James W.; Sakaue, Hirotaka; Liu, Tianshu; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The development and capabilities of fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint (fast PSP) are reviewed within the context of recent applications to aerodynamic and acoustic investigations. PSP is an optical technique for determining surface pressure distributions by measuring changes in the intensity of emitted light, whereas fast PSP is an extension applicable to unsteady flows and acoustics. Most fast PSP formulations are based on the development of porous binders that allow for rapid oxygen diffusion and interaction with the chemical sensor. This article reviews the development of porous binders, the selection of luminophore molecules suitable for unsteady testing, dynamic calibrations of PSP, data-acquisition methods, and noteworthy applications for flow and acoustic diagnostics. Calibrations of the dynamic response of fast PSP show a flat frequency response to at least 6 kHz, with some paint formulations exceeding a response of 1 MHz. Various applications of fast PSP are discussed that highlight the capabilities of the technique, and concluding remarks highlight the need for the future development of fast PSP.

  3. Optimization and Control of Acoustic Liner Impedance with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Houston; Follet, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    Because communities are impacted by steady increases in aircraft traffic, aircraft noise continues to be a growing problem for the growth of commercial aviation. Research has focused on improving the design of specific high noise source areas of aircraft and on noise control measures to alleviate noise radiated from aircraft to the surrounding environment. Engine duct liners have long been a principal means of attenuating engine noise. The ability to control in-situ the acoustic impedance of a liner would provide a valuable tool to improve the performance of liners. The acoustic impedance of a liner is directly related to the sound absorption qualities of that liner. Increased attenuation rates, the ability to change liner acoustic impedance to match various operating conditions, or the ability to tune a liner to more precisely match design impedance represent some ways that in-situ impedance control could be useful. With this in mind, the research to be investigated will focus on improvements in the ability to control liner impedance using a mean flow through the liner which is referred to as bias flow.

  4. Fire, flow and dynamic equilibrium in stream macroinvertebrate communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arkle, R.S.; Pilliod, D.S.; Strickler, K.

    2010-01-01

    The complex effects of disturbances on ecological communities can be further complicated by subsequent perturbations within an ecosystem. We investigated how wildfire interacts with annual variations in peak streamflow to affect the stability of stream macroinvertebrate communities in a central Idaho wilderness, USA. We conducted a 4-year retrospective analysis of unburned (n = 7) and burned (n = 6) catchments, using changes in reflectance values (??NBR) from satellite imagery to quantify the percentage of each catchment's riparian and upland vegetation that burned at high and low severity. For this wildland fire complex, increasing riparian burn severity and extent were associated with greater year-to-year variation, rather than a perennial increase, in sediment loads, organic debris, large woody debris (LWD) and undercut bank structure. Temporal changes in these variables were correlated with yearly peak flow in burned catchments but not in unburned reference catchments, indicating that an interaction between fire and flow can result in decreased habitat stability in burned catchments. Streams in more severely burned catchments exhibited increasingly dynamic macroinvertebrate communities and did not show increased similarity to reference streams over time. Annual variability in macroinvertebrates was attributed, predominantly, to the changing influence of sediment, LWD, riparian cover and organic debris, as quantities of these habitat components fluctuated annually depending on burn severity and annual peak streamflows. These analyses suggest that interactions among fire, flow and stream habitat may increase inter-annual habitat variability and macroinvertebrate community dynamics for a duration approaching the length of the historic fire return interval of the study area. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. An Investigation of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Mach 2 Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieberding, Zachary J.

    Hypersonic technology is the next advancement to enter the aerospace community; it is defined as the study of flight at speeds Mach 5 and higher where intense aerodynamic heating is prevalent. Hypersonic flight is achieved through use of scramjet engines, which intake air and compress it by means of shock waves and geometry design. The airflow is then directed through an isolator where it is further compressed, it is then delivered to the combustor at supersonic speeds. The combusted airflow and fuel mixture is then accelerated through a nozzle to achieve the hypersonic speeds. Unfortunately, scramjet engines can experience a phenomenon known as an inlet unstart, where the combustor produces pressures large enough to force the incoming airflow out of the inlet of the engine, resulting in a loss of acceleration and power. There have been several government-funded programs that look to prove the concept of the scramjet engine and also tackle this inlet unstart issue. The research conducted in this thesis is a fundamental approach towards controlling the unstart problem: it looks at the basic concept of sending a signal upstream through the boundary layer of a supersonic flow and being able to detect a characterizeable signal. Since conditions within and near the combustor are very harsh, hardware is unable to be installed in that area, so this testing will determine if a signal can be sent and if so, how far upstream can the signal be detected. This experimental approach utilizes several acoustic and mass injection sources to be evaluated over three test series in a Mach 2 continuous flow wind tunnel that will determine the success of the objective. The test series vary in that the conditions of the flow and the test objectives change. The research shows that a characterizeable signal can be transmitted upstream roughly 12 inches through the subsonic boundary layer of a supersonic cross flow. It is also shown that the signal attenuates as the distance between the

  6. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M; Techet, Alexandra H; Yoerger, Dana R; Whitcomb, Louis L; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-12-11

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well's two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well's oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m(3) s(-1) at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s(-1) (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d(-1)), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s(-1) (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d(-1)) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s(-1) (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d(-1)).

  7. Irreversibility and complex network behavior of stream flow fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serinaldi, Francesco; Kilsby, Chris G.

    2016-05-01

    Exploiting the duality between time series and networks, directed horizontal visibility graphs (DHVGs) are used to perform an unprecedented analysis of the dynamics of stream flow fluctuations with focus on time irreversibility and long range dependence. The analysis relies on a large quality-controlled data set consisting of 699 daily time series recorded in the continental United States (CONUS) that are not affected by human activity and primarily reflects meteorological conditions. DHVGs allow a clear visualization and quantification of time irreversibility of flow dynamics, which can be interpreted as a signature of nonlinearity, and long range dependence resulting from the interaction of atmospheric, surface and underground processes acting at multiple spatio-temporal scales. Irreversibility is explored by mapping the time series into ingoing, outgoing, and undirected graphs and comparing the corresponding degree distributions. Using surrogate data preserving up to the second order linear temporal dependence properties of the observed series, DHVGs highlight the additional complexity introduced by nonlinearity into flow fluctuation dynamics. We show that the degree distributions do not decay exponentially as expected, but tend to follow a subexponential behavior, even though sampling uncertainty does not allow a clear distinction between apparent or true power law decay. These results confirm that the complexity of stream flow dynamics goes beyond a linear representation involving for instance the combination of linear processes with short and long range dependence, and requires modeling strategies accounting for temporal asymmetry and nonlinearity.

  8. Global Stream Temperatures and Flows under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vliet, M. T.; Yearsley, J. R.; Franssen, W. H.; Ludwig, F.; Haddeland, I.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Kabat, P.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change will affect thermal and hydrologic regimes of rivers, having a direct impact on human water use and freshwater ecosystems. Here we assess the impact of climate change on stream temperature and streamflow globally. We used a physically-based stream temperature river basin model (RBM) linked to the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. The modelling framework was adapted for global application including impacts of reservoirs and thermal heat discharges, and was validated using observed water temperature and river discharge records in large river basins globally. VIC-RBM was forced with an ensemble of bias-corrected Global Climate Model (GCM) output resulting in global projections of daily streamflow and water temperature for the 21st century. Global mean and high (95th percentile) stream temperatures are projected to increase on average by 0.8-1.6 (1.0-2.2)°C for the SRES B1-A2 scenario for 2071-2100 relative to 1971-2000. The largest water temperature increases are projected for Europe, North America, Southeast Asia, South Africa and parts of Australia. In these regions, the sensitivities for warming are exacerbated by projected decreases in summer low flows. Large increases in water temperature combined with decreases in low flows are found for the southeastern U.S., Europe and eastern China. These regions could potentially be affected by increased deterioration of water quality and freshwater habitats, and reduced water available for beneficial uses such as thermoelectric power production.

  9. Flow structure, performance and scaling of acoustic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Michael Oliver

    Acoustic jets are studied, with an emphasis on their flow structure, performance, and scaling. The ultimate goal is the development of a micromachined acoustic jet for propulsion of a micromachined airborne platform, as well as integrated cooling and pumping applications. Scaling suggests an increase in performance with decreasing size, motivating the use of micro-technology. Experimental studies are conducted at three different orders of magnitude in size, each closely following analytic expectations. The jet creates a periodic vortical structure, the details of which are a function of amplitude. At small actuation amplitude, but still well above the linear acoustic regime, the flow structure consists of individual vortex rings, propagating away from the nozzle, formed during the outstroke of the acoustic cavity. At large amplitude, a trail of vorticity forms between the periodic vortex rings. Approximately corresponding to these two flow regions are two performance regimes. At low amplitude, the jet thrust increases with the fourth power of the amplitude; and at large amplitude, the thrust equals the momentum flux ejected during the output stroke, and increases as the square of the amplitude. Resonance of the cavity, at Reynolds numbers greater than approximately 10, enhances the jet performance beyond the incompressible behavior. Gains of an order of magnitude in the jet velocity occur at Reynolds numbers of approximately 100, and the data suggest further gains with increasing Reynolds number. The smallest geometries tested are micromachined acoustic jets, manufactured using MEMS technology. The throat dimensions are 50 by 200 mum, and the overall device size is approximately 1 mm 2, with eight throats per device. Several jets are manufactured in an array, to suit any given application. The performance is very dependent on frequency, with a sharp peak at the system resonance, occurring at approximately 70 kHz (inaudible). The mean jet velocity of these devices

  10. Stream flow changes across North Carolina (USA) 1955-2012 with implications for environmental flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitzen, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines changes in stream flow conditions across North Carolina, relates these changes to geomorphological conditions of rivers, and makes recommendations for environmental flow guidelines to conserve and protect riverine ecosystems. Monthly stream flow percentile metrics (90th, 75th, 50th, 25th, and 10th percentiles) are compared over two time periods (1955-1980 and 1984-2012) for 63 gages distributed statewide. The results showed that stream flow changes vary spatially by flow magnitude, ecoregion, basin, and temporally by months. The greatest changes involve decreases to the 10th, 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles and the least amount of change is associated with 90th percentile flows. The spring and summer months of February through August have the greatest flow reductions, while September, November, and December exhibit magnitude increases for the 75th and 90th percentile flows. The Blue Ridge has the least amount of change, whereas the Piedmont and Coastal Plain have the greatest change. The few gages that do not show significant magnitude decreases to the 10th percentile flow are below major dams on the Neuse, Cape Fear, and Roanoke rivers. These same dammed rivers exhibit increases to the 90th percentile flows. The Tar River Basin, which is free of dams, shows opposite effects, with significant decreases to the 10th percentile flows and minimal changes to the 75th and 90th percentile flows. This study elucidates the importance of establishing environmental flow criteria that apply statewide across North Carolina. Sustainable environmental flow criteria need to be established that conserve seasonal patterns of flows, sustain low flows (from increases and decreases), and protect headwater and tributary accumulation areas from over-abstraction.

  11. Low-Flow Characteristics of Kentucky Streams, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullavan, John N.

    1984-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The U. S. Geologlcal Survey has been gathering low-flow data on streams throughout Kentucky for many years. This report presents low-flow characteristics at gaged and ungaged sites where the flow is not significantly regulated. Data on avai1able streamflow during low-flow periods are used for the design of plants that dispose of waste using di1ution procedures, to estimate avai1able industrial and municipal water supplies, to estimate irrigation supplies, and in the design of recreational faci1ities. This preliminary report presents low-flow data at 84 continuous-record sites and the 7-day 2-year and 7-day 10-year flow only at 203 partial-record sites. The station identifier, 7-day 10-year dlscharge in cubic feet per second (ft3/s), and the drainage area in square mi1es (mi2 ) are shown on the map. Other data are shown in tabular form. Low-flow characteristics previously published by Swisshelm (1974) and Sullavan (1980) have been combined and included in this report for reference purposes.

  12. Estimates of Flow Duration, Mean Flow, and Peak-Discharge Frequency Values for Kansas Stream Locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    Streamflow statistics of flow duration and peak-discharge frequency were estimated for 4,771 individual locations on streams listed on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. These statistics included the flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent, as well as the mean flow value. Peak-discharge frequency values were estimated for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods. Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent and the mean flow for uncontrolled flow stream locations. The contributing-drainage areas of 149 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Kansas and parts of surrounding States that had flow uncontrolled by Federal reservoirs and used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. Logarithmic transformations of climatic and basin data were performed to yield the best linear relation for developing equations to compute flow durations and mean flow. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were contributing-drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. The analyses yielded a model standard error of prediction range of 0.43 logarithmic units for the 90-percent duration analysis to 0.15 logarithmic units for the 10-percent duration analysis. The model standard error of prediction was 0.14 logarithmic units for the mean flow. Regression equations used to estimate peak-discharge frequency values were obtained from a previous report, and estimates for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods were determined for this report. The regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute flow durations, mean flow, and estimates of peak-discharge frequency for locations along uncontrolled flow streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Flow durations, mean

  13. Apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid

    DOEpatents

    Speir, Leslie G.; Adams, Edwin L.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid is diosed. The apparatus consists of a housing having a spherical cavity and a spherical moderator containing a radiation source positioned within the spherical cavity. The spherical moderator is of lesser diameter than the spherical cavity so as to define a spherical annular volume around the moderator. The housing includes fluid intake and output conduits which open onto the spherical cavity at diametrically opposite positions. Fluid flows through the cavity around the spherical moderator and is uniformly irradiated due to the 4.pi. radiation geometry. The irradiation source, for example a .sup.252 CF neutron source, is removable from the spherical moderator through a radial bore which extends outwardly to an opening on the outside of the housing. The radiation source may be routinely removed without interrupting the flow of fluid or breaching the containment of the fluid.

  14. Coupling nutrient uptake and energy flow in headwater streams

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Fellows, Christine; Valett, H. Maurice; Dahm, Cliff; Thomas, Steve

    2006-08-01

    Nutrient cycling and energy flow in ecosystems are tightly linked through the metabolic processes of organisms. Greater uptake of inorganic nutrients is expected to be associated with higher rates of metabolism [gross primary production (GPP) and respiration (R)], due to assimilatory demand of both autotrophs and heterotrophs. However, relationships between uptake and metabolism should vary with the relative contribution of autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter. To investigate the relationship between metabolism and nutrient uptake, we used whole-stream and benthic chamber methods to measure rates of nitrate-nitrogen (NO{sub 3}-N) uptake and metabolism in four headwater streams chosen to span a range of light availability and therefore differing rates of GPP and contributions of autochthonous carbon. We coupled whole-stream metabolism with measures of NO{sub 3}-N uptake conducted repeatedly over the same stream reach during both day and night, as well as incubating benthic sediments under both light and dark conditions. NO{sub 3}-N uptake was generally greater in daylight compared to dark conditions, and although day-night differences in whole-stream uptake were not significant, light-dark differences in benthic chambers were significant at three of the four sites. Estimates of N demand indicated that assimilation by photoautotrophs could account for the majority of NO{sub 3}-N uptake at the two sites with relatively open canopies. Contrary to expectations, photoautotrophs contributed substantially to NO{sub 3}-N uptake even at the two closed-canopy sites, which had low values of GPP/R and relied heavily on allochthonous carbon to fuel R.

  15. The effect of in-stream activities on the Njoro River, Kenya. Part I: Stream flow and chemical water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yillia, Paul T.; Kreuzinger, Norbert; Mathooko, Jude M.

    For shallow streams in sub-Saharan Africa, in-stream activities could be described as the actions by people and livestock, which take place within or besides stream channels. This study examined the nature of in-stream activities along a rural stream in Kenya and established the inequality in water allocation for various livelihood needs, as well as the negative impact they have on dry weather stream flow and chemical water quality. Seven locations along the stream were studied in wet and dry weather of 2006. Enumeration consisted of making head counts of people and livestock and tallying visitors at hourly intervals from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. To estimate water abstraction, filled containers of known volume were counted and the stream was sampled to examine the impact on water quality. Water samples were obtained upstream and downstream of in-stream activities before (6 a.m.) and during (11 a.m., 6 p.m.) activities. Samples were analyzed for suspended solids, turbidity, BOD 5, total nitrogen and total phosphorus. The daily total abstraction at the middle reaches during dry weather was 120-150 m 3 day -1. More than 60% of abstraction was done by water vendors. Vended water from the stream was sold at US 3.5-7.5 per m 3 and vendors earned between US 3-6 a day. Abstracted water contributed approximately 40-60% of the total daily consumptive water use in the riparian area during dry weather but >30% of the morning stream flow was abstracted thereby upsetting stream flow in the lower reaches. The daily total water abstraction correlated positively ( R2, 0.98) and significantly ( p < 0.05) with the daily total human visit, which was diurnally periodic with two peaks, occurring between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. This diurnal pattern of visits and the corresponding in-stream activities affected water quality. In particular, suspended solids, turbidity and BOD 5 levels increased significantly ( p < 0.05) downstream during in-stream activities. It was concluded

  16. Seasonal Stream Flow Forecasting and Decision Support in Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, D. W.; Nykanen, D. K.; Mahmoud, M.; Wei, W.

    2003-12-01

    A decision support model based on stream flow ensemble forecasts has been developed for the Lower Colorado River Authority in Central Texas, and predictive skill is added to climatology-based forecasts by conditioning the ensembles on observable climate indicators. These indicators include stream flow (persistence), soil moisture, and large-scale recurrent patterns such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and the North Atlantic Oscillation. In the absence of historical soil moisture measurements, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) Retrospective Land Surface Data Set is applied. Strong correlation between observed runoff volumes and runoff volumes simulated by the (uncalibrated) VIC model indicates the viability of this approach. Following correlation analysis to screen potential predictors, a Bayesian procedure for updating ensemble probabilities is outlined, and various skill scores are reviewed for evaluating forecast performance. Verification of the ensemble forecasts using a resampling procedure indicates a small but potentially significant improvement in forecast skill over climatology that could be exploited in seasonal water management decisions. Future work involves evaluation of seasonal soil moisture forecasts, further evaluation of annual flow forecasts, incorporation of climate forecasts in reservoir operating rules, and estimation of the value of the forecasts.

  17. A computational modeling approach of the jet-like acoustic streaming and heat generation induced by low frequency high power ultrasonic horn reactors.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Francisco Javier; Knoerzer, Kai

    2011-11-01

    High power ultrasound reactors have gained a lot of interest in the food industry given the effects that can arise from ultrasonic-induced cavitation in liquid foods. However, most of the new food processing developments have been based on empirical approaches. Thus, there is a need for mathematical models which help to understand, optimize, and scale up ultrasonic reactors. In this work, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to predict the acoustic streaming and induced heat generated by an ultrasonic horn reactor. In the model it is assumed that the horn tip is a fluid inlet, where a turbulent jet flow is injected into the vessel. The hydrodynamic momentum rate of the incoming jet is assumed to be equal to the total acoustic momentum rate emitted by the acoustic power source. CFD velocity predictions show excellent agreement with the experimental data for power densities higher than W(0)/V ≥ 25kWm(-3). This model successfully describes hydrodynamic fields (streaming) generated by low-frequency-high-power ultrasound.

  18. Energetic Geodesic Acoustic Modes Associated with Two-Stream-like Instabilities in Tokamak Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Qu, Z S; Hole, M J; Fitzgerald, M

    2016-03-01

    An unstable branch of the energetic geodesic acoustic mode (EGAM) is found using fluid theory with fast ions characterized by their narrow width in energy distribution and collective transit along field lines. This mode, with a frequency much lower than the thermal GAM frequency ω_{GAM}, is now confirmed as a new type of unstable EGAM: a reactive instability similar to the two-stream instability. The mode can have a very small fast ion density threshold when the fast ion transit frequency is smaller than ω_{GAM}, consistent with the onset of the mode right after the turn-on of the beam in DIII-D experiments. The transition of this reactive EGAM to the velocity gradient driven EGAM is also discussed.

  19. The effect of fluid streams in porous media on acoustic compression wave propagation, transmission, and reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeo, A.; Djeran-Maigre, I.; Rosi, G.; Silvani, C.

    2013-03-01

    In geomechanics, a relevant role is played by coupling phenomena between compressible fluid seepage flow and deformation of the solid matrix. The behavior of complex porous materials can be greatly influenced by such coupling phenomena. A satisfactorily theoretical framework for their description is not yet completely attained. In this paper, we discuss how the model developed in dell'Isola et al. (Int J Solids Struct 46:3150-3164, 2009) can describe how underground flows or, more generally, confined streams of fluid in deformable porous matrices affect compression wave propagation and their reflection and transmission at a solid-material discontinuity surface. Further work will investigate the effect of stream flow in porous media on shear waves, generalizing what done in Djeran Maigre and Kuznetsov (Comptes Rendus Mécanique 336(1-2):102-107, 2008) for shear waves in one-constituent orthotropic two-layered plates. The presented treatment shows that the presence of fluid streams considerably affect reflection and transmission phenomena in porous media.

  20. Does stream flow structure woody riparian vegetation in subtropical catchments?

    PubMed

    James, Cassandra S; Mackay, Stephen J; Arthington, Angela H; Capon, Samantha J; Barnes, Anna; Pearson, Ben

    2016-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the relevance of hydrological classification and class differences to the characteristics of woody riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape in Queensland, Australia. We followed classification procedures of the environmental flow framework ELOHA - Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration. Riparian surveys at 44 sites distributed across five flow classes recorded 191 woody riparian species and 15, 500 individuals. There were differences among flow classes for riparian species richness, total abundance, and abundance of regenerating native trees and shrubs. There were also significant class differences in the occurrence of three common tree species, and 21 indicator species (mostly native taxa) further distinguished the vegetation characteristics of each flow class. We investigated the influence of key drivers of riparian vegetation structure (climate, depth to water table, stream-specific power, substrate type, degree of hydrologic alteration, and land use) on riparian vegetation. Patterns were explained largely by climate, particularly annual rainfall and temperature. Strong covarying drivers (hydrology and climate) prevented us from isolating the independent influences of these drivers on riparian assemblage structure. The prevalence of species considered typically rheophytic in some flow classes implies a more substantial role for flow in these classes but needs further testing. No relationships were found between land use and riparian vegetation composition and structure. This study demonstrates the relevance of flow classification to the structure of riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape, and the influence of covarying drivers on riparian patterns. Management of environmental flows to influence riparian vegetation assemblages would likely have most potential in sites dominated by rheophytic species where hydrological influences override other controls. In contrast, where vegetation assemblages are

  1. Does stream flow structure woody riparian vegetation in subtropical catchments?

    PubMed

    James, Cassandra S; Mackay, Stephen J; Arthington, Angela H; Capon, Samantha J; Barnes, Anna; Pearson, Ben

    2016-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the relevance of hydrological classification and class differences to the characteristics of woody riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape in Queensland, Australia. We followed classification procedures of the environmental flow framework ELOHA - Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration. Riparian surveys at 44 sites distributed across five flow classes recorded 191 woody riparian species and 15, 500 individuals. There were differences among flow classes for riparian species richness, total abundance, and abundance of regenerating native trees and shrubs. There were also significant class differences in the occurrence of three common tree species, and 21 indicator species (mostly native taxa) further distinguished the vegetation characteristics of each flow class. We investigated the influence of key drivers of riparian vegetation structure (climate, depth to water table, stream-specific power, substrate type, degree of hydrologic alteration, and land use) on riparian vegetation. Patterns were explained largely by climate, particularly annual rainfall and temperature. Strong covarying drivers (hydrology and climate) prevented us from isolating the independent influences of these drivers on riparian assemblage structure. The prevalence of species considered typically rheophytic in some flow classes implies a more substantial role for flow in these classes but needs further testing. No relationships were found between land use and riparian vegetation composition and structure. This study demonstrates the relevance of flow classification to the structure of riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape, and the influence of covarying drivers on riparian patterns. Management of environmental flows to influence riparian vegetation assemblages would likely have most potential in sites dominated by rheophytic species where hydrological influences override other controls. In contrast, where vegetation assemblages are

  2. Trends in peak flows of selected streams in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, T.J.; Perry, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of a systematic change in flood potential led to an investigation of trends in the magnitude of annual peak flows in Kansas. Efficient design of highway bridges and other flood-plain structures depends on accurate understanding of flood characteristics. The Kendall's tau test was used to identify trends at 40 stream-gaging stations during the 40-year period 1958-97. Records from 13 (32 percent) of the stations showed significant trends at the 95-percent confidence level. Only three of the records (8 percent) analyzed had increasing trends, whereas 10 records (25 percent) had decreasing trends, all of which were for stations located in the western one-half of the State. An analysis of flow volume using mean annual discharge at 29 stations in Kansas resulted in 6 stations (21 percent) with significant trends in flow volumes. All six trends were decreasing and occurred in the western one-half of the State. The Kendall's tau test also was used to identify peak-flow trends over the entire period of record for 54 stream-gaging stations in Kansas. Of the 23 records (43 percent) showing significant trends, 16 (30 percent) were decreasing, and 7 (13 percent) were increasing. The trend test then was applied to 30-year periods moving in 5-year increments to identify time periods within each station record when trends were occurring. Systematic changes in precipitation patterns and long-term declines in ground-water levels in some stream basins may be contributing to peak-flow trends. To help explain the cause of the streamflow trends, the Kendall's tau test was applied to total annual precipitation and ground-water levels in Kansas. In western Kansas, the lack of precipitation and presence of decreasing trends in ground-water levels indicated that declining water tables are contributing to decreasing trends in peak streamflow. Declining water tables are caused by ground-water withdrawals and other factors such as construction of ponds and terraces. Peak-flow

  3. Simulation of stream-groundwater exchange and near-stream flow paths of two first-order mountain streams using MODFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Wroblicky, G.J.; Campana, M.E.; Dahm, C.N.; Valett, H.M.; Morrice, J.A.; Baker, M.A.; Henry, K.S.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrologic exchange between surface water and groundwater has been shown to exert strong controls on stream biota and biogeochemical processes. To quantify such exchange, the authors constructed two-dimensional unconfined groundwater flow models for two first-order stream sites in New Mexico, Aspen Creek and Rio Calaveras, using the U.S.G.S. modular three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater flow model (MODFLOW). They calibrated the model to hydraulic head, stream stage, and seepage meter measurements. Model-calibrated flow rates between the stream and local aquifer system range between 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}6} cm/s at Aspen Creek, and 10 {sup {minus}4} and 10 {sup {minus}7} cm/s at Rio Calaveras. Modeled flow rates at both sites tended to under predict seepage meter estimates by one-half to one order of magnitude. A particle tracking code (MODPATH) delineated near-stream flow paths. Near-stream flow paths were found to be associated with stream meander bends and areas where the streambed slope increased significantly.

  4. Selected flows with free surfaces: Streams and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    1995-03-01

    The basic purpose of the research described in this article was to develop a non contact method for diagnosing the physical parameters of the free surface of a liquid using drop oscillation analysis. In particular, the purpose is to measure the temperature of an evaporating surface. The realization of this goal has led to the development of new experimental techniques which make it possible to record fast processes using video and digital imaging equipment. Experimental studies of the process of the formation of drops as a result of the controlled breakup of a stream revealed the existence of an additional phase in the process based on the formation of microstreams and microsatellites with micrometer-like dimensions. A comparison of measurement results with Eggers' asymptotic model (23) confirmed the model's basic assumption of the local nature of the final phase in the disintegration of the stream, which at the same time points to the existence of a number of discrepancies which provide evidence of the limitations of this approximation. The next part of the article presents the results of observations of the instability of streams of liquid caused by its evaporation. In an attempt to analyze the mechanisms which initiate the turbulence of the evaporating surface, the author focused on surface tension gradients as an essential factor in the destabilization of small-diameter streams. The author also described the occurrence of a number of new phenomena in the destabilization of a stream, including the separation of surface fragments, their stabilization by the flow of vapor, and a quasistable change in the trajectory of the stream. The author also developed an experimental method which makes it possible to detect and produce a precise description of the deformation of drops. Measurements of the oscillations of small drops in the air led to the development of a complete non-linear model of the oscillations of a viscous drop and made it possible to verify simplified

  5. Acoustic communication in two freshwater gobies: ambient noise and short-range propagation in shallow streams.

    PubMed

    Lugli, M; Fine, M L

    2003-07-01

    Noise is an important theoretical constraint on the evolution of signal form and sensory performance. In order to determine environmental constraints on the communication of two freshwater gobies Padogobius martensii and Gobius nigricans, numerous noise spectra were measured from quiet areas and ones adjacent to waterfalls and rapids in two shallow stony streams. Propagation of goby sounds and waterfall noise was also measured. A quiet window around 100 Hz is present in many noise spectra from noisy locations. The window lies between two noise sources, a low-frequency one attributed to turbulence, and a high-frequency one (200-500 Hz) attributed to bubble noise from water breaking the surface. Ambient noise from a waterfall (frequencies below 1 kHz) attenuates as much as 30 dB between 1 and 2 m, after which values are variable without further attenuation (i.e., buried in the noise floor). Similarly, courtship sounds of P. martensii attenuate as much as 30 dB between 5 and 50 cm. Since gobies are known to court in noisy as well as quiet locations in these streams, their acoustic communication system (sounds and auditory system) must be able to cope with short-range propagation dictated by shallow depths and ambient noise in noisy locations. PMID:12880062

  6. Acoustic communication in two freshwater gobies: ambient noise and short-range propagation in shallow streams.

    PubMed

    Lugli, M; Fine, M L

    2003-07-01

    Noise is an important theoretical constraint on the evolution of signal form and sensory performance. In order to determine environmental constraints on the communication of two freshwater gobies Padogobius martensii and Gobius nigricans, numerous noise spectra were measured from quiet areas and ones adjacent to waterfalls and rapids in two shallow stony streams. Propagation of goby sounds and waterfall noise was also measured. A quiet window around 100 Hz is present in many noise spectra from noisy locations. The window lies between two noise sources, a low-frequency one attributed to turbulence, and a high-frequency one (200-500 Hz) attributed to bubble noise from water breaking the surface. Ambient noise from a waterfall (frequencies below 1 kHz) attenuates as much as 30 dB between 1 and 2 m, after which values are variable without further attenuation (i.e., buried in the noise floor). Similarly, courtship sounds of P. martensii attenuate as much as 30 dB between 5 and 50 cm. Since gobies are known to court in noisy as well as quiet locations in these streams, their acoustic communication system (sounds and auditory system) must be able to cope with short-range propagation dictated by shallow depths and ambient noise in noisy locations.

  7. Transient streaming potentials associated with brine flow in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, B.

    2013-12-01

    Experimental data collected in falling-head permeameter tests using brine flow through crushed rock salt are presented. The brine was obtained by recirculating what was initially deionized water through a column of crushed rock salt until saturation (specific gravity = 1.205) was attained. The column was then repacked with fresh crushed salt. Brine flow through the salt was then monitored with a pressure transducer and silver-silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrodes, measuring the pressure and voltage drops, respectively, across the length of the salt column. The measurements are reported. Preliminary analysis of the data is performed with a recently developed model for transient streaming potentials in falling-head permeameters.

  8. Electrohydrodynamic distortion of sample streams in continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Snyder, Robert S.; Roberts, Glyn O.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous flow electrophoresis experiments were carried out, using an electrolyte and a sample both made of aqueous solutions of phosphate buffer (with polystyrene latex added for visibility), to investigate causes of the sample spreading in this procedure. It is shown theoretically that an electric field perpendicular to a circular filament of conducting fluid surrounded by a fluid of different conductivity produces an electrohydrodynamic flow, which distorts the filament into an ellipse. Experimental results were found to be fully consistent with theretical predictions. It was found that the rate of distortion of the sample stream into a ribbon was proportional to the square of the applied voltage gradient. Furthermore, the orientation of the ribbon depends on the ratios of dielectric constant and electrical conductivity between the buffer and the sample.

  9. Comparison of Methods for Estimating Low Flow Characteristics of Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tasker, Gary D.

    1987-01-01

    Four methods for estimating the 7-day, 10-year and 7-day, 20-year low flows for streams are compared by the bootstrap method. The bootstrap method is a Monte Carlo technique in which random samples are drawn from an unspecified sampling distribution defined from observed data. The nonparametric nature of the bootstrap makes it suitable for comparing methods based on a flow series for which the true distribution is unknown. Results show that the two methods based on hypothetical distribution (Log-Pearson III and Weibull) had lower mean square errors than did the G. E. P. Box-D. R. Cox transformation method or the Log-W. C. Boughton method which is based on a fit of plotting positions.

  10. Trapping of embolic particles in a vessel phantom by cavitation-enhanced acoustic streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Cain, Charles A.; Grotberg, James B.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R2 = 0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc = 0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location.

  11. Trapping of embolic particles in a vessel phantom by cavitation-enhanced acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L; Cain, Charles A; Grotberg, James B; Xu, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R(2) = 0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc = 0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location.

  12. Trapping of Embolic Particles in a Vessel Phantom by Cavitation-Enhanced Acoustic Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Cain, Charles A.; Grotberg, James B.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R2=0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc=0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location. PMID:25109407

  13. A mixing layer theory for flow resistance in shallow streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, Gabriel; Wiberg, Patricia; Albertson, John; Hornberger, George

    2002-11-01

    A variety of surface roughness characterizations have emerged from nineteenth and twentieth century studies of channel hydraulics. When the water depth h is much larger than the characteristic roughness height ks, roughness formulations such as Manning's n and the friction factor f can be explicitly related to the momentum roughness height zo in the log-law formulation for turbulent boundary layers, thereby unifying roughness definitions for a given surface. However, when h is comparable to (or even smaller than) ks, the log-law need not be valid. Using a newly proposed mixing layer analogy for the inflectional velocity profile within and just above the roughness layer, a model for the flow resistance in shallow flows is developed. The key model parameter is the characteristic length scale describing the depth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz wave instability. It is shown that the new theory, originally developed for canopy turbulence, recovers much of the earlier roughness results for flume experiments and shallow gravel streams. This study is the first to provide such a unifying framework between canopy atmospheric turbulence and shallow gravel stream roughness characterization. The broader implication of this study is to support the merger of a wealth of surface roughness characterizations independently developed in nineteenth and twentieth century hydraulics and atmospheric sciences and to establish a connection between roughness formulations across traditionally distinct boundary layer types.

  14. Acoustic streaming induced elimination of nonspecifically bound proteins from a surface acoustic wave biosensor: Mechanism prediction using fluid-structure interaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Singh, Reetu; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.

    2010-11-01

    Biosensors typically operate in liquid media for detection of biomarkers and suffer from fouling resulting from nonspecific binding of protein molecules to the device surface. In the current work, using a coupled field finite element fluid-structure interaction simulation, we have identified that fluid motion induced by high intensity sound waves, such as those propagating in these sensors, can lead to the efficient removal of the nonspecifically bound proteins thereby eliminating sensor fouling. We present a computational analysis of the acoustic-streaming phenomenon induced biofouling elimination by surface acoustic-waves (SAWs) propagating on a lithium niobate piezoelectric crystal. The transient solutions generated from the developed coupled field fluid solid interaction model are utilized to predict trends in acoustic-streaming induced forces for varying design parameters such as voltage intensity, device frequency, fluid viscosity, and density. We utilize these model predictions to compute the various interaction forces involved and thereby identify the possible mechanisms for removal of nonspecifically-bound proteins. For the range of sensor operating conditions simulated, our study indicates that the SAW motion acts as a body force to overcome the adhesive forces of the fouling proteins to the device surface whereas the acoustic-streaming induced hydrodynamic forces prevent their reattachment. The streaming velocity fields computed using the finite element models in conjunction with the proposed particle removal mechanism were used to identify the optimum conditions that lead to improved removal efficiency. We show that it is possible to tune operational parameters such as device frequency and input voltage to achieve effective elimination of biofouling proteins in typical biosensing media. Our simulation results agree well with previously reported experimental observations. The findings of this work have significant implications in designing reusable

  15. Downscaling stream flow time series from monthly to daily scales using an auto-regressive stochastic algorithm: StreamFARM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebora, N.; Silvestro, F.; Rudari, R.; Herold, C.; Ferraris, L.

    2016-06-01

    Downscaling methods are used to derive stream flow at a high temporal resolution from a data series that has a coarser time resolution. These algorithms are useful for many applications, such as water management and statistical analysis, because in many cases stream flow time series are available with coarse temporal steps (monthly), especially when considering historical data; however, in many cases, data that have a finer temporal resolution are needed (daily). In this study, we considered a simple but efficient stochastic auto-regressive model that is able to downscale the available stream flow data from monthly to daily time resolution and applied it to a large dataset that covered the entire North and Central American continent. Basins with different drainage areas and different hydro-climatic characteristics were considered, and the results show the general good ability of the analysed model to downscale monthly stream flows to daily stream flows, especially regarding the reproduction of the annual maxima. If the performance in terms of the reproduction of hydrographs and duration curves is considered, better results are obtained for those cases in which the hydrologic regime is such that the annual maxima stream flow show low or medium variability, which means that they have a low or medium coefficient of variation; however, when the variability increases, the performance of the model decreases.

  16. The Effects of the Impedance of the Flow Source on the Design of Tidal Stream Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, S.

    2011-12-01

    The maximum performance of a wind turbine is set by the well-known Betz limit. If the designer of a wind turbine uses too fast a rotation, too large a blade chord or too high an angle of blade pitch, the air flow can take an easier path over or around the rotor. Most estimates of the tidal stream resource use equations borrowed from wind and would be reasonably accurate for a single unit. But water cannot flow through the seabed or over rotors which reach to the surface. If contra-rotating, vertical-axis turbines with a rectangular flow-window are placed close to one another and reach from the surface close to the seabed, the leakage path is blocked and they become more like turbines in a closed duct. Instead of an equation with area times velocity-cubed we should use the first power of volume flow rate though the rotor times the pressure difference across it. A long channel with a rough bed will already be losing lots of energy and will behave more like a high impedance flow. Attempts to block it with closely-packed turbines will increase the head across the turbines with only a small effect on flow rate. The same thing will occur if a close-packed line of turbines is built out to sea from a headland. It is necessary to understand the impedance of the flow source all the way out to mid-ocean. In deep seas where the current velocities at the seabed are too slow to disturb the ooze the friction coefficients will be similar to those of gloss paint, perhaps 0.0025. But the higher velocities in shallow water will remove ooze and quite large sediments leaving rough, bare rock and leading to higher friction-coefficients. Energy dissipation will be set by the higher friction coefficients and the cube of the higher velocities. The presence of turbines will reduce seabed losses and about one third of the present loss can be converted to electricity. The velocity reduction would be about 10%. In many sites the energy output will be far higher than the wind turbine equations

  17. Effect of acoustic flows on the structure of a constricted glow discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saifutdinov, A. I.; Fadeev, S. A.; Saifutdinova, A. A.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical experiments on the effect of acoustic flows on the structure of a constricted glow discharge in argon have been performed in the hybrid approximation. The possibility of controlling the combustion regime of the glow discharge with an extended positive column at a high pressure by means of the formation of acoustic flows at the excitation of a standing acoustic wave has been demonstrated. In this case, the discharge transfers from the constricted combustion regime to the diffuse one and becomes stable.

  18. Assessment of climate change and its impact on forest stream flow using wavelet analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterization of stream flow is essential to water resource management, water supply planning, environmental protection, and ecological restoration; while climate change can exacerbate stream flow and add instability to the flow. In this study, the wavelet analysis technique was employed to asse...

  19. Ensemble stream flow predictions using the ECMWF forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiczko, Adam; Romanowicz, Renata; Osuch, Marzena; Pappenberger, Florian; Karamuz, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    Floods and low flows in rivers are seasonal phenomena that can cause several problems to society. To anticipate high and low flow events, flow forecasts are crucial. They are of particular importance in mountainous catchments, where the lead time of forecasts is usually short. In order to prolong the forecast lead-time, numerical weather predictions (NWPs) are used as a hydrological model driving force. The forecasted flow is commonly given as one value, even though it is uncertain. There is an increasing interest in accounting for the uncertainty in flood early warning and decision support systems. When NWP are given in the form of ensembles, such as the ECMWF forecasts, the uncertainty of these forecasts can be accounted for. Apart from the forecast uncertainty the uncertainty related to the hydrological model used also plays an important role in the uncertainty of the final flow prediction. The aim of this study is the development of a stream flow prediction system for the Biała Tarnowska, a mountainous catchment in the south of Poland. We apply two different hydrological models. One is a conceptual HBV model for rainfall-flow predictions, applied within a Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) framework, the second is a data-based DBM model, adjusted for Polish conditions by adding the Soil Moisture Accounting (SMA) and snow-melt modules. Both models provide the uncertainty of the predictions, but the DBM approach is much more numerically efficient, therefore more suitable for the real-time forecasting.. The ECMWF forecasts require bias reduction in order to correspond to observations. Therefore we applied Quantile Mapping with and without seasonal adjustment for bias correction. Up to seven-days ahead forecast skills are compared using the Relative Operation Characteristic (ROC) graphs, for the flood warning and flood alarm flow value thresholds. The ECMWF forecasts are obtained from the project TIGGE (http

  20. Non-ideal Effects in Streaming Bi-Dust Acoustic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Puerta, J.; Castro, E.; Martin, P.; Arias, H.

    2006-12-04

    Streaming dust acoustic instabilities in the presence of a dust beam in a weakly non-ideal dusty plasma have been studied considering a new form for the state equation with two kind of grains. Fluctuating charging effects are not considered in this work. Homogeneous dust-acoustic waves (DAWS) are studied for a perturbed plasma in a very low frequency regime, where dusty plasmas support new kind of waves and instabilities due to the dust collective dynamics. In this analysis a fluid model is used and electrons and ions are determined by their Boltzmann factors in order to find an adequate dispersion relation, which has several parameters depending of the state equation constants. In this paper we use the state equation structured by Ree and Hoover using Pade approximant for a hard-sphere gas in the form P = nT 1 + nb{sub 0} (1 + a{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + a{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}/1 - b{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + b{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}) is applied, where b0 is calculated by the second virial term for the hard-core model. This type of equation is more accurate than other expressions and easier to manipulate. Comparisons between the ideal and non ideal cases is performed. Constants a1, a2, b1, b2, are calculated with the Pade method. The onset of the instability and also the growth rates are studied in function of relevant parameters of the system as the radius of the grains and their densities. In our analysis the instability region for non ideal plasma is compared with that of the ideal ones.

  1. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  2. Methods for estimating low-flow statistics for Massachusetts streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ries, Kernell G.; Friesz, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    Methods and computer software are described in this report for determining flow duration, low-flow frequency statistics, and August median flows. These low-flow statistics can be estimated for unregulated streams in Massachusetts using different methods depending on whether the location of interest is at a streamgaging station, a low-flow partial-record station, or an ungaged site where no data are available. Low-flow statistics for streamgaging stations can be estimated using standard U.S. Geological Survey methods described in the report. The MOVE.1 mathematical method and a graphical correlation method can be used to estimate low-flow statistics for low-flow partial-record stations. The MOVE.1 method is recommended when the relation between measured flows at a partial-record station and daily mean flows at a nearby, hydrologically similar streamgaging station is linear, and the graphical method is recommended when the relation is curved. Equations are presented for computing the variance and equivalent years of record for estimates of low-flow statistics for low-flow partial-record stations when either a single or multiple index stations are used to determine the estimates. The drainage-area ratio method or regression equations can be used to estimate low-flow statistics for ungaged sites where no data are available. The drainage-area ratio method is generally as accurate as or more accurate than regression estimates when the drainage-area ratio for an ungaged site is between 0.3 and 1.5 times the drainage area of the index data-collection site. Regression equations were developed to estimate the natural, long-term 99-, 98-, 95-, 90-, 85-, 80-, 75-, 70-, 60-, and 50-percent duration flows; the 7-day, 2-year and the 7-day, 10-year low flows; and the August median flow for ungaged sites in Massachusetts. Streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for 87 to 133 streamgaging stations and low-flow partial-record stations were used to develop the equations. The

  3. Low-flow characteristics of streams in the Lahaina District, West Maui, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Chui Ling

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize streamflow availability under natural low-flow conditions for streams in the Lahaina District, west Maui, Hawaiʻi. The study-area streams included Honolua Stream and tributary Pāpua Gulch, Honokahua Stream and tributary Mokupeʻa Gulch, Kahana Stream, Honokōwai Stream and tributaries Amalu and Kapāloa Streams, Wahikuli Gulch and tributary Hāhākea Gulch, Kahoma Stream and tributary Kanahā Stream, Kauaʻula Stream, Launiupoko Stream, Olowalu Stream, and Ukumehame Gulch. The results of this study can be used to assist in the determination of technically defensible instream-flow standards for the study-area streams. Low-flow characteristics for natural (unregulated) streamflow conditions were represented by flow-duration discharges that are equaled or exceeded between 50 and 95 percent of the time. Partial-record sites were established on 10 main streams and 5 tributary streams, mainly upstream from existing surface-water diversions. Flow characteristics were determined using historical and current streamflow data from continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations and miscellaneous sites, and additional data collected as part of this study. Based on strategically scheduled observations, six of the study-area streams were ephemeral streams that were observed to remain dry at least 50 percent of the time: Pāpua Gulch, Honokahua Stream and its tributary Mokupeʻa Gulch, Kahana Stream, and Wahikuli Gulch and its tributary Hāhākea Gulch. For the remaining streams with measurable flow, Honolua, Honokōwai, Kahoma, Kanahā, Kauaʻula, Launiupoko, and Olowalu Streams, and Ukumehame Gulch, flow-duration discharges were computed for the 30-year base period (water years 1984–2013), using two record-augmentation techniques. The 95-percent flow-duration discharges ranged from 0 to 4.8 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). The 50-percent flow-duration discharges ranged from 0.47 to 9.5 ft3/s. This study also estimated the streamflow

  4. Characterizing the Drivers of Intermittent Flow in Arctic Alaska Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, E.; Kane, D. L.; Stephan, N.

    2012-12-01

    Fish and wildlife species in the Arctic have developed life history strategies to deal with the extreme climate of the North. In the case of Arctic grayling, these strategies include long life, yearly spawning and migration.. In order to understand how such a species will be affected by a changing climate, we must first determine how these adaptive strategies may be at odds with the changing Arctic landscape. Arctic grayling migrate to spawning grounds just after spring break-up; then they migrate to feeding sites in early summer and finally in the fall migrate back to their overwintering sites. Low precipitation and high evapotranspiration rates during the summer can lead to low water levels and a fragmentation of the hydrologic landscape. This fragmentation creates a barrier to fish migration. The Kuparuk River is a perennial stream originating in the foothills of the Brooks Range on the North Slope of Alaska. The basin is underlain by continuous permafrost which essentially blocks the surface system from interacting with the subpermafrost groundwater system. Shallow subsurface flow occurs in the active layer, that area above permafrost which undergoes seasonal thawing in the summer. Sections of the Kuparuk are intermittent in that during low flows in the system these reaches appear dry (no flow in channel). Water reappears in the channel, downstream of these dry reaches, and it is believed that water continues to flow below the surface through the unfrozen thaw bulb beneath these reaches. These dry reaches act as summer barriers to fish migration within the Kuparuk River system. Previous research of this phenomenon sought to understand the location and timing of these dry events. The current research to be presented here attempts to determine the drivers of these dry channel events. Dye tracers and discharge measurements are used to determine the amount of hyporheic flow along these dry reaches and a statistical model incorporating soil moisture, precipitation

  5. Viscous interaction of flow redevelopment after flow reattachment with supersonic external streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, W. L.; Spring, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A flow model has been developed to study the flow development after reattachment with supersonic external streams. Special attention is given to the pressure difference across the viscous layer, and it is suggested that such a flow redevelopment can be treated as a relaxation of this pressure difference. Upon correlating the pressure difference with a slope parameter of the velocity profile, the system of equations governing the flow would produce a saddle point singularity corresponding to the fully rehabilitated asymptotic flow condition. A method of calculation for this flowfield, in conjunction with the matching of the upstream flow, has been derived and is discussed. Samples of calculations are also presented. Reasonably good agreement with experimental data has also been observed.

  6. Scientists discover massive jet streams flowing inside the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    These new findings will help them understand the famous sunspot cycle and associated increases in solar activity that can affect the Earth with power and communications disruptions. The observations are the latest made by the Solar Oscillations Investigation (SOI) group at Stanford University, CA, and they build on discoveries by the SOHO science team over the past year. "We have detected motion similar to the weather patterns in the Earth's atmosphere", said Dr. Jesper Schou of Stanford. "Moreover, in what is a completely new discovery, we have found a jet-like flow near the poles. This flow is totally inside the Sun. It is completely unexpected, and cannot be seen at the surface." "These polar streams are on a small scale, compared to the whole Sun, but they are still immense compared to atmospheric jet streams on the Earth", added Dr. Philip Scherrer, the SOI principal investigator at Stanford. "Ringing the Sun at about 75 degrees latitude, they consist of flattened oval regions about 30,000 kilometres across where material moves about ten percent (about 130 km/h) faster than its surroundings. Although these are the smallest structures yet observed inside the Sun, each is still large enough to engulf two Earths." Additionally, there are features similar to the Earth's trade winds on the surface of the Sun. The Sun rotates much faster at the equator than at the poles. However, Stanford researchers Schou and Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev have found that there are belts in the northern and southern hemispheres where currents flow at different speeds relative to each other. Six of these gaseous bands move slightly faster than the material surrounding them. The solar belts are more than 65 thousand km across and they contain "winds" that move about 15 kilometres per hour relative to their surroundings. The first evidence of these belts was found more than a decade ago by Dr. Robert Howard of the Mount Wilson Observatory. The Stanford researchers have now shown that

  7. Scientists discover massive jet streams flowing inside the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-08-01

    These new findings will help them understand the famous sunspot cycle and associated increases in solar activity that can affect the Earth with power and communications disruptions. The observations are the latest made by the Solar Oscillations Investigation (SOI) group at Stanford University, CA, and they build on discoveries by the SOHO science team over the past year. "We have detected motion similar to the weather patterns in the Earth's atmosphere", said Dr. Jesper Schou of Stanford. "Moreover, in what is a completely new discovery, we have found a jet-like flow near the poles. This flow is totally inside the Sun. It is completely unexpected, and cannot be seen at the surface." "These polar streams are on a small scale, compared to the whole Sun, but they are still immense compared to atmospheric jet streams on the Earth", added Dr. Philip Scherrer, the SOI principal investigator at Stanford. "Ringing the Sun at about 75 degrees latitude, they consist of flattened oval regions about 30,000 kilometres across where material moves about ten percent (about 130 km/h) faster than its surroundings. Although these are the smallest structures yet observed inside the Sun, each is still large enough to engulf two Earths." Additionally, there are features similar to the Earth's trade winds on the surface of the Sun. The Sun rotates much faster at the equator than at the poles. However, Stanford researchers Schou and Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev have found that there are belts in the northern and southern hemispheres where currents flow at different speeds relative to each other. Six of these gaseous bands move slightly faster than the material surrounding them. The solar belts are more than 65 thousand km across and they contain "winds" that move about 15 kilometres per hour relative to their surroundings. The first evidence of these belts was found more than a decade ago by Dr. Robert Howard of the Mount Wilson Observatory. The Stanford researchers have now shown that

  8. Adequacy of satellite derived rainfall data for stream flow modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artan, G.; Gadain, Hussein; Smith, Jody L.; Asante, Kwasi; Bandaragoda, C.J.; Verdin, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Floods are the most common and widespread climate-related hazard on Earth. Flood forecasting can reduce the death toll associated with floods. Satellites offer effective and economical means for calculating areal rainfall estimates in sparsely gauged regions. However, satellite-based rainfall estimates have had limited use in flood forecasting and hydrologic stream flow modeling because the rainfall estimates were considered to be unreliable. In this study we present the calibration and validation results from a spatially distributed hydrologic model driven by daily satellite-based estimates of rainfall for sub-basins of the Nile and Mekong Rivers. The results demonstrate the usefulness of remotely sensed precipitation data for hydrologic modeling when the hydrologic model is calibrated with such data. However, the remotely sensed rainfall estimates cannot be used confidently with hydrologic models that are calibrated with rain gauge measured rainfall, unless the model is recalibrated. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007.

  9. Selective breakup of lipid vesicles under acoustic microstreaming flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Garbin, Valeria

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of lipid vesicles under small deformation in simple shear flow is well characterized: complex behaviors such as tumbling, breathing, and tank-treading are observed depending on the viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluid, vesicle excess area, membrane viscosity, and bending modulus. In contrast, phenomena upon large deformation are still poorly understood, in particular vesicle breakup. Simple shear flow geometries do not allow to reach the large stresses necessary to cause vesicle breakup. We use the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by an oscillating microbubble to study the large deformation and breakup of giant unilamellar vesicles. The deformation is governed by a capillary number based on the membrane elasticity K : Ca = ηγ˙a / K where η is the viscosity of the outer fluid, a the vesicle radius, and γ˙ the shear rate. We explore the effect of the mechanical properties of the membrane, and demonstrated selective breakup of vesicles based on the difference in membrane elasticity. The results reveal the influence of membrane mechanical properties in shear-induced vesicle breakup and the possibility to control in a quantitative way the selectivity of the process, with potential applications in biomedical technologies. The authors acknowledge funding from EU/FP7 Grant Number 618333.

  10. Flow and acoustic features of a supersonic tapered nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Bowman, H. L.; Schadow, K. C.

    1992-05-01

    The acoustic and flow characteristics of a supersonic tapered jet were measured for free and shrouded flow configurations. Measurements were performed for a full range of pressure ratios including over- and underexpanded and design conditions. The supersonic tapered jet is issued from a converging-diverging nozzle with a 3∶1 rectangular slotted throat and a conical diverging section leading to a circular exit. The jet was compared to circular and rectangular supersonic jets operating at identical conditions. The distinct feature of the jet is the absence of screech tones in the entire range of operation. Its near-field pressure fluctuations have a wide band spectrum in the entire range of measurements, for Mach numbers of 1 to 2.5, for over- and underexpanded conditions. The free jet's spreading rate is nearly constant and similar to the rectangular jet, and in a shroud, the pressure drop it is inducing is linearly proportional to the primary jet Mach number. This behavior persisted in high adverse pressure gradients at overexpanded conditions, and with nozzle divergence angles of up to 35°, no inside flow separation was observed.

  11. Quantifying Flow Resistance of Mountain Streams Using the HHT Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Fu, X.

    2014-12-01

    This study quantifies the flow resistance of mountain streams with gravel bed and remarkable bed forms. The motivation is to follow the previous ideas (Robert, A. 1990) that the bed surface can be divided into micro-scale and macro-scale roughness, respectively. We processed the field data of longitudinal bed profiles of the Longxi River, Sichuan Province, China, using the Hilbert-Huang Transformation Method (HHT). Each longitudinal profile was decomposed into a set of curves with different frequencies of spatial fluctuation. The spectrogram was accordingly obtained. We supposed that a certain high and low frequency curves correspond to the micro- and macro-roughness of stream bed, respectively. We specified the characteristic height and length with the spectrogram, which represent the macro bed form accounting for bed form roughness. We then estimated the bed form roughness as being proportional to the ratio of the height to length multiplied by the height(Yang et al,2005). We also assumed the parameter, Sp, defined as the sinuosity of the highest frequency curve as the measure of the micro-scale roughness. We then took into account the effect of bed material sizes through using the product of d50/R and Sp, where d50 is the sediment median size and R is the hydraulic radius. The macro- and micro-scale roughness parameters were merged together nonlinearly to evaluate the flow resistance caused by the interplaying friction and form drag forces. Validation results show that the square of the determinant coefficient can reach as high as 0.84 in the case of the Longxi River. Future studies will focus on the verification against more field data as well as the combination of skin friction and form drag. Key words: flow resistance; roughness; HHT; spectrogram; form drag Robert, A. (1990), Boundary roughness in coarse-grained channels, Prog. Phys. Geogr., 14(1), 42-69. Yang, S.-Q., S.-K. Tan, and S.-Y. Lim. (2005), Flow resistance and bed form geometry in a wide alluvial

  12. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs. PMID:27302661

  13. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs.

  14. Source Water Flow Pathways In Forested, Mountain, Headwater Streams: A Link Between Sediment Movement Patterns And Stream Water Chemistry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Conklin, M. H.; Liu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Three years of continuous and discrete sediment and water quality data, from four forested, mountain, headwater catchments in the Sierra Nevada, is used to identify water sources, determine the importance of sub-surface flow pathways, detect any changes in source waters due to seasonal variation or drought, and link flow pathways with observed patterns of in-channel sediment movement within the study watersheds. Patterns in stream chemistry and turbidity point to infiltration as the dominant flow pathway within these catchments. Data support a flow pathway conceptual model in which precipitation water infiltrates into the shallow or deeper subsurface, increasing the hydraulic head of the water table and pushing pre-event water into the stream ahead of event water. Study catchments contain perennial streams and are characterized by a Mediterranean climate with a distinct wet and dry season. Sites are located in the rain-snow transition zone with snow making up 40 to 60 percent of average annual precipitation. Barring human disturbances such as logging/grazing (compaction) or fire (hydrophobicity), catchment soils have high infiltration capacities. Springs and seeps maintain baseflow during the summer low-flow season, and shifting chemical signals within the streams indicate the increased importance of sub-surface water sources during drought years. End-member mixing analysis was conducted to identify possible water end members. Turbidity hysteresis patterns described by previous studies show in-channel sources are dominant for discharge events year round, and there is no difference in fine sediment delivery to streams with or without a soil protecting layer of snow on the land surface. The dominance of sub-surface water sources and evidence for infiltration flow fits with turbidity data, as little material is reaching the stream due to erosive overland flow. An understanding of flow pathways provides a foundation for sustainable land use management in forested

  15. Patterns and age distribution of ground-water flow to streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modica, E.; Reilly, T.E.; Pollock, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Simulations of ground-water flow in a generic aquifer system were made to characterize the topology of ground-water flow in the stream subsystem and to evaluate its relation to deeper ground-water flow. The flow models are patterned after hydraulic characteristics of aquifers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and are based on numerical solutions to three-dimensional, steady-state, unconfined flow. The models were used to evaluate the effects of aquifer horizontal-to-vertical hydraulic conductivity ratios, aquifer thickness, and areal recharge rates on flow in the stream subsystem. A particle tracker was used to determine flow paths in a stream subsystem, to establish the relation between ground-water seepage to points along a simulated stream and its source area of flow, and to determine ground-water residence time in stream subsystems. In a geometrically simple aquifer system with accretion, the source area of flow to streams resembles an elongated ellipse that tapers in the downgradient direction. Increased recharge causes an expansion of the stream subsystem. The source area of flow to the stream expands predominantly toward the stream headwaters. Baseflow gain is also increased along the reach of the stream. A thin aquifer restricts ground-water flow and causes the source area of flow to expand near stream headwaters and also shifts the start-of-flow to the drainage basin divide. Increased aquifer anisotropy causes a lateral expansion of the source area of flow to streams. Ground-water seepage to the stream channel originates both from near- and far-recharge locations. The range in the lengths of flow paths that terminate at a point on a stream increase in the downstream direction. Consequently, the age distribution of ground water that seeps into the stream is skewed progressively older with distance downstream. Base flow ia an integration of ground water with varying age and potentially different water quality, depending on the source within the drainage basin

  16. Development of acoustic flow instruments for solid/gas pipe flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1986-05-01

    Two nonintrusive acoustic flow sensing techniques are reported. One technique, passive in nature, simply measures the bandpassed acoustic noise level produced by particle/particle and particle/wall collisions. The noise levels, given in true RMS voltages or in autocorrelations, show a linear relationship to particle velocity but increase with solid concentration. Therefore, the passive technique requires calibration and a separate measure of solid concentration before it can be used to monitor the particle velocity. The second technique is based on the active cross-correlation principle. It measures particle velocity directly by correlating flow-related signatures at two sensing stations. The velocity data obtained by this technique are compared with measurements by a radioactive-particle time-of-flight (TOF) method. A multiplier of 1.53 is required to bring the acoustic data into agreement with the radioactive TOF result. The difference may originate from the difference in flow fields where particles are detected. The radioactive method senses particles mainly in the turbulent region and essentially measures average particle velocity across the pipe, while the acoustic technique detects particles near the pipe wall, and so measures the particle velocity in the viscous sublayer. Both techniques were tested in flows of limestone and air and 1-mm glass beads and air at the Argonne National Laboratory Solid/Gas Test Facility (SGFTF). The test matrix covered solid velocities of 20 to 30 m/s in a 2-in. pipe and solid-to-gas loading ratios of 6 to 22. 37 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Factors influencing the stream-aquifer flow exchange coefficient.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Mehl, Steffen; Morgado, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of river gain from or loss to a hydraulically connected water table aquifer is crucial in issues of water rights and also when attempting to optimize conjunctive use of surface and ground waters. Typically in groundwater models this exchange flow is related to a difference in head between the river and some point in the aquifer, through a "coefficient." This coefficient has been defined differently as well as the location for the head in the aquifer. This paper proposes a new coefficient, analytically derived, and a specific location for the point where the aquifer head is used in the difference. The dimensionless part of the coefficient is referred to as the SAFE (stream-aquifer flow exchange) dimensionless conductance. The paper investigates the factors that influence the value of this new conductance. Among these factors are (1) the wetted perimeter of the cross-section, (2) the degree of penetration of the cross-section, and (3) the shape of the cross-section. The study shows that these factors just listed are indeed ordered in their respective level of importance. In addition the study verifies that the analytical correct value of the coefficient is matched by finite difference simulation only if the grid system is sufficiently fine. Thus the use of the analytical value of the coefficient is an accurate and efficient alternative to ad hoc estimates for the coefficient typically used in finite difference and finite element methods.

  18. Factors influencing the stream-aquifer flow exchange coefficient.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Mehl, Steffen; Morgado, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of river gain from or loss to a hydraulically connected water table aquifer is crucial in issues of water rights and also when attempting to optimize conjunctive use of surface and ground waters. Typically in groundwater models this exchange flow is related to a difference in head between the river and some point in the aquifer, through a "coefficient." This coefficient has been defined differently as well as the location for the head in the aquifer. This paper proposes a new coefficient, analytically derived, and a specific location for the point where the aquifer head is used in the difference. The dimensionless part of the coefficient is referred to as the SAFE (stream-aquifer flow exchange) dimensionless conductance. The paper investigates the factors that influence the value of this new conductance. Among these factors are (1) the wetted perimeter of the cross-section, (2) the degree of penetration of the cross-section, and (3) the shape of the cross-section. The study shows that these factors just listed are indeed ordered in their respective level of importance. In addition the study verifies that the analytical correct value of the coefficient is matched by finite difference simulation only if the grid system is sufficiently fine. Thus the use of the analytical value of the coefficient is an accurate and efficient alternative to ad hoc estimates for the coefficient typically used in finite difference and finite element methods. PMID:24010703

  19. Formation of inverse Chladni patterns at microscale by acoustic streaming on a silicon membrane immersed in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Cedric; Vuillermet, Gael; Casset, Fabrice

    2015-11-01

    High frequency acoustics (in the MHz range) is known to be very efficient to handle micro particles or living cells in microfluidics by taking advantage of the acoustic radiation force. Here, we will show that low frequency (~ 50kHz) together with use ultra thin silicon plate can give rise to a micro streaming that enables to move particles at will. Indeed, by means of silicon membranes excited in the low ultrasound range, we show that it is possible to form inverse two-dimensional Chladni patterns of micro-beads in liquid. Unlike the well-known effect in a gaseous environment at macroscale, where gravity effects are generally dominant, leading particles towards the nodal regions of displacement, we will show that the micro scale streaming in the vicinity of the plate tends to gather particles in antinodal regions. Moreover, a symmetry breaking effect together with the streaming can trigger a whole rotation of the beads in the fluidic cavity. We demonstrate that it is possible to make the patterns rotate at a well defined angular velocity where beads actually jump from one acoustic trap to another.

  20. Low-Flow Characteristics and Regionalization of Low-Flow Characteristics for Selected Streams in Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funkhouser, Jaysson E.; Eng, Ken; Moix, Matthew W.

    2008-01-01

    Water use in Arkansas has increased dramatically in recent years. Since 1990, the use of water for all purposes except power generation has increased 53 percent (4,004 cubic feet per second in 1990 to 6,113 cubic feet per second in 2005). The biggest users are agriculture (90 percent), municipal water supply (4 percent) and industrial supply (2 percent). As the population of the State continues to grow, so does the demand for the State's water resources. The low-flow characteristics of a stream ultimately affect its utilization by humans. Specific information on the low-flow characteristics of streams is essential to State water-management agencies such as the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality, the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission, and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission when dealing with problems related to irrigation, municipal and industrial water supplies, fish and wildlife conservation, and dilution of waste. Low-flow frequency data are of particular value to management agencies responsible for the development and management of the State's water resources. This report contains the low-flow characteristics for 70 active continuous-streamflow record gaging stations, 59 inactive continuous-streamflow record stations, and 101 partial-record gaging stations. These characteristics are the annual 7-day, 10-year low flow and the annual 7-day, 2-year low flow, and the seasonal, bimonthly, and monthly 7-day, 10-year low flow for the 129 active and inactive continuous-streamflow record and 101 partial-record gaging stations. Low-flow characteristics were computed on the basis of streamflow data for the period of record through September 2005 for the continuous-streamflow record and partial-record streamflow gaging stations. The low-flow characteristics of these continuous- and partial-record streamflow gaging stations were utilized in a regional regression analysis to produce equations for estimating the annual, seasonal, bimonthly, and monthly

  1. Estimating Flow-Duration and Low-Flow Frequency Statistics for Unregulated Streams in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John; Stonewall, Adam J.; Haluska, Tana

    2008-01-01

    Flow statistical datasets, basin-characteristic datasets, and regression equations were developed to provide decision makers with surface-water information needed for activities such as water-quality regulation, water-rights adjudication, biological habitat assessment, infrastructure design, and water-supply planning and management. The flow statistics, which included annual and monthly period of record flow durations (5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, and 95th percent exceedances) and annual and monthly 7-day, 10-year (7Q10) and 7-day, 2-year (7Q2) low flows, were computed at 466 streamflow-gaging stations at sites with unregulated flow conditions throughout Oregon and adjacent areas of neighboring States. Regression equations, created from the flow statistics and basin characteristics of the stations, can be used to estimate flow statistics at ungaged stream sites in Oregon. The study area was divided into 10 regression modeling regions based on ecological, topographic, geologic, hydrologic, and climatic criteria. In total, 910 annual and monthly regression equations were created to predict the 7 flow statistics in the 10 regions. Equations to predict the five flow-duration exceedance percentages and the two low-flow frequency statistics were created with Ordinary Least Squares and Generalized Least Squares regression, respectively. The standard errors of estimate of the equations created to predict the 5th and 95th percent exceedances had medians of 42.4 and 64.4 percent, respectively. The standard errors of prediction of the equations created to predict the 7Q2 and 7Q10 low-flow statistics had medians of 51.7 and 61.2 percent, respectively. Standard errors for regression equations for sites in western Oregon were smaller than those in eastern Oregon partly because of a greater density of available streamflow-gaging stations in western Oregon than eastern Oregon. High-flow regression equations (such as the 5th and 10th percent exceedances) also generally were more accurate

  2. An analysis of the acoustic energy in a flow duct with a vortex sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boij, Susann

    2009-03-01

    Modelling the acoustic scattering and absorption at an area expansion in a flow duct requires the incorporation of the flow-acoustic interaction. One way to quantify the interaction is to study the energy in the incident and the scattered field respectively. If the interaction is strong, energy may be transferred between the acoustic and the main flow field. In particular, shear layers, that may be the result of the flow separation, are unstable to low frequency perturbations such as acoustic waves. The vortex sheet model is an analytical linear acoustic model, developed to study scattering of acoustic waves in duct with sharp edges including the interaction with primarily the separated flows that arise at sharp edges and corners. In the model the flow field at an area expansion in a duct is described as a jet issuing into the larger part of the duct. In this paper, the flow-acoustic interaction is described in terms of energy flow. The linear convective wave equation is solved for a two-dimensional, rectangular flow duct geometry. The resulting modes are classified as "hydrodynamic" and "acoustic" when separating the acoustic energy from the part of the energy arising from the steady flow field. In the downstream duct, the set of modes for this complex flow field are not orthogonal. For small Strouhal numbers, the plane wave and the two hydrodynamic waves are all plane, although propagating with different wave speeds. As the Strouhal numbers increases, the hydrodynamic modes changes to get a shape where the amplitude is concentrated near the vortex sheet. In an intermediate Strouhal number region, the mode shape of the first higher order mode is very similar to the damped hydrodynamic mode. A physical interpretation of this is that we have a strong coupling between the flow field and the acoustic field when the modes are non-orthogonal. Energy concepts for this duct configuration and mean flow profile are introduced. The energy is formulated such that the vortex

  3. Acoustic attenuation analysis program for ducts with mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, R. K., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized acoustic attenuation prediction procedure has been developed to evaluate acoustically lined ducts for various geometric and environmental parameters. The analysis procedure is based on solutions to the acoustic wave equation, assuming uniform airflow on a duct cross section, combined with appropriate mathematical lining impedance models. The impedance models included in the analysis procedure are representative of either perforated sheet or porous polyimide impregnated fiberglass facing sheet coupled with a cellular backing space. Advantages and limitations of the analysis procedure are reviewed.

  4. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, H.; Haque, Q.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  5. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, H.; Ali, S.; Haque, Q.

    2015-08-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Koeteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  6. Effects of Debris Flows on Stream Ecosystems of the Klamath Mountains, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cover, M. R.; Delafuente, J. A.; Resh, V. H.

    2006-12-01

    We examined the long-term effects of debris flows on channel characteristics and aquatic food webs in steep (0.04-0.06 slope), small (4-6 m wide) streams. A large rain-on-snow storm event in January 1997 resulted in numerous landslides and debris flows throughout many basins in the Klamath Mountains of northern California. Debris floods resulted in extensive impacts throughout entire drainage networks, including mobilization of valley floor deposits and removal of vegetation. Comparing 5 streams scoured by debris flows in 1997 and 5 streams that had not been scoured as recently, we determined that debris-flows decreased channel complexity by reducing alluvial step frequency and large woody debris volumes. Unscoured streams had more diverse riparian vegetation, whereas scoured streams were dominated by dense, even-aged stands of white alder (Alnus rhombiflia). Benthic invertebrate shredders, especially nemourid and peltoperlid stoneflies, were more abundant and diverse in unscoured streams, reflecting the more diverse allochthonous resources. Debris flows resulted in increased variability in canopy cover, depending on degree of alder recolonization. Periphyton biomass was higher in unscoured streams, but primary production was greater in the recently scoured streams, suggesting that invertebrate grazers kept algal assemblages in an early successional state. Glossosomatid caddisflies were predominant scrapers in scoured streams; heptageniid mayflies were abundant in unscoured streams. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were of similar abundance in scoured and unscoured streams, but scoured streams were dominated by young-of-the-year fish while older juveniles were more abundant in unscoured streams. Differences in the presence of cold-water (Doroneuria) versus warm-water (Calineuria) perlid stoneflies suggest that debris flows have altered stream temperatures. Debris flows have long-lasting impacts on stream communities, primarily through the cascading effects of

  7. A method to determine the acoustical properties of locally and nonlocally reacting duct liners in grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustical properties of locally and nonlocally reacting acoustical liners in grazing flow are described. The effect of mean flow and shear flow are considered as well as the application to rigid and limp bulk reacting materials. The axial wavenumber of the least attenuated mode in a flow duct is measured. The acoustical properties of duct liners is then deduced from the measured axial wavenumber and known flow profile and boundary conditions. This method is a natural extension of impedance-like measurements.

  8. Flow Dynamics and Stability of the NE Greenland Ice Stream from Active Seismics and Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riverman, K. L.; Alley, R. B.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Christianson, K. A.; Peters, L. E.; Muto, A.

    2015-12-01

    We find that dilatant till facilitates rapid ice flow in central Greenland, and regions of dryer till limit the expansion of ice flow. The Northeast Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS) is the largest ice stream in Greenland, draining 8.4% of the ice sheet's area. Fast ice flow initiates near the ice sheet summit in a region of high geothermal heat flow and extends some 700km downstream to three outlet glaciers along the NE Coast. The flow pattern and stability mechanism of this ice stream are unique to others in Greenland and Antarctica, and merit further study to ascertain the sensitivity of this ice stream to future climate change. In this study, we present the results of the first-ever ground-based geophysical survey of the initiation zone of NEGIS. Based on radar and preliminary seismic data, Christianson et al. (2014, EPSL) propose a flow mechanism for the ice stream based on topographically driven hydropotential lows which generate 'sticky' regions of the bed under the ice stream margins. We further test this hypothesis using a 40km reflection seismic survey across both ice stream margins. We find that regions of 'sticky' bed as observed by the radar survey are coincident with regions of the bed with seismic returns indicating drier subglacial sediments. These findings are further supported by five amplitude-verses-offset seismic surveys indicating dilatant till within the ice stream and consolidated sediments within its margins.

  9. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  10. The path to COVIS: A review of acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, Karen G.; Silver, Deborah; Xu, Guangyu; Light, Russ; Jackson, Darrell; Jones, Christopher; Ozer, Sedat; Liu, Li

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow regimes started with the incidental recognition of a plume on a routine sonar scan for obstacles in the path of the human-occupied submersible ALVIN. Developments in sonar engineering, acoustic data processing and scientific visualization have been combined to develop technology which can effectively capture the behavior of focused and diffuse hydrothermal discharge. This paper traces the development of these acoustic imaging techniques for hydrothermal flow regimes from their conception through to the development of the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). COVIS has monitored such flow eight times a day for several years. Successful acoustic techniques for estimating plume entrainment, bending, vertical rise, volume flux, and heat flux are presented as is the state-of-the-art in diffuse flow detection.

  11. Separating underwater ambient noise from flow noise recorded on stereo acoustic tags attached to marine mammals.

    PubMed

    von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Samarra, Filipa I P; Beerens, S Peter; Miller, Patrick J O

    2016-08-01

    Sound-recording acoustic tags attached to marine animals are commonly used in behavioural studies. Measuring ambient noise is of interest to efforts to understand responses of marine mammals to anthropogenic underwater sound, or to assess their communication space. Noise of water flowing around the tag reflects the speed of the animal, but hinders ambient noise measurement. Here, we describe a correlation-based method for stereo acoustic tags to separate the relative contributions of flow and ambient noise. The uncorrelated part of the noise measured in digital acoustic recording tag (DTAG) recordings related well to swim speed of a humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), thus providing a robust measure of flow noise over a wide frequency bandwidth. By removing measurements affected by flow noise, consistent ambient noise estimates were made for two killer whales (Orcinus orca) with DTAGs attached simultaneously. The method is applicable to any multi-channel acoustic tag, enabling application to a wide range of marine species. PMID:27229472

  12. Echo-acoustic flow dynamically modifies the cortical map of target range in bats.

    PubMed

    Bartenstein, Sophia K; Gerstenberg, Nadine; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating bats use the delay between their sonar emissions and the reflected echoes to measure target range, a crucial parameter for avoiding collisions or capturing prey. In many bat species, target range is represented as an orderly organized map of echo delay in the auditory cortex. Here we show that the map of target range in bats is dynamically modified by the continuously changing flow of acoustic information perceived during flight ('echo-acoustic flow'). Combining dynamic acoustic stimulation in virtual space with extracellular recordings, we found that neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor encode echo-acoustic flow information on the geometric relation between targets and the bat's flight trajectory, rather than echo delay per se. Specifically, the cortical representation of close-range targets is enlarged when the lateral passing distance of the target decreases. This flow-dependent enlargement of target representation may trigger adaptive behaviours such as vocal control or flight manoeuvres. PMID:25131175

  13. Separating underwater ambient noise from flow noise recorded on stereo acoustic tags attached to marine mammals.

    PubMed

    von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Samarra, Filipa I P; Beerens, S Peter; Miller, Patrick J O

    2016-08-01

    Sound-recording acoustic tags attached to marine animals are commonly used in behavioural studies. Measuring ambient noise is of interest to efforts to understand responses of marine mammals to anthropogenic underwater sound, or to assess their communication space. Noise of water flowing around the tag reflects the speed of the animal, but hinders ambient noise measurement. Here, we describe a correlation-based method for stereo acoustic tags to separate the relative contributions of flow and ambient noise. The uncorrelated part of the noise measured in digital acoustic recording tag (DTAG) recordings related well to swim speed of a humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), thus providing a robust measure of flow noise over a wide frequency bandwidth. By removing measurements affected by flow noise, consistent ambient noise estimates were made for two killer whales (Orcinus orca) with DTAGs attached simultaneously. The method is applicable to any multi-channel acoustic tag, enabling application to a wide range of marine species.

  14. Echo-acoustic flow dynamically modifies the cortical map of target range in bats.

    PubMed

    Bartenstein, Sophia K; Gerstenberg, Nadine; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating bats use the delay between their sonar emissions and the reflected echoes to measure target range, a crucial parameter for avoiding collisions or capturing prey. In many bat species, target range is represented as an orderly organized map of echo delay in the auditory cortex. Here we show that the map of target range in bats is dynamically modified by the continuously changing flow of acoustic information perceived during flight ('echo-acoustic flow'). Combining dynamic acoustic stimulation in virtual space with extracellular recordings, we found that neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor encode echo-acoustic flow information on the geometric relation between targets and the bat's flight trajectory, rather than echo delay per se. Specifically, the cortical representation of close-range targets is enlarged when the lateral passing distance of the target decreases. This flow-dependent enlargement of target representation may trigger adaptive behaviours such as vocal control or flight manoeuvres.

  15. Selected flow characteristics of streams in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swift, C. H., III

    1966-01-01

    Flow-duration, annual low-flow, and annual high-flow tables through September 30, 1963, are given in this report for 110 stream-gaging stations in the Willamette and Sandy River basins. These tables summarize the basic data needed to define the streamflow characteristics at the gaging stations. The content of each of the three summary tables is described, and techniques for preparing flow-duration curves, low-flow frequency curves, and high-flow frequency curves are explained.

  16. Application of acoustic velocity meters for gaging discharge of three low-velocity tidal streams in the St. Johns River basin, northeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloat, J.V.; Gain, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    Index-velocity data collected with acoustic velocity meters, stage data, and cross-sectional area data were used to calculate discharge at three low-velocity, tidal streamflow stations in north-east Florida. Discharge at three streamflow stations was computed as the product of the channel cross-sectional area and the mean velocity as determined from an index velocity measured in the stream using an acoustic velocity meter. The tidal streamlflow stations used in the study were: Six Mile Creek near Picolata, Fla.; Dunns Creek near Satsuma, Fla.; and the St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Cross-sectional areas at the measurement sections ranged from about 3,000 square feet at Six Mile Creek to about 18,500 square feet at St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Physical characteristics for all three streams were similar except for drainage area. The topography primarily is low-relief, swampy terrain; stream velocities ranged from about -2 to 2 feet per second; and the average change in stage was about 1 foot. Instantaneous discharge was measured using a portable acoustic current meter at each of the three streams to develop a relation between the mean velocity in the stream and the index velocity measured by the acoustic velocity meter. Using least-squares linear regression, a simple linear relation between mean velocity and index velocity was determined. Index velocity was the only significant linear predictor of mean velocity for Six Mile Creek and St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. For Dunns Creek, both index velocity and stage were used to develop a multiple-linear predictor of mean velocity. Stage-area curves for each stream were developed from bathymetric data. Instantaneous discharge was computed by multiplying results of relations developed for cross-sectional area and mean velocity. Principal sources of error in the estimated discharge are identified as: (1) instrument errors associated with measurement of stage and index velocity, (2) errors in the representation of

  17. Acoustic-televiewer and acoustic-waveform logs used to characterize deeply buried basalt flows, Hanford site, Benton County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic-waveform and acoustic-televiewer logs were obtained for a 400-meter interval of deeply buried basalt flows in three boreholes, and over shorter intervals in two additional boreholes located on the U.S. Department of Energy 's Hanford site in Benton County, Washington. Borehole-wall breakouts were observed in the unaltered interiors of a large part of individual basalt flows; however, several of the flows in one of the five boreholes had almost no breakouts. The distribution of breakouts observed on the televiewer logs correlated closely with the incidence of core disking in some intervals, but the correlation was not always perfect, perhaps because of the differences in the specific fracture mechanisms involved. Borehole-wall breakouts were consistently located on the east and west sides of the boreholes. The orientation is consistent with previous estimates of the principal horizontal-stress field in south-central Washington, if breakouts are assumed to form along the azimuth of the least principal stress. The distribution of breakouts repeatedly indicated an interval of breakout-free rock at the top and bottom of flows. Because breakouts frequently terminate at major low-angle fractures, the data indicate that fracturing may have relieved some of the horizontal stresses near flow tops and bottoms. Unaltered and unfractured basalt appeared to have a uniform compressional velocity of 6.0 + or - 0.1 km/sec and a uniform shear velocity of 3.35 + or - 0.1 km/sec throughout flow interiors. Acoustics-waveform logs also indicated that borehole-wall breakouts did not affect acoustic propagation along the borehole; so fracturing associated with the formation of breakouts appeared to be confined to a thin annulus of stress concentration around the borehole. Televiewer logs obtained before and after hydraulic fracturing in these boreholes indicated the extent of induced fractures, and also indicated minor changes to pre-existing fractures that may have been inflated

  18. Stream flow, salmon and beaver dams: roles in the structuring of stream fish communities within an anadromous salmon dominated stream.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sean C; Cunjak, Richard A

    2007-11-01

    The current paradigm of fish community distribution is one of a downstream increase in species richness by addition, but this concept is based on a small number of streams from the mid-west and southern United States, which are dominated by cyprinids. Further, the measure of species richness traditionally used, without including evenness, may not be providing an accurate reflection of the fish community. We hypothesize that in streams dominated by anadromous salmonids, fish community diversity will be affected by the presence of the anadromous species, and therefore be influenced by those factors affecting the salmonid population. Catamaran Brook, New Brunswick, Canada, provides a long-term data set to evaluate fish community diversity upstream and downstream of an obstruction (North American beaver Castor canadensis dam complex), which affects distribution of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. The Shannon Weiner diversity index and community evenness were calculated for sample sites distributed throughout the brook and over 15 years. Fish community diversity was greatest upstream of the beaver dams and in the absence of Atlantic salmon. The salmon appear to depress the evenness of the community but do not affect species richness. The community upstream of the beaver dams changes due to replacement of slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus by salmon, rather than addition, when access is provided. Within Catamaran Brook, location of beaver dams and autumn streamflow interact to govern adult Atlantic salmon spawner distribution, which then dictates juvenile production and effects on fish community. These communities in an anadromous Atlantic salmon dominated stream do not follow the species richness gradient pattern shown in cyprinid-dominated streams and an alternative model for stream fish community distribution in streams dominated by anadromous salmonids is presented. This alternative model suggests that community distribution may be a function of semipermeable obstructions

  19. Mobility power flow analysis of coupled plate structure subjected to mechanical and acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The mobility power flow approach that was previously applied in the derivation of expressions for the vibrational power flow between coupled plate substructures forming an L configuration and subjected to mechanical loading is generalized. Using the generalized expressions, both point and distributed mechanical loads on one or both of the plates can be considered. The generalized approach is extended to deal with acoustic excitation of one of the plate substructures. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the plate structure and the acoustic fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure. For a number of coupled plate substrates, the acoustic pressure generated by one substructure will interact with the motion of another substructure. That is, in the case of the L-shaped plate, acoustic interaction exists between the two plate substructures due to the generation of the acoustic waves by each of the substructures. An approach to deal with this phenomena is described.

  20. Effects of viscosity and acoustic streaming on the interparticle radiation force between rigid spheres in a standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehrirahnama, Shahrokh; Chau, Fook Siong; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2016-02-01

    The total acoustic radiation force acting on interacting spheres in a viscous fluid consists of the primary and secondary forces. The primary force pushes rigid spheres to the pressure node due to the incident standing wave. The secondary force is the interparticle force caused by the interaction between spheres in the standing wave. In this study, an algorithm based on the multipole series expansion and Stokeslet method is proposed for calculating the primary and secondary radiation forces acting on a pair of spheres in a viscous fluid. It is concluded that the acoustical interaction between a pair of spheres is considerably stronger in a viscous fluid compared to the inviscid case due to the streaming effects in the viscous fluid. For spheres located far from each other, the interaction becomes considerably weak; thus, the spheres move mainly due to the primary radiation force.

  1. A stream-gaging network analysis for the 7-Day, 10-year annual low flow in New Hampshire streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    The 7-day, 10-year (7Q10) low-flow-frequency statistic is a widely used measure of surface-water availability in New Hampshire. Regression equations and basin-characteristic digital data sets were developed to help water-resource managers determine surface-water resources during periods of low flow in New Hampshire streams. These regression equations and data sets were developed to estimate streamflow statistics for the annual and seasonal low-flow-frequency, and period-of-record and seasonal period-of-record flow durations. generalized-least-squares (GLS) regression methods were used to develop the annual 7Q10 low-flow-frequency regression equation from 60 continuous-record stream-gaging stations in New Hampshire and in neighboring States. In the regression equation, the dependent variables were the annual 7Q10 flows at the 60 stream-gaging stations. The independent (or predictor) variables were objectively selected characteristics of the drainage basins that contribute flow to those stations. In contrast to ordinary-least-squares (OLS) regression analysis, GLS-developed estimating equations account for differences in length of record and spatial correlations among the flow-frequency statistics at the various stations. A total of 93 measurable drainage-basin characteristics were candidate independent variables. On the basis of several statistical parameters that were used to evaluate which combination of basin characteristics contribute the most to the predictive power of the equations, three drainage-basin characteristics were determined to be statistically significant predictors of the annual 7Q10: (1) total drainage area, (2) mean summer stream-gaging station precipitation from 1961 to 90, and (3) average mean annual basinwide temperature from 1961 to 1990. To evaluate the effectiveness of the stream-gaging network in providing regional streamflow data for the annual 7Q10, the computer program GLSNET (generalized-least-squares NETwork) was used to analyze the

  2. StreamStats in Oklahoma - Drainage-Basin Characteristics and Peak-Flow Frequency Statistics for Ungaged Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Esralew, Rachel A.

    2010-01-01

    drainage-basin outlet for the period 1961-1990, 10-85 channel slope (slope between points located at 10 percent and 85 percent of the longest flow-path length upstream from the outlet), and percent impervious area. The Oklahoma StreamStats application interacts with the National Streamflow Statistics database, which contains the peak-flow regression equations in a previously published report. Fourteen peak-flow (flood) frequency statistics are available for computation in the Oklahoma StreamStats application. These statistics include the peak flow at 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence intervals for rural, unregulated streams; and the peak flow at 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence intervals for rural streams that are regulated by Natural Resources Conservation Service floodwater retarding structures. Basin characteristics and streamflow statistics cannot be computed for locations in playa basins (mostly in the Oklahoma Panhandle) and along main stems of the largest river systems in the state, namely the Arkansas, Canadian, Cimarron, Neosho, Red, and Verdigris Rivers, because parts of the drainage areas extend outside of the processed hydrologic units.

  3. MODIFICATION OF STREAM FLOW ROUTING FOR BANK STORAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bank storage is a process in which volumes of water are temporally retained by alluvial stream banks during flood events, and gradually released as baseflows. This process has implications on ground-water resource

  4. Techniques for estimating peak-flow frequency relations for North Dakota streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Sether, Tara

    1992-01-01

    This report presents techniques for estimating peak-flow frequency relations for North Dakota streams. In addition, a generalized skew coefficient analysis was completed for North Dakota to test the validity of using the generalized skew coefficient map in Bulletin 17B of the Hydrology Subcommittee of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data, 1982, 'Guidelines for Determining Flood Flow Frequency.' The analysis indicates that the generalized skew coefficient map in Bulletin 17B provides accurate estimates of generalized skew coefficient values for natural-flow streams in North Dakota. Peak-flow records through 1988 for 192 continuous- and partial-record streamflow gaging stations that had 10 or more years of record were used in a generalized least-squares regression analysis that relates peak flows for selected recurrence intervals to selected basin characteristics. Peak-flow equations were developed for recurrence intervals of 2, 10, 15, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years for three hydrologic regions in North Dakota. The peak-flow equations are applicable to natural-flow streams that have drainage areas of less than or equal to 1,000 square miles. The standard error of estimate for the three hydrologic regions ranges from 60 to 70 percent for the 100-year peak-flow equations. Methods are presented for transferring peak-flow data from gaging stations to ungaged sites on the same stream and for determining peak flows for ungaged sites on ungaged streams. Peak-flow relations, weighted estimates of peak flow, and selected basin characteristics are tabulated for the 192 gaging stations used in the generalized skew coefficient and regression analyses. Peak-flow relations also are provided for 63 additional gaging stations that were not used in the generalized skew coefficient and regression analyses. These 63 gaging stations generally represent streams that are significantly controlled by regulation and those that have drainage areas greater than 1,000 square miles.

  5. Ion streaming instability of dust-acoustic surface waves in a semi-infinite Lorentzian complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-10-01

    The growth rate of the dust-acoustic surface wave in the semi-infinite complex plasma with an ion streaming passing through the plasma at rest is analytically derived. We have adopted the Lorentzian distribution for electrons to investigate the nonthermal property of a plasma on the growth rate. We find that the growth rate of the surface wave increases as the wave number increases, and it is always larger than that of the bulk wave, especially in the realm of large wave numbers. The nonthermal effect of Lorentzian electrons in the high-energy tail is found to enhance the growth rate. It is also found that the density and speed of streaming ion would increase the growth rate. The growth rate of the surface wave is compared to that of the bulk wave for various physical parameters.

  6. HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF BASE-FLOW AND BANK STORAGE IN ALLUVIAL STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents analytical solutions, which describe the effect of time-variable net recharge (net accretion to water table) and bank storage in alluvial aquifers on the sustenance of stream flows during storm and inter-storm events. The solutions relate the stream discharge,...

  7. HOW WELL CAN YOU ESTIMATE LOW FLOW AND BANKFULL DISCHARGE FROM STREAM CHANNEL HABITAT DATA?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeled estimates of stream discharge are becoming more important because of reductions in the number of gauging stations and increases in flow alteration from land development and climate change. Field measurements of channel morphology are available at thousands of streams and...

  8. Flow variability and ongoing margin shifts on Bindschadler and MacAyeal Ice Streams, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulbe, C. L.; Scambos, T. A.; Klinger, M.; Fahnestock, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Ice streams on the Ross Sea side of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet are known to experience flow variability on hourly, annual, and multicentury time scales. We report here on observations of flow variability at the decade scale on the Bindschadler and MacAyeal Ice Streams (BIS and MacIS). Our analysis makes use of archived ice velocity data and new mappings from composited Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 imagery that together span the interval from 1985 to 2014. Both ice streams speedup and slowdown in a range of about ±5 m a-2 over our various comparison intervals. The rates of change are variable in both time and space, and there is no evidence of external forcing at work across the two streams. Widespread changes are most likely linked to instability in the subglacial till and/or subglacial water flow. Sticky spots near the confluence of the two ice streams are loci for speed changes. These relatively young and slow-flowing features appear to be forcing shifts in margin position near the outlets of both streams. The margin jumps reduce the effective outlet widths of the streams by 20% and 30% on BIS and MacIS, respectively. Those magnitudes are similar to the outlet narrowing experienced by Kamb Ice Stream prior to its stagnation.

  9. Effects of grazing flow on the steady-state flow resistance and acoustic impedance of thin porous-faced liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of grazing flow on the steady state flow resistance and acoustic impedance of seven Feltmetal and three Rigimesh thin porous faced liners were studied. The steady-state flow resistance of the ten specimens was measured using standard fluid mechanical experimental techniques. The acoustic impedance was measured using the two microphone method. The principal findings of the study are that the effects of grazing flow were measured and found to be small; small differences were measured between steady-state and acoustic resistance, and a semi-empirical model was derived that correlated the steady-state resistance data of the seven Feltmetal liners and the face sheet reactance of both the Feltmetal and Rigimesh liners.

  10. Flow-Structure-Acoustic Interaction Computational Modeling of Voice Production inside an Entire Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2015-11-01

    Human voice quality is directly determined by the interplay of dynamic behavior of glottal flow, vibratory characteristics of VFs and acoustic characteristics of upper airway. These multiphysics constituents are tightly coupled together and precisely coordinate to produce understandable sound. Despite many years' research effort, the direct relationships among the detailed flow features, VF vibration and aeroacoustics still remains elusive. This study utilizes a first-principle based, flow-structure-acoustics interaction computational modeling approach to study the process of voice production inside an entire human airway. In the current approach, a sharp interface immersed boundary method based incompressible flow solver is utilized to model the glottal flow; A finite element based solid mechanics solver is utilized to model the vocal vibration; A high-order immersed boundary method based acoustics solver is utilized to directly compute sound. These three solvers are fully coupled to mimic the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. The geometry of airway is reconstructed based on the in-vivo MRI measurement reported by Story et al. (1995) and a three-layer continuum based vocal fold model is taken from Titze and Talkin (1979). Results from these simulations will be presented and further analyzed to get new insight into the complex flow-structure-acoustic interaction during voice production. This study is expected to improve the understanding of fundamental physical mechanism of voice production and to help to build direct cause-effect relationship between biomechanics and voice sound.

  11. The influence of stream thermal regimes and preferential flow paths on hyporheic exchange in a glacial meltwater stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzetto, Karen D.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Gooseff, Michael N.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Given projected increases in stream temperatures attributable to global change, improved understanding of relationships between stream temperatures and hyporheic exchange would be useful. We conducted two conservative tracer injection experiments in a glacial meltwater stream, to evaluate the effects of hyporheic thermal gradients on exchange processes, including preferential flow paths (PFPs). The experiments were conducted on the same day, the first (a stream injection) during a cool, morning period and the second (dual stream and hyporheic injections) during a warm, afternoon period. In the morning, the hyporheic zone was thermally uniform at 4°C, whereas by the afternoon the upper 10 cm had warmed to 6–12°C and exhibited greater temperature heterogeneity. Solute transport modeling showed that hyporheic cross-sectional areas (As) at two downstream sites were two and seven times lower during the warm experiment. Exchange metrics indicated that the hyporheic zone had less influence on downstream solute transport during the warm, afternoon experiment. Calculated hyporheic depths were less than 5 cm, contrasting with tracer detection at 10 and 25 cm depths. The hyporheic tracer arrival at one downstream site was rapid, comparable to the in-stream tracer arrival, providing evidence for PFPs. We thus propose a conceptual view of the hyporheic zone in this reach as being dominated by discrete PFPs weaving through hydraulically isolated areas. One explanation for the simultaneous increase in temperature heterogeneity and As decrease in a warmer hyporheic zone may be a flow path preferentiality feedback mechanism resulting from a combination of temperature-related viscosity decreases and streambed heterogeneity.

  12. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  13. Subglacial water flow inferred from stream measurements at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fountain, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    Comparisons of water discharge and cation load in each of the two main streams indicate that subglacial hydraulic processes differ between drainage basins. One stream drains from a conduit that is isolated in its lower reach from the surrounding subglacial region and receives water routed englacially from the surface. The upper reach of the conduit also receives water rounted englacially from the surface as well as from a distributed subglacial flow system. The other main stream drains from a conduit coupled to a debris layer beneath the glacier. Observations of the layer in natural ice tunnels indicate that the water may flow within a thin layer of debris. A one-dimensional model of flow through the debris layer can explain both the base-flow and diurnal variations of the second main stream. -from Author

  14. Best Practices for Continuous Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report is a technical "best practices" document describing sensor deployment for and collection of continuous temperature and flow data at ungaged sites in wadeable streams. This document addresses questions related to equipment needs; configuration, placement, and ins...

  15. A quest for macroinvertebrate indicators of flow conditions in small, suburban stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of hydrologic variability is considered a key pathway by which urbanization affects stream assemblages; however, understanding the mechanisms of alteration remains a challenge. One approach is to identify biological metrics that show distinct responses to flows, which ...

  16. Best Practices for Continuous Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This external review draft report is a technical "best practices" document describing sensor deployment for and data collection of continuous temperature and flow at ungaged sites in wadeable streams. This document addresses questions related to equipment needs; configuration, pl...

  17. Organic carbon flow in a swamp-stream ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    An annual organic carbon budget is presented for an 8-km segment of Creeping Swamp, an undisturbed, third-order swamp-stream in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, USA. Annual input of organic carbon (588 gC/m/sup 2/) was 96% allochthonous and was dominated by leaf litter inputs (36%) and fluvial, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) inputs (31%). Although the swamp-stream was primarily heterotrophic, autochthonous organic carbon input, primarily from filamentous algae, was important during February and March when primary production/ecosystem respiration (P/R) ratios of the flooded portions were near one. Annual output of organic carbon via fluvial processes (214 gC/m/sup 2/), 95% as DOC, was 36% of total annual inputs, indicating that the swamp-stream segment ecosystem was 64% efficient at retaining organic carbon. Organic carbon dynamics in the Creeping Swamp segment were compared to those reported for upland stream segments using indices of organic matter processing suggested by Fisher (1977) and a loading potential index suggested here. Creeping Swamp, while loading at a high rate, retains a much larger portion of its organic carbon inputs than two upland streams. Despite the high degree of retention and oxidation of organic inputs to Creeping Swamp, there is a net annual fluvial export of 21 gC/m/sup 2/, mostly in the dissolved form. Watersheds drained by swamp-streams in the southeastern United States are thought to have large organic carbon exports compared to upland forested drainages, because the stream network covers a much greater proportion of the total watershed area.

  18. Estimating the Magnitude of Peak Flows for Streams in Maine for Selected Recurrence Intervals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.

    1999-01-01

    This report gives estimates of, and presents techniques for estimating, the magnitude of peak flows for streams in Maine for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years. A flowchart in this report guides the user to the appropriate estimates and (or) estimating techniques for a site on a specific stream. Section 1, 'Estimates of peak flows and maximum recorded flows at USGS streamflow-gaging stations,' contains peak-flow estimates and the maximum recorded flows at 98 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations. In the development of the peak-flow estimates at gaging stations, a new generalized skew coefficient was calculated for Maine. This single statewide value of 0.029 (with a standard error of prediction of 0.297) is more accurate for Maine than the national skew isoline map in Bulletin 17B of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data. Two techniques are presented to estimate the peak flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in rural drainage basins. These two techniques were developed using generalized least squares regression procedures at 70 USGS gaging stations in Maine and eastern New Hampshire. Section 2, 'Estimating peak flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in rural drainage basins,' uses the final explanatory variables of drainage area and basin wetlands. The average standard error of prediction for the 100-year peak flow regression equation in section 2 was 48.6 percent to -32.7 percent. Drainage area was the only explanatory variable used in section 3, 'Estimating peak flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in rural drainage basins - Simplified technique.' The average standard error of prediction for the 100-year peak flow regression equation in section 3 was 80.3 percent to -44.5 percent. Section 4 of the report describes techniques for estimating peak flows for ungaged sites on gaged, unregulated streams in rural drainage basins. Section 5, 'Estimating peak flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in urbanized

  19. Trends in base flow, total flow, and base-flow index of selected streams in and near Oklahoma through 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esralew, Rachel A.; Lewis, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated trends in base flow, total flow, and base-flow index of selected streams in Oklahoma and evaluated possible causes for trends. Thirty-seven streamflow-gaging stations that had unregulated or moderately regulated streamflow were selected for trend analysis. Statistical evaluation of trends in annual and seasonal (winter-spring and summer-autumn) base flow, total flow, and base-flow index at 37 selected streamflow-gaging stations in Oklahoma was performed by using a Kendall's tau trend test. This trend analysis also was performed for annual and seasonal precipitation for nine climate divisions in the study area, annual peak flows, the number of days where flow was zero or less than 1 cubic foot per second (both annually and seasonally), and annual winter groundwater levels for 35 shallow wells near the analyzed stations. Precipitation-adjusted trends using LOESS regressions and Kendall's tau were computed for annual and seasonal base-flow and total-flow volumes in order to identify the presence of underlying trends in streamflow that are not associated with annual or seasonal variations in precipitation. In general, upward trends in precipitation were detected for climate divisions in north-central Oklahoma and south-central and southeastern Kansas. More climate divisions had statistically significant upward trends in total precipitation for annual water years than in winter-spring or summer-autumn water years. Significant trends in annual or seasonal base-flow volume were detected for 22 stations, 19 of which had trends that were upward in direction. Significant trends in annual or seasonal total-flow volume were detected for 14 stations, 9 of which had trends that were upward in direction. Most stations that had significant upward trends in annual or seasonal total-flow volume also had significant upward trends in base-flow volume for the same period. Precipitation

  20. Quantifying groundwater flows to streams using differential flow gaugings and water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, James L.; Cook, Peter G.; Berhane, Dawit; Rumpf, Chris; McMahon, Gerard A.

    2012-01-01

    SummaryWhile estimates of net groundwater inflow to streams (inflow minus outflow) can be made using differential flow gauging, the inclusion of water chemistry (tracer) measurements allows both inflow and outflow to be separately quantified. In this paper we assess how the estimates of net and gross groundwater inflows are affected by the choice of tracer at three contrasting field sites. Groundwater flows are first estimated with differential flow gauging and then with the sequential addition of natural tracer data - electrical conductivity, chloride concentration and radon activity measurements. The final analysis is where an injected tracer experiment is also conducted to constrain the gas transfer velocity for radon. Groundwater inflow rates were estimated by calibrating a numerical model which simulated flows and concentrations of tracers in the river. Although both the total groundwater inflow along the study reach and the spatial distribution of inflow depended on the data used for the model calibration, the difference between the estimates was less than the prediction error. The analysis also showed that prediction error for groundwater inflow decreases as additional tracers are included in the analysis. The magnitude of the error reduction is related to the properties of the specific catchment. Generally, for a tracer to reduce uncertainty substantially the concentration of the tracer in groundwater must be well defined, and the contrast between the concentration of the tracer in groundwater and the river must be high.

  1. Development of the Hydroecological Integrity Assessment Process for Determining Environmental Flows for New Jersey Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennen, Jonathan G.; Henriksen, James A.; Nieswand, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    The natural flow regime paradigm and parallel stream ecological concepts and theories have established the benefits of maintaining or restoring the full range of natural hydrologic variation for physiochemical processes, biodiversity, and the evolutionary potential of aquatic and riparian communities. A synthesis of recent advances in hydroecological research coupled with stream classification has resulted in a new process to determine environmental flows and assess hydrologic alteration. This process has national and international applicability. It allows classification of streams into hydrologic stream classes and identification of a set of non-redundant and ecologically relevant hydrologic indices for 10 critical sub-components of flow. Three computer programs have been developed for implementing the Hydroecological Integrity Assessment Process (HIP): (1) the Hydrologic Indices Tool (HIT), which calculates 171 ecologically relevant hydrologic indices on the basis of daily-flow and peak-flow stream-gage data; (2) the New Jersey Hydrologic Assessment Tool (NJHAT), which can be used to establish a hydrologic baseline period, provide options for setting baseline environmental-flow standards, and compare past and proposed streamflow alterations; and (3) the New Jersey Stream Classification Tool (NJSCT), designed for placing unclassified streams into pre-defined stream classes. Biological and multivariate response models including principal-component, cluster, and discriminant-function analyses aided in the development of software and implementation of the HIP for New Jersey. A pilot effort is currently underway by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection in which the HIP is being used to evaluate the effects of past and proposed surface-water use, ground-water extraction, and land-use changes on stream ecosystems while determining the most effective way to integrate the process into ongoing regulatory programs. Ultimately, this scientifically defensible

  2. Flow Durations, Low-Flow Frequencies, and Monthly Median Flows for Selected Streams in Connecticut through 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    Flow durations, low-flow frequencies, and monthly median streamflows were computed for 91 continuous-record, streamflow-gaging stations in Connecticut with 10 or more years of record. Flow durations include the 99-, 98-, 97-, 95-, 90-, 85-, 80-, 75-, 70-, 60-, 50-, 40-, 30-, 25-, 20-, 10-, 5-, and 1-percent exceedances. Low-flow frequencies include the 7-day, 10-year (7Q10) low flow; 7-day, 2-year (7Q2) low flow; and 30-day, 2-year (30Q2) low flow. Streamflow estimates were computed for each station using data for the period of record through water year 2005. Estimates of low-flow statistics for 7 short-term (operated between 3 and 10 years) streamflow-gaging stations and 31 partial-record sites were computed. Low-flow estimates were made on the basis of the relation between base flows at a short-term station or partial-record site and concurrent daily mean streamflows at a nearby index station. The relation is defined by the Maintenance of Variance Extension, type 3 (MOVE.3) method. Several short-term stations and partial-record sites had poorly defined relations with nearby index stations; therefore, no low-flow statistics were derived for these sites. The estimated low-flow statistics for the short-term stations and partial-record sites include the 99-, 98-, 97-, 95-, 90-, and 85-percent flow durations; the 7-day, 10-year (7Q10) low flow; 7-day, 2-year (7Q2) low flow; and 30-day, 2-year (30Q2) low-flow frequencies; and the August median flow. Descriptive information on location and record length, measured basin characteristics, index stations correlated to the short-term station and partial-record sites, and estimated flow statistics are provided in this report for each station. Streamflow estimates from this study are stored on USGS's World Wide Web application 'StreamStats' (http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/connecticut.html).

  3. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating grid choked flow inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.; Miller, B. A.; Golladay, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating grid choked-flow inlet was determined in a low-speed wind tunnel at free-stream velocities of 24, 32, and 45 m/sec and incidence angles of 0, 10, 20, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 deg. The inlet was sized to fit a 13.97- centimeter-diameter fan with a design weight flow of 2.49 kg/sec. Measurements were made to determine inlet total pressure recovery, flow distortion, and sound pressure level for both choked and unchoked geometries over a range of inlet weight flows. For the unchoked geometry, inlet total pressure recovery ranged from 0.983 to 0.989 at incidence angles less than 40 deg. At 40 deg incidence angle, inlet cowl separation was encountered which resulted in lower values of pressure recovery and higher levels of fan broadband noise. For the choked geometry, increasing total pressure losses occurred with increasing inlet weight flow that prevented the inlet from reaching full choked conditions with the particular fan used. These losses were attributed to the high Mach number drag rise characteristics of airfoil grid. At maximum attainable inlet weight flow, the total pressure recovery at static conditions was 0.935. The fan blade passing frequency and other fan generated pure tones were eliminated from the noise spectrum, but the broadband level was increased.

  4. Flow Duct Data for Validation of Acoustic Liner Codes for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Munro, Scott; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire acoustic and flow data with hard and lined duct wall duct sections for validation of a liner prediction code being developed at NASA LaRC. Both the mean flowfield and acoustic flowfields were determined in a cross-plane of the rectangular duct. A flow duct facility with acoustic drivers connected to a rectangular (4.7 x 2.0 inch) source section and a linear acoustic liner mounted downstream of the source section was used in this study. The liner section was designed to allow liner materials to be placed on all 4 walls of the duct. The test liner was of the locally-reacting type and was made from a ceramic material. The material, consisting of a tubular structure, was provided by NASA LaRC. The liner was approximately 8.89 cm (3.5 inches) thick. For the current study, only the two "short" sides of the duct were lined with liner material. The other two sides were hard walls. Two especially built instrumentation sections were attached on either sides of the liner section to allow acoustic and flow measurements to be made upstream and downstream of the liner. The two instrumentation duct sections were built to allow measurement of acoustic and flow properties at planes perpendicular to flow upstream and downstream of the liner section. The instrumentation section was also designed to provide a streamwise gradient in acoustic (complex) pressure from which the acoustic particle velocity, needed for the model validation, can be computed. Flow measurements included pressure, temperature, and velocity profiles upstream of the liner section. The in-flow sound pressure levels and phases were obtained with a microphone probe equipped with a nose cone in two cross planes upstream of the liner and two cross plane downstream of the liner. In addition to the acoustic measurements at the cross planes. axial centerline acoustic data was acquired using an axially traversing microphone probe which was traversed from a location

  5. Passive microfluidic control of two merging streams by capillarity and relative flow resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Lim, Yong Taik; Yang, Haesik; Shin, Yong Beom; Kim, Kyuwon; Lee, Dae-Sik; Park, Se Ho; Kim, Youn Tae

    2005-10-01

    In the progress of microfluidic devices, a simple and precise control of multiple streams has been essential for complex microfluidic networks. Consequently, microfluidic devices, which have a simple structure, typically use external energy sources to control the multiple streams. Here, we propose a pure passive scheme that uses capillarity without using external force or external regulation to control the merging of two streams and even to regulate their volumetric flow rate (VFR). We accomplish this process by controlling the geometry of two inlets and a junction, and by regulating the hydrophilicity of a substrate. Additionally, we use the relative flow resistance to control the VFR ratio of the merged two streams. Our results will significantly simplify the control of multiple streams without sacrificing precision.

  6. Testing and comparison of four ionic tracers to measure stream flow loss by multiple tracer injection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zellweger, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    An injectate containing lithium, sodium, chloride and bromide was added continuously at five sites along a 507 m study reach of St Kevin Gulch, Lake County, Colorado to determine which sections of the stream were losing water to the stream bed and to ascertain how well the four tracers performed. The acidity of the stream (pH 3.6) made it possible for lithium and sodium, which are normally absorbed by ion exchange with stream bed sediment, to be used as conservative tracers. Net flow losses as low as 0.81 s-1, or 8% of flow, were calculated between measuring sites. By comparing the results of simultaneous injection it was determined whether subsections of the study reach were influent or effluent. Evaluation of tracer concentrations along 116 m of stream indicated that all four tracers behaved conservatively. Discharges measured by Parshall flumes were 4-18% greater than discharges measured by tracer dilution. -from Author

  7. Tree leaf control on low flow water quality in a small Virginia stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, K.V.; Feltz, H.R.

    1968-01-01

    Impaired water quality in a small stream was related to autumn leaf fall from riparian vegetation. Dissolved oxygen and pH decreased, and water color, specific conductance, iron, manganese, and bicarbonate values increased as the rate of leaf fall increased. Similar quality changes occurred in laboratory cultures of tree leaves in filtered stream water, but the five leaf species studied produced widely differing results. Stream quality improved rapidly following channel flushing by storm flow. Organic loading by tree litter can exert significant control on water composition, especially during low flow.

  8. Relation of streams, lakes, and wetlands to groundwater flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Thomas C.

    Surface-water bodies are integral parts of groundwater flow systems. Groundwater interacts with surface water in nearly all landscapes, ranging from small streams, lakes, and wetlands in headwater areas to major river valleys and seacoasts. Although it generally is assumed that topographically high areas are groundwater recharge areas and topographically low areas are groundwater discharge areas, this is true primarily for regional flow systems. The superposition of local flow systems associated with surface-water bodies on this regional framework results in complex interactions between groundwater and surface water in all landscapes, regardless of regional topographic position. Hydrologic processes associated with the surface-water bodies themselves, such as seasonally high surface-water levels and evaporation and transpiration of groundwater from around the perimeter of surface-water bodies, are a major cause of the complex and seasonally dynamic groundwater flow fields associated with surface water. These processes have been documented at research sites in glacial, dune, coastal, mantled karst, and riverine terrains. Résumé Les eaux de surface sont parties intégrantes des systèmes aquifères. Les eaux souterraines interagissent avec les eaux de surface dans presque tous les types d'environnements, depuis les petits ruisseaux, les lacs et les zones humides jusqu'aux bassins versants des vallées des grands fleuves et aux lignes de côte. Il est en général admis que les zones topographiquement hautes sont des lieux de recharge des aquifères et les zones basses des lieux de décharge, ce qui est le cas des grands systèmes aquifères régionaux. La superposition de systèmes locaux, associés à des eaux de surface, à l'organisation régionale d'écoulements souterrains résulte d'interactions complexes entre les eaux souterraines et les eaux de surface dans tous les environnements, quelle que soit la situation topographique régionale. Les processus

  9. Solute transport processes in flow-event-driven stream-aquifer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter G.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between streams and groundwater controls key features of the stream hydrograph and chemograph. Since surface runoff is usually less saline than groundwater, flow events are usually accompanied by declines in stream salinity. In this paper, we use numerical modelling to show that, at any particular monitoring location: (i) the increase in stream stage associated with a flow event will precede the decrease in solute concentration (arrival time lag for solutes); and (ii) the decrease in stream stage following the flow peak will usually precede the subsequent return (increase) in solute concentration (return time lag). Both arrival time lag and return time lag increase with increasing wave duration. However, arrival time lag decreases with increasing wave amplitude, whereas return time lag increases. Furthermore, while arrival time lag is most sensitive to parameters that control river velocity (channel roughness and stream slope), return time lag is most sensitive to groundwater parameters (aquifer hydraulic conductivity, recharge rate, and dispersitivity). Additionally, the absolute magnitude of the decrease in river concentration is sensitive to both river and groundwater parameters. Our simulations also show that in-stream mixing is dominated by wave propagation and bank storage processes, and in-stream dispersion has a relatively minor effect on solute concentrations. This has important implications for spreading of contaminants released to streams. Our work also demonstrates that a high contribution of pre-event water (or groundwater) within the flow hydrograph can be caused by the combination of in-stream and bank storage exchange processes, and does not require transport of pre-event water through the catchment.

  10. The acoustic signature of bubbles fragmenting in sheared flow.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the sound of bubbles fragmenting in fluid shear are presented and analyzed. The frequency, amplitude, and decay rate of the acoustic emissions from 1.8-mm-radius bubbles fragmenting between opposed fluid jets have been determined. A broad band of frequencies (1.8 to 30 kHz) is observed with peak pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.03 to 2 Pa. While the peak pressure amplitudes show no significant scaling with frequency, the frequency dependence of the decay rates is consistent with the sum of thermal and acoustic radiation losses.

  11. Generalization and extension of the law of acoustic energy conservation in a nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    An exact conservation equation is derived which generalizes the familiar acoustic energy equations. The new relation is valid for arbitrary disturbances to a viscous, compressible flow. It is suggested by a development of the acoustic energy equation by means of a regular perturbation expansion of the general energy equation of fluid mechanics. A perturbation energy density and flux are defined and identified as the exact physical quantities whose leading order perturbation representations are the usual acoustic energy density and flux. The conservation equation governing the perturbation energy quantities is shown to yield previously known results for several special cases.

  12. Availability and Distribution of Base Flow in Lower Honokohau Stream, Island of Maui

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontaine, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Honokohau Stream is one of the few perennial streams in the Lahaina District of West Maui. Current Honokohau water-use practices often lead to conflicts among water users, which are most evident during periods of base flow. To better manage the resource, data are needed that describe the availability and distribution of base flow in lower Honokohau Stream and how base flow is affected by streamflow diversion and return-flow practices. Flow-duration discharges for percentiles ranging from 50 to 95 percent were estimated at 13 locations on lower Honokohau Stream using data from a variety of sources. These sources included (1) available U.S. Geological Survey discharge data, (2) published summaries of Maui Land & Pineapple Company, Inc. diversion and water development-tunnel data, (3) seepage run and low-flow partial-record discharge measurements made for this study, and (4) current (2003) water diversion and return-flow practices. These flow-duration estimates provide a detailed characterization of the distribution and availability of base flow in lower Honokohau Stream. Estimates of base-flow statistics indicate the significant effect of Honokohau Ditch diversions on flow in the stream. Eighty-six percent of the total flow upstream from the ditch is diverted from the stream. Immediately downstream from the diversion dam there is no flow in the stream 91.2 percent of the time, except for minor leakage through the dam. Flow releases at the Taro Gate, from Honokohau Ditch back into the stream, are inconsistent and were found to be less than the target release of 1.55 cubic feet per second on 9 of the 10 days on which measurements were made. Previous estimates of base-flow availability downstream from the Taro Gate release range from 2.32 to 4.6 cubic feet per second (1.5 to 3.0 million gallons per day). At the two principal sites where water is currently being diverted for agricultural use in the valley (MacDonald's and Chun's Dams), base flows of 2.32 cubic feet per

  13. ON THE HYDRAULICS OF STREAM FLOW ROUTING WITH BANK STORAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bank storage is a process in which volumes of water are temporally retained by alluvial stream banks during flood events, and gradually released to partially sustain baseflow. This process has important hydrologic and ecological implications. In this paper, analytical solutions a...

  14. Pool-Type Fishways: Two Different Morpho-Ecological Cyprinid Species Facing Plunging and Streaming Flows

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Paulo; Santos, José M.; Katopodis, Christos; Pinheiro, António; Ferreira, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    Fish are particularly sensitive to connectivity loss as their ability to reach spawning grounds is seriously affected. The most common way to circumvent a barrier to longitudinal connectivity, and to mitigate its impacts, is to implement a fish passage device. However, these structures are often non-effective for species with different morphological and ecological characteristics so there is a need to determine optimum dimensioning values and hydraulic parameters. The aim of this work is to study the behaviour and performance of two species with different ecological characteristics (Iberian barbel Luciobarbus bocagei–bottom oriented, and Iberian chub Squalius pyrenaicus–water column) in a full-scale experimental pool-type fishway that offers two different flow regimes–plunging and streaming. Results showed that both species passed through the surface notch more readily during streaming flow than during plunging flow. The surface oriented species used the surface notch more readily in streaming flow, and both species were more successful in moving upstream in streaming flow than in plunging flow. Streaming flow enhances upstream movement of both species, and seems the most suitable for fishways in river systems where a wide range of fish morpho-ecological traits are found. PMID:23741465

  15. Estimating the magnitude of peak flows for streams in Kentucky for selected recurrence intervals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Martin, Gary R.

    2003-01-01

    This report gives estimates of, and presents techniques for estimating, the magnitude of peak flows for streams in Kentucky for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 500 years. A flowchart in this report guides the user to the appropriate estimates and (or) estimating techniques for a site on a specific stream. Estimates of peak flows are given for 222 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Kentucky. In the development of the peak-flow estimates at gaging stations, a new generalized skew coefficient was calculated for the State. This single statewide value of 0.011 (with a standard error of prediction of 0.520) is more appropriate for Kentucky than the national skew isoline map in Bulletin 17B of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data. Regression equations are presented for estimating the peak flows on ungaged, unregulated streams in rural drainage basins. The equations were developed by use of generalized-least-squares regression procedures at 187 U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations in Kentucky and 51 stations in surrounding States. Kentucky was divided into seven flood regions. Total drainage area is used in the final regression equations as the sole explanatory variable, except in Regions 1 and 4 where main-channel slope also was used. The smallest average standard errors of prediction were in Region 3 (from -13.1 to +15.0 percent) and the largest average standard errors of prediction were in Region 5 (from -37.6 to +60.3 percent). One section of this report describes techniques for estimating peak flows for ungaged sites on gaged, unregulated streams in rural drainage basins. Another section references two previous U.S. Geological Survey reports for peak-flow estimates on ungaged, unregulated, urban streams. Estimating peak flows at ungaged sites on regulated streams is beyond the scope of this report, because peak flows on regulated streams are dependent upon variable human activities.

  16. Altered stream-flow regimes and invasive plant species: The Tamarix case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromberg, J.C.; Lite, S.J.; Marler, R.; Paradzick, C.; Shafroth, P.B.; Shorrock, D.; White, J.M.; White, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that anthropogenic alteration of stream-flow regimes is a key driver of compositional shifts from native to introduced riparian plant species. Location: The arid south-western United States; 24 river reaches in the Gila and Lower Colorado drainage basins of Arizona. Methods: We compared the abundance of three dominant woody riparian taxa (native Populus fremontii and Salix gooddingii, and introduced Tamarix) between river reaches that varied in stream-flow permanence (perennial vs. intermittent), presence or absence of an upstream flow-regulating dam, and presence or absence of municipal effluent as a stream water source. Results: Populus and Salix were the dominant pioneer trees along the reaches with perennial flow and a natural flood regime. In contrast, Tamarix had high abundance (patch area and basal area) along reaches with intermittent stream flows (caused by natural and cultural factors), as well as those with dam-regulated flows. Main conclusions: Stream-flow regimes are strong determinants of riparian vegetation structure, and hydrological alterations can drive dominance shifts to introduced species that have an adaptive suite of traits. Deep alluvial groundwater on intermittent rivers favours the deep-rooted, stress-adapted Tamarix over the shallower-rooted and more competitive Populus and Salix. On flow-regulated rivers, shifts in flood timing favour the reproductively opportunistic Tamarix over Populus and Salix, both of which have narrow germination windows. The prevailing hydrological conditions thus favour a new dominant pioneer species in the riparian corridors of the American Southwest. These results reaffirm the importance of reinstating stream-flow regimes (inclusive of groundwater flows) for re-establishing the native pioneer trees as the dominant forest type. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Variability in isotopic composition of base flow in two headwater streams of the southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nitin K.; Emanuel, Ryan E.; McGlynn, Brian L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the influence of hillslope scale topographic characteristics and the relative position of hillslopes along streams (i.e., internal catchment structure) on the isotopic composition of base flow in first-order, forested headwater streams at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory. The study focused on two adjacent forested catchments with different topographic characteristics. We used stable isotopes (18O and 2H) of water together with stream gauging and geospatial analysis to evaluate relationships between internal catchment structure and the spatiotemporal variability of base flow δ18O. Base flow δ18O was variable in space and time along streams, and the temporal variability of base flow δ18O declined with increasing drainage area. Base flow became enriched in 18O moving along streams from channel heads to catchment outlets but the frequency of enrichment varied between catchments. The spatiotemporal variability in base flow δ18O was high adjacent to large hillslopes with short flow paths, and it was positively correlated with the relative arrangement of hillslopes within the catchment. These results point to influence of unique arrangement of hillslopes on the patterns of downstream enrichment. Spatial variability in base flow δ18O within the streams was relatively low during dry and wet conditions, but it was higher during the transition period between dry and wet conditions. These results suggest that the strength of topographic control on the isotopic composition of base flow can vary with catchment wetness. This study highlights that topographic control on base flow generation and isotopic composition is important even at fine spatial scales.

  18. Predicting spatial distribution of postfire debris flows and potential consequences for native trout in headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedell, Edwin R; Gresswell, Bob; McMahon, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and degradation and invasion of nonnative species have restricted the distribution of native trout. Many trout populations are limited to headwater streams where negative effects of predicted climate change, including reduced stream flow and increased risk of catastrophic fires, may further jeopardize their persistence. Headwater streams in steep terrain are especially susceptible to disturbance associated with postfire debris flows, which have led to local extirpation of trout populations in some systems. We conducted a reach-scale spatial analysis of debris-flow risk among 11 high-elevation watersheds of the Colorado Rocky Mountains occupied by isolated populations of Colorado River Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus). Stream reaches at high risk of disturbance by postfire debris flow were identified with the aid of a qualitative model based on 4 primary initiating and transport factors (hillslope gradient, flow accumulation pathways, channel gradient, and valley confinement). This model was coupled with a spatially continuous survey of trout distributions in these stream networks to assess the predicted extent of trout population disturbances related to debris flows. In the study systems, debris-flow potential was highest in the lower and middle reaches of most watersheds. Colorado River Cutthroat Trout occurred in areas of high postfire debris-flow risk, but they were never restricted to those areas. Postfire debris flows could extirpate trout from local reaches in these watersheds, but trout populations occupy refugia that should allow recolonization of interconnected, downstream reaches. Specific results of our study may not be universally applicable, but our risk assessment approach can be applied to assess postfire debris-flow risk for stream reaches in other watersheds.

  19. Methods for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esralew, Rachel A.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2010-01-01

    Flow statistics can be used to provide decision makers with surface-water information needed for activities such as water-supply permitting, flow regulation, and other water rights issues. Flow statistics could be needed at any location along a stream. Most often, streamflow statistics are needed at ungaged sites, where no flow data are available to compute the statistics. Methods are presented in this report for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams in Oklahoma. Flow statistics included the (1) annual (period of record), (2) seasonal (summer-autumn and winter-spring), and (3) 12 monthly duration statistics, including the 20th, 50th, 80th, 90th, and 95th percentile flow exceedances, and the annual mean-flow (mean of daily flows for the period of record). Flow statistics were calculated from daily streamflow information collected from 235 streamflow-gaging stations throughout Oklahoma and areas in adjacent states. A drainage-area ratio method is the preferred method for estimating flow statistics at an ungaged location that is on a stream near a gage. The method generally is reliable only if the drainage-area ratio of the two sites is between 0.5 and 1.5. Regression equations that relate flow statistics to drainage-basin characteristics were developed for the purpose of estimating selected flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams that are not near gaging stations on the same stream. Regression equations were developed from flow statistics and drainage-basin characteristics for 113 unregulated gaging stations. Separate regression equations were developed by using U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in regions with similar drainage-basin characteristics. These equations can increase the accuracy of regression equations used for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics at ungaged stream locations in Oklahoma. Streamflow-gaging stations were grouped by selected drainage

  20. Observation of hydrothermal flows with acoustic video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Tamaki, K.; Scientific Team Of Yk09-13 Leg 1

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate hydrothermal discharging and its diffusion process along the ocean ridge is necessary for understanding balance of mass and flux in the ocean, ecosystem around hydrothermal fields and so on. However, it has been difficult for us to measure hydrothermal activities without disturbance caused by observation platform ( submersible, ROV, AUV ). We wanted to have some observational method to observe hydrothermal discharging behavior as it was. DIDSON (Dual-Frequency IDentification SONar) is acoustic lens-based sonar. It has sufficiently high resolution and rapid refresh rate that it can substitute for optical system in turbid or dark water where optical systems fail. DIDSON operates at two frequencies, 1.8MHz or 1.1MHz, and forms 96 beams spaced 0.3° apart or 48 beams spaced 0.6° apart respectively. It images out to 12m at 1.8MHz and 40m at 1.1MHz. The transmit and receive beams are formed with acoustic lenses with rectangular apertures and made of polymethylpentene plastic and FC-70 liquid. This physical beam forming allows DIDSON to consume only 30W of power. DIDSON updates its image between 20 to 1 frames/s depending on the operating frequency and the maximum range imaged. It communicates its host using Ethernet. Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo ( IIS ) has understood DIDSON’s superior performance and tried to find new method for utilization of it. The observation systems that IIS has ever developed based on DIDSON are waterside surveillance system, automatic measurement system for fish length, automatic system for fish counting, diagnosis system for deterioration of underwater structure and so on. A next challenge is to develop an observation method based on DIDSON for hydrothermal discharging from seafloor vent. We expected DIDSON to reveal whole image of hydrothermal plume as well as detail inside the plume. In October 2009, we conducted seafloor reconnaissance using a manned deep-sea submersible Shinkai6500 in Central Indian

  1. Mobility power flow analysis of an L-shaped plate structure subjected to acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical investigation based on the Mobility Power Flow method is presented for the determination of the vibrational response and power flow for two coupled flat plate structures in an L-shaped configuration, subjected to acoustical excitation. The principle of the mobility power flow method consists of dividing the global structure into a series of subsystems coupled together using mobility functions. Each separate subsystem is analyzed independently to determine the structural mobility functions for the junction and excitation locations. The mobility functions, together with the characteristics of the junction between the subsystems, are then used to determine the response of the global structure and the power flow. In the coupled plate structure considered here, mobility power flow expressions are derived for excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the structure and the fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure.

  2. Unique flow transitions and particle collection switching phenomena in a microchannel induced by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2010-12-01

    We present an experimental approach for controlled switching between uniform flow for pumping and vortical flow for mixing in a microchannel fabricated onto a piezoelectric substrate. For particle laden fluids, this arrangement permits a choice between transport and alignment of microparticles. Using surface acoustic waves with amplitudes beyond 1 nm, the transition from uniform to mixing flows occurs when the acoustic wavelength in the fluid is reduced to a dimension smaller than the channel width, i.e., λf≥Wch for uniform flow and λfflow. On the other hand, using relatively weak surface acoustic waves with amplitudes below 1 nm, particles in an initially homogeneous suspension agglomerate into equally spaced lines with a separation of λf/2. Switching the transducer between its fundamental resonant frequency f0 and its first harmonic frequency f1+˜2f0 causes a switch between uniform and mixing flow, while switching between large and small amplitude excitation allows one to choose whether to collect the particles in the flow along nodal lines parallel to the channel. These results are uniquely achieved without requiring the microfabrication of complex microchannel architectures and control schemes; the switching is simply achieved by adjusting two parameters: the acoustic excitation frequency and amplitude.

  3. Zonal Flow Velocimetry using Acoustic Modes in Experimental Models of a Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Mautino, A. R.; Stone, D.; Triana, S. A.; Lekic, V.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Rotating hydromagnetic experiments can serve as models of planetary cores, matching some of the dimensionless parameters relevant to planets. One challenge with such experiments is determining the flows present. The opacity of the fluids used in these experiments (e.g. liquid sodium) prevents direct flow visualization techniques from being employed. One method allowing determination of zonal flows in such experiments is acoustic mode velocimetry. In this technique, the rotational splittings of acoustic mode spectra are used to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of the flow. Here we present the use of this technique to study flows in experimental models of the Earth's core. Most of these results were obtained in a 60 cm diameter spherical Couette device, with a 20 cm diameter inner sphere, and using nitrogen gas as the working fluid. Turbulent flow is driven in the system via differential rotation of the outer shell and inner sphere. Acoustic modes are excited in the fluid volume using a speaker, and microphones are used to measure the frequencies and rotational splittings of the modes. We compare the observed splittings with those predicted by theory as a way of validating the method, and infer mean flows from these observations. We also present some preliminary results of acoustic studies in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Finally, we discuss future prospects for this experimental technique.

  4. Analysing subglacial geology hidden beneath the ice streams flowing into the Weddell Sea (West Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraccioli, F.; King, O.; Jordan, T. A.; Ross, N.; Bingham, R. G.; Le Brocq, A. M.; Smith, A.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.; Siegert, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Subglacial geology provides important controls on the onset and maintenance of fast glacial flow in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). Widespread subglacial sediments deposited within deep rift basins, thinner drapes of marine sediments within the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) and high geothermal heat flux associated with Cenozoic magmatism have been previously identified as key geological controls that can modulate ice sheet dynamics. Here, we compile a suite of new and vintage aeromagnetic and airborne gravity observations to examine the large-scale geological setting of several major ice streams flowing into the Weddell Sea Embayment and assess the role of geological controls on subglacial topography and WAIS flow regimes. We focus on the subglacial geology beneath the Institute and Moeller ice streams, the Rutford ice stream and the Evans ice stream. We show that the Moeller ice stream is underlain by a major strike-slip fault system, which is part of the tectonic boundary between East and West Antarctica. A set of en-echelon subglacial basins formed along the strike-slip fault and these basins appear to steer enhanced flow far inland. Deep sedimentary basins are not present along this fault system, however, suggesting that subglacial sediments are not necessarily a geological template for the onset of fast glacial flow. The recently identified Robin Subglacial Basin that underlies the fast flowing coastal region of the Institute ice stream contains 1-3 km of sedimentary infill and smooth bedrock topography. Enhanced flow in the tributaries of the Institute ice stream cuts across the Ellsworth Mountains and is controlled by basement faults displacing metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. Prominent magnetic anomalies overlie outcrops of Jurassic granitic intrusions and enable us to trace their subglacial extent beneath the catchments of Institute, Moeller and Rutford ice streams. These large granitoid bodies form topographic highs that appear to divert

  5. Acoustics and Thrust of Separate Flow Exhaust Nozzles With Mixing Devices Investigated for High Bypass Ratio Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, Naseem H.

    2000-01-01

    Typical installed separate-flow exhaust nozzle system. The jet noise from modern turbofan engines is a major contributor to the overall noise from commercial aircraft. Many of these engines use separate nozzles for exhausting core and fan streams. As a part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program, the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field led an experimental investigation using model-scale nozzles in Glenn s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. The goal of the investigation was to develop technology for reducing the jet noise by 3 EPNdB. Teams of engineers from Glenn, the NASA Langley Research Center, Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Corporation, the Boeing Company, GE Aircraft Engines, Allison Engine Company, and Aero Systems Engineering contributed to the planning and implementation of the test.

  6. Monitoring strategies of stream phosphorus under contrasting climate-driven flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyenola, G.; Meerhoff, M.; Teixeira-de Mello, F.; González-Bergonzoni, I.; Graeber, D.; Fosalba, C.; Vidal, N.; Mazzeo, N.; Ovesen, N. B.; Jeppesen, E.; Kronvang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Climate and hydrology are relevant control factors determining the timing and amount of nutrient losses from land to downstream aquatic systems, in particular of phosphorus (P) from agricultural lands. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the differences in P export patterns and the performance of alternative monitoring strategies in streams under contrasting climate-driven flow regimes. We compared a set of paired streams draining lowland micro-catchments under temperate climate and stable discharge conditions (Denmark) and under sub-tropical climate and flashy conditions (Uruguay). We applied two alternative nutrient sampling programs (high-frequency composite sampling and low-frequency instantaneous-grab sampling) and estimated the contribution derived from point and diffuse sources fitting a source apportionment model. We expected to detect a pattern of higher total and particulate phosphorus export from diffuse sources in streams in Uruguay streams, mostly as a consequence of higher variability in flow regime (higher flashiness). Contrarily, we found a higher contribution of dissolved P in flashy streams. We did not find a notably poorer performance of the low-frequency sampling program to estimate P exports in flashy streams compared to the less variable streams. We also found signs of interaction between climate/hydrology and land use intensity, in particular in the presence of point sources of P, leading to a bias towards underestimation of P in hydrologically stable streams and overestimation of P in flashy streams. Based on our findings, we suggest that the evaluation and use of more accurate monitoring methods, such as automatized flow-proportional water samplers and automatized bankside analyzers, should be prioritized whenever logistically possible. However, it seems particularly relevant in currently flashy systems and also in systems where climate change predictions suggest an increase in stream flashiness.

  7. Flow directionality, mountain barriers and functional traits determine diatom metacommunity structuring of high mountain streams.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoyu; Li, Bin; He, Fengzhi; Gu, Yuan; Sun, Meiqin; Zhang, Haomiao; Tan, Lu; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Shuoran; Cai, Qinghua

    2016-04-19

    Stream metacommunities are structured by a combination of local (environmental filtering) and regional (dispersal) processes. The unique characters of high mountain streams could potentially determine metacommunity structuring, which is currently poorly understood. Aiming at understanding how these characters influenced metacommunity structuring, we explored the relative importance of local environmental conditions and various dispersal processes, including through geographical (overland), topographical (across mountain barriers) and network (along flow direction) pathways in shaping benthic diatom communities. From a trait perspective, diatoms were categorized into high-profile, low-profile and motile guild to examine the roles of functional traits. Our results indicated that both environmental filtering and dispersal processes influenced metacommunity structuring, with dispersal contributing more than environmental processes. Among the three pathways, stream corridors were primary pathway. Deconstructive analysis suggested different responses to environmental and spatial factors for each of three ecological guilds. However, regardless of traits, dispersal among streams was limited by mountain barriers, while dispersal along stream was promoted by rushing flow in high mountain stream. Our results highlighted that directional processes had prevailing effects on metacommunity structuring in high mountain streams. Flow directionality, mountain barriers and ecological guilds contributed to a better understanding of the roles that mountains played in structuring metacommunity.

  8. Flow directionality, mountain barriers and functional traits determine diatom metacommunity structuring of high mountain streams

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoyu; Li, Bin; He, Fengzhi; Gu, Yuan; Sun, Meiqin; Zhang, Haomiao; Tan, Lu; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Shuoran; Cai, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Stream metacommunities are structured by a combination of local (environmental filtering) and regional (dispersal) processes. The unique characters of high mountain streams could potentially determine metacommunity structuring, which is currently poorly understood. Aiming at understanding how these characters influenced metacommunity structuring, we explored the relative importance of local environmental conditions and various dispersal processes, including through geographical (overland), topographical (across mountain barriers) and network (along flow direction) pathways in shaping benthic diatom communities. From a trait perspective, diatoms were categorized into high-profile, low-profile and motile guild to examine the roles of functional traits. Our results indicated that both environmental filtering and dispersal processes influenced metacommunity structuring, with dispersal contributing more than environmental processes. Among the three pathways, stream corridors were primary pathway. Deconstructive analysis suggested different responses to environmental and spatial factors for each of three ecological guilds. However, regardless of traits, dispersal among streams was limited by mountain barriers, while dispersal along stream was promoted by rushing flow in high mountain stream. Our results highlighted that directional processes had prevailing effects on metacommunity structuring in high mountain streams. Flow directionality, mountain barriers and ecological guilds contributed to a better understanding of the roles that mountains played in structuring metacommunity. PMID:27090223

  9. Effects of flow scarcity on leaf-litter processing under oceanic climate conditions in calcareous streams.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Aingeru; Pérez, Javier; Molinero, Jon; Sagarduy, Mikel; Pozo, Jesús

    2015-01-15

    Although temporary streams represent a high proportion of the total number and length of running waters, historically the study of intermittent streams has received less attention than that of perennial ones. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of flow cessation on litter decomposition in calcareous streams under oceanic climate conditions. For this, leaf litter of alder was incubated in four streams (S1, S2, S3 and S4) with different flow regimes (S3 and S4 with zero-flow periods) from northern Spain. To distinguish the relative importance and contribution of decomposers and detritivores, fine- and coarse-mesh litter bags were used. We determined processing rates, leaf-C, -N and -P concentrations, invertebrate colonization in coarse bags and benthic invertebrates. Decomposition rates in fine bags were similar among streams. In coarse bags, only one of the intermittent streams, S4, showed a lower rate than that in the other ones as a consequence of lower invertebrate colonization. The material incubated in fine bags presented higher leaf-N and -P concentrations than those in the coarse ones, except in S4, pointing out that the decomposition in this stream was driven mainly by microorganisms. Benthic macroinvertebrate and shredder density and biomass were lower in intermittent streams than those in perennial ones. However, the bags in S3 presented a greater amount of total macroinvertebrates and shredders comparing with the benthos. The most suitable explanation is that the fauna find a food substrate in bags less affected by calcite precipitation, which is common in the streambed at this site. Decomposition rate in coarse bags was positively related to associated shredder biomass. Thus, droughts in streams under oceanic climate conditions affect mainly the macroinvertebrate detritivore activity, although macroinvertebrates may show distinct behavior imposed by the physicochemical properties of water, mainly travertine precipitation, which can

  10. Effects of flow scarcity on leaf-litter processing under oceanic climate conditions in calcareous streams.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Aingeru; Pérez, Javier; Molinero, Jon; Sagarduy, Mikel; Pozo, Jesús

    2015-01-15

    Although temporary streams represent a high proportion of the total number and length of running waters, historically the study of intermittent streams has received less attention than that of perennial ones. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of flow cessation on litter decomposition in calcareous streams under oceanic climate conditions. For this, leaf litter of alder was incubated in four streams (S1, S2, S3 and S4) with different flow regimes (S3 and S4 with zero-flow periods) from northern Spain. To distinguish the relative importance and contribution of decomposers and detritivores, fine- and coarse-mesh litter bags were used. We determined processing rates, leaf-C, -N and -P concentrations, invertebrate colonization in coarse bags and benthic invertebrates. Decomposition rates in fine bags were similar among streams. In coarse bags, only one of the intermittent streams, S4, showed a lower rate than that in the other ones as a consequence of lower invertebrate colonization. The material incubated in fine bags presented higher leaf-N and -P concentrations than those in the coarse ones, except in S4, pointing out that the decomposition in this stream was driven mainly by microorganisms. Benthic macroinvertebrate and shredder density and biomass were lower in intermittent streams than those in perennial ones. However, the bags in S3 presented a greater amount of total macroinvertebrates and shredders comparing with the benthos. The most suitable explanation is that the fauna find a food substrate in bags less affected by calcite precipitation, which is common in the streambed at this site. Decomposition rate in coarse bags was positively related to associated shredder biomass. Thus, droughts in streams under oceanic climate conditions affect mainly the macroinvertebrate detritivore activity, although macroinvertebrates may show distinct behavior imposed by the physicochemical properties of water, mainly travertine precipitation, which can

  11. Shrouded probe performance: Variable flow operation and effect of free stream turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; McFarland, A.R.

    1997-02-01

    Performance of a shrouded aerosol sampling probe, operated in accordance with the variable flow protocol of EPA Methods 5 and 17, was compared with its performance in a fixed flow rate mode. The effect of free stream turbulence intensity on the transmission ratio of the shrouded probe was also evaluated. This study shows that the sampling flow rate through a shrouded probe can be varied in proportion to the stack velocity, and representative samples can be obtained. This variable sampling flow rate protocol is appropriate to nonnuclear stacks and to nuclear stacks that have the potential to emit significant quantities of radioactive aerosol particles. A shrouded probe, designed for nominal conditions of 57 L/min at a stack velocity of 12 m/s was tested in a wind tunnel over a range of free stream velocities of 6-24 m/s. When the flow rate through the shrouded probe was varied proportionally with the free stream velocity, the transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the aerosol concentration in the free stream of the stack or duct) of 10-{mu}m aerodynamic diameter (AD) particles varied between 0.97 and 1.04. In comparison, sampling at a fixed flow rate over the same range of free stream velocities resulted in transmission ratios of 0.88-1.32. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of flow on the acoustic resonances of an open-ended duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingard, U.; Singhal, V. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of flow on the acoustic resonances of an open-ended, hard-walled duct is analyzed. The flow produces acoustic losses both in the interior of the duct and at the ends. Unless the duct is very long, typically 100 times the diameter, the losses at the ends dominate. At flow Mach numbers in excess of 0.4 the losses are so large that axial duct resonances are almost completely suppressed. The plane-wave Green's function for the duct with flow is expressed in terms of the (experimentally determined) pressure reflection coefficients at the ends of the duct, and the flow dependence of the complex eigenfrequencies of the duct is obtained. Some observations concerning the noise produced by the flow in the duct are also reported.

  13. Field and laboratory experiments on high dissolution rates of limestone in stream flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattanji, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Mariko; Song, Wonsuh; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Takaya, Yasuhiko; Matsukura, Yukinori

    2014-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments were performed to examine dissolution rates of limestone in stream flow. Field experiments were conducted in three stream sites (A-C) with different lithological or hydrological settings around a limestone plateau in the Abukuma Mts., Japan. Sites A and B are allogenic streams, which flow from non-limestone sources into dolines, and site C has a karst spring source. Tablets made of limestone from the same plateau with a diameter of 3.5 cm and a thickness of 1 cm were placed in the streams for 3 years (2008-2011) where alkalinity, pH and major cation concentrations were measured periodically. The saturation indices of calcite (SIc) of stream water were - 2.8 ± 0.4 at site A, - 2.5 ± 0.4 at site B and - 0.5 ± 0.4 at site C. Annual weight loss ratios for tablets were extremely high at site A (0.11-0.14 mg cm- 2 d- 1), high at site B (0.05 mg cm- 2 d- 1), and low at site C (0.005 mg cm- 2 d- 1). The contrasting rates of weight loss are mainly explained by chemical conditions of stream water. In addition, laboratory experiments for dissolution of limestone tablets using a flow-through apparatus revealed that flow conditions around the limestone tablet is another important factor for dissolution in the stream environment. These results revealed that limestone dissolves at a rapid rate where water unsaturated to calcite continuously flows, such as in an allogenic stream.

  14. Base-flow measurements at partial-record sites on small streams in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Carroll

    1986-01-01

    This report contains site descriptions and base-flow data collected at 362 partial-record sites in South Carolina. These data include site name, site description, latitude, longitude, drainage area, instantaneous streamflow, and date of the streamflow measurement. The base-flow data can be used as an aid to estimate low flow characteristics at ungaged locations on streams in South Carolina. Partial record data collection sites were established in all physiographic provinces except the lower Coastal Plain. Data collection sites were not established in the lower Coastal Plain because of the widespread occurrence of zero during drought periods in all but the larger streams. (USGS)

  15. Rethinking hyporheic flow and transient storage to advance understanding of stream-catchment connections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, K.E.; Gooseff, M.N.; Kimball, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Although surface water and groundwater are increasingly referred to as one resource, there remain environmental and ecosystem needs to study the 10 m to 1 km reach scale as one hydrologic system. Streams gain and lose water over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Large spatial scales (kilometers) have traditionally been recognized and studied as river-aquifer connections. Over the last 25 years hyporheic exchange flows (1-10 m) have been studied extensively. Often a transient storage model has been used to quantify the physical solute transport setting in which biogeochemical processes occur. At the longer 10 m to 1 km scale of stream reaches it is now clear that streams which gain water overall can coincidentally lose water to the subsurface. At this scale, the amounts of water transferred are not necessarily significant but the exchanges can, however, influence solute transport. The interpretation of seemingly straightforward questions about water, contaminant, and nutrient fluxes into and along a stream can be confounded by flow losses which are too small to be apparent in stream gauging and along flow paths too long to be detected in tracer experiments. We suggest basic hydrologic approaches, e.g., measurement of flow along the channel, surface and subsurface solute sampling, and routine measurements of the water table that, in our opinion, can be used to extend simple exchange concepts from the hyporheic exchange scale to a scale of stream-catchment connection. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Dating base flow in streams using dissolved gases and diurnal temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Casile, Gerolamo; Haase, Karl B.

    2015-12-01

    A method is presented for using dissolved CFCs or SF6 to estimate the apparent age of stream base flow by indirectly estimating the mean concentration of the tracer in the inflowing groundwater. The mean value is estimated simultaneously with the mean residence times of the gas and water in the stream by sampling the stream for one or both age tracers, along with dissolved nitrogen and argon at a single location over a period of approximately 12-14 h. The data are fitted to an equation representing the temporal in-stream gas exchange as it responds to the diurnal temperature fluctuation. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by collecting and analyzing samples at six different stream locations across parts of northern Virginia, USA. The studied streams drain watersheds with areas of between 2 and 122 km2 during periods when the diurnal stream temperature ranged between 2 and 5°C. The method has the advantage of estimating the mean groundwater residence time of discharge from the watershed to the stream without the need for the collection of groundwater infiltrating to streambeds or local groundwater sampled from shallow observation wells near the stream.

  17. Extraction of conjugate main-stream structures from a complex network flow.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Koutarou; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a method to extract main-stream structures for a given complex network flow by trimming less effective links. As the resulting main streams generally have an almost loopless treelike structure, we can define the stream basin size for each node, which characterizes the importance of the node with regard to the flow. As a real-world example, we apply this method to an interfirm trading network, both for the money flow and its conjugate-the material or service flow-confirming that both basin size distributions follow a similar power law that differs significantly from the basin size distributions of rivers in nature. We theoretically analyze the process of trimming and derive a consistent statistical formulation between the original link number and the basin size. PMID:25974555

  18. Improvement of trout streams in Wisconsin by augmenting low flows with ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novitzki, R.P.

    1973-01-01

    Approximately 2 cubic feet per second of ground water were introduced into the Little Plover River in 1968 when natural streamflow ranged from 3 to 4 cubic feet per second. These augmentation flows were retained undiminished through the 2-mile reach of stream monitored. Maximum stream temperatures were reduced as much as 5?F (3?C) at the augmentation site during the test period, although changes became insignificant more than 1 mile downstream. Maximum temperatures might be reduced as much as 10?F (6?C) during critical periods, based on estimates using a stream temperature model developed as part of the study. During critical periods significant temperature improvement may extend 2 miles or more downstream. Changes in minimum DO (dissolved oxygen) levels were slight, primarily because of the high natural DO levels occurring during the test period. Criteria for considering other streams for flow augmentation are developed on the basis of the observed hydrologic responses in the Little Plover River. Augmentation flows of nearly 2? cubic feet per second of ground water were introduced into the headwater reach of Black Earth Creek from the end of June through mid-October 1969. Streamflow ranged from 1 to 2 cubic feet per second at the augmentation site, and the average flow at the gaging station at Black Earth, approximately 8 miles downstream, ranged from 25 to 50 cubic feet per second. Augmentation flows were retained through the 8-mile reach of stream. Temperature of the augmentation flow as it entered the stream ranged from 60? to 70?F (about 16? to 21?C) during the test period, and minimum stream temperatures were raised 5?F (3?C) or more at the augmentation site, with changes extending from 2 to 3 miles downstream. Augmentation during critical periods could maintain stream temperatures between 40? and 70?F (4? and 21?C) through most of the study reach. DO levels were increased by as much as 2 milligrams per liter or more below the augmentation site, although the

  19. Is there a geomorphic expression of interbasin groundwater flow in watersheds? Interactions between interbasin groundwater flow, springs, streams, and geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisbee, Marty D.; Tysor, Elizabeth H.; Stewart-Maddox, Noah S.; Tsinnajinnie, Lani M.; Wilson, John L.; Granger, Darryl E.; Newman, Brent D.

    2016-02-01

    Interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) can play a significant role in the generation and geochemical evolution of streamflow. However, it is exceedingly difficult to identify IGF and to determine the location and quantity of water that is exchanged between watersheds. How does IGF affect landscape/watershed geomorphic evolution? Can geomorphic metrics be used to identify the presence of IGF? We examine these questions in two adjacent sedimentary watersheds in northern New Mexico using a combination of geomorphic/landscape metrics, springflow residence times, and spatial geochemical patterns. IGF is expressed geomorphically in the landscape placement of springs and flow direction and shape of stream channels. Springs emerge preferentially on one side of stream valleys where landscape incision has intercepted IGF flow paths. Stream channels grow toward the IGF source and show little bifurcation. In addition, radiocarbon residence times of springs decrease and the geochemical composition of springs changes as the connection to IGF is lost.

  20. Determining long time-scale hyporheic zone flow paths in Antarctic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gooseff, M.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Runkel, R.L.; Vaughn, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    In the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, glaciers are the source of meltwater during the austral summer, and the streams and adjacent hyporheic zones constitute the entire physical watershed; there are no hillslope processes in these systems. Hyporheic zones can extend several metres from each side of the stream, and are up to 70 cm deep, corresponding to a lateral cross-section as large as 12 m2, and water resides in the subsurface year around. In this study, we differentiate between the near-stream hyporheic zone, which can be characterized with stream tracer experiments, and the extended hyporheic zone, which has a longer time-scale of exchange. We sampled stream water from Green Creek and from the adjacent saturated alluvium for stable isotopes of D and 18O to assess the significance and extent of stream-water exchange between the streams and extended hyporheic zones over long time-scales (days to weeks). Our results show that water residing in the extended hyporheic zone is much more isotopically enriched (up to 11??? D and 2.2??? 18O) than stream water. This result suggests a long residence time within the extended hyporheic zone, during which fractionation has occured owing to summer evaporation and winter sublimation of hyporheic water. We found less enriched water in the extended hyporheic zone later in the flow season, suggesting that stream water may be exchanged into and out of this zone, on the time-scale of weeks to months. The transient storage model OTIS was used to characterize the exchange of stream water with the extended hyporheic zone. Model results yield exchange rates (??) generally an order magnitude lower (10-5 s-1) than those determined using stream-tracer techniques on the same stream. In light of previous studies in these streams, these results suggest that the hyporheic zones in Antarctic streams have near-stream zones of rapid stream-water exchange, where 'fast' biogeochemical reactions may influence water chemistry, and extended

  1. Wall pressure fluctuations and acoustics in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. A.; Lauchle, G. C.

    1986-09-01

    Measurements of the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) wall pressure spectrum and the facility's propagating acoustic field were conducted in the Boundary Layer Research Facility. Subminiature, piezoresistive-type pressure transducers were used. Detailed calibration of the pressure transducers was performed using a standing wave tube. Measured sensitivities of the transducers were within 0.5 dB of factory specifications and measured phase differences between individual transducers were insignificant. The TBL wall pressure spectrum was obtained using a novel signal-processing technique that allowed a minimization of both acoustic and vibration-induced noise. This technique uses pairs of transducer difference signals from an exisymmetric array of three flush-mounted pressure sensors and permits cancellation of the propagating acoustic and vibrationally induced pressure fields. A measurement involving the coherence function between these transducer signals was shown to validate the measured TBL wall pressure spectra and all assumptions used in developing the measurement technique. Non-dimensionalized spectra of the TBL fluctuating wall pressure measured in this investigation are compared to those measured previously. These comparisons substantiated a maximum, normalized transducer diameter for the complete resolution of the high-frequency part of the TBL wall pressure spectrum.

  2. Numerical Analysis of the Acoustic Field of Tip-Clearance Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Moghadam, S. M.; M. Meinke Team; W. Schröder Team

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the acoustic field generated by a shrouded axial fan are studied by a hybrid fluid-dynamics-acoustics method. In a first step, large-eddy simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of tip clearance flow for various tip gap sizes and to determine the acoustic sources. The simulations are performed for a single blade out of five blades with periodic boundary conditions in the circumferential direction on a multi-block structured mesh with 1.4 ×108 grid points. The turbulent flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 9.36 ×105 at undisturbed inflow condition and the results are compared with experimental data. The diameter and strength of the tip vortex increase with the tip gap size, while simultaneously the efficiency of the fan decreases. In a second step, the acoustic field on the near field is determined by solving the acoustic perturbation equations (APE) on a mesh for a single blade consisting of approx. 9.8 ×108 grid points. The overall agreement of the pressure spectrum and its directivity with measurements confirm the correct identification of the sound sources and accurate prediction of the acoustic duct propagation. The results show that the longer the tip gap size the higher the broadband noise level. Senior Scientist, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University.

  3. Study on estimating the evapotranspiration cover coefficient for stream flow simulation through remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chihda; Cheng, Chichuan; Lo, Hannchung; Chen, Yeongkeung

    2010-08-01

    This study focuses on using remote sensing techniques to estimate the evapotranspiration cover coefficient (CV) which is an important parameter for stream flow. The objective is to derive more accurate stream flow from the estimated CV. The study area is located in the Dan-Shuei watershed in northern Taiwan. The processes include the land-use classification using hybrid classification and four Landsat-5 TM images; the CV estimations based on remote sensing and traditional approaches; comparison of stream flow simulation according to the above two CV values. The result indicated that the study area was classified into seven land-use types with 88.3% classification accuracy. The simulated stream flow using remote sensing approach could represent more accurate hydrological characteristics than a traditional approach. Obviously integrating remote sensing technique and the SEBAL model is a useful approach to estimate the CV. The CV parameter estimated by remote sensing technique did improve the accuracy of the stream flow simulation. Therefore, the results can be extended to further studies such as forest water management.

  4. Method For Enhanced Gas Monitoring In High Density Flow Streams

    DOEpatents

    Von Drasek, William A.; Mulderink, Kenneth A.; Marin, Ovidiu

    2005-09-13

    A method for conducting laser absorption measurements in high temperature process streams having high levels of particulate matter is disclosed. An impinger is positioned substantially parallel to a laser beam propagation path and at upstream position relative to the laser beam. Beam shielding pipes shield the beam from the surrounding environment. Measurement is conducted only in the gap between the two shielding pipes where the beam propagates through the process gas. The impinger facilitates reduced particle presence in the measurement beam, resulting in improved SNR (signal-to-noise) and improved sensitivity and dynamic range of the measurement.

  5. Apparatus and method for acoustic monitoring of steam quality and flow

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-09-13

    An apparatus and method for noninvasively monitoring steam quality and flow and in pipes or conduits bearing flowing steam, are described. By measuring the acoustic vibrations generated in steam-carrying conduits by the flowing steam either by direct contact with the pipe or remotely thereto, converting the measured acoustic vibrations into a frequency spectrum characteristic of the natural resonance vibrations of the pipe, and monitoring the amplitude and/or the frequency of one or more chosen resonance frequencies, changes in the steam quality in the pipe are determined. The steam flow rate and the steam quality are inversely related, and changes in the steam flow rate are calculated from changes in the steam quality once suitable calibration curves are obtained.

  6. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  7. Hyporheic exchange flows induced by constructed riffles and steps in lowland streams in southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Tamao; Hill, Alan R.

    2006-12-01

    Stream-subsurface water interaction induced by natural riffles and constructed riffles/steps was examined in lowland streams in southern Ontario, Canada. The penetration of stream water into the subsurface was analysed using hydrometric data, and the zone of > 10% stream water was calculated from a chemical mixing equation using tracer injection of bromide and background chloride concentrations. The constructed riffles studied induced more extensive hyporheic exchange than the natural riffles because of their steeper longitudinal hydraulic head gradients and coarser streambed sediments. The depth of > 10% stream water zone in a small and a large constructed riffle extended to > 0.2 m and > 1.4 m depths respectively. Flux and residence time distribution of hyporheic exchange were simulated in constructed riffles using MODFLOW, a finite-difference groundwater flow model. Hyporheic flux and residence time distribution varied along the riffles, and the exchange occurring upstream from the riffle crest was small in flux and had a long residence time. In contrast, hyporheic exchange occurring downstream from the riffle crest had a relatively short residence time and accounted for 83% and 70% of total hyporheic exchange flow in a small and large riffle respectively. Although stream restoration projects have not considered the hyporheic zone, our data indicate that constructed riffles and steps can promote vertical hydrologic exchange and increase the groundwater-surface water linkage in degraded lowland streams. Copyright

  8. Tidal Modulation of the Flow of Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adalgeirsdottir, G.; Murray, T.; Smith, A.; Nicholls, K.; Makinson, K.; King, M.; Behar, A.

    2005-12-01

    Ice from the interior of Antarctica is delivered to the ice shelves and the oceans through fast flowing ice streams and glaciers. The ice streams flow up to two orders of magnitude faster than the surrounding ice and are the most dynamic components of the ice sheet system. As a part of the RABID project an array of 5 GPS receivers, was operated continuously on the Rutford Ice stream, West Antarctica, from 28 December 2004 - 3 February 2005, about 40 km upstream from the grounding line. The chosen sampling rate was 10 sec, which gives high resolution data on the ice stream motion. A base station was deployed on rock in the Ellsworth Mountains, ~30 km from the array, providing a fixed control for the ice stream network. The data are processed with rigorous kinematic methods. The measured velocity of the ice stream is about 1 m per day. After removing the mean velocity along the ice stream from the measurement the residual of the horizontal displacement shows periodicity of ~15 days, which is related to the spring-neap tides. The variation in velocity is about 5%. Highest velocity is measured during the transition from spring to neap tide, with the largest increase in speed during spring tide and decrease during neap tides. A weak diurnal signal is visible during spring tides. The amplitude of the diurnal signal decreases during neap tides.

  9. A logistic regression equation for estimating the probability of a stream in Vermont having intermittent flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Brouillette, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    A logistic regression equation was developed for estimating the probability of a stream flowing intermittently at unregulated, rural stream sites in Vermont. These determinations can be used for a wide variety of regulatory and planning efforts at the Federal, State, regional, county and town levels, including such applications as assessing fish and wildlife habitats, wetlands classifications, recreational opportunities, water-supply potential, waste-assimilation capacities, and sediment transport. The equation will be used to create a derived product for the Vermont Hydrography Dataset having the streamflow characteristic of 'intermittent' or 'perennial.' The Vermont Hydrography Dataset is Vermont's implementation of the National Hydrography Dataset and was created at a scale of 1:5,000 based on statewide digital orthophotos. The equation was developed by relating field-verified perennial or intermittent status of a stream site during normal summer low-streamflow conditions in the summer of 2005 to selected basin characteristics of naturally flowing streams in Vermont. The database used to develop the equation included 682 stream sites with drainage areas ranging from 0.05 to 5.0 square miles. When the 682 sites were observed, 126 were intermittent (had no flow at the time of the observation) and 556 were perennial (had flowing water at the time of the observation). The results of the logistic regression analysis indicate that the probability of a stream having intermittent flow in Vermont is a function of drainage area, elevation of the site, the ratio of basin relief to basin perimeter, and the areal percentage of well- and moderately well-drained soils in the basin. Using a probability cutpoint (a lower probability indicates the site has perennial flow and a higher probability indicates the site has intermittent flow) of 0.5, the logistic regression equation correctly predicted the perennial or intermittent status of 116 test sites 85 percent of the time.

  10. The role of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming in mediating ultrasound-induced changes of TGF-beta gene expression in bone cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harle, J.; Mayia, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper relates ultrasound-induced changes in bone cell function to quantitative data assessing the level of several interaction mechanisms within the exposure environment. Characterisation of ultrasound fields in terms of resultant levels of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming may provide a novel means of accurately assessing the likelihood of biological effects in vitro.

  11. Response of macrophyte communities to flow regulation in mountain streams.

    PubMed

    Abati, Silverio; Minciardi, Maria Rita; Ciadamidaro, Simone; Fattorini, Simone; Ceschin, Simona

    2016-07-01

    River macrophytes are widely used in freshwater ecosystem assessment because of their sensitivity to anthropogenic pressures, even if there are only a few studies that investigated how macrophytes respond to water regime alterations. In this study, we analyzed the effects of dams on river macrophyte communities through a comparison between upstream and downstream sides from 18 dams located in Alps and Apennines. A co-inertia analysis and a Mantel test were applied to assess if the analysis of environmental parameters could be effective in predicting macrophyte community structure. We analyzed morphological and physicochemical inter-site differences and tested the influence of dams on various aspects of community structure (composition, richness, diversity, dominance, coverage) using multivariate randomized block permutation procedure. Plant similarity between sites was evaluated at the level of phylum, and indicator species analysis was performed to identify the taxa most sensitive or tolerant to water regulation. We found that the overall environmental setting overwhelms the dam impact and that the influence of hydrological alteration became apparent when comparing upstream and downstream assemblages at the same dam. In particular, we found that most of taxa had a higher affinity with the downstream side and that in general, stream regulation increases plant richness and coverage, but reduces community evenness. Analyses based on higher taxonomic groups (phyla) demonstrated that this community can be effectively used in bioassessment even at phylum level analysis. In particular, we found that bryophytes, strictly linked with changes in substrate stability, show particular sensitivity to water regulation in mountain streams. PMID:27315127

  12. An investigation of the influence of acoustic waves on the liquid flow through a porous material.

    PubMed

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Barake, Sander; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation has been made of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material. The experiments have been performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. Also, a temperature measurement of the flowing liquid inside the core was made. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. The acoustic waves were found to produce a significant effect on the pressure gradient at constant liquid flow rate through the core samples. During the application of acoustic waves the pressure gradient inside the core decreases. This effect turned out to be due to the decrease of the liquid viscosity caused by an increase in liquid temperature as a result of the acoustic energy dissipation inside the porous material. Also, a theoretical model has been developed to calculate the dissipation effect on the viscosity and on the pressure gradient. The model predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Experimental Validation of Numerical Simulations for an Acoustic Liner in Grazing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Pastouchenko, Nikolai N.; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2013-01-01

    A coordinated experimental and numerical simulation effort is carried out to improve our understanding of the physics of acoustic liners in a grazing flow as well our computational aeroacoustics (CAA) method prediction capability. A numerical simulation code based on advanced CAA methods is developed. In a parallel effort, experiments are performed using the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube at the NASA Langley Research Center. In the experiment, a liner is installed in the upper wall of a rectangular flow duct with a 2 inch by 2.5 inch cross section. Spatial distribution of sound pressure levels and relative phases are measured on the wall opposite the liner in the presence of a Mach 0.3 grazing flow. The computer code is validated by comparing computed results with experimental measurements. Good agreements are found. The numerical simulation code is then used to investigate the physical properties of the acoustic liner. It is shown that an acoustic liner can produce self-noise in the presence of a grazing flow and that a feedback acoustic resonance mechanism is responsible for the generation of this liner self-noise. In addition, the same mechanism also creates additional liner drag. An estimate, based on numerical simulation data, indicates that for a resonant liner with a 10% open area ratio, the drag increase would be about 4% of the turbulent boundary layer drag over a flat wall.

  14. Preliminary study of the effect of the turbulent flow field around complex surfaces on their acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Boldman, D.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly extensive measurements have been conducted of the turbulent flow around various surfaces as a basis for a study of the acoustic characteristics involved. In the experiments the flow from a nozzle was directed upon various two-dimensional surface configurations such as the three-flap model. A turbulent flow field description is given and an estimate of the acoustic characteristics is provided. The developed equations are based upon fundamental theories for simple configurations having simple flows. Qualitative estimates are obtained regarding the radiation pattern and the velocity power law. The effect of geometry and turbulent flow distribution on the acoustic emission from simple configurations are discussed.

  15. Low-flow characteristics and profiles for selected streams in the Roanoke River basin, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of the magnitude and frequency of low-flow discharges is an important part of protecting surface-water resources and planning for municipal and industrial economic expansion. Low-flow characteristics are summarized for 22 continuous-record gaging stations in North Carolina (19 sites) and Virginia (3 sites) and 60 partial-record gaging stations in the North Carolina Roanoke River Basin. Records of discharge collected through the 1994 water year are used. Flow characteristics included in the summary are (1) average annual unit flow, (2) 7Q10 low-flow discharge, the minimum average discharge for a 7-consecutive-day period occurring, on average, once in 10 years; (3) 30Q2 low-flow discharge; (4) W7Q10 low-flow discharge, similar to 7Q10 discharge except that flow during November through March only is considered; and (5) 7Q2 low-flow discharge. The potential for sustaining base flows is moderate to high in the western part of the basin as well as in the eastern and western fringes of the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces, respectively. Areas of low potential for sustaining base flow exist in the central part of the basin (between eastern Caswell County and western Warren County), where soils have low infiltration rates, and in lower regions of the Coastal Plain, where small streams tend to have zero flow during prolonged drought. Drainage area and low-flow discharge profiles are presented for 10 streams in the Roanoke River Basin in North Carolina and reflect a wide range in basin size, characteristics, and streamflow conditions. The selected streams are Town Fork Creek, Hogans Creek, Mayo River, Buffalo Creek, Smith River, Country Line Creek, Dan River, Marlow Creek, Hyco River, and Roanoke River. The drainage-area profiles show the increases in drainage areas as streams travel their course in the basin. At the mouths of streams profiles, the drainage areas range from 22 miles to about 9,700 miles. Low-flow discharges for each stream

  16. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating-centerbody choked-flow inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.; Abbott, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Low-speed wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine the effects of free-stream velocity and incidence angle on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a translating centerbody choked-flow inlet. The inlet was sized to fit a 13.97 cm diameter fan with a design weight flow of 2.49 kg/sec. Performance was determined at free-stream velocities to 45 meters per second and incidence angles of 0 deg to 50 deg. The inlet was operated in both the choked and unchoked modes over a range of weight flows. Measurements were made of inlet total pressure recovery, flow distortion, surface static pressure distribution, and fan noise suppression. In the choked mode, increasing incidence angle tended to reduce the amount of inlet noise suppression for a given amount of inlet suction. This tendency was overcome by applying sufficient inlet suction to increase the flow Mach number. At 45 meters per second free-stream velocity, at least 22 decibels of suppression were measured at 35 deg incidence angle with a total pressure recovery of 0.985.

  17. Estimating selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic-mean flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Gary R.; Fowler, Kathleen K.; Arihood, Leslie D.

    2016-09-06

    Information on low-flow characteristics of streams is essential for the management of water resources. This report provides equations for estimating the 1-, 7-, and 30-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years and the harmonic-mean flow at ungaged, unregulated stream sites in Indiana. These equations were developed using the low-flow statistics and basin characteristics for 108 continuous-record streamgages in Indiana with at least 10 years of daily mean streamflow data through the 2011 climate year (April 1 through March 31). The equations were developed in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.Regression techniques were used to develop the equations for estimating low-flow frequency statistics and the harmonic-mean flows on the basis of drainage-basin characteristics. A geographic information system was used to measure basin characteristics for selected streamgages. A final set of 25 basin characteristics measured at all the streamgages were evaluated to choose the best predictors of the low-flow statistics.Logistic-regression equations applicable statewide are presented for estimating the probability that selected low-flow frequency statistics equal zero. These equations use the explanatory variables total drainage area, average transmissivity of the full thickness of the unconsolidated deposits within 1,000 feet of the stream network, and latitude of the basin outlet. The percentage of the streamgage low-flow statistics correctly classified as zero or nonzero using the logistic-regression equations ranged from 86.1 to 88.9 percent.Generalized-least-squares regression equations applicable statewide for estimating nonzero low-flow frequency statistics use total drainage area, the average hydraulic conductivity of the top 70 feet of unconsolidated deposits, the slope of the basin, and the index of permeability and thickness of the Quaternary surficial sediments as explanatory variables. The average standard error of

  18. Estimating selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic-mean flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Gary R.; Fowler, Kathleen K.; Arihood, Leslie D.

    2016-01-01

    Information on low-flow characteristics of streams is essential for the management of water resources. This report provides equations for estimating the 1-, 7-, and 30-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years and the harmonic-mean flow at ungaged, unregulated stream sites in Indiana. These equations were developed using the low-flow statistics and basin characteristics for 108 continuous-record streamgages in Indiana with at least 10 years of daily mean streamflow data through the 2011 climate year (April 1 through March 31). The equations were developed in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.Regression techniques were used to develop the equations for estimating low-flow frequency statistics and the harmonic-mean flows on the basis of drainage-basin characteristics. A geographic information system was used to measure basin characteristics for selected streamgages. A final set of 25 basin characteristics measured at all the streamgages were evaluated to choose the best predictors of the low-flow statistics.Logistic-regression equations applicable statewide are presented for estimating the probability that selected low-flow frequency statistics equal zero. These equations use the explanatory variables total drainage area, average transmissivity of the full thickness of the unconsolidated deposits within 1,000 feet of the stream network, and latitude of the basin outlet. The percentage of the streamgage low-flow statistics correctly classified as zero or nonzero using the logistic-regression equations ranged from 86.1 to 88.9 percent.Generalized-least-squares regression equations applicable statewide for estimating nonzero low-flow frequency statistics use total drainage area, the average hydraulic conductivity of the top 70 feet of unconsolidated deposits, the slope of the basin, and the index of permeability and thickness of the Quaternary surficial sediments as explanatory variables. The average standard error of

  19. Streaming driven by sessile microbubbles: Explaining flow patterns and frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound excitation of bubbles drives powerful steady streaming flows which have found widespread applications in microfluidics, where bubbles are typically of semicircular cross section and attached to walls of the device (sessile). While bubble-driven streaming in bulk fluid is well understood, this practically relevant case presents additional complexity introduced by the wall and contact lines. We develop an asymptotic theory that takes into account the presence of the wall as well as the oscillation dynamics of the bubble, providing a complete description of the streaming flow as a function only of the driving frequency, the bubble size, and the physical properties of the fluid. We show that the coupling between different bubble oscillation modes sustains the experimentally observed streaming flow vortex pattern over a broad range of frequencies, greatly exceeding the widths of individual mode resonances. Above a threshold frequency, we predict, and observe in experiment, reversal of the flow direction. Our analytical theory can be used to guide the design of microfluidic devices, both in situations where robust flow patterns insensitive to parameter changes are desired (e.g. lab-on-a-chip sorters), and in cases where intentional modulation of the flow field appearance is key (e.g. efficient mixers). Current address: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology.

  20. A logistic regression equation for estimating the probability of a stream flowing perennially in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bent, Gardner C.; Archfield, Stacey A.

    2002-01-01

    A logistic regression equation was developed for estimating the probability of a stream flowing perennially at a specific site in Massachusetts. The equation provides city and town conservation commissions and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection with an additional method for assessing whether streams are perennial or intermittent at a specific site in Massachusetts. This information is needed to assist these environmental agencies, who administer the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act of 1996, which establishes a 200-foot-wide protected riverfront area extending along the length of each side of the stream from the mean annual high-water line along each side of perennial streams, with exceptions in some urban areas. The equation was developed by relating the verified perennial or intermittent status of a stream site to selected basin characteristics of naturally flowing streams (no regulation by dams, surface-water withdrawals, ground-water withdrawals, diversion, waste-water discharge, and so forth) in Massachusetts. Stream sites used in the analysis were identified as perennial or intermittent on the basis of review of measured streamflow at sites throughout Massachusetts and on visual observation at sites in the South Coastal Basin, southeastern Massachusetts. Measured or observed zero flow(s) during months of extended drought as defined by the 310 Code of Massachusetts Regulations (CMR) 10.58(2)(a) were not considered when designating the perennial or intermittent status of a stream site. The database used to develop the equation included a total of 305 stream sites (84 intermittent- and 89 perennial-stream sites in the State, and 50 intermittent- and 82 perennial-stream sites in the South Coastal Basin). Stream sites included in the database had drainage areas that ranged from 0.14 to 8.94 square miles in the State and from 0.02 to 7.00 square miles in the South Coastal Basin.Results of the logistic regression analysis

  1. Applications of digital holography in visualized measurement of acoustic and flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianlin; Li, Enpu; Sun, Weiwei; Di, Jianglei

    2010-03-01

    Digital holography allows recording the hologram using digitally imaging devices such as CCD, and reconstructing the holographic image by numerically simulating the diffraction of the hologram. Its main advantages are by which one can directly obtain the complex amplitude distribution of the object field, so that more impersonally measure the detail information of the object field, such as the distribution of the refractive index changing in crystals induced by light irradiation, deformation of the object surface, particle distribution, as well as acoustic field, flow field and temperature distribution in air. In this paper, we summarize the principle and some of our experimental results on the applications of digital holography in visualized measurement of acoustic standing wave (acoustic levitation field), plasma plume and water flow (Karman vortex street) fields.

  2. Applications of digital holography in visualized measurement of acoustic and flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianlin; Li, Enpu; Sun, Weiwei; di, Jianglei

    2009-12-01

    Digital holography allows recording the hologram using digitally imaging devices such as CCD, and reconstructing the holographic image by numerically simulating the diffraction of the hologram. Its main advantages are by which one can directly obtain the complex amplitude distribution of the object field, so that more impersonally measure the detail information of the object field, such as the distribution of the refractive index changing in crystals induced by light irradiation, deformation of the object surface, particle distribution, as well as acoustic field, flow field and temperature distribution in air. In this paper, we summarize the principle and some of our experimental results on the applications of digital holography in visualized measurement of acoustic standing wave (acoustic levitation field), plasma plume and water flow (Karman vortex street) fields.

  3. Dust acoustic vortices in an inhomogeneous quantum magnetoplasma with dissipation and sheared dust flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Nargis, Shahida

    2008-10-01

    Linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dust acoustic waves are studied in a nonuniform, dissipative quantum plasma with sheared dust flow parallel to the ambient magnetic field, using the quantum hydrodynamic model. It is shown that the shear dust flow parallel to the external magnetic field can drive the quantum dust-acoustic wave unstable provided it has a negative slope. Stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations that govern the quantum dust-acoustic waves are also obtained. It is found that electrostatic monopolar, dipolar, and vortex street-type solutions can appear in such a plasma. It is observed that the inclusion of dust, quantum statistical, and Bohm potential terms significantly modify the scale lengths of these nonlinear structures. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to the dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  4. Can gene flow have negative demographic consequences? Mixed evidence from stream threespine stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jean-Sébastien; Hendry, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Dispersal and gene flow can have both positive and negative effects on population size, but little empirical support from nature exists for the negative effects. We test for such effects in a stream population of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) that is subject to high gene flow from a lake and is thus maladapted to stream conditions. In this system, maladaptation increases with distance along the stream, and this increase is associated with decreasing population densities until stickleback are no longer present (2.5 km from the lake). We conducted field experiments to inform whether this association might reflect a negative role for gene flow in constraining population size and therefore causing a local range limit. We specifically tested predictions deriving from theory: peripheral populations should show partial local adaptation, be under strong selection and not simply be maintained by dispersal. First, a transplant experiment suggested a weak home-site advantage in the peripheral population. Second, a mark–recapture study showed directional selection for a stream-adapted phenotype in 1 of 2 years. Third, another mark–recapture experiment showed that dispersal is limited to the point that positive demographic effects of dispersal are probably minimal. We conclude that, although gene flow does constrain morphological maladaptation in the outlet stream population, the evidence for its contribution to population size and range limits is mixed. We discuss the implications of our work for the study of factors influencing the evolution of species' ranges. PMID:19414468

  5. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  6. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  7. Interactions of landscape position, stream flow, and litter quality on litter decomposition in intermittent to ephemeral streams in the American Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, K. A.; Schwabedissen, S. G.; Gallo, E. L.; Meixner, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ephemeral streams are an important but little studied resource in the American Southwest. Many streams in arid and semi-arid regions are ephemeral (e.g. 89% of western US), only flowing in response to rainfall, and the distribution of these streams is likely to increase in a changing climate. Given the hydrologic variability and additional water present in ephemeral stream systems, decomposition rates are likely to vary as a function of stream flow presence and soil-water presence. Here we examine how different types of litter decompose across a climate gradient in Arizona with a range of ephemeral, intermittent to perennial streams. We used a space for time substitution and deployed common gamble oak and sycamore litterbags at three replicate reach transects at 13 sites in Arizona over an 18-month period. Within each of these sites, we deployed little bags in channel, riparian, and channel landscape positions for (1100 total litter bags). We measured soil-water presence and stream flow days with electrical resistivity sensors. Cumulative rainfall ranged from 9 to 38 cm across the sites whereas cumulative stream flow presence varied dramatically across the sites, from 11 to 433 days over the 18-month deployment. As expected, rates of decomposition were higher in channels than riparian and upland positions at sites with higher soil-water and stream flow presence and slower for oak compared to sycamore leaves. Eighty-six of the oak compared to seventy four percent of the sycamore mass was remaining after 180 days. Cumulative days of soil -water presence and stream flow associated with each site were positively related to rates of decomposition of litter located in channels suggesting that changes in streamflow and soil-water presence associated climate change will have large effects of rates of nutrient release via the process of decomposition.

  8. Estimates of median flows for streams on the Kansas surface water register

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2002-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a-2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a-2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10-years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the uncontrolled gaging stations used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a root mean square error of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a root mean square error of 0.247 logarithmic units. These equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the regression-estimated and gaged flow information. On

  9. Solar forcing of the stream flow of a continental scale South American river.

    PubMed

    Mauas, Pablo J D; Flamenco, Eduardo; Buccino, Andrea P

    2008-10-17

    Solar forcing on climate has been reported in several studies although the evidence so far remains inconclusive. Here, we analyze the stream flow of one of the largest rivers in the world, the Paraná in southeastern South America. For the last century, we find a strong correlation with the sunspot number, in multidecadal time scales, and with larger solar activity corresponding to larger stream flow. The correlation coefficient is r=0.78, significant to a 99% level. In shorter time scales we find a strong correlation with El Niño. These results are a step toward flood prediction, which might have great social and economic impacts. PMID:18999720

  10. Method of measuring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Jr., Henry D.

    1978-04-11

    This invention relates to an improved method of monitoring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream. The method very basically consists of heating equal sections of the fluid stream above and below the point of entry of the substance to be monitored, and measuring and comparing the resulting change in temperature of the sections. Advantage is taken of the difference in thermal characteristics of the fluid and the substance to be measured to correlate temperature differences in the sections above and below the substance feed point for providing an indication of the mass flow rate of the substance.

  11. Solar forcing of the stream flow of a continental scale South American river.

    PubMed

    Mauas, Pablo J D; Flamenco, Eduardo; Buccino, Andrea P

    2008-10-17

    Solar forcing on climate has been reported in several studies although the evidence so far remains inconclusive. Here, we analyze the stream flow of one of the largest rivers in the world, the Paraná in southeastern South America. For the last century, we find a strong correlation with the sunspot number, in multidecadal time scales, and with larger solar activity corresponding to larger stream flow. The correlation coefficient is r=0.78, significant to a 99% level. In shorter time scales we find a strong correlation with El Niño. These results are a step toward flood prediction, which might have great social and economic impacts.

  12. Modelling stream flow and quantifying blue water using modified STREAM model in the Upper Pangani River Basin, Eastern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiptala, J. K.; Mul, M. L.; Mohamed, Y.; van der Zaag, P.

    2013-12-01

    Effective management of all water uses in a river basin requires spatially distributed information of evaporative water use and the link towards the river flows. Physically based spatially distributed models are often used to generate this kind of information. These models require enormous amounts of data, if not sufficient would result in equifinality. In addition, hydrological models often focus on natural processes and fail to account for water usage. This study presents a spatially distributed hydrological model that has been developed for a heterogeneous, highly utilized and data scarce river basin in Eastern Africa. Using an innovative approach, remote sensing derived evapotranspiration and soil moisture variables for three years were incorporated as input data in the model conceptualization of the STREAM model (Spatial Tools for River basin Environmental Analysis and Management). To cater for the extensive irrigation water application, an additional blue water component was incorporated in the STREAM model to quantify irrigation water use (ETb(I)). To enhance model parameter identification and calibration, three hydrological landscapes (wetlands, hill-slope and snowmelt) were identified using field data. The model was calibrated against discharge data from five gauging stations and showed considerably good performance especially in the simulation of low flows where the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of the natural logarithm (Eln) of discharge were greater than 0.6 in both calibration and validation periods. At the outlet, the Eln coefficient was even higher (0.90). During low flows, ETb(I) consumed nearly 50% of the river flow in the river basin. ETb(I) model result was comparable to the field based net irrigation estimates with less than 20% difference. These results show the great potential of developing spatially distributed models that can account for supplementary water use. Such information is important for water resources planning and management in heavily

  13. Median and Low-Flow Characteristics for Streams under Natural and Diverted Conditions, Northeast Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    Flow-duration statistics under natural (undiverted) and diverted flow conditions were estimated for gaged and ungaged sites on 21 streams in northeast Maui, Hawaii. The estimates were made using the optimal combination of continuous-record gaging-station data, low-flow measurements, and values determined from regression equations developed as part of this study. Estimated 50- and 95-percent flow duration statistics for streams are presented and the analyses done to develop and evaluate the methods used in estimating the statistics are described. Estimated streamflow statistics are presented for sites where various amounts of streamflow data are available as well as for locations where no data are available. Daily mean flows were used to determine flow-duration statistics for continuous-record stream-gaging stations in the study area following U.S. Geological Survey established standard methods. Duration discharges of 50- and 95-percent were determined from total flow and base flow for each continuous-record station. The index-station method was used to adjust all of the streamflow records to a common, long-term period. The gaging station on West Wailuaiki Stream (16518000) was chosen as the index station because of its record length (1914-2003) and favorable geographic location. Adjustments based on the index-station method resulted in decreases to the 50-percent duration total flow, 50-percent duration base flow, 95-percent duration total flow, and 95-percent duration base flow computed on the basis of short-term records that averaged 7, 3, 4, and 1 percent, respectively. For the drainage basin of each continuous-record gaged site and selected ungaged sites, morphometric, geologic, soil, and rainfall characteristics were quantified using Geographic Information System techniques. Regression equations relating the non-diverted streamflow statistics to basin characteristics of the gaged basins were developed using ordinary-least-squares regression analyses. Rainfall

  14. Acoustic intensity-based method for sound radiations in a uniform flow.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Zhou, Zhengfang; Zhuang, Mei

    2009-11-01

    An acoustic intensity-based method (AIBM) is extended and verified for predicting sound radiation in a subsonic uniform flow. The method assumes that the acoustic propagation is governed by the modified Helmholtz equation on and outside of a control surface, which encloses all the noise sources and nonlinear effects. With acoustic pressure derivative and its co-located acoustic pressure as input from an open control surface, the unique solution of the modified Helmholtz equation is obtained by solving the least squares problem. The AIBM is coupled with near-field Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)/Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) methods to predict sound radiation of model aeroacoustic problems. The effectiveness of this hybrid approach has been demonstrated by examples of both tonal and broadband noise. Since the AIBM method is stable and accurate based on the input acoustic data from an open surface in a radiated field, it is therefore advantageous for the far-field prediction of aerodynamics noise propagation when an acoustic input from a closed control surface, like the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings surface, is not available [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 264, 321-342 (1969)]. PMID:19894800

  15. Flow-Through Stream Modeling with MODFLOW and MT3D: Certainties and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Ben Simon, Rose; Bernard, Stéphane; Meurville, Charles; Rebour, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to assess MODFLOW and MT3D capabilities for simulating the spread of contaminants from a river exhibiting an unusual relationship with an alluvial aquifer, with the groundwater head higher than the river head on one side and lower on the other (flow-through stream). A series of simulation tests is conducted using a simple hypothetical model so as to characterize and quantify these limitations. Simulation results show that the expected contaminant spread could be achieved with a specific configuration composed of two sets of parameters: (1) modeled object parameters (hydraulic groundwater gradient, hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer and streambed), and (2) modeling parameters (vertical discretization of aquifer, horizontal refinement of stream modeled with River [RIV] package). The influence of these various parameters on simulation results is investigated, and potential complications and errors are identified. Contaminant spread from stream to aquifer is not always reproduced by MT3D due to the RIV package's inability to simulate lateral exchange fluxes between stream and aquifer. This paper identifies the need for a MODFLOW streamflow package allowing lateral stream-aquifer interactions and streamflow routine calculations. Such developments could be of particular interest for modeling contaminated flow-through streams.

  16. Acoustic Characterization of Axial Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Operation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner L; Royston, Thomas J; Bhat, Geetha; Tatooles, Antone J

    2016-01-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), implantable pumps used to supplement cardiac output, has become an increasingly common and effective treatment for advanced heart failure. Although modern continuous-flow LVADs improve quality of life and survival more than medical management of heart failure, device malfunction remains a common concern. Improved noninvasive methods for assessment of LVAD function are needed to detect device complications. An electronic stethoscope was used to record sounds from the HeartMate II axial flow pump in vitro and in vivo. The data were then uploaded to a computer and analyzed using two types of acoustic analysis software. Left ventricular assist device acoustics were quantified and were related to pump speed, acoustic environment, and inflow and outflow graft patency. Peak frequency values measured in vivo were found to correlate strongly with both predicted values and in vitro measurements (r > 0.999). Plots of the area under the acoustic spectrum curve, obtained by integrating over 50 Hz increments, showed strong correlations between in vivo and in vitro measurements (r > 0.966). Device thrombosis was found to be associated with reduced LVAD acoustic amplitude in two patients who underwent surgical device exchange.

  17. Acoustic Characterization of Axial Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Operation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner L; Royston, Thomas J; Bhat, Geetha; Tatooles, Antone J

    2016-01-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), implantable pumps used to supplement cardiac output, has become an increasingly common and effective treatment for advanced heart failure. Although modern continuous-flow LVADs improve quality of life and survival more than medical management of heart failure, device malfunction remains a common concern. Improved noninvasive methods for assessment of LVAD function are needed to detect device complications. An electronic stethoscope was used to record sounds from the HeartMate II axial flow pump in vitro and in vivo. The data were then uploaded to a computer and analyzed using two types of acoustic analysis software. Left ventricular assist device acoustics were quantified and were related to pump speed, acoustic environment, and inflow and outflow graft patency. Peak frequency values measured in vivo were found to correlate strongly with both predicted values and in vitro measurements (r > 0.999). Plots of the area under the acoustic spectrum curve, obtained by integrating over 50 Hz increments, showed strong correlations between in vivo and in vitro measurements (r > 0.966). Device thrombosis was found to be associated with reduced LVAD acoustic amplitude in two patients who underwent surgical device exchange. PMID:26536535

  18. Flow-excited acoustic resonances of coaxial side-branches in an annular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthurs, D.; Ziada, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the aeroacoustic response of an annular duct with closed coaxial side-branches, and examines the effect of several passive countermeasures on the resonance intensity. The investigated geometry is inspired by the design of the Roll-Posts in the Rolls-Royce LiftSystem® engine, which is currently being developed for the Lockheed Martin Joint Strike Fighter (JSF®) aircraft. The effects of design parameters, such as diameter ratio, branch length ratio and thickness of the annular flow on the frequency and resonance intensity of the first acoustic mode are studied experimentally. Numerical simulations of the acoustic mode shapes and frequencies are also performed. The annular flow has been found to excite several acoustic modes, the strongest in all cases being the first acoustic mode, which consists of a quarter wavelength along the length of each branch. The ratios of the branch length and diameter, with respect to the main duct diameter, have been found to have strong effects on the frequency of the acoustic modes.

  19. No Snow No Flow: How Montane Stream Networks Respond to Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, G.; Nolin, A. W.; Selker, J. S.; Lewis, S.; Hempel, L. A.; Jefferson, A.; Walter, C.; Roques, C.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrologic extremes, such as drought, offer an exceptional opportunity to explore how runoff generation mechanisms and stream networks respond to changing precipitation regimes. The winter of 2014-2015 was the warmest on record in western Oregon, US, with record low snowpacks, and was followed by an anomalously warm, dry spring, resulting in historically low streamflows. But a year like 2015 is more than an outlier meteorological year. It provides a unique opportunity to test fundamental hypotheses for how montane hydrologic systems will respond to anticipated changes in amount and timing of recharge. In particular, the volcanic Cascade Mountains represent a "landscape laboratory" comprised of two distinct runoff regimes: the surface-flow dominated Western Cascade watersheds, with flashy streamflow regimes, rapid baseflow recession, and very low summer flows; and (b) the spring-fed High Cascade watersheds, with a slow-responding streamflow regime, and a long and sustained baseflow recession that maintains late summer streamflow through deep-groundwater contributions to high volume, coldwater springs. We hypothesize that stream network response to the extremely low snowpack and recharge varies sharply in these two regions. In surface flow dominated streams, the location of channel heads can migrate downstream, contracting the network longitudinally; wetted channel width and depth contract laterally as summer recession proceeds and flows diminish. In contrast, in spring-fed streams, channel heads "jump" to the next downstream spring when upper basin spring flow diminishes to zero. Downstream of flowing springs, wetted channel width and depth contract laterally as flows recede. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a field campaign to measure changing discharge, hydraulic geometry, and channel head location in both types of watersheds throughout the summer and early fall. Multiple cross-section sites were established on 6 streams representing both flow regime types

  20. Assessment of and Improvements to Acoustic Velocimetry in Flows in Core-like Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautino, A. R.; Adams, M. M.; Stone, D.; Triana, S. A.; Lathrop, D. P.; Lekic, V.

    2015-12-01

    Rapidly rotating fluid flows are found in a wide variety of geophysical and astrophysical contexts, including the Earth's outer core. The dynamics of such flows can be studied experimentally at conditions inaccessible to computational modeling. However, accurately measuring the mean and time-varying flows noninvasively presents a technical challenge, particularly in opaque liquids. In this study, we tackle the problem of mapping zonal flow profiles in spherical Couette flows, shear flows in a core-like geometry. These rotating flows induce shifts and splittings in the spectrum of the acoustically resonant fluid-filled cavity. The azimuthal component of flow can be estimated from the spectra of the acoustic modes, using inversion procedures adapted from Helioseismology. Here, we present a technique for reconstructing the mean velocity field using modal analysis by way of the Finite Element Method, which is used to compute the forward model accurately, taking into account structural geometries associated with the experimental setups, such as shafts and axles. Accurate forward modeling is crucial for reliable mode identification, and we demonstrate that it allows us to identify many more modes than is possible when using the spherically symmetric approximation. We model flow geometry as a superposition of low order basis flow patterns, each of which affects mode frequency splittings and shifts through advection and Coriolis forces.

  1. Methods for estimating low-flow characteristics of ungaged streams in selected areas, northern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumenik, R.P.; Grubbs, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Methods for estimating low-flow frequency characteristics at ungaged sites were developed for two areas in northern Florida. In the Yellow, Blackwater, Escambia, and Perdido River Basins study area (northwestern Florida), regional regression equations were developed for estimating the 7- and 30-day, 2- and 10-year low-flow characteristic (Q7,2, Q7,10, Q30,2, and Q30,10) by determining values of basin characteristics from digital Geographical Information System (GIS) coverages or hardcopy maps. A GIS, ARC-INFO, was used to quantify basin characteristics that were used in regression equations. Sources of digital data used in this analysis are elevation data, from a digital elevation model, stream length and location data from a digital hydrography coverage, and watershed boundaries digitized from topographic maps. The most accurate regression equations employed a basin characteristic that was based on a simple conceptual model of one- dimensional ground-water flow using Darcy's law. Slightly less accurate equations were obtained using drainage area as the only explanatory variable. The standard error of prediction for the Darcy and drainage area equations of Q7,2 was 65 and 74 percent, respectively; Q7,10, 58 and 62 percent, respectively; Q30,2, 51 and, 54 percent, respectively; and Q30,10, 44 and 51 percent, respectively. In the Santa Fe River Basin study area (northeastern Florida), a flow-routing method was used to estimate low-flow characteristics at ungaged sites from low stream- flow analyses based on records at gaged sites. The use of the flow-routing method is suggested for areas where regression analysis proves unsuccessful, where low-flow characteristics have been defined at a significant number of sites, and where information about the basin characteristics has been thoroughly researched. Low-flow frequency characteristics determined at 40 sites and measurements made during five synoptic runs in 1989-91 were used to develop a flow-routing method. Low-flow

  2. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-15

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  3. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  4. Surface acoustic streaming in microfluidic system for rapid multicellular tumor spheroids generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlHasan, Layla; Qi, Aisha; Al-Aboodi, Aswan; Rezk, Amged; Shilton, Richie R.; Chan, Peggy P. Y.; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a novel and rapid method to generate in vitro three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. A SAW device with single-phase unidirectional transducer electrodes (SPUTD) on lithium niobate substrate was fabricated using standing UV photolithography and wet-etching techniques. To generate spheroids, the SAW device was loaded with medium containing human breast carcinoma (BT474) cells, an oscillating electrical signal at resonant frequency was supplied to the SPUDT to generate acoustic radiation in the medium. Spheroids with uniform size and shape can be obtained using this method in less than 1 minute, and the size of the spheroids can be controlled through adjusting the seeding density. The resulting spheroids were used for further cultivation and were monitored using an optical microscope in real time. The viability and actin organization of the spheroids were assessed using live/dead viability staining and actin cytoskeleton staining, respectively. Compared to spheroids generated using the liquid overlay method, the SAW generated spheroids exhibited higher circularity and higher viability. The F-actin filaments of spheroids appear to aggregate compared to that of untreated cells, indicating that mature spheroids can be obtained using this method. This spheroid generating method can be useful for a variety of biological studies and clinical applications.

  5. Evaluation of acoustic doppler velocity meters to quantify flow from Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal

  6. Climate change implications on maximum monthly stream flow in Cyprus using fuzzy regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukas, A.; Spiliotopoulos, M.

    2010-09-01

    Maximum stream flow data collected from Cyprus Water Development Department and outputs of global circulation models (General Circulation Models, GCM) are used in this study, to develop statistical downscaling techniques in order to investigate the impact of climate change on stream flow at Yermasoyia watershed, Cyprus. The Yermasoyia watershed is located in the southern side of mountain Troodos, northeast of Limassol city and it drains into Yermasoyia reservoir. The watershed area is about 157 km2 and its altitude ranges from 70 m up to 1400 m, above mean sea level. The watershed is constituted mainly by igneous rocks, degraded basalt and handholds. The mean annual precipitation is 638 mm while the mean annual flow is estimated in 22,5 millions m3. The reservoir water surface is 110 hectares and has maximum capacity of 13,6 million m3. Earlier studies have shown that the development of downscaling methodologies using multiple linear fuzzy regression models can give quite satisfactory results. In this study, the outputs of SRES A2 and SRES B2 scenarios of the second version of the Canadian Coupled Global Climate Model (CGCM2) are utilized. This model is based on the earlier CGCM1 (Flato et al. (2000), but with some improvements to address shortcomings identified in the first version. Fuzzy regression is used for the downscaling of maximum monthly stream flow. The methodology is validated by independent historical data and used for the estimation of future maximum stream flow time series. From the 30 years of observed data representing the current climate, the first 25 years (1968-1993) are considered for calibrating the downscaling model while the remaining 5 years (1994-1998) are used in order to validate the model. The model was first developed using the logarithm of observed maximum monthly streamflow as the depended variable and 36 output parameters of GCM as the candidate independent variables. Then, five (5) independent GCM parameters were selected, namely

  7. Validating alternative methodologies to estimate the hydrological regime of temporary streams when flow data are unavailable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Cid, Núria; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic life in temporary streams is strongly conditioned by the temporal variability of the hydrological conditions that control the occurrence and connectivity of diverse mesohabitats. In this context, the software TREHS (Temporary Rivers' Ecological and Hydrological Status) has been developed, in the framework of the LIFE Trivers project, to help managers for adequately implement the Water Framework Directive in this type of water bodies. TREHS, using the methodology described in Gallart et al (2012), defines six temporal 'aquatic states', based on the hydrological conditions representing different mesohabitats, for a given reach at a particular moment. Nevertheless, hydrological data for assessing the regime of temporary streams are often non-existent or scarce. The scarcity of flow data makes frequently impossible the characterization of temporary streams hydrological regimes and, as a consequence, the selection of the correct periods and methods to determine their ecological status. Because of its qualitative nature, the TREHS approach allows the use of alternative methodologies to assess the regime of temporary streams in the lack of observed flow data. However, to adapt the TREHS to this qualitative data both the temporal scheme (from monthly to seasonal) as well as the number of aquatic states (from 6 to 3) have been modified. Two alternatives complementary methodologies were tested within the TREHS framework to assess the regime of temporary streams: interviews and aerial photographs. All the gauging stations (13) belonging to the Catalan Internal Catchments (NE, Spain) with recurrent zero flows periods were selected to validate both methodologies. On one hand, non-structured interviews were carried out to inhabitants of villages and small towns near the gauging stations. Flow permanence metrics for input into TREHS were drawn from the notes taken during the interviews. On the other hand, the historical series of available aerial photographs (typically 10

  8. Fluid flow monitoring in hydrocarbon reservoirs using downhole measurements of streaming potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. D.; Saunders, J. H.; Vinogradov, J.; Jaafar, M. Z.; Pain, C. C.

    2009-04-01

    Downhole measurements of streaming potential, using permanently installed electrodes, are a promising new technology for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring, and may also be used to characterize fluid flow in aquifers and during CO2 sequestration. We have used a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to investigate the behavior of the streaming potential during hydrocarbon production in a range of reservoir environments. We demonstrate that streaming potential signals originate at water-oil and water-gas fronts, and at geological boundaries, where water saturation changes. As water encroaches on a production well, the streaming potential signal associated with the waterfront reaches the well whilst the front is up to 100m away, so the potential measured at the well starts to change relative to a reference electrode. The encroaching water can therefore be detected at some distance from the well, which contrasts with most other downhole monitoring techniques. Variations in the geometry of the encroaching waterfront may be characterized using an array of electrodes positioned along the well, but an understanding of the local reservoir geology is required to distinguish signals caused by the moving front, from those caused by saturation changes at geological boundaries. To interpret streaming potential measurements requires knowledge of the streaming potential coupling coefficient during multiphase flow of oil and/or gas, and brine which may be highly saline. We have measured the coupling coefficient in sandstone cores saturated with high salinity brine and find that it decreases with increasing brine salinity, but less rapidly than predicted by extrapolating historical data obtained in the low salinity range. The coupling coefficient is small, but still measurable, even when the brine salinity approaches the saturated concentration limit. We have used a simple bundle-of-capillary-tubes model to predict the variation in streaming potential coupling

  9. Determination of an equivalent pore size from acoustic flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Linde; Liu, Jin; Garrett, Steven

    2005-09-01

    The hydraulic radius, rh, is defined as the ratio of a channel's cross-sectional area to its perimeter. This parameter is important for specification of the performance of a porous medium that can be used as a regenerator in a Stirling engine or refrigerator. It is easy to calculate rh for pores of regular geometry, but difficult in more complex media. Two techniques which use oscillating flow to determine this parameter will be presented and compared. One technique extracts rh by finding the low velocity limit of the standard expression for viscous pressure drop in the Poiseuille flow regime. The other involves a plot of the nondimensional viscous flow resistance, Δpvis/Δxωρu, versus the reciprocal of the viscous penetration depth, 1/δν, in the laminar flow regime. When rh<δν, the flow behavior is frequency independent and the dynamics is characterized by rh only. When rh>δν, the flow resistance is frequency dependent and the dynamics is characterized by both rh and δν. It is possible to identify an effective hydraulic radius by equating it to the value of δν where that transition occurs. [Work supported by ONR.

  10. Velocity phase encoded MRI of gas flow in the acoustic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Geoffrey

    This thesis explores the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study acoustic oscillations of a gas in a cylindrical tube. It describes experiments performed under conditions where the gas is in the Acoustic Viscous Boundary Layer and its flow is laminar. Velocity maps acquired at discrete phases of the acoustic oscillation are presented, and are compared with thermoacoustic theory. This represents the first time that such information has been obtained using MRI. An important component of the work reported in this thesis involves the design, construction, and characterization of an acousto-mechanical resonator (AMR). This device can drive oscillatory gas motion and impose density variations at rates that are compatible with MRI data acquisition. To date it has been operated at frequencies ranging from 0.7 Hz to 1.65 Hz and with peak gas displacement amplitudes of up to 2.5 cm. The AMR is based on a modular design intended to permit the study of acoustic flow through a variety of different structures and under a variety of different conditions. MRI experiments were performed on a mixture of thermally-polarized 3He and O2. The latter is used to increase the 3He longitudinal nuclear relaxation rate T1 --1 to a value comparable to the acoustic frequency. In turn, measurements of T1 --1 provide a means for determining the precise composition of the gas mixture. Velocity phase-encoding techniques were then used to map acoustic flow fields: A bipolar magnetic field gradient pulse inserted into the imaging sequence stores velocity information in the phase of the complex image data. The MRI pulse sequence is synchronized with the periodic motion of the gas so that the velocity measurement can be performed at discrete and well-defined phases of the acoustic cycle. These non-invasive flow imaging experiments provide information that is complementary to that which can be obtained from other gas velocity probes, and may lead to new opportunities in the study of acoustic

  11. Viscosity changes of riparian water controls diurnal fluctuations of stream-flow and DOC concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Michael; Klaus, Julian; Pfister, Laurent; Weiler, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Diurnal fluctuations in stream-flow are commonly explained as being triggered by the daily evapotranspiration cycle in the riparian zone, leading to stream flow minima in the afternoon. While this trigger effect must necessarily be constrained by the extent of the growing season of vegetation, we here show evidence of daily stream flow maxima in the afternoon in a small headwater stream during the dormant season. We hypothesize that the afternoon maxima in stream flow are induced by viscosity changes of riparian water that is caused by diurnal temperature variations of the near surface groundwater in the riparian zone. The patterns were observed in the Weierbach headwater catchment in Luxembourg. The catchment is covering an area of 0.45 km2, is entirely covered by forest and is dominated by a schistous substratum. DOC concentration at the outlet of the catchment was measured with the field deployable UV-Vis spectrometer spectro::lyser (scan Messtechnik GmbH) with a high frequency of 15 minutes over several months. Discharge was measured with an ISCO 4120 Flow Logger. During the growing season, stream flow shows a frequently observed diurnal pattern with discharge minima in the afternoon. During the dormant season, a long dry period with daily air temperature amplitudes of around 10 ° C occurred in March and April 2014, with discharge maxima in the afternoon. The daily air temperature amplitude led to diurnal variations in the water temperature of the upper 10 cm of the riparian zone. Higher riparian water temperatures cause a decrease in water viscosity and according to the Hagen-Poiseuille equation, the volumetric flow rate is inversely proportional to viscosity. Based on the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the viscosity changes of water, we calculated higher flow rates of near surface groundwater through the riparian zone into the stream in the afternoon which explains the stream flow maxima in the afternoon. With the start of the growing season, the viscosity

  12. Unsteady boundary-layer flow over jerked plate moving in a free stream of viscoelastic fluid.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Sufian; Mehmood, Ahmer; Ali, Asif; Saleem, Najma

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0 ≤ τ < ∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs. PMID:24892060

  13. Unsteady Boundary-Layer Flow over Jerked Plate Moving in a Free Stream of Viscoelastic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Ahmer; Ali, Asif; Saleem, Najma

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0 ≤ τ < ∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs. PMID:24892060

  14. Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Paul D.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system cludes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provide a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

  15. Ecosystem Consequences of Contrasting Flow Regimes in an Urban Effects Stream Mesocosm Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    A stream mesocosm experiment was conducted to study the ecosystem-wide effects of two replicated flow hydrograph treatments programmed in an attempt to compare a simulated predevelopment condition to the theoretical changes that new development brings, while accounting for engine...

  16. 78 FR 65306 - Best Practices for Continuous Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... minimally disturbed, free-flowing freshwater wadeable streams is an impediment to analyses of long-term trends in biological, thermal, and hydrologic data. In recent years, there has been substantial interest..., including states in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and Southeast, are initiating collection of...

  17. Climate and Land-Cover Change Impacts on Stream Flow in the Southwest U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vegetation change in arid and semi-arid climatic regions of the American West are a primary concern in sustaining key ecosystem services such as clean, reliable water sources for multiple uses. Land cover and climate change impacts on stream flow were investigated in a southeast ...

  18. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments. PMID:17503939

  19. Acoustic mapping of diffuse flow at a seafloor hydrothermal site: Monolith Vent, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Wen, T.; Jones, C.; Mitsuzawa, K.; Bemis, K. G.; Dworski, J. G.

    Diffuse flow of hydrothermal solutions commonly occurs in patchy areas up to tens of meters in diameter in seafloor hydrothermal fields. It is recognized as a quantitatively significant component of thermal and chemical fluxes, yet is elusive to map. We report a new acoustic method to detect and map areas of diffuse flow using phase-coherent correlation techniques. The sonar system was modified to record phase information and mounted on DSV SEA CLIFF. The submersible occupied a stationary position on the seafloor and the transducer scanned the seafloor surrounding Monolith Vent, a sulfide edifice venting black smokers, at a nominal range of 17 m at a depth of 2249 m on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Patchy areas of uncorrelated returns clearly stood out from a background of returns that exhibited ping-to-ping correlation. The areas of uncorrelated returns coincided with areas of diffuse flow as mapped by a video survey with the Navy's Advanced Tethered Vehicle (ATV). Correlated returns were backscattered from invariant seafloor. Uncorrelated returns were distorted by index of refraction inhomogeneities as they passed through diffuse flow between the seafloor and the transducer. The acoustic method presented can synoptically map areas of diffuse flow. When combined with standard in situ measurement and sampling methods the acoustic mapping will facilitate accurate determination of diffuse thermal and chemical fluxes in seafloor hydrothermal fields.

  20. Numerical calculation of the transient behaviour of two pure cross-flow heat exchangers coupled by a circulating flow stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na Ranong, Chakkrit; Hapke, Jobst; Roetzel, Wilfried

    2010-11-01

    The transient thermal behaviour of a heat shifting system consisting of two pure cross-flow heat exchangers coupled by a circulating flow stream is studied theoretically. A suitable mathematical description of the system is based on the energy balance equation for general flow processes yielding a system of coupled hyperbolic partial differential equations in two dimensions. System responses to perturbations of inlet temperatures and mass flow rates are numerically calculated with an explicit finite difference method. A criterion for the generation of computational grids minimising effects of numerical dispersion and dissipation is applied to the system of coupled pure cross-flow heat exchangers which has not been considered up to now. Due to its internal circulation the coupled system shows a different behaviour compared to single cross-flow heat exchangers like inverse response and oscillatory behaviour to non-oscillating input signals.

  1. Evaluating Key Watershed Components of Low Flow Regimes in New England Streams.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Alisa C; Gold, Arthur J; Pelletier, Marguerite C

    2016-05-01

    Water resource managers seeking to optimize stream ecosystem services and abstractions of water from watersheds need an understanding of the importance of land use, physical and climatic characteristics, and hydrography on different low flow components of stream hydrographs. Within 33 USGS gaged watersheds of southern New England, we assessed relationships between watershed variables and a set of low flow parameters by using an information-theoretical approach. The key variables identified by the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) weighting factors as generating positive relationships with low flow events included percent stratified drift, mean elevation, drainage area, and mean August precipitation. The extent of wetlands in the watershed was negatively related to low flow magnitudes. Of the various land use variables, the percentage of developed land was found to have the highest importance and a negative relationship on low flow magnitudes, but was less important than wetlands and physical and climatic features. Our results suggest that management practices aimed to sustain low flows in fluvial systems can benefit from attention to specific watershed features. We draw attention to the finding that streams located in watersheds with high proportions of wetlands may require more stringent approaches to withdrawals to sustain fluvial ecosystems during drought periods, particularly in watersheds with extensive development and limited deposits of stratified drift.

  2. Urban contribution of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants to streams during differing flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Skopec, M.; Meyer, M.T.; Furlong, E.T.; Zaugg, S.D.

    2004-01-01

    During 2001, 76 water samples were collected upstream and downstream of select towns and cities in Iowa during high-, normal- and low-flow conditions to determine the contribution of urban centers to concentrations of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) in streams under varying flow conditions. The towns ranged in population from approximately 2000 to 200 000. Overall, one or more OWCs were detected in 98.7% of the samples collected, with 62 of the 105 compounds being found. The most frequently detected compounds were metolachlor (pesticide), cholesterol (plant and animal sterol), caffeine (stimulant), β-sitosterol (plant sterol) and 1,7-dimethylxanthine (caffeine degradate). The number of OWCs detected decreased as streamflow increased from low- (51 compounds detected) to normal- (28) to high-flow (24) conditions. Antibiotics and other prescription drugs were only frequently detected during low-flow conditions. During low-flow conditions, 15 compounds (out of the 23) and ten compound groups (out of 11) detected in more than 10% of the streams sampled had significantly greater concentrations in samples collected downstream than in those collected upstream of the urban centers. Conversely, no significant differences in the concentrations were found during high-flow conditions. Thus, the urban contribution of OWCs to streams became progressively muted as streamflow increased.

  3. Effects of dust correlations on the marginal stability of ion stream driven dust acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Manish K.; Avinash, K.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of dust–dust correlations on the marginal stability of dust acoustic waves excited by ion drift is studied. The ion drift is driven by the electric field {E}0 which is generally present in the discharge. Correlation effects on marginal stability are studied using augmented Debye–Hückel approximation. The marginal stability boundary is calculated in {E}0-{P}0 (P 0 is the pressure of the neutral gas) space with correlated dust grains. We show that due to dust-dust correlation the stability boundary moves into the unstable region thereby stabilizing the DAW. The effects are significant for smaller values of κ (=a/{λ }d) below unity (a is the mean particle distance and {λ }d is Debye length).

  4. Tracking Energy Flow Using a Volumetric Acoustic Intensity Imager (VAIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas P.

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement device has been invented at the Naval Research Laboratory which images instantaneously the intensity vector throughout a three-dimensional volume nearly a meter on a side. The measurement device consists of a nearly transparent spherical array of 50 inexpensive microphones optimally positioned on an imaginary spherical surface of radius 0.2m. Front-end signal processing uses coherence analysis to produce multiple, phase-coherent holograms in the frequency domain each related to references located on suspect sound sources in an aircraft cabin. The analysis uses either SVD or Cholesky decomposition methods using ensemble averages of the cross-spectral density with the fixed references. The holograms are mathematically processed using spherical NAH (nearfield acoustical holography) to convert the measured pressure field into a vector intensity field in the volume of maximum radius 0.4 m centered on the sphere origin. The utility of this probe is evaluated in a detailed analysis of a recent in-flight experiment in cooperation with Boeing and NASA on NASA s Aries 757 aircraft. In this experiment the trim panels and insulation were removed over a section of the aircraft and the bare panels and windows were instrumented with accelerometers to use as references for the VAIM. Results show excellent success at locating and identifying the sources of interior noise in-flight in the frequency range of 0 to 1400 Hz. This work was supported by NASA and the Office of Naval Research.

  5. A Computational Study of the Flow Physics of Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The present investigation is a continuation of a previous joint project between the Florida State University and the NASA Langley Research Center Liner Physics Team. In the previous project, a study of acoustic liners, in two dimensions, inside a normal incidence impedance tube was carried out. The study consisted of two parts. The NASA team was responsible for the experimental part of the project. This involved performing measurements in an impedance tube with a large aspect ratio slit resonator. The FSU team was responsible for the computation part of the project. This involved performing direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the NASA experiment in two dimensions using CAA methodology. It was agreed that upon completion of numerical simulation, the computed values of the liner impedance were to be sent to NASA for validation with experimental results. On following this procedure good agreements were found between numerical results and experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies and sound-pressure-level. Broadband incident sound waves were also simulated numerically and measured experimentally. Overall, good agreements were also found.

  6. Acoustic geometry through perturbation of mass accretion rate: radial flow in static spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananda, Deepika B.; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Das, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an alternative derivation of the general relativistic acoustic analogue geometry by perturbing the mass accretion rate or flux of an ideal fluid flowing radially in a general static and spherically symmetric spacetime. To the best of our knowledge, this has so far been done in non-relativistic scenario. The resulting causal structure of the two dimensional acoustic geometry is qualitatively similar to that one derives via the perturbation of the velocity potential. Using this, we then briefly discuss the stability issues by studying the wave configurations generated by the perturbation of the mass accretion rate, and formally demonstrate the stability of the accretion process. This is in qualitative agreement with earlier results on stability, established via study of wave configurations generated by the perturbation of velocity potential, by using the acoustic geometry associated with it. We further discuss explicit examples of the Schwarzschild and Rindler spacetimes.

  7. Methods for estimating flow-duration curve and low-flow frequency statistics for ungaged locations on small streams in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ziegeweid, Jeffrey R.; Lorenz, David L.; Sanocki, Chris A.; Czuba, Christiana R.

    2015-12-24

    Equations developed in this study apply only to stream locations where flows are not substantially affected by regulation, diversion, or urbanization. All equations presented in this study will be incorporated into StreamStats, a web-based geographic information system tool developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. StreamStats allows users to obtain streamflow statistics, basin characteristics, and other information for user-selected locations on streams through an interactive map.

  8. Morphodynamic Response of Laboratory Stream Beds to Unsteady Flow Events of Varying Magnitude and Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, A. D.; Gunsolus, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Natural processes and anthropogenic activities can cause short-term flow increases in rivers. These changes in flow, such as those caused by extreme rainfall events or seasonal variation in precipitation patterns, can result in substantial, and sometimes quite rapid, adjustments in sediment regime and alluvial stream morphology. Such morphological adjustments can pose short-term erosion hazards, increased risk of flooding, degradation to aquatic habitat, damage to in-stream engineering infrastructure, and re-mobilization of pollutants. Alterations in river hydraulics, sediment transport and stream morphology from specific unsteady events prove challenging to accurately predict and assess. This research quantifies the morphodynamic response of stream beds to unsteady flow events of varying magnitude and duration. For this purpose, a series of experimental runs is conducted in a 0.31 m-wide, 5.0 m-long laboratory sediment transport flume comprised of a well-sorted medium sand. All runs start from flat-bed initial conditions with a given longitudinal slope. The bed is allowed to develop under constant base-flow (antecedent) conditions until equilibrium conditions are reached. For each run a prescribed increase in flow rate for a pre-determined duration is applied to simulate the unsteady flow event. The magnitude of the increase in flow rate and the duration of the event are systematically varied from run to run. In each run measurements of bed morphology are conducted prior to the event (during antecedent flow conditions), at the conclusion of the event, and following a return base-flow (antecedent) conditions. Sediment transport rates are monitored throughout each run. The morphological response and the time-scale of the bed adjustments to unsteady events is quantified. The effect of the magnitude and duration of the flow increase on this increase is evaluated. This study contributes to the development of predictive tools for engineers and hydrologists to better

  9. Constraints upon the response of fish and crayfish to environmental flow releases in a regulated headwater stream network.

    PubMed

    Chester, Edwin T; Matthews, Ty G; Howson, Travis J; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Mackie, Jonathon K; Strachan, Scott R; Robson, Belinda J

    2014-01-01

    In dry climate zones, headwater streams are often regulated for water extraction causing intermittency in perennial streams and prolonged drying in intermittent streams. Regulation thereby reduces aquatic habitat downstream of weirs that also form barriers to migration by stream fauna. Environmental flow releases may restore streamflow in rivers, but are rarely applied to headwaters. We sampled fish and crayfish in four regulated headwater streams before and after the release of summer-autumn environmental flows, and in four nearby unregulated streams, to determine whether their abundances increased in response to flow releases. Historical data of fish and crayfish occurrence spanning a 30 year period was compared with contemporary data (electrofishing surveys, Victoria Range, Australia; summer 2008 to summer 2010) to assess the longer-term effects of regulation and drought. Although fish were recorded in regulated streams before 1996, they were not recorded in the present study upstream or downstream of weirs despite recent flow releases. Crayfish (Geocharax sp. nov. 1) remained in the regulated streams throughout the study, but did not become more abundant in response to flow releases. In contrast, native fish (Gadopsis marmoratus, Galaxias oliros, Galaxias maculatus) and crayfish remained present in unregulated streams, despite prolonged drought conditions during 2006-2010, and the assemblages of each of these streams remained essentially unchanged over the 30 year period. Flow release volumes may have been too small or have operated for an insufficient time to allow fish to recolonise regulated streams. Barriers to dispersal may also be preventing recolonisation. Indefinite continuation of annual flow releases, that prevent the unnatural cessation of flow caused by weirs, may eventually facilitate upstream movement of fish and crayfish in regulated channels; but other human-made dispersal barriers downstream need to be identified and ameliorated, to allow

  10. Distribution of Amphipods (Gammarus nipponensis Ueno) Among Mountain Headwater Streams with Different Legacies of Debris Flow Occurrence

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand the impacts of debris flows on the distribution of an amphipod with limited dispersal ability in the context of stream networks, we surveyed the presence of Gammarus nipponensis in 87 headwater streams with different legacies of debris flow occurrence within an 8.5-...

  11. Investigation of technology for the monitoring of UF/sub 6/ mass flow in UF/sub 6/ streams diluted with H/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, O.J.; Cooley, J.N.; Hewgley, W.A.; Moran, B.W.; Swindle, D.W. Jr.

    1986-12-01

    The applicability, availability, and effectiveness of gas flow meters are assessed as a means for verifying the mass flows of pure UF/sub 6/ streams diluted with a carrier gas. The initial survey identified the orifice, pitot tube, thermal, vortex shedding, and vortex precession (swirl) meters as promising for the intended use. Subsequent assessments of these flow meters revealed that two - the orifice meter and the pitot tube meter - are the best choices for the proposed applications: the first is recommended for low velocity gas, small diameter piping; the latter, for high velocity gas, large diameter piping. Final selection of the gas flow meters should be based on test loop evaluations in which the proposed meters are subjected to gas flows, temperatures, and pressures representative of those expected in service. Known instruments are evaluated that may be applicable to the measurement of uranium or UF/sub 6/ concentration in a UF/sub 6/ - H/sub 2/ process stream at an aerodynamic enrichment plant. Of the six procedures evaluated, four have been used for process monitoring in a UF/sub 6/ environment: gas mass spectrometry, infrared-ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, and acoustic gas analysis. The remaining two procedures, laser fluorimetry and atomic absorption spectroscopy, would require significant development work before they could be used for process monitoring. Infrared-ultravioloet-visible spectrophotometry is judged to be the best procedure currently available to perform the required measurement.

  12. A biological tool to assess flow connectivity in reference temporary streams from the Mediterranean Basin.

    PubMed

    Cid, N; Verkaik, I; García-Roger, E M; Rieradevall, M; Bonada, N; Sánchez-Montoya, M M; Gómez, R; Suárez, M L; Vidal-Abarca, M R; Demartini, D; Buffagni, A; Erba, S; Karaouzas, I; Skoulikidis, N; Prat, N

    2016-01-01

    Many streams in the Mediterranean Basin have temporary flow regimes. While timing for seasonal drought is predictable, they undergo strong inter-annual variability in flow intensity. This high hydrological variability and associated ecological responses challenge the ecological status assessment of temporary streams, particularly when setting reference conditions. This study examined the effects of flow connectivity in aquatic macroinvertebrates from seven reference temporary streams across the Mediterranean Basin where hydrological variability and flow conditions are well studied. We tested for the effect of flow cessation on two streamflow indices and on community composition, and, by performing random forest and classification tree analyses we identified important biological predictors for classifying the aquatic state either as flowing or disconnected pools. Flow cessation was critical for one of the streamflow indices studied and for community composition. Macroinvertebrate families found to be important for classifying the aquatic state were Hydrophilidae, Simuliidae, Hydropsychidae, Planorbiidae, Heptageniidae and Gerridae. For biological traits, trait categories associated to feeding habits, food, locomotion and substrate relation were the most important and provided more accurate predictions compared to taxonomy. A combination of selected metrics and associated thresholds based on the most important biological predictors (i.e. Bio-AS Tool) were proposed in order to assess the aquatic state in reference temporary streams, especially in the absence of hydrological data. Although further development is needed, the tool can be of particular interest for monitoring, restoration, and conservation purposes, representing an important step towards an adequate management of temporary rivers not only in the Mediterranean Basin but also in other regions vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

  13. Watershed flow paths and stream water nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratios under simulated precipitation regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mark B.; Wang, Dong

    2008-12-01

    Stream water nitrogen-to-phosphorus (N:P) ratios influence algal community composition and nutrient limitation in lotic ecosystems. N:P ratios trend across climates, with low stream water N:P ratios more common in arid climates, yet little is known about mechanisms that cause this spatial and temporal variation. This study evaluates the relationship between precipitation regime (mean annual precipitation and its frequency), watershed flow pathways, and stream water total N-to-total P (TN:TP) ratios, using a model based on a central Minnesota watershed. The purpose of the study was to examine hydrologic mechanisms that control stream water TN:TP ratios. We constructed a model that accounted for hydrological and biogeochemical processes, followed by 161 simulations under a wide range of precipitation frequency and intensity scenarios. Precipitation regime controlled total runoff and subsurface hydrologic connectivity, which had implications for TN and TP concentrations and TN:TP ratios. Results supported the hypothesis that watershed hydrology is an important control on stream water TN:TP ratios and suggested that variation of flow pathways can lead to fundamental changes of N:P ratios.

  14. Isentropic acoustic propagation in a viscous fluid with uniform circular pipeline flow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2013-10-01

    Isentropic wave propagation in a viscous fluid with a uniform mean flow confined by a rigid-walled circular pipeline is considered. A method based on the Fourier-Bessel theory, which is complete and orthogonal in Lebesgue space, is introduced to solve the convected acoustic equations. After validating the method's convergence, the cut-off frequency of wave modes is addressed. Furthermore, the effect of flow profile on wave attenuation is analyzed. Meanwhile, measurement performance of an ultrasonic flow meter based on wave propagation is numerically accounted.

  15. Isentropic acoustic propagation in a viscous fluid with uniform circular pipeline flow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2013-10-01

    Isentropic wave propagation in a viscous fluid with a uniform mean flow confined by a rigid-walled circular pipeline is considered. A method based on the Fourier-Bessel theory, which is complete and orthogonal in Lebesgue space, is introduced to solve the convected acoustic equations. After validating the method's convergence, the cut-off frequency of wave modes is addressed. Furthermore, the effect of flow profile on wave attenuation is analyzed. Meanwhile, measurement performance of an ultrasonic flow meter based on wave propagation is numerically accounted. PMID:24116397

  16. Topologically protected one-way edge mode in networks of acoustic resonators with circulating air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xu; He, Cheng; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Feng, Liang; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-05-01

    Recent explorations of topology in physical systems have led to a new paradigm of condensed matters characterized by topologically protected states and phase transition, for example, topologically protected photonic crystals enabled by magneto-optical effects. However, in other wave systems such as acoustics, topological states cannot be simply reproduced due to the absence of similar magnetics-related sound-matter interactions in naturally available materials. Here, we propose an acoustic topological structure by creating an effective gauge magnetic field for sound using circularly flowing air in the designed acoustic ring resonators. The created gauge magnetic field breaks the time-reversal symmetry, and therefore topological properties can be designed to be nontrivial with non-zero Chern numbers and thus to enable a topological sonic crystal, in which the topologically protected acoustic edge-state transport is observed, featuring robust one-way propagation characteristics against a variety of topological defects and impurities. Our results open a new venue to non-magnetic topological structures and promise a unique approach to effective manipulation of acoustic interfacial transport at will.

  17. Microbial responses to changes in flow status in temporary headwater streams: a cross-system comparison.

    PubMed

    Febria, Catherine M; Hosen, Jacob D; Crump, Byron C; Palmer, Margaret A; Williams, D Dudley

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are responsible for the bulk of biogeochemical processing in temporary headwater streams, yet there is still relatively little known about how community structure and function respond to periodic drying. Moreover, the ability to sample temporary habitats can be a logistical challenge due to the limited capability to measure and predict the timing, intensity and frequency of wet-dry events. Unsurprisingly, published datasets on microbial community structure and function are limited in scope and temporal resolution and vary widely in the molecular methods applied. We compared environmental and microbial community datasets for permanent and temporary tributaries of two different North American headwater stream systems: Speed River (Ontario, Canada) and Parkers Creek (Maryland, USA). We explored whether taxonomic diversity and community composition were altered as a result of flow permanence and compared community composition amongst streams using different 16S microbial community methods (i.e., T-RFLP and Illumina MiSeq). Contrary to our hypotheses, and irrespective of method, community composition did not respond strongly to drying. In both systems, community composition was related to site rather than drying condition. Additional network analysis on the Parkers Creek dataset indicated a shift in the central microbial relationships between temporary and permanent streams. In the permanent stream at Parkers Creek, associations of methanotrophic taxa were most dominant, whereas associations with taxa from the order Nitrospirales were more dominant in the temporary stream, particularly during dry conditions. We compared these results with existing published studies from around the world and found a wide range in community responses to drying. We conclude by proposing three hypotheses that may address contradictory results and, when tested across systems, may expand understanding of the responses of microbial communities in temporary streams to

  18. Microbial responses to changes in flow status in temporary headwater streams: a cross-system comparison

    PubMed Central

    Febria, Catherine M.; Hosen, Jacob D.; Crump, Byron C.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Williams, D. Dudley

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are responsible for the bulk of biogeochemical processing in temporary headwater streams, yet there is still relatively little known about how community structure and function respond to periodic drying. Moreover, the ability to sample temporary habitats can be a logistical challenge due to the limited capability to measure and predict the timing, intensity and frequency of wet-dry events. Unsurprisingly, published datasets on microbial community structure and function are limited in scope and temporal resolution and vary widely in the molecular methods applied. We compared environmental and microbial community datasets for permanent and temporary tributaries of two different North American headwater stream systems: Speed River (Ontario, Canada) and Parkers Creek (Maryland, USA). We explored whether taxonomic diversity and community composition were altered as a result of flow permanence and compared community composition amongst streams using different 16S microbial community methods (i.e., T-RFLP and Illumina MiSeq). Contrary to our hypotheses, and irrespective of method, community composition did not respond strongly to drying. In both systems, community composition was related to site rather than drying condition. Additional network analysis on the Parkers Creek dataset indicated a shift in the central microbial relationships between temporary and permanent streams. In the permanent stream at Parkers Creek, associations of methanotrophic taxa were most dominant, whereas associations with taxa from the order Nitrospirales were more dominant in the temporary stream, particularly during dry conditions. We compared these results with existing published studies from around the world and found a wide range in community responses to drying. We conclude by proposing three hypotheses that may address contradictory results and, when tested across systems, may expand understanding of the responses of microbial communities in temporary streams to

  19. E. coli transport to stream water column from bottom sediments to the stream water column in base flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Shelton, Daniel; Stocker, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    E. coli as an indicator bacterium is commonly used to characterize microbiological water quality, to evaluate surface water sources for microbiological impairment, and to assess management practices that lead to the decrease of pathogens and indicator influx in surface water sources for recreation and irrigation. Bottom sediments present a large reservoir of fecal indicator bacteria that are known to be released to water column during high flow events caused by rainstorms and snowmelt. The objective of this work was to see if the influx of E. coli from sediments to water occurs also during base flow periods when groundwater rather than runoff provides the major water input to the stream. The experiment was carried out at the first-order creek in Maryland flowing in the riparian zone in base flow conditions. An inert tracer was released to creek water from the manifold for 5 hours. Streamflow and concentrations of E. coli and tracer were monitored in water 10 m below tracer release location, and at the downstream location at 450 m from the release location. The tracer mass recovered at the downstream location was close to the released tracer mass. We then could directly compare the total numbers of E. coli in volumes of water containing tracer at the upstream (release) location and the downstream location. There was a substantial (3 to 6 times) increase in flow between the upstream and downstream locations as well as the substantial increase in the E. coli total numbers in water (14 to 26 times). The average E. coli influx from the bottom sediment was about 400 cells m-2s-1. Although this value is about 2 to 5 times less than published E. coli release rates during high flow events, it still can substantially change the microbial water quality assessment without any input from animal agriculture or manure application. Interesting research objectives include finding out whether the transport of E. coli from bottom sediment to water column during the base flow periods

  20. Ground water stratification and delivery of nitrate to an incised stream under varying flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; O'Connell, M. E.; Prestegaard, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water processes affecting seasonal variations of surface water nitrate concentrations were investigated in an incised first-order stream in an agricultural watershed with a riparian forest in the coastal plain of Maryland. Aquifer characteristics including sediment stratigraphy, geochemistry, and hydraulic properties were examined in combination with chemical and isotopic analyses of ground water, macropore discharge, and stream water. The ground water flow system exhibits vertical stratification of hydraulic properties and redox conditions, with sub-horizontal boundaries that extend beneath the field and adjacent riparian forest. Below the minimum water table position, ground water age gradients indicate low recharge rates (2-5 cm yr-1) and long residence times (years to decades), whereas the transient ground water wedge between the maximum and minimum water table positions has a relatively short residence time (months to years), partly because of an upward increase in hydraulic conductivity. Oxygen reduction and denitrification in recharging ground waters are coupled with pyrite oxidation near the minimum water table elevation in a mottled weathering zone in Tertiary marine glauconitic sediments. The incised stream had high nitrate concentrations during high flow conditions when much of the ground water was transmitted rapidly across the riparian zone in a shallow oxic aquifer wedge with abundant outflow macropores, and low nitrate concentrations during low flow conditions when the oxic wedge was smaller and stream discharge was dominated by upwelling from the deeper denitrified parts of the aquifer. Results from this and similar studies illustrate the importance of near-stream geomorphology and subsurface geology as controls of riparian zone function and delivery of nitrate to streams in agricultural watersheds. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  1. Ground water stratification and delivery of nitrate to an incised stream under varying flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Böhlke, J K; O'Connell, Michael E; Prestegaard, Karen L

    2007-01-01

    Ground water processes affecting seasonal variations of surface water nitrate concentrations were investigated in an incised first-order stream in an agricultural watershed with a riparian forest in the coastal plain of Maryland. Aquifer characteristics including sediment stratigraphy, geochemistry, and hydraulic properties were examined in combination with chemical and isotopic analyses of ground water, macropore discharge, and stream water. The ground water flow system exhibits vertical stratification of hydraulic properties and redox conditions, with sub-horizontal boundaries that extend beneath the field and adjacent riparian forest. Below the minimum water table position, ground water age gradients indicate low recharge rates (2-5 cm yr(-1)) and long residence times (years to decades), whereas the transient ground water wedge between the maximum and minimum water table positions has a relatively short residence time (months to years), partly because of an upward increase in hydraulic conductivity. Oxygen reduction and denitrification in recharging ground waters are coupled with pyrite oxidation near the minimum water table elevation in a mottled weathering zone in Tertiary marine glauconitic sediments. The incised stream had high nitrate concentrations during high flow conditions when much of the ground water was transmitted rapidly across the riparian zone in a shallow oxic aquifer wedge with abundant outflow macropores, and low nitrate concentrations during low flow conditions when the oxic wedge was smaller and stream discharge was dominated by upwelling from the deeper denitrified parts of the aquifer. Results from this and similar studies illustrate the importance of near-stream geomorphology and subsurface geology as controls of riparian zone function and delivery of nitrate to streams in agricultural watersheds.

  2. Ground water stratification and delivery of nitrate to an incised stream under varying flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Böhlke, J K; O'Connell, Michael E; Prestegaard, Karen L

    2007-01-01

    Ground water processes affecting seasonal variations of surface water nitrate concentrations were investigated in an incised first-order stream in an agricultural watershed with a riparian forest in the coastal plain of Maryland. Aquifer characteristics including sediment stratigraphy, geochemistry, and hydraulic properties were examined in combination with chemical and isotopic analyses of ground water, macropore discharge, and stream water. The ground water flow system exhibits vertical stratification of hydraulic properties and redox conditions, with sub-horizontal boundaries that extend beneath the field and adjacent riparian forest. Below the minimum water table position, ground water age gradients indicate low recharge rates (2-5 cm yr(-1)) and long residence times (years to decades), whereas the transient ground water wedge between the maximum and minimum water table positions has a relatively short residence time (months to years), partly because of an upward increase in hydraulic conductivity. Oxygen reduction and denitrification in recharging ground waters are coupled with pyrite oxidation near the minimum water table elevation in a mottled weathering zone in Tertiary marine glauconitic sediments. The incised stream had high nitrate concentrations during high flow conditions when much of the ground water was transmitted rapidly across the riparian zone in a shallow oxic aquifer wedge with abundant outflow macropores, and low nitrate concentrations during low flow conditions when the oxic wedge was smaller and stream discharge was dominated by upwelling from the deeper denitrified parts of the aquifer. Results from this and similar studies illustrate the importance of near-stream geomorphology and subsurface geology as controls of riparian zone function and delivery of nitrate to streams in agricultural watersheds. PMID:17412903

  3. Flow topology and acoustic emissions of trailing edge serrations at incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce León, Carlos; Ragni, Daniele; Pröbsting, Stefan; Scarano, Fulvio; Madsen, Jesper

    2016-05-01

    The flow past a NACA 0018 airfoil with sawtooth trailing edge serrations has been investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV). The serration flap angle and airfoil incidence are varied in order to study the effect of secondary flow establishing between the suction and pressure sides of the serrations. The flow topology around the serrations is inferred from the analysis of time-averaged streamlines close to the airfoil surface and from the wall-normal flow velocity in between serrations. Additional PIV measurements with a plane in cross-flow highlight the formation of streamwise vortex pairs. The flow behavior is further characterized in terms of its turbulence statistics. Noise emissions are measured with an acoustic phased array in combination with beamforming. The serrations are found to be effective in reducing noise, and their application is studied for different degrees of airfoil incidence and serration flap angle.

  4. Stream habitat analysis using the instream flow incremental methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bovee, Ken D.; Lamb, Berton L.; Bartholow, John M.; Stalnaker, Clair B.; Taylor, Jonathan; Henriksen, Jim

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the Instream Flow Methodology in its entirety. This also is to serve as a comprehensive introductory textbook on IFIM for training courses as it contains the most complete and comprehensive description of IFIM in existence today. This should also serve as an official guide to IFIM in publication to counteract the misconceptions about the methodology that have pervaded the professional literature since the mid-1980's as this describes IFIM as it is envisioned by its developers. The document is aimed at the decisionmakers of management and allocation of natural resources in providing them an overview; and to those who design and implement studies to inform the decisionmakers. There should be enough background on model concepts, data requirements, calibration techniques, and quality assurance to help the technical user design and implement a cost-effective application of IFIM that will provide policy-relevant information. Some of the chapters deal with basic organization of IFIM, procedural sequence of applying IFIM starting with problem identification, study planning and implementation, and problem resolution.

  5. Interactions between hyporheic flow produced by stream meanders, bars, and dunes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonedahl, Susa H.; Harvey, Judson W.; Packman, Aaron I.

    2013-01-01

    Stream channel morphology from grain-scale roughness to large meanders drives hyporheic exchange flow. In practice, it is difficult to model hyporheic flow over the wide spectrum of topographic features typically found in rivers. As a result, many studies only characterize isolated exchange processes at a single spatial scale. In this work, we simulated hyporheic flows induced by a range of geomorphic features including meanders, bars and dunes in sand bed streams. Twenty cases were examined with 5 degrees of river meandering. Each meandering river model was run initially without any small topographic features. Models were run again after superimposing only bars and then only dunes, and then run a final time after including all scales of topographic features. This allowed us to investigate the relative importance and interactions between flows induced by different scales of topography. We found that dunes typically contributed more to hyporheic exchange than bars and meanders. Furthermore, our simulations show that the volume of water exchanged and the distributions of hyporheic residence times resulting from various scales of topographic features are close to, but not linearly additive. These findings can potentially be used to develop scaling laws for hyporheic flow that can be widely applied in streams and rivers.

  6. Assessing the ecological base and peak flow of the alpine streams in Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C.; Yang, P. S.; Tian, P. L.

    2009-04-01

    The ecological base and peak flow are crucial for the assessment and design for habitat rehabilitation and recovery. The amount of discharge affects the aquatic creatures and may severely damage the existence and balance of the community under extreme conditions. Aquatic insects are selected as the target species in this study to evaluate the influence of the discharge and to estimate the ecological base and peak flow. The distribution of the number of species and abundance (density) versus discharge is assessed to define the critical discharge. Two streams located at the alpine area in central Taiwan are selected as the study area to evaluate the base and peak flow. From the preliminary data (Aug 2008 to Dec 2008) collected from one stream Creek C originating from Sitou Area in Central Taiwan shows that the abundance of several species varies with the discharge. The dominate family and genus of aquatic insects is Baetidae (Order Ephemeroptera) and Baetis spp. that accounts for 32.47% and 31.11%, respectively. The Hilsenhoff family biotic index (FBI) shows that the water quality is classified to "Good" and "Very Good" level while the river pollution index (RPI) indicates that the stream is non-polluted. The discharge of base flow interpreted from the 95% curve of duration for the daily discharge is 0.0234 cms. Consistent observations are yet to be collected to yield more accurate result and ecological peak flow in rainy and typhoon seasons.

  7. Polymer-template-assisted growth of gold nanowires using a novel flow-stream technique.

    PubMed

    Metwalli, E; Moulin, J-F; Perlich, J; Wang, W; Diethert, A; Roth, S V; Müller-Buschbaum, P

    2009-10-01

    By utilizing a fluidic device, a gold nanoparticle dispersion is cast onto a nanostructured polymer template using solution subjected to hydrodynamic flow. With in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), the progressive gold deposition from a stream of gold solution onto the polymer template of a diblock copolymer with parallel cylinder morphology arranged into powder-like domains is investigated. The continuously flowing solution causes a systematic increase in the X-ray contrast between both of the microphase-separated blocks of the block copolymer film, indicating flow-induced selective gold immobilization on one block. Both in situ GISAXS data and atomic force microscopy of the metal-deposited polymer film prove the 1D coalescence of nanoparticles into continuous nanowires. With additional gold nanoparticle upload by the continuous flow-stream method, the selectivity of the nanoparticle deposition diminishes as a result of the formation of a pseudo uniform gold layer. Consequently, this flow-stream deposition technique introduces an easy alternative method to the vapor deposition technique for surface gold nanopatterning. PMID:19572494

  8. Magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences are hitherto unknown, however, these issues are vitally important for understanding the instability and eruption of solar and stellar prominences, as well as the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we report high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that clearly manifests the magnetic structure and origin of counter-streaming mass flows in solar prominences. Based on the observational results, we propose a new prominence model in the present paper, which can reconcile many discrepancies in previous studies, for example, the distribution of magnetic fields in solar prominences, the relationship between the photospheric magnetic fields and the ends of prominence feet, as well as the origin of counterstreaming mass flows in solar prominences. In addition, we also find that the photospheric pressure-driven three and five minutes oscillations can effectively modulate the kinematics of solar prominences.

  9. Characterization of acoustic droplet vaporization for control of bubble generation under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shih-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Luan; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the manipulation of bubbles generated by acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) under clinically relevant flow conditions. Optical microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging were used to observe bubbles generated by 2-MHz ultrasound pulses at different time points after the onset of ADV. The dependence of the bubble population on droplet concentration, flow velocity, fluid viscosity and acoustic parameters, including acoustic pressure, pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. The results indicated that post-ADV bubble growth spontaneously driven by air permeation markedly affected the bubble population after insonation. The bubbles can grow to a stable equilibrium diameter as great as twice the original diameter in 0.5-1 s, as predicted by the theoretical calculation. The growth trend is independent of flow velocity, but dependent on fluid viscosity and droplet concentration, which directly influence the rate of gas uptake by bubbles and the rate of gas exchange across the wall of the semipermeable tube containing the bubbles and, hence, the gas content of the host medium. Varying the acoustic pressure does not markedly change the formation of bubbles as long as the ADV thresholds of most droplets are reached. Varying pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency markedly reduces the number of bubbles. Lengthening pulse duration favors the production of large bubbles, but reduces the total number of bubbles. Increasing the PRF interestingly provides superior performance in bubble disruption. These results also suggest that an ADV bubble population cannot be assessed simply on the basis of initial droplet size or enhancement of imaging contrast by the bubbles. Determining the optimal acoustic parameters requires careful consideration of their impact on the bubble population produced for different application scenarios.

  10. Large subglacial lakes in East Antarctica at the onset of fast-flowing ice streams.

    PubMed

    Bell, Robin E; Studinger, Michael; Shuman, Christopher A; Fahnestock, Mark A; Joughin, Ian

    2007-02-22

    Water plays a crucial role in ice-sheet stability and the onset of ice streams. Subglacial lake water moves between lakes and rapidly drains, causing catastrophic floods. The exact mechanisms by which subglacial lakes influence ice-sheet dynamics are unknown, however, and large subglacial lakes have not been closely associated with rapidly flowing ice streams. Here we use satellite imagery and ice-surface elevations to identify a region of subglacial lakes, similar in total area to Lake Vostok, at the onset region of the Recovery Glacier ice stream in East Antarctica and predicted by ice-sheet models. We define four lakes through extensive, flat, featureless regions of ice surface bounded by upstream troughs and downstream ridges. Using ice velocities determined using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), we find the onset of rapid flow (moving at 20 to 30 m yr(-1)) of the tributaries to the Recovery Glacier ice stream in a 280-km-wide segment at the downslope margins of these four subglacial lakes. We conclude that the subglacial lakes initiate and maintain rapid ice flow through either active modification of the basal thermal regime of the ice sheet by lake accretion or through scouring bedrock channels in periodic drainage events. We suggest that the role of subglacial lakes needs to be considered in ice-sheet mass balance assessments. PMID:17314977

  11. Comparison of Comet Enflow and VA One Acoustic-to-Structure Power Flow Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2010-01-01

    Comet Enflow is a commercially available, high frequency vibroacoustic analysis software based on the Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA). In this method the same finite element mesh used for structural and acoustic analysis can be employed for the high frequency solutions. Comet Enflow is being validated for a floor-equipped composite cylinder by comparing the EFEA vibroacoustic response predictions with Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) results from the commercial software program VA One from ESI Group. Early in this program a number of discrepancies became apparent in the Enflow predicted response for the power flow from an acoustic space to a structural subsystem. The power flow anomalies were studied for a simple cubic, a rectangular and a cylindrical structural model connected to an acoustic cavity. The current investigation focuses on three specific discrepancies between the Comet Enflow and the VA One predictions: the Enflow power transmission coefficient relative to the VA One coupling loss factor; the importance of the accuracy of the acoustic modal density formulation used within Enflow; and the recommended use of fast solvers in Comet Enflow. The frequency region of interest for this study covers the one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 16 Hz to 4000 Hz.

  12. The Effects of Surfaces on the Aerodynamics and Acoustics of Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft noise mitigation is an ongoing challenge for the aeronautics research community. In response to this challenge, low-noise aircraft concepts have been developed that exhibit situations where the jet exhaust interacts with an airframe surface. Jet flows interacting with nearby surfaces manifest a complex behavior in which acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics are altered. In this paper, the variation of the aerodynamics, acoustic source, and far-field acoustic intensity are examined as a large at plate is positioned relative to the nozzle exit. Steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions are examined to study the aerodynamic changes in the field-variables and turbulence statistics. The mixing noise model of Tam and Auriault is used to predict the noise produced by the jet. To validate both the aerodynamic and the noise prediction models, results are compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and free-field acoustic data respectively. The variation of the aerodynamic quantities and noise source are examined by comparing predictions from various jet and at plate configurations with an isolated jet. To quantify the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects on the aerodynamic noise source, a non-dimensional number is formed that contains the flow-conditions and airframe installation parameters.

  13. Methods for estimating selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic mean flows for streams in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, David A.; Barnes, Kimberlee K.

    2012-01-01

    A statewide study was conducted to develop regression equations for estimating six selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic mean flows for ungaged stream sites in Iowa. The estimation equations developed for the six low-flow frequency statistics include: the annual 1-, 7-, and 30-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years, the annual 30-day mean low flow for a recurrence interval of 5 years, and the seasonal (October 1 through December 31) 1- and 7-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years. Estimation equations also were developed for the harmonic-mean-flow statistic. Estimates of these seven selected statistics are provided for 208 U.S. Geological Survey continuous-record streamgages using data through September 30, 2006. The study area comprises streamgages located within Iowa and 50 miles beyond the State's borders. Because trend analyses indicated statistically significant positive trends when considering the entire period of record for the majority of the streamgages, the longest, most recent period of record without a significant trend was determined for each streamgage for use in the study. The median number of years of record used to compute each of these seven selected statistics was 35. Geographic information system software was used to measure 54 selected basin characteristics for each streamgage. Following the removal of two streamgages from the initial data set, data collected for 206 streamgages were compiled to investigate three approaches for regionalization of the seven selected statistics. Regionalization, a process using statistical regression analysis, provides a relation for efficiently transferring information from a group of streamgages in a region to ungaged sites in the region. The three regionalization approaches tested included statewide, regional, and region-of-influence regressions. For the regional regression, the study area was divided into three low-flow regions on the basis of hydrologic

  14. Aeroacoustics of Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    Results from acoustic measurements of noise radiated from a heated, three-stream, co-annular exhaust system operated at subsonic conditions are presented. The experiments were conducted for a range of core, bypass, and tertiary stream temperatures and pressures. The nozzle system had a fan-to-core area ratio of 2.92 and a tertiary-to-core area ratio of 0.96. The impact of introducing a third stream on the radiated noise for third-stream velocities below that of the bypass stream was to reduce high frequency noise levels at broadside and peak jet-noise angles. Mid-frequency noise radiation at aft observation angles was impacted by the conditions of the third stream. The core velocity had the greatest impact on peak noise levels and the bypass-to-core mass flow ratio had a slight impact on levels in the peak jet-noise direction. The third-stream jet conditions had no impact on peak noise levels. Introduction of a third jet stream in the presence of a simulated forward-flight stream limits the impact of the third stream on radiated noise. For equivalent ideal thrust conditions, two-stream and three-stream jets can produce similar acoustic spectra although high-frequency noise levels tend to be lower for the three-stream jet.

  15. Doppler flow imaging of cytoplasmic streaming using spectral domain phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choma, Michael A.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2006-03-01

    Spectral domain phase microscopy (SDPM) is a function extension of spectral domain optical coherence tomography. SDPM achieves exquisite levels of phase stability by employing common-path interferometry. We discuss the theory and limitations of Doppler flow imaging using SDPM, demonstrate monitoring the thermal contraction of a glass sample with nanometer per second velocity sensitivity, and apply this technique to measurement of cytoplasmic streaming in an Amoeba proteus pseudopod. We observe reversal of cytoplasmic flow induced by extracellular CaCl2, and report results that suggest parabolic flow of cytoplasm in the A. proteus pseudopod.

  16. Numerical investigation of the spatial scale and time dependency of tile drainage contribution to stream flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nicholas W.; Arenas, Antonio A.; Schilling, Keith E.; Weber, Larry J.

    2016-07-01

    Tile drainage systems are pervasive in the Central U.S., significantly altering the hydrologic system. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of tile drainage systems on streamflow. A physically based coupled hydrologic model was applied to a 45 km2 agricultural Iowa watershed. Tile drainage was incorporated though an equivalent porous medium approach, calibrated though numerical experimentation. Experimental results indicated that a significant increase in hydraulic conductivity of the equivalent medium layer was needed to achieve agreement in total outflow with an explicit numerical representation of a tiled system. Watershed scale analysis derived the tile drainage contribution to stream flow (QT/Q) from a numerical tracer driven analysis of instream surface water. During precipitation events tile drainage represented 30% of stream flow, whereas during intervals between precipitations events, 61% of stream flow originated from the tile system. A division of event and non-event periods produced strong correlations between QT/Q and drainage area, positive for events, and negative for non-events. The addition of precipitation into the system acted to saturate near surface soils, increase lateral soil water movement, and dilute the relatively stable instream tile flow. Increased intensity precipitation translated the QT/Q relationship downward in a consistent manner. In non-event durations, flat upland areas contributed large contributions of tile flow, diluted by larger groundwater (non-tile) contribution to stream flow in the downstream steeper portion of the watershed. Study results provide new insights on the spatiotemporal response of tile drainage to precipitation and contributions of tile drainage to streamflow at a watershed scale, with results having important implications for nitrate transport.

  17. Field study and simulation of diurnal temperature effects on infiltration and variably saturated flow beneath an ephemeral stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ronan, A.D.; Prudic, D.E.; Thodal, C.E.; Constantz, J.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to investigate flow beneath an ephemeral stream and to estimate streambed infiltration rates. Discharge and stream-area measurements were used to determine infiltration rates. Stream and subsurface temperatures were used to interpret subsurface flow through variably saturated sediments beneath the stream. Spatial variations in subsurface temperatures suggest that flow beneath the streambed is dependent on the orientation of the stream in the canyon and the layering of the sediments. Streamflow and infiltration rates vary diurnally: Stream flow is lowest in late afternoon when stream temperature is greatest and highest in early morning when stream temperature is least. The lower afternoon streamflow is attributed to increased infiltration rates; evapotranspiration is insufficient to account for the decreased streamflow. The increased infiltration rates are attributed to viscosity effects on hydraulic conductivity from increased stream temperatures. The first set of field data was used to calibrate a two-dimensional variably saturated flow model that includes heat transport. The model was calibrated to (1) temperature fluctuations in the subsurface and (2) infiltration rates determined from measured stream flow losses. The second set of field data was to evaluate the ability to predict infiltration rates on the basis of temperature measurements alone. Results indicate that the variably saturated subsurface flow depends on downcanyon layering of the sediments. They also support the field observations in indicating that diurnal changes in infiltration can be explained by temperature dependence of hydraulic conductivity. Over the range of temperatures and flows monitored, diurnal stream temperature changes can be used to estimate streambed infiltration rates. It is often impractical to maintain equipment for determining infiltration rates by traditional means; however, once a model is calibrated using both infiltration and temperature data

  18. Estimation of geomorphically significant flows in alpine streams of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Surian, N.; Andrews, E.D.

    1999-01-01

    Streamflows recorded at 24 gauging stations in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado were analyzed to derive regional regression equations for estimating the natural flow duration and flood frequency in reaches where the natural flows are unknown or have been altered by diversion or regulation. The principal objective of this analysis is to determine whether the relatively high, infrequent, but geomorphically and ecologically important flows in the Rocky Mountains can be accurately estimated by regional flow duration equations. The region considered in this study is an area of relatively abundant runoff, and, consequently, intense water resources development. The specific streams analyzed here, however, are unaltered and remain nearly pristine. Regional flow duration equations are derived for two situations. When the mean annual discharge is known, flows ??? 10% of the time can be estimated with an uncertainty of ??9% for the 10% exceedance flow, to ??11%forthe 1.0% exceedance flow. When the mean annual discharge is unknown, the relatively high, infrequent flow can be estimated using the mean basin precipitation rate (in m3/s), and basin relief with an uncertainty of ??23% for the 10% exceedance flow to ??21% for the 1.0% exeedance flow. The uncertainty in estimated discharges using the equations derived in this analysis is substantially smaller than has been previously reported, especially for the geomorphically significant flows which are relatively large and infrequent. The improvement is due primarily to the quality of streamflow records analyzed and a well-defined hydrologic region.

  19. Concurrent identification of aero-acoustic scattering and noise sources at a flow duct singularity in low Mach number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovardi, Carlo; Jaensch, Stefan; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A numerical method to concurrently characterize both aeroacoustic scattering and noise sources at a duct singularity is presented. This approach combines Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with techniques of System Identification (SI): In a first step, a highly resolved LES with external broadband acoustic excitation is carried out. Subsequently, time series data extracted from the LES are post-processed by means of SI to model both acoustic propagation and noise generation. The present work studies the aero-acoustic characteristics of an orifice placed in a duct at low flow Mach numbers with the "LES-SI" method. Parametric SI based on the Box-Jenkins mathematical structure is employed, with a prediction error approach that utilizes correlation analysis of the output residuals to avoid overfitting. Uncertainties of model parameters due to the finite length of times series are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. Numerical results for acoustic scattering matrices and power spectral densities of broad-band noise are validated against experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies below the cut-off frequency of the duct.

  20. Laminar flame and acoustic waves in two-dimensional flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zaytsev, M. L. Akkerman, V. B.

    2011-03-15

    The complete system of fluid dynamics equations describing the development of instability of a reaction front in a two-dimensional flow in reversed time are reduced to a closed system of equations of front dynamics by using Lagrangian variables and integrals of motion. The system can be used to analyze processes behind the front without solving the complete system of fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics equations. It is demonstrated how the gas density disturbances induced by the moving front can be described in the adiabatic approximation.

  1. Effects of acoustic streaming from moderate-intensity pulsed ultrasound for enhancing biofilm mitigation effectiveness of drug-loaded liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong; Green, Adam M; Willsey, Graham G; Marshall, Jeffrey S; Wargo, Matthew J; Wu, Junru

    2015-08-01

    Because biofilms have resistance to antibiotics, their control using minimum amounts of chemicals and energy becomes a critical issue particularly for resource-constrained long-term space and deep-sea explorations. This preliminary study investigates how ultrasound promoting penetration of antibiotic-loaded liposomes into alginate-based bacterial biofilms, resulting in enhanced bacterial (Ralstonia insidiosa) killing. Nano-sized liposomes are used as a delivery vehicle for the antibiotic gentamicin. Alginate-based synthetic biofilms, which are widely acknowledged as biofilm phantoms, filled with liposome solution are formed at the bottoms of six-well Petri dishes and exposed to ultrasound (frequency = 2.25 MHz, 10% duty cycle, and spatially and temporally averaged intensity ISAPA = 4.4 W/cm(2)). Gentamicin is released from liposomes after they are lysed using detergent solution (0.05% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 1.0% Triton X-100) and incubated for 20 min. The alginate biofilm is dissolved and diluted, counting of colony-forming units shows about 80% of the bacteria are killed. It has also been shown the liposome-capture density by the alginate film increases linearly with the ultrasound intensity up to ISAPA = 6.2 W/cm(2) reaching approximately threefold that without ultrasound. Measurement by using particle-image velocimetry has demonstrated the acoustic streaming with modification by thermal convection controls the enhancement of the liposome capture rate.

  2. Coherent structures in swirling flows and their role in acoustic combustion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Gutmark, Ephraim; Weisenstein, Wolfgang

    1999-09-01

    Interaction between flow instabilities and acoustic resonant modes and their effect on heat release were investigated and controlled in an experimental low-emission swirl stabilized combustor. Acoustic boundary conditions of the combustor were modified to excite combustion instability at various axisymmetric and helical unstable modes in a fully premixed combustion. The combustion unstable modes were related to flow instabilities in the recirculating wakelike region on the combustor axis and the separating shear layer at the sudden expansion (dump plane). Flow field measurements were performed in a water tunnel using a simulated combustor configuration. The water tunnel tests demonstrated the existence of several modes of flow instabilities in a highly swirling flow, modes which were shown to affect the combustion process. Mean and turbulent characteristics of the internal and external swirling shear layers were measured and unstable flow modes were identified. Instability modes during combustion were visualized by phase locked images of OH chemiluminescence. The axisymmetric mode showed large variation of the heat release during one cycle, while the helical modes showed variations in the radial location of maximal heat release. Closed loop active control system was employed to suppress the thermoacoustic pressure oscillations and to reduce NOx emissions. Microphone and OH emission detection sensors monitored the combustion process and provided input to the control system. An acoustic source modulated the airflow and thus affected the mixing process and the combustion. Effective suppression of the pressure oscillations and the concomitant reduction of NOx emissions were associated with a reduced coherence of the flow structures which excited the thermoacoustic instability.

  3. Analysis of the STS-126 Flow Control Valve Structural-Acoustic Coupling Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Trevor M.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    During the Space Transportation System mission STS-126, one of the main engine's flow control valves incurred an unexpected failure. A section of the valve broke off during liftoff. It is theorized that an acoustic mode of the flowing fuel, coupled with a structural mode of the valve, causing a high cycle fatigue failure. This report documents the analysis efforts conducted in an attempt to verify this theory. Hand calculations, computational fluid dynamics, and finite element methods are all implemented and analyses are performed using steady-state methods in addition to transient analysis methods. The conclusion of the analyses is that there is a critical acoustic mode that aligns with a structural mode of the valve

  4. Flow and acoustic properties of low Reynolds number underexpanded supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Tieh-Feng; Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the flow and acoustic properties of model underexpanded supersonic jets was conducted. In particular, the role played by large-scale organized fluctuations in the flow evolution and acoustic production processes was examined in detail. The experimental conditions were chosen as low-Reynolds-number (Re = 8000) Mach 1.4 and 2.1 underexpanded jets exhausting from convergent nozzles. A consequence of performing the experiments at low Reynolds number is that the broadband shock-associated noise is suppressed. The focus of the present study is on the generation of noise by large-scale instabilities in the presence of strong shock cell structures. It is demonstrated that the production of screech is related to the modulation and decay of large-scale turbulence structures.

  5. Structural and acoustic noise produced by turbulent flow over an elastic trailing edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1993-09-01

    An analysis is made of the sound and vibration produced by turbulent flow at low Mach number over the trailing edge of an elastic plate. General formulas are developed for the structural and acoustic edge-noise when the control surface is modeled by a semiinfinite thin elastic plate which can support bending waves. Numerical results are given for steel plates in air and in water. In the latter case it is shown that, when the frequency is smaller than the coincidence frequency, the bending wave power exceeds the total sound power generated at the edge by 20-40 dB, independently of the mean flow velocity, so that sound generated by secondary scattering may then be the dominant source of acoustic radiation.

  6. Acoustic transmission matrix of a variable area duct or nozzle carrying a compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The differential equations governing the propagation of sound in a variable area duct or nozzle carrying a one dimensional subsonic compressible fluid flow are derived and put in state variable form using acoustic pressure and particle velocity as the state variables. The duct or nozzle is divided into a number of regions. The region size is selected so that in each region the Mach number can be assumed constant and the area variation can be approximated by an exponential area variation. Consequently, the state variable equation in each region has constant coefficients. The transmission matrix for each region is obtained by solving the constant coefficient acoustic state variable differential equation. The transmission matrix for the duct or nozzle is the product of the individual transmission matrices of each region. Solutions are presented for several geometries with and without mean flow.

  7. Low-frequency acoustic atomization with oscillatory flow around micropillars in a microfluidic device

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yin Nee E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Wong, Teck Neng E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Nguyen, Nam Trung

    2014-10-06

    This letter reports a low frequency acoustic atomization technique with oscillatory extensional flow around micropillars. Large droplets passing through two micropillars are elongated. Small droplets are then produced through the pinch-off process at the spindle-shape ends. As the actuation frequency increases, the droplet size decreases with increasing monodispersity. This method is suitable for in-situ mass production of fine droplets in a multi-phase environment without external pumping. Small particles encapsulation was demonstrated with the current technique.

  8. Visualizing flow fields using acoustic Doppler current profilers and the Velocity Mapping Toolbox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide examples of how the U.S. Geological Survey is using acoustic Doppler current profilers for much more than routine discharge measurements. These instruments are capable of mapping complex three-dimensional flow fields within rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Using the Velocity Mapping Toolbox to process the ADCP data allows detailed visualization of the data, providing valuable information for a range of studies and applications.

  9. An evaluation of the relations between flow regime components, stream characteristics, species traits and meta-demographic rates of warmwater stream fishes: Implications for aquatic resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, James T.; Shea, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Fishery biologists are increasingly recognizing the importance of considering the dynamic nature of streams when developing streamflow policies. Such approaches require information on how flow regimes influence the physical environment and how those factors, in turn, affect species-specific demographic rates. A more cost-effective alternative could be the use of dynamic occupancy models to predict how species are likely to respond to changes in flow. To appraise the efficacy of this approach, we evaluated relative support for hypothesized effects of seasonal streamflow components, stream channel characteristics, and fish species traits on local extinction, colonization, and recruitment (meta-demographic rates) of stream fishes. We used 4 years of seasonal fish collection data from 23 streams to fit multistate, multiseason occupancy models for 42 fish species in the lower Flint River Basin, Georgia. Modelling results suggested that meta-demographic rates were influenced by streamflows, particularly short-term (10-day) flows. Flow effects on meta-demographic rates also varied with stream size, channel morphology, and fish species traits. Small-bodied species with generalized life-history characteristics were more resilient to flow variability than large-bodied species with specialized life-history characteristics. Using this approach, we simplified the modelling framework, thereby facilitating the development of dynamic, spatially explicit evaluations of the ecological consequences of water resource development activities over broad geographic areas. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Contribution of return flows to streamflow in selected stream reaches in Illinois, 1988-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaTour, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Water returns by sewage-treatment plants and various water users can be a significant part of streamflow. Knowledge of the effect of return flows on stream- flow is needed for purposes of assessing streamwater quality and water supply. The results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, are presented to describe the contribution of return flows to streamflow for five stream reaches in Illinois during 1988-89. The reaches studied were South Branch Kishwaukee River upstream from De Kaib, Mackinaw River upstream from Congerville, Addison Creek upstream from Bellwood, Flag Creek upstream from Willow Springs, and Thorn Creek upstream from Glenwood. The annual average contributions of return flows to streamflow in each reach ranged from 1 to 99 percent of the annual average streamflow. Return flows significantly affected streamflows in the Flag Creek and Thorn Creek reaches. Significant return flows probably sustained streamflows in the Addison Creek, Flag Creek, and Thorn Creek reaches. Return flows exceeded streamflow during at least 1 month during the 1988 drought at all of the study reaches, except the Thorn Creek reach. Of the amount of return flows that exceeded streamflow, all reaches lost an estimated 0.01 to 0.34 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) to evaporation and 0.36 to 1.33 Mgal/d to infiltration. An analysis-of-variance test indicated that return flows did not differ among seasons. A second analysis indicated that the proportion of return flows to streamflow did differ seasonally. Return flows during July through September 1988-89 constituted a large proportion (67 percent) of the annual streamflows.

  11. Macroinvertebrate response to flow changes in a subalpine stream: predictions from two-dimensional hydrodynamic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, T.J.; Holmquist, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are being used increasingly as alternatives to traditional one-dimensional instream flow methodologies for assessing adequacy of flow and associated faunal habitat. Two-dimensional modelling of habitat has focused primarily on fishes, but fish-based assessments may not model benthic macroinvertebrate habitat effectively. We extend two-dimensional techniques to a macroinvertebrate assemblage in a high-elevation stream in the Sierra Nevada (Dana Fork of the Tuolumne River, Yosemite National Park, CA, USA). This stream frequently flows at less than 0.03?m3?s?1 in late summer and is representative of a common water abstraction scenario: maximum water abstraction coinciding with seasonally low flows. We used two-dimensional modelling to predict invertebrate responses to reduced flows that might result from increased abstraction. We collected site-specific field data on the macroinvertebrate assemblage, bed topography and flow conditions and then coupled a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with macroinvertebrate indices to evaluate habitat across a range of low flows. Macroinvertebrate indices were calculated for the wetted area at each flow. A surrogate flow record based on an adjacent watershed was used to evaluate frequency and duration of low flow events. Using surrogate historical records, we estimated that flow should fall below 0.071?m3?s?1 at least 1?day in 82 of 95?years and below 0.028?m3?s?1 in 48 of 95?years. Invertebrate metric means indicated minor losses in response to modelled discharge reductions, but wetted area decreased substantially. Responses of invertebrates to water abstraction will likely be a function of changing habitat quantity rather than quality.

  12. Lagrangian mass-flow investigations of inorganic contaminants in wastewater-impacted streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Antweiler, R.C.; Flynn, J.L.; Keefe, S.H.; Kolpin, D.W.; Roth, D.A.; Schnoebelen, D.J.; Taylor, H.E.; Verplanck, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the potential effects of increased reliance on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to meet municipal, agricultural, and environmental flow requires an understanding of the complex chemical loading characteristics of the WWTPs and the assimilative capacity of receiving waters. Stream ecosystem effects are linked to proportions of WWTP effluent under low-flow conditions as well as the nature of the effluent chemical mixtures. This study quantifies the loading of 58 inorganic constituents (nutrients to rare earth elements) from WWTP discharges relative to upstream landscape-based sources. Stream assimilation capacity was evaluated by Lagrangian sampling, using flow velocities determined from tracer experiments to track the same parcel of water as it moved downstream. Boulder Creek, Colorado and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, representing two different geologic and hydrologic landscapes, were sampled under low-flow conditions in the summer and spring. One-half of the constituents had greater loads from the WWTP effluents than the upstream drainages, and once introduced into the streams, dilution was the predominant assimilation mechanism. Only ammonium and bismuth had significant decreases in mass load downstream from the WWTPs during all samplings. The link between hydrology and water chemistry inherent in Lagrangian sampling allows quantitative assessment of chemical fate across different landscapes. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. Lagrangian mass-flow investigations of inorganic contaminants in wastewater-impacted streams.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Antweiler, Ronald C; Flynn, Jennifer L; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kolpin, Dana W; Roth, David A; Schnoebelen, Douglas J; Taylor, Howard E; Verplanck, Philip L

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the potential effects of increased reliance on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to meet municipal, agricultural, and environmental flow requires an understanding of the complex chemical loading characteristics of the WWTPs and the assimilative capacity of receiving waters. Stream ecosystem effects are linked to proportions of WWTP effluent under low-flow conditions as well as the nature of the effluent chemical mixtures. This study quantifies the loading of 58 inorganic constituents (nutrients to rare earth elements) from WWTP discharges relative to upstream landscape-based sources. Stream assimilation capacity was evaluated by Lagrangian sampling, using flow velocities determined from tracer experiments to track the same parcel of water as it moved downstream. Boulder Creek, Colorado and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, representing two different geologic and hydrologic landscapes, were sampled under low-flow conditions in the summer and spring. One-half of the constituents had greater loads from the WWTP effluents than the upstream drainages, and once introduced into the streams, dilution was the predominant assimilation mechanism. Only ammonium and bismuth had significant decreases in mass load downstream from the WWTPs during all samplings. The link between hydrology and water chemistry inherent in Lagrangian sampling allows quantitative assessment of chemical fate across different landscapes.

  14. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  15. Topics in structural dynamics: Nonlinear unsteady transonic flows and Monte Carlo methods in acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The results are reported of two unrelated studies. The first was an investigation of the formulation of the equations for non-uniform unsteady flows, by perturbation of an irrotational flow to obtain the linear Green's equation. The resulting integral equation was found to contain a kernel which could be expressed as the solution of the adjoint flow equation, a linear equation for small perturbations, but with non-constant coefficients determined by the steady flow conditions. It is believed that the non-uniform flow effects may prove important in transonic flutter, and that in such cases, the use of doublet type solutions of the wave equation would then prove to be erroneous. The second task covered an initial investigation into the use of the Monte Carlo method for solution of acoustical field problems. Computed results are given for a rectangular room problem, and for a problem involving a circular duct with a source located at the closed end.

  16. A millennium-length reconstruction of Bear River stream flow, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRose, R. J.; Bekker, M. F.; Wang, S.-Y.; Buckley, B. M.; Kjelgren, R. K.; Bardsley, T.; Rittenour, T. M.; Allen, E. B.

    2015-10-01

    The Bear River contributes more water to the eastern Great Basin than any other river system. It is also the most significant source of water for the burgeoning Wasatch Front metropolitan area in northern Utah. Despite its importance for water resources for the region's agricultural, urban, and wildlife needs, our understanding of the variability of Bear River's stream flow derives entirely from the short instrumental record (1943-2010). Here we present a 1200-year calibrated and verified tree-ring reconstruction of stream flow for the Bear River that explains 67% of the variance of the instrumental record over the period from 1943 to 2010. Furthermore, we developed this reconstruction from a species that is not typically used for dendroclimatology, Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). We identify highly significant periodicity in our reconstruction at quasi-decadal (7-8 year), multi-decadal (30 year), and centennial (>50 years) scales. The latter half of the 20th century was found to be the 2nd wettest (∼40-year) period of the past 1200 years, while the first half of the 20th century marked the 4th driest period. The most severe period of reduced stream flow occurred during the Medieval Warm Period (ca. mid-1200s CE) and persisted for ∼70 years. Upper-level circulation anomalies suggest that atmospheric teleconnections originating in the western tropical Pacific are responsible for the delivery of precipitation to the Bear River watershed during the October-December (OND) season of the previous year. The Bear River flow was compared to recent reconstructions of the other tributaries to the Great Salt Lake (GSL) and the GSL level. Implications for water management could be drawn from the observation that the latter half of the 20th century was the 2nd wettest in 1200 years, and that management for future water supply should take into account the stream flow variability over the past millennium.

  17. A Mechanism for Cytoplasmic Streaming: Kinesin-Driven Alignment of Microtubules and Fast Fluid Flows.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Corey E; Brunner, Matthew E; Djagaeva, Inna; Bielecki, Anthony M; Deutsch, Joshua M; Saxton, William M

    2016-05-10

    The transport of cytoplasmic components can be profoundly affected by hydrodynamics. Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes offers a striking example. Forces on fluid from kinesin-1 are initially directed by a disordered meshwork of microtubules, generating minor slow cytoplasmic flows. Subsequently, to mix incoming nurse cell cytoplasm with ooplasm, a subcortical layer of microtubules forms parallel arrays that support long-range, fast flows. To analyze the streaming mechanism, we combined observations of microtubule and organelle motions with detailed mathematical modeling. In the fast state, microtubules tethered to the cortex form a thin subcortical layer and undergo correlated sinusoidal bending. Organelles moving in flows along the arrays show velocities that are slow near the cortex and fast on the inward side of the subcortical microtubule layer. Starting with fundamental physical principles suggested by qualitative hypotheses, and with published values for microtubule stiffness, kinesin velocity, and cytoplasmic viscosity, we developed a quantitative coupled hydrodynamic model for streaming. The fully detailed mathematical model and its simulations identify key variables that can shift the system between disordered (slow) and ordered (fast) states. Measurements of array curvature, wave period, and the effects of diminished kinesin velocity on flow rates, as well as prior observations on f-actin perturbation, support the model. This establishes a concrete mechanistic framework for the ooplasmic streaming process. The self-organizing fast phase is a result of viscous drag on kinesin-driven cargoes that mediates equal and opposite forces on cytoplasmic fluid and on microtubules whose minus ends are tethered to the cortex. Fluid moves toward plus ends and microtubules are forced backward toward their minus ends, resulting in buckling. Under certain conditions, the buckling microtubules self-organize into parallel bending arrays, guiding varying directions

  18. Distance, flow and PCR inhibition: eDNA dynamics in two headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Jane, Stephen F; Wilcox, Taylor M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Schwartz, Michael K; Lowe, Winsor H; Letcher, Benjamin H; Whiteley, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) detection has emerged as a powerful tool for monitoring aquatic organisms, but much remains unknown about the dynamics of aquatic eDNA over a range of environmental conditions. DNA concentrations in streams and rivers will depend not only on the equilibrium between DNA entering the water and DNA leaving the system through degradation, but also on downstream transport. To improve understanding of the dynamics of eDNA concentration in lotic systems, we introduced caged trout into two fishless headwater streams and took eDNA samples at evenly spaced downstream intervals. This was repeated 18 times from mid-summer through autumn, over flows ranging from approximately 1-96 L/s. We used quantitative PCR to relate DNA copy number to distance from source. We found that regardless of flow, there were detectable levels of DNA at 239.5 m. The main effect of flow on eDNA counts was in opposite directions in the two streams. At the lowest flows, eDNA counts were highest close to the source and quickly trailed off over distance. At the highest flows, DNA counts were relatively low both near and far from the source. Biomass was positively related to eDNA copy number in both streams. A combination of cell settling, turbulence and dilution effects is probably responsible for our observations. Additionally, during high leaf deposition periods, the presence of inhibitors resulted in no amplification for high copy number samples in the absence of an inhibition-releasing strategy, demonstrating the necessity to carefully consider inhibition in eDNA analysis.

  19. Evaluation of a method of estimating low-flow frequencies from base-flow measurements at Indiana streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, John Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical technique of estimating low-flow frequencies from base-flow measurements was evaluated by using data for streams in Indiana. Low-flow frequencies at low- flow partial-record stations were estimated by relating base-flow measurements to concurrent daily flows at nearby streamflow-gaging stations (index stations) for which low-flowfrequency curves had been developed. A network of long-term streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana provided a sample of sites with observed low-flow frequencies. Observed values of 7-day, 10-year low flow and 7-day, 2-year low flow were compared to predicted values to evaluate the accuracy of the method. Five test cases were used to evaluate the method under a variety of conditions in which the location of the index station and its drainage area varied relative to the partial-record station. A total of 141 pairs of streamflow-gaging stations were used in the five test cases. Four of the test cases used one index station, the fifth test case used two index stations. The number of base-flow measurements was varied for each test case to see if the accuracy of the method was affected by the number of measurements used. The most accurate and least variable results were produced when two index stations on the same stream or tributaries of the partial-record station were used. All but one value of the predicted 7-day, 10-year low flow were within 15 percent of the values observed for the long-term continuous record, and all of the predicted values of the 7-day, 2-year lowflow were within 15 percent of the observed values. This apparent accuracy, to some extent, may be a result of the small sample set of 15. Of the four test cases that used one index station, the most accurate and least variable results were produced in the test case where the index station and partial-record station were on the same stream or on streams tributary to each other and where the index station had a larger drainage area than the partial-record station. In

  20. Sound propagation in and radiation from acoustically lined flow ducts: A comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Dean, P. D.; Wynne, G. A.; Burrin, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of many of the fundamental details of sound propagation in hard wall and soft wall annular flow ducts are reported. The theory of sound propagation along such ducts and the theory for determining the complex radiation impedance of higher order modes of an annulus are outlined, and methods for generating acoustic duct modes are developed. The results of a detailed measurement program on propagation in rigid wall annular ducts with and without airflow through the duct are presented. Techniques are described for measuring cut-on frequencies, modal phase speed, and radial and annular mode shapes. The effects of flow velocity on cut-on frequencies and phase speed are measured. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions for all of the effects studies. The two microphone method of impedance is used to measure the effects of flow on acoustic liners. A numerical study of sound propagation in annular ducts with one or both walls acoustically lined is presented.

  1. Impact of transient stream flow on water exchange and reactions in the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater-surface water exchange is an important process that can facilitate the degradation of critical substances like nitrogen-species and contaminants, supporting a healthy status of the aquatic ecosystem. In our study, we simulate water exchange, solute transport and reactions within a natural in-stream gravel bar using a coupled surface and subsurface numerical model. Stream water flow is simulated by computational fluid dynamics software that provides hydraulic head distributions at the streambed, which are used as an upper boundary condition for a groundwater model. In the groundwater model water exchange, solute transport, aerobic respiration and denitrification in the subsurface are simulated. Ambient groundwater flow is introduced by lateral upstream and downstream hydraulic head boundaries that generate neutral, losing or gaining stream conditions. Stream water transports dissolved oxygen, organic carbon (as the dominant electron donor) and nitrate into the subsurface, whereas an additional nitrate source exists in the ambient groundwater. Scenarios of stream flow events varying in duration and stream stage are simulated and compared with steady state scenarios with respect to water fluxes, residence times and the solute turn-over rates. Results show, that water exchange and solute turn-over rates highly depend on the interplay between event characteristics and ambient groundwater levels. For scenarios, where the stream flow event shifts the hydraulic system to a net-neutral hydraulic gradient between the average stream stage and the ambient groundwater level (minimal exchange between ground- and surface water), solute consumption is higher, compared to the steady losing or gaining case. In contrast, events that induce strong losing conditions lead to a lower potential of solute consumption.

  2. EFFECTS OF LOW FLOW ON INVASION PROCESS OF EXOTIC STREAM INVERTEBRATES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Naoya; Sakai, Toru; Miyake, Yo

    This study aimed to demonstrate recent invasion status and low-flow resistance of two exotic invertebrates, Pyasa acuta and Crangonyx floridanus, in Shigenobu River, Ehime, Japan. Six years of longitudinal survey revealed that density of these two invasive species were high in the middle and lower segments of the mainstem, in which stream habitats were degraded. Furthermore, the distribution of Crangonyx floridanus appeared to expand toward upstream along the river. A short-term survey during a descending flow showed that Crangonyx floridanus decreased along with other major invertebrate taxa. In contrast, relative abundance of Pyasa acuta increased as flow decreased, indicating that this invasive species has relatively high resistance to low flow. Thus, low flow was suggested to facilitate the invasion of Pyasa acuta.

  3. Regulation of ice stream flow through subglacial formation of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsborrow, Monica; Andreassen, Karin; Hubbard, Alun; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Gudlaugsson, Eythor; Patton, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Variations in the flow of ice streams and outlet glaciers are a primary control on ice sheet stability, yet comprehensive understanding of the key processes operating at the ice-bed interface remains elusive. Basal resistance is critical, especially sticky spots--localized zones of high basal traction--for maintaining force balance in an otherwise well-lubricated/high-slip subglacial environment. Here we consider the influence of subglacial gas-hydrate formation on ice stream dynamics, and its potential to initiate and maintain sticky spots. Geophysical data document the geologic footprint of a major palaeo-ice-stream that drained the Barents Sea-Fennoscandian ice sheet approximately 20,000 years ago. Our results reveal a ~250 km2 sticky spot that coincided with subsurface shallow gas accumulations, seafloor fluid expulsion and a fault complex associated with deep hydrocarbon reservoirs. We propose that gas migrating from these reservoirs formed hydrates under high-pressure, low-temperature subglacial conditions. The gas hydrate desiccated, stiffened and thereby strengthened the subglacial sediments, promoting high traction--a sticky spot--that regulated ice stream flow. Deep hydrocarbon reservoirs are common beneath past and contemporary glaciated areas, implying that gas-hydrate regulation of subglacial dynamics could be a widespread phenomenon.

  4. Iso-acoustic focusing of cells for size-insensitive acousto-mechanical phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Augustsson, Per; Karlsen, Jonas T.; Su, Hao-Wei; Bruus, Henrik; Voldman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of single cells is an emerging tool for cell classification, enabling assessment of effective parameters relating to cells' interior molecular content and structure. Here, we present iso-acoustic focusing, an equilibrium method to analyze the effective acoustic impedance of single cells in continuous flow. While flowing through a microchannel, cells migrate sideways, influenced by an acoustic field, into streams of increasing acoustic impedance, until reaching their cell-type specific point of zero acoustic contrast. We establish an experimental procedure and provide theoretical justifications and models for iso-acoustic focusing. We describe a method for providing a suitable acoustic contrast gradient in a cell-friendly medium, and use acoustic forces to maintain that gradient in the presence of destabilizing forces. Applying this method we demonstrate iso-acoustic focusing of cell lines and leukocytes, showing that acoustic properties provide phenotypic information independent of size. PMID:27180912

  5. Surface acoustic wave induced particle manipulation in a PDMS channel--principle concepts for continuous flow applications.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Enlund, Johannes; Johansson, Stefan; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2012-04-01

    A device for acoustic particle manipulation in the 40 MHz range for continuous-flow operation in a 50 μm wide PDMS channel has been evaluated. Unidirectional interdigital transducers on a Y-cut Z-propagation lithium nixobate wafer were used to excite a surface acoustic wave that generated an acoustic standing wave inside the microfluidic channel. It was shown that particle alignment nodes with different inter-node spacing could be obtained, depending on device design and driving frequency. The observed inter-node spacing differed from the standard half-wavelength inter-node spacing generally employed in bulk acoustic transducer excited resonant systems. This effect and the related issue of acoustic node positions relative the channel walls, which is fundamental for most continuous flow particle manipulation operations in channels, was evaluated in measurements and simulations. Specific applications of particle separation and alignment where these systems can offer benefits relative state-of the art designs were identified.

  6. Channel water balance and exchange with subsurface flow along a mountain headwater stream in Montana, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payn, R.A.; Gooseff, M.N.; McGlynn, B.L.; Bencala, K.E.; Wondzell, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Channel water balances of contiguous reaches along streams represent a poorly understood scale of stream-subsurface interaction. We measured reach water balances along a headwater stream in Montana, United States, during summer base flow recessions. Reach water balances were estimated from series of tracer tests in 13 consecutive reaches delineated evenly along a 2.6 km valley segment. For each reach, we estimated net change in discharge, gross hydrologic loss, and gross hydrologic gain from tracer dilution and mass recovery. Four series of tracer tests were performed during relatively high, intermediate, and low base flow conditions. The relative distribution of channel water along the stream was strongly related to a transition in valley structure, with a general increase in gross losses through the recession. During tracer tests at intermediate and low flows, there were frequent substantial losses of tracer mass (>10%) that could not be explained by net loss in flow over the reach, indicating that many of the study reaches were concurrently losing and gaining water. For example, one reach with little net change in discharge exchanged nearly 20% of upstream flow with gains and losses along the reach. These substantial bidirectional exchanges suggest that some channel interactions with subsurface flow paths were not measurable by net change in flow or transient storage of recovered tracer. Understanding bidirectional channel water balances in stream reaches along valleys is critical to an accurate assessment of stream solute fate and transport and to a full assessment of exchanges between the stream channel and surrounding subsurface.

  7. Acoustic black hole in a stationary hydrodynamic flow of microcavity polaritons.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H S; Gerace, D; Carusotto, I; Sanvitto, D; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Sagnes, I; Bloch, J; Amo, A

    2015-01-23

    We report an experimental study of superfluid hydrodynamic effects in a one-dimensional polariton fluid flowing along a laterally patterned semiconductor microcavity and hitting a micron-sized engineered defect. At high excitation power, superfluid propagation effects are observed in the polariton dynamics; in particular, a sharp acoustic horizon is formed at the defect position, separating regions of sub- and supersonic flow. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by theoretical calculations based on a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Promising perspectives to observe Hawking radiation via photon correlation measurements are illustrated.

  8. Acoustic Black Hole in a Stationary Hydrodynamic Flow of Microcavity Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. S.; Gerace, D.; Carusotto, I.; Sanvitto, D.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Sagnes, I.; Bloch, J.; Amo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental study of superfluid hydrodynamic effects in a one-dimensional polariton fluid flowing along a laterally patterned semiconductor microcavity and hitting a micron-sized engineered defect. At high excitation power, superfluid propagation effects are observed in the polariton dynamics; in particular, a sharp acoustic horizon is formed at the defect position, separating regions of sub- and supersonic flow. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by theoretical calculations based on a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Promising perspectives to observe Hawking radiation via photon correlation measurements are illustrated.

  9. Measurement of the flow velocity in unmagnetized plasmas by counter propagating ion-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.X.; Li Yangfang; Xiao Delong; Li Jingju; Li Yiren

    2005-06-15

    The diffusion velocity of an inhomogeneous unmagnetized plasma is measured by means of the phase velocities of ion-acoustic waves propagating along and against the direction of the plasma flow. Combined with the measurement of the plasma density distributions by usual Langmuir probes, the method is applied to measure the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and effective ion collision frequency in inhomogeneous plasmas formed in an asymmetrically discharged double-plasma device. Experimental results show that the measured flow velocities, diffusion coefficients, and effective collision frequencies are in agreement with ion-neutral collision dominated diffusion theory.

  10. Quantifying the contribution of land use and climate change to stream flow alteration in tropical catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marhaento, Hero; Booij, Martijn J.; Hoekstra, Arjen Y.

    2015-04-01

    A new approach is introduced to measure the quantitative contribution of land use and climate change to stream flow alteration based on the changes in the proportion of excess water relative to changes in the proportion of excess energy. The quantitative contribution is estimated based on three measures: (1) the resultant length (R) which indicates the magnitude of the changes in the proportion of excess water and energy with a higher resultant indicating a higher magnitude; (2) the slope of change (θ in arc degree) which indicates the magnitude of the contribution of land use and climate changes with a higher slope reflecting a higher contribution of climate change; and (3) the relative contribution of land use and climate changes to stream flow alteration (C in %). In this study, we applied our approach to five catchments (Pidekso, Keduang, Samin, Madiun and Kening) ranging in size from 234 to 3759 km2 on Java, Indonesia. The hydro-climatic data cover the period 1975 - 2012 and the land use maps acquired from multi-temporal satellite imageries (i.e. for the years 1972, 1994, 2002 and 2013) were used and analyzed. The approach consists of four steps: (1) performing abrupt change detection on annual stream flow using Pettitt's test; (2) calculating the proportion of excess water and the proportion of excess energy for the period before and after the abrupt change of the stream flow; (3) calculating the quantitative contribution of land use and climate change to stream flow changes; (4) comparing the results with the Mann-Kendall trend analysis of variability in precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, and the land use change analysis. The results show that all catchments have a simultaneous increase of the proportion of excess water and energy for the period after the abrupt change compared to the period before the abrupt change. The Samin catchment gives the highest R value with a value of 0.9 followed by Pidekso catchment (0.7), Keduang catchment (0

  11. Acoustic radiation damping of flat rectangular plates subjected to subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen Heitman

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic radiation damping for various isotropic and laminated composite plates and semi-infinite strips subjected to a uniform, subsonic and steady flow has been predicted. The predictions are based on the linear vibration of a flat plate. The fluid loading is characterized as the perturbation pressure derived from the linearized Bernoulli and continuity equations. Parameters varied in the analysis include Mach number, mode number and plate size, aspect ratio and mass. The predictions are compared with existing theoretical results and experimental data. The analytical results show that the fluid loading can significantly affect realistic plate responses. Generally, graphite/epoxy and carbon/carbon plates have higher acoustic radiation damping values than similar aluminum plates, except near plate divergence conditions resulting from aeroelastic instability. Universal curves are presented where the acoustic radiation damping normalized by the mass ratio is a linear function of the reduced frequency. A separate curve is required for each Mach number and plate aspect ratio. In addition, acoustic radiation damping values can be greater than or equal to the structural component of the modal critical damping ratio (assumed as 0.01) for the higher subsonic Mach numbers. New experimental data were acquired for comparison with the analytical results.

  12. Relation Between Fog & Summer Stream Flow on the North Coast of California in Redwood National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, K.

    2012-12-01

    There are three common definitions of fog; visibility less than 800 meters (Dawson 1998), ceiling height less than 400 meters (Liepper 1995, Johnstone & Dawson 2010) or low level stratus that touches the ground. Regardless of the definition used the ecological importance of fog is evidenced by the commonly used term occult precipitation i.e. water that is not accounted for. Fog is most common on the coast of Northern California during summer, the time of least precipitation. The diurnal flux in stream flows is also most evident in the summer. Diurnal flux and seasonal trends in stream flow are thought to be controlled by precipitation and evapotranspiration. Fog impacts both precipitation and evapotranspiration. While changes in fog regimes are expected to occur as a result of climate change, the ability to measure fog and anticipate the implications are in nascent stages. Although, methods for detecting fog using satellite imagery have been developed they have not been perfected and they generally only give height info for the cloud deck (top of clouds). Although deck height is important for aviation and enables some inference of what is occurring on the ground the thickness and base height are important variables for developing a greater understanding of the impacts of fog. Fog harps will be used to detect fog on the ground. Fog harp data will be compared with the results of satellite imagery analysis for presence or absence of fog. After detrending, stream flow data will be divided into categories of fog and no fog. The two categories will be tested for a statistically significant difference. The results have the potential to help solve a piece of the climate change puzzle. The data will help with the anticipation of change in stream flows in areas with high levels of summer fog and Mediterranean climates as well as refine techniques for analyzing satellite imagery for presence or absence of fog.

  13. Flow on Magnetizable Particles in Turbulent Air Streams. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davey, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The flow of magnetizable particles in a turbulent air stream in the presence of an imposed magnetic field and the phenomenon of drag reduction produced by the introduction of particles in turbulent boundary layer are investigated. The nature of the particle magnetic force is discussed and the inherent difference between electric and magnetic precipitation is considered. The incorporation of turbulent diffusion theory with an imposed magnetic migration process both with and without inertia effects is examined.

  14. Method for estimating low-flow characteristics of ungaged streams in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arihood, Leslie D.; Glatfelter, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    Equations for estimating the 7-day, 2-year and 7oday, 10-year low flows at sites on ungaged streams are presented. Regression analysis was used to develop equations relating basin characteristics and low-flow characteristics at 82 gaging stations. Significant basin characteristics in the equations are contributing drainage area and flow-duration ratio, which is the 20-percent flow duration divided by the 90-percent flow duration. Flow-duration ratio has been regionalized for Indiana on a plate. Ratios for use in the equations are obtained from the plate. Drainage areas are determined from maps or are obtained from reports. The predictive capability of the method was determined by tests of the equations and of the flow-duration ratios on the plate. The accuracy of the equations alone was tested by estimating the low-flow characteristics at 82 gaging stations where flow-duration ratio is already known. In this case, the standard errors of estimate for 7-day, 2-year and 7-day, 10-year low flows are 19 and 28 percent. When flow-duration ratios for the 82 gaging stations are obtained from the map, the standard errors are 46 and 61 percent. However, when stations having drainage areas of less than 10 square miles are excluded from the test, the standard errors decrease to 38 and 49 percent. Standard errors increase when stations with small basins are included, probably because some of the flow-duration ratios obtained for these small basins are incorrect. Local geology and its effect on the ratio are not adequately reflected on the plate, which shows the regional variation in flow-duration ratio. In all the tests, no bias is apparent areally, with increasing drainage area or with increasing ratio. Guidelines and limitations should be considered when using the method. The method can be applied only at sites in the northern and central physiographic zones of the State. Low-flow characteristics cannot be estimated for regulated streams unless the amount of regulation is

  15. Method for estimating low-flow characteristics of ungaged streams in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arihood, L.D.; Glatfelter, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Equations for estimating the 7-day, 2-yr and 7-day, 10-yr low flows at sites on ungaged streams are presented. Regression analysis was used to develop equations relating basin characteristics and low flow characteristics at 82 gaging stations. Significant basin characteristics in the equations are contributing drainage area and flow duration ratio, which is the 20% flow duration divided by the 90% flow duration. Flow duration ratio has been regionalized for Indiana on a plate. Ratios for use in the equations are obtained from this plate. Drainage areas are determined from maps or are obtained from reports. The predictive capability of the method was determined by tests of the equations and of the flow duration ratios on the plate. The accuracy of the equations alone was tested by estimating the low flow characteristics at 82 gaging stations where flow duration ratio is already known. In this case, the standard errors of estimate for 7-day, 2-yr and 7-day, 10-yr low flows are 19% and 28%. When flow duration ratios for the 82 gaging stations are obtained from the map, the standard errors are 46% and 61%. However, when stations with drainage areas < 10 sq mi are excluded from the test, the standard errors reduce to 38% and 49%. Standard errors increase when stations with small basins are included, probably because some of the flow duration ratios obtained for these small basins are incorrect. Local geology and its effect on the ratio are not adequately reflected on the plate, which shows the regional variation in flow duration ratio. In all the tests, no bias is apparent areally, with increasing drainage area or with increasing ratio. Guidelines and limitations should be considered when using the method. The method can be applied only at sites in the northern and the central physiographic zones of the state. Low flow characteristics cannot be estimated for regulated streams unless the amount of regulation is known so that the estimated low flow characteristic can be

  16. Determination of ammonium in Kjeldahl digests by gas-diffusion flow-injection analysis with a bulk acoustic wave-impedance sensor.

    PubMed

    Su, X L; Nie, L H; Yao, S Z

    1997-11-01

    A novel flow-injection analysis (FIA) system has been developed for the rapid and direct determination of ammonium in Kjeldahl digests. The method is based on diffusion of ammonia across a PTFE gas-permeable membrane from an alkaline (NaOH/EDTA) stream into a stream of diluted boric acid. The trapped ammonium in the acceptor is determined on line by a bulk acoustic wave (BAW)-impedance sensor and the signal is proportional to the ammonium concentration present in the digests. The proposed system exhibits a favorable frequency response to 5.0 x 10(-6)-4.0 x 10(-3) mol l(-1) ammonium with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-6) mol l(-1), and the precision was better than 1% (RSD) for 0.025-1.0 mM ammonium at a through-put of 45-50 samples h(-1). Results obtained for nitrogen determination in amino acids and for proteins determination in blood products are in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional distillation/titration method, respectively. The effects of composition of acceptor stream, cell constant of conductivity electrode, sample volume, flow rates and potential interferents on the FIA signals were discussed in detail.

  17. Fine Magnetic Structure and Origin of Counter-streaming Mass Flows in a Quiescent Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu; Liu, Ying D.; Chen, P. F.; Su, Jiangtao; Xu, Zhi; Liu, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    We present high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that consists of a vertical and a horizontal foot encircled by an overlying spine and has ubiquitous counter-streaming mass flows. While the horizontal foot and the spine were connected to the solar surface, the vertical foot was suspended above the solar surface and was supported by a semicircular bubble structure. The bubble first collapsed, then reformed at a similar height, and finally started to oscillate for a long time. We find that the collapse and oscillation of the bubble boundary were tightly associated with a flare-like feature located at the bottom of the bubble. Based on the observational results, we propose that the prominence should be composed of an overlying horizontal spine encircling a low-lying horizontal and vertical foot, in which the horizontal foot consists of shorter field lines running partially along the spine and has ends connected to the solar surface, while the vertical foot consists of piling-up dips due to the sagging of the spine fields and is supported by a bipolar magnetic system formed by parasitic polarities (i.e., the bubble). The upflows in the vertical foot were possibly caused by the magnetic reconnection at the separator between the bubble and the overlying dips, which intruded into the persistent downflow field and formed the picture of counter-streaming mass flows. In addition, the counter-streaming flows in the horizontal foot were possibly caused by the imbalanced pressure at the both ends.

  18. FINE MAGNETIC STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF COUNTER-STREAMING MASS FLOWS IN A QUIESCENT SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu; Xu, Zhi; Liu, Zhong; Liu, Ying D.; Chen, P. F.; Su, Jiangtao

    2015-11-20

    We present high-resolution observations of a quiescent solar prominence that consists of a vertical and a horizontal foot encircled by an overlying spine and has ubiquitous counter-streaming mass flows. While the horizontal foot and the spine were connected to the solar surface, the vertical foot was suspended above the solar surface and was supported by a semicircular bubble structure. The bubble first collapsed, then reformed at a similar height, and finally started to oscillate for a long time. We find that the collapse and oscillation of the bubble boundary were tightly associated with a flare-like feature located at the bottom of the bubble. Based on the observational results, we propose that the prominence should be composed of an overlying horizontal spine encircling a low-lying horizontal and vertical foot, in which the horizontal foot consists of shorter field lines running partially along the spine and has ends connected to the solar surface, while the vertical foot consists of piling-up dips due to the sagging of the spine fields and is supported by a bipolar magnetic system formed by parasitic polarities (i.e., the bubble). The upflows in the vertical foot were possibly caused by the magnetic reconnection at the separator between the bubble and the overlying dips, which intruded into the persistent downflow field and formed the picture of counter-streaming mass flows. In addition, the counter-streaming flows in the horizontal foot were possibly caused by the imbalanced pressure at the both ends.

  19. Artificial intelligence based models for stream-flow forecasting: 2000-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Zaher Mundher; El-shafie, Ahmed; Jaafar, Othman; Afan, Haitham Abdulmohsin; Sayl, Khamis Naba

    2015-11-01

    The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has increased since the middle of the 20th century as seen in its application in a wide range of engineering and science problems. The last two decades, for example, has seen a dramatic increase in the development and application of various types of AI approaches for stream-flow forecasting. Generally speaking, AI has exhibited significant progress in forecasting and modeling non-linear hydrological applications and in capturing the noise complexity in the dataset. This paper explores the state-of-the-art application of AI in stream-flow forecasting, focusing on defining the data-driven of AI, the advantages of complementary models, as well as the literature and their possible future application in modeling and forecasting stream-flow. The review also identifies the major challenges and opportunities for prospective research, including, a new scheme for modeling the inflow, a novel method for preprocessing time series frequency based on Fast Orthogonal Search (FOS) techniques, and Swarm Intelligence (SI) as an optimization approach.

  20. Ecological Response to Extreme Flow Events in Streams and Rivers: Implications of Climate Change for Aquatic Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, C. P.; Vander Laan, J. J.; Dhungel, S.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    We used the USEPA's 2008-2009 National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA) data to assess the potential sensitivity of stream biodiversity to both spatial variation in measures of extreme flow and likely changes in extreme flows associated with projected climate change. The NRSA data consisted of macroinvertebrate samples collected at 1313 reference-quality sites. We characterized the hydrologic regimes at each of these sites by developing Random Forest empirical models from long-term (≥ 20 years) daily flow records obtained from 601 gaged USGS stations. These models described spatial variation in 16 flow variables as a function of climate and watershed attributes. Three of the models characterized aspects of extreme flow: the mean number of zero-flow events per year (ZeroDays), the mean number of high-flow events per year (HighDays = number of events per year that exceed the 95th percentile of mean annual flow), and the coefficient of variation of daily flows (CV). We used these models to predict the flow attributes expected at each of the 1313 sites with ecological data. We then built additional Random Forest models that related among-site differences in stream macroinvertebrate taxonomic composition, assemblage richness, and the likelihood of observing individual taxa to the 16 measures of flow regime and other environmental predictors. At the national level, ZeroDays was an important predictor of macroinvertebrate biodiversity: richness declined as ZeroDays increased. A similar pattern was observed when analyses were restricted to lowland and plains streams. For eastern highland streams, HighDays was a better predictor of stream biodiversity than aspects of low flow: richness declined as HighDays increased. For western streams, CV was a better predictor of biodiversity than either ZeroDays or HighDays: biodiversity decreased as CV increased. Empirical models that linked flow attributes to climate change projections imply that flow regime response to climate

  1. Flow and acoustic field due to an inclined plate with a downstream splitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. M.; Conlisk, A. T.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work, the high Reynolds number flow past an inclined plate with a splitter plate placed in its wake is considered numerically. A numerical conformal mapping technique is employed to transform the two-plate system into the same number of cylinders: the flow field is assumed to be two-dimensional. The vortex shedding from the inclined plate is modelled using the discrete vortex method. It is shown that the splitter plate has a profound effect on the development of the flow over a range of values of a suitably defined offset parameter and for a range of positions of the leading edge of the splitter plate. The acoustic field is also calculated and the spectrum reflects the flow results.

  2. Steady streaming: A key mixing mechanism in low-Reynolds-number acinar flows

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Haribalan; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    Study of mixing is important in understanding transport of submicron sized particles in the acinar region of the lung. In this article, we investigate transport in view of advective mixing utilizing Lagrangian particle tracking techniques: tracer advection, stretch rate and dispersion analysis. The phenomenon of steady streaming in an oscillatory flow is found to hold the key to the origin of kinematic mixing in the alveolus, the alveolar mouth and the alveolated duct. This mechanism provides the common route to folding of material lines and surfaces in any region of the acinar flow, and has no bearing on whether the geometry is expanding or if flow separates within the cavity or not. All analyses consistently indicate a significant decrease in mixing with decreasing Reynolds number (Re). For a given Re, dispersion is found to increase with degree of alveolation, indicating that geometry effects are important. These effects of Re and geometry can also be explained by the streaming mechanism. Based on flow conditions and resultant convective mixing measures, we conclude that significant convective mixing in the duct and within an alveolus could originate only in the first few generations of the acinar tree as a result of nonzero inertia, flow asymmetry, and large Keulegan–Carpenter (KC) number. PMID:21580803

  3. Steady streaming: A key mixing mechanism in low-Reynolds-number acinar flows.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Haribalan; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-04-01

    Study of mixing is important in understanding transport of submicron sized particles in the acinar region of the lung. In this article, we investigate transport in view of advective mixing utilizing Lagrangian particle tracking techniques: tracer advection, stretch rate and dispersion analysis. The phenomenon of steady streaming in an oscillatory flow is found to hold the key to the origin of kinematic mixing in the alveolus, the alveolar mouth and the alveolated duct. This mechanism provides the common route to folding of material lines and surfaces in any region of the acinar flow, and has no bearing on whether the geometry is expanding or if flow separates within the cavity or not. All analyses consistently indicate a significant decrease in mixing with decreasing Reynolds number (Re). For a given Re, dispersion is found to increase with degree of alveolation, indicating that geometry effects are important. These effects of Re and geometry can also be explained by the streaming mechanism. Based on flow conditions and resultant convective mixing measures, we conclude that significant convective mixing in the duct and within an alveolus could originate only in the first few generations of the acinar tree as a result of nonzero inertia, flow asymmetry, and large Keulegan-Carpenter (K(C)) number. PMID:21580803

  4. Acoustic divergence with gene flow in a lekking hummingbird with complex songs.

    PubMed

    González, Clementina; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Hummingbirds have developed a remarkable diversity of learned vocalizations, from single-note songs to phonologically and syntactically complex songs. In this study we evaluated if geographic song variation of wedge-tailed sabrewings (Campylopterus curvipennis) is correlated with genetic divergence, and examined processes that explain best the origin of intraspecific song variation. We contrasted estimates of genetic differentiation, genetic structure, and gene flow across leks from microsatellite loci of wedge-tailed sabrewings with measures for acoustic signals involved in mating derived from recordings of males singing at leks throughout eastern Mexico. We found a strong acoustic structure across leks and geography, where lek members had an exclusive assemblage of syllable types, differed in spectral and temporal measurements of song, and song sharing decreased with geographic distance. However, neutral genetic and song divergence were not correlated, and measures of genetic differentiation and migration estimates indicated gene flow across leks. The persistence of acoustic structuring in wedge-tailed sabrewings may thus best be explained by stochastic processes across leks, in which intraspecific vocal variation is maintained in the absence of genetic differentiation by postdispersal learning and social conditions, and by geographical isolation due to the accumulation of small differences, producing most dramatic changes between populations further apart. PMID:25271429

  5. Acoustic Divergence with Gene Flow in a Lekking Hummingbird with Complex Songs

    PubMed Central

    González, Clementina; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Hummingbirds have developed a remarkable diversity of learned vocalizations, from single-note songs to phonologically and syntactically complex songs. In this study we evaluated if geographic song variation of wedge-tailed sabrewings (Campylopterus curvipennis) is correlated with genetic divergence, and examined processes that explain best the origin of intraspecific song variation. We contrasted estimates of genetic differentiation, genetic structure, and gene flow across leks from microsatellite loci of wedge-tailed sabrewings with measures for acoustic signals involved in mating derived from recordings of males singing at leks throughout eastern Mexico. We found a strong acoustic structure across leks and geography, where lek members had an exclusive assemblage of syllable types, differed in spectral and temporal measurements of song, and song sharing decreased with geographic distance. However, neutral genetic and song divergence were not correlated, and measures of genetic differentiation and migration estimates indicated gene flow across leks. The persistence of acoustic structuring in wedge-tailed sabrewings may thus best be explained by stochastic processes across leks, in which intraspecific vocal variation is maintained in the absence of genetic differentiation by postdispersal learning and social conditions, and by geographical isolation due to the accumulation of small differences, producing most dramatic changes between populations further apart. PMID:25271429

  6. Investigation of Mixing a Supersonic Stream with the Flow Downstream of a Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    The flow characteristics in the base region of a two-dimensional supersonic compression ramp are investigated. A stream-wise oriented air jet, M = 1.75, is injected through a thin horizontal slot into a supersonic air main flow, M = 2.3, at the end of a two-dimensional compression ramp. The velocity profile and basic characteristics of the flow in the base region immediately following the ramp are determined. Visualization of the flowfield for qualitative observations is accomplished via Dark Central Ground Interferometry (DCGI). Two-dimensional velocity profiles are obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV