Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic streaming velocity

  1. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan A.; McEwen, Joseph E.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ˜5 ) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  2. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation. PMID:27058069

  3. Feasibility of using acoustic velocity meters for estimating highly organic suspended-solids concentrations in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Levee 4 canal site below control structure G-88 in the Everglades agricultural area in northwestern Broward County, Florida, to study the relation of acoustic attenuation to suspended-solids concentrations. Acoustic velocity meter and temperature data were obtained with concurrent water samples analyzed for suspended-solids concentrations. Two separate acoustic velocity meter frequencies were used, 200 and 500 kilohertz, to determine the sensitivity of acoustic attenuation to frequency for the measured suspended-solids concentration range. Suspended-solids concentrations for water samples collected at the Levee 4 canal site from July 1993 to September 1994 ranged from 22 to 1,058 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from about 30 to 93 percent. Regression analyses showed that attenuation data from the acoustic velocity meter (automatic gain control) and temperature data alone do not provide enough information to adequately describe the concentrations of suspended solids. However, if velocity is also included as one of the independent variables in the regression model, a satisfactory correlation can be obtained. Thus, it is feasible to use acoustic velocity meter instrumentation to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in streams, even when suspended solids are primarily composed of organic material. Using the most comprehensive data set available for the study (500 kiloherz data), the best fit regression model produces a standard error of 69.7 milligrams per liter, with actual errors ranging from 2 to 128 milligrams per liter. Both acoustic velocity meter transmission frequencies of 200 and 500 hilohertz produced similar results, suggesting that transducers of either frequency could be used to collect attenuation data at the study site. Results indicate that calibration will be required for each acoustic velocity meter system to the unique suspended-solids regime existing at each site. More robust solutions may

  4. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  5. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  6. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  7. Application of acoustic velocity meters for gaging discharge of three low-velocity tidal streams in the St. Johns River basin, northeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloat, J.V.; Gain, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    Index-velocity data collected with acoustic velocity meters, stage data, and cross-sectional area data were used to calculate discharge at three low-velocity, tidal streamflow stations in north-east Florida. Discharge at three streamflow stations was computed as the product of the channel cross-sectional area and the mean velocity as determined from an index velocity measured in the stream using an acoustic velocity meter. The tidal streamlflow stations used in the study were: Six Mile Creek near Picolata, Fla.; Dunns Creek near Satsuma, Fla.; and the St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Cross-sectional areas at the measurement sections ranged from about 3,000 square feet at Six Mile Creek to about 18,500 square feet at St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Physical characteristics for all three streams were similar except for drainage area. The topography primarily is low-relief, swampy terrain; stream velocities ranged from about -2 to 2 feet per second; and the average change in stage was about 1 foot. Instantaneous discharge was measured using a portable acoustic current meter at each of the three streams to develop a relation between the mean velocity in the stream and the index velocity measured by the acoustic velocity meter. Using least-squares linear regression, a simple linear relation between mean velocity and index velocity was determined. Index velocity was the only significant linear predictor of mean velocity for Six Mile Creek and St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. For Dunns Creek, both index velocity and stage were used to develop a multiple-linear predictor of mean velocity. Stage-area curves for each stream were developed from bathymetric data. Instantaneous discharge was computed by multiplying results of relations developed for cross-sectional area and mean velocity. Principal sources of error in the estimated discharge are identified as: (1) instrument errors associated with measurement of stage and index velocity, (2) errors in the representation of

  8. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  9. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  10. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  11. Acoustic streaming and Sun's meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    A vast number of physical processes involving oscillations of a bounded viscous fluid are relevantly influenced by acoustic streaming. When this happens a steady circulation of fluid develops in a thin boundary adjacent to the interface. Some examples are refracted sound waves, a fluid inside a spherical cavity undergoing torsional oscillations or a pulsating liquid droplet. Steady streaming around circular interfaces consists of a hemispherically symmetric recirculation of fluid from the equatorial plane to the polar axes closely resembling the meridional circulation pattern observed in the Sun's convection zone that determines the solar cycle. In this paper, it is argued that the acoustic pulsations exhibited by the Sun would lead to acoustic streaming in the boundary of the convection zone. A simple estimation using a typical dominant frequency of 3 mHz and the observed surface oscillation amplitude yields a steady streaming velocity us ∼ 10 m s‑1, which is on the order of the meridional circulation velocity observed in the Sun's convection zone.

  12. Ultrasonic velocity meter used in stream gaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fayard, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Many streams and canals in Florida are affected by tides or control structures and experience very low flow velocities at times. For example, the St. Johns River in northeastern Florida is affected by tides for about 140 miles upstream from its mouth and many canals in the Miami area of southeastern Florida are controlled by manmade structures and other elements that cause a variable backwater effect and very low flow velocities. For these conditions, it becomes necessary to obtain a continuous index of mean velocity as well as stage in order to compute discharge. Point-velocity sensing systems have been used to relate point velocity to mean velocity but their usefulness commonly is limited because of the lack of an exact relation. The ultrasonic velocity meter (UVM) provides an alternative approach to measuring a velocity index that can be related to mean velocity; one that provides an integrated velocity at a prescribed elevation across a stream. Six stations in the tidal-affected lower St. Johns River basin are presently equipped with UVM's. Measuring sections are as narrow as 100 feet and as wide as 900 feet. Multiple acoustic paths are used to measure wide sections in a straight reach of river; crossing paths are used to measure sections in a bend of the river. Because of low velocity and variable backwater conditions, flow also is measured with UVM's in 11 canals in the Miami area that drain into The Everglades. At some of the canal sites transducers have been permanently mounted and a 'portable' UVM module is used to obtain instantaneous velocity readings.

  13. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming. PMID:24437742

  14. Fast acoustic streaming in standing waves: generation of an additional outer streaming cell.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Daru, Virginie; Bailliet, Hélène; Moreau, Solène; Valière, Jean-Christophe; Baltean-Carlès, Diana; Weisman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Rayleigh streaming in a cylindrical acoustic standing waveguide is studied both experimentally and numerically for nonlinear Reynolds numbers from 1 to 30 [Re(NL)=(U0/c0)(2)(R/δν)(2), with U0 the acoustic velocity amplitude at the velocity antinode, c0 the speed of sound, R the tube radius, and δν the acoustic boundary layer thickness]. Streaming velocity is measured by means of laser Doppler velocimetry in a cylindrical resonator filled with air at atmospheric pressure at high intensity sound levels. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically with high resolution finite difference schemes. The resonator is excited by shaking it along the axis at imposed frequency. Results of measurements and of numerical calculation are compared with results given in the literature and with each other. As expected, the axial streaming velocity measured and calculated agrees reasonably well with the slow streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for fast streaming (ReNL>1). Both experimental and numerical results show that when ReNL is increased, the center of the outer streaming cells are pushed toward the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. PMID:23967913

  15. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  16. Diversity of acoustic streaming in a rectangular acoustofluidic field.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Hu, Junhui

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of acoustic streaming field in a 2D rectangular chamber with a traveling wave and using water as the acoustic medium is numerically investigated by the finite element method. It is found that the working frequency, the vibration excitation source length, and the distance and phase difference between two separated symmetric vibration excitation sources can cause the diversity in the acoustic streaming pattern. It is also found that a small object in the acoustic field results in an additional eddy, and affects the eddy size in the acoustic streaming field. In addition, the computation results show that with an increase of the acoustic medium's temperature, the speed of the main acoustic streaming decreases first and then increases, and the angular velocity of the corner eddies increases monotonously, which can be clearly explained by the change of the acoustic dissipation factor and shearing viscosity of the acoustic medium with temperature. Commercialized FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics is used to implement the computation tasks, which makes our method very easy to use. And the computation method is partially verified by an established analytical solution. PMID:25541360

  17. Extreme Value Analysis of Tidal Stream Velocity Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Samuel; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Bryden, Ian

    2011-04-26

    This paper presents a statistical extreme value analysis of maximum velocity perturbations from the mean flow speed in a tidal stream. This study was performed using tidal velocity data measured using both an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at the same location which allows for direct comparison of predictions. The extreme value analysis implements of a Peak-Over-Threshold method to explore the effect of perturbation length and time scale on the magnitude of a 50-year perturbation.

  18. Acoustic Investigation of Jet Mixing Noise in Dual Stream Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Dahl, Milo D.

    2012-01-01

    In an earlier study, a prediction model for jet noise in dual stream jets was proposed that is founded on velocity scaling laws in single stream jets and similarity features of the mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy in dual stream flows. The model forms a composite spectrum from four component single-stream jets each believed to represent noise-generation from a distinct region in the actual flow. While the methodology worked effectively at conditions considered earlier, recent examination of acoustic data at some unconventional conditions indicate that further improvements are necessary in order to expand the range of applicability of the model. The present work demonstrates how these predictions compare with experimental data gathered by NASA and industry for the purpose of examining the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of such nozzles for a wide range of core and fan stream conditions. Of particular interest are jets with inverted velocity and temperature profiles and the appearance of a second spectral peak at small aft angles to the jet under such conditions. It is shown that a four-component spectrum succeeds in modeling the second peak when the aft angle refraction effects are properly incorporated into the model. A tradeoff of noise emission takes place between two turbulent regions identified as transition and fully mixed regions as the fan stream velocity exceeds that of the core stream. The effect of nozzle discharge coefficients will also be discussed.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic streaming: absorption coefficient and acoustic field shape estimation.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Grucker, Daniel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric

    2006-07-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to visualize acoustic streaming in liquids. A single-shot spin echo sequence (HASTE) with a saturation band perpendicular to the acoustic beam permits the acquisition of an instantaneous image of the flow due to the application of ultrasound. An average acoustic streaming velocity can be estimated from the MR images, from which the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and the bulk viscosity of different glycerol-water mixtures can be deduced. In the same way, this MRI method could be used to assess the acoustic field and time-average power of ultrasonic transducers in water (or other liquids with known physical properties), after calibration of a geometrical parameter that is dependent on the experimental setup. PMID:16650447

  20. HYBRID COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH STREAM VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Thacker, Robert J.

    2013-07-10

    In the early universe, substantial relative ''stream'' velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To assess the impact of these velocities on high-redshift structure formation, we carry out a suite of high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations, which use smoothed particle hydrodynamic data sets as initial conditions, converted using a new tool developed for this work. These simulations resolve structures with masses as small as a few 100 M{sub Sun }, and we focus on the 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} ''mini-halos'' in which the first stars formed. At z Almost-Equal-To 17, the presence of stream velocities has only a minor effect on the number density of halos below 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, but it greatly suppresses gas accretion onto all halos and the dark matter structures around them. Stream velocities lead to significantly lower halo gas fractions, especially for Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} objects, an effect that is likely to depend on the orientation of a halo's accretion lanes. This reduction in gas density leads to colder, more compact radial profiles, and it substantially delays the redshift of collapse of the largest halos, leading to delayed star formation and possibly delayed reionization. These many differences suggest that future simulations of early cosmological structure formation should include stream velocities to properly predict gas evolution, star formation, and the epoch of reionization.

  1. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    DOEpatents

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  2. New Sensors For Flow Velocity And Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1991-01-01

    Paper describes two sensor-development programs at Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center. One program for digital image velocimetry (DIV) sensors, and other program, for advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnels. DIV measures, in real time, instantaneous velocity fields of time-varying flow or of collection of objects moving with varying velocities. Advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnels being developed to reduce effects of interference from wind noise, noise from interactions between flows and sensors, flow-induced vibrations of sensors, deflections of accoustic waves by boundary layers induced by sensors, and reflections from walls and sensor supports.

  3. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect. PMID:26585023

  4. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  5. Accuracy of acoustic velocity metering systems for measurement of low velocity in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Curtis, R.E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) accuracy depends on equipment limitations, the accuracy of acoustic-path length and angle determination, and the stability of the mean velocity to acoustic-path velocity relation. Equipment limitations depend on path length and angle, transducer frequency, timing oscillator frequency, and signal-detection scheme. Typically, the velocity error from this source is about +or-1 to +or-10 mms/sec. Error in acoustic-path angle or length will result in a proportional measurement bias. Typically, an angle error of one degree will result in a velocity error of 2%, and a path-length error of one meter in 100 meter will result in an error of 1%. Ray bending (signal refraction) depends on path length and density gradients present in the stream. Any deviation from a straight acoustic path between transducer will change the unique relation between path velocity and mean velocity. These deviations will then introduce error in the mean velocity computation. Typically, for a 200-meter path length, the resultant error is less than one percent, but for a 1,000 meter path length, the error can be greater than 10%. Recent laboratory and field tests have substantiated assumptions of equipment limitations. Tow-tank tests of an AVM system with a 4.69-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of 9.3 mms/sec, and the field tests of an AVM system with a 20.5-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of a 4 mms/sec. (USGS)

  6. Experimental and analytical investigation of acoustic streaming generated by standing ultrasonic waves in an open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, K.; Loh, B.-G.; Lee, D.-R.

    2007-12-01

    Acoustic streaming patterns, velocity fields, which is induced by a cylindrical ultrasonic exciter vibrating at 28.4kHz in an open physical boundaries, is analytically and experimentally investigated using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). Induced acoustic streaming patterns and velocity fields for the gaps of 18mm at which the irrotational tangential velocity becomes a maximum, resulting in a substantial increase in the acoustic streaming velocity and pronounced visualization of streaming patterns between the vibrator and quiescent glass plate are presented. The overall air flow patterns at the gaps of 24, 30, 36mm are similar to the gap of 18 mm but as the gap increases the frequency of occurrence and irregularity of vortices in the gap appear to increase. The symmetric definite steady circular flow with local vortices is observed. The maximum streaming velocity measured stands at 0.16 cm/s with a vibration amplitude of 50 micrometers. Theoretical analysis indicates that the pattern of air flow in the gap is determined by the top and bottom limiting velocities induced by acoustic streaming within the Stokes boundary layer and that the streaming pattern is symmetrical with respect to the center axis of the vibrator by reason of symmetry. The comparison between the experimental data and the theoretical estimation based on Nyborg and Jackson is performed.

  7. Estimation of acoustical streaming: theoretical model, Doppler measurements and optical visualisation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Kowalewski, T; Secomski, W; Wójcik, J

    1998-02-01

    An approximate solution for the streaming velocity generated by flat and weakly focused transducers was derived by directly solving the Dirichlet boundary conditions for the Poisson equation, the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for the axial components of the streaming velocity. The theoretical model was verified experimentally using a 32 MHz pulsed Doppler unit. The experimental acoustical fields were produced by three different 4 mm diameter flat and focused transducers driven by the transmitter generating the average acoustic power within the range from 1 microW to 6 mW. The streaming velocity was measured along the ultrasonic beam from 0 to 2 cm. Streaming was induced in a solution of water and corn starch. The experimental results showed that for a given acoustic power the streaming velocity was independent of the starch density in water, changed from 0.3 to 40 grams of starch in 1 l of distilled water. For applied acoustic powers, the streaming velocity changed linearly from 0.2 to 40 mm/s. Both, the theoretical solutions for plane and focused waves and the experimental results were in good agreement. The streaming velocity field was also visualised using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and two different evaluation methods. The first based on the FFT-based cross-correlation analysis between small sections for each pair of images and the second employing the algorithm of searching for local displacements between several images. PMID:9614292

  8. Sizing of microbubbles in blood stream based on ultrasound velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, Behrooz

    2005-05-01

    Microbubbles, are produced inside the human body by several mechanisms which may cause many serious health problems or even death. The ability of a gas bubble to scatter ultrasound waves has led to the testing of various ultrasonic devices to monitor microbubble formation in the blood stream. These have included pulsed echo, acoustic-optical imaging, Doppler technique and the through-transmission technique. In this work, a pulse through transmission method for measuring ultrasound velocity in bubbly gel phantoms was used. The bubble size has been assessed by measurement of the pulse-wave velocity. A specially designed pressure chamber ensured the measured velocity was directly related to the volume of microbubble by Boyle's law. This velocity is an average indicator of the bubble size between transmitting and receiving transducers. The average bubble radius was 0.1 mm. For best results the measurement were carried out around 1-3 MHz frequency range. It is shown that a large change in velocity of ultrasound occurs as a result of small changes in the volume of microbubble. When the fraction by volume of gas in gel is changed from 0.6 percent to 0.8 percent the velocity changed from 1500 to 500 m/s respectively. This large change in velocity should provide a good base for detecting and more importantly, sizing microbubbles in the blood stream. The measured results were compared with theoretical prediction with good agreement between theory and experiment. This technique can be used as a simple real time method to monitor and measure the volume of the microbubles in the blood stream. This technique has many application in medical field such as; open heart surgery, blood dialysis and deep sea diving (decompression sickness).

  9. Supersonic velocities in noncommutative acoustic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we derive Schwarzschild and Kerr-like noncommutative acoustic black hole metrics in the (3+1)-dimensional noncommutative Abelian Higgs model. We have found that the changing ΔTH in the Hawking temperature TH due to spacetime noncommutativity accounts for supersonic velocities vg, whose deviation with respect to the sound speed cs is given in the form (vg-cs)/cs=ΔTH/8TH.

  10. Acoustic streaming induced by an ultrasonically oscillating endodontic file.

    PubMed

    Verhaagen, B; Boutsioukis, C; van der Sluis, L W M; Versluis, M

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasonically activated irrigation is an advanced dental technique for irrigation of the root canal system during a root canal treatment. The basic cleaning mechanism is a result of acoustic streaming induced by an oscillating file, leading to mixing of the irrigant and pressure and shear stresses on the walls of the root canal. Here the induced acoustic streaming, pressure, and shear stress are investigated in a two-dimensional cross-section of the root canal, using a combination of theory, numerical predictions, and experimental validation through high-speed particle tracking velocimetry. Acoustic streaming theory describes very well the flow induced by an ultrasonically oscillating endodontic file. It consists of an oscillatory component, which is dominant near the file, and a steady component, or jet, along the axis of oscillation. The importance of the oscillatory component for both the pressure and the shear stress is apparent, as it is two to three orders of magnitude higher than the steady component. A confinement affects the formation of the steady jets; meanwhile the oscillatory velocities and associated pressure and shear stress are increased. Previous work considering only the steady component of the flow therefore, underestimated the hydrodynamic effects induced by ultrasonic files. PMID:25234972

  11. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  12. Acoustic streaming field structure. Part II. Examples that include boundary-driven flow.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Charles

    2012-01-01

    In this paper three simple acoustic streaming problems are presented and solved. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the use of a previously published streaming model by Bradley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100(3), 1399-1408 (1996)] and illustrate, with concrete examples, some of the features of streaming flows that were predicted by the general model. In particular, the problems are intended to demonstrate cases in which the streaming field boundary condition at the face of the radiator has a nontrivial lateral dc velocity component. Such a boundary condition drives a steady solenoidal flow just like a laterally translating boundary drives Couette flow. PMID:22280567

  13. A finite element model for simulating acoustic streaming in cystic breast lesions with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, K R; Trahey, G E

    2000-01-01

    Streaming detection is an ultrasonic technique that can be used to distinguish fluid-filled lesions, or cysts, from solid lesions. With this technique, high intensity ultrasound pulses are used to induce acoustic streaming in cyst fluid, and this motion is detected using Doppler flow estimation methods. Results from a pilot clinical study were recently published in which acoustic streaming was successfully induced and detected in 14 of 15 simple breast cysts and four of 14 sonographically indeterminate breast lesions in vivo. In the study, the detected velocities were found to vary considerably among cysts and for different pulsing regimes. A finite element model of streaming detection is presented. This model is utilized to investigate methods of increasing induced acoustic streaming velocity while minimizing patient exposure to high intensity ultrasound during streaming detection. Parameters studied include intensity, frequency, acoustic beam shape, cyst-diameter, cyst fluid protein concentration, and cyst fluid viscosity. The model, which provides both transient and steady-state solutions, is shown to predict trends in streaming velocity accurately. Experimental results from studies investigating the potential for nonlinear streaming enhancement in cysts are also provided. PMID:18238532

  14. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular plug nozzles. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Blozy, J. T.; Staid, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of model scale parametric static and wind tunnel aerodynamic performance tests on unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle configurations with inverted velocity profile are discussed. The nozzle configurations are high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles applicable to dual-stream exhaust systems typical of a variable cycle engine for Advanced Supersonic Transport application. In all, seven acoustic models and eight aerodynamic performance models were tested. The nozzle geometric variables included outer stream radius ratio, inner stream to outer stream ratio, and inner stream plug shape. When compared to a conical nozzle at the same specific thrust, the results of the static acoustic tests with the coannular nozzles showed noise reductions of up to 7 PNdB. Extensive data analysis showed that the overall acoustic results can be well correlated using the mixed stream velocity and the mixed stream density. Results also showed that suppression levels are geometry and flow regulation dependent with the outer stream radius ratio, inner stream-to-outer stream velocity ratio and inner stream velocity ratio and inner stream plug shape, as the primary suppression parameters. In addition, high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzles were found to yield shock associated noise level reductions relative to a conical nozzle. The wind tunnel aerodynamic tests showed that static and simulated flight thrust coefficient at typical takeoff conditions are quite good - up to 0.98 at static conditions and 0.974 at a takeoff Mach number of 0.36. At low inner stream flow conditions significant thrust loss was observed. Using an inner stream conical plug resulted in 1% to 2% higher performance levels than nozzle geometries using a bent inner plug.

  15. Link Between Resistivity and Acoustic Velocity Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacikoylu, P.; Dvorkin, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    sand/shale model for velocity (the modified lower Hashin-Strikman elastic bound). Keywords: formation factor, acoustic velocity, rock physics relations.

  16. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts. PMID:26764815

  17. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q , the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v1≪cs for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v1≪cs/Q . Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  18. Acoustic streaming flows and sample rotation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Eugene

    1998-11-01

    Levitated drops in a gas can be driven into rotation by altering their surrounding convective environment. When these drops are placed in an acoustic resonant chamber, the symmetry characteristics of the steady streaming flows in the vicinity of the drops determine the rotational motion of the freely suspended fluid particles. Using ultrasonic standing waves around 22 kHz and millimeter-size electrostatically levitated drops, we have investigated the correlation between the convective flow characteristics and their rotational behavior. The results show that accurate control of the drop rotation axis and rate can be obtained by carefully modifying the symmetry characteristics of the chamber, and that the dominant mechanism for rotation drive is the drag exerted by the air flow over the drop surface. In addition, we found that the rotational acceleration depends on the drop viscosity, suggesting that this torque is initially strongly influenced by differential flows within the drop itself. [Work sponsored by NASA].

  19. Evaluation of the successive approximations method for acoustic streaming numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-05-01

    This work evaluates the successive approximations method commonly used to predict acoustic streaming by comparing it with a direct method. The successive approximations method solves both the acoustic wave propagation and acoustic streaming by solving the first and second order Navier-Stokes equations, ignoring the first order convective effects. This method was applied to acoustic streaming in a 2D domain and the results were compared with results from the direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The velocity results showed qualitative agreement between both methods, which indicates that the successive approximations method can describe the formation of flows with recirculation. However, a large quantitative deviation was observed between the two methods. Further analysis showed that the successive approximation method solution is sensitive to the initial flow field. The direct method showed that the instantaneous flow field changes significantly due to reflections and wave interference. It was also found that convective effects contribute significantly to the wave propagation pattern. These effects must be taken into account when solving the acoustic streaming problems, since it affects the global flow. By adequately calculating the initial condition for first order step, the acoustic streaming prediction by the successive approximations method can be improved significantly. PMID:27250122

  20. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-15

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  1. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-26

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. The stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  2. Numerical and theoretical analysis of beam vibration induced acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qun

    The purpose of this research is to numerically and analytically investigate the acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer, which are induced by a beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms. Analytical results show that the beam vibrating in standing waveforms scatters the acoustic waves into the free space, which have a larger attenuation coefficient and longer propagating traveling wavelength than those of the plane wave. In contrast to a constant Reynolds stress in the plane wave, the Reynolds stress generated by such acoustic wave is expected to drive the free space streaming away from the anti-nodes and towards nodes of the standing wave vibration. The sonic and ultrasonic streamings within the channel between the vibrating beam and a parallel stationary beam are also investigated. The acoustic streaming is utilized to cool the stationary beam, which has either a heat source attached to it or subjected to a uniform heat flux. The sonic streaming is found to be mainly the boundary layer streaming dominating the whole channel while the ultrasonic streaming is clearly composed of two boundary layer streamings near both beams and a core region streaming, which is driven by the streaming velocity at the edge of the boundary layer near the vibrating beam. The standing wave vibration of the beam induces acoustic streaming in a series of counterclockwise eddies, which is directed away from the anti-nodes and towards the nodes. The magnitude of the sonic streaming is proportional to o2A 2 while that of the ultrasonic streaming is proportional to o 3/2A2. Numerical results show that the acoustic streaming induced by the beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms has almost the same cooling efficiency for the heat source and the heat flux cases although the flow and temperature fields within the channel are different. The hysteresis of the ultrasonic streaming flow patterns associated with the change of the aspect ratio of the channel

  3. Use of Acoustic Doppler Instruments for Measuring Discharge in Streams with Appreciable Sediment Transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    The use of Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) for measuring discharge in streams with sediment transport was discussed. The studies show that the acoustic frequency of an ADCP in combination with the sediment transport characteristics in a river causes the ADCP bottom-tracking algorithms to detect a moving bottom. A moving bottom causes bottom-tracking-referenced water velocities and discharges to be biased low. The results also show that the use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) data allows accurate measurement of water velocities and discharges in such cases.

  4. An acoustic streaming instability in thermoacoustic devices utilizing jet pumps.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, S; Swift, G W

    2003-03-01

    Thermoacoustic-Stirling hybrid engines and feedback pulse tube refrigerators can utilize jet pumps to suppress streaming that would otherwise cause large heat leaks and reduced efficiency. It is desirable to use jet pumps to suppress streaming because they do not introduce moving parts such as bellows or membranes. In most cases, this form of streaming suppression works reliably. However, in some cases, the streaming suppression has been found to be unstable. Using a simple model of the acoustics in the regenerators and jet pumps of these devices, a stability criterion is derived that predicts when jet pumps can reliably suppress streaming. PMID:12656366

  5. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  6. Controlling acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic heptagonal tweezers with application to cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Bernassau, A L; Glynne-Jones, P; Gesellchen, F; Riehle, M; Hill, M; Cumming, D R S

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force has been demonstrated as a method for manipulating micron-scale particles, but is frequently affected by unwanted streaming. In this paper the streaming in a multi-transducer quasi-standing wave acoustic particle manipulation device is assessed, and found to be dominated by a form of Eckart streaming. The experimentally observed streaming takes the form of two main vortices that have their highest velocity in the region where the standing wave is established. A finite element model is developed that agrees well with experimental results, and shows that the Reynolds stresses that give rise to the fluid motion are strongest in the high velocity region. A technical solution to reduce the streaming is explored that entails the introduction of a biocompatible agar gel layer at the bottom of the chamber so as to reduce the fluid depth and volume. By this means, we reduce the region of fluid that experiences the Reynolds stresses; the viscous drag per unit volume of fluid is also increased. Particle Image Velocimetry data is used to observe the streaming as a function of agar-modified cavity depth. It was found that, in an optimised structure, Eckart streaming could be reduced to negligible levels so that we could make a sonotweezers device with a large working area of up to 13 mm × 13 mm. PMID:23725599

  7. Unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiduo; Fernández Comesaña, Daniel; Carrillo Pousa, Graciano; Yang, Yixin; Xu, Lingji

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the foundations of a unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient. Highly directional characteristics play a key role in reducing the influence of undesired acoustic sources. These characteristics can be achieved by using multiple acoustic sensors in a spatial gradient arrangement. Two particle velocity sensors possessing the figure eight directivity pattern were used in a first-order gradient configuration to yield a unidirectional probe that can reject most excitations originating from both sides and the rear. The effects of key parameters are thoroughly discussed, and the proposed theory is validated in practice. PMID:27369169

  8. Acoustic velocity sensor for the NRL ABC research platform

    SciTech Connect

    Corsaro, R.D.; Houston, B.

    1996-04-01

    A new research platform has been constructed for general underwater structural-acoustics studies of sensor/actuator coupling mechanisms, and in particular for active acoustic boundary control (ABC) studies. It consists of an array of 15 {open_quote}{open_quote}ABC{close_quote}{close_quote} tiles arranged in a 5{times}3 pattern on a backing structure (an air-backed steel plate). Tiles are 10 inches square, and each tile contains a large area actuator, pressure sensor, and (acoustic particle) velocity sensor. While the actuator and pressure sensor could be constructed of commercially available transducer material, the selection of a suitable acoustic velocity sensor proved more difficult. This paper describes the velocity sensor system selected and its impact on the resulting performance and characteristics of the ABC Platform. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  10. Estimating stream discharge using stage and multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, J. B.; Rasmussen, K.; Ledet Jensen, J.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2011-12-01

    For temperate region countries with small or moderately sized streams, such as those in Denmark, seasonal weed growth imposes a significant temporal change of the stage-discharge relation. In the past such problems were often avoided by using hydraulic structures, however, firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations presently. As a consequence, the nonlinear drift in weed density and structure adds a significant uncertainty to the hydrograph. Furthermore, the expected increase in extreme discharge situations due to climate changes in the Northern part of Europe may further violate a stable relation between stage and discharge in streams. Extreme high flow situations cause abrupt rise in stage, and consequently weed can be partly uprooted and partly bend down along the bed, thereby changing the conveyance of the stream. In addition, extreme high flow situations can cause the streams to flood the banks. If these hydraulic changes occur in between direct measurements of discharge they are not detected or accounted for in the stage-discharge relation, and the hydrograph can be significantly biased. The objective of this research is to investigate how both seasonal and short duration changes in weed distribution and abrupt changes in stage are recognized in the stream's velocity gradient. It is examined whether the use of multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry can provide an improved method for hydrograph estimation with lower uncertainty than traditional stage-discharge methods. In this presentation we shall present results from a study where, at two sites in Denmark, the stream velocity field has been mapped by the use of three Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter (ADVM) instruments. The ADVM instruments are mounted in three different depths, continuously measuring horizontal average water velocities. Velocity and stage data are selected from one summer and two winter periods, and a method for converting velocity

  11. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow

    PubMed Central

    Sou, In Mei; Layman, Christopher N.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  12. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow.

    PubMed

    Sou, In Mei; Allen, John S; Layman, Christopher N; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2011-11-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  13. Characterization of acoustic streaming and heating using synchronized infrared thermography and particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Layman, Christopher N; Sou, In Mei; Bartak, Rico; Ray, Chittaranjan; Allen, John S

    2011-09-01

    Real-time measurements of acoustic streaming velocities and surface temperature fields using synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography are reported. Measurements were conducted using a 20 kHz Langevin type acoustic horn mounted vertically in a model sonochemical reactor of either degassed water or a glycerin-water mixture. These dissipative phenomena are found to be sensitive to small variations in the medium viscosity, and a correlation between the heat flux and vorticity was determined for unsteady convective heat transfer. PMID:21514205

  14. Simulation of nonlinear Westervelt equation for the investigation of acoustic streaming and nonlinear propagation effects.

    PubMed

    Solovchuk, Maxim; Sheu, Tony W H; Thiriet, Marc

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the influence of blood flow on temperature distribution during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumors. A three-dimensional acoustic-thermal-hydrodynamic coupling model is developed to compute the temperature field in the hepatic cancerous region. The model is based on the nonlinear Westervelt equation, bioheat equations for the perfused tissue and blood flow domains. The nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations are employed to describe the flow in large blood vessels. The effect of acoustic streaming is also taken into account in the present HIFU simulation study. A simulation of the Westervelt equation requires a prohibitively large amount of computer resources. Therefore a sixth-order accurate acoustic scheme in three-point stencil was developed for effectively solving the nonlinear wave equation. Results show that focused ultrasound beam with the peak intensity 2470 W/cm(2) can induce acoustic streaming velocities up to 75 cm/s in the vessel with a diameter of 3 mm. The predicted temperature difference for the cases considered with and without acoustic streaming effect is 13.5 °C or 81% on the blood vessel wall for the vein. Tumor necrosis was studied in a region close to major vessels. The theoretical feasibility to safely necrotize the tumors close to major hepatic arteries and veins was shown. PMID:24180802

  15. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  16. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  17. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  18. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery. PMID:26025507

  19. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  20. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  1. Three-Dimensional Phenomena in Microbubble Acoustic Streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Alvaro; Rossi, Massimiliano; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Kähler, Christian J.

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound-driven oscillating microbubbles are used as active actuators in microfluidic devices to perform manifold tasks such as mixing, sorting, and manipulation of microparticles. A common configuration consists of side bubbles created by trapping air pockets in blind channels perpendicular to the main channel direction. This configuration consists of acoustically excited bubbles with a semicylindrical shape that generate significant streaming flow. Because of the geometry of the channels, such flows are generally considered as quasi-two-dimensional. Similar assumptions are often made in many other microfluidic systems based on flat microchannels. However, in this Letter we show that microparticle trajectories actually present a much richer behavior, with particularly strong out-of-plane dynamics in regions close to the microbubble interface. Using astigmatism particle-tracking velocimetry, we reveal that the apparent planar streamlines are actually projections of a stream surface with a pseudotoroidal shape. We, therefore, show that acoustic streaming cannot generally be assumed as a two-dimensional phenomenon in confined systems. The results have crucial consequences for most of the applications involving acoustic streaming such as particle trapping, sorting, and mixing.

  2. Nonlinear acoustic streaming in straight and tapered tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Brian C.

    In thermoacoustic and Stirling devices such as the pulse-tube refrigerator, efficiency is diminished by the formation of a second-order mean velocity known as Rayleigh streaming. This flow emerges from the interaction of the working gas with the wall of the tube in a thin boundary layer. Recent studies have suggested that streaming velocity can be decreased in a tube by tapering it slightly. This research investigates that claim through the development of a numerical model of Rayleigh streaming in variously tapered tubes. It is found that the numerical simulation of streaming in a straight tube compares well with theory, and the application of different thermal boundary conditions at the tube wall shows that for pressurized helium, inner streaming vortices which appear near an adiabatic tube wall do not develop near an isothermal wall. An order analysis indicates that the temperature dependence of viscosity and thermal conductivity contributes appreciably to an accurate numerical model of streaming. Comparison of Rayleigh streaming in tapered tubes shows the effects of taper angle on the circulation and velocity of the mean flow.

  3. A simulation of streaming flows associated with acoustic levitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rednikov, A.; Riley, N.

    2002-04-01

    Steady-state acoustic streaming flow patterns have been observed by Trinh and Robey [Phys. Fluids 6, 3567 (1994)], during the operation of a variety of single axis ultrasonic levitators in a gaseous environment. Microstreaming around levitated samples is superimposed on the streaming flow which is observed in the levitator even in the absence of any particle therein. In this paper, by physical arguments, numerical and analytical simulations we provide entirely satisfactory interpretations of the observed flow patterns in both isothermal and nonisothermal situations.

  4. Acoustic Streaming in Microgravity: Flow Stability and Heat Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for drops and bubbles levitated in a liquid host, with particular attention given to the effect of shape oscillations and capillary waves on the local flow fields. Some preliminary results are also presented on the use of streaming flows for the control of evaporation rate and rotation of electrostatically levitated droplets in 1 g. The results demonstrate the potential for the technological application of acoustic methods to active control of forced convection in microgravity.

  5. Fiber-optic, cantilever-type acoustic motion velocity hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Cranch, G A; Miller, G A; Kirkendall, C K

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between fluid loaded fiber-optic cantilevers and a low frequency acoustic wave is investigated as the basis for an acoustic vector sensor. The displacements of the prototype cantilevers are measured with an integrated fiber laser strain sensor. A theoretical model predicting the frequency dependent shape of acoustically driven planar and cylindrical fiber-optic cantilevers incorporating effects of fluid viscosity is presented. The model demonstrates good agreement with the measured response of two prototype cantilevers, characterized with a vibrating water column, in the regime of Re ≥ 1. The performance of each cantilever geometry is also analyzed. Factors affecting the sensor performance such as fluid viscosity, laser mode profile, and support motion are considered. The planar cantilever is shown to experience the largest acoustically induced force and hence the highest acoustic responsivity. However, the cylindrical cantilever exhibits the smoothest response in water, due to the influence of viscous fluid damping, and is capable of two axis particle velocity measurement. These cantilevers are shown to be capable of achieving acoustic resolutions approaching the lowest sea-state ocean noise. PMID:22779459

  6. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  7. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  8. Upper-ocean velocity structure of Gulf Stream warm-core ring 82B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Kennelly, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic-Doppler current profiling of warm-core ring (WCR) 82B revealed changes in the velocity structure over much of the ring's 7-month lifespan. As ring diameter decreased, peak speeds in the high-velocity region decreased from 0.8 m/s in April 1982 to 0.5 m/s in August 1982. Azimuthally averaged velocities revealed the core of WCR 82B to be in near solid-body rotation, with little measurable horizontal divergence at 100 m. In addition, potential vorticity was conserved in the ring core despite interactions with the Gulf Stream and large changes in ring size. Deviations from symmetry in WCR 82B were caused by superposition with the shelf-slope front, small cyclonic eddies, and upper-layer mean flow.

  9. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND DARK SATELLITE GALAXIES THROUGH THE STREAM VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-08-10

    The formation of purely baryonic globular clusters with no gravitationally bound dark matter is still a theoretical challenge. We show that these objects might form naturally whenever there is a relative stream velocity between baryons and dark matter. The stream velocity causes a phase shift between linear modes of baryonic and dark matter perturbations, which translates to a spatial offset between the two components when they collapse. For a 2σ (3σ) density fluctuation, baryonic clumps with masses in the range 10{sup 5}-2.5 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} (10{sup 5}-4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) collapse outside the virial radii of their counterpart dark matter halos. These objects could survive as long-lived, dark-matter-free objects and might conceivably become globular clusters. In addition, their dark matter counterparts, which were deprived of gas, might become dark satellite galaxies.

  10. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  11. Near-field Oblique Remote Sensing of Stream Water-surface Elevation, Slope, and Surface Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.; McDonald, R.; Wright, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for estimating discharges during flood events or in steep channels is the difficulty and hazard inherent in obtaining in-stream measurements. One possible solution is to use near-field remote sensing to obtain simultaneous water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities. In this test case, we utilized Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to remotely measure water-surface elevations and slope in combination with surface velocities estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) obtained by video-camera and/or infrared camera. We tested this method at several sites in New Mexico and Colorado using independent validation data consisting of in-channel measurements from survey-grade GPS and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Preliminary results indicate that for relatively turbid or steep streams, TLS collects tens of thousands of water-surface elevations and slopes in minutes, much faster than conventional means and at relatively high precision, at least as good as continuous survey-grade GPS measurements. Estimated surface velocities from this technique are within 15% of measured velocity magnitudes and within 10 degrees from the measured velocity direction (using extrapolation from the shallowest bin of the ADCP measurements). Accurately aligning the PIV results into Cartesian coordinates appears to be one of the main sources of error, primarily due to the sensitivity at these shallow oblique look angles and the low numbers of stationary objects for rectification. Combining remotely-sensed water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities produces simultaneous velocity measurements from a large number of locations in the channel and is more spatially extensive than traditional velocity measurements. These factors make this technique useful for improving estimates of flow measurements during flood flows and in steep channels while also decreasing the difficulty and hazard associated with making measurements in these

  12. High-velocity streams of dust originating from Saturn.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Horányi, Mihaly; Burton, Marcia; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Roy, Mou; Grün, Eberhard

    2005-01-20

    High-velocity submicrometre-sized dust particles expelled from the jovian system have been identified by dust detectors on board several spacecraft. On the basis of periodicities in the dust impact rate, Jupiter's moon Io was found to be the dominant source of the streams. The grains become positively charged within the plasma environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and gain energy from its co-rotational electric field. Outside the magnetosphere, the dynamics of the grains are governed by the interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field that eventually forms the streams. A similar process was suggested for Saturn. Here we report the discovery by the Cassini spacecraft of bursts of high-velocity dust particles (> or = 100 km s(-1)) within approximately 70 million kilometres of Saturn. Most of the particles detected at large distances appear to originate from the outskirts of Saturn's outermost main ring. All bursts of dust impacts detected within 150 Saturn radii are characterized by impact directions markedly different from those measured between the bursts, and they clearly coincide with the spacecraft's traversals through streams of compressed solar wind. PMID:15662418

  13. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  14. Estimating Discharge using Multi-level Velocity Data from Acoustic Doppler Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang Poulsen, J.; Rømer Rasmussen, K.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2010-12-01

    In the majority of Danish streams, weed growth affects the effective stream width and bed roughness and therefore imposes temporal variations on the stage-discharge relationship. Small stream-gradients and firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations and thus remove or limit such influences. Hence, estimation of the hydrograph is based on continuous stream gauging combined with monthly control measurements of discharge and assuming linear variation of bed roughness between the monthly measurements. As a result, any non-linear drift in weed density or structure which affect the frictional characteristics of the stream during both normal and peak flows are ignored. The present investigation studies if such temporal variation in the conveyance may be detected and eventually compensated for when estimating the hydrograph. Therefore acoustic Dopplers have been placed at the main discharge station in one of the largest Danish catchments (the Skjern). The instruments were set out in early February 2010 during the winter season and have been running since then. The long term average discharge at the station is near 14 m3/s and the cross sectional profile is roughly trapezoidal having width about 15 m., but slightly skew so that the stream is about 0.5 m. deeper off the right than off the left bank. During winter, the depths are typically near 2 m. while during summer they are about 1.5 m. During peak flows, when the discharge exceeds 35 m3/s, the depth increases to more than 3 m. The Doppler instruments (Nortek) are placed on a vertical pole about 2 m. off the right bank at three fixed elevations above the streambed (0.3, 0.6, and 1.3 m); the beams point horizontally towards the left bank perpendicularly to the average flow direction. At each depth, the Doppler sensor records 10 minute average stream velocities in the central 10 m. section of the stream. During summer periods with low flow, stream velocity has only

  15. Acoustically induced streaming flows near a model cod otolith and their potential implications for fish hearing.

    PubMed

    Kotas, Charlotte W; Rogers, Peter H; Yoda, Minami

    2011-08-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear's sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8-24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280-830 Hz. Phase-locked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species. PMID:21877817

  16. Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing

    SciTech Connect

    Kotas, Charlotte W; Rogers, Peter; Yoda, Minami

    2011-01-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

  17. Numerics of surface acoustic wave (SAW) driven acoustic streaming and radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Kahler, Christian; Costanzo, Francesco; Jun Huang, Tony

    2015-11-01

    Recently, surface acoustic wave (SAW) based systems have shown great potential for various lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the physical understanding of the precise acoustic fields and associated acoustophoresis is rather limited. In this work, we present a numerical study of the acoustophoretic particle motion inside a SAW-actuated, liquid-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel. We utilize a perturbation approach to divide the flow variables into first- and second-order components. The first-order fields result in a time-averaged acoustic radiation force on suspended particles, as well as the time-averaged body force terms that drive the second-order fields. We model the SAW actuation by a displacement function while we utilize impedance boundary conditions to model the PDMS walls. We identify the precise acoustic fields generated inside the microchannel and investigate a range of particle sizes to characterize the transition from streaming-dominated acoustophoresis to radiation-force-dominated acoustophoresis. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of SAW devices to tune the position of vertical pressure node inside the microchannel by tuning the phase difference between the two incoming surface acoustic waves.

  18. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces. PMID:27102956

  19. Numerical investigation of symmetry breaking and critical behavior of the acoustic streaming field in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2015-06-01

    For energy efficiency and material cost reduction it is preferred to drive high-intensity discharge lamps at frequencies of approximately 300 kHz. However, operating lamps at these high frequencies bears the risk of stimulating acoustic resonances inside the arc tube, which can result in low frequency light flicker and even lamp destruction. The acoustic streaming effect has been identified as the link between high frequency resonances and low frequency flicker. A highly coupled three-dimensional multiphysics model has been set up to calculate the acoustic streaming velocity field inside the arc tube of high-intensity discharge lamps. It has been found that the velocity field suffers a phase transition to an asymmetrical state at a critical acoustic streaming force. In certain respects the system behaves similar to a ferromagnet near the Curie point. It is discussed how the model allows to investigate the light flicker phenomenon. Concerning computer resources the procedure is considerably less demanding than a direct approach with a transient model.

  20. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application: Dual stream nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of an unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle and a coannular plug nozzle with a 20-chute outer stream suppressor were experimentally determined. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale model nozzles. Also, aerodynamic measurements of four selected plumes were made with a laser velocimeter. The presence of the 180 deg shield produced different mixing characteristics on the shield side compared to the unshield side because of the reduced mixing with ambient air on the shielded side. This resulted in a stretching of the jet, yielding a higher peak mean velocity up to a length of 10 equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. The 180 deg shield in community orientation around the suppressed coannular plug nozzle yielded acoustic benefit at all observer angles for a simulated takeoff. While the effect of shield-to-outer stream velocity ratio was small at angles up to 120 deg, beyond this angle significant acoustic benefit was realized with a shield-to-outer stream velocity ratio of 0.64.

  1. Droplet Manipulation Using Acoustic Streaming Induced by a Vibrating Membrane.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang Van; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple method for on-demand manipulation of aqueous droplets in oil. With numerical simulations and experiments, we show that a vibrating membrane can produce acoustic streaming. By making use of this vortical flow, we manage to repulse the droplets away from the membrane edges. Then, by simply aligning the membrane at 45° to the flow, the droplets can be forced to follow the membrane's boundaries, thus steering them across streamlines and even between different oil types. We also characterize the repulsion and steering effect with various excitation voltages at different water and oil flow rates. The maximum steering frequency we have achieved is 165 Hz. The system is extremely robust and reliable: the same membrane can be reused after many days and with different oils and/or surfactants at the same operating frequency. PMID:27119623

  2. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  3. Acoustic streaming in simplified liquid rocket engines with transverse mode oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.; Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    This study considers a simplified model of a liquid rocket engine in which uniform injection is imposed at the faceplate. The corresponding cylindrical chamber has a small length-to-diameter ratio with respect to solid and hybrid rockets. Given their low chamber aspect ratios, liquid thrust engines are known to experience severe tangential and radial oscillation modes more often than longitudinal ones. In order to model this behavior, tangential and radial waves are superimposed onto a basic mean-flow model that consists of a steady, uniform axial velocity throughout the chamber. Using perturbation tools, both potential and viscous flow equations are then linearized in the pressure wave amplitude and solved to the second order. The effects of the headwall Mach number are leveraged as well. While the potential flow analysis does not predict any acoustic streaming effects, the viscous solution carried out to the second order gives rise to steady secondary flow patterns near the headwall. These axisymmetric, steady contributions to the tangential and radial traveling waves are induced by the convective flow motion through interactions with inertial and viscous forces. We find that suppressing either the convective terms or viscosity at the headwall leads to spurious solutions that are free from streaming. In our problem, streaming is initiated at the headwall, within the boundary layer, and then extends throughout the chamber. We find that nonlinear streaming effects of tangential and radial waves act to alter the outer solution inside a cylinder with headwall injection. As a result of streaming, the radial wave velocities are intensified in one-half of the domain and reduced in the opposite half at any instant of time. Similarly, the tangential waves are either enhanced or weakened in two opposing sectors that are at 90° angle to the radial velocity counterparts. The second-order viscous solution that we obtain clearly displays both an oscillating and a steady flow

  4. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  5. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  6. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  7. Response of benthic insect species to changes in stream velocity resulting from stripmining disturbance

    SciTech Connect

    Stair, D.M. Jr.; Tolbert, V.R.

    1980-01-01

    Increased stream velocity resulting from increased runoff may cause considerable alterations in benthic communities. Stream velocity in disturbed watersheds can exceed tolerance limits of even the most resistant species. Increased velocities may also adversely impact benthic communities by increasing bedload movement, thus destroying habitats or physically abrading individuals. Studies are underway to document bedload movement and effects on benthic communities in mining disturbed streams. Additional studies are being initiated to determine if there are additive effects from the combination of increased stream velocity and sediment movement.

  8. Asymmetric steady streaming as a mechanism for acoustic propulsion of rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal, François; Lauga, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Recent experiments showed that standing acoustic waves could be exploited to induce self-propulsion of rigid metallic particles in the direction perpendicular to the acoustic wave. We propose in this paper a physical mechanism for these observations based on the interplay between inertial forces in the fluid and the geometrical asymmetry of the particle shape. We consider an axisymmetric rigid near-sphere oscillating in a quiescent fluid along a direction perpendicular to its symmetry axis. The kinematics of oscillations can be either prescribed or can result dynamically from the presence of an external oscillating velocity field. Steady streaming in the fluid, the inertial rectification of the time-periodic oscillating flow, generates steady stresses on the particle which, in general, do not average to zero, resulting in a finite propulsion speed along the axis of the symmetry of the particle and perpendicular to the oscillation direction. Our derivation of the propulsion speed is obtained at leading order in the Reynolds number and the deviation of the shape from that of a sphere. The results of our model are consistent with the experimental measurements, and more generally explains how time periodic forcing from an acoustic field can be harnessed to generate autonomous motion.

  9. An Analysis of Consolidation Grouting Effect of Bedrock Based on its Acoustic Velocity Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Lu, Wen-bo; Zhang, Wen-ju; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the mechanical properties of fractured rock masses. Based on the in situ acoustic velocity measurement data of ~20 hydropower stations in China, we assessed the acoustic velocity increase of rock masses as a result of consolidation grouting in different geological conditions, such as fault sites, weathered areas and excavation-induced damage zones. We established an empirical relationship between the acoustic velocity of rock masses before and after consolidation grouting, and examined the correlation between acoustic velocity and deformation modulus. A case study is presented about a foundation consolidation grouting project for an intake tower of Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that different types of rock masses possess distinct ranges for resultant acoustic velocity increase by consolidation grouting. Under a confidence interval of 95 %, the ranges of the increasing rate of acoustic velocity in a faulted zone, weathered zone, and excavation-induced damage zone are observed to be 12.7-43.1, 12.3-31.2, and 6.9-14.5 %, respectively. The acoustic velocity before grouting and its increasing rate can be used to predict the effectiveness of consolidation grouting.

  10. Improving H-Q rating curves in temprorary streams by using Acoustic Doppler Current meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, P.; Salles, C.; Rodier, C.; Hernandez, F.; Gayrard, E.; Tournoud, M.-G.

    2012-04-01

    Intermittent rivers pose different challenges to stream rating due to high spatial and temporal gradients. Long dry periods, cut by short duration flush flood events explain the difficulty to obtain reliable discharge data, for low flows as well as for floods: problems occur with standard gauging, zero flow period, etc. Our study aims to test the use of an acoustic Doppler currentmeter (ADC) for improving stream rating curves in small catchments subject to large variations of discharge, solid transport and high eutrophication levels. The study is conducted at the outlet of the river Vène, a small coastal river (67 km2) located close to the city of Montpellier (France). The low flow period lasts for more than 6 month; during this period the river flow is sustained by effluents from urban sewage systems, which allows development of algae and macrophytes in the riverbed. The ADC device (Sontek ®Argonaut SW) is a pulsed Doppler current profiling system designed for measuring water velocity profiles and levels that are used to compute volumetric flow rates. It is designed for shallow waters (less than 4 meter depth). Its main advantages are its low cost and high accuracy (±1% of the measured velocity or ±0.05 m/sec, as reported by the manufacturer). The study will evaluate the improvement in rating curves in an intermittent flow context and the effect of differences in sensitivity between low and high water level, by comparing mean flow velocity obtained by ADC to direct discharges measurements. The study will also report long-term use of ADC device, by considering effects of biofilms, algae and macrophytes, as well as solid transport on the accuracy of the measurements. In conclusion, we show the possibility to improve stream rating and continuous data collection of an intermittent river by using a ADC with some precautions.

  11. The relationship between mineral content and acoustic velocity of sandstone reservoirs in Junggar basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Gu, Hanming

    2015-08-01

    Sandstone reservoirs have generally high porosity in the Shawan formation of the Chunguang oil field, Junggar basin, because they developed in geological conditions of shallow and weak compaction. High porosity always links lower acoustic velocities in sandstone. However, when it is more than a certain value (approximately 27.5%), the porosity is not in accordance with acoustic velocities. In addition, cast thin sections illustrated incoherence between pore types and porosity. Fluids and mineral content are the two main factors changing acoustic velocities. This means that acoustic velocities of the high-porosity sandstone are mainly affected by the mineral content and fluid properties. Hence, data from litho-electric analysis are used to measure velocities of the compression shear waves, and thin sections are used to identify the mineral content. By the application of cross-plot maps, relations of acoustic velocities and mineral contents are proposed. Mineral contents include mainly quartz, feldspar, and tuff. In normal rock physical models, the shale content is calculated from well logs. The mineral grain is often regarded as pure quartz grain or average mineral composition. However, the application of the normal rock physics model will be inaccurate for high-porosity sandstone. Experience regression functions of the velocity model are established to estimate acoustic velocities. Also, mineral content logs could be predicted by using the P-wave acoustic log, and the rock physics model would be enhanced by using these logs of dynamic mineral contents. Shear wave velocity could also be estimated more accurately.

  12. Energetic Geodesic Acoustic Modes Associated with Two-Stream-like Instabilities in Tokamak Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Qu, Z S; Hole, M J; Fitzgerald, M

    2016-03-01

    An unstable branch of the energetic geodesic acoustic mode (EGAM) is found using fluid theory with fast ions characterized by their narrow width in energy distribution and collective transit along field lines. This mode, with a frequency much lower than the thermal GAM frequency ω_{GAM}, is now confirmed as a new type of unstable EGAM: a reactive instability similar to the two-stream instability. The mode can have a very small fast ion density threshold when the fast ion transit frequency is smaller than ω_{GAM}, consistent with the onset of the mode right after the turn-on of the beam in DIII-D experiments. The transition of this reactive EGAM to the velocity gradient driven EGAM is also discussed. PMID:26991183

  13. Relative contributions of sand and gravel bedload transport to acoustic Doppler bedload- velocity magnitudes in the Trinity River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeuman, D.; Pittman, S.

    2007-12-01

    Apparent bedload velocities measured using the bottom-track feature of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have received attention over the past few years as potential surrogate technique for estimating bedload transport rates and for investigating bedload dynamics. This poster reports findings from perhaps the first use of ADCP bedload velocity measurements in an applied sediment monitoring program. Sediment transport data reported here were collected under the auspices of the Trinity River Restoration Program as part of an intensive sediment monitoring effort to assess the effects of the 2006 flow release in the Trinity River of Northern California. A 1200-kHz ADCP was deployed for a subset of bedload samples collected during the release to evaluate whether acoustic bedload velocities can be used to aid interpolation between less-frequent physical samples. Paired conventional bedload samples and acoustic bedload velocity samples supplemented by underwater video showed that the instrument used in this study is sensitive primarily to the motion of sand-sized particles at the bed, but comparatively insensitive to the motion of gravel- and cobble-sized particles. High bed velocities were measured at times and in locations where sand transport rates at the bed were high, as determined by both physical samples and video. Low bed velocities were measured where both the video and bedload samples indicated that little or no bedload was being transported, irrespective of the persistence of fast-moving sand particles in the near-bed water column. To the extent that suspended or saltating particles influence the bottom- track signal, they are near enough to the bed to be captured in the physical sampler. Thus, contamination of the bottom-track signal by suspended particles (commonly referred to as water bias) is not a significant problem with this instrument in streams with low to moderate suspended sediment concentrations. These results demonstrate that acoustic

  14. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  15. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  16. Acoustic streaming induced elimination of nonspecifically bound proteins from a surface acoustic wave biosensor: Mechanism prediction using fluid-structure interaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Singh, Reetu; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.

    2010-11-01

    Biosensors typically operate in liquid media for detection of biomarkers and suffer from fouling resulting from nonspecific binding of protein molecules to the device surface. In the current work, using a coupled field finite element fluid-structure interaction simulation, we have identified that fluid motion induced by high intensity sound waves, such as those propagating in these sensors, can lead to the efficient removal of the nonspecifically bound proteins thereby eliminating sensor fouling. We present a computational analysis of the acoustic-streaming phenomenon induced biofouling elimination by surface acoustic-waves (SAWs) propagating on a lithium niobate piezoelectric crystal. The transient solutions generated from the developed coupled field fluid solid interaction model are utilized to predict trends in acoustic-streaming induced forces for varying design parameters such as voltage intensity, device frequency, fluid viscosity, and density. We utilize these model predictions to compute the various interaction forces involved and thereby identify the possible mechanisms for removal of nonspecifically-bound proteins. For the range of sensor operating conditions simulated, our study indicates that the SAW motion acts as a body force to overcome the adhesive forces of the fouling proteins to the device surface whereas the acoustic-streaming induced hydrodynamic forces prevent their reattachment. The streaming velocity fields computed using the finite element models in conjunction with the proposed particle removal mechanism were used to identify the optimum conditions that lead to improved removal efficiency. We show that it is possible to tune operational parameters such as device frequency and input voltage to achieve effective elimination of biofouling proteins in typical biosensing media. Our simulation results agree well with previously reported experimental observations. The findings of this work have significant implications in designing reusable

  17. Unexpected tidal variation of the ocean-acoustic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, H.; Fukao, Y.; Hibiya, T.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean sound velocity significantly varies at tidal frequency in not only shallow but also deep pert. Unexpected largely semidiurnal fluctuation of ocean-acoustic waves (T-waves), which propagate through the SOFAR channel, is found on the ocean bottom seismometer records for the 1999 submarine volcanic swarm in northern Mariana. The amplitude is one order larger than any previous artificial experiments. Here we report the first in situ evidence that T-wave travel time provide information about vertical movement of seawater due to internal tides. Numerical 3-D modelling shows the internal tide excited by external tidal forcing is particularly large along the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Ridge because of rough topography. A semidiurnal up-and-down movement associated with the internal tide cause an undulation of the SOFAR channel on the order of 100 m, which causes T-wave travel time variations consistent with the observed ones. The results are consistent with the observed travel time variations both in amplitude and phase, demonstrating that T-waves from volcanic swarms can be used to detect oceanic internal tides. Generation of internal tides is an important sink of the external tidal energy so that accurate estimate of conversion of the external to internal tides is essential to close the global tidal energy budget and to understand the Earth-Moon system evolution.

  18. Reconstructing transient acoustic radiation from an arbitrary object with a uniform surface velocity distribution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the general formulations for reconstructing the transient acoustic field generated by an arbitrary object with a uniformly distributed surface velocity in free space. These formulations are derived from the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral theory that correlates the transient acoustic pressure at any field point to those on the source surface. For a class of acoustic radiation problems involving an arbitrarily oscillating object with a uniformly distributed surface velocity, for example, a loudspeaker membrane, the normal surface velocity is frequency dependent but is spatially invariant. Accordingly, the surface acoustic pressure is expressible as the product of the surface velocity and the quantity that can be solved explicitly by using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral equation. This surface acoustic pressure can be correlated to the field acoustic pressure using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation. Consequently, it is possible to use nearfield acoustic holography to reconstruct acoustic quantities in entire three-dimensional space based on a single set of acoustic pressure measurements taken in the near field of the target object. Examples of applying these formulations to reconstructing the transient acoustic pressure fields produced by various arbitrary objects are demonstrated. PMID:25096086

  19. Improving acoustic streaming effects in fluidic systems by matching SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane layers.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the use of acoustic waves for promoting and improving streaming in tridimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cuvettes of 15mm width×14mm height×2.5mm thickness. The acoustic waves are generated by a 28μm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) - PVDF - piezoelectric transducer in its β phase, actuated at its resonance frequency: 40MHz. The acoustic transmission properties of two materials - SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - were numerically compared. It was concluded that PDMS inhibits, while SU-8 allows, the transmission of the acoustic waves to the propagation medium. Therefore, by simulating the acoustic transmission properties of different materials, it is possible to preview the acoustic behavior in the fluidic system, which allows the optimization of the best layout design, saving costs and time. This work also presents a comparison between numerical and experimental results of acoustic streaming obtained with that β-PVDF transducer in the movement and in the formation of fluid recirculation in tridimensional closed domains. Differences between the numerical and experimental results are credited to the high sensitivity of acoustic streaming to the experimental conditions and to limitations of the numerical method. The reported study contributes for the improvement of simulation models that can be extremely useful for predicting the acoustic effects of new materials in fluidic devices, as well as for optimizing the transducers and matching layers positioning in a fluidic structure. PMID:27044029

  20. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  1. Impact of baryonic streaming velocities on the formation of supermassive black holes via direct collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Schleicher, D. R. G.

    2014-06-01

    Baryonic streaming motions produced prior to the epoch of recombination became supersonic during the cosmic dark ages. Various studies suggest that such streaming velocities change the halo statistics and also influence the formation of Population III stars. In this study, we aim to explore the impact of streaming velocities on the formation of supermassive black holes at z>10 via the direct collapse scenario. To accomplish this goal, we perform cosmological large eddy simulations for two haloes of a few times 107M⊙ with initial streaming velocities of 3, 6 and 9 km s-1. These massive primordial haloes illuminated by the strong Lyman-Werner flux are the potential cradles for the formation of direct collapse seed black holes. To study the evolution for longer times, we employ sink particles and track the accretion for 10 000 years. Our findings show that higher streaming velocities increase the circular velocities from about 14 to 16 km s-1. They also delay the collapse of haloes for a few million years, but do not have any significant impact on the halo properties such as turbulent energy, radial velocity, density and accretion rates. Sink particles of about ˜105M⊙ are formed at the end of our simulations and no clear distribution of sink masses is observed in the presence of streaming motions. It is further found that the impact of streaming velocities is less severe in massive haloes compared to the minihaloes as reported in the previous studies.

  2. Acoustic Particle Velocity Sensors: Design, Performance, and Applications Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Berliner, M.J.; Lindberg, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    These proceedings represent the papers presented at a workshop sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and the Acoustical Society of America. The topics discussed include designs, applications and performance of underwater acoustic sensors. There were 29 papers presented and all have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  3. Backcoupling of acoustic streaming on the temperature field inside high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieger, J.; Baumann, B.; Wolff, M.; Manders, F.; Suijker, J.

    2015-11-01

    Operating high-intensity discharge lamps in the high frequency range (20-300 kHz) provides energy-saving and cost reduction potentials. However, commercially available lamp drivers do not make use of this operating strategy because light intensity fluctuations and even lamp destruction are possible. The reason for the fluctuating discharge arc are acoustic resonances in this frequency range that are excited in the arc tube. The acoustic resonances in turn generate a fluid flow that is caused by the acoustic streaming effect. Here, we present a 3D multiphysics model to determine the influence of acoustic streaming on the temperature field in the vicinity of an acoustic eigenfrequency. In that case a transition from stable to instable behavior occurs. The model is able to predict when light flicker can be expected. The results are in very good accordance with accompanying experiments.

  4. Surface acoustic wave velocity and elastic constants of cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Riobóo, Rafael J.; Cuscó, Ramon; Prieto, Carlos; Kopittke, Caroline; Novikov, Sergei V.; Artús, Luis

    2016-06-01

    We present high-resolution surface Brillouin scattering measurements on cubic GaN layers grown on GaAs substrate. By using a suitable scattering geometry, scattering by surface acoustic waves is recorded for different azimuthal angles, and the surface acoustic wave velocities are determined. A comparison of experimental results with numerical simulations of the azimuthal dependence of the surface wave velocity shows good agreement and allows a consistent set of elastic constants for c-GaN to be determined.

  5. Effect of tank liquid acoustic velocity on Doppler string phantom measurements.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A

    1991-03-01

    The quantitative effects of degassed water in string phantom tank Doppler measurements are derived theoretically. The Doppler parameter measurements considered are range gate registration, range gate profile, image flow angle measurements, and velocity calculation. The equipment velocity calculation is demonstrated to have an appreciable error which is due to the water acoustic velocity and the transducer acquisition geometry. A velocity calibration technique is proposed that only needs a simple multiplicative factor to compensate for the water in the tank. PMID:2027185

  6. Spatially growing disturbances in a high velocity ratio two-stream, coplanar jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of cold and heated secondary flow on the instability of a two-stream, coplanar jet having a 0.7 Mach number heated primary jet for a nominal fan to primary velocity ratio of 0.68 was investigated by means of inviscid linearized stability theory. The instability properties of spatially growing axisymmetric and first order azimuthal disturbances were studied. The instability characteristics of the two-stream jet with a velocity ratio of 0.68 are very different from those of a single stream jet, and a two-stream, coplanar jet having a 0.9 Mach number heated primary jet and a cold secondary jet for a fan to primary velocity ratio of 0.30. For X/D = 1 and in comparison to the case where the velocity ratio was 0.3, the presence of the fan stream with a velocity ratio of 0.68 enhanced the instability of the jet and increased the unstable frequency range. However, the axisymmetric mode (m = 0) and the first order azimuthal mode (m = 1) have similar spatial growth rates where the velocity ratio is 0.68 while for a velocity ratio of 0.3 the growth rate of the first order azimuthal mode (m = 1) is greater. Comparing the cold and hot secondary flow results showed that for a velocity ratio of 0.68 the growth rate is greater for cold.

  7. Theoretical and experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a porous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Schraven, Arthur; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material has been made. Particular attention was paid to the phenomenon of acoustic streaming of the liquid in the porous material due to the damping of the acoustic waves. The experiments were performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. A microphone was used to measure the damping of the waves in the porous material and also temperature and pressure measurements in the flowing liquid inside the cores were carried out. To model the acoustic streaming effect Darcy's law was extended with a source term representing the momentum transfer from the acoustic waves to the liquid. The model predictions for the pressure distribution inside the core under acoustic streaming conditions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a porous material.

    PubMed

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Schraven, Arthur; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material has been made. Particular attention was paid to the phenomenon of acoustic streaming of the liquid in the porous material due to the damping of the acoustic waves. The experiments were performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. A microphone was used to measure the damping of the waves in the porous material and also temperature and pressure measurements in the flowing liquid inside the cores were carried out. To model the acoustic streaming effect Darcy's law was extended with a source term representing the momentum transfer from the acoustic waves to the liquid. The model predictions for the pressure distribution inside the core under acoustic streaming conditions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. PMID:12241483

  9. Optical and acoustical measuring techniques. [for Doppler measurement of flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the techniques of laser and acoustic Doppler measurement of fluid velocities in confined and free flows. The main mathematical relations are presented, and some systems are studied. Resolution properties of coaxial, bistatic, and pulsed CO2 laser Doppler velocimeter systems are compared. Schematics for pulsed and continuous wave acoustic Doppler systems are discussed. Both of these types of systems benefit from using a bistatic configuration instead of a coaxial system. The pulsed systems avoid contamination of source noise by not sampling until after the source noise has passed the receiver. Comparison of wind velocity measured with a pulsed acoustic Doppler and with a boundary layer profile is made.

  10. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  11. Analyses of Acoustic Streaming Generated by Four Ultrasonic Vibrators in a Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Masafumi

    2004-05-01

    When ultrasonic waves are applied, the heat transfer at a heated surface in water increases markedly. The origin of this increase in heat transfer is thought to be due to the agitation effect from the microjets of cavitation and from acoustic streaming. The method in which four vibrators are used has the ability of further enhancing heat transfer. This paper presents the method using four vibrators to eject an acoustic stream jet at a selected position in the vessel. Analyses of this method are performed to establish it theoretically and to compare with an experiment previously conducted. The analyses shown in this research indicate that the aspects of acoustic streaming generated by the four vibrators in the vessel can be correctly predicted and provide a foundation for the development of using this method for the enhancement of heat transfer.

  12. Incompressible flow computations based on the vorticity-stream function and velocity-pressure formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.; Ganjoo, D. K.

    1990-01-01

    Finite element procedures and computations based on the velocity-pressure and vorticity-stream function formulations of incompressible flows are presented. Two new multistep velocity-pressure formulations are proposed and compared with the vorticity-stream function and one-step formulations. The example problems chosen are the standing vortex problem and flow past a circular cylinder. Benchmark quality computations are performed for the cylinder problem. The numerical results indicate that the vorticity-stream function formulation and one of the two new multistep formulations involve much less numerical dissipation than the one-step formulation.

  13. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  14. Study of the onset of the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators with pulse ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro, Angelica; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, we introduced pulse mode ultrasound as a new method for reducing and controlling the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators (Hoyos and Castro, 2013). Here, by modifying other parameters such as the resonator geometry and the particle size, we have found a threshold for particle manipulation with ultrasonic standing waves in confined resonators without the influence of the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulse mode ultrasound open the possibility of manipulating particles smaller than 1 μm size. PMID:26705604

  15. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  16. Gas-rich and gas-poor structures through the stream velocity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina; Naoz, Smadar; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Using adiabatic high-resolution numerical simulations, we quantify the effect of the streaming motion of baryons with respect to dark matter at the time of recombination on structure formation and evolution. Formally a second-order effect, the baryonic stream velocity has proven to have significant impact on dark matter halo abundance, as well as on the gas content and morphology of small galaxy clusters. In this work, we study the impact of stream velocity on the formation and gas content of haloes with masses up to 109 M⊙, an order of magnitude larger than previous studies. We find that the non-zero stream velocity has a sizable impact on the number density of haloes with masses ≲ few × 107 M⊙ up to z = 10, the final redshift of our simulations. Furthermore, the gas stream velocity induces a suppression of the gas fraction in haloes, which at z = 10 is ˜10 per cent for objects with M ˜ 107 M⊙, as well as a flattening of the gas density profiles in the inner regions of haloes. We further identify and study the formation, in the context of a non-zero stream velocity, of moderately long lived gas-dominated structures at intermediate redshifts 10 < z < 20, which Naoz and Narayan have recently proposed as potential progenitors of globular clusters.

  17. Gas-rich and gas poor structures through the stream velocity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina; Naoz, Smadar; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Using adiabatic high-resolution numerical simulations we quantify the effect of the streaming motion of baryons with respect to dark matter at the time of recombination on structure formation and evolution. Formally a second order effect, the baryonic stream velocity has proven to have significant impact on dark matter halo abundance, as well as on the gas content and morphology of small galaxy clusters. In this work, we study the impact of stream velocity on the formation and gas content of haloes with masses up to 109M⊙, an order of magnitude larger than previous studies. We find that the non-zero stream velocity has a sizable impact on the number density of haloes with masses ≲ few× 107M⊙ up to z = 10, the final redshift of our simulations. Furthermore, the gas stream velocity induces a suppression of the gas fraction in haloes, which at z=10 is ˜10% for objects with M ˜ 107M⊙, as well as a flattening of the gas density profiles in the inner regions of haloes. We further identify and study the formation, in the context of a non-zero stream velocity, of moderately long lived gas dominated structures at intermediate redshifts 10 < z < 20, which Naoz and Narayan have recently proposed as potential progenitors of globular clusters.

  18. Direct calculation of acoustic streaming including the boundary layer phenomena in an ultrasonic air pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2012-05-01

    Direct finite difference fluid simulation of acoustic streaming on the fine-meshed three-dimensiona model by graphics processing unit (GPU)-oriented calculation array is discussed. Airflows due to the acoustic traveling wave are induced when an intense sound field is generated in a gap between a bending transducer and a reflector. Calculation results showed good agreement with the measurements in the pressure distribution. In addition to that, several flow-vortices were observed near the boundary of the reflector and the transducer, which have been often discussed in acoustic tube near the boundary, and have never been observed in the calculation in the ultrasonic air pump of this type.

  19. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOEpatents

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  20. Inflow velocities of cold flows streaming into massive galaxies at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Ceverino, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocities of the accretion along streams from the cosmic web into massive galaxies at high redshift with the help of three different suites of AMR hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. The results are compared to free-fall velocities and to the sound speeds of the hot ambient medium. The sound speed of the hot ambient medium is calculated using two different methods to determine the medium's temperature. We find that the simulated cold stream velocities are in violent disagreement with the corresponding free-fall profiles. The sound speed is a better albeit not always correct description of the cold flows' velocity. Using these calculations as a first order approximation for the gas inflow velocities vinflow = 0.9 vvir is given. We conclude from the hydrodynamical simulations as our main result that the velocity profiles for the cold streams are constant with radius. These constant inflow velocities seem to have a `parabola-like' dependency on the host halo mass in units of the virial velocity that peaks at Mvir = 1012 M⊙ and we also propose that the best-fitting functional form for the dependency of the inflow velocity on the redshift is a square root power-law relation: v_inflow ∝ √{z + 1} v_vir.

  1. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments. PMID:17503939

  2. On the correlation of plume centerline velocity decay of turbulent acoustically excited jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, Uwe H.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic excitation was shown to alter the velocity decay and spreading characteristics of jet plumes by modifying the large-scale structures in the plume shear layer. The present work consists of reviewing and analyzing available published and unpublished experimental data in order to determine the importance and magnitude of the several variables that contribute to plume modification by acoustic excitation. Included in the study were consideration of the effects of internal and external acoustic excitation, excitation Strouhal number, acoustic excitation level, nozzle size, and flow conditions. The last include jet Mach number and jet temperature. The effects of these factors on the plume centerline velocity decay are then summarized in an overall empirical correlation.

  3. Precise tailoring of acoustic velocity in optical fibers by hydrogenation and UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanting; Dong, Liang

    2012-12-01

    Tailoring of acoustic properties in solids has many potential applications in both acoustics, i.e. acoustic gratings and waveguides, and photon-phonon interactions, i.e. stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). One immediate application is in the area of SBS suppression in optical fibers. We demonstrate, for the first time, a post-processing technique where hydrogen is diffused in to a fiber core and then locally and permanently bonded to core glass by a subsequent UV exposure. It is discovered that local acoustic velocity can be altered by as much as ~2% this way, with strong potential for much further improvements with an increased hydrogen pressure. It is also found that the large change in acoustic velocity is primarily due to a reduction in bulk modulus, possibly as a result of network bonds being broken up by the addition of OH bonds. It is possible to use this technique to precisely tailor acoustic velocity along a fiber for more optimized SBS suppression in a fiber amplifier. Change in Brillouin Stokes frequency of ~320MHz at 1.064μm was observed. PMID:23262726

  4. Analysis of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Data for Acoustic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a Normal Incidence Tube configuration at various frequency, phase, and amplitude levels. This report presents the results of the PIV analysis and data reduction portions of the test and details the processing that was done. Estimates of lower measurement sensitivity levels were determined based on PIV image quality, correlation, and noise level parameters used in the test. Comparison of measurements with linear acoustic theory are presented. The onset of nonlinear, harmonic frequency acoustic levels were also studied for various decibel and frequency levels ranging from 90 to 132 dB and 500 to 3000 Hz, respectively.

  5. Large area planar fiber optic accelerometers for measurement of acoustic velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Bucaro, J.A.; Lagakos, N.; Houston, B.H.; Kraus, L.

    1996-04-01

    Large area, flexible planar fiber optic accelerometers have been developed for use as acoustic velocity sensors in underwater applications. The devices use a specially designed optical fiber with specific jackets which suppress the fiber sensor{close_quote}s response to acoustic pressure. The sensor has been subjected to a variety of tests including direct acceleration response, direct pressure response, and response to flexural wave excitation when mounted to a {open_quote}{open_quote}hull simulator{close_quote}{close_quote} backing structure. A thorough analysis has been carried out to understand the dynamic responses and limitations of these sensor types. This work is motivated by the desire to measure spatially averaged acoustic velocity while suppressing higher wavenumber mechanical excitations. In conjunction with existing large area pressure sensors (or with suitable structural models), these devices would provide a powerful capability for the measurement and detection of acoustic fields near structures having general impedance properties. This would allow, for example, the decomposition of the acoustic field into backward and forward propagating waves near such a boundary, the determination of acoustic intensity, the detection of the acoustic field with high signal-to-noise ratios even near a soft, pressure release boundary, and determination of the impedance of the structure itself. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Acoustic Velocity Of The Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Liu, C.; Huang, P.

    2004-12-01

    Along the Manila Trench south of 21øXN, deep-sea sediments are being underthrusted beneath the Taiwan accretionary prism which is composed of the Kaoping Slope and Hengchun Ridge. Offshore southwestern Taiwan, foreland sediments and Late Miocene strata of the Tainan Basin are being accreted onto the fold-and thrust belt of the syn-collision accretionary wedge of the Kaoping Slope. The Kaoping Slope consists of thick Neogene to Recent siliciclastics deformed by fold-and-thrust structures and mud diapers. These Pliocene-Quaternary sediments deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and upper slope area are considered to be paleo-channel deposits confined by NNE-SSW trend mud diapiric structure. Seismic P-wave velocities of the sediment deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and Kaoping Slope area are derived from mutichannel seismic reflection data and wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles collected by sonobuoys. Sediment velocity structures constrained from mutichannel seismic reflection data using velocity spectrum analysis method and that derived from sonobuoy data using tau-sum inversion method are compared, and they both provide consistent velocity structures. Seismic velocities were analyzed along the seismic profile from the surface to maximum depths of about 2.0 km below the seafloor. Our model features a sediment layer1 with 400 ms in thickness and a sediment layer2 with 600 ms in thickness. For the shelf sediments, we observe a linear interval velocity trend of V=1.53+1.91T in layer1, and V=1.86+0.87T in layer2, where T is the one way travel time within the layer. For the slop sediment, the trend of V=1.47+1.93T in layer1, and V=1.70+1.55T in layer2. The layer1¡¦s velocities gradients are similar between the shelf (1.91 km/sec2) and the slope(1.93 km/sec2). It means layer1 distributes over the slope and shelf widely. The result of the sediment velocity gradients in this area are in good agreement with that reported for the south Atlantic continental margins.

  7. A Void Fraction Characterisation by Low Frequency Acoustic Velocity Measurements in Microbubble Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaro, Matthieu

    Low frequency acoustic velocity measurements have been applied for the characterization of microbubble clouds generated in water. This method, based on the Wood's model (1941) links the acoustic velocity throughout a two-phase medium to its void fraction value. Low frequency means below resonance frequencies of the bubbles inside the cloud. An original bench was developed to allow the qualification of this method. The experiments conducted allowed us to characterize void fraction values between 10-3 and 10-7. The radii of the studied microbubbles are between a few micrometers and a hundred micrometers.

  8. Response of partially premixed flames to acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    This article describes an experimental investigation of the forced response of a swirl-stabilized partially premixed flame when it is subjected to acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio fluctuations. The flame's response is analyzed using phase-resolved CH{sup *} chemiluminescence images and flame transfer function (FTF) measurements, and compared with the response of a perfectly premixed flame under acoustic perturbations. The nonlinear response of the partially premixed flame is manifested by a partial extinction of the reaction zone, leading to rapid reduction of flame surface area. This nonlinearity, however, is observed only when the phase difference between the acoustic velocity and the equivalence ratio at the combustor inlet is close to zero. The condition, {delta}{phi}{sub {phi}}'-V'{approx}0 , indicates that reactant mixtures with high equivalence ratio impinge on the flame front with high velocity, inducing large fluctuations of the rate of heat release. It is found that the phase difference between the acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio nonuniformities is a key parameter governing the linear/nonlinear response of a partially premixed flame, and it is a function of modulation frequency, inlet velocity, fuel injection location, and fuel injector impedance. The results presented in this article will provide insight into the response of a partially premixed flame, which has not been well explored to date. (author)

  9. Intelligent front-end sample preparation tool using acoustic streaming.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Erika J.; McClain, Jaime L.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Edwards, Thayne L.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Branch, Darren W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Anderson, John Mueller; James, Conrad D.; Smith, Gennifer; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel

    2009-09-01

    We have successfully developed a nucleic acid extraction system based on a microacoustic lysis array coupled to an integrated nucleic acid extraction system all on a single cartridge. The microacoustic lysing array is based on 36{sup o} Y cut lithium niobate, which couples bulk acoustic waves (BAW) into the microchannels. The microchannels were fabricated using Mylar laminates and fused silica to form acoustic-fluidic interface cartridges. The transducer array consists of four active elements directed for cell lysis and one optional BAW element for mixing on the cartridge. The lysis system was modeled using one dimensional (1D) transmission line and two dimensional (2D) FEM models. For input powers required to lyse cells, the flow rate dictated the temperature change across the lysing region. From the computational models, a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min produced a temperature rise of 23.2 C and only 6.7 C when flowing at 60 {micro}L/min. The measured temperature changes were 5 C less than the model. The computational models also permitted optimization of the acoustic coupling to the microchannel region and revealed the potential impact of thermal effects if not controlled. Using E. coli, we achieved a lysing efficacy of 49.9 {+-} 29.92 % based on a cell viability assay with a 757.2 % increase in ATP release within 20 seconds of acoustic exposure. A bench-top lysing system required 15-20 minutes operating up to 58 Watts to achieve the same level of cell lysis. We demonstrate that active mixing on the cartridge was critical to maximize binding and release of nucleic acid to the magnetic beads. Using a sol-gel silica bead matrix filled microchannel the extraction efficacy was 40%. The cartridge based magnetic bead system had an extraction efficiency of 19.2%. For an electric field based method that used Nafion films, a nucleic acid extraction efficiency of 66.3 % was achieved at 6 volts DC. For the flow rates we tested (10-50 {micro}L/min), the nucleic acid extraction

  10. Computing induced velocity perturbations due to a helicopter fuselage in a free stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Althoff, Susan L.

    1989-01-01

    The velocity field of a representative helicopter fuselage in a free stream is computed. Perturbation velocities due to the fuselage are computed in a plan above the location of the helicopter rotor (rotor removed). The velocity perturbations computed by a source-panel model of the fuselage are compared with experimental measurements taken with a laser velocimeter. Three paneled fuselage models are studied: fuselage shape, fuselage shape with hub shape, and a body of revolution. The velocity perturbations computed for both fuselage shape models agree well with the measured velocity field except in the close vicinity of the rotor hub. In the hub region, without knowing the extent of separation, modeling of the effective source shape is difficult. The effects of the fuselage perturbations are not well-predicted with a simplified ellipsoid fuselage. The velocity perturbations due to the fuselage at the plane of the measurements have magnitudes of less than 8 percent of free-stream velocity. The velocity perturbations computed by the panel method are tabulated for the same locations at which previously reported rotor-inflow velocity measurements were made.

  11. Aeroacoustics of volcanic jets: Acoustic power estimation and jet velocity dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Ogden, Darcy E.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano acoustics is to relate observed infrasonic signals to the eruptive processes generating them. A link between acoustic power Πvelocity V was proposed by Woulff and McGetchin (1976) based upon the prevailing jet noise theory at the time (acoustic analogy theory). We reexamine this approach in the context of the current understanding of jet noise, using data from a laboratory jet, a full-scale military jet aircraft, and a full-scale rocket motor. Accurate estimates of Πacoustic field experiments. Typical volcano acoustic data better represent point measurements of acoustic intensity Ivelocity-scaling laws currently proposed for acoustic intensity differ from those for acoustic power and are of the form Iacoustic data and thus requires modification. Quantitative integration of field, numerical, and laboratory studies within a modern aeroacoustics framework will lead to a more accurate relationship between volcanic infrasound and eruption parameters.

  12. Acoustic and vibration performance evaluations of a velocity sensing hull array

    SciTech Connect

    Cray, B.A.; Christman, R.A.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic and vibration measurements were conducted at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center{close_quote}s Seneca Lake Facility to investigate the {ital in} {ital situ} signal response of a linear array of velocity sensors (sensors that measure either acoustic particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement have generically been denoted as {ital velocity} {ital sensors}) on a coating. The coating used at Seneca Lake consisted of air-voided elastomeric tiles with an overall coating thickness of approximately 3 inches. The accelerometer array and coating were mounted on the Seneca Lake Hull Fixture, which measures 33 feet lengthwise with an arc length of 20 feet. The fixture weighs approximately 30 tons. Specifically, measurements of {ital in} {ital situ} sensitivity, velocity reduction, reflection gain, array beam response, and equivalent planewave self-noise levels are presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. THE DELAY OF POPULATION III STAR FORMATION BY SUPERSONIC STREAMING VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Greif, Thomas H.; White, Simon D. M.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Springel, Volker

    2011-08-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that coherent relative streaming velocities of order 30 km s{sup -1} between dark matter and gas permeated the universe on scales below a few Mpc directly after recombination. Here we use a series of high-resolution moving-mesh calculations to show that these supersonic motions significantly influence the virialization of the gas in minihalos and delay the formation of the first stars. As the gas streams into minihalos with bulk velocities around 1 km s{sup -1} at z {approx} 20, the additional momentum and energy input reduces the gas fractions and central densities of the halos, increasing the typical virial mass required for efficient cooling by a factor of three and delaying Population III star formation by {Delta}z {approx_equal} 4. Since the distribution of the magnitude of the streaming velocities is narrowly peaked around a non-negligible value, this effect is important in most regions of the universe. As a consequence, the increased minimum halo mass implies a reduction of the absolute number of minihalos that can be expected to cool and form Population III stars by up to an order of magnitude. We further find that the streaming velocities increase the turbulent velocity dispersion of the minihalo gas, which could affect its ability to fragment and hence alter the mass function of the first stars.

  14. Convection and fluidization in oscillatory granular flows: The role of acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Convection and fluidization phenomena in vibrated granular beds have attracted a strong interest from the physics community since the last decade of the past century. As early reported by Faraday, the convective flow of large inertia particles in vibrated beds exhibits enigmatic features such as frictional weakening and the unexpected influence of the interstitial gas. At sufficiently intense vibration intensities surface patterns appear bearing a stunning resemblance with the surface ripples (Faraday waves) observed for low-viscosity liquids, which suggests that the granular bed transits into a liquid-like fluidization regime despite the large inertia of the particles. In his 1831 seminal paper, Faraday described also the development of circulation air currents in the vicinity of vibrating plates. This phenomenon (acoustic streaming) is well known in acoustics and hydrodynamics and occurs whenever energy is dissipated by viscous losses at any oscillating boundary. The main argument of the present paper is that acoustic streaming might develop on the surface of the large inertia particles in the vibrated granular bed. As a consequence, the drag force on the particles subjected to an oscillatory viscous flow is notably enhanced. Thus, acoustic streaming could play an important role in enhancing convection and fluidization of vibrated granular beds, which has been overlooked in previous studies. The same mechanism might be relevant to geological events such as fluidization of landslides and soil liquefaction by earthquakes and sound waves. PMID:26123774

  15. A study of the connection between tidal velocities, soliton packets and acoustic signal losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin-Bing, Stanley A.; Warn-Varnas, Alex C.; King, David B.; Lamb, Kevin G.; Hawkins, James A.; Teixeira, Marvi

    2002-11-01

    Coupled ocean model and acoustic model simulations of soliton packets in the Yellow Sea have indicated that the environmental conditions necessary for anomalous signal losses can occur several times in a 24 h period. These conditions and the subsequent signal losses were observed in simulations made over an 80 h space-time evolution of soliton packets that were generated by a 0.7 m/s tidal velocity [Chin-Bing et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 2459 (2002)]. This particular tidal velocity was used to initiate the Lamb soliton model because the soliton packets that were generated compared favorably with SAR measurements of soliton packets in the Yellow Sea. The tidal velocities in this region can range from 0.3 m/s to 1.2 m/s. In this work we extend our simulations and analyses to include soliton packets generated by other tidal velocities in the 0.3-1.2 m/s band. Anomalous signal losses are again observed. Examples will be shown that illustrate the connections between the tidal velocities, the soliton packets that are generated by these tidal velocities, and the signal losses that can occur when acoustic signals are propagated through these soliton packets. [Work supported by ONR/NRL and by a High Performance Computing DoD grant.

  16. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  17. Gated photon correlation spectroscopy for acoustical particle velocity measurements in free-field conditions.

    PubMed

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben; Theobald, Pete

    2013-03-01

    The measurement of acoustic pressure at a point in space using optical methods has been the subject of extensive research in airborne acoustics over the last four decades. The main driver is to reliably establish the acoustic pascal, thus allowing the calibration of microphones with standard and non-standard dimensions to be realized in an absolute and direct manner. However, the research work so far has mostly been limited to standing wave tubes. This Letter reports on the development of an optical system capable of measuring acoustic particle velocities in free-field conditions; agreement within less than 0.6 dB was obtained with standard microphone measurements during these initial experiments. PMID:23464122

  18. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  19. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  20. Flow patterns and transport in Rayleigh surface acoustic wave streaming: combined finite element method and raytracing numerics versus experiments.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, Thomas; Gogel, Daniel; Kostur, Marcin; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-01

    This work presents an approach for determining the streaming patterns that are generated by Rayleigh surface acoustic waves in arbitrary 3-D geometries by finite element method (FEM) simulations. An efficient raytracing algorithm is applied on the acoustic subproblem to avoid the unbearable memory demands and computational time of a conventional FEM acoustics simulation in 3-D. The acoustic streaming interaction is modeled by a body force term in the Stokes equation. In comparisons between experiments and simulated flow patterns, we demonstrate the quality of the proposed technique. PMID:18986877

  1. Effect of facility variation on the acoustic characteristics of three single stream nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, O. A.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of the jet noise produced by three single stream nozzles have been investigated statically at the NASA-Lewis Research Center outdoor jet acoustic facility. The nozzles consisted of a 7.6 cm diameter convergent conical, a 10.2 cm diameter convergent conical and an 8-lobe daisy nozzle with 7.6 cm equivalent diameter flow area. The acoustic experiments at NASA covered pressure ratios from 1.4 to 2.5 at total temperatures of 811 K and ambient. The data obtained with four different microphone arrays are compared.

  2. TSONIC- TRANSONIC VELOCITIES ON A BLADE-TO-BLADE STREAM SURFACE OF A TURBOMACHINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.

    1994-01-01

    This program obtains a transonic flow solution on a blade-to-blade surface between blades of a turbomachine. The flow must be essentially subsonic, but there may be locally supersonic flow. The solution is two-dimensional, isentropic, and shock free. The blades may be fixed or rotating. The flow may be axial, radial, or mixed, and there may be a change in stream-channel thickness in the through-flow direction. A loss in relative stagnation pressure may be accounted for. The program input consists of blade and stream-channel geometry, stagnation flow conditions, inlet and outlet flow angles, and blade-to-blade stream-channel weight flow. The output includes blade surface velocities, velocity magnitude and direction at all interior mesh points in the blade-to-blade passage, and streamline coordinates throughout the passage. The transonic solution is obtained by a combination of a finite-difference, stream-function solution and a velocity-gradient solution. The finite-difference solution at a reduced weight flow provides information needed to obtain a velocity-gradient solution. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on the IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 36K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1969 and last updated in 1979.

  3. VELOCITIES AND STREAMLINES ON A BLADE-TO-BLADE STREAM SURFACE OF A TURBOMACHINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.

    1994-01-01

    This program is a revision of an existing program for blade-to-blade aerodynamic analysis of turbomachine blades and it is a simpler program while consistent with related programs. The analysis is for two-dimensional, subsonic, compressible (or incompressible), nonviscous flow in a circular or straight infinite cascade of blades, which may be fixed or rotating. The flow may be axial, radial, or mixed, and the stream channel thickness may change in the through-flow direction. The program input consists of blade and stream channel geometry, total flow conditions, inlet and outlet flow angles, and blade-to-blade stream channel weight flow. The output includes blade surface velocities, velocity magnitude and direction at all interior mesh points in the blade-to-blade passage, and streamline coordinates throughout the passage. This program was developed on an IBM 7094/7044 DCS.

  4. Measurement of the flow velocity in unmagnetized plasmas by counter propagating ion-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.X.; Li Yangfang; Xiao Delong; Li Jingju; Li Yiren

    2005-06-15

    The diffusion velocity of an inhomogeneous unmagnetized plasma is measured by means of the phase velocities of ion-acoustic waves propagating along and against the direction of the plasma flow. Combined with the measurement of the plasma density distributions by usual Langmuir probes, the method is applied to measure the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and effective ion collision frequency in inhomogeneous plasmas formed in an asymmetrically discharged double-plasma device. Experimental results show that the measured flow velocities, diffusion coefficients, and effective collision frequencies are in agreement with ion-neutral collision dominated diffusion theory.

  5. Measurement of acoustic velocity in the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Michard, Marc; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems generate cooling power from a high-amplitude acoustic standing wave. There has recently been a growing interest in this technology because of its simple and robust architecture and its use of environmentally safe gases. With the prospect of commercialization, it is necessary to enhance the efficiency of thermoacoustic cooling systems and more particularly of some of their components such as the heat exchangers. The characterization of the flow field at the end of the stack plates is a crucial step for the understanding and optimization of heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers. In this study, a specific particle image velocimetry measurement is performed inside a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Acoustic velocity is measured using synchronization and phase-averaging. The measurement method is validated inside a void resonator by successfully comparing experimental data with an acoustic plane wave model. Velocity is measured inside the oscillating boundary layers, between the plates of the stack, and compared to a linear model. The flow behind the stack is characterized, and it shows the generation of symmetric pairs of counter-rotating vortices at the end of the stack plates at low acoustic pressure level. As the acoustic pressure level increases, detachment of the vortices and symmetry breaking are observed.

  6. Numerical simulation of acoustofluidic manipulation by radiation forces and acoustic streaming for complex particles.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Philipp; Leibacher, Ivo; Baasch, Thierry; Dual, Jurg

    2015-11-21

    The numerical prediction of acoustofluidic particle motion is of great help for the design, the analysis, and the physical understanding of acoustofluidic devices as it allows for a simple and direct comparison with experimental observations. However, such a numerical setup requires detailed modeling of the acoustofluidic device with all its components and thorough understanding of the acoustofluidic forces inducing the particle motion. In this work, we present a 3D trajectory simulation setup that covers the full spectrum, comprising a time-harmonic device model, an acoustic streaming model of the fluid cavity, a radiation force simulation, and the calculation of the hydrodynamic drag. In order to make quantitatively accurate predictions of the device vibration and the acoustic field, we include the viscous boundary layer damping. Using a semi-analytical method based on Nyborg's calculations, the boundary-driven acoustic streaming is derived directly from the device simulation and takes into account cavity wall vibrations which have often been neglected in the literature. The acoustic radiation forces and the hydrodynamic drag are calculated numerically to handle particles of arbitrary shape, structure, and size. In this way, complex 3D particle translation and rotation inside experimental microdevices can be predicted. We simulate the rotation of a microfiber in an amplitude-modulated 2D field and analyze the results with respect to experimental observations. For a quantitative verification, the motion of an alumina microdisk is compared to a simple experiment. Demonstrating the potential of the simulation setup, we compute the trajectory of a red blood cell inside a realistic microdevice under the simultaneous effects of acoustic streaming and radiation forces. PMID:26448531

  7. Effect of facility variation on the acoustic characteristics of three single stream nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, O. A.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of the jet noise produced by three single stream nozzles were investigated statistically at the NASA-Lewis Research Center outdoor jet acoustic facility. The nozzles consisted of a 7.6 cm diameter convergent conical, a 10.2 cm diameter convergent conical and an 8-lobe daisy nozzle with 7.6 cm equivalent diameter flow area. The same nozzles were tested previously at cold flow conditions in other facilities such as the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) 7.3 m acoustic wind tunnel. The acoustic experiments at NASA covered pressure ratios from 1.4 to 2.5 at total temperatures of 811 K and ambient. The data obtained with four different microphone arrays are compared. The results are also compared with data taken at the RAE facility and with a NASA prediction procedure.

  8. Acoustic streaming, fluid mixing, and particle transport by a Gaussian ultrasound beam in a cylindrical container

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.; Wu, Junru

    2015-10-15

    A computational study is reported of the acoustic streaming flow field generated by a Gaussian ultrasound beam propagating normally toward the end wall of a cylindrical container. Particular focus is given to examining the effectiveness of the acoustic streaming flow for fluid mixing within the container, for deposition of particles in suspension onto the bottom surface, and for particle suspension from the bottom surface back into the flow field. The flow field is assumed to be axisymmetric with the ultrasound transducer oriented parallel to the cylinder axis and normal to the bottom surface of the container, which we refer to as the impingement surface. Reflection of the sound from the impingement surface and sound absorption within the material at the container bottom are both accounted for in the computation. The computation also accounts for thermal buoyancy force due to ultrasonic heating of the impingement surface, but over the time period considered in the current simulations, the flow is found to be dominated by the acoustic streaming force, with only moderate effect of buoyancy force.

  9. Acoustic streaming, fluid mixing, and particle transport by a Gaussian ultrasound beam in a cylindrical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.; Wu, Junru

    2015-10-01

    A computational study is reported of the acoustic streaming flow field generated by a Gaussian ultrasound beam propagating normally toward the end wall of a cylindrical container. Particular focus is given to examining the effectiveness of the acoustic streaming flow for fluid mixing within the container, for deposition of particles in suspension onto the bottom surface, and for particle suspension from the bottom surface back into the flow field. The flow field is assumed to be axisymmetric with the ultrasound transducer oriented parallel to the cylinder axis and normal to the bottom surface of the container, which we refer to as the impingement surface. Reflection of the sound from the impingement surface and sound absorption within the material at the container bottom are both accounted for in the computation. The computation also accounts for thermal buoyancy force due to ultrasonic heating of the impingement surface, but over the time period considered in the current simulations, the flow is found to be dominated by the acoustic streaming force, with only moderate effect of buoyancy force.

  10. Measurement of vortex velocities over a wide range of vortex age, downstream distance and free stream velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorke, J. B.; Moffett, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to obtain vortex velocity signatures over a wide parameter range encompassing the data conditions of several previous researchers while maintaining a common instrumentation and test facility. The generating wing panel was configured with both a revolved airfoil tip shape and a square tip shape and had a semispan aspect of 4.05/1.0 with a 121.9 cm span. Free stream velocity was varied from 6.1 m/sec to 76.2 m/sec and the vortex core velocities were measured at locations 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 chordlengths downstream of the wing trailing edge, yielding vortex ages up to 2.0 seconds. Wing pitch angles of 6, 8, 9 and 12 deg were investigated. Detailed surface pressure distributions and wing force measurements were obtained for each wing tip configuration. Correlation with vortex velocity data taken in previous experiments is good. During the rollup process, vortex core parameters appear to be dependent primarily on vortex age. Trending in the plateau and decay regions is more complex and the machanisms appear to be more unstable.

  11. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  12. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range. PMID:23927100

  13. SIMULATIONS OF EARLY BARYONIC STRUCTURE FORMATION WITH STREAM VELOCITY. II. THE GAS FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Yoshida, Naoki; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-01-20

    Understanding the gas content of high-redshift halos is crucial for studying the formation of the first generation of galaxies and reionization. Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that the relative 'stream' velocity between the dark matter and baryons at the time of recombination-formally a second-order effect, but an unusually large one-can influence the later structure formation history of the universe. We quantify the effect of the stream velocity on the so-called characteristic mass-the minimum mass of a dark matter halo capable of retaining most of its baryons throughout its formation epoch-using three different high-resolution sets of cosmological simulations (with separate transfer functions for baryons and dark matter) that vary in box size, particle number, and the value of the relative velocity between the dark matter and baryons. In order to understand this effect theoretically, we generalize the linear theory filtering mass to properly account for the difference between the dark matter and baryonic density fluctuation evolution induced by the stream velocity. We show that the new filtering mass provides an accurate estimate for the characteristic mass, while other theoretical ansatzes for the characteristic mass are substantially less precise.

  14. Acoustic signal propagation and measurement in natural stream channels for application to surrogate bed load measurements: Halfmoon Creek, Colorado.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring sediment-generated noise using submerged hydrophones is a surrogate method for measuring bed load transport in streams with the potential for improving estimates of bed load transport through widespread, inexpensive monitoring. Understanding acoustic signal propagation in natural stream e...

  15. Predicting mean residence time and exchange velocity in the hyporheic zone of restored streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morén, Ida; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    The hyporheic zones of streams and rivers have been identified as hotspots for biogeochemical reactions in the aquatic environment, making the retention time and exchange velocity of the hyporheic zone essential parameters in the modelling of these processes. However, exact site-specific values of those parameters are often missing in stream restoration projects because there are no well-defined scaling relationships linking them to measurable reach characteristics. In this study we derive semi-analytical solutions for the retention time and exchange velocity in the hyporheic zone. In particular the effect on hyporheic exchange is expressed by the use of physically based models and by superimposing different geomorphologic features of different scales. It is suggested that all exchange phenomena can be modelled as head anomalies expressed with a harmonic distribution along the stream with specific wavelength and head amplitude. The maximum head of an exchange phenomena is either dominated by hydrodynamic or hydrostatic water pressure, depending on the size of the feature causing the exchange. The theory leads to constitutive relationships for exchange velocity and residence time expressed as functions of the distribution of wavelengths, distribution of head amplitude and hydraulic conductivity. In order to validate and evaluate certain empirical coefficients, a number of Rhodamine WT tracer tests were performed in a partly restored agricultural stream in the south of Sweden called the Tullstorps brook. To evaluate the tracer test in sections where remediation actions have been undertaken we used the method of temporal moments. In conjunction with the tracer tests a characterisation of the stream was carried out where hydraulic conductivity of the streambed and stream morphology was measured. The study verifies that the residence time in the hyporheic zone decreases with the maximum hydraulic head of the largest (dominating) geomorphic feature of the reach, and

  16. Coupling of dust acoustic and shear mode through velocity shear in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S. Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-07-15

    In the strongly coupled limit, the generalized hydrodynamic model shows that a dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support a “shear” like mode. It is being demonstrated here that in presence of velocity shear gradient, this shear like mode gets coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperatures of the dust, electron, and ion fluids. In the local analysis, the dispersion relation shows that velocity shear gradient not only couples the two modes but is also responsible for the instabilities of that coupled mode which is confirmed by nonlocal analysis with numerical techniques.

  17. Surface Vector Velocity Estimates and Gulf Stream Observations From the UMass Dual Beam Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkovic, D.; Toporkov, J. V.; Sletten, M. A.; Farquharson, G.; Frasier, S. J.; Marmorino, G. O.; Judd, K. P.

    2004-12-01

    The Dual Beam Interferometer (DBI) developed by University of Massachusetts (UMass) consists of two C-band along-track interferometric synthetic aperture radars (ATI-SAR). The beams of this airborne system are squinted 20 degrees forward and aft of broadside allowing surface vector velocity estimation in a single aircraft pass. The instrument has been deployed several times over the period of last two years off coastal areas of Florida on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) WP-3D plane in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). During 2002-2003 the instrument has undergone a series of tests and engineering flights with the August 2003 data producing the first interferogram. March 2004 flights were mainly focused on the western boundary of the Gulf Stream off Cape Canaveral, Florida. Simultaneous imagery of the sea-surface temperature field were obtained using NRL's Infrared (IR) camera, which was mounted in belly of the aircraft. Multiple passes over the Gulf Stream were made under a range of environmental conditions and viewing geometries relative to the Gulf Stream current and the wind. Additional flights were made over the barrier islands west of Ft. Meyers, Florida at times of near maximum ebb tidal flow. This paper will present initial estimates of the surface vector velocities for each area. The Gulf Stream velocity estimates show a current maximum of 1.5 m/s across the edge of the Stream which is consistent with estimates of the current from IR imagery using feature tracking. Estimates of the flow between the barrier islands are of the order of 1.5 to 2 m/s, which agrees well with the predicted tidal flow.

  18. Impact of acoustic velocity structure to measurement of ocean bottom crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Eto, S.; Ando, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method of monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging. The goal of our research is to achieve sub-centimeter accuracy in measuring oceanic crustal deformation by a very short-time measurement like 10 hours. In this study, we focused on lateral variation of acoustic velocity structure in seawater and introduced an inclined acoustic velocity structure model to improve accuracy of the measurement. We have a few measurement sites along Nankai trough, Japan. In each sites, we deployed a trio of transponders on ocean floor (seafloor benchmark units) within distance comparable with the depth. An ultrasonic signal is generated from a surface vessel drifting over the benchmark unit, which is received and replied by the benchmark unit. In this system, both acoustic velocity structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted on an assumption that the acoustic velocity structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. Ikuta et al., (AGU fall meeting 2009) reported an approach to improve accuracy of benchmark positioning using a new additional assumption. The additional assumption was that the configuration of the transponders trio constituting one benchmark unit does not change. They determined the time evolution of weight center for the fixed transponder triangle between different measurements using all repetitively obtained data sets at once. This is contrasting to the previous method in which each data set for different measurement was solved independently. This assumption worked well in reducing number of unknown parameters. As a result, repeatability of benchmark positioning improved from 5 cm to 3 cm. We conducted numerical experiments synthesizing acoustic travel-time data to evaluate the robustness of this new approach. When acoustic travel-time data is

  19. Evaluation of the Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter for Computation of Discharge Records at Three Sites in Colorado, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Diaz, Paul; Smits, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted a study in 2004-2005 at three sites in Colorado: Bear Creek at Morrison, Clear Creek near Empire, and Redlands Canal near Grand Junction. The study was done to evaluate acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADVM) technology in different hydrologic settings that are characteristic of many Colorado streamflow-gaging sites. ADVMs have been tested and used extensively in many parts of the United States by USGS but not in Colorado where relatively small, shallow, clear, coarse-bed streams that ice up in the winter may affect the ADVM suitability. In this study, ADVM instrumentation was successfully used and discharge computations compared favorably, generally within 5 to 10 percent, with conventional USGS stage/discharge methods at the three Colorado sites. However, two factors, encountered in this study, may adversely affect the use of ADVM technology in Colorado. First, for some streams, the depth required (about 1.5 feet for a side-looking instrument) cannot be met during low-flow periods of the year. Second, cold temperatures and freezing-thawing cycles can produce ice effects that could prevent collection of usable ADVM (and stage) data.

  20. Underwater patch near-field acoustical holography based on particle velocity and vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, DeSen; Li, SiChun; Sun, Yu; Mo, ShiQi; Shi, ShengGuo

    2012-11-01

    One-step patch near-field acoustical holography (PNAH) is a powerful tool for identifying noise sources from the partially known sound pressure field. The acoustical property to be reconstructed on the surface of interest is related to the partially measured pressure on the hologram surface in terms of sampling and bandlimiting matrices, which cost more in computation. A one-step procedure based on measuring of the normal component of the particle velocity is described, including the mathematical formulation. The numerical simulation shows that one-step PNAH based on particle velocity can obtain more accurately reconstructed results and it is also less sensitive to noise than the method based on pressure. These findings are confirmed by an underwater near-field acoustical holography experiment conducted with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results have illustrated the high performance of one-step PNAH based on particle velocity in the reconstruction of sound field and the advantages of a vector hydrophone array in an underwater near-field measurement.

  1. Trapping of Embolic Particles in a Vessel Phantom by Cavitation-Enhanced Acoustic Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Cain, Charles A.; Grotberg, James B.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R2=0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc=0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location. PMID:25109407

  2. Trapping of embolic particles in a vessel phantom by cavitation-enhanced acoustic streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Cain, Charles A.; Grotberg, James B.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R2 = 0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc = 0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location.

  3. Abnormal acoustic wave velocities in basaltic and (Fe,Al)-bearing silicate glasses at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-01

    We have measured acoustic VP and VS velocities of (Fe,Al)-bearing MgSiO3 silicate glasses and an Icelandic basalt glass up to 25 GPa. The velocity profiles of the (Fe,Al)-bearing and basaltic silicate glasses display decreased VP and VS with minima at approximately 5 and 2 GPa, respectively, which could be explained by the mode softening in the aluminosilicate networks. Our results represent the first observation of such velocity softening extending into the chemically complex basaltic glass at a relatively low transition pressure, which is likely due to its degree of polymerization, while the Fe and Al substitutions reduce sound velocities in MgSiO3 glass. If the velocity softening in the basaltic and silicate glasses can be used as analogs for understanding melts in Earth's interior, these observations suggest that the melt fraction needed to account for the velocity reduction in the upper mantle low-velocity zone may be smaller than previously thought.

  4. Field assessment of noncontact stream gauging using portable surface velocity radars (SVR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welber, Matilde; Le Coz, Jérôme; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Zolezzi, Guido; Zamler, Daniel; Dramais, Guillaume; Hauet, Alexandre; Salvaro, Martino

    2016-02-01

    The applicability of a portable, commercially available surface velocity radar (SVR) for noncontact stream gauging was evaluated through a series of field-scale experiments carried out in a variety of sites and deployment conditions. Comparisons with various concurrent techniques showed acceptable agreement with velocity profiles, with larger uncertainties close to the banks. In addition to discharge error sources shared with intrusive velocity-area techniques, SVR discharge estimates are affected by flood-induced changes in the bed profile and by the selection of a depth-averaged to surface velocity ratio, or velocity coefficient (α). Cross-sectional averaged velocity coefficients showed smaller fluctuations and closer agreement with theoretical values than those computed on individual verticals, especially in channels with high relative roughness. Our findings confirm that α = 0.85 is a valid default value, with a preferred site-specific calibration to avoid underestimation of discharge in very smooth channels (relative roughness ˜ 0.001) and overestimation in very rough channels (relative roughness > 0.05). Theoretically derived and site-calibrated values of α also give accurate SVR-based discharge estimates (within 10%) for low and intermediate roughness flows (relative roughness 0.001 to 0.05). Moreover, discharge uncertainty does not exceed 10% even for a limited number of SVR positions along the cross section (particularly advantageous to gauge unsteady flood flows and very large floods), thereby extending the range of validity of rating curves.

  5. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  6. Beam misalignments and fluid velocities in laser-induced thermal acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Schlamp, S.; Hornung, H.G.; Cummings, E.B.

    1999-09-01

    Beam misalignments and bulk fluid velocities can influence the time history and intensity of laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) signals. A closed-form analytic expression for LITA signals incorporating these effects is derived, allowing the magnitude of beam misalignment and velocity to be inferred from the signal shape. It is demonstrated how instantaneous, nonintrusive, and remote measurement of sound speed and velocity (Mach number) can be inferred simultaneously from homodyne-detected LITA signals. The effects of different forms of beam misalignment are explored experimentally and compared with theory, with good agreement, allowing the amount of misalignment to be measured from the LITA signal. This capability could be used to correct experimental misalignments and account for the effects of misalignment in other LITA measurements. It is shown that small beam misalignments have no influence on the accuracy or repeatability of sound speed measurements with LITA. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  7. Beam Misalignments and Fluid Velocities in Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan; Cummings, Eric B.; Hornung, Hans G.

    1999-09-01

    Beam misalignments and bulk fluid velocities can influence the time history and intensity of laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) signals. A closed-form analytic expression for LITA signals incorporating these effects is derived, allowing the magnitude of beam misalignment and velocity to be inferred from the signal shape. It is demonstrated how instantaneous, nonintrusive, and remote measurement of sound speed and velocity (Mach number) can be inferred simultaneously from homodyne-detected LITA signals. The effects of different forms of beam misalignment are explored experimentally and compared with theory, with good agreement, allowing the amount of misalignment to be measured from the LITA signal. This capability could be used to correct experimental misalignments and account for the effects of misalignment in other LITA measurements. It is shown that small beam misalignments have no influence on the accuracy or repeatability of sound speed measurements with LITA.

  8. Acoustic impedance of micro perforated membranes: Velocity continuity condition at the perforation boundary.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Cazzolato, Ben; Zander, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The classic analytical model for the sound absorption of micro perforated materials is well developed and is based on a boundary condition where the velocity of the material is assumed to be zero, which is accurate when the material vibration is negligible. This paper develops an analytical model for finite-sized circular micro perforated membranes (MPMs) by applying a boundary condition such that the velocity of air particles on the hole wall boundary is equal to the membrane vibration velocity (a zero-slip condition). The acoustic impedance of the perforation, which varies with its position, is investigated. A prediction method for the overall impedance of the holes and the combined impedance of the MPM is also provided. The experimental results for four different MPM configurations are used to validate the model and good agreement between the experimental and predicted results is achieved. PMID:26827008

  9. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  10. Active Control of Jet Noise Using High Resolution TRPIV Part 2: Velocity-Pressure-Acoustic Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Kerwin; Kostka, Stanislav; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Glauser, Mark

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the pressure, velocity and acoustic field of a transonic jet. Test conditions comprise a 2 inch nozzle, analyzing two flow speeds, Mach 0.6 and 0.85, with open loop control explored for the Mach 0.6 case. We make simultaneous measurements of the near-field pressure and far-field acoustics at 40 kHz, alongside 10 kHz time resolved PIV measurements in the r-z plane. Cross correlations are performed exploring how both the near-field Fourier filtered pressure and low dimensional POD modes relate to the far-field acoustics. Of interest are those signatures witch exhibit the strongest correlation with far-field, and subsequently how these structures can be controlled. The goal is to investigate how flow-induced perturbations, via synthetic jet actuators, of the developing shear layer might bring insight into how one may alter the flow such that the far-field acoustic signature is mitigated. The TR-PIV measurements will prove to be a powerful tool in being able to track the propagation of physical structures for both the controlled and uncontrolled jet.

  11. Planar nearfield acoustical holography in moving fluid medium at subsonic and uniform velocity.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyu-Sang; Niu, Yaying; Kim, Yong-Joe

    2010-10-01

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) data measured by using a microphone array attached to a high-speed aircraft or ground vehicle include significant airflow effects. For the purpose of processing the measured NAH data, an improved nearfield acoustical holography procedure is introduced that includes the effects of a fluid medium moving at a subsonic and uniform velocity. The convective wave equation along with the convective Euler's equation is used to develop the proposed NAH procedure. A mapping function between static and moving fluid medium cases is derived from the convective wave equation. Then, a conventional wave number filter designed for static fluid media is modified to be applicable to the moving fluid cases by applying the mapping function to the static wave number filter. In order to validate the proposed NAH procedure, a monopole simulation at the airflow speed of Mach=-0.6 is conducted. The reconstructed acoustic fields obtained by applying the proposed NAH procedure to the simulation data agree well with directly-calculated acoustic fields. Through an experiment with two loudspeakers performed in a wind tunnel operating at Mach=-0.12, it is shown that the proposed NAH procedure can be also used to reconstruct the sound fields radiated from the two loudspeakers. PMID:20968355

  12. Line-of-sight Velocity and Metallicity Measurements of the Palomar 5 Tidal Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, M. N.; Hwang, N.; Chiba, M.; Aoki, W.

    2016-06-01

    We present Subaru/Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph and Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrometer medium-resolution spectroscopy of a tidally disrupting Milky Way (MW) globular cluster Palomar 5 (Pal 5) and its tidal stream. The observed fields are located to cover an angular extent of ˜17° along the stream, providing an opportunity to investigate a trend in line-of-sight velocities (V los) along the stream, which is essential to constrain its orbit and underlying gravitational potential of the MW’s dark matter halo. A spectral fitting technique is applied to the observed spectra to obtain stellar parameters and metallicities ([Fe/H]) of the target stars. The 19 stars most likely belonging to the central Pal 5 cluster have a mean V los of ‑58.1 ± 0.7 km s‑1 and metallicity [Fe/H] = ‑1.35 ± 0.06 dex, both of which are in good agreement with those derived in previous high-resolution spectroscopic studies. Assuming that the stream stars have the same [Fe/H] as the progenitor cluster, the derived [Fe/H] and {V}{{los}} values are used to estimate the possible V los range of the member stars at each location along the stream. Because of the heavy contamination of the field MW stars, the estimated V los range depends on prior assumptions about the stream’s {V}{{los}}, which highlights the importance of more definitely identifying the member stars using proper motion and chemical abundances to obtain unbiased information of V los in the outer part of the Pal 5 stream. The models for the gravitational potential of the MW’s dark matter halo that are compatible with the estimated V los range are discussed.

  13. Velocity dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments: comparison of measurements with predictions using acoustic models.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2011-06-01

    The large velocity dispersion recently reported could be explained by a gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model) proposed by the author. However, at high frequencies, some measured results have been reported for negative velocity dispersion and attenuation proportional to the first to fourth power of frequency. In this study, first, it is shown that the results of velocity dispersion and attenuation calculated using the BIMGS model are consistent with the results measured in two kinds of water-saturated sands with different grain sizes, except in the high-frequency range. Then, the velocity dispersion and attenuation in six kinds of water-saturated glass beads and four kinds of water-saturated silica sands with different grain sizes are measured in the frequency ranges of 80-140 and 300-700 kHz. The measured results are compared with those calculated using the BIMGS model plus some acoustic models. It is shown that the velocity dispersion and attenuation are well predicted by using the BIMGS model in the range of kd ≤ 0.5 (k: wavenumber in water, d: grain diameter) and by using the BIMGS model plus multiple scattering effects in the range of kd ≥ 0.5 in which negative velocity dispersion appears. PMID:21682381

  14. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application: Single stream nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Brausch, J. F.; Janardan, B. A.; Balsa, T. F.; Knott, P. R.; Pickup, N.

    1984-01-01

    A technology base for the thermal acoustic shield concept as a noise suppression device for single stream exhaust nozzles was developed. Acoustic data for 314 test points for 9 scale model nozzle configurations were obtained. Five of these configurations employed an unsuppressed annular plug core jet and the remaining four nozzles employed a 32 chute suppressor core nozzle. Influence of simulated flight and selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables on the acoustic behavior of the thermal acoustic shield was determined. Laser velocimeter and aerodynamic measurements were employed to yield valuable diagnostic information regarding the flow field characteristics of these nozzles. An existing theoretical aeroacoustic prediction method was modified to predict the acoustic characteristics of partial thermal acoustic shields.

  15. Dust acoustic soliton and double layers with streaming dust and superthermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, S. Ali; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-07-01

    Dust acoustic waves are investigated in plasma system containing dynamic and streaming dust, supertherrmal electrons and ions. Linear and nonlinear studies are carried out and elaborated with the help of parameters taken for Saturn's F-ring. An energy integral equation is obtained by using the Sagdeev potential approach, and results are displayed by solving it analytically and numerically. The dependence of nonlinear structures on κ values, the ratio of electron to dust equilibrium densities μ ed , Mach number M, and dust streaming speed v d0 have been presented. The streaming speed appears as a destructive partner for the Mach number M in the pseudoenergy equation and hence plays a dominant modifying role in the formation of nonlinear structures. It plays a destructive role for some of the solitons and works as a source, for the emergence of new solitons (region). Formation of double layers are also investigated and shown that the amplitude, width and existence of double layers structures are predominantly affected by the presence of superthermal electrons, ions, and streaming dust beam.

  16. Slow climate velocities of mountain streams portend their role as refugia for cold-water biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Isaak, Daniel J; Young, Michael K; Luce, Charles H; Hostetler, Steven W; Wenger, Seth J; Peterson, Erin E; Ver Hoef, Jay M; Groce, Matthew C; Horan, Dona L; Nagel, David E

    2016-04-19

    The imminent demise of montane species is a recurrent theme in the climate change literature, particularly for aquatic species that are constrained to networks and elevational rather than latitudinal retreat as temperatures increase. Predictions of widespread species losses, however, have yet to be fulfilled despite decades of climate change, suggesting that trends are much weaker than anticipated and may be too subtle for detection given the widespread use of sparse water temperature datasets or imprecise surrogates like elevation and air temperature. Through application of large water-temperature databases evaluated for sensitivity to historical air-temperature variability and computationally interpolated to provide high-resolution thermal habitat information for a 222,000-km network, we estimate a less dire thermal plight for cold-water species within mountains of the northwestern United States. Stream warming rates and climate velocities were both relatively low for 1968-2011 (average warming rate = 0.101 °C/decade; median velocity = 1.07 km/decade) when air temperatures warmed at 0.21 °C/decade. Many cold-water vertebrate species occurred in a subset of the network characterized by low climate velocities, and three native species of conservation concern occurred in extremely cold, slow velocity environments (0.33-0.48 km/decade). Examination of aggressive warming scenarios indicated that although network climate velocities could increase, they remain low in headwaters because of strong local temperature gradients associated with topographic controls. Better information about changing hydrology and disturbance regimes is needed to complement these results, but rather than being climatic cul-de-sacs, many mountain streams appear poised to be redoubts for cold-water biodiversity this century. PMID:27044091

  17. Field-derived relationships for flow velocity and resistance in high-gradient streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Comiti, F.; Mao, L.; Wilcox, A.; Wohl, E.E.; Lenzi, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    We measured velocity and channel geometry in 10 reaches (bed gradient = 0.08-0.21) of a predominantly step-pool channel, the Rio Cordon, Italy, over a range of discharges (3-80% of the bankfull discharge). The resulting data were used to compute flow resistance. At-a-station hydraulic geometry relations indicate that in most reaches, the exponent describing the rate of velocity increases with discharge was between 0.48 and 0.6, which is within the range of published values for pool-riffle channels. The Rio Cordon data are also combined with published hydraulics data from step-pool streams to explore non-dimensional relationships between velocity and flow resistance and factors including unit discharge, channel gradient, and step geometry. Multiple regression analysis of this combined field dataset indicated that dimensionless unit discharge (q*) is the most important independent variable overall in explaining variations in velocity and flow resistance, followed by channel slope and the ratio of step height to step length. Empirical equations are provided both for dimensionless velocity and flow resistance, but prediction of the former variable appears more reliable. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of acoustic tomography to reconstruct the horizontal flow velocity field in a shallow river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Kaneko, Arata; Nistor, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    A novel acoustic tomographic measurement system capable of resolving sound travel time in extremely shallow rivers is introduced and the results of an extensive field measurements campaign are presented and further discussed. Acoustic pulses were transmitted over a wide frequency band of 20-35 kHz between eight transducers for about a week in a meandering reach of theBāsen River, Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the field experiment was validating the concept of acoustic tomography in rivers for visualizing current fields. The particular novelty of the experiment resides in its unusual tomographic features: subbasin scale (100 m × 270 m) and shallowness (0.5-3.0 m) of the physical domain, frequency of the transmitted acoustic signals (central frequency of 30 kHz), and the use of small sampling intervals (105 s). Inverse techniques with no a priori statistical information were used to estimate the depth-average current velocity components from differential travel times. Zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization, in conjunction with L-curve method deployed to stabilize the solution and to determine the weighting factor appearing in the inverse analysis. Concurrent direct environmental measurements were provided in the form of ADCP readings close to the right and left bank. Very good agreement found between along-channel velocities larger than 0.2 m/s obtained from the two techniques. Inverted quantities were, however, underestimated, perhaps due to vicinity of the ADCPs to the banks and strong effect of river geometry on the readings. In general, comparing the visualized currents with direct nodal measurements illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures.

  19. Permeability, electrical impedance, and acoustic velocities on reservoir rocks from the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Boyd, P.J.

    1996-01-24

    Previous measurements of acoustic velocities on NEGU- 17 cores indicate that saturation effects are significant enough to cause Vp/Vs anomalies observed in the field. In this study we report on the results of new measurements on core recently recovered from SB-15-D along with some additional measurements on the NEGU-17 cores. The measurements indicate correlations between mechanical, transport, and water storage properties of the matrix which may prove useful for reservoir assessment and management. The SB-15-D material is found to be similar to the NEGU-17 material in terms of acoustic velocities, being characterized by a notably weak pressure dependence on the velocities and a modest Vp/Vs signature of saturation. The effect of saturation on Vp/Vs appears to result in part from a chemo-mechanical weakening of the shear modulus due to the presence of water. Electrical properties of SB-15-D material are qualitatively similar to those of the NEGU-17 cores, although resistivities of SB-15-D cores are notably lower and dielectric permittivities higher than in their NEGU- 17 counterparts. While some limited correlations of measured properties with depth are noted, no clear change in character is observed within SB-15-D cores which can be associated with the proposed cap-rock/reservoir boundary.

  20. Acoustic wave velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on acousto-optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'neva, P. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Sound velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on isotropic and anisotropic acousto-optical crystals have been determined by numerical simulations. The isotropic materials are represented by fused quartz (SiO2) and flint glass, while anisotropic materials include tetragonal crystals of paratellurite (TeO2) and rutile (TiO2) and a trigonal crystal of tellurium (Te). It is established that the acoustic anisotropy of periodic composite structures strongly depends on both the chemical composition and geometric parameters of components.

  1. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  2. Diffusive Promotion by Velocity Gradient of Cytoplasmic Streaming (CPS) in Nitella Internodal Cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Mochizuki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming (CPS) is well known to assist the movement of nutrients, organelles and genetic material by transporting all of the cytoplasmic contents of a cell. CPS is generated by motility organelles that are driven by motor proteins near a membrane surface, where the CPS has been found to have a flat velocity profile in the flow field according to the sliding theory. There is a consistent mixing of contents inside the cell by CPS if the velocity gradient profile is flattened, which is not assisted by advection diffusion but is only supported by Brownian diffusion. Although the precise flow structure of the cytoplasm has an important role for cellular metabolism, the hydrodynamic mechanism of its convection has not been clarified. We conducted an experiment to visualise the flow of cytoplasm in Nitella cells by injecting tracer fluorescent nanoparticles and using a flow visualisation system in order to understand how the flow profile affects their metabolic system. We determined that the velocity field in the cytosol has an obvious velocity gradient, not a flattened gradient, which suggests that the gradient assists cytosolic mixing by Taylor-Aris dispersion more than by Brownian diffusion. PMID:26694322

  3. Diffusive Promotion by Velocity Gradient of Cytoplasmic Streaming (CPS) in Nitella Internodal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Mochizuki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming (CPS) is well known to assist the movement of nutrients, organelles and genetic material by transporting all of the cytoplasmic contents of a cell. CPS is generated by motility organelles that are driven by motor proteins near a membrane surface, where the CPS has been found to have a flat velocity profile in the flow field according to the sliding theory. There is a consistent mixing of contents inside the cell by CPS if the velocity gradient profile is flattened, which is not assisted by advection diffusion but is only supported by Brownian diffusion. Although the precise flow structure of the cytoplasm has an important role for cellular metabolism, the hydrodynamic mechanism of its convection has not been clarified. We conducted an experiment to visualise the flow of cytoplasm in Nitella cells by injecting tracer fluorescent nanoparticles and using a flow visualisation system in order to understand how the flow profile affects their metabolic system. We determined that the velocity field in the cytosol has an obvious velocity gradient, not a flattened gradient, which suggests that the gradient assists cytosolic mixing by Taylor–Aris dispersion more than by Brownian diffusion. PMID:26694322

  4. VELOCITIES AND STREAMLINES ON A BLADE-TO-BLADE STREAM SURFACE OF A TANDEM BLADE TURBOMACHINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program gives the blade-to-blade solution of the two-dimensional, subsonic, compressible (or incompressible), nonviscous flow problem for a circular or straight infinite cascade of tandem or slotted turbomachine blades. The blades may be fixed or rotating. The flow may be axial, radial , or mixed. The method of solution is based on the stream function using an iterative solution of nonlinear finite-difference equations. These equations are solved using two major levels of iteration. The inner iteration consists of the solution of simultaneous linear equations by successive over-relaxation, using an estimated optimum over-relaxation factor. The outer iteration then changes the coefficients of the simultaneous equations to correct for compressibility. The program input consists of the basic blade geometry, the meridional stream channel coordinates, fluid stagnation conditions, weight flow and flow split through the slot, and inlet and outlet flow angles. The output includes blade surface velocities, velocity magnitude and direction throughout the passage, and the streamline coordinates.

  5. Evaluation of acoustic doppler velocity meters to quantify flow from Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal

  6. Ultrasonic database development for the acoustic inspection device: the velocity-attenuation measurement system (VAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Burghard, Brion J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2004-07-01

    The inspection of sealed containers is a critical task for personnel charged with enforcing government policies, maintaining public safety, and ensuring national security. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, handheld acoustic inspection device (AID) that provides non-invasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities. The AID technology has been deployed worldwide and user"s are providing feedback and requesting additional capabilities and functionality. Recently, PNNL has developed a laboratory-based system for automated, ultrasonic characterization of fluids to support database development for the AID. Using pulse-echo ultrasound, ultrasonic pulses are launched into a container or bulk-solid commodity. The return echoes from these pulses are analyzed in terms of time-of-flight and frequency content (as a function of temperature) to extract physical property measurements (acoustic velocity and attenuation) of the material under test. These measured values are then compared to a tailored database of materials and fluids property data acquired using the Velocity-Attenuation Measurement System (VAMS). This bench-top platform acquires key ultrasonic property measurements as a function of temperature and frequency. This paper describes the technical basis for operation of the VAMS, recent enhancements to the measurement algorithms for both the VAMS and AID technologies, and new measurement data from laboratory testing and performance demonstration activities. Applications for homeland security and counterterrorism, law enforcement, drug-interdiction and fuel transportation compliance activities will be discussed.

  7. Particle velocity gradient based acoustic mode beamforming for short linear vector sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Gur, Berke

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a subtractive beamforming algorithm for short linear arrays of two-dimensional particle velocity sensors is described. The proposed method extracts the highly directional acoustic modes from the spatial gradients of the particle velocity field measured at closely spaced sensors along the array. The number of sensors in the array limits the highest order of modes that can be extracted. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that the acoustic mode beamformer achieves directivity comparable to the maximum directivity that can be obtained with differential microphone arrays of equivalent aperture. When compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamformers for pressure sensor arrays, the proposed method achieves comparable directivity with 70%-85% shorter apertures. Moreover, the proposed method has additional capabilities such as high front-back (port-starboard) discrimination, frequency and steer direction independent response, and robustness to correlated ambient noise. Small inter-sensor spacing that results in very compact apertures makes the proposed beamformer suitable for space constrained applications such as hearing aids and short towed arrays for autonomous underwater platforms. PMID:24907810

  8. Error analysis of the impulse excitation of vibration measurement of acoustic velocities in steel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raggio, Leandro Iglesias; Etcheverry, Javier; Sánchez, Gustavo; Bonadeo, Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge of the acoustic velocities in solid materials is crucial for several nondestructive evaluation techniques such as wall thickness measurement, materials characterization, determination of the location of cracks and inclusions, TOFD, etc. The longitudinal wave velocity is easily measured using ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, while a simple and accurate way to measure the shear wave speed would be a useful addition to the commonly available tools. In this work we use the impulse excitation of vibration, a very well known technique to determine the elastic constants of solid materials from the measurement of the lowest resonant frequencies excited by an impulse, to determine both longitudinal and transversal sound velocities for steel samples. Significant differences were found when comparing the longitudinal wave velocity with the one determined by a standard pulse-echo technique. Part of the difference was tracked back to the use of analytical formulas for the resonant frequencies, and corrected through the use of accurate numerical simulations. In this paper the systematic analysis of the possible error sources is reported.

  9. Shipboard acoustic Doppler profiler velocity observations near Point Conception: Spring 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.; Brink, K. H.

    1987-04-01

    During April 1983, shipboard Doppler acoustic log current profiles were collected in an effort to characterize the flow field near points Conception and Arguello, California. Subsurface velocity maps derived from these profiles have been used to describe spatial flow structures both on and off the shelf and to investigate flow variability as a function of time and of wind stress. Persistent westward flow out of the northern half of the Santa Barbara Channel and eastward flow into its southern half were observed regardless of the direction of the local wind stress. During one well-documented upwelling-favorable wind event, currents responded in the form of an energetic (maximum 21-m speeds of >60 cm s-1) offshore squirt of cold water. During weak or downwelling-favorable winds, currents continuous with the Santa Barbara Channel outflow were observed flowing to the northwest following the local isobaths before turning offshore west of Point Arguello. Evidence for wind forcing of current fluctuations nearshore between the points and north of Point Arguello was found. Lack of a thermal wind balance between directly measured velocity shear and horizontal density gradient was explained by the presence of large accelerations in the momentum equations. Lack of a consistent relation between velocity and temperature gradient illustrates the difficulty in estimating velocity from temperature information alone in this area.

  10. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program was developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions showed significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. The velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation, since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field, as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provided a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  11. Self-adjustment of stream bed roughness and flow velocity in a steep mountain channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Johannes M.; Rickenmann, Dieter; Turowski, Jens M.; Kirchner, James W.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how channel bed morphology affects flow conditions (and vice versa) is important for a wide range of fluvial processes and practical applications. We investigated interactions between bed roughness and flow velocity in a steep, glacier-fed mountain stream (Riedbach, Ct. Valais, Switzerland) with almost flume-like boundary conditions. Bed gradient increases along the 1 km study reach by roughly 1 order of magnitude (S = 3-41%), with a corresponding increase in streambed roughness, while flow discharge and width remain approximately constant due to the glacial runoff regime. Streambed roughness was characterized by semivariograms and standard deviations of point clouds derived from terrestrial laser scanning. Reach-averaged flow velocity was derived from dye tracer breakthrough curves measured by 10 fluorometers installed along the channel. Commonly used flow resistance approaches (Darcy-Weisbach equation and dimensionless hydraulic geometry) were used to relate the measured bulk velocity to bed characteristics. As a roughness measure, D84 yielded comparable results to more laborious measures derived from point clouds. Flow resistance behavior across this large range of steep slopes agreed with patterns established in previous studies for both lower-gradient and steep reaches, regardless of which roughness measures were used. We linked empirical critical shear stress approaches to the variable power equation for flow resistance to investigate the change of bed roughness with channel slope. The predicted increase in D84 with increasing channel slope was in good agreement with field observations.

  12. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  13. Acoustic Emissions, Velocities And Permeability Evolution During Formation Of Compaction Bands In Sandstone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, J.; Stanchits, S.; Dresen, G.; Schubnel, A.; Gueguen, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Compaction bands are zones of localized deformation observed in high porosity rock (Mollema et al. [1996], Klein et al. [2001], Fortin et al. [2003]). These planar bands form perpendicular to the direction of maximum compression. Compaction bands display significantly reduced porosity and are potentially important permeability barriers in reservoir rocks and aquifers. To investigate localized compaction and changes in physical properties of porous sandstone, we performed triaxial tests on Bleurswiller sandstone, (50% quartz 30% feldspars and 20% clay, 25% porosity), on Fontainebleau sandstone (100% quartz, 25% porosity) and on Flechtingen sandstone (65-75% quartz, calcite and illite 15%, porosity 5.5-7%). Experiments were performed under wet conditions at a pore pressure of 10 MPa. Thirteen experiments were performed at the Laboratoire de Geologie (Ecole Normal Superieur Paris) and at GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam. Evolution of volumetric strain, elastic wave velocities and permeability were recorded at confining pressures of 12 and 180 MPa. Acoustic Emission (AE) characteristics during deformation were studied at GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam. To monitor velocity change and microcracking of sandstone, 10 P-wave sensors and 8 polarized S-wave piezoelectric sensors were glued to the cylindrical surface of the samples. To monitor fracture-induced anisotropy, two additional P sensors were installed in axial direction. Fully digitized waveforms were recorded by 10 MHz/16bit Data Acquisition System with an accuracy of AE hypocenters determination of about 2.5 mm. Location of acoustic emission events reveal the evolution of localized compaction bands in sandstone subjected to axial compression. The formation of the bands depends on rock type and effective pressure. Our experiments show a reduction of permeability across compaction bands by about one to two orders of magnitude (Vajdova et al. [2004]; Holcomb et al., [2003]) suggesting that the bands may act as barriers to

  14. Effects of Current Velocity on the Nascent Architecture of Stream Microbial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Battin, Tom J.; Kaplan, Louis A.; Newbold, J. Denis; Cheng, Xianhao; Hansen, Claude

    2003-01-01

    Current velocity affected the architecture and dynamics of natural, multiphyla, and cross-trophic level biofilms from a forested piedmont stream. We monitored the development and activity of biofilms in streamside flumes operated under two flow regimes (slow [0.065 m s−1] and fast [0.23 m s−1]) by combined confocal laser scanning microscopy with cryosectioning to observe biofilm structure and composition. Biofilm growth started as bacterial microcolonies embedded in extracellular polymeric substances and transformed into ripple-like structures and ultimately conspicuous quasihexagonal networks. These structures were particularly pronounced in biofilms grown under slow current velocities and were characterized by the prominence of pennate diatoms oriented along their long axes to form the hexagons. Microstructural heterogeneity was dynamic, and biofilms that developed under slower velocities were thicker and had larger surface sinuosity and higher areal densities than their counterparts exposed to higher velocities. Surface sinuosity and biofilm fragmentation increased with thickness, and these changes likely reduced resistance to the mass transfer of solutes from the water column into the biofilms. Nevertheless, estimates of dissolved organic carbon uptake and microbial growth suggested that internal cycling of carbon was more important in thick biofilms grown in slow flow conditions. High-pressure liquid chromatography-pulsed amperometric detection analyses of exopolysaccharides documented a temporal shift in monosaccharide composition as the glucose levels decreased and the levels of rhamnose, galactose, mannose, xylose, and arabinose increased. We attribute this change in chemical composition to the accumulation of diatoms and increased incorporation of detrital particles in mature biofilms. PMID:12957933

  15. Drag characteristics of circular cylinders in a laminar boundary layer at supersonic free-stream velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.; Lamb, M.; Howell, D. T.

    1973-01-01

    Drag measurements were obtained with circular cylinders attached to a flat-plate surface with their longitudinal axes perpendicular to the plate surface. When more than one cylinder was tested, they were alined in a spanwise row perpendicular to the free-stream velocity vector. The drag measurements were obtained through a range of Mach numbers from 2.3 to 4.6, cylinder heights ranging from approximately 0.4 to 3 times the undisturbed laminar boundary-layer thickness, and cylinder height-to-diameter ratios of 1.0 and approximately 2. Included in the paper is a complete presentation in figure form of the experimental results and a discussion of the more significant findings. An attempt is made to select the most appropriate parameters for correlating the experimental results and, where possible, these results are compared with theoretical calculations.

  16. Acoustic communication in two freshwater gobies: ambient noise and short-range propagation in shallow streams.

    PubMed

    Lugli, M; Fine, M L

    2003-07-01

    Noise is an important theoretical constraint on the evolution of signal form and sensory performance. In order to determine environmental constraints on the communication of two freshwater gobies Padogobius martensii and Gobius nigricans, numerous noise spectra were measured from quiet areas and ones adjacent to waterfalls and rapids in two shallow stony streams. Propagation of goby sounds and waterfall noise was also measured. A quiet window around 100 Hz is present in many noise spectra from noisy locations. The window lies between two noise sources, a low-frequency one attributed to turbulence, and a high-frequency one (200-500 Hz) attributed to bubble noise from water breaking the surface. Ambient noise from a waterfall (frequencies below 1 kHz) attenuates as much as 30 dB between 1 and 2 m, after which values are variable without further attenuation (i.e., buried in the noise floor). Similarly, courtship sounds of P. martensii attenuate as much as 30 dB between 5 and 50 cm. Since gobies are known to court in noisy as well as quiet locations in these streams, their acoustic communication system (sounds and auditory system) must be able to cope with short-range propagation dictated by shallow depths and ambient noise in noisy locations. PMID:12880062

  17. Surface acoustic wave velocity of gold films deposited on silicon substrates at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, E.; Jimenez Rioboo, R. J.; Prieto, C.; Every, A. G.

    2011-07-15

    Au thin films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on Si (001) substrates at different substrate temperatures, ranging from 200 K to 450 K. With increasing temperature, the expected crystallinity and morphology of the Au thin film are clearly improved, as shown by x ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy experiments. Parallel to this, the surface acoustic wave propagation velocity shows a clear enhancement toward the ideal values obtained from numerical simulations of a Au thin film on Si (001) substrate. Moreover, a very thin and slightly rough interlayer between the Si (001) substrate and the Au thin film is developed for temperatures above 350 K. The composition and nature of this interlayer is not known. This interlayer may be responsible for the steep change in the structural and elastic properties of the Au thin films at the higher temperatures and possibly also for an improvement of the adhesion properties of the Au on the Si (001) substrate.

  18. Optical multi-point measurements of the acoustic particle velocity with frequency modulated Doppler global velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; König, Jörg; Haufe, Daniel; Schlüssler, Raimund; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    To reduce the noise of machines such as aircraft engines, the development and propagation of sound has to be investigated. Since the applicability of microphones is limited due to their intrusiveness, contactless measurement techniques are required. For this reason, the present study describes an optical method based on the Doppler effect and its application for acoustic particle velocity (APV) measurements. While former APV measurements with Doppler techniques are point measurements, the applied system is capable of simultaneous measurements at multiple points. In its current state, the system provides linear array measurements of one component of the APV demonstrated by multi-tone experiments with tones up to 17 kHz for the first time. PMID:23927110

  19. Linking water surface roughness to velocity patterns using terrestrial laser scanning and acoustic doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heritage, George; Milan, David; Entwistle, Neil

    2010-05-01

    There are well established links between water surface characteristics and hydraulics. Biotope identification is currently an important part of the River Habitat Survey in England and Wales. Their differentiation is based upon recognition of a family of flow features exhibited on the water surface. Variability in this water surface ‘roughness' is dependent upon the interaction of flow with boundary roughness and flow depth. Past research that has attempted to differentiate biotopes based upon differences in Froude number (Fr) and Reynolds number (Re), however this linkage has only been limited to local analysis between flow velocity, depth and roughness. Milan et al. (2010) have recently demonstrated that terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can be applied to produce fully quantitative maps of hydraulic habitat, based upon defined water surface roughness delimeters. However the nature of the linkages between water surface roughness, flow velocity and depth are still poorly understood, particularly at the reach-scale. This study attempts to provide a full spatial picture of the links between water surface roughness, flow depth and velocity. A Sontek Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP) was used to provide detailed information on vertical velocity and water depth for a 300 m reach of the gravel-bed River Wharfe, Yorkshire, UK. Simultaneous to the ADVP measurements, a Riegl LMS-Z210 TLS was used to take a series of first return scans of the water surface. Categorisation of the point cloud elevation data for the water surface was achieved through the allocation of moving window standard deviation values to a regular grid, thus defining water surface roughness. The ADVP data demonstrate gross reach-scale variation in velocity and depth linked to bedforms, and more localised spatial and temporal variation within biotope units. The ADVP data was used to produce reach-scale maps of Fr and Re. The extent to which water surface roughness defined biotopes mapped onto these

  20. Use of acoustic velocity methodology and remote sensing techniques to measure unsteady flow on the lower Yazoo River in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cooper, Lance M.; Davis, Angela A.

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for computing continuous discharge during varied, non-uniform low and medium flows on the Yazoo River at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, using acoustic signal processing and conventional streamgaging techniques. Procedures were also developed to compute locations of discharges during future high flow events when the stream reach is subject to hi-directional and reverse flow caused by rising stages on the Mississippi River using a combination of acoustic equipment and remote sensing technology. A description of the study area is presented. Selected results of these methods are presented for the period from March through September 1997.

  1. Stream velocity and dispersion characteristics determined by dye-tracer studies on selected stream reaches in the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Karl K.

    1995-01-01

    Dye-tracer analyses were done in the Willamette River and nine tributaries of the Willamette River, from April 1992 to July 1993 during low to medium stream discharge conditions, to determine velocity and dispersion. These dye-tracer analyses provided information on time of arrival, peak concentration, and the occurrence and longevity of a constituent dissolved in streamflow at various discharges. The time of travel of the peak and leading and trailing edge of the dye cloud were determined for each stream segment and were related to discharge at an index location in each stream. On the basis of the dye-tracer measurements, an equation was developed to estimate the velocity of the peak of a solute cloud for unmeasured streams. The results of the dyetracer study on the Willamette River from river mile 161.2 to river mile 138.3 were compared with a previous study of the same river reach. The results of the comparison indicate that, since 1968, the discharge velocity relation has not changed in the streamflow range observed in this study. In order to identify dyedispersion characteristics of a conservative solute in each stream segment, a relation was developed between the elapsed time from injection to the unit-peak concentration of dye measured at each sampling location. A general equation was developed to estimate the peak concentration of dye at a given elapsed time. Channel characteristics and streamflow magnitude are known to effect dye dispersion; however, comparison of streams with apparently similar characteristics resulted in different unit-peak concentration values at various times after dye injection.

  2. Slow Climate Velocities in Mountain Streams Impart Thermal Resistance to Cold-Water Refugia Across the West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, D.; Young, M.; Luce, C.; Hostetler, S.; Wenger, S. J.; Peterson, E.; Ver Hoef, J.

    2015-12-01

    Mountain streams provide important headwater refugia for native fish, amphibians, and other cold-water fauna globally. Although the well documented existence of such refugia indicates some level of resistance to ongoing environmental change, stream warming associated with climate change raises questions about their future persistence. Moreover, evidence exists that air temperatures are warming faster at higher elevations, and some stream temperature models predict that cold streams associated with snowmelt hydrologies will be most sensitive to air temperature increases (i.e. high ratio of stream Δ˚C:air Δ˚C). Here, we estimate stream sensitivities to climate forcing using long-term monitoring records from 927 sites across the topographically complex northwestern U.S. Sensitivity values are combined with high-resolution NorWeST stream temperature scenarios (website: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/boise/AWAE/projects/NorWeST.html) to map climate velocities at 1 kilometer resolution throughout the 450,000 stream kilometers in the regional network. Our results suggest that cold mountain streams are often 'double buffered' against the thermal effects of climate change due to low sensitivities (0.3ºC/ºC) and steep gradients, which translated to very slow climate velocities (<0.35 km/decade for streams >3% slope) from 1968-2011 when air temperatures warmed at the rate of 0.2ºC/decade. Alternative scenarios based on aggressive air temperature warming rates (2x historical rates) and higher sensitivity values of cold streams suggests velocities will remain low in mountain streams due to the dominant effects of steep channel slope and strong local temperature gradients. These results reinforce earlier predictions from high-resolution species distribution models that show which watersheds are most likely to host resilient native trout populations across the West later this century (Climate Shield project website: http://www.fs

  3. Sound velocity of iron up to 152 GPa by picosecond acoustics in diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decremps, F.; Antonangeli, D.; Gauthier, M.; Ayrinhac, S.; Morand, M.; Marchand, G. Le; Bergame, F.; Philippe, J.

    2014-03-01

    High-pressure method combining diamond anvil cell with picosecond ultrasonics technique is demonstrated to be a very suitable tool to measure the acoustic properties of iron up to 152 GPa. Such innovative approach allows to measure directly the longitudinal sound velocity under pressure of hundreds of GPa in laboratory, overcoming most of the drawbacks of traditional techniques. The very high accuracy, comparable to piezoacoustics technique, allows to observe the kink in elastic properties at the body-centered cubic-hexagonal close packed transition and to show with a good confidence that the Birch's law still stands up to 1.5 Mbar and ambient temperature. The linear extrapolation of the measured sound velocities versus densities of hcp iron is out of the preliminary reference Earth model, arguing for alloying effects or anharmonic high-temperature effects. A comparison between our measurements and shock wave experiments allowed us to quantify temperature corrections at constant pressure in ~-0.35 and ~-0.30 m s-1/K at 100 and 150 GPa, respectively. More in general, the here-presented technique allows detailed elastic and viscoelastic studies under extreme thermodynamic conditions on a wide variety of systems as liquids, crystalline, or polycrystalline solids, metallic or not, with very broad applications in Earth and planetary science.

  4. Calculation of reciprocal velocity curves of intrinsic surface acoustic wave in quartz crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yu, Kuanxin

    2010-10-01

    Quartz crystal has excellent piezoelectric properties, it can be used as substrates of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, for example delay line, filter, oscillator, convolver, acousto-optic (AO) device and so on. In this paper, Intrinsic SAW basic equation group and SAW mechanical boundary condition equation group are deduced from character equation of the crystal. Intrinsic SAW velocities are calculated using circle iterative method in three coordinate planes of quartz crystal systematically. Stiffness coefficient of piezoelectric crystal can be changed by piezoelectric effect and it is named as piezoelectric modified stiffness coefficient. Reciprocal velocity curves of quartz crystal in the three coordinate planes using the non-modified stiffness coefficients and the piezoelectric modified stiffness coefficients are drawn respectively. Configurations and periods of the curves are similar to projection figures of crystal lattice of the triangle crystal system in same coordinate planes. It means that there is internal relationship between the SAW properties and point group symmetries of the crystal. Research results lay a solid base for design and manufacture of the SAW device. It has theoretical significance and practical value.

  5. An experimental study of the structure and acoustic field of a jet in a cross stream. [Ames 7-ft by 10-ft wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camelier, I.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The plane of symmetry of a high speed circular jet was surveyed to measure the mean and turbulent velocity fields by using constant temperature hot wire anemometry. The intensity of the noise radiated from the jet was determined in the tunnel test section by utilizing the cross-correlation at a particular time delay between the signals of two microphones suitably located along a given direction. Experimental results indicate that the turbulent intensity inside the crossflow jet increases by a factor of (1 + 1/2) as compared to the turbulent intensity of the same jet under free conditions, with r indicating the ratio of the jet velocity by the cross stream velocity. The peak observed in the turbulence spectra obtained inside the potential core of the jet has a frequency that increases by the same factor with respect to the corresponding frequency measured in the case of the free jet. The noise radiated by the jet becomes more intense as the crossflow velocity increases. The measured acoustic intensity of the crossflow jet is higher than the value which would be expected from the increase of the turbulent intensity only.

  6. Non-ideal Effects in Streaming Bi-Dust Acoustic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Puerta, J.; Castro, E.; Martin, P.; Arias, H.

    2006-12-04

    Streaming dust acoustic instabilities in the presence of a dust beam in a weakly non-ideal dusty plasma have been studied considering a new form for the state equation with two kind of grains. Fluctuating charging effects are not considered in this work. Homogeneous dust-acoustic waves (DAWS) are studied for a perturbed plasma in a very low frequency regime, where dusty plasmas support new kind of waves and instabilities due to the dust collective dynamics. In this analysis a fluid model is used and electrons and ions are determined by their Boltzmann factors in order to find an adequate dispersion relation, which has several parameters depending of the state equation constants. In this paper we use the state equation structured by Ree and Hoover using Pade approximant for a hard-sphere gas in the form P = nT 1 + nb{sub 0} (1 + a{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + a{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}/1 - b{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + b{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}) is applied, where b0 is calculated by the second virial term for the hard-core model. This type of equation is more accurate than other expressions and easier to manipulate. Comparisons between the ideal and non ideal cases is performed. Constants a1, a2, b1, b2, are calculated with the Pade method. The onset of the instability and also the growth rates are studied in function of relevant parameters of the system as the radius of the grains and their densities. In our analysis the instability region for non ideal plasma is compared with that of the ideal ones.

  7. Reliability of Phase Velocity Measurements of Flexural Acoustic Waves in the Human Tibia In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Axial-transmission acoustics have shown to be a promising technique to measure individual bone properties and detect bone pathologies. With the ultimate goal being the in-vivo application of such systems, quantification of the key aspects governing the reliability is crucial to bring this method towards clinical use. Materials and Methods This work presents a systematic reliability study quantifying the sources of variability and their magnitudes of in-vivo measurements using axial-transmission acoustics. 42 healthy subjects were measured by an experienced operator twice per week, over a four-month period, resulting in over 150000 wave measurements. In a complementary study to assess the influence of different operators performing the measurements, 10 novice operators were trained, and each measured 5 subjects on a single occasion, using the same measurement protocol as in the first part of the study. Results The estimated standard error for the measurement protocol used to collect the study data was ∼ 17 m/s (∼ 4% of the grand mean) and the index of dependability, as a measure of reliability, was Φ = 0.81. It was shown that the method is suitable for multi-operator use and that the reliability can be improved efficiently by additional measurements with device repositioning, while additional measurements without repositioning cannot improve the reliability substantially. Phase velocity values were found to be significantly higher in males than in females (p < 10−5) and an intra-class correlation coefficient of r = 0.70 was found between the legs of each subject. Conclusions The high reliability of this non-invasive approach and its intrinsic sensitivity to mechanical properties opens perspectives for the rapid and inexpensive clinical assessment of bone pathologies, as well as for monitoring programmes without any radiation exposure for the patient. PMID:27015093

  8. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. PMID:25465962

  9. Imaging the position-dependent 3D force on microbeads subjected to acoustic radiation forces and streaming.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Baasch, Thierry; Schaap, Iwan A T; Dual, Jurg

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation in microfluidic channels is becoming a powerful tool in microfluidics to control micrometer sized objects in medical, chemical and biological applications. By creating a standing acoustic wave in the channel, the resulting pressure field can be employed to trap or sort particles. To design efficient and reproducible devices, it is important to characterize the pressure field throughout the volume of the microfluidic device. Here, we used an optically trapped particle as probe to measure the forces in all three dimensions. By moving the probe through the volume of the channel, we imaged spatial variations in the pressure field. In the direction of the standing wave this revealed a periodic energy landscape for 2 μm beads, resulting in an effective stiffness of 2.6 nN m(-1) for the acoustic trap. We found that multiple fabricated devices showed consistent pressure fields. Surprisingly, forces perpendicular to the direction of the standing wave reached values of up to 20% of the main-axis-values. To separate the direct acoustic force from secondary effects, we performed experiments with different bead sizes, which attributed some of the perpendicular forces to acoustic streaming. This method to image acoustically generated forces in 3D can be used to either minimize perpendicular forces or to employ them for specific applications in novel acoustofluidic designs. PMID:27302661

  10. Influence of acoustic streaming on ultrasonic particle manipulation in a 100-well ring-transducer microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlin, Mathias; Christakou, Athanasia E.; Frisk, Thomas; Önfelt, Björn; Wiklund, Martin

    2013-03-01

    We characterize and quantify the performance of ultrasonic particle aggregation and positioning in a 100-well microplate. We analyze the result when operating a planar ultrasonic ring transducer at different single actuation frequencies in the range 2.20-2.40 MHz, and compare with the result obtained from different schemes of frequency-modulated actuation. Compared to our previously used wedge transducer design, the ring transducer has a larger contact area facing the microplate, resulting in lower temperature increase for a given actuation voltage. Furthermore, we analyze the dynamics of acoustic streaming occurring simultaneously with the particle trapping in the wells of the microplate, and we define an adaptive ultrasonic actuation scheme for optimizing both efficiency and robustness of the method. The device is designed as a tool for ultrasound-mediated cell aggregation and positioning. This is a method for high-resolution optical characterization of time-dependent cellular processes at the level of single cells. In this paper, we demonstrate how to operate our device in order to optimize the scanning time of 3D confocal microscopy with the aim to perform high-resolution time-lapse imaging of cells or cell-cell interactions in a highly parallel manner.

  11. Stability analysis of confined V-shaped flames in high-velocity streams.

    PubMed

    El-Rabii, Hazem; Joulin, Guy; Kazakov, Kirill A

    2010-06-01

    The problem of linear stability of confined V-shaped flames with arbitrary gas expansion is addressed. Using the on-shell description of flame dynamics, a general equation governing propagation of disturbances of an anchored flame is obtained. This equation is solved analytically for V-flames anchored in high-velocity channel streams. It is demonstrated that dynamics of the flame disturbances in this case is controlled by the memory effects associated with vorticity generated by the perturbed flame. The perturbation growth rate spectrum is determined, and explicit analytical expressions for the eigenfunctions are given. It is found that the piecewise linear V structure is unstable for all values of the gas expansion coefficient. Despite the linearity of the basic pattern, however, evolutions of the V-flame disturbances are completely different from those found for freely propagating planar flames or open anchored flames. The obtained results reveal strong influence of the basic flow and the channel walls on the stability properties of confined V-flames. PMID:20866527

  12. Anisotropy in Experimentally Compressed Kaolinite-Illite-Quartz Aggregates: Microstructure, Preferred Orientation and Acoustic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voltolini, M.; Wenk, H.; Mondol, N. H.; Bjørlykke, K.; Jahren, J.

    2007-12-01

    Shales and mudstones composed of clay minerals and quartz are important sedimentary rocks that frequently display anisotropy of physical properties. This study investigates anisotropy in experimentally compressed kaolinite-illite-quartz aggregates by determining preferred orientation (texture) of component phases and comparing results with acoustic anisotropy. Sample were prepared compressing clay (81% kaolinite, 14% illite and 4% K-feldspar)-silt (~99% quartz) mixtures (0 to 100% clay) at 5 and 50 MPa vertical effective stress to explore the role of clay content and compaction stress on the elastic properties. Optical and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize microstructures. Texture patterns are quantified based on synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns analyzed with the Rietveld method. Preferred orientation of quartz is more or less random. Clay minerals are strongly oriented. Pole figures display axisymmetric (001) maxima parallel to the compression direction, ranging in strength from 1.6 to 8 multiples of a random distribution. Texture strength strongly increases with compaction pressure and clay content. Both microstructure and preferred orientation are essential contributions to aggregate elastic properties that have been calculated by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distributions. Calculated P-wave velocity anisotropies range from 0% (100% quartz) to 44% (100% clay, 50 MPa). Anisotropy roughly doubles by increasing the vertical effective stress from 5 to 50 MPa. In experiments only P- and S-wave velocities parallel to the compression direction were measured and values (2-3 km/s) are much lower than those predicted by single crystal averaging (5-7 km/s) which we attribute mainly to the influence of porosity that was not considered in the model. With these experimental compaction data we are currently refining a model to determine macroscopic properties of mudstones and shales based on detailed information of

  13. Repeatability of Surface Wave Velocity Estimates from Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, N.; Wagner, A. M.; Dou, S.; Martin, E. R.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Daley, T. M.; Robertson, M.; Freifeld, B. M.; Bjella, K.; Ulrich, C.

    2015-12-01

    The repeatability of surface wave velocity estimates from local ambient noise hinges on the stability of the crosscorrelation function for the receiver pair in the presence of a variable noise field, assuming near-surface soil properties are invariant over the duration of the surveys. Distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) data recorded on a linear trenched fiber optic cable sensor can accurately sample surface waves in a near continuous fashion (>1 kHz) with high spatial resolution (>1 receiver/m) and long range (10's of km). DAS recordings of ambient noise represent a unique means to explore the practical reliability of field-scale seismic property estimation from seismic interferometry. We test this hypothesis using continuous DAS field recordings from a shallow trench experiment near a busy road with diurnally-variable traffic patterns. Continuous records are processed using a modified ambient noise workflow consisting of receiver pair crosscorrelation, signal stacking, dispersion analysis, and a Monte Carlo search procedure to determine a best-fitting Vs model. The same processing flow is also applied to campaign data acquired with geophones to determine the repeatability benefit of trenched DAS deployment.

  14. Loss reduction of leaky surface acoustic wave by loading with high-velocity thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakio, Shoji; Hosaka, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    The propagation properties of a leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) on rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (YX-LN) substrates loaded with an aluminum nitride (AlN) thin film with a higher phase velocity than that of the substrate were investigated theoretically and experimentally. From the theoretical calculation, it was found that the minimum attenuation can be obtained at a certain thickness of the AlN thin film for a cut angle ranging from 0 to 60° because the cut angle giving the minimum attenuation shifts toward a smaller cut angle as the film thickness is increased. The propagation properties of an LSAW on several rotated YX-LN substrates were measured by using an interdigital transducer (IDT) pair with a wavelength λ of 8 µm, and the predicted shifts of the minimum attenuation toward a smaller cut angle were demonstrated experimentally. For 0° and 10°YX-LN samples, the measured insertion loss and propagation loss were markedly reduced by loading with the AlN thin film. A larger electromechanical coupling factor (16.9%) than that at the cut angle giving zero attenuation without a film and a propagation loss less of 0.02 dB/λ were obtained simultaneously at a film thickness of 0.125 λ for the 10°YX-LN sample.

  15. Density-velocity equations with bulk modulus for computational hydro-acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Po-Hsien; Chen, Yung-Yu; John Yu, S.-T.

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports a new set of model equations for Computational Hydro Acoustics (CHA). The governing equations include the continuity and the momentum equations. The definition of bulk modulus is used to relate density with pressure. For 3D flow fields, there are four equations with density and velocity components as the unknowns. The inviscid equations are proved to be hyperbolic because an arbitrary linear combination of the three Jacobian matrices is diagonalizable and has a real spectrum. The left and right eigenvector matrices are explicitly derived. Moreover, an analytical form of the Riemann invariants are derived. The model equations are indeed suitable for modeling wave propagation in low-speed, nearly incompressible air and water flows. To demonstrate the capability of the new formulation, we use the CESE method to solve the 2D equations for aeolian tones generated by air flows passing a circular cylinder at Re = 89,000, 46,000, and 22,000. Numerical results compare well with previously published data. By simply changing the value of the bulk modulus, the same code is then used to calculate three cases of water flows passing a cylinder at Re = 89,000, 67,000, and 44,000.

  16. Acoustic emission monitoring of low velocity impact damage in graphite/epoxy laminates during tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) system was set up in a linear location data acquisition mode to monitor the tensile loading of eight-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy specimens containing low velocity impact damage. The impact damage was induced using an instrumented drop weight tower. During impact, specimens were supported by either an aluminum plate or a membrane configuration. Cross-sectional examinations revealed that the aluminum plate configuration resulted in primarily matrix cracking and back surface fiber failure. The membrane support resulted in only matrix cracking and delamination damage. Penetrant enhanced radiography and immersion ultrasonics were used in order to assess the amount of impact damage in each tensile specimen. During tensile loading, AE reliably detected and located the damage sites which included fiber failure. All specimens with areas of fiber breakage ultimately failed at the impact site. AE did not reliably locate damage which consisted of only delaminations and matrix cracking. Specimens with this type of damage did not ultimately fail at the impact site. In summary, AE demonstrated the ability to increase the reliability of structural proof tests; however, the successful use of this technique requires extensive baseline testing.

  17. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R.; Miller, James G.

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (cg) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (α') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (cp) and attenuation coefficient (α) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for cg and α' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  18. Elastic wave velocity and acoustic emission monitoring during Gypsum dehydration under triaxial stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; David, E. C.; Héripré, E.; Schubnel, A. J.; Zimmerman, R. W.; Gueguen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Dehydration experiments were performed on natural Gypsum polycrystal samples coming from Volterra, Italy in order to study contemporaneously the evolution of P and S elastic wave velocities and acoustic emission (AE) triggering. During these experiments, temperature was slowly raised at 0.15 degrees C per minute under constant stress conditions. Two experiments were realized under quasi-hydrostatic stress (15 and 55 MPa respectively). The third experiment was realized under constant triaxial stress (σ3=45MPa, σ1=75MPa). All three were drained (10MPa constant pore pressure). In each experiments, both P and S wave velocities reduced drastically (as much as approx. 50% in the low confining pressure case) at the onset of dehydration. Importantly, the Vp/Vs ratio also decreased. Shortly after the onset of decrease in P and S wave velocities, the dehydration reaction was also accompanied by bursts of AEs. Time serie locations of the AEs show that they initiated from the pore pressure port, ie from where the pore fluid could easily be drained, and then slowly migrated within the sample. In each experiments, the AE rate could be positively correlated to the reaction rate, inferred from pore volumetry. In such a way, the AE rate reached a peak when the reaction was the fastest. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed they had a large volumetric component in compaction, confirming that AEs were indeed related to pore closure and/or collapse. In addition, the AE rate also increased with confinement, ie when a larger amount of compaction was observed. Interestingly, when under differential stress conditions, AE focal mechanisms were mainly in shear. Additional dehydration experiments performed within an environmental scanning electron microscope under low vacuum highlight that, in drained conditions at least, the reaction seems to take place in two phases. First, cracks are being opened along cleavage planes within a single gypsum crystal, which allows for the

  19. Measurement of surface acoustic wave velocity using phase shift mask and application on thin film of thermoelectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyao; Zhao, Peng; Gunning, Noel; Johnson, David; Zhao, Ji-Cheng; Cahill, David

    2014-03-01

    We describe a convenient approach for measuring the velocity vSAW of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) of the near-surface layer of a material through optical pump-probe measurements and apply this method, in combination with conventional picosecond acoustics, to determine a subset of the elastic constants of thin films of semiconducting misfit layered compounds. SAWs with a wavelength of 700 nm are generated and detected using an elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phase-shift mask which is fabricated using a commercially-available Si grating as a mold. The velocity of SAWs of [(SnSe)1.04]m[MoSe2]n synthesized by elemental reactants show subtle variations in their elastic constants as a function of m and n. Precise measurements of elastic constants will enable a better understanding of interfacial stiffness in nanoscale multilayers and the effects of phonon focusing on thermal conductivity.

  20. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program has been developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions show significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. In addition, as shown in the paper, the velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provides a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  1. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  2. An acoustic velocity measurement system for aiding barge traffic in the Colorado River locks near Matagorda, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, J.W.; Scheffler, C.

    2004-01-01

    In July 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey installed an acoustic Doppler velocity meter in the Colorado River, near the city of Matagorda in southeast Texas. The meter is part of an integrated system used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to control barge traffic that passes through a lock system located at the confluence of the Colorado River and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. The meter was installed on the river bottom as part of a system developed and used by the National Weather Service. The upward-looking meter measures the average velocity in the top 3 meters (10 feet) of the water column. These river-velocity data are used in conjunction with additional velocity and water-stage data, from proximal sites, by the barge operators to assess conditions at the Colorado River crossing and for lock operations. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  3. On the Role of Hyporheic Exchange and Stream Flow Velocity in Driving Diurnal Fluctuations in Discharge During Baseflow Recession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wondzell, S. M.; Gooseff, M. N.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2005-12-01

    Diurnal fluctuations in stream flow during baseflow discharge have been observed in many streams and is typically attributed to water losses from evapo-transpiration. However, there is no widely transferable conceptual model describing the response of hillslopes, riparian zones, and streams, and their interactions, that explains these diurnal variations in streamflow. Bond et al. (2002) proposed a conceptual model suggesting that diurnal streamflow variation during baseflow is, in part, due to groundwater-surface water interactions within the riparian corridor of a 2nd-order stream in central Oregon. Their conceptual model is based on two critical observations: 1) that the amplitude in the diurnal fluctuations decreases with baseflow recession, and 2) that the time lag between maximum evapo-transpirational demand and minimum stream discharge increases with baseflow recession. We test Bond et al.'s (2002) conceptual model with data collected over the summer of 2004 from a previously-established network of piezometers and wells located at the site used by Bond et al. (2002) and with data from previous stream tracer experiments within the same reach. Our data do not support Bond et al.'s conceptual model. In fact, there is no evidence that evapo-transpirational drawdown of riparian aquifers generates diurnal fluctuations in stream discharge despite clear connections via hyporheic exchange flows. Our results do not shed light on questions about the location and physical mechanisms that generate diurnal fluctuations in discharge. Our results do suggest, however, that decreases in stream flow velocity with baseflow recession are important in influencing the amplitude and time lag of the observed diurnal fluctuations and that the hyporheic zone could act as a reservoir to dampen fluctuations in discharge generated higher in the watershed.

  4. Estimation of Shear Wave Velocity in Seafloor Sediment by Seismo-Acoustic Interface Waves:. a Case Study for Geotechnical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hefeng; Hovem, Jens M.; Frivik, Svein Arne

    2006-10-01

    Estimates of shear wave velocity profiles in seafloor sediments can be obtained from inversion of measured dispersion relations of seismo-acoustic interface waves propagating along the seabed. The interface wave velocity is directly related to shear wave velocity with value of between 87-96% of the shear wave velocity, dependent on the Poission ratio of the sediments. In this paper we present two different techniques to determine the dispersion relation: a single-sensor method used to determine group velocity and a multi-sensor method used to determine the phase velocity of the interface wave. An inversion technique is used to determine shear wave velocity versus depth and it is based on singular value decomposition and regularization theory. The technique is applied to data acquired at Steinbåen outside Horten in the Oslofjorden (Norway) and compared with the result from independent core measurements taken at the same location. The results show good agreement between the two ways of determining shear wave velocity.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data, Acquired from 12 and 16 Bit Streaming Systems during Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H.; Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative analysis of continuous acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during a triaxial compression test, using a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system, is presented. A cylindrical sample (diameter 50.1 mm and length 125 mm) of Berea sandstone was triaxally deformed at a confining pressure of 15 MPa and a strain rate of 1.6E-06 s-1. The sample was loaded differentially until failure occurred at approximately σ1 = 160 MPa. AE activity was monitored for the duration of the experiment by an array of 8 broadband piezoelectric transducers coupled to the rock sample. Raw signals were amplified by 40 dB using pre-amplifiers equipped with filter modules with a frequency passband of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The amplifiers had a split output enabling the measured signal to be fed into a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system. AE waveforms were continuously recorded at 10 MS/s on 8 data acquisition channels per system. Approximately 4,500 events were harvested and source located from the continuous data for each system. P-wave arrivals were automatically picked and event locations calculated using the downhill Simplex method and a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model based on periodical surveys across the sample. Events detected on the 12-bit and 16-bit systems were compared both in terms of their P-wave picks and their source locations. In the early stages of AE activity, there appeared to be little difference between P-wave picks and hypocenter locations from both data sets. As the experiment progressed into the post-peak stress regime, which was accompanied by an increase in AE rate and amplitude, fewer events could be harvested from the 12-bit data compared to the 16-bit data. This is linked to the observation of a higher signal-to-noise ratio on AE waveforms harvested from the 16-bit stream compared to those from the 12-bit stream, which results in an easier identification of P-wave onsets. Similarly a higher confidence in source location is expected. Analysis

  6. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Survey of Flow Velocities in Detroit River, a Connecting Channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to survey flow velocities in Detroit River from July 8-19, 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. More than 3.5 million point velocities were measured at 130 cross sections. Cross sections were generally spaced about 1,800 ft apart along the river from the head of Detroit River at the outlet of Lake St. Clair to the mouth of Detroit River on Lake Erie. Two transects were surveyed at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were generally obtained 0.8-2.2 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved though the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  7. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in St. Clair River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure flow velocities in St. Clair River during a survey in May and June of 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. The survey provides 2.7 million point velocity measurements at 104 cross sections. Sections are spaced about 1,630 ft apart along the river from Port Huron to Algonac, Michigan, a distance of 28.6 miles. Two transects were obtained at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were obtained 2-4 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved through the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  8. Transitional boundary layer flow and heat transfer over blocked surfaces with influence of free stream velocity and block height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yemenici, O.; Firatoglu, Z. A.

    2013-11-01

    Velocity, turbulent intensity, static pressure and temperature measurements over the flat plate and blocked surfaces were investigated in a low speed wind tunnel in the presence of free stream velocity and block height. The experiments were carried out for free stream velocities of 5, 7 and 10 m/s encompassing the transitional region and for block heights of 10, 15 and 20 mm forming the different flow samples. A constant-temperature anemometer, a micro-manometer and copper-constant thermocouples were used for measurements of velocity and turbulent intensity, static pressure and temperature, respectively. The results showed that the flow separations and reattachments occurred on the blocked surfaces which enhanced the average heat transfer up to 1.54, 1.71 and 1.84 fold of the flat plate value at 5 m/s for the rising block height, 1.49, 1.68 and 1.80 at 7 m/s, and 1.44, 1.63 and 1.78 at 10 m/s, respectively.

  9. Large-scale Observations of a Subauroral Polarization Stream by Midlatitude SuperDARN Radars: Instantaneous Longitudinal Velocity Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Baker, J. B. H.; Sazykin, S.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Thomas, E. J.; Shepherd, S. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Bristow, W. A.; Zheng, Y.; Coster, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present simultaneous measurements of flow velocities inside a subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) made by six midlatitude high-frequency SuperDARN radars. The instantaneous observations cover three hours of universal time and six hours of magnetic local time (MLT). From velocity variations across the field-of-view of the radars we infer the local 2D flow direction at three different longitudes. We find that the local flow direction inside the SAPS channel is remarkably constant over the course of the event. The flow speed, however, shows significant temporal and spatial variations. After correcting for the radar look direction we are able to accurately determine the dependence of the SAPS velocity on magnetic local time. We find that the SAPS velocity variation with magnetic local time is best described by an exponential function. The average velocity at 00 MLT was 1.2 km/s and it decreased with a spatial e-folding scale of two hours of MLT toward the dawn sector. We speculate that the longitudinal distribution of pressure gradients in the ring current is responsible for this dependence and find these observations in good agreement with results from ring current models. Using TEC measurements we find that the high westward velocities of the SAPS are - as expected - located in a region of low TEC values, indicating low ionospheric conductivities.

  10. Improved method for calculating transonic velocities on blade-to-blade stream surfaces of a turbomachine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A method was developed to improve the accuracy of an existing computer program used to calculate transonic velocities on a blade-to-blade surface of a turbomachine. The method eliminates problems encountered in obtaining solutions with the velocity gradient equation when large gradients in velocity occur through the blade row. With the improved method, results indicate that the transonic solution can be obtained by scaling the velocities obtained at the reduced mass flow rate where all velocities are subsonic thereby eliminating the need for a solution of the velocity gradient equation. Solutions obtained with the scaling method on a two dimensional compressor cascade and an axial turbine stator show good agreement with experimental data. The results obtained for the stationary blade rows and comparison of analytical results obtained with and without the present method suggest that the method will yield an improved solution for centrifugal compressor impellers.

  11. Combustion Oscillations in a Twin-Stream Afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macquisten, M. A.

    1995-12-01

    In a modern turbo-fan engine, the afterburner flame-holders are positioned in the mixing flow between the core and bypass streams. These two streams have different velocities and temperatures. They also have different duct lengths and, therefore, different acoustic properties. The influence of such a twin-stream supply on acoustically coupled combustion oscillations is investigated in this paper. Measurements on an experimental rig show how differences in the acoustic impedances, the mean velocities and the mean temperatures in the two supply streams lead to appreciably different unsteady heat release rates in the two streams. These affect the frequency of the combustion oscillations. A theory explains these results and correctly describes the variation in frequency as the properties of the two supply streams are varied.

  12. Accretion in young stars: measure of the stream velocity of TW Hya from the X-ray Doppler shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, Costanza; Bonito, Rosaria; Orlando, Salvatore; Miceli, Marco; Peres, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra are a unique tool to investigate the accretion process in young stars. In fact X-rays allow to investigate the accretion-shock region, where the infalling material is heated by strong shocks due to the impact with the denser stellar atmosphere. Here we show for the first time that it is possible to constrain the velocity of the accretion stream by measuring the Doppler shift of the emitted X-rays. To this aim we analyzed the deep Chandra/HETGS observation of the accreting young star TW Hya. We selected a sample of emission lines free from significant blends, fitted them with gaussian profiles, computed the radial velocity corresponding to each line, and averaged these velocities to obtain an accurate estimate of the global velocity of the X-ray emitting plasma. After correcting for Earth's motion, we compared this observed velocity with the photospheric radial velocity. In order to check this procedure we applied the same technique to other Chandra/HETGS spectra of single stars, whose X-rays are due only to coronal plasma. While spectra of pure coronal sources provide Doppler shifts in agreement with the known stellar radial velocity, we found that the X-ray spectrum of TW Hya is red-shifted by ~30-40 km/s with respect to the stellar photosphere. This proves that the X-ray emitting plasma on TW Hya is moving with respect to the stellar surface, definitively confirming that it originates in the accretion-shock region. The observed velocity suggests that the base of the accretion region is located at low latitudes of the stellar surface.

  13. Finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations for acoustic group velocity and attenuation derivative applied to encapsulated microbubble suspensions.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Joel

    2007-04-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the conflict between the inherently bandlimited data and the requirement of KK integrals for a complete infinite spectrum of input information. For data exhibiting localized extrema, KK relations can provide accurate transforms over finite bandwidths due to the local-weighting properties of the KK kernel. Recently, acoustic KK relations have been derived for the determination of the group velocity (cg) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (alpha') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number). These relations are applicable to bandlimited data exhibiting resonant features without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. In contrast to twice-subtracted finite-bandwidth KK predictions for phase velocity and attenuation coefficient (components of the undifferentiated wave number), these more recently derived relations for cg and alpha' provide stricter tests of causal consistency because the resulting shapes are invariant with respect to subtraction constants. The integrals in these relations can be formulated so that they only require the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient data without differentiation. Using experimental data from suspensions of encapsulated microbubbles, the finite-bandwidth KK predictions for cg and alpha' are found to provide an accurate mapping of the primary wave number quantities onto their derivatives. PMID:17471707

  14. Aeroacoustics of Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    Results from acoustic measurements of noise radiated from a heated, three-stream, co-annular exhaust system operated at subsonic conditions are presented. The experiments were conducted for a range of core, bypass, and tertiary stream temperatures and pressures. The nozzle system had a fan-to-core area ratio of 2.92 and a tertiary-to-core area ratio of 0.96. The impact of introducing a third stream on the radiated noise for third-stream velocities below that of the bypass stream was to reduce high frequency noise levels at broadside and peak jet-noise angles. Mid-frequency noise radiation at aft observation angles was impacted by the conditions of the third stream. The core velocity had the greatest impact on peak noise levels and the bypass-to-core mass flow ratio had a slight impact on levels in the peak jet-noise direction. The third-stream jet conditions had no impact on peak noise levels. Introduction of a third jet stream in the presence of a simulated forward-flight stream limits the impact of the third stream on radiated noise. For equivalent ideal thrust conditions, two-stream and three-stream jets can produce similar acoustic spectra although high-frequency noise levels tend to be lower for the three-stream jet.

  15. Applicability of acoustic Doppler devices for flow velocity measurements and discharge estimation in flows with sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Guillaume; Gallart, Francesc; Gratiot, Nicolas; Soler, Montserrat; Reid, Ian; Vachtman, Dina; Latron, Jérôme; Martín-Vide, Juan Pedro; Laronne, Jonathan B.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic Doppler devices (Unidata Starflow) have been deployed for velocity measurements and discharge estimates in five contrasted open-channel flow environments, with particular attention given to the influence of sediment transport on instrument performance. The analysis is based on both field observations and flume experiments. These confirm the ability of the Starflow to provide reliable discharge time-series, but point out its limitations when sediment is being transported. (i) After calibration of the instrument by the Index Velocity Method, the deviation from reference discharge measurements was < 20% at the 95% confidence level. (ii) In ungauged conditions at high flows, the Starflow was particularly useful in providing velocity data for approximating measurements of discharge. (iii) However, channel and flume experiments revealed the effects of mobilised sediment on velocity estimates: coarse particles (⩾ 150 μm) transported by way of saltation or as bedload caused a significant underestimation of velocity by as much as 50%; a slight underestimation (10-15%) was also observed when significant quantities of fine particles (⩽150 μm) were transported in suspension; this underestimation was shown to reach 20-30% when suspended sediment concentrations were very high (c. 50-100 g L-1).

  16. Oxidation and thermal fatigue of coated and uncoated NX-188 nickel-base alloy in a high velocity gas stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Young, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A cast nickel-base superalloy, NX-188, coated and uncoated, was tested in a high-velocity gas stream for resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue by cycling between room temperature and 980, 1040, and 1090 C. Contrary to the behavior of more conventional nickel-base alloys, uncoated NX-188 exhibited the greatest weight loss at the lowest test temperature. In general, on the basis of weight change and metallographic observations a coating consisting of vapor-deposited Fe-Cr-Al-Y over a chromized substrate exhibited the best overall performance in resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue.

  17. A revised velocity-reversal and sediment-sorting model for a high-gradient, pool-riffle stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, D.M.; Wohl, E.E.; Jarrett, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Sediment-sorting processes related to varying channel-bed morphology were investigated from April to November 1993 along a 1-km pool-riffle and step-pool reach of North Saint Vrain Creek, a small mountain stream in the Rocky Mountains of northern Colorado. Measured cross-sectional areas of flow were used to suggest higher velocities in pools than in riffles at high flow. Three hundred and sixteen tracer particles, ranging in size from 16 mm to 256 mm, were placed in two separate pool-riffle-pool sequences and used to assess sediment-sorting patterns and sediment-transport competence variations. Tracer-particle depositional evidence indicated higher sediment-transport competence in pools than in riffles at high flow. Pool-riffle sediment sorting may be created by velocity reversals, and more localized sorting results from gravitational forces along the upstream sloping portion of the channel bed located at the downstream end of pools.

  18. Ion acoustic wave velocity measurement of the concentration of two ion species in a multi-dipole plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hala, A. M.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2001-05-01

    The concentration of two species in a multi-dipole plasma was determined by measuring the ion acoustic wave group velocity and the electron temperature. The wave was launched from a grid immersed in the plasma and was detected by a Langmuir probe. Electron temperature was found separately from an I--V characteristic trace. The measurements were performed in helium/xenon and argon/xenon plasmas. Typical parameters of the plasma were T{sub e}{approx}0.5--3eV, density 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3}, plasma potential of 3--5 V, and pressure range from 1 to 20 mTorr. The accuracy of the measurement was from 2% to 4% depending on the mass difference between the two species and how accurately the group velocity and electron temperature are measured.

  19. Feasibility of using an acoustic velocity meter to measure flow in the Chipps Island channel, Suisun Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffard, Stuart H.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted in 1978 to determine the feasibility of using an acoustic velocity meter to measure the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta outflow in the Chipps Island Channel, Suisun Bay, Calif. Three parts of transducers with frequencies of 100, 40, and 24 kilohertz were installed on a cross-channel test path and operated at three elevations, 15.5, 8.0, and 4.0 feet below mean lower low water, to test signal transmission at varying depths. Transmission was most reliable at the lowest depth, and the 24-kilohertz transducers at the 7-millivolt threshold of signal strength met the study 's criterion of no persistent signal loss of more than one hour 's duration in any phase of the tidal cycle. Signal strength was statistically correlated with the environmental factors of wind velocity, wind direction, solar insolation, electrical conductivity, water temperature, water velocity, stage, rate of change in stage, and the acceleration of the rate of change in stage. All correlations were weak. Signal strength is apparently a function of the interaction of several environmental factors. A 32-day test to observe if aquatic growth on the transducers would affect signal transmission showed no reduction in signal strength. Suspended-sediment samples indicated that both the size and concentration of particles are greater than presumed in earlier studies. According to the results of this study, chances are good for reliable transmission of acoustic velocity meter signals. Usually some signals were much stronger than the average 20-second signal strength at 15-minute intervals used for correlation and the frequency analysis. Superior equipment is now being developed specifically for the Chipps Island site to transmit signals several times stronger than the signals analyzed in these tests. (USGS)

  20. Acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic air pump with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain analysis and comparison to the measurement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    The direct finite-difference fluid simulation of acoustic streaming on a fine-meshed three-dimensional model using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based calculation array is discussed. Airflows are induced by an acoustic traveling wave when an intense sound field is generated in a gap between a bending transducer and a reflector. The calculation results showed good agreement with measurements in a pressure distribution. Several flow vortices were observed near the boundary layer of the reflector and the transducer, which have often been observed near the boundary of acoustic tubes, but have not been observed in previous calculations for this type of ultrasonic air pump. PMID:25001051

  1. Laser-optic Measurements of Velocity of Particles in the Powder Stream at Coaxial Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergachev, D. V.; Mikhal'chenko, A. A.; Kovalev, O. B.; Kuz'min, V. I.; Grachev, G. N.; Pinaev, P. A.

    The problems of particle velocity and temperature measurement can be solved with commonly-known methods of registration based on spectrometry and a complex of laser and optical means. The diagnostic technique combines two independent methods of particle velocity measurement, namely the passive way which is based on the intrinsic radiation of the heated particles in a gas flow, and the active one which utilizes the effect of the laser beam scattering. It is demonstrated that the laser radiation can affect significantly the particles velocity at the laser cladding. Presented bar charts of statistical distributions of the particles velocities illustrate two modes of the coaxial nozzle performance, with and without СО2-laser radiation. Different types of powders (Al2O3, Mo, Ni, Al) were used in tests, the particle size distributions were typical for the laser cladding; air, nitrogen, argon were used as working gases, continuous radiation of the СО2 laser reached 3 kW. It is shown that in the laser-radiation field, the powder particles undergo extra acceleration due to the laser evaporation and reactive force occurrence resulting from the recoil pressure vapors from the beamed part of particles' surfaces. The observed effect of particles acceleration depends on the particles concentration in the powder flow. Due to the laser acceleration, the velocities of individual particles may reach the values of about 80 - 100 m/s. The trichromatic pyrometry method was utilized to measure the particles temperature in the powder flow.

  2. A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD NEAR THE MAGELLANIC STREAM: METALLICITY AND SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Nimisha; Fox, Andrew J.; Tumlinson, Jason; Thom, Christopher; Ely, Justin; Westmeier, Tobias

    2015-02-10

    The Magellanic Stream (MS) is a well-resolved gaseous tail originating from the Magellanic Clouds. Studies of its physical properties and chemical composition are needed to understand its role in Galactic evolution. We investigate the properties of a compact HVC (CHVC 224.0-83.4-197) lying close on the sky to the MS to determine whether it is physically connected to the Stream and to examine its internal structure. Our study is based on analysis of HST/COS spectra of three QSOs (Ton S210, B0120-28, and B0117-2837) all of which pass through this single cloud at small angular separation (≲0.°72), allowing us to compare physical conditions on small spatial scales. No significant variation is detected in the ionization structure from one part of the cloud to the other. Using Cloudy photoionization models, toward Ton S210 we derive elemental abundances of [C/H] = –1.21 ± 0.11, [Si/H] = –1.16 ± 0.11, [Al/H] = –1.19 ± 0.17, and [O/H] = –1.12 ± 0.22, which agree within 0.09 dex. The CHVC abundances match the 0.1 solar abundances measured along the main body of the Stream. This suggests that the CHVC (and by extension the extended network of filaments to which it belongs) has an origin in the MS. It may represent a fragment that has been removed from the Stream as it interacts with the gaseous Galactic halo.

  3. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  4. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants. PMID:27392205

  5. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  6. Dust ion-acoustic shock waves in charge varying dusty plasmas with electrons having vortexlike velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Tribeche, M.

    2010-12-15

    A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to investigate the properties of dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with vortexlike electron distribution. We use the ionization model, hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a trapped electron charging current derived from the well-known orbit limited motion theory. A new modified Burger equation is derived. Besides nonlinear trapping, this equation involves two kinds of dissipation (the anomalous one inherent to nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and the one due to the particle loss and ionization). These two kinds of dissipation can act concurrently. The traveling wave solution has been acquired by employing the modified extended tanh-function method. The shocklike solution is numerically analyzed based on the typical numerical data from laboratory dusty plasma devices. It is found that ion temperature, trapped particles, and weak dissipations significantly modify the shock structures.

  7. Uncertainty in stream discharges mesured with the index velocity method in an alpine river with unstable bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Elise; Thollet, Fabien; Camenen, Benoit; Le Coz, Jerome; Mansanarez, Valentin; Dramais, Guillaume; Gautheron, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The ability to provide an instantaneous and continuous time series for flow discharge in a river is a fundamental issue for flood risk or drought assessment or for ecological studies by estimating fine sediments and associated pollutant flux. Automated direct measurement of streamflow discharge is difficult at present and one or more surrogate measurements are generally used to estimate it. Moreover, alpine rivers are often characterized by a very unstable bed due to active sediment transport. As a consequence, hydrometric stations generally suffer from frequent rating curve shifts. This study deals with a hydrometric station located on the downstream part of the Arvan River in Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, France. A Sommer RQ-24 radar was installed at the station, that continuously measures both water surface level and surface velocity. Regular stream gaugings were achieved by measuring either local velocities with a conventional current-meter during low flow periods or surface velocities using a handheld radar velocimeter during floods when the reach is not wadable. First, a classical stage-discharge relationship was developed thanks to these gaugings by applying the BaRatin software using Bayesian inference, which allows the definition of hydraulic priors and gives an estimation of the uncertainties. Since rating curve shifts frequently occur, large uncertainties can be observed in the rating curve for low flow. Second, the index velocity method (IVM) was also applied to this site and a new method for estimating the related uncertainties is suggested. It showed that the IVM significantly reduces the uncertainties in the discharge estimation for low flows. Moreover, the combined surface level and velocity measurements are useful to detect rating curve shifts and thus periods of stable hydraulic control.

  8. Scale Model Acoustic Test Validation of IOP-SS Water Prediction using Loci-STREAM-VoF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). SMAT consists of a 5% scale representation of the ignition overpressure sound-suppression system (IOP-SS) that is being tested to quantify the water flow and induced air entrainment in and around the mobile launcher exhaust hole. This data will be compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the newly developed Loci-STREAM Volume of Fluid (VoF) methods. Compressible and incompressible VoF methods have been formulated, and are currently being used to simulate the water flow of SMAT IOP-SS. The test data will be used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and validate the VoF methods.

  9. The role of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming in mediating ultrasound-induced changes of TGF-beta gene expression in bone cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harle, J.; Mayia, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper relates ultrasound-induced changes in bone cell function to quantitative data assessing the level of several interaction mechanisms within the exposure environment. Characterisation of ultrasound fields in terms of resultant levels of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming may provide a novel means of accurately assessing the likelihood of biological effects in vitro.

  10. Stability Dust-Ion-Acoustic Wave In Dusty Plasmas With Stream -Influence Of Charge Fluctuation Of Dust Grains

    SciTech Connect

    Atamaniuk, Barbara; Zuchowski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-15

    There is a quickly increasing wealth of experimental data on so-called dusty plasmas i. e. ionized gases or usual plasmas that contain micron sized charged particles. Interest in these structures is driven both by their importance in many astrophysical as well as commercial situations. Among them are linear and nonlinear wave phenomena. We consider the influence of dust charge fluctuations on stability of the ion-acoustic waves when the stream of particles is present. It is assumed that all grains of dust have equal masses but charges are not constant in time-they may fluctuate in time. The dust charges are not really independent of the variations of the plasma potentials. All modes will influence the charging mechanism, and feedback will lead to several new interesting and unexpected phenomena. The charging of the grains depends on local plasma characteristics. If the waves disturb these characteristic, then charging of the grains is affected and the grain charge is modified, with a resulting feedback on the wave mode. In case considering here, when temperature of electrons is much greater then the temperature of the ions and temperature of electrons is not great enough for further ionization of the ions, we show that stability of the acoustic wave depends only one phenomenological coefficient.

  11. Feasibility study of the use of the acoustic velocity meter for measurement of net outflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Winchell

    1969-01-01

    A reliable measure of the fresh-water outflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta is needed for the operation of the California Water Project and for the evaluation of the interrelated water problems of the delta and San Francisco Bay regions. The Chipps Island channel, immediately downstream from the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, is the most promising site for this flow measurement, but the conventional techniques used for evaluating steady flows cannot be employed there because the channel reach is in the tidal zone, and reversals of flow occur during each tidal cycle. Net outflows, which may be as little-as 2,000 cubic feet per second must necessarily be computed as the difference between the large ebbflow and floodflow volumes that move back and forth between the delta region and San Francisco Bay. Discharges during peak periods of the ebb and flood tidal cycles may exceed 300,000 cubic feet per second. In consequence, a very high degree of precision must be maintained in the gross flow measurements if meaningful computations of net outflow are to be made. This report evaluates the probable accuracies that might be achieved by use of an AVM (acoustic velocity meter), a device which measures the stream velocity along a diagonal line across the channel. The study indicates that this line velocity will provide a stable index of the mean velocity in the channel and that such an index could be used as a primary parameter for the computation of discharge. Therefore, net outflows probably could be computed with the required accuracy by the use of such a device. The significant factors controlling the precision of measurement would be the stability of the channel geometry and streamline orientation, the precision with which the current-meter measurements needed for calibration of the system could be made, the instrumental calibration stability of the AVM system, and the length of period over which net outflows were computed. The AVM system

  12. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  13. Comparison of P- and S-waves velocities estimated from Biot-Gassmann and Kuster-Toksöz models with results obtained from acoustic wavetrains interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BałA, Maria; Cichy, Adam

    2007-06-01

    Kuster-Toksöz and Biot-Gassmann models for estimating velocities of longitudinal and shear waves on the basis of well-logging data were analysed. P-wave and S-wave velocity models are crucial for interpretation of seismic data. Discussed models enable determination with quite good accuracy, in some cases higher than the acoustic full wavetrains interpretation. Because velocity strongly depends on lithology and saturation of pore space, the selection of parameters of rock matrix, hydrocarbons and formation waters has a strong effect on the quality of velocities estimation.

  14. Simulated flight acoustic investigation of treated ejector effectiveness on advanced mechanical suppresors for high velocity jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brausch, J. F.; Motsinger, R. E.; Hoerst, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Ten scale-model nozzles were tested in an anechoic free-jet facility to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of a mechanically suppressed inverted-velocity-profile coannular nozzle with an accoustically treated ejector system. The nozzle system used was developed from aerodynamic flow lines evolved in a previous contract, defined to incorporate the restraints imposed by the aerodynamic performance requirements of an Advanced Supersonic Technology/Variable Cycle Engine system through all its mission phases. Accoustic data of 188 test points were obtained, 87 under static and 101 under simulated flight conditions. The tests investigated variables of hardwall ejector application to a coannular nozzle with 20-chute outer annular suppressor, ejector axial positioning, treatment application to ejector and plug surfaces, and treatment design. Laser velocimeter, shadowgraph photograph, aerodynamic static pressure, and temperature measurement were acquired on select models to yield diagnositc information regarding the flow field and aerodynamic performance characteristics of the nozzles.

  15. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report. [nozzle transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; and (3) to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer function versus nondimensional frequency.

  16. Experimental investigation of shock-cell noise reduction for dual-stream nozzles in simulated flight comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Test nozzles and acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Hoerst, D. J.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Parameters which contribute to supersonic jet shock noise were investigated for the purpose of determining means to reduce such noise generation to acceptable levels. Six dual-stream test nozzles with varying flow passage and plug closure designs were evaluated under simulated flight conditions in an anechoic chamber. All nozzles had combined convergent-divergent or convergent flow passages. Acoustic behavior as a function of nozzle flow passage geometry was measured. The acoustic data consist primarily of 1/3 octave band sound pressure levels and overall sound pressure levels. Detailed schematics and geometric characteristics of the six scale model nozzle configurations and acoustic test point definitions are presented. Tabulation of aerodynamic test conditions and a computer listing of the measured acoustic data are displayed.

  17. The formation of massive black holes in z ˜ 30 dark matter haloes with large baryonic streaming velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Li, Miao

    2014-03-01

    The origins of the ˜109 M⊙ quasar supermassive black holes (BHs) at redshifts z > 6 remain a theoretical puzzle. One possibility is that they grew from ˜105 M⊙ BHs formed in the `direct collapse' of pristine, atomic-cooling (temperatures ≳ 8000 K; PAC) gas that did not fragment to form ordinary stars due to a lack of molecular hydrogen and metals. We propose that baryonic streaming - the relic relative motion of gas with respect to dark matter from cosmological recombination - provides a natural mechanism for establishing the conditions necessary for direct collapse. This effect delays the formation of the first stars by inhibiting the infall of gas into dark matter haloes; streaming velocities more than twice the root-mean-square value could forestall star formation until halo virial temperatures ≳ 8000 K. The resulting PAC gas can proceed to form massive BHs by any of the mechanisms proposed in the literature to induce direct collapse in the absence of an ultraviolet background. This scenario produces haloes containing PAC gas at a characteristic redshift z ˜ 30. It can explain the abundance of the most luminous quasars at z ≈ 6, regardless of whether direct collapse occurs in nearly all or less than 1 per cent of PAC haloes.

  18. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  19. Surface acoustic streaming in microfluidic system for rapid multicellular tumor spheroids generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlHasan, Layla; Qi, Aisha; Al-Aboodi, Aswan; Rezk, Amged; Shilton, Richie R.; Chan, Peggy P. Y.; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a novel and rapid method to generate in vitro three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. A SAW device with single-phase unidirectional transducer electrodes (SPUTD) on lithium niobate substrate was fabricated using standing UV photolithography and wet-etching techniques. To generate spheroids, the SAW device was loaded with medium containing human breast carcinoma (BT474) cells, an oscillating electrical signal at resonant frequency was supplied to the SPUDT to generate acoustic radiation in the medium. Spheroids with uniform size and shape can be obtained using this method in less than 1 minute, and the size of the spheroids can be controlled through adjusting the seeding density. The resulting spheroids were used for further cultivation and were monitored using an optical microscope in real time. The viability and actin organization of the spheroids were assessed using live/dead viability staining and actin cytoskeleton staining, respectively. Compared to spheroids generated using the liquid overlay method, the SAW generated spheroids exhibited higher circularity and higher viability. The F-actin filaments of spheroids appear to aggregate compared to that of untreated cells, indicating that mature spheroids can be obtained using this method. This spheroid generating method can be useful for a variety of biological studies and clinical applications.

  20. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  1. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  2. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic-velocity methods used to characterise the excavation disturbance associated with deep tunnels in hard rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Stephen D.; Young, R. Paul

    1998-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic-velocity monitoring studies have been undertaken at both the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) and at the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Company (SKB) Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). At both locations the excavations were tunnels in granitic material at approximately 420 m depth. However, the stress regime was more severe at the URL Mine-by tunnel site than the HRL ZEDEX tunnel. Different parts of the ZEDEX tunnel were created using different excavation techniques. Using AE and ultrasonic techniques to study these tunnels we have been able to examine the nature of the excavation-disturbed zone around the tunnel, as well as examining the effects of different stress regimes and excavation techniques. Studies were undertaken both during and after the Mine-by tunnel excavation and during excavation in the ZEDEX tunnel. AE monitoring in the wall of the Mine-by tunnel during excavation showed that some activity occurred in the sidewall regions, but the spatial density of AE hypocentres increased toward the regions in the floor and roof of the tunnel where breakout notches formed. This sidewall activity was clustered primarily within 0.5 m of the tunnel wall. AE monitoring in the floor of the tunnel showed that small numbers of AE continued to occur in the notch region in the floor of the tunnel over 2 years after excavation was completed. This activity became more acute as the rock was heated, imposing thermally induced stresses on the volume. Ultrasonic-velocity studies both in the floor and the wall of the tunnel showed that the velocity is strongly anisotropic with the direction of slowest velocity orthogonal to the tunnel surface. The velocity increased with distance into the rock from the tunnel surface. In the floor, this effect was seen up to 2 m from the tunnel surface. Most of the change occurred within the first 0.5 m from the tunnel perimeter. At the lower-stress HRL, most of

  3. Surface deformation, crack formation, and acoustic velocity changes in pyrophyllite under polyaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spetzler, Hartmut A.; Sobolev, Gennady A.; Sondergeld, Carl H.; Salov, Boris G.; Getting, Ivan C.; Koltsov, Anotoli

    1981-02-01

    Jacketed cubes of pyrophyllite (31.6 mm on an edge) with variable water content were stressed monotonically to failure under polyaxial compression (σ1 > σ2 = 2σ3). The maximum and minimum principal stresses, σ1, and σ3, were applied with pistons, and the intermediate stress σ2 with a transparent fluid. An optical window in the pressure vessel allowed in situ measurements of the σ2 face deformation by optical holography. In addition, the more conventional techniques of stress, strain, and elastic wave velocity measurements as well as optical and electron microscopy were used to study the formation and propagation of fractures. The strength ( σ1 - σ3)f of the samples increased by about 50% as σ2 was increased from 5 MPa to 100 MPa. Air dry samples were stronger than water-soaked samples by about ˜20%. Increasing the strain rate from 2 × 10-8 to 10-6 s-1 at σ2 = 5 MPa and 30 MPa increased the strength by about 10%. At σ2 = 100 MPa this trend was reversed, and samples that were deformed at the low strain rate were stronger by approximately 5%. The crack morphology of recovered samples was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Subparallel sets of fractures and en échelon fracture patterns ahead of the macrofracture were easily visible with the unaided eye when σ2 was 5 MPa or 30 MPa. However, at σ2 = 100 MPa these fracture patterns were only visible under the microscope, and the cracks appeared much thinner. The holographic observations of the σ2 face revealed the following: as σ1 was increased, broad bulges formed in a crosslike pattern along the lines of the maximum shear stress. Macrofracture initiation, which occurred in a corner, was preceded by concentrated surface deformation. As the macrofracture propagated across the sample, it deviated from the direction of the maximum shear stress. Ahead of the tip of the macrofracture and migrating with it was a pronounced bulge. In response to monotonically increasing σ1, the displacement

  4. Effects of dust correlations on the marginal stability of ion stream driven dust acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Manish K.; Avinash, K.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of dust–dust correlations on the marginal stability of dust acoustic waves excited by ion drift is studied. The ion drift is driven by the electric field {E}0 which is generally present in the discharge. Correlation effects on marginal stability are studied using augmented Debye–Hückel approximation. The marginal stability boundary is calculated in {E}0-{P}0 (P 0 is the pressure of the neutral gas) space with correlated dust grains. We show that due to dust-dust correlation the stability boundary moves into the unstable region thereby stabilizing the DAW. The effects are significant for smaller values of κ (=a/{λ }d) below unity (a is the mean particle distance and {λ }d is Debye length).

  5. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M.; Vanstreels, K.

    2014-07-14

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (ψ) of a 500 nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E = 25 ± 1 GPa and ψ=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  6. Numerical study of nonlinear streaming inside a standing wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daru, V.; Carlès, D. Baltean; Weisman, C.

    2012-09-01

    The acoustic streaming associated to standing waves in a cylindrical resonator is studied for increasing nonlinear Reynolds numbers by numerically solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, using a high resolution finite difference scheme. The resonator is excited by shaking it along the axis at imposed frequency, corresponding to the fundamental resonance frequency of the waveguide. For sufficiently large acoustic velocities, shocks are visible. The mean field is computed by time-averaging over the main acoustic period. When the nonlinear Reynolds number increases, the center of the outer streaming cells are pushed toward the acoustic velocity nodes and two additional vortices per quarter-wavelength are generated on the axis, near the velocity antinodes. This result differs from linear models and is in agreement with several recent experimental measurement performed in the nonlinear regime. The mean temperature field evolution within the resonator is also investigated.

  7. The meandering Gulf Stream as seen by the Geosat altimeter - Surface transport, position, and velocity variance from 73 deg to 46 deg W

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of the surface geostrophic velocity field for the Gulf Stream region for the position, structure, and surface transport of the Gulf Stream for 2.5 yr of the Geosat altimeter Exact Repeat Mission. Synthetic data using a Gaussian velocity profile were generated and fit to the sea surface residual heights to create a synthetic mean sea surface height field and profiles of absolute geostrophic currents. An analysis of the model parameters and the actual geostrophic velocity profiles revealed two different flow regimes for the Gulf Stream connected by a narrow transition region coincident with the New England Seamount Chain. The upstream region was found to exhibit relatively straight Gulf Stream paths, long Eulerian time scales, and eastward propagating meanders. The downstream region had more large meanders, no consistent propagation direction, and shorter Eulerian time scales. A 25-percent reduction in surface transport occurred in the transition region, with a corresponding reduction in current speed and no change in Gulf Stream width.

  8. Ultrahigh-pressure acoustic wave velocities of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses up to 200 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Itaru; Murakami, Motohiko; Kohara, Shinji; Ohara, Koji; Ohtani, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    Extensive experimental studies on the structure and density of silicate glasses as laboratory analogs of natural silicate melts have attempted to address the nature of dense silicate melts that may be present at the base of the mantle. Previous ultrahigh-pressure experiments, however, have been performed on simple systems such as SiO2 or MgSiO3, and experiments in more complex system have been conducted under relatively low-pressure conditions below 60 GPa. The effect of other metal cations on structural changes that occur in dense silicate glasses under ultrahigh pressures has been poorly understood. Here, we used a Brillouin scattering spectroscopic method up to pressures of 196.9 GPa to conduct in situ high-pressure acoustic wave velocity measurements of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses in order to understand the effect of Al2O3 on pressure-induced structural changes in the glasses as analogs of aluminosilicate melts. From 10 to 40 GPa, the transverse acoustic wave velocity ( V S ) of Al2O3-rich glass (SiO2 + 20.5 mol% Al2O3) was greater than that of Al2O3-poor glass (SiO2 + 3.9 mol% Al2O3). This result suggests that SiO2-Al2O3 glasses with higher proportions of Al ions with large oxygen coordination numbers (5 and 6) become elastically stiffer up to 40 GPa, depending on the Al2O3 content, but then soften above 40 GPa. At pressures from 40 to ~100 GPa, the increase in V S with increasing pressure became less steep than below 40 GPa. Above ~100 GPa, there were abrupt increases in the P-V S gradients ( dV S /dP) at 130 GPa in Al2O3-poor glass and at 116 GPa in Al2O3-rich glass. These changes resemble previous experimental results on SiO2 glass and MgSiO3 glass. Given that changes of dV S / dP have commonly been related to changes in the Si-O coordination states in the glasses, our results, therefore, may indicate a drastic structural transformation in SiO2-Al2O3 glasses above 116 GPa, possibly associated with an average Si-O coordination number change to higher than 6. Compared

  9. Acoustic Emission and Velocity Measurements using a Modular Borehole Prototype Tool to Provide Real Time Rock Mass Characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. S.; Pettitt, W. S.; Young, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    Permanent changes to rock mass properties can occur due to the application of excavation or thermal induced stresses. This project involves the design of hardware and software for the long term monitoring of a rock volume, and the real time analysis and interpretation of induced microcracks and their properties. A set of borehole sondes have been designed with each sonde containing up to 6 sensor modules. Each piezoelectric sensor is dual mode allowing it to either transmit an ultrasonic pulse through a rock mass, or receive ultrasonic waveform data. Good coupling of the sensors with the borehole wall is achieved through a motorized clamping mechanism. The borehole sondes are connected to a surface interface box and digital acquisition system and controlled by a laptop computer. The system allows acoustic emission (AE) data to be recorded at all times using programmable trigger logic. The AE data is processed in real time for 3D source location and magnitude, with further analysis such as mechanism type available offline. Additionally the system allows velocity surveys to be automatically performed at pre-defined times. A modelling component of the project, using a 3D dynamic finite difference code, is investigating the effect that different microcrack distributions have on velocity waveform data in terms of time and frequency amplitude. The modelling codes will be validated using data recorded from laboratory tests on rocks with known crack fabrics, and then used in insitu experimental tests. This modelling information will be used to help interpret, in real time, microcrack characteristics such as crack density, size, and fluid content. The technology has applications in a number of branches of geotechnical and civil engineering including radioactive waste storage, mining, dams, bridges, and oil reservoir monitoring.

  10. Temperature and velocity determination of shock-heated flows with non-resonant heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, F. J.; Baab, S.; Lamanna, G.; Weigand, B.

    2015-12-01

    Non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), a four-wave mixing technique, was applied to post-shock flows within a shock tube. Simultaneous single-shot determination of temperature, speed of sound and flow velocity behind incident and reflected shock waves at different pressure and temperature levels are presented. Measurements were performed non-intrusively and without any seeding. The paper describes the technique and outlines its advantages compared to more established laser-based methods with respect to the challenges of shock tube experiments. The experiments include argon and nitrogen as test gas at temperatures of up to 1000 K and pressures of up to 43 bar. The experimental data are compared to calculated values based on inviscid one-dimensional shock wave theory. The single-shot uncertainty of the technique is investigated for worst-case test conditions resulting in relative standard deviations of 1, 1.7 and 3.4 % for Mach number, speed of sound and temperature, respectively. For all further experimental conditions, calculated values stay well within the 95 % confidence intervals of the LITA measurement.

  11. Simultaneous estimation of cortical bone thickness and acoustic wave velocity using a multivariable optimization approach: Bone phantom and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Podhajecki, Jerzy; Falińska, Katarzyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents a method that allows the thickness of a compact bone layer and longitudinal wave velocity in the bone to be determined simultaneously with the use of reflected waves, with particular emphasis on the case of layers when the propagation time through the layer is shorter than the time duration of the interrogating pulse. The proposed method estimates simultaneously the thickness of the cortical bone layer and acoustic wave velocity by fitting the temporal spectrum of the simulated reflected wave to the spectrum of the reflected wave measured experimentally. For the purpose of echo-simulations the model of "soft tissue - compact bone layer - cancellous bone" was developed. Next, the cost function was defined as the least square error between the measured and simulated temporal spectra. Minimization of the cost function allowed us to determine the values of the parameters of the cortical bone layer which best fitted the measurements. To solve the optimization problem a simulated annealing algorithm was used. The method was tested using acoustic data obtained at the frequency of 0.6 MHz and 1 MHz respectively for a custom designed bone mimicking phantom and a calf femur. For the cortical shell of the calf femur whose thickness varies from 2.1 mm to 2.4 mm and velocity of 2910 m/s, the relative errors of the thickness estimation ranged from 0.4% to 5.5%. The corresponding error of the acoustic wave velocity estimation in the layer was 3.1%. In the case of artificial bone the thickness of the cortical layer was equal to 1.05 and 1.2 mm and acoustic wave velocity was 2900 m/s. These parameters were determined with the errors ranging from 1.9% to 10.8% and from 3.9% to 4.5% respectively. PMID:26522955

  12. Effect of ion temperature on ion-acoustic solitary waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Kaushik; Saha, Taraknath; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2012-10-15

    The effect of ion temperature on the existence of arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves is studied in a two component plasma in presence of a q-nonextensive velocity distributed electrons by using Sagdeev's pseudo potential technique. The range of relevent parameters for which solitons may exist is discussed. It is observed that both q, the nonextensive parameter and the ion temperature {sigma}, play significant roles in the formation and existence of solitons.

  13. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  14. Modal Rayleigh-like streaming in layered acoustofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Junjun; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Hill, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Classical Rayleigh streaming is well known and can be modelled using Nyborg's limiting velocity method as driven by fluid velocities adjacent to the walls parallel to the axis of the main acoustic resonance. We have demonstrated previously the existence and the mechanism of four-quadrant transducer plane streaming patterns in thin-layered acoustofluidic devices which are driven by the limiting velocities on the walls perpendicular to the axis of the main acoustic propagation. We have recently found experimentally that there is a third case which resembles Rayleigh streaming but is a more complex pattern related to three-dimensional cavity modes of an enclosure. This streaming has vortex sizes related to the effective wavelength in each cavity axis of the modes which can be much larger than those found in the one-dimensional case with Rayleigh streaming. We will call this here modal Rayleigh-like streaming and show that it can be important in layered acoustofluidic manipulation devices. This paper seeks to establish the conditions under which each of these is dominant and shows how the limiting velocity field for each relates to different parts of the complex acoustic intensity patterns at the driving boundaries.

  15. Feasibility of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters for the Production of Discharge Records from U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Ross, Jerry H.

    2002-01-01

    It is feasible to use acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVM's) installed at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations to compute records of river discharge. ADVM's are small acoustic current meters that use the Doppler principle to measure water velocities in a two-dimensional plane. Records of river discharge can be computed from stage and ADVM velocity data using the 'index velocity' method. The ADVM-measured velocities are used as an estimator or 'index' of the mean velocity in the channel. In evaluations of ADVM's for the computation of records of river discharge, the USGS installed ADVM's at three streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana: Kankakee River at Davis, Fall Creek at Millersville, and Iroquois River near Foresman. The ADVM evaluation study period was from June 1999 to February 2001. Discharge records were computed, using ADVM data from each station. Discharge records also were computed using conventional stage-discharge methods of the USGS. The records produced from ADVM and conventional methods were compared with discharge record hydrographs and statistics. Overall, the records compared closely from the Kankakee River and Fall Creek stations. For the Iroquois River station, variable backwater was present and affected the comparison; because the ADVM record compensates for backwater, the ADVM record may be superior to the conventional record. For the three stations, the ADVM records were judged to be of a quality acceptable to USGS standards for publications and near realtime ADVM-computed discharges are served on USGS real-time data World Wide Web pages.

  16. Angular spectrum approach for the computation of group and phase velocity surfaces of acoustic waves in anisotropic materials

    PubMed

    Pluta; Schubert; Jahny; Grill

    2000-03-01

    The decomposition of an acoustic wave into its angular spectrum representation creates an effective base for the calculation of wave propagation effects in anisotropic media. In this method, the distribution of acoustic fields is calculated in arbitrary planes from the superposition of the planar components with proper phase shifts. These phase shifts depend on the ratio of the distance between the planes to the normal component of the phase slowness vector. In anisotropic media, the phase shifts depend additionally on the changes of the slowness with respect to the direction of the propagation vector and the polarization. Those relations are obtained from the Christoffel equation. The method employing the fast Fourier transformation algorithm is especially suited for volume imaging in anisotropic media, based on holographic detection in transmission of acoustic waves generated by a point source. This technique is compared with measurements on crystals performed by phase-sensitive scanning acoustic microscopy. PMID:10829665

  17. Acoustic velocity measurement by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry: Development of an Extended Kalman Filter and validation in free-field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duff, Alain; Plantier, Guy; Valière, Jean C.; Gazengel, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    A signal processing technique, based on the use of an Extended Kalman Filter, has been developed to measure sound fields by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry in weak flow. This method allows for the parametric estimation of both the acoustic particle and flow velocity for a forced sine-wave excitation where the acoustic frequency is known. The measurements are performed from the in-phase and the quadrature components of the Doppler downshifted signal thanks to an analog quadrature demodulation technique. Then, the estimated performance is illustrated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations obtained from synthesized signals and compared with asymptotic and analytical forms for the Cramer-Rao Bounds. Results allow the validity domain of the method to be defined and show the availability for free-field measurements in a large range. Finally, an application based on real data obtained in free field is presented.

  18. A qualitative and quantitative investigation of the uncracked and cracked condition of concrete beams using impulse excitation, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic pulse velocity techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliopoulos, S.; Iliopoulos, A.; Pyl, L.; Sol, H.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    The Impulse Excitation Technique (IET) is a useful tool for characterizing the structural condition of concrete. Processing the obtained dynamic parameters (damping ratio, response frequency) as a function of response amplitude, clear and systematic differences appear between intact and cracked specimens, while factors like age and sustained load are also influential. Simultaneously, Acoustic Emission (AE) and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) techniques are used during the three point bending test of the beams in order to supply additional information on the level of damage accumulation which resulted in the specific dynamic behavior revealed by the IET test.

  19. Estimating sea-ice coverage, draft, and velocity in Marguerite Bay (Antarctica) using a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Visbeck, Martin; Beardsley, Robert C.; Brechner Owens, W.

    2008-02-01

    A technique for the analysis of data from a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to determine ice coverage, draft and velocity is presented and applied to data collected in Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula shelf. This method provides sea-ice information when no dedicated upward-looking sonar (ULS) data are available. Ice detection is accomplished using windowed variances of ADCP vertical velocity, vertical error velocity, and surface horizontal speed. ADCP signal correlation and backscatter intensity were poor indicators of the presence of ice at this site. Ice draft is estimated using a combination of ADCP backscatter data, atmospheric and oceanic pressure data, and information about the thermal stratification. This estimate requires corrections to the ADCP-derived range for instrument tilt and sound speed profile. Uncertainties of ±0.20 m during midwinter and ±0.40 m when the base of the surface mixed layer is above the ADCP for ice draft are estimated based on: (a) a Monte Carlo simulation, (b) uncertainty in the sound speed correction, and (c) performance of the zero-draft estimate during times of known open water. Ice velocity is taken as the ADCP horizontal velocity in the depth bin specified by the range estimate.

  20. Effect of simulated forward speed on the jet noise of inverted velocity profile coannular nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packman, A. B.; Ng, K. W.; Chen, C. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were conducted of inverted velocity profile coannular nozzles and a conical nozzle in an acoustic wind tunnel facility to simulate flight effects on jet noise generation. Coannular model nozzles were tested at fan to core nozzle exit area ratios of .75 and 1.2. Fan stream jet velocity ranged up to 2000 fps at a variety of fan exhaust pressure ratios and temperatures for a core stream of 1000 fps. The wind tunnel airflow was varied from static to 425 fps. The acoustic results indicated that the noise level differences seen previously under static conditions are retained in the flight environment.

  1. Detailed documentation of dynamic changes in water depth and surface velocity during large flood at steep mountain stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Yuko; Uchida, Taro

    2015-04-01

    Understanding discharge capacity of the channel and changes in hydraulic property during large storms are essential for the flash flood prediction, however, those information are limited for the steep mountain channels because of complex nature of steep channels and lack of measured data. Thus, we aimed to obtain detailed water level and surface velocity data during large flood at steep mountain channel and document how complex channel morphology could affect water flows during large storms. We installed water level and surface velocity sensors at cascade and 10m downstream pool cross section of the cascade-pool channel at Aono Research Forest of the Arboricultural Research Institute of The University of Tokyo Forests, in Japan and measured for 1-minutes interval. We could obtain data for storm with total precipitation of 288 mm falling in 59 hours with maximum rainfall intensity of 25 mm/hr on relatively wet condition. During this storm, relative water depth increased from 0.35 to 1.57m and surface velocity increased from 0.35 to 4.15m/s. As expected, changes in water depth, surface velocity and velocity profiles were complex and even different between adjacent cascade and pool cross section. Changes in flow characteristics occurred fist at the cascade when discharge increased to some point, water was suddenly stagnated locally at the foot of the cascade. From this moment, water level increased remarkably but surface velocity and velocity profile stayed almost constant at the cascade cross section. Then, at the downstream pool, when most of rocks were submerged at the mean depth of 0.7m, surface velocity suddenly started to increase remarkably and velocity profile changed, as they might develop negative flow in the lower portion of the profile, but water level did not increase as much. When rainfall diminished, first, surface velocity markedly declined and velocity profile went back to original state at the pool, then submerged flows at the bottom of the cascade

  2. Alternative dust-ion acoustic waves in a magnetized charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons having a vortex-like velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjaz, Idir; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-06-01

    Alternative localized dust-ion acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons having a vortex-like velocity distribution. The correct non-Maxwellian charging currents are obtained based on the well-known orbit limited motion theory. Following the standard reductive perturbation technique, a Schamel-Zakharov Kuznetsov Burgers (S-ZKB) equation is derived. It is shown that due to an interplay between trapping and nonthermality, our dusty plasma model may support solitary as well as shock waves the main quantities (phase velocity, amplitude and width) of which are drastically influenced by trapping, nonthermality and charge variation. Due to the flexibility provided by the outlined distribution function (two concepts of non isothermality), we stress that our model should provide a good fit of the space observations.

  3. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillinger, M.; Shaposhnikov, K.; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Schmid, U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (ScxAl1-xN) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S21 measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  4. Free-jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual stream nozzles. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Laser velocimeter and suppressor. Base pressure data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles. Aerodynamic laser velocimeter measurements were made for four selected plumes. In addition, static pressure data in the chute base region of the suppressor configurations were obtained to assess the influence of the shield stream on the suppressor base drag.

  5. Velocity Structure of the Alpine Fault Zone, New Zealand: Laboratory and Log-Based Fault Rock Acoustic Properties at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppson, T.; Graham, J. L., II; Tobin, H. J.; Paris Cavailhes, J.; Celerier, B. P.; Doan, M. L.; Nitsch, O.; Massiot, C.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of fault zone rocks at seismogenic depth play a key role in rupture nucleation, propagation, and damage associated with fault slip. In order to understand the seismic hazard posed by a fault we need to both measure these properties and understand how they govern that particular fault's behavior. The Alpine Fault is the principal component of the active transpressional plate boundary through the South Island of New Zealand. Rapid exhumation along the fault provides an opportunity to study near-surface rocks that have experienced similar histories to those currently deforming at mid-crustal depths. In this study, we examine the acoustic properties of the Alpine Fault in Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP)-1 drill core samples and borehole logs from the shallow fault zone, DFDP-2 borehole logs from the hanging wall, and outcrop samples from a number of field localities along the central Alpine Fault. P- and S-wave velocities were measured at ultrasonic frequencies on saturated 2.5 cm-diameter core plugs taken from DFDP-1 core and outcrops. Sampling focused on mylonites, cataclasites, and fault gouge from both the hanging and foot walls of the fault in order to provide a 1-D seismic velocity transect across the entire fault zone. Velocities were measured over a range of effective pressures between 1 and 68 MPa to determine the variation in acoustic properties with depth and pore pressure. When possible, samples were cut in three orthogonal directions and S-waves were measured in two polarization directions on all samples to constrain velocity anisotropy. XRD and petrographic characterization were used to examine how fault-related alteration and deformation change the composition and texture of the rock, and to elucidate how these changes affect the measured velocities. The ultrasonic velocities were compared to sonic logs from DFDP to examine the potential effects of frequency dispersion, brittle deformation, and temperature on the measured

  6. Averaged indicators of secondary flow in repeated acoustic Doppler current profiler crossings of bends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Cross-stream velocity was measured in a large river bend at high spatial resolution over three separate survey episodes. A suite of methods for resolving cross-stream velocity distributions was tested on data collected using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the sand-bedded Sacramento River, California. The bend was surveyed with repeated ADCP crossings at eight cross sections during a rising limb of high discharge in February 2004 and twice on recession in March 2004. By translating and interpolating repeated ADCP crossings to planar grids, velocity ensembles at similar positions along irregular boat paths could be averaged. The averaging minimized turbulent fluctuations in streamwise velocities over 1 m/s, enabling the resolution of weaker cross-stream velocities (???15-30 cm/s). Secondary-flow influence on suspended sediment was inferred from a lateral region of acoustic backscatter intensity aligned with outward flow over the point bar. A near-bed decrease in backscatter intensity across the pool corresponded with inward cross-stream flow. These suspension indicators were used to orient averaged velocity grids for unambiguously defining the cross-stream velocity magnitudes. Additional field investigations could test whether the correlation between cross-stream velocity and backscatter intensity patterns results from helical recirculation of suspended sediment to the inside of the bend. These river measurements, consistent with classic and recent laboratory studies, show that ADCP surveys can provide refined views of secondary flow and sediment movement in large rivers.

  7. A modified Holly-Preissmann scheme for simulating sharp concentration fronts in streams with steep velocity gradients using RIV1Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-wei; Zhu, De-jun; Chen, Yong-can; Wang, Zhi-gang

    2014-12-01

    RIV1Q is the stand-alone water quality program of CE-QUAL-RIV1, a hydraulic and water quality model developed by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station. It utilizes an operator-splitting algorithm and the advection term in governing equation is treated using the explicit two-point, fourth-order accurate, Holly-Preissmann scheme, in order to preserve numerical accuracy for advection of sharp gradients in concentration. In the scheme, the spatial derivative of the transport equation, where the derivative of velocity is included, is introduced to update the first derivative of dependent variable. In the stream with larger cross-sectional variation, steep velocity gradient can be easily found and should be estimated correctly. In the original version of RIV1Q, however, the derivative of velocity is approximated by a finite difference which is first-order accurate. Its leading truncation error leads to the numerical error of concentration which is related with the velocity and concentration gradients and increases with the decreasing Courant number. The simulation may also be unstable when a sharp velocity drop occurs. In the present paper, the derivative of velocity is estimated with a modified second-order accurate scheme and the corresponding numerical error of concentration decreases. Additionally, the stability of the simulation is improved. The modified scheme is verified with a hypothetical channel case and the results demonstrate that satisfactory accuracy and stability can be achieved even when the Courant number is very low. Finally, the applicability of the modified scheme is discussed.

  8. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program was developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock-free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provision is made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface as well as approximate blade surface velocities. Subsonic solutions are obtained by a finite-difference, stream-function solution. Transonic solutions are obtained by a velocity-gradient method that uses information from a finite-difference, stream-function solution at a reduced mass flow.

  9. Acoustic power absorption and enhancement generated by slow and fast MHD waves. Evidence of solar cycle velocity/intensity amplitude changes consistent with the mode conversion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Jiménez, A.; Elsworth, Y.; Schunker, H.

    2010-06-01

    We used long duration, high quality, unresolved (Sun-as-a star) observations collected by the ground based network BiSON and by the instruments GOLF and VIRGO on board the ESA/NASA SOHO satellite to search for solar-cycle-related changes in mode characteristics in velocity and continuum intensity for the frequency range between 2.5 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz. Over the ascending phase of solar cycle 23 we found a suppression in the p-mode amplitudes both in the velocity and intensity data between 2.5 mHz <ν< 4.5 mHz with a maximum suppression for frequencies in the range between 2.5 mHz <ν< 3.5 mHz. The size of the amplitude suppression is 13 ± 2 per cent for the velocity and 9 ± 2 per cent for the intensity observations. Over the range of 4.5 mHz <ν< 5.5 mHz the findings hint within the errors to a null change both in the velocity and intensity amplitudes. At still higher frequencies, in the so called High-frequency Interference Peaks (HIPs) between 5.8 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz, we found an enhancement in the velocity amplitudes with the maximum 36 ± 7 per cent occurring for 6.3 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz. However, in intensity observations we found a rather smaller enhancement of about 5 ± 2 per cent in the same interval. There is evidence that the frequency dependence of solar-cycle velocity amplitude changes is consistent with the theory behind the mode conversion of acoustic waves in a non-vertical magnetic field, but there are some problems with the intensity data, which may be due to the height in the solar atmosphere at which the VIRGO data are taken.

  10. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  11. Acoustic Velocity Log Numerical Simulation and Saturation Estimation of Gas Hydrate Reservoir in Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method. PMID:23935407

  12. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes III: nonaxisymmetric propagation and circumferential modes in lossless conditions.

    PubMed

    Baik, Kyungmin; Jiang, Jian; Leighton, Timothy G

    2013-03-01

    Equations for the nonaxisymmetric modes that are axially and circumferentially propagating in a liquid-filled tube with elastic walls surrounded by air/vacuum are presented using exact elasticity theory. Dispersion curves for the axially propagating modes are obtained and verified through comparison with measurements. The resulting theory is applied to the circumferential modes, and the pressures and the stresses in the liquid-filled pipe are calculated under external forced oscillation by an acoustic source. This provides the theoretical foundation for the narrow band acoustic bubble detector that was subsequently deployed at the Target Test Facility (TTF) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), TN. PMID:23463995

  13. Streaming Induced by Ultrasonic Vibration in a Water Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Murakami, Koichi; Sasaki, Yuuichi

    2000-06-01

    The flow pattern induced by ultrasonic vibration in a water vessel is investigated experimentally using several liquids. In tap water, vortex streaming of cavitation bubbles around the pressure node of a standing wave occurred because of the large number of cavitation bubbles generated by the ultrasonic vibration. Acoustic streaming of the Rayleigh type caused by cavitation bubble streaming is also induced in tap water. In a glycerin aqueous solution of 30%, Eckart streaming, which flowed upward from the vibrator, occurred due to the dissipation of ultrasonic energy caused by viscosity. On the other hand, in degassed water, streaming is hardly generated at all since a uniform and stable standing wave is formed in the water vessel. The velocity of the acoustic streaming generated in the water vessel by 27.8 kHz vibration is 1 to 6 mm/s. The cavitation bubble streaming in tap water is completely independent of normal Rayleigh or Eckart streaming. This bubble streaming is considerably faster than previous streaming.

  14. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  15. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif; Ehsan, Zahida; Khan, S. A.; Mahmood, S.

    2014-02-15

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  16. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Gill, T. S.; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2011-02-15

    The modulational instability (MI) of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in a two-component plasma is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics proposed by Tsallis [J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) which governs the MI of the IAWs is obtained. The presence of the nonextensive electron distribution is shown to influence the MI of the waves. Three different ranges of the nonextensive q-parameter are considered and in each case the MI sets in under different conditions. Furthermore, the effects of the q-parameter on the growth rate of MI are discussed in detail.

  17. Source localization corrections for airborne acoustic platforms based on a climatological assessment of temperature and wind velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Cheinet, Sylvain; Collier, Sandra L.; Reiff, Christian; Ligon, David A.; Wilson, D. Keith; Noble, John M.; Alberts, W. C. Kirkpatrick, II

    2012-06-01

    Acoustic sensors are being employed on airborne platforms, such as Persistent Threat Detection System (PTDS) and Persistent Ground Surveillance System (PGSS), for source localization. Under certain atmospheric conditions, airborne sensors oer a distinct advantage over ground sensors. The performance of both ground and airborne sensors is aected by environmental factors, such as atmospheric turbulence and wind and temperature proles. For airborne sensors, the eects of refraction must be accounted for in order to determine the source coordinates. Such a method for ground-to-air applications has been developed and is further rened here. Ideally, knowledge of the exact atmospheric proles will allow for the most accurate mitigation of refractive eects. However, acoustic sensors deployed in theater are rarely supported by atmospheric sensing systems that retrieve real-time temperature and wind elds. Atmospheric conditions evolve through seasons, time of day, and are strongly location dependent. Therefore, the development of an atmospheric proles database based on a long time series climatological assessment will provide knowledge for use in physics-based bearing estimation algorithms, where otherwise no correction would have been performed. Long term atmospheric data sets from weather modeling systems are used for a climatological assessment of the refraction corrections and localization errors over selected sites.

  18. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes II: simulation for Spallation Neutron Sources and planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Baik, Kyungmin; Leighton, Timothy G

    2011-08-01

    This paper uses a finite element method (FEM) to compare predictions of the attenuation and sound speeds of acoustic modes in a fluid-filled pipe with those of the analytical model presented in the first paper in this series. It explains why, when the predictions of the earlier paper were compared with experimental data from a water-filled PMMA pipe, the uncertainties and agreement for attenuation data were worse than those for sound speed data. Having validated the FEM approach in this way, the versatility of FEM is thereafter demonstrated by modeling two practical applications which are beyond the analysis of the earlier paper. These applications model propagation in the mercury-filled steel pipework of the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee), and in a long-standing design for acoustic sensors for use on planetary probes. The results show that strong coupling between the fluid and the solid walls means that erroneous interpretations are made of the data if they assume that the sound speed and attenuation in the fluid in the pipe are the same as those that would be measured in an infinite volume of identical fluid, assumptions which are common when such data have previously been interpreted. PMID:21877784

  19. Free-jet acoustic investigation of high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles. Comprehensive data report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Janardan, B. A.; Majjigi, R. K.; Shutiani, P. K.; Vogt, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Six coannular plug nozzle configurations having inverted velocity and temperature profiles, and a baseline convergent conical nozzle were tested for simulated flight acoustic evaluation in General Electric's Anechoic Free-Jet Acoustic Facility. The nozzles were tested over a range of test conditions that are typical of a Variable Cycle Engine for application to advanced high speed aircraft. The outer stream radius ratio for most of the configurations was 0.853, and the inner-stream-outer-stream area ratio was tested in the range of 0.54. Other variables investigated were the influence of bypass struts, a simple noncontoured convergent-divergent outer stream nozzle for forward quadrant shock noise control, and the effects of varying outer stream radius and inner-stream-to-outer-stream velocity ratios on the flight noise signatures of the nozzles. It was found that in simulated flight, the high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles maintain their jet noise and shock noise reduction features previously observed in static testing. The presence of nozzle bypass structs will not significantly effect the acoustic noise reduction features of a General Electric-type nozzle design. A unique coannular plug nozzle flight acoustic spectral prediction method was identified and found to predict the measured results quite well. Special laser velocimeter and acoustic measurements were performed which have given new insight into the jet and shock noise reduction mechanisms of coannular plug nozzles with regard to identifying further beneficial research efforts.

  20. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles, volume 1. [jet engine noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken to: (1) define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; (3) and to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan nozzle convergence angle, core extention length to annulus height ratio, and flow Mach number and temperatures were studied. The results are presented as normalized directivity plots.

  1. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  2. Propagation of Electron Acoustic Soliton, Periodic and Shock Waves in Dissipative Plasma with a q-Nonextensive Electron Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. M., El-Hanbaly; E. K., El-Shewy; Elgarayhi, A.; A. I., Kassem

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear properties of small amplitude electron-acoustic (EA) solitary and shock waves in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma with nonextensive distribution for hot electrons have been investigated. A reductive perturbation method used to obtain the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation. Bifurcation analysis has been discussed for non-dissipative system in the absence of Burgers term and reveals different classes of the traveling wave solutions. The obtained solutions are related to periodic and soliton waves and their behavior are shown graphically. In the presence of the Burgers term, the EXP-function method is used to solve the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation and the obtained solution is related to shock wave. The obtained results may be helpful in better conception of waves propagation in various space plasma environments as well as in inertial confinement fusion laboratory plasmas.

  3. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar Tribeche, Mouloud E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz; Bains, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  4. Variable charge dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2010-06-15

    A first theoretical work is presented to study variable charge dust acoustic solitons within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. Our results reveal that the spatial patterns of the variable charge solitary wave are significantly modified by electron nonextensive effects. In particular, it may be noted that for -11. As the electrons deviate from their thermodynamic equilibrium, the dust grain charge Q{sub d} becomes more negative and the dust grains localization (accumulation) less pronounced. The electrons are locally expelled and pushed out of the region of the soliton's localization. This electron depletion becomes less effective as the electrons evolve far away from their thermal equilibrium. The case q>1 provides qualitatively opposite results: electron nonextensivity makes the solitary structure more spiky. Our results should help in providing a good fit between theoretical and experimental results.

  5. Obliquely propagating ion acoustic waves in the auroral E region: Further evidence of irregularity production by field-aligned electron streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Villain, J.P. ); Hanuise, C. ); Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B.; Ruohoniemi, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Common volume observations of E region high-latitude irregularities at decameter wavelengths have been obtained with the JHU/APL HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador, and the SHERPA HF radar located at Schefferville, Quebec. In this paper, the authors analyze an event with characteristics similar to those of a distinctive type of event described by Villain et al. (1987). The experimental configuration, which combines the azimuthal-scanning capability of the Goose Bay radar with the frequency-scanning operation of the Schefferville radar, has provided unambiguous evidence of the existence of two irregularity layers at different altitudes within the E region. The layers, which exhibit different characteristics, can be related to the action of the gradient drift and ion acoustic instability mechanisms. It is shown that the ion acoustic modes have phase velocities in the range of 400 to 550 m/s and are produced in regions of subcritical perpendicular electron Hall drift. They infer that the observed irregularities are produced through a combination of perpendicular and field-aligned relative electron-ion drifts. Features previously observed but no t satisfactorily explained by perpendicular drift excitation alone can be understood in terms of field-aligned drift excitation. They conclude that the role of electron-ion field-aligned drift may be much more important than previously realized.

  6. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program has been developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provisions are made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface and approximate blade surface velocities.

  7. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  8. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann simulation on acoustics-induced particle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sau-Chung; Yuen, Wai-Tung; Wu, Chili; Chao, Christopher Yu-Hang

    2015-10-01

    Particle manipulation by acoustics has been investigated for many years. By a proper design, particle deposition can be induced by the same principle. The use of acoustics can potentially be developed into an energy-efficient technique for particle removal or filtration system as the pressure drop due to acoustic effects is low and the flow velocity is not necessary to be high. Two nonlinear acoustic effects, acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, are important. Acoustic streaming introduces vortices and stagnation points on the surface of an air duct and removes the particles by deposition. Acoustic radiation pressure causes particles to form agglomerates and enhances inertial impaction and/or gravitational sedimentation. The objective of this paper is to develop a numerical model to investigate the particle deposition induced by acoustic effects. A three-step approach is adopted and lattice Boltzamnn technique is employed as the numerical method. This is because the lattice Boltzmann equation is hyperbolic and can be solved locally, explicitly, and efficiently on parallel computers. In the first step, the acoustic field and its mean square fluctuation values are calculated. Due to the advantage of the lattice Boltzmann technique, a simple, stable and fast lattice Boltzmann method is proposed and verified. The result of the first step is input into the second step to solve for acoustic streaming. Another finite difference lattice Boltzmann method, which has been validated by a number of flows and benchmark cases in the literature, is used. The third step consists in tracking the particle's motion by a Lagrangian approach where the acoustic radiation pressure is considered. The influence of the acoustics effects on particle deposition is explained. The numerical result matches with an experiment. The model is a useful tool for optimizing the design and helps to further develop the technique.

  9. Acoustic velocities of pure and iron-bearing magnesium silicate perovskite measured to 25 GPa and 1200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantel, Julien; Frost, Daniel J.; McCammon, Catherine A.; Jing, Zhicheng; Wang, Yanbin

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasonic interferometry measurements in conjunction with in situ X-ray techniques have been used to measure compressional and shear wave velocities and densities of MgSiO3 perovskite (Mg-Pv) and Mg0.95Fe0.042+Fe0.013+SiO3 perovskite ((Mg, Fe)-Pv) in the multianvil at pressures up to 25 GPa and temperatures to 1200 K. Data for Mg-Pv are consistent with previous studies and the (Mg, Fe)-Pv sample has almost identical shear properties to Mg-Pv. The adiabatic bulk modulus, Ks, for (Mg, Fe)-Pv, however, is found to be substantially lower than Mg-Pv, with a refined value of 236 GPa and a pressure derivative of 4.7. It is proposed that this low KS value result from a change in the elasticity of Fe-bearing perovskite at low pressures <30 GPa. High temperature data are consistent with recent models and it is shown that the obtained elastic properties of (Mg, Fe)-Pv are not inconsistent with a lower mantle of bulk silicate Earth composition.

  10. Characterization of Three-Stream Jet Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Flow-field measurements were conducted on single-, dual- and three-stream jets using two-component and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow-field measurements complimented previous acoustic measurements. The exhaust system consisted of externally-plugged, externally-mixed, convergent nozzles. The study used bypass-to-core area ratios equal to 1.0 and 2.5 and tertiary-to-core area ratios equal to 0.6 and 1.0. Axisymmetric and offset tertiary nozzles were investigated for heated and unheated high-subsonic conditions. Centerline velocity decay rates for the single-, dual- and three-stream axisymmetric jets compared well when axial distance was normalized by an equivalent diameter based on the nozzle system total exit area. The tertiary stream had a greater impact on the mean axial velocity for the small bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles than for large bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles. Normalized turbulence intensities were similar for the single-, dual-, and three-stream unheated jets due to the small difference (10 percent) in the core and bypass velocities for the dual-stream jets and the low tertiary velocity (50 percent of the core stream) for the three-stream jets. For heated jet conditions where the bypass velocity was 65 percent of the core velocity, additional regions of high turbulence intensity occurred near the plug tip which were not present for the unheated jets. Offsetting the tertiary stream moved the peak turbulence intensity levels upstream relative to those for all axisymmetric jets investigated.

  11. Characterization of Three-Stream Jet Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Flow-field measurements were conducted on single-, dual- and three-stream jets using two-component and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow-field measurements complimented previous acoustic measurements. The exhaust system consisted of externally-plugged, externally-mixed, convergent nozzles. The study used bypass-to-core area ratios equal to 1.0 and 2.5 and tertiary-to-core area ratios equal to 0.6 and 1.0. Axisymmetric and offset tertiary nozzles were investigated for heated and unheated high-subsonic conditions. Centerline velocity decay rates for the single-, dual- and three-stream axisymmetric jets compared well when axial distance was normalized by an equivalent diameter based on the nozzle system total exit area. The tertiary stream had a greater impact on the mean axial velocity for the small bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles than for large bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles. Normalized turbulence intensities were similar for the single-, dual-, and three-stream unheated jets due to the small difference (10%) in the core and bypass velocities for the dual-stream jets and the low tertiary velocity (50% of the core stream) for the three-stream jets. For heated jet conditions where the bypass velocity was 65% of the core velocity, additional regions of high turbulence intensity occurred near the plug tip which were not present for the unheated jets. Offsetting the tertiary stream moved the peak turbulence intensity levels upstream relative to those for all axisymmetric jets investigated.

  12. Comparison, analysis, and estimation of discharge data from two acoustic velocity meters on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melching, Charles S.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM) on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (the Canal) at Romeoville, Ill., provides vital information for the accounting of the diversion of water from Lake Michigan. A detailed analysis of the discharge record on the Canal at Romeoville was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to establish the most accurate estimates of discharge for water years 1986-91. The analysis involved (1) checking the consistency of the discharges estimated by two different AVM's installed at Romeoville for consecutive time periods by statistical and regression analyses, (2) adjusting the discharge record to account for corrections to the width and depth of the Canal determined by field measurements, and (3) development of equations for estimating discharge on days when the AVM was inoperative using discharge estimates made by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago at the lock, powerhouse, and controlling works at Lockport, Ill. No signi- ficant difference in the discharge estimates made by the two AVM's could be documented. The estimation equations combined regression analysis with physical principles of the outlet-works operation. The estimation equations simulated the verification period of October 1, 1991, to May 31, 1992, within 0.22, 5.15, and 0.66 percent for the mean, standard deviation, and skewness coefficient, respectively. Discharges were recalculated for the corrected width and depth, estimated for the periods of AVM inoperation, and entered into the discharge record for the station.

  13. MERIDL- VELOCITIES AND STREAMLINES ON THE HUB-SHROUD MIDCHANNEL STREAM SURFACE OF AN AXIAL, RADIAL, OR MIXED FLOW TURBOMACHINE OR ANNULAR DUCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program was developed for calculating the subsonic or transonic flow on the hub-shroud mid-channel stream surface of a single blade row of a turbomachine. The design and analysis of blades for compressors and turbines ideally requires methods for analyzing unsteady, three-dimensional, turbulent viscous flow through a turbomachine. Since an exact solution is impossible at present, solutions on two-dimensional surfaces are calculated to obtain a quasi-three dimensional solution. When three-dimensional effects are important, significant information can be obtained from a solution on a cross-sectional surface of the passage normal to the flow. With this program, a solution to the equations of flow on the meridional surface can be carried out. This solution is chosen when the turbomachine under consideration has significant variation in flow properties in the hubshroud direction, especially when input is needed for use in blade-to-blade calculations. The program can also perform flow calculations for annular ducts without blades. This program should prove very useful in the design and analysis of any turbomachine. This program calculates a solution for two-dimensional, adiabatic shockfree flow. The flow must be essentially subsonic, but there may be local areas of supersonic flow. To obtain the solution, this program uses both the finite difference and the quasi-orthogonal (velocity gradient) methods combined in a way that takes maximum advantage of both. The finite-difference method solves a finite-difference equation along the meridional stream surface in a very efficient manner but is limited to subsonic velocities. This approach must be used in cases where the blade aspect ratios are above one, cases where the passage is curved, and cases with low hub-tip-ratio blades. The quasi-orthogonal method solves the velocity gradient equation on the meridional surface and is used if it is necessary to extend the range of solutions into the transonic regime. In

  14. Scour and deposition patterns in complex flow around stream restoration structures in a meandering stream channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarek, J. L.; Plott, J. R.; Diplas, P.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Lightbody, A.

    2010-12-01

    Instream structures are often employed in stream restoration projects to minimize erosion on the outside of a meander bend where shear stresses are highest, but guidelines for installation are often based on subjective criteria or professional experience. As part of a multiphase study to develop comprehensive quantitative design guidelines for instream structures, a series of experiments were conducted in the sand-bed meandering stream channel in the Outdoor StreamLab (OSL) at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL). Following an experiment with a single rock vane, three arrays of three evenly spaced structures (rock vanes, J-hooks, and bendway weirs) were installed in a single meander bend. To improve fundamental understanding of the interaction of the complex flow field around these structures with the sediment bed in a field-scale meandering stream, high resolution channel topography data were obtained for the entire meander bend at bankfull flow conditions (280 LPS) with and without structure arrays. Three-dimensional flow velocity and turbulence was measured using acoustic Doppler velocimetry for each scenario in nine cross sections located before, after, between, and over the structure installation locations. Velocity point spacing was decreased close to boundaries (bed, bank, or structure). The velocity data confirmed that the velocity core moved away from the outside of the meander bend in the presence of structures; however, increased local shear stresses around the structures increased scour which threatened structure stability. For each structure array, individual structures introduced different velocity patterns including visible recirculation zones and turbulent structures depending on the structure type and where in the meander bend the structure was placed. The results from these experiments will inform stream restoration structure design in a meandering stream.

  15. Measurement of microbubble-induced acoustic microstreaming using microparticle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, Paul; Zhu, Yonggang; Manasseh, Richard; Ooi, Andrew

    2005-02-01

    Micro particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the velocity fields around oscillating gas bubbles in microfluidic geometries were undertaken. Two sets of experiments were performed. The first measured the acoustic microstreaming around a gas bubble with a radius of 195 μm attached to a wall in a chamber of 30 mm× 30 mm× 0.66 mm. Under acoustic excitation, vigorous streaming in the form of a circulation around on the bubble was observed. The streaming flow was highest near the surface of the bubble with velocities around 1mm/s measured. The velocity magnitude decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the bubble. The velocity field determined by micro-PIV matched the streaklines of the fluorescent particles very well. The second set of experiments measured the streaming at the interface between a trapped air bubble and water inside a microchannel of cross section 100 μm × 90 μm. The streaming flow was limited to within a short distance from the interface and was observed as a looping flow, moving towards the interface from the top and being circulated back from the bottom of the channel. The characteristic streaming velocity was in the order of 100 μm/s.

  16. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reethof, G.; McDaniel, O.H.

    1982-01-01

    The work has shown that acoustic agglomeration at practical acoustic intensities and frequencies is technically and most likely economically viable. The following studies were performed with the listed results: The physics of acoustic agglomeration is complex particularly at the needed high acoustic intensities in the range of 150 to 160 dB and frequencies in the 2500 Hz range. The analytical model which we developed, although not including nonlinear acoustic efforts, agreed with the trends observed. We concentrated our efforts on clarifying the impact of high acoustic intensities on the generation of turbulence. Results from a special set of tests show that although some acoustically generated turbulence of sorts exists in the 150 to 170 dB range with acoustic streaming present, such turbulence will not be a significant factor in acoustic agglomeration compared to the dominant effect of the acoustic velocities at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. Studies of the robustness of the agglomerated particles using the Anderson Mark III impactor as the source of the shear stresses on the particles show that the agglomerates should be able to withstand the rigors of flow through commercial cyclones without significant break-up. We designed and developed a 700/sup 0/F tubular agglomerator of 8'' internal diameter. The electrically heated system functioned well and provided very encouraging agglomeration results at acoustic levels in the 150 to 160 dB and 2000 to 3000 Hz ranges. We confirmed earlier results that an optimum frequency exists at about 2500 Hz and that larger dust loadings will give better results. Studies of the absorption of acoustic energy by various common gases as a function of temperature and humidity showed the need to pursue such an investigation for flue gas constituents in order to provide necessary data for the design of agglomerators. 65 references, 56 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Experimental and numerical investigations of resonant acoustic waves in near-critical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nusair; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2015-10-01

    Flow and transport induced by resonant acoustic waves in a near-critical fluid filled cylindrical enclosure is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Supercritical carbon dioxide (near the critical or the pseudo-critical states) in a confined resonator is subjected to acoustic field created by an electro-mechanical acoustic transducer and the induced pressure waves are measured by a fast response pressure field microphone. The frequency of the acoustic transducer is chosen such that the lowest acoustic mode propagates along the enclosure. For numerical simulations, a real-fluid computational fluid dynamics model representing the thermo-physical and transport properties of the supercritical fluid is considered. The simulated acoustic field in the resonator is compared with measurements. The formation of acoustic streaming structures in the highly compressible medium is revealed by time-averaging the numerical solutions over a given period. Due to diverging thermo-physical properties of supercritical fluid near the critical point, large scale oscillations are generated even for small sound field intensity. The strength of the acoustic wave field is found to be in direct relation with the thermodynamic state of the fluid. The effects of near-critical property variations and the operating pressure on the formation process of the streaming structures are also investigated. Irregular streaming patterns with significantly higher streaming velocities are observed for near-pseudo-critical states at operating pressures close to the critical pressure. However, these structures quickly re-orient to the typical Rayleigh streaming patterns with the increase operating pressure. PMID:26520322

  18. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  19. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  20. SU-D-210-07: The Dependence On Acoustic Velocity of Medium On the Needle Template and Electronic Grid Alignment in Ultrasound QA for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, P; Kapoor, R; Curran, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the impact on acoustic velocity (AV) of two different media (water and milk) using the needle template/electronic grid alignment test. Water, easily available, makes a good material to test the alignment of the template and grid although water’s AV (1498 m/s at 25°C) is significantly different from tissue (1540 m/s). Milk, with an AV much closer (1548 m/s) to prostate tissue, may be a good substitute for water in ultrasound quality assurance testing. Methods: Tests were performed using a Hitachi ultrasound unit with a mechanical arrangement designed to position needles parallel to the transducer. In this work, two materials – distilled water and homogenized whole milk (AVs of 1498 and 1548 m/s at 25°C) were used in a phantom to test ultrasound needle/grid alignment. The images were obtained with both materials and analyzed for their placement accuracy. Results: The needle template/electronic grid alignment tests showed displacement errors between measured and calculated values. The measurements showed displacements of 2.3mm (water) and 0.4mm (milk), and 1.6mm (water) and 0.3mm (milk) at depths of 7cm and 5cm respectively from true needle positions. The calculated results showed a displacement of 2.36 mm (water); 0.435mm (milk), and 1.66mm (water) and 0.31mm (milk) at a depth of 7cm and 5cm respectively. The displacements in the X and Y directions were also calculated. At depths of 7cm and 5cm, the (ΔX,ΔY) displacements in water were (0.829mm, 2.21mm) and (0.273mm, 1.634mm) and for milk were (0.15mm, 0.44mm) and (0.05mm, 0.302mm) respectively. Conclusion: The measured and calculated values were in good agreement for all tests. They show that milk provides superior results when performing needle template and electronic grid alignment tests for ultrasound units used in prostate brachytherapy.

  1. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  2. Acoustic Radiation Force on a Finite-Sized Particle due to an Acoustic Field in a Viscous Compressible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Parmar, Manoj; Balachandar, S.

    2013-11-01

    Particles when subjected to acoustic waves experience a time-averaged second-order force known as the acoustic radiation force, which is of prime importance in the fields of microfluidics and acoustic levitation. Here, the acoustic radiation force on a rigid spherical particle in a viscous compressible medium due to progressive and standing waves is considered. The relevant length scales include: particle radius (a), acoustic wavelength (λ) and viscous penetration depth (δ). While a / λ and a / δ are arbitrary, δ << λ . A farfield derivation approach has been used in determining the radiated force. Expressing the flow-field as a sum of the incident and scattered fields, an analytical expression for the force is obtained as a summation over infinite series (monopole, dipole and higher sources). These results indicate that the contributions from monopole, dipole and their cross-interaction are sufficient to describe the acoustic radiation force. Subsequently, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of the particle surface and volume averages of the incoming velocity. This generalization allows one to evaluate the radiation force for an incoming wave of any functional form. However acoustic streaming effects are neglected.

  3. Fluid shielding of high-velocity jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental noise data for a nozzle exhaust system incorporating a thermal acoustic shield (TAS) are presented to show the effect of changes in geometric and flow parameters on attenuation of high-velocity jet exhaust noise in the flyover plane. The results are presented for a 10.00-cm-diameter primary conical nozzle with a TAS configuration consisting of a 2.59- or 5.07-cm-wide annular gap. Shield-stream exhaust velocity was varied from 157 to 248 m/sec to investigate the effect of velocity ratio. The results showed that increasing the annular gap width increases attenuation of high-frequency noise when comparisons are made on the same ideal thrust basis. Varying the velocity ratio had a minor effect on the noise characteristics of the nozzles investigated.

  4. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  5. Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performance of a scoop inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.; Dietrich, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performances of a scoop inlet were studied. The scoop inlet is designed with a portion of the lower cowling extended forward to direct upward any noise that is propagating out the front of the engine toward the ground. The tests were conducted in an anechoic wind tunnel facility at free stream velocities of 0, 18, 41, and 61 m/sec and angles of attack from -10 deg to 120 deg. Inlet throat Mach number was varied from 0.30 to 0.75. Aerodynamically, at a free stream velocity of 41 m/sec, the design throat Mach number (0.63), and an angle of attack of 50 deg, the scoop inlet total pressure recovery was 0.989 and the total pressure distortion was 0.15. The angles of attack where flow separation occurred with the scoop inlet were higher than those for a conventional symmetric inlet. Acoustically, the scoop inlet provided a maximum noise reduction of 12 to 15 db below the inlet over the entire range of throat Mach number and angle of attack at a free-stream velocity of 41 m/sec.

  6. Use of acoustic backscatter and vertical velocity to estimate concentration and dynamics of suspended solids in Upper Klamath Lake, south-central Oregon: Implications for Aphanizomenon flos-aquae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical velocity and acoustic backscatter measurements by acoustic Doppler current profilers were used to determine seasonal, subseasonal (days to weeks), and diel variation in suspended solids in a freshwater lake where massive cyanobacterial blooms occur annually. During the growing season, the suspended material in the lake is dominated by the buoyancy-regulating cyanobacteria, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Measured variables (water velocity, relative backscatter [RB], wind speed, and air and water temperatures) were averaged over the deployment season at each sample time of day to determine average diel cycles. Phase shifts between diel cycles in RB and diel cycles in wind speed, vertical water temperature differences (delta T(degree)), and horizontal current speeds were found by determining the lead or lag that maximized the linear correlation between the respective diel cycles. Diel cycles in RB were more in phase with delta T(degree) cycles, and, to a lesser extent, wind cycles, than to water current cycles but were out of phase with the cycle that would be expected if the vertical movement of buoyant cyanobacteria colonies was controlled primarily by light. Clear evidence of a diel cycle in vertical velocity was found only at the two deepest sites in the lake. Cycles of vertical velocity, where present, were out of phase with expected vertical motion of cyanobacterial colonies based on the theoretical cycle for light-driven vertical movement. This suggests that water column stability and turbulence were more important factors in controlling vertical distribution of colonies than light. Variations at subseasonal time scales were determined by filtering data to pass periods between 1.2 and 15 days. At subseasonal time scales, correlations between RB and currents or air temperature were consistent with increased concentration of cyanobacterial colonies near the surface when water column stability increased (higher air temperatures or weaker currents) and

  7. Field Observations of Supraglacial Streams on the Juneau Icefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zok, A.; Karlstrom, L.; Hood, E. W.; Manga, M.; Wenzel, R.; Kite, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Each year during the summer, networks of meltwater streams form below the neve line on many glaciers as the ice surface ablates. This supraglacial network forms an integral part of the total glacial hydrologic system, and exhibits many features common to other fluvial systems despite marked differences in the mechanisms and timescales of erosional processes. Here, we discuss field observations of supraglacial streams on the Mendenhall and Llewellyn glaciers on the Juneau Icefield, taken in July and August, 2010. These sites, 960 m apart in elevation and on different sides of the continental divide, exist in different microclimates and are dominated by different terrain features. The Mendenhall site, near the terminus, receives a large yearly rainwater input and exhibits well-developed stream networks dominated by structural control of the underlying ice. In contrast, the Llewellyn site is much drier and near the neve line, with a dense network of streams whose incision dominates the sculpting of the glacial surface. Stream data includes temperature measurements taken with a Distributed Temperature Sensor and HOBO temperature loggers, velocity profiles taken with an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter, downstream meander migration rates, and the isotopic composition of water samples. We also document the dynamics of streams in the context of the broader supraglacial network by taking detailed GPS surveys of the beds and banks of streams, as well as measuring drainage density and subsurface flow. Finally, we relate these measurements to surface ablation rates and meteorological data gathered from each site. We find distinct diurnal variation in stream water temperature, discharge, and isotopic content. Distributed Temperature Sensor measurements and cross sectional temperature profiles reveal subtle variation in downstream and cross-stream water temperature. Water temperature generally increases downstream where channels tend to be large, and we investigate the contribution

  8. Highly directional acoustic receivers.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A; Evora, Victor M; Nuttall, Albert H

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources. PMID:12656387

  9. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  10. Producing Metallic Glasses With Acoustic Leviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Feng, I. A.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic fields support and cool liquid particles. Levitated by sound energy, liquid drop in acoustic standing-wave field surrounded by acousticically-induced jet streams. Streaming gas cools drow below its freezing point in small fraction of second. Allows new amorphous alloys including "metallic glass" to be formed.

  11. The Puzzling Ophiuchus Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies or globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way can be pulled apart by tidal forces, leaving behind a trail of stars known as a stellar stream. One such trail, the Ophiuchus stream, has posed a serious dynamical puzzle since its discovery. But a recent study has identified four stars that might help resolve this streams mystery.Conflicting TimescalesThe stellar stream Ophiuchus was discovered around our galaxy in 2014. Based on its length, which appears to be 1.6 kpc, we can calculate the time that has passed since its progenitor was disrupted and the stream was created: ~250 Myr. But the stars within it are ~12 Gyr old, and the stream orbits the galaxy with a period of ~350 Myr.Given these numbers, we can assume that Ophiuchuss progenitor completed many orbits of the Milky Way in its lifetime. So why would it only have been disrupted 250 million years ago?Fanning StreamLed by Branimir Sesar (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy), a team of scientists has proposed an idea that might help solve this puzzle. If the Ophiuchus stellar stream is on a chaotic orbit common in triaxial potentials, which the Milky Ways may be then the stream ends can fan out, with stars spreading in position and velocity.The fanned part of the stream, however, would be difficult to detect because of its low surface brightness. As a result, the Ophiuchus stellar stream could actually be longer than originally measured, implying that it was disrupted longer ago than was believed.Search for Fan StarsTo test this idea, Sesar and collaborators performed a search around the ends of the stream, looking for stars thatare of the right type to match the stream,are at the predicted distance of the stream,are located near the stream ends, andhave velocities that match the stream and dont match the background halo stars.Histogram of the heliocentric velocities of the 43 target stars. Six stars have velocities matching the stream velocity. Two of these are located in the main stream; the other

  12. The unsteady laminar boundary layer on an axisymmetric body subject to small-amplitude fluctuations in the free-stream velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of small-amplitude, time-periodic, free-stream disturbances on an otherwise steady axisymmetric boundary layer on a circular cylinder is considered. Numerical solutions to the problem are presented, and an asymptotic solution to the flow, valid far downstream along the axis of the cylinder is detailed. Particular emphasis is placed on the unsteady eigensolutions that occur far downstream, which turn out to be very different from the analogous planar eigensolutions. These axisymmetric eigensolutions are computed numerically and also are described by asymptotic analyses valid for low and high frequencies of oscillation.

  13. Effects of forward velocity on turbulent jet mixing noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    Flight simulation experiments were conducted in an anechoic free jet facility over a broad range of model and free jet velocities. The resulting scaling laws were in close agreement with scaling laws derived from theoretical and semiempirical considerations. Additionally, measurements of the flow structure of jets were made in a wind tunnel by using a laser velocimeter. These tests were conducted to describe the effects of velocity ratio and jet exit Mach number on the development of a jet in a coflowing stream. These turbulence measurements and a simplified Lighthill radiation model were used in predicting the variation in radiated noise at 90 deg to the jet axis with velocity ratio. Finally, the influence of forward motion on flow-acoustic interactions was examined through a reinterpretation of the 'static' numerical solutions to the Lilley equation.

  14. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  15. Stream-coordinate structure and variability of the Kuroshio Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Penelope J.; Donohue, Kathleen A.; Watts, D. Randolph

    2009-07-01

    Fine horizontal-scale surveys performed during the Kuroshio Extension System Study in May 2004 provide near-synoptic ADCP and CTD data along cross-jet transects just up-stream of the first meander trough of the Kuroshio Extension. An array of current- and pressure-recording inverted echo sounders (CPIES) deployed over a ˜600×600km region centered on the first meander trough provide time series of bottom pressure and currents as well as acoustic travel time ( τ), which is converted via the gravest empirical mode method to profiles of temperature, salinity, and specific volume anomaly. These datasets are used here to determine the mean velocity, hydrographic, and potential vorticity structure of the Kuroshio Extension in its "weakly meandering" state in a stream-coordinate system, which avoids the lateral smearing of the jet structure that results from an Eulerian approach. Maximum surface down-stream velocities range from 1 to 2 m/s, averaging around 1.4 m/s. Down-stream velocities reach the bottom south of the core with average magnitudes of 1-5 cm/s but vary in magnitude and direction depending upon the presence of deep barotropic eddies. In the first meander crest, mean cross-stream flux ( O(0.5-2 cm/s)) is towards the cyclonic side, while entering the trough it is towards the anticyclonic side. However, cross-stream flows appear to be event-driven, with fluctuations in steepness of the meander pattern driven by jet instability. Transports above 5300 dbar decrease west to east from 138 Sv at 143.75∘E in the first crest, to 124 Sv at the trough and 75 Sv entering the second crest at 148.5∘E. The mean from the surveys shows relative vorticity ( ζ) making contributions as high as 72% of f on the cyclonic side and -41% of f on the anticyclonic side, while the "twisting" term due to vertical shear and horizontal density gradients reaches a maximum in the mean of 45% of f north of the core. Comparison of the structure in crests and troughs from the CPIES

  16. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  17. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-08-10

    A chemical or intrinsic physical property sensor is described comprising: (a) a substrate; (b) an interaction region of said substrate where the presence of a chemical or physical stimulus causes a detectable change in the velocity and/or an attenuation of an acoustic wave traversing said region; and (c) a plurality of paired input and output interdigitated electrodes patterned on the surface of said substrate where each of said paired electrodes has a distinct periodicity, where each of said paired electrodes is comprised of an input and an output electrode; (d) an input signal generation means for transmitting an input signal having a distinct frequency to a specified input interdigitated electrode of said plurality so that each input electrode receives a unique input signal, whereby said electrode responds to said input signal by generating an acoustic wave of a specified frequency, thus, said plurality responds by generating a plurality of acoustic waves of different frequencies; (e) an output signal receiving means for determining an acoustic wave velocity and an amplitude of said acoustic waves at several frequencies after said waves transverses said interaction region and comparing these values to an input acoustic wave velocity and an input acoustic wave amplitude to produce values for perturbations in acoustic wave velocities and for acoustic wave attenuation as a function of frequency, where said output receiving means is individually coupled to each of said output interdigitated electrode; (f) a computer means for analyzing a data stream comprising information from said output receiving means and from said input signal generation means to differentiate a specified response due to a perturbation from a subsequent specified response due to a subsequent perturbation to determine the chemical or intrinsic physical properties desired.

  18. On th meridional surface profile of the Gulf Stream at 55 deg W

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Zachariah R.; Teague, William J.

    1995-01-01

    Nine-month records from nine inverted echo sounders (IESs) are analyzed to describe the mean baroclinic Gulf Stream at 55 deg W. IES acoustic travel times are converted to thermocline depth which is optimally interpolated. Kinematic and dynamic parameters (Gulf Stream meridional position, velocity, and vorticity) are calculated. Primary Gulf Stream variabiltiy is attributed to meandering and and changes in direction. A mean, stream-coordinate (relative to Gulf Stream instantaneous position and direction) meridional profile is derived and compared with results presented by other investigators. The mean velocity is estimated at 0.84 m/s directed 14 deg to the right eastward, and the thermocline (12 c) drops 657 m (north to south), corresponding to a baroclinic rise of the surface of 0.87 m. The effect of Gulf Stream curvature on temporal mean profiles is found to be unimportant and of minimal importance overall. The derived, downstream current profile is well represented by a Gaussian function and is about 190 km wide where it crosses zero. Surface baroclinic transport is estimated to be 8.5 x 10(exp 4) sq m/s, and maximum shear (flanking the maximum) is 1.2 x 10(exp -5). Results compare well with other in situ observational results from the same time period. On the other hand, analyses (by others) of concurrent satellite altimetry (Geosat) suggest a considerable narrower, more intense mean Gulf Stream.

  19. Temperature Dependence of Surface Acoustic Wave Propagation Velocity in InxGa1-xN Films Obtained by High-Resolution Brillouin Spectroscopy: Determination of Temperature Coefficient of Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riobóo, Rafael J. Jiménez; Prieto, Carlos; Cuscó, Ramón; Artús, Lluís; Boney, Chris; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2013-05-01

    Temperature-dependent surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation velocity and temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) have been determined for the first time in InxGa1-xN alloys by means of high-resolution Brillouin spectroscopy (HRBS). HRBS offers an alternative way of determining TCF. The obtained TCF values present a non-linear behavior with the In concentration. TCF of pure InN (-13.75 ppm/K) is similar to those of AlN and GaN (-19 and -17.7 ppm/K, respectively). InxGa1-xN samples exhibit frequency values that are very stable against temperature changes, which makes InxGa1-xN a good candidate for current SAW-based technological applications.

  20. Dust-ion-acoustic solitons with transverse perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Moslem, Waleed M.; El-Taibany, W.F.; El-Shewy, E.K.; El-Shamy, E.F.

    2005-05-15

    The ionization source model is considered, for the first time, to study the combined effects of trapped electrons, transverse perturbation, ion streaming velocity, and dust charge fluctuations on the propagation of dust-ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas. The solitary waves are investigated through the derivation of the damped modified Kadomtsev-Petviashivili equation using the reductive perturbation method. Conditions for the formation of solitons as well as their properties are clearly explained. The relevance of our investigation to supernovae shells is also discussed.

  1. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  2. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  3. Small acoustically forced symmetric bodies in viscous fluids.

    PubMed

    Nadal, François; Lauga, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The total force exerted on a small rigid body by an acoustic field in a viscous fluid is addressed analytically in the limit where the typical size of the particle is smaller than both the viscous diffusion length scale and the acoustic wavelength. In this low-frequency limit, such a force can be calculated provided the effect of the acoustic steady streaming is negligible. Using the Eulerian linear expansion of Lagrangian hydrodynamic quantities (velocity and pressure), the force on a small solid sphere free to move in an acoustic field is first calculated in the case of progressive and standing waves, and it is compared to past results. The proposed method is then extended to the case of more complex shapes with three planes of symmetry. For a symmetric body oriented with one of its axis along the wave direction, the acoustic force exerted by a progressive wave is affected by the particle shape at leading order. In contrast, for a standing wave (with the same orientation), the force experienced by the particle at leading order is the same as the one experienced by a sphere of same volume and density. PMID:27036245

  4. Toward a Neurophysiological Theory of Auditory Stream Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Joel S.; Alain, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Auditory stream segregation (or streaming) is a phenomenon in which 2 or more repeating sounds differing in at least 1 acoustic attribute are perceived as 2 or more separate sound sources (i.e., streams). This article selectively reviews psychophysical and computational studies of streaming and comprehensively reviews more recent…

  5. AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with enhanced microfluidic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. B.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chen, J. J.; Xuan, W. P.; Chen, J. K.; Wang, X. Z.; Mayrhofer, P.; Duan, P. F.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.; Luo, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the characterization of scandium aluminum nitride (Al1‑x Sc x N, x  =  27%) films and discusses surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on them. Both AlScN and AlN films were deposited on silicon by sputtering and possessed columnar microstructures with (0 0 0 2) crystal orientation. The AlScN/Si SAW devices showed improved electromechanical coupling coefficients (K 2, ~2%) compared with pure AlN films (<0.5%). The performance of the two types of devices was also investigated and compared, using acoustofluidics as an example. The AlScN/Si SAW devices achieved much lower threshold powers for the acoustic streaming and pumping of liquid droplets, and the acoustic streaming and pumping velocities were 2  ×  and 3  ×  those of the AlN/Si SAW devices, respectively. Mechanical characterization showed that the Young’s modulus and hardness of the AlN film decreased significantly when Sc was doped, and this was responsible for the decreased acoustic velocity and resonant frequency, and the increased temperature coefficient of frequency, of the AlScN SAW devices.

  6. Acoustic and Aero-Mixing Experimental Results for Fluid Shield Scale Model Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Mengle, V. G.; Shin, H. W.; Majjigi, R. K.

    2005-01-01

    The principle objectives of this investigation are to evaluate the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of fluid shield nozzle concept and to assess Far 36, Stage 3 potential for fluid shield nozzle with Flade Cycle. Acoustic data for nine scale model nozzle configurations are obtained. The effects of simulated flight and geometric and aerothermodynamic flow variables on the acoustic behavior of the fluid shield are determined. The acoustic tests are aimed at studying the effect of: (1) shield thickness, (2) wrap angle, (3) mass flow and velocity ratios between shield and core streams at constant cycle specific thrust (i.e., mixed velocity), (4) porous plug, and (5) subsonic shield. Shadowgraphs of six nozzle configurations are obtained to understand the plume flowfield features. Static pressure data on suppressor chutes in the core stream (shielded and unshielded) sides and on plug surface are acquired to determine the impact of fluid shield on base drag of the 36-chute suppressor nozzle and the thrust augmentation due to the plug, respectively.

  7. Shock associated noise reduction from inverted-velocity-profile coannular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanna, H. K.; Tam, C. K. W.; Brown, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Acoustic measurements show that the shock noise from the outer stream is virtually eliminated when the inner stream is operated at a Mach number just above unity, regardless of all the other jet operating conditions. At this optimum condition, the coannular jet provides the maximum noise reduction relative to the equivalent single jet. The shock noise reduction can be achieved at inverted-as well as normal-velocity-profile conditions, provided the coannular jet is operated with the inner stream just slightly supersonic. Analytical models for the shock structure and shock noise are developed indicate that a drastic change in the outer stream shock cell structure occurs when the inner stream increases its velocity from subsonic to supersonic. At this point, the almost periodic shock cell structure of the outer stream nearly completely disappears the noise radiated is minimum. Theoretically derive formulae for the peak frequencies and intensity scaling of shock associated noise are compared with the measured results, and good agreement is found for both subsonic and supersonic inner jet flows.

  8. A method for predicting the noise levels of coannular jets with inverted velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A coannular jet was equated with a single stream equivalent jet with the same mass flow, energy, and thrust. The acoustic characteristics of the coannular jet were then related to the acoustic characteristics of the single jet. Forward flight effects were included by incorporating a forward exponent, a Doppler amplification factor, and a Strouhal frequency shift. Model test data, including 48 static cases and 22 wind tunnel cases, were used to evaluate the prediction method. For the static cases and the low forward velocity wind tunnel cases, the spectral mean square pressure correlation coefficients were generally greater than 90 percent, and the spectral sound pressure level standard deviation were generally less than 3 decibels. The correlation coefficient and the standard deviation were not affected by changes in equivalent jet velocity. Limitations of the prediction method are also presented.

  9. Electrochemical Processes Enhanced by Acoustic Liquid Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic liquid manipulation is a family of techniques that employ the nonlinear acoustic effects of acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming to manipulate the behavior of liquids. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are exploring new methods of manipulating liquids for a variety of space applications, and we have found that acoustic techniques may also be used in the normal Earth gravity environment to enhance the performance of existing fluid processes. Working in concert with the NASA Commercial Technology Office, the Great Lakes Industrial Technology Center, and Alchemitron Corporation (Elgin, IL), researchers at Glenn have applied nonlinear acoustic principles to industrial applications. Collaborating with Alchemitron Corporation, we have adapted the devices to create acoustic streaming in a conventional electroplating process.

  10. Aggregate sound velocities and acoustic Grüneisen parameter of iron up to 300 GPa and 1,200 K

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovinsky, L. S.; Dubrovinskaia, N. A.; Le Bihan, T.

    2001-01-01

    Successful interpretation of available geophysical data requires experimental and theoretical information on the elasticity of solids under physical conditions of Earth's interior. Because iron is considered as major component in Earth's core, elastic properties of iron at high pressures and temperatures are very important for modeling its composition and dynamics. We use in situ x-ray diffraction data on ɛ-iron at static pressures up to 300 GPa and temperatures to 1,200 K to determine the Debye–Waller temperature factors and calculate aggregate sound velocities and Grüneisen parameter of ɛ-iron by using an approach that is based on Rietveld refinement at high pressures and temperatures. PMID:11504937

  11. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel: Acoustic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in a wind tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a CTOL hybrid inlet, an STOL hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the baseline inlet noise and the effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The 1/3 octave band noise data from these tests are given along with selected plots of 1/3 octave band spectra and directivity and full scale PNL directivities. The test facilities and data reduction techniques used are also described.

  12. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  13. Acoustic noise from volcanoes - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woulff, G.; Mcgetchin, T. R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses some theoretical aspects of acoustic investigation of volcanoes and describes a field experiment involving the recording, analysis, and interpretation of acoustic radiation from energetic fumaroles at Volcan Acatenango, Guatemala, during mid-January 1973. Particular attention is given to deriving information about the flow velocity of the erupting medium from acoustics as a means to study eruption dynamics. Theoretical considerations suggest that acoustic power radiated during gaseous volcanic eruptions may be related to gas exit velocity according to appropriate power laws. Eruption acoustics proves useful as a means of quantitative monitoring of volcanic activity.

  14. The acoustic vector sensor: a versatile battlefield acoustics sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bree, Hans-Elias; Wind, Jelmer W.

    2011-06-01

    The invention of the Microflown sensor has made it possible to measure acoustic particle velocity directly. An acoustic vector sensor (AVS) measures the particle velocity in three directions (the source direction) and the pressure. The sensor is a uniquely versatile battlefield sensor because its size is a few millimeters and it is sensitive to sound from 10Hz to 10kHz. This article shows field tests results of acoustic vector sensors, measuring rifles, heavy artillery, fixed wing aircraft and helicopters. Experimental data shows that the sensor is suitable as a ground sensor, mounted on a vehicle and on a UAV.

  15. Acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan jet noise simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Stringas, E. J.; Brausch, J. F.; Staid, P. S.; Heck, P. H.; Latham, D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a static acoustic and aerodynamic performance, model-scale test program on coannular unsuppressed and multielement fan suppressed nozzle configurations are summarized. The results of the static acoustic tests show a very beneficial interaction effect. When the measured noise levels were compared with the predicted noise levels of two independent but equivalent conical nozzle flow streams, noise reductions for the unsuppressed coannular nozzles were of the order of 10 PNdB; high levels of suppression (8 PNdB) were still maintained even when only a small amount of core stream flow was used. The multielement fan suppressed coannular nozzle tests showed 15 PNdB noise reductions and up to 18 PNdB noise reductions when a treated ejector was added. The static aerodynamic performance tests showed that the unsuppressed coannular plug nozzles obtained gross thrust coefficients of 0.972, with 1.2 to 1.7 percent lower levels for the multielement fan-suppressed coannular flow nozzles. For the first time anywhere, laser velocimeter velocity profile measurements were made on these types of nozzle configurations and with supersonic heated flow conditions. Measurements showed that a very rapid decay in the mean velocity occurs for the nozzle tested.

  16. Polariton Condensation in Dynamic Acoustic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-Méndez, E. A.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Wouters, M.; Bradley, R.; Biermann, K.; Guda, K.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.; Sarkar, D.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that the tunable potential introduced by a surface acoustic wave on a homogeneous polariton condensate leads to fragmentation of the condensate into an array of wires which move with the acoustic velocity. Reduction of the spatial coherence of the condensate emission along the surface acoustic wave direction is attributed to the suppression of coupling between the spatially modulated condensates. Interparticle interactions observed at high polariton densities screen the acoustic potential, partially reversing its effect on spatial coherence.

  17. Regular patterns stabilize auditory streams.

    PubMed

    Bendixen, Alexandra; Denham, Susan L; Gyimesi, Kinga; Winkler, István

    2010-12-01

    The auditory system continuously parses the acoustic environment into auditory objects, usually representing separate sound sources. Sound sources typically show characteristic emission patterns. These regular temporal sound patterns are possible cues for distinguishing sound sources. The present study was designed to test whether regular patterns are used as cues for source distinction and to specify the role that detecting these regularities may play in the process of auditory stream segregation. Participants were presented with tone sequences, and they were asked to continuously indicate whether they perceived the tones in terms of a single coherent sequence of sounds (integrated) or as two concurrent sound streams (segregated). Unknown to the participant, in some stimulus conditions, regular patterns were present in one or both putative streams. In all stimulus conditions, participants' perception switched back and forth between the two sound organizations. Importantly, regular patterns occurring in either one or both streams prolonged the mean duration of two-stream percepts, whereas the duration of one-stream percepts was unaffected. These results suggest that temporal regularities are utilized in auditory scene analysis. It appears that the role of this cue lies in stabilizing streams once they have been formed on the basis of simpler acoustic cues. PMID:21218898

  18. FILTER FOR HIGH VELOCITY GAS STREAMS

    DOEpatents

    Heckman, R.A.; Warner, H.F.

    1963-11-01

    An air filter that is particularly useful in air-sampling rockets is presented. The filter comprises a cellulose fiber mat having an evenly disposed thin coating of stearic acid. Protective loose weave fabric covers are stitched to the front and back of the fiber mat, the stitching being in the form of a sine wave spiraled from the midpoint of the mat out to its periphery. (AEC)

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  20. Acoustic velocity measurements on Na 2O-TiO 2-SiO 2 liquids: Evidence for a highly compressible TiO 2 component related to five-coordinated Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Lange, Rebecca A.; Ai, Yuhui

    2007-09-01

    Longitudinal acoustic velocities were measured at 1 bar in 10 Na 2O-TiO 2-SiO 2 (NTS) liquids for which previous density and thermal expansion data are reported in the literature. Data were collected with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer at centered frequencies of 4.5, 5, and 6 MHz between 1233 and 1896 K; in all cases, the sound speeds decrease with increasing temperature. Six of the liquids have a similar TiO 2 concentration (˜25 mol %), so that the effect of varying Na/Si ratio on the partial molar compressibility of the TiO 2 component can be evaluated. Theoretically based models for βT and (∂ V/∂ P) T as a function of composition and temperature are presented. As found previously for the partial molar volume of TiO 2(V) in sodium silicate melts, values of β (13.7-18.8 × 10 -2/GPa) vary systematically with the Na/Si and Na/(Si + Ti) ratio in the liquid. In contrast values of β for the SiO 2 and Na 2O components (6.6 and 8.0 × 10 -2/GPa, respectively, at 1573 K) are independent of composition. Na 2O is the only component that contributes to the temperature dependence of the compressibility of NTS liquids (1.13 ± 0.04 × 10 -4/GPa K). The results further indicate that the TiO 2 component is twice as compressible as the Na 2O and SiO 2 components. The enhanced compressibility of TiO 2 appears to be related to the abundance of five-coordinated Ti ( [5]Ti) in these liquids, but not with a change in Ti coordination. Instead, it is proposed that the asymmetric geometry of [5]Ti in a square pyramidal site promotes different topological rearrangements in alkali titanosilicate liquids, which lead to the enhanced compressibility of TiO 2.

  1. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  2. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  3. GCN: a gaseous Galactic halo stream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shoko

    2010-10-01

    We show that a string of HI clouds that form part of the high-velocity cloud complex known as GCN is a probable gaseous stream extending over more than 50° in the Galactic halo. The radial velocity gradient along the stream is used to deduce transverse velocities as a function of distance, enabling a family of orbits to be computed. We find that a direction of motion towards the Galactic disc coupled with a mid-stream distance of ~20kpc provides a good match to the observed sky positions and radial velocities of the HI clouds comprising the stream. With an estimated mass of 105Msolar, its progenitor is likely to be a dwarf galaxy. However, no stellar counterpart has been found amongst the currently known Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies or stellar streams and the exact origin of the stream is therefore currently unknown.

  4. Aerodynamic and acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1976-01-01

    The static aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of duct-burning turbofan (DBTF) exhaust nozzles are established. Scale models, having a total area equivalent to a 0.127 m diameter convergent nozzle, simulating unsuppressed coannular nozzles and mechanically suppressed nozzles with and without ejectors (hardwall and acoustically treated) were tested in a quiescent environment. The ratio of fan to primary area was varied from 0.75 to 1.2. Far field acoustic data, perceived noise levels, and thrust measurements were obtained for 417 test conditions. Pressure ratios were varied from 1.3 to 4.1 in the fan stream and from 1.53 to 2.5 in the primary stream. Total temperature varied from 395 to 1090 K in both streams. Jet noise reductions relative to synthesized prediction from 8 PNdB (with the unsuppressed coannular nozzle) to 15 PNdB (with a mechanically suppressed configuration) were observed at conditions typical of engines being considered under the Advanced Supersonic Technology program. The inherent suppression characteristic of the unsuppressed coannular nozzle is related to the rapid mixing in the jet wake caused by the velocity profiles associated with the DBTF. Since this can be achieved without a mechanical suppressor, significant reductions in aircraft weight or noise footprint can be realized.

  5. Measurement of Stream Discharge by Wading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K. Michael; Shields, Ronald R.

    2000-01-01

    Most years the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) makes over 50,000 stream discharge measurements. Over 75 percent of those measurements are made by wading streams and using the velocity-area method. This PowerPoint presentation describes how stream discharge should be measured when wading and using the velocity-area method. It is intended as a learning and reference tool for anyone responsible for making wading discharge measurements.

  6. The effects of forcing on a single stream shear layer and its parent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haw, Richard C.; Foss, John F.

    1990-01-01

    Forcing and its effect on fluid flows has become an accepted tool in the study and control of flow systems. It has been used both as a diagnostic tool, to explore the development and interaction of coherent structures, and as a method of controlling the behavior of the flow. A number of forcing methods have been used in order to provide a perturbation to the flow; among these are the use of an oscillating trailing edge, acoustically driven slots, external acoustic forcing, and mechanical piston methods. The effect of a planar mechanical piston forcing on a single stream shear layer is presented; it can be noted that this is one of the lesser studied free shear layers. The single stream shear layer can be characterized by its primary flow velocity scale and the thickness of the separating boundary layer. The velocity scale is constant over the length of the flow field; theta (x) can be used as a width scale to characterize the unforced shear layer. In the case of the forced shear layer the velocity field is a function of phase time and definition of a width measure becomes somewhat problematic.

  7. Acoustical Characterization of the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Investigations of near-shore and in-shore environments have, rightly, focused on geological, thermodynamic and hydrodynamic parameters. A complementary acoustical characterization of the estuarine environment provides another layer of information to facilitate a more complete understanding of the physical environment. Relatively few acoustical studies have been carried out in rivers, estuaries or other energetic environments; nearly all acoustical work in such environments has been done at high acoustic frequencies—in the 10's and 100's of kHz. To this end, within the context of a larger hydrodynamic field experiment (RIVET II), a small acoustic field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE), the acoustic objective of which was to characterize the acoustic environment in the CRE in terms of ambient noise field statistics and acoustic propagation characteristics at low-to-mid-frequencies. Acoustically, the CRE salt wedge consists of two isospeed layers separated by a thin, three-dimensional high-gradient layer. Results demonstrate that (1) this stratification supports ducting of low-angle acoustic energy in the upper layer and the creation of an acoustic shadow zone in the lower layer; (2) the spatiotemporal dynamics of the salt wedge structure during the very energetic flood and ebb tides induce significant variability in the acoustic environment, as well as significant flow noise across the acoustic transducer; and (3) this flow noise correlates to current velocity and complicates acoustical observations at low frequencies.

  8. Experimental analysis of radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle acoustophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Marin, Alvaro; Kähler, Christian J.; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas; Muller, Peter B.; Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the acoustophoretic motion of microparticles suspended in a liquid-filled acoustofluidic microchannel. This analysis intends to provide an experimental validation and support to very recent numerical and analytical models of radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle acoustophoresis (see Muller et al., Lab Chip 12, in press, 2012). For the experiments, we used a suspension of water and spherical polystyrene particles in a straight microchannel with rectangular cross section, actuated in its 1.94-MHz resonance by means of a piezoelectric transducer. The particles were labeled with a fluorescent dye and their motion was observed using an epifluorescent microscope. For the analysis, the Astigmatism Particle Tracking Velocimetry (APTV) technique was used to measure the three-dimensional trajectories and velocities of the particles with high precision and resolution (Cierpka et al., Meas Sci Technol 22, 2011). The experiments were performed for different particle sizes, ranging from 0.5- μm particles, dominated by the Stokes drag force induced by the acoustic streaming of the flow, to 5- μm particles, dominated by the acoustic radiation force. The results agree well with the analytical and numerical predictions.

  9. Mixing layer resonance under high-speed stream forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomassin, Jean; Mureithi, Njuki; Vo, Huu Duc

    2014-12-01

    In the majority of fluid-structure interaction problems, the biggest challenge lies in the fundamental understanding of the flow physics. Forced mixing layers is an important phenomenon found in many cases of flow-induced vibrations and acoustics. The response of a mixing layer to high-speed stream acoustic forcing is investigated with a theoretical and experimental approach. Two different experiments demonstrating the fluid mechanic phenomenon are presented. The first experiment consists of a circular jet impinging on a vibrating plate. The second experiment demonstrates the mixing layer resonance in the context of a fluidelastic instability causing high-amplitude vibrations in gas turbine high-pressure compressor rotor blades. Both the plate and the adjacent blade vibration induce an acoustic feedback that propagates within the jet and blade tip clearance flow, respectively. The resonance was found to occur when the feedback wavelength matched either the jet-to-plate or the inter-blade distance. In both experimental cases, the resonance condition has been simply modeled by the coincidence of a 1D feedback wave, which propagates upstream at reduced velocity by the high-speed flow. The coupling between the jet induced mixing layer and the feedback wave is assumed to naturally occur when one of the wave crests reaches the separation edge. The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the coupling mechanism between an emanating shear layer and the acoustic forcing originating within a fast flow stream. The study is based on a simplified analytical model in order to enlarge the current understanding of the mixing layer receptivity to the more specific case of its response to high-speed stream forcing. To identify the mixing layer resonant modes, an analytical resonance condition is proposed. It is found that the mixing layer response becomes spatially resonant for specific source locations downstream in the high-speed flow. The study also provides an

  10. Parvulescu Revisited: Small Tank Acoustics for Bioacousticians.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Peter H; Hawkins, Anthony D; Popper, Arthur N; Fay, Richard R; Gray, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often perform hearing studies on fish in small tanks. The acoustic field in such a tank is considerably different from the acoustic field that occurs in the animal's natural environment. The significance of these differences is magnified by the nature of the fish's auditory system where either acoustic pressure (a scalar), acoustic particle velocity (a vector), or both may serve as the stimulus. It is essential for the underwater acoustician to understand the acoustics of small tanks to be able to carry out valid auditory research in the laboratory and to properly compare and interpret the results of others. PMID:26611052

  11. Flow effects on benthic stream invertebrates and ecological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprivsek, Maja; Brilly, Mitja

    2010-05-01

    is not enough to make a shelter for stream invertebrates. It serves as a shelter only for microorganisms, but the stream invertebrates have to avoid the swift flow or adapt to flow with adaptations described above. To understand what conditions are subject to aquatic organisms and how to adapt, it is essential. Both, knowledge of fluid dynamics in natural watercourses and ecology are needed to understand to what conditions the stream invertebrates are exposed and how they cope with them. Some investigations of near bed flow will be performed on the Glinšica stream. The acoustic Doppler velocimeter SonTek will be adapted to measure so close to the bed as possible. It is expected we should be able to measure the velocities just 0,5 cm above the bed surface. We intend to measure the velocities on a natural and on a regulated reach and then compare the results.

  12. Acoustically Enhanced Electroplating Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center, Alchemitron Corp. is developing the Acoustically Enhanced Electroplating Process (AEEP), a new technique of employing nonlinear ultrasonics to enhance electroplating. The applications range from electroplating full-panel electronic circuit boards to electroplating microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. In a conventional plating process, the surface area to be plated is separated from the nonplated areas by a temporary mask. The mask may take many forms, from a cured liquid coating to a simple tape. Generally, the mask is discarded when the plating is complete, creating a solid waste product that is often an environmental hazard. The labor and materials involved with the layout, fabrication, and tooling of masks is a primary source of recurring and nonrecurring production costs. The objective of this joint effort, therefore, is to reduce or eliminate the need for masks. AEEP improves selective plating processes by using directed beams of high-intensity acoustic waves to create nonlinear effects that alter the fluid dynamic and thermodynamic behavior of the plating process. It relies on two effects: acoustic streaming and acoustic heating. Acoustic streaming is observed when a high-intensity acoustic beam creates a liquid current within the beam. The liquid current can be directed as the beam is directed and, thus, users can move liquid around as desired without using pumps and nozzles. The current of the electroplating electrolyte, therefore, can be directed at distinct target areas where electroplating is desired. The current delivers fresh electrolyte to the target area while flushing away the spent electrolyte. This dramatically increases the plating rate in the target area. In addition, acoustic heating of both the liquid in the beam and the target surface increases the chemical reaction rate, which further increases the plating rate. The combined effects of acoustic streaming and

  13. On the fully nonlinear acoustic waves in a plasma with positrons beam impact and superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Shan, S.; El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-15

    Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions, superthermal electrons, and positrons beam are reported. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to an energy-balance like equation. The latter is numerically analyzed to examine the existence regions for solitary and shock waves. It is found that only solitary waves can propagate, however, the model cannot support shocks. The effects of superthermality and beam parameters (via, positrons concentration and streaming velocity) on the existence region, as well as solitary wave profile have been discussed.

  14. Pressure measurement in supersonic air flow by differential absorptive laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2007-06-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach 2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, the streamwise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature, and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  15. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  16. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  17. Using micro-3D printing to build acoustically driven microswimmers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Nicolas; Stephan, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Spelman, Tamsin; Lauga, Eric; Dyfcom Team; Complex; Biological Fluids Team

    2015-11-01

    With no protection, a micron-sized free air bubble at room temperature in water has a life span shorter than a few tens of seconds. Using two-photon lithography, which is similar to 3D printing at the micron scale, we can build ``armors'' for these bubbles: micro-capsules with an opening to contain the bubble and extend its life to several hours in biological buffer solutions. When excited by an ultrasound transducer, a 20 μm bubble performs large amplitude oscillations in the capsule opening and generates a powerful acoustic streaming flow (velocity up to dozens of mm/s). A collaboration with the Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, is helping us predict the true resonance of these capsules and the full surrounding streaming flow. The present Bubbleboost project aims at creating red blood cell sized capsules (~ 10-20 μm) that can move on their own with a non-contact acoustic excitation for drug delivery applications. Another application of this research is in microfluidics: we are able to fabricate fields of capsules able to generate mixing effects in microchannels, or use the bubble-generated flow to guide passing objects at a junction. ERC Grant Agreement Bubbleboost no. 614655.

  18. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  19. CONNECTICUT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer of named streams in Connecticut. It includes two Shapefiles with line and polygon features. Both Shapefiles should be used together. The polygon shapefile fills in open water streams such as the Connecticut River as well as Long Island Sound. T...

  20. Stream Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J.

    Stream processors, like other multi core architectures partition their functional units and storage into multiple processing elements. In contrast to typical architectures, which contain symmetric general-purpose cores and a cache hierarchy, stream processors have a significantly leaner design. Stream processors are specifically designed for the stream execution model, in which applications have large amounts of explicit parallel computation, structured and predictable control, and memory accesses that can be performed at a coarse granularity. Applications in the streaming model are expressed in a gather-compute-scatter form, yielding programs with explicit control over transferring data to and from on-chip memory. Relying on these characteristics, which are common to many media processing and scientific computing applications, stream architectures redefine the boundary between software and hardware responsibilities with software bearing much of the complexity required to manage concurrency, locality, and latency tolerance. Thus, stream processors have minimal control consisting of fetching medium- and coarse-grained instructions and executing them directly on the many ALUs. Moreover, the on-chip storage hierarchy of stream processors is under explicit software control, as is all communication, eliminating the need for complex reactive hardware mechanisms.

  1. Cosmic microwave background acoustic peak locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Knox, L.; Mulroe, B.; Narimani, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and 12 extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g. that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 deg out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models versus numerical calculations. Here, we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential transients, neutrino free-streaming, the breakdown of tight coupling, the shape of the primordial power spectrum, details of the geometric projection from three to two dimensions, and the thickness of the last scattering surface. We also compare the peak locations determined from Planck measurements to expectations under the Λ cold dark matter model. Taking into account how the peak locations were determined, we find them to be in agreement.

  2. Investigation of micromixing by acoustically oscillated sharp-edges.

    PubMed

    Nama, Nitesh; Huang, Po-Hsun; Huang, Tony Jun; Costanzo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Recently, acoustically oscillated sharp-edges have been utilized to achieve rapid and homogeneous mixing in microchannels. Here, we present a numerical model to investigate acoustic mixing inside a sharp-edge-based micromixer in the presence of a background flow. We extend our previously reported numerical model to include the mixing phenomena by using perturbation analysis and the Generalized Lagrangian Mean (GLM) theory in conjunction with the convection-diffusion equation. We divide the flow variables into zeroth-order, first-order, and second-order variables. This results in three sets of equations representing the background flow, acoustic response, and the time-averaged streaming flow, respectively. These equations are then solved successively to obtain the mean Lagrangian velocity which is combined with the convection-diffusion equation to predict the concentration profile. We validate our numerical model via a comparison of the numerical results with the experimentally obtained values of the mixing index for different flow rates. Further, we employ our model to study the effect of the applied input power and the background flow on the mixing performance of the sharp-edge-based micromixer. We also suggest potential design changes to the previously reported sharp-edge-based micromixer to improve its performance. Finally, we investigate the generation of a tunable concentration gradient by a linear arrangement of the sharp-edge structures inside the microchannel. PMID:27158292

  3. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  4. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  5. Dynamical modeling of tidal streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo

    2014-11-01

    I present a new framework for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams. The framework consists of simple models for the initial action-angle distribution of tidal debris, which can be straightforwardly evolved forward in time. Taking advantage of the essentially one-dimensional nature of tidal streams, the transformation to position-velocity coordinates can be linearized and interpolated near a small number of points along the stream, thus allowing for efficient computations of a stream's properties in observable quantities. I illustrate how to calculate the stream's average location (its 'track') in different coordinate systems, how to quickly estimate the dispersion around its track, and how to draw mock stream data. As a generative model, this framework allows one to compute the full probability distribution function and marginalize over or condition it on certain phase-space dimensions as well as convolve it with observational uncertainties. This will be instrumental in proper data analysis of stream data. In addition to providing a computationally efficient practical tool for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams, the action-angle nature of the framework helps elucidate how the observed width of the stream relates to the velocity dispersion or mass of the progenitor, and how the progenitors of 'orphan' streams could be located. The practical usefulness of the proposed framework crucially depends on the ability to calculate action-angle variables for any orbit in any gravitational potential. A novel method for calculating actions, frequencies, and angles in any static potential using a single orbit integration is described in the Appendix.

  6. Dynamical Modeling of Tidal Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2014-11-01

    I present a new framework for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams. The framework consists of simple models for the initial action-angle distribution of tidal debris, which can be straightforwardly evolved forward in time. Taking advantage of the essentially one-dimensional nature of tidal streams, the transformation to position-velocity coordinates can be linearized and interpolated near a small number of points along the stream, thus allowing for efficient computations of a stream's properties in observable quantities. I illustrate how to calculate the stream's average location (its "track") in different coordinate systems, how to quickly estimate the dispersion around its track, and how to draw mock stream data. As a generative model, this framework allows one to compute the full probability distribution function and marginalize over or condition it on certain phase-space dimensions as well as convolve it with observational uncertainties. This will be instrumental in proper data analysis of stream data. In addition to providing a computationally efficient practical tool for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams, the action-angle nature of the framework helps elucidate how the observed width of the stream relates to the velocity dispersion or mass of the progenitor, and how the progenitors of "orphan" streams could be located. The practical usefulness of the proposed framework crucially depends on the ability to calculate action-angle variables for any orbit in any gravitational potential. A novel method for calculating actions, frequencies, and angles in any static potential using a single orbit integration is described in the Appendix.

  7. Computing continuous record of discharge with quantified uncertainty using index velocity observations: A probabilistic machine learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, Touraj; Hamilton, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs). In general, the index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate and recommended when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage such as backwater and unsteady flow conditions caused by but not limited to the following; stream confluences, streams flowing into lakes or reservoirs, tide-affected streams, regulated streamflows (dams or control structures), or streams affected by meteorological forcing, such as strong prevailing winds. In existing index velocity modeling techniques, two models (ratings) are required; index velocity model and stage-area model. The outputs from each of these models, mean channel velocity (Vm) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. Mean channel velocity (Vm) can generally be determined by a multivariate regression parametric model such as linear regression in the simplest case. The main challenges in the existing index velocity modeling techniques are; 1) Preprocessing and QA/QC of continuous index velocity data and synchronizing them with discharge measurements. 2) Nonlinear relationship between mean velocity and index velocity which is not uncommon at monitoring locations. 3)Model exploration and analysis in order to find the optimal regression model predictor(s) and model type (linear vs nonlinear and if nonlinear number of the parameters). 3) Model changes caused by dynamical changes in the environment (geomorphic, biological) over time 5) Deployment of the final model into the Data Management Systems (DMS) for real-time discharge calculation 6) Objective estimation of uncertainty caused by: field measurement errors; structural uncertainty; parameter uncertainty; and continuous sensor data

  8. Acoustic investigation of wall jet over a backward-facing step using a microphone phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perschke, Raimund F.; Ramachandran, Rakesh C.; Raman, Ganesh

    2015-02-01

    The acoustic properties of a wall jet over a hard-walled backward-facing step of aspect ratios 6, 3, 2, and 1.5 are studied using a 24-channel microphone phased array at Mach numbers up to M=0.6. The Reynolds number based on inflow velocity and step height assumes values from Reh = 3.0 ×104 to 7.2 ×105. Flow without and with side walls is considered. The experimental setup is open in the wall-normal direction and the expansion ratio is effectively 1. In case of flow through a duct, symmetry of the flow in the spanwise direction is lost downstream of separation at all but the largest aspect ratio as revealed by oil paint flow visualization. Hydrodynamic scattering of turbulence from the trailing edge of the step contributes significantly to the radiated sound. Reflection of acoustic waves from the bottom plate results in a modulation of power spectral densities. Acoustic source localization has been conducted using a 24-channel microphone phased array. Convective mean-flow effects on the apparent source origin have been assessed by placing a loudspeaker underneath a perforated flat plate and evaluating the displacement of the beamforming peak with inflow Mach number. Two source mechanisms are found near the step. One is due to interaction of the turbulent wall jet with the convex edge of the step. Free-stream turbulence sound is found to be peaked downstream of the step. Presence of the side walls increases free-stream sound. Results of the flow visualization are correlated with acoustic source maps. Trailing-edge sound and free-stream turbulence sound can be discriminated using source localization.

  9. Monitoring of stage and velocity, for computation of discharge in the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kevin K.; Goodwin, Greg E.

    2013-01-01

    example of a nonstandard stream gage. Traditional methods of equating stage to discharge historically were not effective. Examples of the nonstandard conditions include the converging tributary flows directly upstream of the gage; the trash rack and walkway near the opening of the conduit introducing turbulence and occasionally entraining air bubbles into the flow; debris within the conduit creating conditions of variable backwater and the constant influx of smaller debris that escapes the trash rack and catches or settles in the conduit and on the equipment. An acoustic Doppler velocity meter was installed to measure stage and velocity to compute discharge. The stage is used to calculate area based the stage-area rating. The index-velocity from the acoustic Doppler velocity meter is applied to the velocity-velocity rating and the product of the two rated values is a rated discharge by the index-velocity method. Nonstandard site conditions prevalent at the Summit Conduit stream gaging station generally are overcome through the index-velocity method. Despite the difficulties in gaging and measurements, improvements continue to be made in data collection, transmission, and measurements. Efforts to improve the site and to improve the ratings continue to improve the quality and quantity of the data available for Lake Michigan diversion accounting.

  10. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  11. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  12. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  13. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  14. Effects of horizontal velocity variations on ultrasonic velocity measurements in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Use of an ultrasonic velocity meter to determine discharge in open channels involves measuring the velocity in a line between transducers in the stream and relating that velocity to the average velocity in the stream. The standard method of calculating average velocity in the channel assumes that the velocity profile in the channel can be represented by the one-dimensional von Karman universal velocity profile. However, the velocity profile can be described by a two-dimensional equation that accounts for the horizontal velocity variations induced by the channel sides. An equation to calculate average velocity accounts for the two-dimensional variations in velocity within a stream. The use of this new equation to calculate average velocity was compared to the standard method in theoretical trapezoidal cross sections and in the L-31N and Snapper Creek Extension Canals near Miami, Florida. These comparisons indicate that the two-dimensional variations have the most significant effect in narrow, deep channels. Also, the two-dimensional effects may be significant in some field situations and need to be considered when determining average velocity and discharge with an ultrasonic velocity meter.

  15. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B.; Barry, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Simulation of a hot coaxial jet: Direct noise prediction and flow-acoustics correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogey, Christophe; Barré, Sébastien; Juvé, Daniel; Bailly, Christophe

    2009-03-01

    A coaxial jet originating from parallel coplanar pipe nozzles is computed by a compressible large eddy simulation (LES) using low-dissipation and low-dispersion schemes in order to determine its acoustic field and to study noise generation mechanisms. The jet streams are at high velocities, the primary stream is heated, and the Reynolds number based on the primary velocity and the secondary diameter is around 106. High levels of turbulence intensity are also specified at the nozzle exit. The jet aerodynamic field and the near-pressure field are both obtained directly from the LES. The far-field noise is calculated by solving the linear acoustic equations, from the unsteady LES data on a cylindrical surface surrounding the jet. A good agreement is observed in terms of directivity, levels, and narrow-band spectra with noise measurements carried out during the EU project CoJeN for a coaxial jet displaying same stream velocities and temperatures, coplanar nozzle outlets with identical area ratio, and a high Reynolds number. However, certainly due to differences in the properties of the nozzle-exit boundary layers with respect to the experiment, some unexpected peaks are noticed in the simulation spectra. They are attributed to the development of a Von Kármán street in the inner mixing layer and to vortex pairings in the outer shear layer. High correlation levels are also calculated between the pressure waves radiated in the downstream direction and flow quantities such as axial velocity, vorticity norm, density, and temperature, taken around the end of the primary and secondary potential cores. Noise generation in the coaxial jet therefore appears significant around the end of the two potential cores. These flow regions are characterized by intermittency, a dominant Strouhal number, and variations in the convection velocity as similarly found in single jets. The use of density or temperature to compute flow-noise correlations finally seems appropriate for a heated

  17. Cosmic string induced peculiar velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dalen, Anthony; Schramm, David N.

    1988-01-01

    This paper considers the scenario of a flat universe with a network of heavy cosmic strings as the primordial fluctuation spectrum. The joint probability of finding streaming velocities of at least 600 km/s on large scales and local peculiar velocities of less than 800 km/s is calculated. It is shown how the effects of loops breaking up and being born with a spectrum of sizes can be estimated. It is found that to obtain large-scale streaming velocities of at least 600 km/s, it is necessary that either a large value for beta G mu exist or the effect of loop fissioning and production details be considerable.

  18. Pattern-formation under acoustic driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Chemical and metallurgical processes enhanced by high intensity acoustic waves, thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, fuel rods in nuclear reactors, heat exchanger tubes, offshore and vibrating structures, solar thermal collectors, acoustic levitators, microfluidic devices, cycling, musical acoustics, blood flow through veins/arteries, hearing in the mammalian ear, carbon nanotube loudspeakers, etc. The evolution of a myriad of processes involving the oscillation of viscous fluids in the presence of solid boundaries is up to a certain extent influenced by acoustic streaming. In addition to the sound field, viscous energy dissipation at the fluid-solid boundary causes a time-independent fluid circulation, which can lead to a significant enhancement of heat, mass and momentum transfer at large oscillation amplitudes. A particularly relevant phenomenon that can be notably affected by acoustic streaming is the promotion of sound waves by temperature gradients or viceversa (thermoacoustics), which is at the basis of potentially efficient and environmental friendly engines and refrigerators that have attracted a renewed interest in the last years. In the present manuscript, historical developments and the underlying basic physics behind acoustic streaming and thermoacoustics are reviewed from an unifying perspective.

  19. Gulf Stream marine hydrokinetic energy resource characterization off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muglia, M.; He, R.; Lowcher, C.; Bane, J.; Gong, Y.; Taylor, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf Stream off North Carolina has current velocities that approach 3 m/s and an average volume transport of 90 Sv (1 Sv= 106 m3/s) off of Cape Hatteras, making it the most abundant MHK (Marine Hydrokinetic Energy) resource for the state. Resource availability at a specific location depends primarily on the variability in Gulf Stream position, which is least offshore of Cape Hatteras after the stream exits the Florida Straits. Proximity to land and high current velocities in relatively shallow waters on the shelf slope make this an optimal location to quantify the MHK energy resource for NC. 3.5 years of current measurements beginning in August of 2013 from a moored 150 kHz ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) at an optimal location for energy extraction quantify the available energy resource and its variability, and establish the skill of a Mid-Atlantic Bight and South Atlantic Bight Regional Ocean Model in predicting the MHK energy resource. The model agrees well with long-term observed current averages and with weekly to monthly fluctuations in the current speeds. Model and observations over the first 9 months of the ADCP deployment period both averaged 1.15 m/s thirty meters below the surface. The model under estimates observed current speeds for the higher frequency current fluctuations of days to weeks. Comparisons between the model and ADCP observed currents, and velocity derived power density over the entire 3.5 years of observations demonstrate the significant inter-annual variability in power density. Shipboard 300 kHz ADCP cross-stream transects and hourly surface currents measurements off Cape Hatteras from a network of land based HF (high frequency) radars further quantify available MHK energy and assess model skill. Cross-stream transects were made with a vessel-mounted 300 kHz ADCP on a line from the 100-1000m isobaths, and measured currents in the top 100m. These measurements demonstrate the variability in the resource with water depth, and

  20. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  1. Acoustic Inspection Device V1.0

    2002-01-16

    The Acoustic Inspection Device (AID) is an instrument used to interrogate materials with ultrasonic acoustic waves. The AID application software program runs under the Microsoft Windows 98 or Windows 2000 operating system. Is serves as the instrument controller and provides the user interface for the instrument known as the Acoustic Inspection Device (AID). The program requests, acquires, and analyzes acoustic waveforms from the AID hardware (pulser/receiver module, digitizer, and communications link). Graphical user displays ofmore » the AID application program include the real-time display of ultrasonic acoustic waveforms and analytical results including acoustic time-of-flight, velocity, and material identification. This program utilizes a novel algorithm, developed at PNNL, that automatically extracts the time-of-flight and amplitude data from the raw waveform and compares the extracted data to a material database.« less

  2. Stream Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    This manual provides teachers with some knowledge of ecological study methods and techniques used in collecting data when plants and animals are studied in the field. Most activities deal with the interrelatedness of plant and animal life to the structure and characteristics of a stream and pond. Also included in this unit plan designed for the…

  3. Stream Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a science curriculum reform effort aimed at enabling students to collect original data concerning an environmental parameter such as water quality on a yearly basis. Students track the overall health of the stream by analyzing both biotic and abiotic factors. (DDR)

  4. Resonance and streaming of armored microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spelman, Tamsin; Bertin, Nicolas; Stephen, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    A new experimental technique involves building a hollow capsule which partially encompasses a microbubble, creating an ``armored microbubble'' with long lifespan. Under acoustic actuation, such bubble produces net streaming flows. In order to theoretically model the induced flow, we first extend classical models of free bubbles to describe the streaming flow around a spherical body for any known axisymmetric shape oscillation. A potential flow model is then employed to determine the resonance modes of the armored microbubble. We finally use a more detailed viscous model to calculate the surface shape oscillations at the experimental driving frequency, and from this we predict the generated streaming flows.

  5. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  6. Antarctica: Measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  7. Ring-shaped velocity distribution functions in energy-dispersed structures formed at the boundaries of a proton stream injected into a transverse magnetic field: Test-kinetic results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitcu, Gabriel; Echim, Marius M.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the formation of ring-shaped and gyro-phase restricted velocity distribution functions (VDFs) at the edges of a cloud of protons injected into non-uniform distributions of the electromagnetic field. The velocity distribution function is reconstructed using the forward test-kinetic method. We consider two profiles of the electric field: (1) a non-uniform E-field obtained by solving the Laplace equation consistent with the conservation of the electric drift and (2) a constant and uniform E-field. In both cases, the magnetic field is similar to the solutions obtained for tangential discontinuities. The initial velocity distribution function is Liouville mapped along numerically integrated trajectories. The numerical results show the formation of an energy-dispersed structure due to the energy-dependent displacement of protons towards the edges of the cloud by the gradient-B drift. Another direct effect of the gradient-B drift is the formation of ring-shaped velocity distribution functions within the velocity-dispersed structure. Higher energy particles populate the edges of the proton beam, while smaller energies are located in the core. Non-gyrotropic velocity distribution functions form on the front-side and trailing edge of the cloud; this effect is due to remote sensing of energetic particles with guiding centers inside the beam. The kinetic features revealed by the test-kinetic solutions have features similar to in-situ velocity distribution functions observed by Cluster satellites in the magnetotail, close to the neutral sheet.

  8. Acoustic Measurement of Suspended Fine Particle Concentrations by Attenuation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of sediment concentration is important in the study of streams and rivers. The work presented explores the appropriate frequency and transducer spacing for acoustic measurement of suspended particles in the range of 0.1 – 64 microns. High frequency (20 MHz) acoustic signal attenuation wa...

  9. The Sagittarius Dwarf Tidal Stream(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, David R.; Majewski, Steven R.

    The Milky Way's prominent and widely studied Sagittarius (Sgr) dSph tidal stream has proven a valuable tool for exploring a number of problems in galactic astronomy. In this review of the Sgr system, we present a descriptive portrait of the most salient and unambiguous observational properties (e.g., location, radial velocity, proper motion, and chemical composition) of the Sgr core and tidal streams as they are presently known. We discuss how the history of these observations has shaped the development of numerical models of the system over time, and some of the major conclusions that have been drawn from such modeling efforts with regard to the size and shape of the Milky Way's gravitational potential and the patterns of enrichment throughout its stellar halo. Finally, we summarize some of the known failings of the present models, which we lay out as a challenge for future progress on understanding this remarkable and fortuitous example of hierarchical galaxy growth via merging in action.

  10. Properties of the Acoustic Vector Field in Underwater Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, David R.

    This thesis focuses on the description and measurement of the underwater acoustic field, based on vector properties of acoustic particle velocity. The specific goal is to interpret vector sensor measurements in underwater waveguides, in particular those measurements made in littoral (shallow) waters. To that end, theoretical models, which include the effects of reflections from the waveguide boundaries, are developed for the acoustic intensity, i.e. the product of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity. Vector properties of acoustic intensity are shown to correspond to a non-dimensional vector property of acoustic particle velocity, its degree of circularity, which describes the trajectory of particle motion. Both experimental measurements and simulations of this non-dimensional vector property are used to analyze characteristics of sound propagation in underwater waveguides. Two measurement techniques are utilized in the experiments described in this thesis. In the first, particle velocity is obtained indirectly by time integration of the measured pressure gradient between two closely spaced (with respect to an acoustic wavelength) conventional pressure sensitive hydrophones. This method was used in ocean experiments conducted with vertical line arrays of hydrophones. In the second technique, particle velocity is measured directly by time integration of the signal generated by an accelerometer. An additional pressure measurement from a co-located hydrophone forms what is known as a "combined sensor" in the Russian literature, which allows for estimation of the vector acoustic intensity. This method was utilized mainly in laboratory experiments.

  11. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  12. Swimming Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  13. MICROTURBULENCE IN GRAVEL BED STREAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, T.; Tsakiris, A. G.; Kramer, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    The overarching objective of this investigation was to evaluate the role of relative submergence on the formation and evolution of cluster microforms in gravel bed streams and its implications to bedload transport. Secondary objectives of this research included (1) a detailed analysis of mean flow measurements around a clast; and (2) a selected number of experimental runs where the mean flow characteristics are linked together with the bed micro-topography observations around a clast. It is hypothesized that the relative submergence is an important parameter in defining the feedback processes between the flow and clasts, which governs the flow patterns around the clasts, thus directly affecting the depositional patterns of the incoming sediments. To examine the validity of the hypothesis and meet the objectives of this research, 19 detailed experimental runs were conducted in a tilting, water recirculating laboratory flume under well-controlled conditions. A fixed array of clast-obstacles were placed atop a well-packed bed with uniform size glass beads. During the runs, multifractional spherical particles were fed upstream of the clast section at a predetermined rate. State-of-the-art techniques/instruments, such as imaging analysis software, Large Scale Particle Velocimeter (LSPIV) and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) were employed to provide unique quantitative measurements for bedload fluxes, clast/clusters geomorphic patterns, and mean flow characteristics in the vicinity of the clusters. Different flow patterns were recorded for the high relative submergence (HRS) and low relative submergence (LRS) experimental runs. The ADV measurements provided improved insight about the governing flow mechanisms for the HRS runs. These mechanisms were described with flow upwelling at the center of the flume and downwelling occurring along the flume walls. Flow downwelling corresponded to an increase in the free surface velocity. Additionally, the visual observations

  14. Theory of Collisional Two-Stream Plasma Instabilities in the Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Chad Allen; Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers; Fontenla, Juan

    2014-06-01

    The solar chromosphere experiences intense heating just above its temperature minimum. The heating increases the electron temperature in this region by over 2000 K. Furthermore, it exhibits little time variation and appears widespread across the solar disk. Although semi-empirical models, UV continuum observations, and line emission measurements confirm the existence of the heating, its source remains unexplained. Potential heating sources such as acoustic shocks, resistive dissipation, and magnetic reconnection via nanoflares fail to account for the intensity, persistence, and ubiquity of the heating. Fontenla (2005) suggested turbulence from a collisional two-stream plasma instability known as the Farley-Buneman instability (FBI) could contribute significantly to the heating. This instability is known to heat the plasma of the E-region ionosphere which bears many similarities to the chromospheric plasma. However, the ionospheric theory of the FBI does not account for the diverse ion species found in the solar chromosphere. This work develops a new collisional, two-stream instability theory appropriate for the chromospheric plasma environment using a linear fluid analysis to derive a new dispersion relationship and critical E x B drift velocity required to trigger the instability. Using a 1D, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, radiative transfer model and careful estimates of collision rates and magnetic field strengths, we calculate the trigger velocities necessary to induce the instability throughout the chromosphere. Trigger velocities as low as 4 km s^-1 are found near the temperature minimum, well below the local neutral acoustic speed in that region. From this, we expect the instability to occur frequently, converting kinetic energy contained in neutral convective flows from the photosphere into thermal energy via turbulence. This could contribute significantly to chromospheric heating and explain its persistent and ubiquitous nature.

  15. Acoustic measurements of clay-size particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of sediment concentration is important in the study of streams and rivers. The work presented explores using high frequency (20 MHz) acoustic signal attenuation to measure the concentration of fine sediment particles (0.2-5.0 microns) in a fluvial environment. A small laboratory tank with...

  16. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  17. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  18. Assessment of Management Strategies for a Straightened Lowland Agricultural Stream in Southwestern Québec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Y.; Biron, P.

    2009-05-01

    Channel straightening and dredging were extensively used in the 20th century to improve agricultural fields' drainage efficiency and facilitate crop maintenance and harvest. Although the adverse geomorphologic and ecological effects of this practice on hydrologic networks are widely acknowledged, alternative management strategies remain marginal in Southwestern Québec. Furthermore, bank stabilization projects are often carried out to mitigate erosion at a local scale with little concern about the watershed scale, i.e. treating the symptom rather than the cause of erosion, and with little guidance on suitable designs for specific areas. We present here the results of a case study conducted in a small straightened agricultural stream in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Richer stream, 45 km east of Montreal, Qc) to assess the efficiency of diverse instream structures to enhance bank stability. The loss in sinuosity and resultant increase in stream power in this stream resulted in acute erosion problems. A conceptual model developed in Java was developed to examine erosion processes at the watershed scale. This model is also used to parameterize a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model (Phoenics) to investigate the effects on flow field of employing various types of instream structures in a section of the Richer Stream which is particularly problematic for river management because of residential development and very limited space available for riparian zones. Model validation was achieved using flow velocity measurements obtained with an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter. Simulation outcomes are analysed with regards to strategies using geomorphological, economical and ecological criteria in an attempt to identify their efficiency. The methods presented here can help decreasing the high degree of uncertainty generally involved in restoration activities by better assessing the efficiency of specific stabilization techniques prior to their implementation while

  19. Key stream/sediment exchanges of water and heat near stream mouths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantz, J. E.; Naranjo, R. C.; Niswonger, R. G.; Neilson, B. T.; Allander, K.; Zamora, C.; Smith, D. W.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The section of stream discharging to a lake or other surface-water body is referred to as the stream mouth, a stream reach with rapidly changing hydrologic conditions, leading to unique aquatic and benthic ecology, as well as a visibly active fishery habitat. Of environmental significance, bridges, control structures, channelization and foot traffic are common near stream mouths, warranting comparisons of natural and channelized stream mouths. The present work completes the first investigation focusing specifically on the hydrology of surface-water/sediment exchanges at stream-mouth reaches discharging to lakes and compares these exchanges to those measured along the nearby shoreline in both a qualitative and quantitative manner. Heat and water exchanges for two common types of stream mouths (a natural stream with a summer barrier bar and a channelized stream mouth) are compared with comparable exchanges along the nearby shoreline on the north shore of Lake Tahoe located in the Central Sierra Nevada Mountain Range (CA/NV, US). The study site was selected partially due the abundance of streams discharging into the lake of both a natural and channelized nature (~30 small streams with a large number of both types of stream mouths). Heat and water exchanges were both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct for the three types of hydrologic settings, with (1) cool, low velocity, longitudinal (hyporheic) flowpaths observed below the channelized stream mouth, discharging beneath the warmer, more buoyant lakeshore water, (2) the nearby shoreline receiving relatively warm, higher velocity discharge and (3) for the natural stream mouth, there was strong diurnal temperature pattern in groundwater discharging through the seasonal barrier beach to the lake. Impacts of strong 2013 wave action on exchanges were also distinct for the three settings, with (1) channelization allowing waves to extend well upstream, (2) a lesser invasive impact in the shoreline swash zone exchanges

  20. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) are used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range from 90 to 130 dB, spectral components, and two-point correlation functions for acoustic-noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. Directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet noise.

  1. Iso-acoustic focusing of cells for size-insensitive acousto-mechanical phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Augustsson, Per; Karlsen, Jonas T.; Su, Hao-Wei; Bruus, Henrik; Voldman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of single cells is an emerging tool for cell classification, enabling assessment of effective parameters relating to cells' interior molecular content and structure. Here, we present iso-acoustic focusing, an equilibrium method to analyze the effective acoustic impedance of single cells in continuous flow. While flowing through a microchannel, cells migrate sideways, influenced by an acoustic field, into streams of increasing acoustic impedance, until reaching their cell-type specific point of zero acoustic contrast. We establish an experimental procedure and provide theoretical justifications and models for iso-acoustic focusing. We describe a method for providing a suitable acoustic contrast gradient in a cell-friendly medium, and use acoustic forces to maintain that gradient in the presence of destabilizing forces. Applying this method we demonstrate iso-acoustic focusing of cell lines and leukocytes, showing that acoustic properties provide phenotypic information independent of size. PMID:27180912

  2. Iso-acoustic focusing of cells for size-insensitive acousto-mechanical phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, Per; Karlsen, Jonas T; Su, Hao-Wei; Bruus, Henrik; Voldman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of single cells is an emerging tool for cell classification, enabling assessment of effective parameters relating to cells' interior molecular content and structure. Here, we present iso-acoustic focusing, an equilibrium method to analyze the effective acoustic impedance of single cells in continuous flow. While flowing through a microchannel, cells migrate sideways, influenced by an acoustic field, into streams of increasing acoustic impedance, until reaching their cell-type specific point of zero acoustic contrast. We establish an experimental procedure and provide theoretical justifications and models for iso-acoustic focusing. We describe a method for providing a suitable acoustic contrast gradient in a cell-friendly medium, and use acoustic forces to maintain that gradient in the presence of destabilizing forces. Applying this method we demonstrate iso-acoustic focusing of cell lines and leukocytes, showing that acoustic properties provide phenotypic information independent of size. PMID:27180912

  3. Iso-acoustic focusing of cells for size-insensitive acousto-mechanical phenotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustsson, Per; Karlsen, Jonas T.; Su, Hao-Wei; Bruus, Henrik; Voldman, Joel

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of single cells is an emerging tool for cell classification, enabling assessment of effective parameters relating to cells' interior molecular content and structure. Here, we present iso-acoustic focusing, an equilibrium method to analyze the effective acoustic impedance of single cells in continuous flow. While flowing through a microchannel, cells migrate sideways, influenced by an acoustic field, into streams of increasing acoustic impedance, until reaching their cell-type specific point of zero acoustic contrast. We establish an experimental procedure and provide theoretical justifications and models for iso-acoustic focusing. We describe a method for providing a suitable acoustic contrast gradient in a cell-friendly medium, and use acoustic forces to maintain that gradient in the presence of destabilizing forces. Applying this method we demonstrate iso-acoustic focusing of cell lines and leukocytes, showing that acoustic properties provide phenotypic information independent of size.

  4. Channel erosion in steep gradient, gravel-paved streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, L.R.; Koger, C.J.; Wheeler, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    Discharges were measured in steep gradient (> 5 percent) gravel-paved streams from 1988 to 1991 in order to empirically determine erosional thresholds based on sediment size, related to critical velocity, tractive force, and unit stream power. Results suggest that the empirical relationship between sediment size and unit stream power provides an accurate and simple methodology for determining the minimum erosion threshold discharge for steep gradient streams common in western Washington and other similar mountain terrains.

  5. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  6. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Acoustically induced structural fatigue of piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.; Francis, J.T.

    1999-11-01

    Piping systems handling high-pressure and high-velocity steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been previously shown that the acoustic fatigue of the piping system is governed by the relationship between fluid pressure drop and downstream Mach number, and the dimensionless pipe diameter/wall thickness geometry parameter. In this paper, the devised relationship is extended to cover acoustic fatigue considerations of medium and smaller-diameter piping systems.

  8. Ice and thermal cameras for stream flow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Petroselli, Andrea; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Flow measurements are instrumental to establish discharge rating curves and to enable flood risk forecast. Further, they are crucial to study erosion dynamics and to comprehend the organization of drainage networks in natural catchments. Flow observations are typically executed with intrusive instrumentation, such as current meters or acoustic devices. Alternatively, non-intrusive instruments, such as radars and microwave sensors, are applied to estimate surface velocity. Both approaches enable flow measurements over areas of limited extent, and their implementation can be costly. Optical methods, such as large scale particle image velocimetry, have proved beneficial for non-intrusive and spatially-distributed environmental monitoring. In this work, a novel optical-based approach is utilized for surface flow velocity observations based on the combined use of a thermal camera and ice dices. Different from RGB imagery, thermal images are relatively unaffected by illumination conditions and water reflections. Therefore, such high-quality images allow to readily identify and track tracers against the background. Further, the optimal environmental compatibility of ice dices and their relative ease of preparation and storage suggest that the technique can be easily implemented to rapidly characterize surface flows. To demonstrate the validity of the approach, we present a set of experiments performed on the Brenta stream, Italy. In the experimental setup, the axis of the camera is maintained perpendicular with respect to the water surface to circumvent image orthorectification through ground reference points. Small amounts of ice dices are deployed onto the stream water surface during image acquisition. Particle tracers' trajectories are reconstructed off-line by analyzing thermal images with a particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) algorithm. Given the optimal visibility of the tracers and their low seeding density, PTV allows for efficiently following tracers' paths in

  9. Microwave-Field Driven Acoustic Modes in Selected DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn Steven

    The direct coupling of a microwave field to selected DNA molecules is demonstrated using standard dielectrometry. The absorption is resonant with a typical lifetime of 300 picoseconds. Such a long lifetime is unexpected for DNA in aqueous solution at room temperature and has interesting implications for microscopic considerations in future models of solvent damping. Resonant absorption at fundamental and harmonic frequencies for both supercoiled circular and linear DNA agrees with an acoustic mode model. Our associated acoustic velocities for linear DNA are very close to the acoustic velocity of the longitudinal acoustic mode independently observed on DNA fibers using Brillouin Spectroscopy. The difference in acoustic velocities for supercoiled circular and linear DNA is discussed in terms of a conformation dependent model. *This research has been funded by the Office of Naval Research, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, and the National Science Foundation.

  10. Acoustic Properties of Lens Materials for Ultrasonic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hideji; Nakaya, Chitose; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Kondo, Toshio; Ishikawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    The acoustic velocities and densities of 20 types of commercial rubber have been measured at a frequency of 2 MHz at room temperature, and they are evaluated in terms of their application to an acoustic lens or an acoustic window of probes of an ultrasonic diagnostic instrument. Fluorosilicone rubber and phoshazene rubber have lower acoustic velocities than the human body, and they have excellent impedance matching with the human body. Both the acoustic velocities and densities of butadiene rubber, polybutadiene rubber, acrylic rubber and polyurethane match those of the human body. It is also described that rubber having good impedance matching with the human body can be fabricated by adjusting the volume fraction of the added filler.

  11. Frequency response of ice streams

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. Rosie; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.; Arthern, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Changes at the grounding line of ice streams have consequences for inland ice dynamics and hence sea level. Despite substantial evidence documenting upstream propagation of frontal change, the mechanisms by which these changes are transmitted inland are not well understood. In this vein, the frequency response of an idealized ice stream to periodic forcing in the downstream strain rate is examined for basally and laterally resisted ice streams using a one-dimensional, linearized membrane stress approximation. This reveals two distinct behavioural branches, which we find to correspond to different mechanisms of upstream velocity and thickness propagation, depending on the forcing frequency. At low frequencies (centennial to millennial periods), slope and thickness covary hundreds of kilometres inland, and the shallow-ice approximation is sufficient to explain upstream propagation, which occurs through changes in grounding-line flow and geometry. At high frequencies (decadal to sub-decadal periods), penetration distances are tens of kilometres; while velocity adjusts rapidly to such forcing, thickness varies little and upstream propagation occurs through the direct transmission of membrane stresses. Propagation properties vary significantly between 29 Antarctic ice streams considered. A square-wave function in frontal stress is explored by summing frequency solutions, simulating some aspects of the dynamical response to sudden ice-shelf change. PMID:23197934

  12. Frequency response of ice streams.

    PubMed

    Williams, C Rosie; Hindmarsh, Richard C A; Arthern, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Changes at the grounding line of ice streams have consequences for inland ice dynamics and hence sea level. Despite substantial evidence documenting upstream propagation of frontal change, the mechanisms by which these changes are transmitted inland are not well understood. In this vein, the frequency response of an idealized ice stream to periodic forcing in the downstream strain rate is examined for basally and laterally resisted ice streams using a one-dimensional, linearized membrane stress approximation. This reveals two distinct behavioural branches, which we find to correspond to different mechanisms of upstream velocity and thickness propagation, depending on the forcing frequency. At low frequencies (centennial to millennial periods), slope and thickness covary hundreds of kilometres inland, and the shallow-ice approximation is sufficient to explain upstream propagation, which occurs through changes in grounding-line flow and geometry. At high frequencies (decadal to sub-decadal periods), penetration distances are tens of kilometres; while velocity adjusts rapidly to such forcing, thickness varies little and upstream propagation occurs through the direct transmission of membrane stresses. Propagation properties vary significantly between 29 Antarctic ice streams considered. A square-wave function in frontal stress is explored by summing frequency solutions, simulating some aspects of the dynamical response to sudden ice-shelf change. PMID:23197934

  13. Broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobb, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    The broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler is an instrument that determines velocity based on the Doppler principle by reflecting acoustic signals off sediment particles in the water. The instrument is capable of measuring velocity magnitude and direction throughout a water column and of measuring water depth. It is also capable of bottom tracking and can, therefore, keep track of its own relative position as it is moved across a channel. Discharge measurements can be made quickly and, based on limited tests, accurately with this instrument. ?? 1993.

  14. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  15. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N.; Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H.; Loth, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  16. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  17. Neural correlates of auditory streaming in an objective behavioral task.

    PubMed

    Itatani, Naoya; Klump, Georg M

    2014-07-22

    Segregating streams of sounds from sources in complex acoustic scenes is crucial for perception in real world situations. We analyzed an objective psychophysical measure of stream segregation obtained while simultaneously recording forebrain neurons in the European starlings to investigate neural correlates of segregating a stream of A tones from a stream of B tones presented at one-half the rate. The objective measure, sensitivity for time shift detection of the B tone, was higher when the A and B tones were of the same frequency (one stream) compared with when there was a 6- or 12-semitone difference between them (two streams). The sensitivity for representing time shifts in spiking patterns was correlated with the behavioral sensitivity. The spiking patterns reflected the stimulus characteristics but not the behavioral response, indicating that the birds' primary cortical field represents the segregated streams, but not the decision process. PMID:25002519

  18. Neural correlates of auditory streaming in an objective behavioral task

    PubMed Central

    Itatani, Naoya; Klump, Georg M.

    2014-01-01

    Segregating streams of sounds from sources in complex acoustic scenes is crucial for perception in real world situations. We analyzed an objective psychophysical measure of stream segregation obtained while simultaneously recording forebrain neurons in the European starlings to investigate neural correlates of segregating a stream of A tones from a stream of B tones presented at one-half the rate. The objective measure, sensitivity for time shift detection of the B tone, was higher when the A and B tones were of the same frequency (one stream) compared with when there was a 6- or 12-semitone difference between them (two streams). The sensitivity for representing time shifts in spiking patterns was correlated with the behavioral sensitivity. The spiking patterns reflected the stimulus characteristics but not the behavioral response, indicating that the birds’ primary cortical field represents the segregated streams, but not the decision process. PMID:25002519

  19. Acoustic hemostasis of porcine superficial femoral artery: Simulation and in-vivo experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; Mitchell, Stuart; Miller, Matthew; Barnes, Stephen; Hopple, Jerry; Kook, John; Moreau-Gobard, Romain; Hsu, Stephen; Ahiekpor-Dravi, Alexis; Crum, Lawrence A.; Eaton, John; Wong, Keith; Sekins, K. Michael

    2012-10-01

    In-vivo focused ultrasound studies were computationally simulated and conducted experimentally with the aim of occluding porcine superficial femoral arteries (SFA) via thermal coagulation. A multi-array HIFU applicator was used which electronically scanned multiple beam foci around the target point. The spatio-temporally averaged acoustic and temperature fields were simulated in a fluid dynamics and acousto-thermal finite element model with representative tissue fields, including muscle, vessel and blood. Simulations showed that with an acoustic power of 200W and a dose time of 60s, perivascular tissue reached 91°C; and yet blood reached a maximum 59°C, below the coagulation objective for this dose regime (75°C). Per simulations, acoustic-streaming induced velocity in blood reached 6.1cm/s. In in-vivo experiments, several arteries were treated. As simulated, thermal lesions were observed in muscle surrounding SFA in all cases. In dosing limited to 30 to 60 seconds, it required 257W to provide occlusion (one complete and one partial occlusion). Angiography and histology showed evidence of thrombogenesis and collagen shrinkage-based vessel constriction at these doses.

  20. Microscale instabilities in stream interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The microstructure of solar wind stream interaction regions is considered theoretically with emphasis on the role of several electrostatic kinetic instabilities which may be important within the stream interface and the compression region. Inside of 1 AU, the interface is likely to be stable against the electrostatic streaming instabilities considered. Between 1 and 2 AU, the interface will excite the magnetized ion-ion instability. The compression region is also found to be unstable beyond 1 AU where the modified two-stream instability, beam-cyclotron instability, and ion-acoustic instability are important in determining the structure of the compressive pulses as they evolve into forward and reverse shocks. It is concluded that the modified two-stream instability and beam-cyclotron instability predominately play a role in heating the electrons to the threshold for the ion-acoustic instability. Various electrostatic plasma waves, ranging in frequency from the lower-hybrid to harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, would be produced by these instabilities. Their signature should also be seen by high time resolution measurements of the temperature of the various plasma species.

  1. Small-scale cyclones on the periphery of a Gulf Stream warm-core ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, M. A.; Evans, R. H.; Joyce, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Small-scale cyclones found around Gulf Stream warm-core ring 82B are investigated by using infrared satellite images and current information obtained with an acoustic-Doppler velocimeter. Currents in these cyclones reveal speeds ranging from 20 to 80 cm/s. One small cyclone or 'ringlet' found in June 1982 was studied extensively by removing the basic rotational velocities of 82B. The azimuthal velocity field for this ringlet was used with the gradient current equation to calculate the absolute dynamic topography at 100 dbar. It was found that the ringlet was 13 dyn-cm lower than its surroundings. In addition, neglect of the centrifugal term would have changed the dynamic topography of the ringlet by 30 percent. From a comparison with CTD data the absolute reference level was determined, and a vertical profile of horizontal currents was calculated for the ringlet. Other cyclones were found throughout the slope water region around warm-core ring 82B with observable lifetimes of 1 to 2 weeks. The northeast quadrant of 82B was a favored generation site for ringlets. Two cyclones were observed to form in this region and were advected anticyclonically around 82B. Typically, at any one time, six cyclones with diameters of approximately 40 to 50 km can be detected north of the Gulf Stream by using satellite images.

  2. Acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Tribikram

    2014-01-01

    In this article different techniques for localizing acoustic sources are described and the advantages/disadvantages of these techniques are discussed. Some source localization techniques are restricted to isotropic structures while other methods can be applied to anisotropic structures as well. Some techniques require precise knowledge of the direction dependent velocity profiles in the anisotropic body while other techniques do not require that knowledge. Some methods require accurate values of the time of arrival of the acoustic waves at the receivers while other techniques can function without that information. Published papers introducing various techniques emphasize the advantages of the introduced techniques while ignoring and often not mentioning the limitations and weaknesses of the new techniques. What is lacking in the literature is a comprehensive review and comparison of the available techniques; this article attempts to do that. After reviewing various techniques the paper concludes which source localization technique should be most effective for what type of structure and what the current research needs are. PMID:23870388

  3. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  4. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  5. Emergence of kinetic behavior in streaming ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillen, P.; Castro, J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2015-04-15

    We create streaming ultracold neutral plasmas by tailoring the photoionizing laser beam that creates the plasma. By varying the electron temperature, we control the relative velocity of the streaming populations, and, in conjunction with variation of the plasma density, this controls the ion collisionality of the colliding streams. Laser-induced fluorescence is used to map the spatially resolved density and velocity distribution function for the ions. We identify the lack of local thermal equilibrium and distinct populations of interpenetrating, counter-streaming ions as signatures of kinetic behavior. Experimental data are compared with results from a one-dimensional, two-fluid numerical simulation.

  6. Behaviour of a Premixed Flame Subjected to Acoustic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shafiq R.; Khan, Waqar A.; Prosser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional premixed laminar methane flame is subjected to acoustic oscillations and studied. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the effects of acoustic perturbations on the reaction rates of different species, with a view to their respective contribution to thermoacoustic instabilities. Acoustically transparent non reflecting boundary conditions are employed. The flame response has been studied with acoustic waves of different frequencies and amplitudes. The integral values of the reaction rates, the burning velocities and the heat release of the acoustically perturbed flame are compared with the unperturbed case. We found that the flame's sensitivity to acoustic perturbations is greatest when the wavelength is comparable to the flame thickness. Even in this case, the perturbations are stable with time. We conclude that acoustic fields acting on the chemistry do not contribute significantly to the emergence of large amplitude pressure oscillations. PMID:24376501

  7. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  8. Jet Noise Scaling in Dual Stream Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    Power spectral laws in dual stream jets are studied by considering such flows a superposition of appropriate single-stream coaxial jets. Noise generation in each mixing region is modeled using spectral power laws developed earlier for single stream jets as a function of jet temperature and observer angle. Similarity arguments indicate that jet noise in dual stream nozzles may be considered as a composite of four single stream jets representing primary/secondary, secondary/ambient, transition, and fully mixed zones. Frequency filter are designed to highlight spectral contribution from each jet. Predictions are provided at an area ratio of 2.0--bypass ratio from 0.80 to 3.40, and are compared with measurements within a wide range of velocity and temperature ratios. These models suggest that the low frequency noise in unheated jets is dominated by the fully mixed region at all velocity ratios, while the high frequency noise is dominated by the secondary when the velocity ratio is larger than 0.80. Transition and fully mixed jets equally dominate the low frequency noise in heated jets. At velocity ratios less than 0.50, the high frequency noise from primary/bypass becomes a significant contributing factor similar to that in the secondary/ambient jet.

  9. Numerical analysis of wave generation and propagation in a focused surface acoustic wave device for potential microfluidics applications.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2009-03-01

    We develop a 3-D finite element model of a focused surface acoustic wave (F-SAW) device based on LiNbO(3) to analyze the wave generation and propagation characteristics for devices operating at MHz frequencies with varying applied input voltages. We compare the F-SAW device to a conventional SAW device with similar substrate dimensions and transducer finger periodicity. SAW devices with concentrically shaped focused interdigital transducer fingers (F-IDTs) are found to excite waves with high intensity and high beam-width compression ratio, confined to a small localized area. F-SAW devices are more sensitive to amplitude variations at regions close to the focal point than conventional SAW devices having uniform IDT configuration. We compute F-SAW induced streaming forces and velocity fields by applying a successive approximation technique to the Navier-Stokes equation (Nyborg's theory). The maximum streaming force obtained at the focal point varies as the square of the applied input voltage. Computed streaming velocities at the focal point in F-SAW devices are at least an order of magnitude higher than those in conventional SAW devices. Simulated frequency response indicates higher insertion losses in F-SAW devices than in conventional devices, reflecting their greater utility as actuators than as sensors. Our simulation findings suggest that F-SAW devices can be utilized effectively for actuation in microfluidic applications involving diffusion limited transport processes. PMID:19411221

  10. Describing Story Evolution from Dynamic Information Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Stuart J.; Butner, R. Scott; Cowley, Wendy E.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Walker, Julia

    2009-10-12

    Sources of streaming information, such as news syndicates, publish information continuously. Information portals and news aggregators list the latest information from around the world enabling information consumers to easily identify events in the past 24 hours. The volume and velocity of these streams causes information from prior days’ to quickly vanish despite its utility in providing an informative context for interpreting new information. Few capabilities exist to support an individual attempting to identify or understand trends and changes from streaming information over time. The burden of retaining prior information and integrating with the new is left to the skills, determination, and discipline of each individual. In this paper we present a visual analytics system for linking essential content from information streams over time into dynamic stories that develop and change over multiple days. We describe particular challenges to the analysis of streaming information and explore visual representations for showing story change and evolution over time.

  11. Disturbance convection velocity in turbulent jets under aeroacoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimshtein, V. G.

    2007-09-01

    The velocity of propagation of toroidal and oblique vortices formed in subsonic and supersonic turbulent jets under longitudinal internal and transverse external excitation by finite-amplitude saw-tooth acoustic waves is studied experimentally. It is demonstrated that the convection velocity of vortices is not constant, and the character of its variation depends on the vortex shape.

  12. Flowfield characteristics of an aerodynamic acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Keller, J.; Pfaffenlehner, M.; Ryssel, E.; Tropea, C.

    1997-11-01

    A droplet held in a single-axis ultrasonic levitator will principally sustain a certain external blowing along the levitation axis, which introduces the possibility of investigating heat and/or mass transfer from the droplet under conditions which are not too remote from those in spray systems. The focus of the present work is on the influence of the acoustic field on the external flow. More specifically, an axisymmetric submerged gas jet in an axial standing acoustic wave is examined, both in the absence and presence of a liquid droplet. Flow visualization is first presented to illustrate the global flow effects and the operating windows of jet velocities and acoustic powers which are suitable for further study. An analytic and numeric solution, based on the parabolic boundary layer equations are then given for the case of no levitated droplet, providing quantitative estimates of the acoustic field/flow interaction. Detailed velocity measurements using a laser Doppler anemometer verify the analytic results and extend these to the case of a levitated droplet. Some unresolved discrepancy remains in predicting the maximum velocity attainable before the droplet is blown out of the levitator. Two methods are developed to estimate the sound pressure level in the levitator by comparing flowfield patterns with analytic results. These results and observations are used to estimate to what extent acoustic aerodynamic levitators can be used in the future for investigating transport properties of individual droplets.

  13. Tungsten Oxide Layers of High Acoustic Impedance for Fully Insulating Acoustic Reflectors.

    PubMed

    DeMiguel-Ramos, M; Diaz-Duran, Barbara; Munir, Junaid; Clement, Marta; Mirea, Teona; Olivares, Jimena; Iborra, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    Gravimetric sensors based on solidly mounted resonators require fully insulating acoustic reflectors to avoid parasitics when operating in liquid media. In this work, we propose a new high-acoustic impedance material, tungsten oxide ([Formula: see text]), for acoustic reflectors. We have optimized the sputtering conditions of [Formula: see text] to obtain nonconductive layers with mass density around [Formula: see text] and acoustic velocities for the shear and the longitudinal modes up to 2700 and 4500 m/s, respectively. Compared to other conventionally used high impedance layers, [Formula: see text] films display several manufacture advantages, such as high deposition rates, great reproducibility, and good adhesion to underlying substrates. We have demonstrated the applicability of [Formula: see text] in practical shear mode bulk acoustic wave resonators that display good performance in liquid environments. PMID:26571521

  14. Acoustic Microfluidics for Bioanalytical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Gabriel

    2013-03-01

    This talk will present new methods the use of ultrasonic standing waves in microfluidic systems to manipulate microparticles for the purpose of bioassays and bioseparations. We have recently developed multi-node acoustic focusing flow cells that can position particles into many parallel flow streams and have demonstrated the potential of such flow cells in the development of high throughput, parallel flow cytometers. These experiments show the potential for the creation of high throughput flow cytometers in applications requiring high flow rates and rapid detection of rare cells. This talk will also present the development of elastomeric capture microparticles and their use in acoustophoretic separations. We have developed simple methods to form elastomeric particles that are surface functionalized with biomolecular recognition reagents. These compressible particles exhibit negative acoustic contrast in ultrasound when suspended in aqueous media, blood serum or diluted blood. These particles can be continuously separated from cells by flowing them through a microfluidic device that uses an ultrasonic standing wave to align the blood cells, which exhibit positive acoustic contrast, at a node in the acoustic pressure distribution while aligning the negative acoustic contrast elastomeric particles at the antinodes. Laminar flow of the separated particles to downstream collection ports allows for collection of the separated negative contrast particles and cells. Separated elastomeric particles were analyzed via flow cytometry to demonstrate nanomolar detection for prostate specific antigen in aqueous buffer and picomolar detection for IgG in plasma and diluted blood samples. This approach has potential applications in the development of rapid assays that detect the presence of low concentrations of biomarkers (including biomolecules and cells) in a number of biological sample types. We acknowledge support through the NSF Research Triangle MRSEC.

  15. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  16. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  17. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  18. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  19. Monitoring acoustic emission (AE) energy in slurry impingement using a new model for particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droubi, M. G.; Reuben, R. L.; White, G.

    2015-10-01

    A series of systematic impact tests have been carried out to investigate the influence of particle size, free stream velocity, particle impact angle, and nominal particle concentration on the amount of energy dissipated in a carbon steel target using a slurry impingement erosion test rig, as indicated by the acoustic emission (AE) recorded by a sensor mounted on the back of the target. Silica sand particles of mean particle size 152.5, 231, and 362.5 μm were used for impingement on the target at angles varying between 30° and 90° while the free stream velocity was changed between 4.2 and 12.7 m/s. In previous work by the authors, it was demonstrated that the AE time series associated with particle-laden air striking a carbon steel target could be described as the cumulation of individual particle arrival events each drawn from a statistical distribution model. The high arrival rate involved in a slurry jet poses challenges in resolving individual particle impact signatures in the AE record, and so the model has been extended in this paper to account for different particle carrier-fluids and to situations where arrivals cannot necessarily be resolved.

  20. Pulsed EMAT (Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer) acoustic measurements on a horizontal continuous caster for internal temperature determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Donald M.

    1989-10-01

    Development of a Pulsed Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer (EMAT) through transmission system for acoustic measurements on steel billets up to 1300 C was completed. Laboratory measurements of acoustic velocity were made, and used to determine the average internal temperature of hot stainless and carbon steel billets. Following the success of the laboratory system development, the laboratory EMAT system was subsequently tested successfully at the Baltimore Specialty Steel Co. on a horizontal continuous caster. Details of the sensor system development and the steel plant demonstration results are presented. Future directions for the high temperature pulsed EMAT internal temperature concept are discussed for potential material processing applications.

  1. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  2. Apparatus for measuring a sorbate dispersed in a fluid stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Updike, O. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive, miniature apparatus was designed for measuring low concentrations of a sorbate dispersed in a fluid stream. The device consists of an elongated body having a surface capable of sorbing an amount of the sorbate proportional to the concentration in the fluid stream and propagating acoustic energy along its length. The acoustic energy is converted to an electrical output signal corresponding to the concentration of sorbate in the fluid stream. The device can be designed to exhibit high sensitivity to extremely small amounts of sorbate dispersed in a fluid stream and to exhibit low sensitivity to large amounts of sorbate. Another advantage is that the apparatus may be formed in a microminiature size and at a low cost using bath microfabrication technology.

  3. Acoustic Location of Lightning Using Interferometric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erives, H.; Arechiga, R. O.; Stock, M.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic arrays have been used to accurately locate thunder sources in lightning flashes. The acoustic arrays located around the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico produce locations which compare quite well with source locations provided by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array. These arrays utilize 3 outer microphones surrounding a 4th microphone located at the center, The location is computed by band-passing the signal to remove noise, and then computing the cross correlating the outer 3 microphones with respect the center reference microphone. While this method works very well, it works best on signals with high signal to noise ratios; weaker signals are not as well located. Therefore, methods are being explored to improve the location accuracy and detection efficiency of the acoustic location systems. The signal received by acoustic arrays is strikingly similar to th signal received by radio frequency interferometers. Both acoustic location systems and radio frequency interferometers make coherent measurements of a signal arriving at a number of closely spaced antennas. And both acoustic and interferometric systems then correlate these signals between pairs of receivers to determine the direction to the source of the received signal. The primary difference between the two systems is the velocity of propagation of the emission, which is much slower for sound. Therefore, the same frequency based techniques that have been used quite successfully with radio interferometers should be applicable to acoustic based measurements as well. The results presented here are comparisons between the location results obtained with current cross correlation method and techniques developed for radio frequency interferometers applied to acoustic signals. The data were obtained during the summer 2013 storm season using multiple arrays sensitive to both infrasonic frequency and audio frequency acoustic emissions from lightning. Preliminary results show that

  4. Acoustic Analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: One-third octave jet noise spectra for a convergent nozzle at subsonic and supersonic velocities. Angle from downstream jet axis, 80 deg. Based data from Olsen. Narrow band jet noise spectra at 90 deg. and small angles to jet axis from Tam, Golobiowski and Seiner. V-large eddy simulation. Equation for small scale (unresolved) components. Formal solution for pressure.

  5. Acoustic radar sounding of the lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    Acoustic radar sounding techniques were used to measure the wind velocity and direction in the first 300 m of the atmosphere. Angle-of-arrival and Doppler techniques were developed to obtain two independent measurements of the wind field. These techniques and preliminary experimental results are described briefly.

  6. The Longest Stellar Stream in M31's Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardal, Mark A.; PAndAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present updated data and dynamical modeling of several tidal features in the M31 halo. We focus on the NW Stream, a nearly radial feature extending outwards from M31. Using new distance estimates fromevolved stars and embedded globular clusters, we find this stream extends to a greater distance from its host than any other known tidal stream. We update the stream velocity profile with new measures from resolved stars and globular clusters. We use Bayesian dynamical modeling to discover the stream's implications for M31's halo mass and the life history of its progenitor galaxy.

  7. Acoustic design of the QCSEE propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, I. J.; Smith, E. B.; Sowers, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic design features and techniques employed in the Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Program are described. The role of jet/flap noise in selecting the engine fan pressure ratio for powered lift propulsion systems is discussed. The QCSEE acoustic design features include a hybrid inlet (near-sonic throat velocity with acoustic treatment); low fan and core pressure ratios; low fan tip speeds; gear-driven fans; high and low frequency stacked core noise treatment; multiple-thickness treatment; bulk absorber treatment; and treatment on the stator vanes. The QCSEE designs represent and anticipated acoustic technology improvement of 12 to 16 PNdb relative to the noise levels of the low-noise engines used on current wide-body commercial jet transport aircraft.

  8. Frequency modulation of the ion-acoustic instability.

    PubMed

    Klostermann, H; Pierre, T

    2000-06-01

    In a double-plasma device with a negatively biased grid separating source and target chamber, the ion-acoustic instability is recorded during the injection of an ion beam whose velocity is chosen between the ion-acoustic velocity and twice this value. The observed broad power spectra of the density fluctuations are found to be related to a strong modulation of the frequency inside the bursts of unstable waves. This modulation is interpreted as being a consequence of the existence of propagating strongly nonlinear coherent structures that arise in the course of the nonlinear spatiotemporal evolution of the ion-acoustic instability. PMID:11088398

  9. Two-dimensional streaming flows in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreeben, Thomas D.; Chini, Gregory P.

    2011-05-01

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps embody a practical application in which acoustically generated streaming flows are used to significantly improve energy efficiency. Streaming in these lamps is examined using finite-element simulations in conjunction with available experimental results on the basis of the assumption that the streaming motion is excited by two-dimensional acoustic standing waves. Neither the magnitude nor the direction of the time-averaged flows is adequately explained by existing theory. Consequently, a modified streaming analysis is proposed in which the fluctuating flow is driven by an oscillating pressure field rather by a moving boundary and convective terms in both the instantaneous and streaming flows are included. Density variations are also shown to be important to the generation of the observed and simulated streaming. This analysis highlights the differences between streaming flows in HID lamps and those described in canonical problems appearing elsewhere in the literature.

  10. Interplanetary stream magnetism - Kinematic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1976-01-01

    The particle density and the magnetic-field intensity and direction are calculated for volume elements of the solar wind as a function of the initial magnetic-field direction and the initial speed gradient. It is assumed that the velocity is constant and radial. These assumptions are approximately valid between about 0.1 and 1.0 AU for many streams. Time profiles of the particle density, field intensity, and velocity are calculated for corotating streams, neglecting effects of pressure gradients. The compression and rarefaction of the magnetic field depend sensitively on the initial field direction. By averaging over a typical stream, it is found that the average radial field intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the heliocentric distance, whereas the average intensity in the direction of the planets' motion does not vary in a simple way, consistent with deep space observations. Changes of field direction may be very large, depending on the initial angle; but when the initial angle at 0.1 AU is such that the base of the field line corotates with the sun, the spiral angle is the preferred direction at 1 AU. The theory is also applicable to nonstationary flows.

  11. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi Cheng, Ying; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-11-30

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  12. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-11-01

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  13. Basal melt beneath whillans ice stream and ice streams A and C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, I.; Teluezyk, S.; Engelhardt, H.

    2002-01-01

    We have used a recently derived map of the velocity of Whillans Ice Stream and Ice Streams A and C to help estimate basal melt. Temperature was modeled with a simple vertical advection-diffusion equation, 'tuned' to match temperature profiles. We find that most of the melt occurs beneath the tributaries where larger basal shear stresses and thicker ice favors greater melt (e.g., 10-20 mm/yr). The occurrence of basal freezing is predicted beneath much of the ice plains of Ice Stream C and Whillans Ice Stream. Modelled melt rates for when Ice Stream C was active suggest there was just enough melt water generated in its tributaries to balance basal freezing on its ice plain. Net basal melt for Whillans Ice Stream is positive due to smaller basal temperature gradients. Modelled temperatures on Whillans Ice Stream, however, were constrained by a single temperature profile at UpB. Basal temperature gradients for Whillans B1 and Ice Stream A may have conditions more similar to those beneath Ice Streams C and D, in which case, there may not be sufficient melt to sustain motion. This would be consistent with the steady deceleration of Whillans stream over the last few decades.

  14. Perspectives on ecological research at the Outdoor StreamLab, a field-scale experimental stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, E. C.; Dieterman, D.; Kramarczuk, K.; Lightbody, A.; Orr, C. H.; Wellnitz, T.

    2009-12-01

    Artificial streams hold great promise for examining ecological processes. They lend themselves to manipulations of discharge, sediment load, water chemistry, and other parameters difficult or impossible to control in natural streams. However, artificial streams also have important limitations. In this presentation we describe insights gained from several ecological studies conducted at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory’s Outdoor StreamLab, including, 1) short-term turbidity exposure effects on fish health, 2) macroinvertebrate grazing rates on periphyton as a function of velocity, 3) rates of macroinvertebrate colonization as related to velocity, and 4) fine-scale correlations of periphytic biomass with hydraulic conditions. Several lessons emerge from these initial attempts at ecological research in the Outdoor StreamLab. We have learned that the size, flow rate, substrate, water chemistry, and available colonization population of the artificial stream limit the kinds of organisms and types of ecological processes that can be examined and the types of experiments that can be run. We suggest that short-term biotic responses are best for study in a system of this type, and note that constant experiment maintenance is essential. Operating artificial streams to meet the needs of multiple researchers also presents challenges of scheduling, coordination, and conflict resolution. Although ecological research in artificial streams has considerable potential, the planning required is no less than that of traditional field studies.

  15. Artificial Swimmers Propelled by Acoustically Activated Flagella.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Daniel; Baasch, Thierry; Jang, Bumjin; Pane, Salvador; Dual, Jürg; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-08-10

    Recent studies have garnered considerable interest in the field of propulsion to maneuver micro- and nanosized objects. Acoustics provide an alternate and attractive method to generate propulsion. To date, most acoustic-based swimmers do not use structural resonances, and their motion is determined by a combination of bulk acoustic streaming and a standing-wave field. The resultant field is intrinsically dependent on the boundaries of their resonating chambers. Though acoustic based propulsion is appealing in biological contexts, existing swimmers are less efficient, especially when operating in vivo, since no predictable standing-wave can be established in a human body. Here we describe a new class of nanoswimmer propelled by the small-amplitude oscillation of a flagellum-like flexible tail in standing and, more importantly, in traveling acoustic waves. The artificial nanoswimmer, fabricated by multistep electrodeposition techniques, compromises a rigid bimetallic head and a flexible tail. During acoustic excitation of the nanoswimmer the tail structure oscillates, which leads to a large amplitude propulsion in traveling waves. FEM simulation results show that the structural resonances lead to high propulsive forces. PMID:27459382

  16. Pressure distribution based optimization of phase-coded acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haixiang; Gao, Lu; Dai, Yafei; Ma, Qingyu; Zhang, Dong

    2014-02-28

    Based on the acoustic radiation of point source, the physical mechanism of phase-coded acoustical vortices is investigated with formulae derivations of acoustic pressure and vibration velocity. Various factors that affect the optimization of acoustical vortices are analyzed. Numerical simulations of the axial, radial, and circular pressure distributions are performed with different source numbers, frequencies, and axial distances. The results prove that the acoustic pressure of acoustical vortices is linearly proportional to the source number, and lower fluctuations of circular pressure distributions can be produced for more sources. With the increase of source frequency, the acoustic pressure of acoustical vortices increases accordingly with decreased vortex radius. Meanwhile, increased vortex radius with reduced acoustic pressure is also achieved for longer axial distance. With the 6-source experimental system, circular and radial pressure distributions at various frequencies and axial distances have been measured, which have good agreements with the results of numerical simulations. The favorable results of acoustic pressure distributions provide theoretical basis for further studies of acoustical vortices.

  17. Materials characterization and flaw detection by acoustic NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Otto

    1992-10-01

    This overview lists the potential applications of acoustic NDE for characterizing and assessing structural inhomogeneities in varied materials. Acoustic NDE is discussed in terms of its application to inhomogeneities such as: interstitials, precipitates, dislocations, phase transformations, porosity, cracks, and dislocation-point defect interactions. Acoustic velocity measurements provide data on interstitial concentrations, and nonlinear acoustics can describe the volume fraction of second-phase precipitates. Ultrasonic NDE can be used to determine the oxygen present in Ti-6211, binary alloys, and other alloys, and theoretical progress is noted in the characterization of porosity and cracks by means of sound velocity and attenuation as well as backscattering. Quantitative acoustic NDE can be used to detect flaws and characterize materials both during processing and by means of periodic inspections.

  18. Spectral solution of acoustic wave-propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The Chebyshev spectral collocation solution of acoustic wave propagation problems is considered. It is shown that the phase errors decay exponentially fast and that the number of points per wavelength is not sufficient to estimate the phase accuracy. Applications include linear propagation of a sinusoidal acoustic wavetrain in two space dimensions, and the interaction of a sound wave with the bow shock formed by placing a cylinder in a uniform Mach 4 supersonic free stream.

  19. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.

    1993-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance bimodal agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. A particulate having a size different from the size of the particulate in the gas stream to be cleaned is introduced into the system to effectuate the bimodal process. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, the added particulate may be a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  20. Experimental study of streaming flows associated with ultrasonic levitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Robey, J. L.

    1994-11-01

    Steady-state acoustic streaming flow patterns have been observed during the operation of a variety of resonant single-axis ultrasonic levitators in a gaseous environment and in the 20-37 kHz frequency range. Light sheet illumination and scattering from smoke particles have revealed primary streaming flows which display different characteristics at low and high sound pressure levels. Secondary macroscopic streaming cells around levitated samples are superimposed on the primary streaming flow pattern generated by the standing wave. These recorded flows are quite reproducible, and are qualitatively the same for a variety of levitator physical geometries. An onset of flow instability can also be recorded in nonisothermal systems, such as levitated spot-heated samples when the resonance conditions are not exactly satisfied. A preliminary qualitative interpretation of these experimental results is presented in terms of the superposition of three discrete sets of circulation cells operating on different spatial scales. These relevant length scales are the acoustic wavelength, the levitated sample size, and finally the acoustic boundary layer thickness. This approach fails, however, to explain the streaming flow-field morphology around liquid drops levitated on Earth. Observation of the interaction between the flows cells and the levitated samples also suggests the existence of a steady-state torque induced by the streaming flows.

  1. Alpha-Stream Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Jr., Rodger William (Inventor); Bruder, Geoffrey Adam (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-acoustic engine and/or cooler is provided and includes an elongated tubular body, multiple regenerators disposed within the body, multiple heat exchangers disposed within the body, where at least one heat exchanger is disposed adjacent to each of the multiple regenerators, multiple transducers axially disposed at each end of the body, and an acoustic wave source generating acoustic waves. At least one of the acoustic waves is amplified by one of the regenerators and at least another acoustic wave is amplified by a second one of regenerators.

  2. Balance Velocities of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, Ian; Fahnestock, Mark; Ekholm, Simon; Kwok, Ron

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetry data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail the location of an ice stream in northeastern Greenland, which was only recently discovered using satellite imagery. Enhanced flow associated with all of the major outlets is clearly visible, although small errors in the source data result in less accurate estimates of the absolute flow speeds. Nevertheless, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning.

  3. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTIC FORCES ON A PARTICLE IN AEROSOL MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    The acoustic force exerted on a solid particle was evaluated to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical physical parameters or constraints affecting particle motion and capture in a collecting device. The application of an acoustic force to the collection of a range of submicron-to-micron particles in a highly turbulent airflow stream laden with solid particles was evaluated in the presence of other assisting and competing forces. This scoping estimate was based on the primary acoustic force acting directly on particles in a dilute aerosol system, neglecting secondary interparticle effects such as agglomeration of the sub-micron particles. A simplified analysis assuming a stable acoustic equilibrium with an infinite sound speed in the solid shows that for a solid-laden air flow in the presence of a standing wave, particles will move toward the nearest node. The results also show that the turbulent drag force on a 1-{micro}m particle resulting from eddy motion is dominant when compared with the electrostatic force or the ultrasonic acoustic force. At least 180 dB acoustic pressure level at 1 MHz is required for the acoustic force to be comparable to the electrostatic or turbulent drag forces in a high-speed air stream. It is noted that particle size and pressure amplitude are dominant parameters for the acoustic force. When acoustic pressure level becomes very large, the acoustic energy will heat up the surrounding air medium, which may cause air to expand. With an acoustic power of about 600 watts applied to a 2000-lpm air flow, the air temperature can increase by as much as 15 C at the exit of the collector.

  4. Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, G.C.; Martin, S.J.

    1990-10-03

    The invention comprises a method for the identification and quantification of sorbed chemical species onto a coating of a device capable of generating and receiving an acoustic wave, by measuring the changes in the velocity of the acoustic wave resulting from the sorption of the chemical species into the coating as the wave travels through the coating and by measuring the changes in the attenuation of an acoustic wave resulting from the sorption of the chemical species into the coating as the wave travels through the coating. The inventive method further correlates the magnitudes of the changes of velocity with respect to changes of the attenuation of the acoustic wave to identify the sorbed chemical species. The absolute magnitudes of the velocity changes or the absolute magnitude of the attenuation changes are used to determine the concentration of the identified chemical species.

  5. Acoustic Doppler current profiler applications used in rivers and estuaries by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected streamflow information for the Nation's streams since 1889. Streamflow information is used to predict floods, manage and allocate water resources, design engineering structures, compute water-quality loads, and operate water-control structures. The current (2007) size of the USGS streamgaging network is over 7,400 streamgages nationwide. The USGS has progressively improved the streamgaging program by incorporating new technologies and techniques that streamline data collection while increasing the quality of the streamflow data that are collected. The single greatest change in streamflow measurement technology during the last 100 years has been the development and application of high frequency acoustic instruments for measuring streamflow. One such instrument, the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), is rapidly replacing traditional mechanical current meters for streamflow measurement (Muste and others, 2007). For more information on how an ADCP works see Simpson (2001) or visit http://hydroacoustics.usgs.gov/. The USGS has used ADCPs attached to manned or tethered boats since the mid-1990s to measure streamflow in a wide variety of conditions (fig. 1). Recent analyses have shown that ADCP streamflow measurements can be made with similar or greater accuracy, efficiency, and resolution than measurements made using conventional current-meter methods (Oberg and Mueller, 2007). ADCPs also have the ability to measure streamflow in streams where traditional current-meter measurements previously were very difficult or costly to obtain, such as streams affected by backwater or tides. In addition to streamflow measurements, the USGS also uses ADCPs for other hydrologic measurements and applications, such as computing continuous records of streamflow for tidally or backwater affected streams, measuring velocity fields with high spatial and temporal resolution, and estimating suspended-sediment concentrations. An overview

  6. Compressional velocity measurements for a highly fractured lunar anorthosite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondergeld, C. H.; Granryd, L. A.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The compressional wave (V sub p) velocities in three mutually perpendicular directions have been measured in lunar sample 60025,174, lunar anorthosite. V sub p measurements were made at ambient temperature and pressure and a new technique was developed to measure the velocities because of the tremendous acoustic wave attenuation of the lunar sample. The measured velocities were all less than 1 km/sec and displayed up to a 21% departure from the mean value of the three directions. The velocities agree with seismic wave velocities determined for the lunar surface at the collection site.

  7. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  8. Acoustic phenomena of open cavity airborne Cassegrainian telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Kuren, J. T.; Otten, L. J., III; Davis, J. A.; Kyrazis, D.

    1974-01-01

    A series of large scale wind tunnel experiments were conducted on a gimbal mounted Cassegrainian telescope enclosed in a shroud with various aerodynamic fairings. The optical aperture was open to the airstream, resulting in acoustic inputs to the telescope. Resonance was shown to be dependent on free stream Mach number, internal cavity and external fairing geometry, and the angle of the plane of the opening relative to the free stream direction. Configurations were found which caused low noise and low unsteady internal loads at the expense of decreased view angle. Air injection over the cavity aided in reducing acoustic resonance.

  9. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  10. Winter Streams: The Web of Life Goes On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokora, Daniel L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes scope and significance of a high school water monitoring project and discusses problems and solutions related to water testing in general and winter water testing in particular. Discussions of stream velocity, stream flow, biotic index, and coliform bacteria tests are included. (DC)

  11. Lagrangian coherent structures in the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Wilson, Chris; Green, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is calculated to identify Lagrangian coherent structures in the Gulf Stream region. The velocity fields are determined using the geostrophic velocities derived from satellite altimetry data. The coherent structures in and around the Gulf Stream are delineated by the both positive and negative FTLE ridges, and represent boundaries between dynamically distinct regions that are important to investigate transport and mixing processes in the ocean. Alternating positive and negative FTLE ridge patterns are found to line the meandering jet, which indicate the regions of entrainment and detrainment along the jet. Results compare well with the Bower kinematic model of a meandering jet, although it is clear that the kinematic model is an over-simplification of the jet dynamics, and studying the dynamics of vortex interaction with the jet is important for understanding fluid transfer in the Gulf Stream region.

  12. Estimating Shear Velocity and Roughness Length From Velocity Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Normand E.; Abrahams, Athol D.

    1992-08-01

    In turbulent boundary layer flows, shear velocity u*, and roughness length z0 are commonly derived from semilogarithmic flow velocity profiles by fitting a straight line by ordinary least squares regression to the profile and calculating estimates of u*, and z0 from the slope and intercept of the computed regression equation. However, it is not clear from the literature whether the appropriate regression is of flow velocity u on the logarithm of height above the bed In z or of ln z on u. In order to calculate estimates of u* and z0, the true or structural relation between u and In z must be established. Because u is generally observed with much greater error than is In z, the structural relation may be estimated by regressing u on ln z; regressing ln z on u is incorrect. An analysis of 24 stream channel flow velocity profiles indicates that even in situations where the correlation between u and ln z exceeds 0.9, performing the incorrect regression can result in the considerable overestimation of u* and z0.

  13. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  14. Acoustic methods of remote probing of the lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, C. G.

    1969-01-01

    The potential usefulness of acoustic methods for the remote probing of the lower atmosphere is reviewed. Starting with a comparison of the effects of temperature, wind, and humidity fluctuations upon the refractive index of air to electromagnetic and acoustic waves, it is shown that the fluctuations in acoustic refractive index may be expected to be about one thousand times stronger than in the radio case. Since the scattered power is proportional to the square of the refractive index fluctuations, the scatter of acoustic waves may be expected to be roughly one million times stronger than for radio waves. In addition, the million-fold ratio between the velocities of electromagnetic and acoustic waves results in an acoustic system requiring one million times less bandwidth to interrogate a given atmospheric volume.

  15. The acoustic monopole in motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, T. D.; Liu, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experiment are presented in which a small monochromatic source which behaves like an acoustic monopole when stationary is moved at a constant speed over an asphalt surface past stationary microphones. An analysis of the monopole moving above a finite impedance reflecting plane is given. The theoretical and experimental results are compared for different ground to observer heights, source frequencies, and source velocities. A computation of the effects of source acceleration on the noise radiated by the monopole is also presented.

  16. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with sound visualization, acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-re verberation methods, both essential for visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?

  17. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with "sound visualization," acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-reverberation methods, both essentialfor visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, "Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?"

  18. Exploring Granular Flows at Intermediate Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; van der Elst, N.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical and geomorphological flows often encompass a wide range of strain rates. Landslides accelerate from nearly static conditions to velocities in the range of meters/seconds. The rheology of granular flows for the end-members is moderately well-understood, but the constitutive low at intermediate velocities is largely unexplored. Here we present evidence that granular flows transition through a regime in which internally generated acoustic waves play a critical role in controlling rheology. In laboratory experiments on natural sand under shear in a commercial rheometer, we observe that the steady-state flows at intermediate velocities are compacted relative to the end members. In a confined volume, this compaction results in a decrease in stress on the boundaries. We establish the key role of the acoustic waves by measuring the noise generated by the shear flows with an accelerometer and then exciting the flow with similar amplitude noise under lower shear rate conditions. The observed compaction for a given amplitude noise is the same in both cases, regardless of whether the noise is generated internally by the grains colliding or artificially applied externally. The boundaries of this acoustically controlled regime can be successfully predicted through non-dimensional analysis balancing the overburden, acoustic pressure and granular inertial terms. In our laboratory experiments, this regime corresponds to 0.1 to 10 cm/s. The controlling role of acoustic waves in intermediate velocities is significant because: (1) Geological systems must pass through this regime on their route to instability. (2) Acoustic waves are much more efficiently generated by angular particles, likely to be found in natural samples, than by perfectly spherical particles, which are more tractable for laboratory and theoretical studies. Therefore, this regime is likely to be missed in many analog and computational approaches. (3) Different mineralogies and shapes result in different

  19. Issues in acoustic vector-sensor processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Malcolm Alistair

    This dissertation examines the ability of acoustic vector sensors to solve the passive direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation and 3-D localization problems. These sensors measure the three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity vector, as well as the acoustic pressure, at one location. By preserving directional information that is present in the structure of the velocity field, they gain a number of advantages over traditional arrays of scalar sensors, such as hydrophones and microphones. We compute and examine, through the Cramér-Rao bound and beam-forming based methods, the ability of arrays of acoustic vector sensors to estimate direction. We first consider the case of an array in free space then extend these results to account for the presence of a reflecting boundary, such as the seabed or a vessel's hull, located near the array. Next, we derive expressions for the noise correlation structure induced by various ambient noise fields, isotropic and anisotropic, at an acoustic vector sensor array, and use them to examine its localization performance. We then propose a decentralized processing scheme to rapidly locate a wideband target in three dimensions. Finally, we present a general framework for the analysis of errors associated with the estimation of a vector, or system of vectors, that has geometrical interpretations in terms of length, angle, etc. The framework is employed throughout the thesis.

  20. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...