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Sample records for acoustic system hydrophone

  1. Fiber optic hydrophones for acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buis, E. J.; Doppenberg, E. J. J.; Lahmann, R.; Toet, P. M.; de Vreugd, J.

    2016-04-01

    Cosmic neutrinos with ultra high energies can be detected acoustically using hydrophones. The detection of these neutrinos may provide crucial information about then GZK mechanism. The flux of these neutrinos, however, is expected to be low, so that a detection volume is required more than a order of magnitude larger than what has presently been realized. With a large detection volume and a large number of hydrophones, there is a need for technology that is cheap and easy to deploy. Fiber optics provide a natural way for distributed sensing. In addition, a sensor has been designed and manufactured that can be produced cost-effectively on an industrial scale. Sensitivity measurements show that the sensor is able to reach the required sea-state zero level. For a proper interpretation of the expected bipolar signals, filtering techniques should be applied to remove the effects of the unwanted resonance peaks.

  2. Investigation of methods for successful installation and operation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) hydrophones in the Willamette River, Oregon, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutz, Gary L.; Sholtis, Matthew D.; Adams, Noah S.; Beeman, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry equipment was installed at three sites in the Willamette River during October 2012 to test the effectiveness of using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System to monitor the movements of fish in a high-flow, high-velocity riverine environment. Hydrophones installed on concrete blocks were placed on the bottom of the river, and data cables were run from the hydrophones to shore where they were attached to anchor points. Under relatively low-flow conditions (less than approximately 10,000 cubic feet per second) the monitoring system remained in place and could be used to detect tagged fish as they traveled downstream during their seaward migration. At river discharge over approximately 10,000 cubic feet per second, the hydrophones were damaged and cables were lost because of the large volume of woody debris in the river and the increase in water velocity. Damage at two of the sites was sufficient to prevent data collection. A limited amount of data was collected from the equipment at the third site. Site selection and deployment strategies were re-evaluated, and an alternate deployment methodology was designed for implementation in 2013.

  3. Passive acoustic localization with an AUV-mounted hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Spain, Gerald L.; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C. David; Smith, Jerome A.; Zimmerman, Richard

    2001-05-01

    A mid-size Odyssey IIb autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) was retrofitted with the advanced vectored-thrust system presently installed on AUVs manufactured by Bluefin Robotics, Inc. Subsequent modifications to this thrust system decreased the radiated acoustic and vibration noise levels recorded by an eight-element hydrophone array mounted on the AUV's inner shroud by 20 to 50 dB across the 20 Hz to 10 kHz band. This reduction in self-noise levels to near, or at, background ocean noise levels permits the use of the vehicle-mounted hydrophone array in passive ocean acoustic studies. One example is the application of passive synthetic aperture processing techniques to provide greater spatial resolution estimates of the direction of low frequency sources. Doppler spreading caused by medium motion is a limiting factor in array gain. At mid frequencies (1-10 kHz), the complexity of the received acoustic field created by scattering off the AUV body is partly captured in the array processing by the use of replica vectors measured in a calibration tank. These empirical replica vectors decrease the azimuthally dependent degradation in beamforming performance over that of plane waves. [Work supported by ONR, Code 321(US).

  4. Underwater acoustic source localization using closely spaced hydrophone pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Seop; Choi, Bok-Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Lee, Kyun Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Underwater sound source position is determined using a line array. However, performance degradation occurs owing to a multipath environment, which generates incoherent signals. In this paper, a hydrophone array is proposed for underwater source position estimation robust to a multipath environment. The array is composed of three pairs of sensors placed on the same line. The source position is estimated by performing generalized cross-correlation (GCC). The proposed system is not affected by a multipath time delay because of the close distance between closely spaced sensors. The validity of the array is confirmed by simulation using acoustic signals synthesized by eigenrays.

  5. Fiber-optic hydrophone array for acoustic surveillance in the littoral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David; Nash, Phillip

    2005-05-01

    We describe a fibre-optic hydrophone array system architecture that can be tailored to meet the underwater acoustic surveillance requirements of the military, counter terrorist and customs authorities in protecting ports and harbours, offshore production facilities or coastal approaches. Physically the fibre-optic hydrophone array is in the form of a lightweight cable, enabling rapid deployment from a small vessel. Based upon an optical architecture of time and wavelength multiplexed interferometric hydrophones, the array is comprised of a series of hydrophone sub-arrays. Using multiple sub-arrays, extended perimeters many tens of kilometres in length can be monitored. Interrogated via a long (~50km) optical fibre data link, the acoustic date is processed using the latest open architecture sonar processing platform, ensuring that acoustic targets below, on and above the surface are detected, tracked and classified. Results obtained from an at sea trial of a 96-channel hydrophone array are given, showing the passive detection and tracking of a diver, small surface craft and big ocean going ships beyond the horizon. Furthermore, we describe how the OptaMarine fibre-optic hydrophone array fits into an integrated multi-layered approach to port and harbour security consisting of active sonar for diver detection and hull imaging, as well as thermal imaging and CCTV for surface monitoring. Finally, we briefly describe a complimentary land perimeter intruder detection system consisting of an array of fibre optic accelerometers.

  6. Acoustic performance and clinical use of a fibreoptic hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Draguioti, E; Tiptaf, R; Shotri, N; Saunders, J E

    1998-01-01

    Initial clinical experience with the use of an optical fibre hydrophone for in vivo ultrasound dosimetry is reported. The hydrophone, originally described by Beard and Mills (1997), operates as an extrinsic, low-finesse Fabry-Perot optical sensor where acoustically-induced thickness changes in a polymer film modulate the phase difference between light beams reflected from the two surfaces of the film. The pressure waveforms from the sensor are compared with those from a calibrated piezoelectric polymer membrane hydrophone. The sensor is found to have a frequency resonance at around 12 MHz, corresponding to the thickness mode of the 50-micron polymer film. The directional responses at 0.16 MHz, 1.0 MHz and 5.0 MHz are found to be similar to those predicted for a plane piston receiver with the same diameter as that of the polymer film (400 microns). The performance of the sensor as a broad-band hydrophone is degraded by the relatively low acoustical impedance of the adhesive used in the fibre-film bond. The hydrophone was used in the clinic for measurement of acoustic pressures within the ureter of 4 patients undergoing clinical extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy on a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Pressures in the range 0.5 to 5.0 MPa were recorded in the ureter at positions over 10 cm from the renal pelvis. Problems related to the clinical use of the sensor, including instability in the sensitivity of the sensor following handling and its mechanical strength in high-amplitude acoustic fields, are discussed. PMID:9483782

  7. A hydrophone prototype for ultra high energy neutrino acoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, A.; Plotnikov, A.; Yershova, O.; Anghinolfi, M.; Piombo, D.

    2009-06-01

    The design of an air-backed fiber-optic hydrophone is presented. With respect to the previous models this prototype is optimized to provide a bandwidth sufficiently large to detect acoustic signals produced by high energy hadronic showers in water. In addiction to the geometrical configuration and to the choice of the materials, the preliminary results of the measured performances in air are presented.

  8. The Quasi-Eulerian Hydrophone: A New Approach for Ocean Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Dziak, R. P.; Fowler, M. J.; Hammond, S. R.; Meinig, C.

    2005-12-01

    For the last 10 years Oregon State University and NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory have successfully operated and maintained autonomous hydrophone arrays to monitor low frequency acoustic energy of earthquakes and marine mammal calls in remote ocean areas where no historical record existed. These hydrophones are moored at mid-water depth and require a routine servicing cruise to retrieve the stored data. The system is robust, but it is not real-time and it takes up to a year before acoustic events can be identified from the raw acoustic data. As a result, we frequently miss opportunities to observe ocean acoustic events as they occur. A new type of autonomous hydrophone called a Quasi-Eulerian hydrophone (QUEphone) is under development at OSU/PMEL. This instrument allows near-real-time monitoring of a selected study area. It is a tether-free float with a built-in hydrophone monitoring system and a buoyancy controller. It is capable of repeat ascent/descent cycles in up to 2000 m of water. In contrast to the conventional Lagrangean float, the QUEphone float stays in the same area by maintaining negative buoyancy and remaining on the seafloor for most of its life span. While on the seafloor the QUEphone runs an intelligent event detection algorithm, and upon detection of a significant number of events will surface to transmit a small data file to shore. We have conducted brief test deployments of the QUEphone in both a fresh-water lake and marine waters off Oregon coast, and the results of these tests will be discussed and compared with other hydrophone data. Once fully developed the QUEphone is expected to provide near real-time analysis capability of earthquakes that affect seafloor hydrothermal vents and their associated ecosystems. Such fast reaction will allow for a rapid response to seismic events, enabling researchers to examine how changes in hydrothermal activity affect deep-ocean vent ecosystems.

  9. Development of a standing wave apparatus for calibrating acoustic vector sensors and hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Richard D; Sagers, Jason D; Wilson, Preston S

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus was developed to calibrate acoustic hydrophones and vector sensors between 25 and 2000 Hz. A standing wave field is established inside a vertically oriented, water-filled, elastic-walled waveguide by a piston velocity source at the bottom and a pressure-release boundary condition at the air/water interface. A computer-controlled linear positioning system allows a device under test to be precisely located in the water column while the acoustic response is measured. Some of the challenges of calibrating hydrophones and vector sensors in such an apparatus are discussed, including designing the waveguide to mitigate dispersion, understanding the impact of waveguide structural resonances on the acoustic field, and developing algorithms to post-process calibration measurement data performed in a standing wave field. Data from waveguide characterization experiments and calibration measurements are presented and calibration uncertainty is reported. PMID:26827015

  10. Hydrophone calibration based on microcontrollers for acoustic detection of UHE neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooppakaew, W.; Danaher, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses hydrophone calibration for generation of artificial Ultra High Energy (UHE) neutrino-induced pulses. Signal processing techniques are applied to hydrophone modelling. A bipolar acoustic generation module is built using PIC microcontrollers for processing and control. The NI-USB6211 commercial module is used for comparison. The modelling is compared to experimental data generated in a laboratory water tank. The result from simulation and experiment are compared, showing excellent agreement. This opens the way to excite steerable hydrophone arrays, which was not possible with previous hardware.

  11. "Lollipop-shaped" high-sensitivity Microelectromechanical Systems vector hydrophone based on Parylene encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Renxin; Zhang, Guojun; Du, Jin; Zhao, Long; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents methods of promoting the sensitivity of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) vector hydrophone by increasing the sensing area of cilium and perfect insulative Parylene membrane. First, a low-density sphere is integrated with the cilium to compose a "lollipop shape," which can considerably increase the sensing area. A mathematic model on the sensitivity of the "lollipop-shaped" MEMS vector hydrophone is presented, and the influences of different structural parameters on the sensitivity are analyzed via simulation. Second, the MEMS vector hydrophone is encapsulated through the conformal deposition of insulative Parylene membrane, which enables underwater acoustic monitoring without any typed sound-transparent encapsulation. Finally, the characterization results demonstrate that the sensitivity reaches up to -183 dB (500 Hz 0dB at 1 V/ μPa ), which is increased by more than 10 dB, comparing with the previous cilium-shaped MEMS vector hydrophone. Besides, the frequency response takes on a sensitivity increment of 6 dB per octave. The working frequency band is 20-500 Hz and the concave point depth of 8-shaped directivity is beyond 30 dB, indicating that the hydrophone is promising in underwater acoustic application.

  12. Development of anticavitation hydrophone using a titanium front plate: Effect of the titanium front plate in high-intensity acoustic field with generation of acoustic cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiiba, Michihisa; Okada, Nagaya; Kurosawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Novel anticavitation hydrophones were fabricated by depositing a hydrothermally synthesized lead zirconate titanate polycrystalline film at the back of a titanium front plate. These anticavitation hydrophones were not damaged by the measurement of the acoustic field formed by a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device. Their sensitivity was improved by approximately 20 dB over that of the conventional anticavitation hydrophone by modifying their basic structure and materials. The durability of the anticavitation hydrophone that we fabricated was compared by exposing it to a high-intensity acoustic field at the focal point of the HIFU field and in the water tank of an ultrasound cleaner. Therefore, the effect of the surface of the titanium front plate on acoustic cavitation was investigated by exposing such a surface to the high-intensity acoustic field. We found that the fabricated anticavitation hydrophone was robust and was not damaged easily, even in the focused acoustic field where acoustic cavitation occurs.

  13. Hydrophone arrays for instantaneous measurement of high-pressure acoustic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2010-03-01

    Electrohydraulic lithotripter acoustic fields are measured with single-element hydrophones even though the acoustic fields are not highly repeatable. The ability to obtain an instantaneous "snapshot" of the sound field would have broad implications for advancing the understanding of how lithotripters fragment stones and damage kidney tissue. To better characterize the acoustic field of lithotripters, linear hydrophone arrays were fabricated by bonding a 9 μm piezopolymer film to a copper-clad polyimide which had an array pattern etched on the copper layer. After bonding, the devices were backed with an epoxy plug in order to provide structural support. The array elements were each 0.5 by 0.5 mm, spaced 1.25 mm center to center, and there were 20 elements. The relative sensitivity of each hydrophone element was measured at 5.25 MHz for an acoustic pressure of 4.5 kPa and the elements were found to vary by ≈ 6%. The arrays were then placed in the focus of a piezoelectric lithotripter and were found to maintain their sensitivity for roughly 500 shock waves before gradually losing sensitivity.

  14. Fiber-optic, cantilever-type acoustic motion velocity hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Cranch, G A; Miller, G A; Kirkendall, C K

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between fluid loaded fiber-optic cantilevers and a low frequency acoustic wave is investigated as the basis for an acoustic vector sensor. The displacements of the prototype cantilevers are measured with an integrated fiber laser strain sensor. A theoretical model predicting the frequency dependent shape of acoustically driven planar and cylindrical fiber-optic cantilevers incorporating effects of fluid viscosity is presented. The model demonstrates good agreement with the measured response of two prototype cantilevers, characterized with a vibrating water column, in the regime of Re ≥ 1. The performance of each cantilever geometry is also analyzed. Factors affecting the sensor performance such as fluid viscosity, laser mode profile, and support motion are considered. The planar cantilever is shown to experience the largest acoustically induced force and hence the highest acoustic responsivity. However, the cylindrical cantilever exhibits the smoothest response in water, due to the influence of viscous fluid damping, and is capable of two axis particle velocity measurement. These cantilevers are shown to be capable of achieving acoustic resolutions approaching the lowest sea-state ocean noise. PMID:22779459

  15. Underwater hybrid near-field acoustical holography based on the measurement of vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Desen; Sun, Yu

    2010-06-01

    Hybrid near-field acoustical holography (NAH) is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from a cylindrical source in a complex underwater environment. In hybrid NAH, we combine statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (SONAH) and broadband acoustical holography from intensity measurements (BAHIM) to reconstruct the underwater cylindrical source field. First, the BAHIM is utilized to regenerate as much acoustic pressures on the hologram surface as necessary, and then the acoustic pressures are taken as input to the formulation implemented numerically by SONAH. The main advantages of this technology are that the complex pressure on the hologram surface can be reconstructed without reference signal, and the measurement array can be smaller than the source, thus the practicability and efficiency of this technology are greatly enhanced. Numerical examples of a cylindrical source are demonstrated. Test results show that hybrid NAH can yield a more accurate reconstruction than conventional NAH. Then, an experiment has been carried out with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results show the advantage of hybrid NAH in the reconstruction of an acoustic field and the feasibility of using a vector hydrophone array in an underwater NAH measurement, as well as the identification and localization of noise sources.

  16. Multipole hydrophone

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.E. III

    1996-04-01

    Directional hydrophones provide the means to resolve bearing ambiguity in towed arrays and to reduce the effects of aliasing in undersampled arrays. A multipole hydrophone combines the output of multiple monopole elements spaced closely in terms of acoustic wavelengths to obtain its directionality. Issues related to multipole sensor implementation and performance include signal-to-noise performance, flow noise influence, and material selection. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Acoustic monitoring in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, using hydrophone of the Ocean Bottom Seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sukyoung; Lee, Won Sang; Kuk Hong, Jong; Yoo, Hyun Jae; Park, Yongcheol; Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita; Geissler, Wolfram H.

    2016-04-01

    Although a number of active source seismic experiments have been conducted over the last few decades to investigate the crustal structure in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, long-term observation to monitor underwater tectonic activities and changes in the cryospheric environment still remains challenging due to existence of sea ice in the study region. Korea Polar Research Institute has accomplished successful deployment of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) in the Ross Sea collaborating with Alfred Wegener Institute during the period of 2011-2012 and 2014 by Korean icebreaker RV Araon. The OBS system manufactured by K.U.M. contains a hydrophone sensor that allow us to monitor underwater acoustics generated by tectonic and ice-related events. We present spectrograms of the continuous hydroacoustic data and various types of signals, e.g. seismic T-waves, iceequakes, and tremors. There are periodic and harmonic tremors that might be related with tidal modulation, and the seasonal variation of the background noise seems to be related with sea ice concentration.

  18. Male sperm whale acoustic behavior observed from multipaths at a single hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laplanche, Christophe; Adam, Olivier; Lopatka, Maciej; Motsch, Jean-François

    2005-10-01

    Sperm whales generate transient sounds (clicks) when foraging. These clicks have been described as echolocation sounds, a result of having measured the source level and the directionality of these signals and having extrapolated results from biosonar tests made on some small odontocetes. The authors propose a passive acoustic technique requiring only one hydrophone to investigate the acoustic behavior of free-ranging sperm whales. They estimate whale pitch angles from the multipath distribution of click energy. They emphasize the close bond between the sperm whale's physical and acoustic activity, leading to the hypothesis that sperm whales might, like some small odontocetes, control click level and rhythm. An echolocation model estimating the range of the sperm whale's targets from the interclick interval is computed and tested during different stages of the whale's dive. Such a hypothesis on the echolocation process would indicate that sperm whales echolocate their prey layer when initiating their dives and follow a methodic technique when foraging.

  19. Underwater patch near-field acoustical holography based on particle velocity and vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, DeSen; Li, SiChun; Sun, Yu; Mo, ShiQi; Shi, ShengGuo

    2012-11-01

    One-step patch near-field acoustical holography (PNAH) is a powerful tool for identifying noise sources from the partially known sound pressure field. The acoustical property to be reconstructed on the surface of interest is related to the partially measured pressure on the hologram surface in terms of sampling and bandlimiting matrices, which cost more in computation. A one-step procedure based on measuring of the normal component of the particle velocity is described, including the mathematical formulation. The numerical simulation shows that one-step PNAH based on particle velocity can obtain more accurately reconstructed results and it is also less sensitive to noise than the method based on pressure. These findings are confirmed by an underwater near-field acoustical holography experiment conducted with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results have illustrated the high performance of one-step PNAH based on particle velocity in the reconstruction of sound field and the advantages of a vector hydrophone array in an underwater near-field measurement.

  20. Autonomous hydrophone array for long-term acoustic monitoring in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Eu, J.-F.; Brachet, C.; Goslin, J.; Royer, J.-Y.; Ammann, J.

    2009-04-01

    We are developing an array of new autonomous hydrophones, benefiting from a long-lasting collaboration with the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (NOAA and Oregon state University). The hydrophones are deployed on a mooring line anchored to the seafloor by an expendable anchor weight. The length of the line is adjusted so that the sensor (and buoy) lies in the middle of the SOFAR channel at about 1000m depth for mid-latitudes (depending on the speed-of-sound profile). The buoy at depth keeps the line under tension and prevents wave-motion noise from the sensor. The instrument continuously samples and records the acoustic signals at 240Hz for seismic studies, or 480Hz (or more) for marine mammal studies. The SOFAR channel acts as an acoustic wave-guide in the ocean so that acoustic waves can propagate with little attenuation over long distances. Autonomous hydrophones allow the detection and localization of the low-magnitude (Mw>2.5) seismic activity along oceanic ridges and in deformed intraplate areas, which remains generally undetected or poorly localized by land-based seismic networks. An array of hydrophones can monitor a much wider area (more than 1000 km across) than ocean-bottom seismometers, which suffer from the rapid attenuation of seismic waves in the crust and upper mantle. Arrays of autonomous hydrophones thus succeed in detecting and locating 30 to 50 times more earthquakes than those listed in the catalogs from land-based seismograph stations. Data are buffered on flash cards and then regularly stored on hard disks or on solid-state drives (e.g. 20Gb of data per year at 240Hz sampling rate). We use 24-bit sigma-delta converters with programmable gain amplifiers. As timing is a key issue for an accurate localisation of the seismic events, instruments are synchronized with GPS time and have a low-power, highly stable calibrated clock (10-8 drift). All electronics and batteries (Li or alcaline) are placed in titanium pressure cases for long

  1. Single-shot measurements of the acoustic field of an electrohydraulic lithotripter using a hydrophone array

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Filoux, Erwan; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Piezopolymer-based hydrophone arrays consisting of 20 elements were fabricated and tested for use in measuring the acoustic field from a shock-wave lithotripter. The arrays were fabricated from piezopolymer films and were mounted in a housing to allow submersion into water. The motivation was to use the array to determine how the shot-to-shot variability of the spark discharge in an electrohydraulic lithotripter affects the resulting focused acoustic field. It was found that the dominant effect of shot-to-shot variability was to laterally shift the location of the focus by up to 5 mm from the nominal acoustic axis of the lithotripter. The effect was more pronounced when the spark discharge was initiated with higher voltages. The lateral beamwidth of individual, instantaneous shock waves were observed to range from 1.5 mm to 24 mm. Due to the spatial variation of the acoustic field, the average of instantaneous beamwidths were observed to be 1 to 2 mm narrower than beamwidths determined from traditional single-point measurements that average the pressure measured at each location before computing beamwidth. PMID:23654419

  2. The design of integrated demodulation system of optical fiber hydrophone array for oceanic oil exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Shi, Qingping; Tian, Changdong; Duan, Fajie; Zhang, Min; Liao, Yanbiao; Zhu, Yaoqiang

    2011-11-01

    An integrated demodulation system of optical fiber hydrophone array is designed in the paper for the application of oceanic oil exploration. The characteristic of artificial seismic signal, sensed and collected by piezoelectric hydrophone sensor used in the actual situation, is analyzed by joint time-frequency analysis. Based on this, parameters of the optical fiber hydrophone sensitivity and modulation frequency are designed with redundancy, ensuring that the upper limit of dynamic range of fiber optic hydrophone demodulation system can meet the requirements in the same operating conditions of sea trials, as those of piezoelectric sensor system.

  3. DFB fiber laser hydrophone with band-pass response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Faxiang; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-11-15

    A distributed-feedback fiber laser hydrophone with band-pass response is presented. The design of the hydrophone aims to equalize static pressure and eliminate signal aliasing of high-frequency acoustic components. Theoretical analysis is presented based on electro-acoustic theory. The experimental results agree well with the theory. The measured underwater responses show that the hydrophone has a pressure sensitivity of -170 dB re:pm/μPa over a bandwidth between 100 Hz and 500 Hz. A sensitivity reduction exceeding -35 dB is observed at 2500 Hz. The tested static pressure sensitivity of the hydrophone is -226 dB. The proposed fiber laser hydrophone of this kind is expected to have important application in deep water fiber-optic sonar systems with anti-aliasing, and the understanding gained through this work can be extended to a guide of hydrophone design for required filtering bandwidth. PMID:22089550

  4. Observations and Bayesian location methodology of transient acoustic signals (likely blue whales) in the Indian Ocean, using a hydrophone triplet.

    PubMed

    Le Bras, Ronan J; Kuzma, Heidi; Sucic, Victor; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-05-01

    A notable sequence of calls was encountered, spanning several days in January 2003, in the central part of the Indian Ocean on a hydrophone triplet recording acoustic data at a 250 Hz sampling rate. This paper presents signal processing methods applied to the waveform data to detect, group, extract amplitude and bearing estimates for the recorded signals. An approximate location for the source of the sequence of calls is inferred from extracting the features from the waveform. As the source approaches the hydrophone triplet, the source level (SL) of the calls is estimated at 187 ± 6 dB re: 1 μPa-1 m in the 15-60 Hz frequency range. The calls are attributed to a subgroup of blue whales, Balaenoptera musculus, with a characteristic acoustic signature. A Bayesian location method using probabilistic models for bearing and amplitude is demonstrated on the calls sequence. The method is applied to the case of detection at a single triad of hydrophones and results in a probability distribution map for the origin of the calls. It can be extended to detections at multiple triads and because of the Bayesian formulation, additional modeling complexity can be built-in as needed. PMID:27250159

  5. Low cost, high performance white-light fiber-optic hydrophone system with a trackable working point.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinyu; Zhao, Meirong; Huang, Xinjing; Bae, Hyungdae; Chen, Yongyao; Yu, Miao

    2016-08-22

    A working-point trackable fiber-optic hydrophone with high acoustic resolution is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensor is based on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cavity molded at the end of a single-mode fiber, acting as a low-finesse Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. The working point tracking is achieved by using a low cost white-light interferometric system with a simple tunable FP filter. By real-time adjusting the optical path difference of the FP filter, the sensor working point can be kept at its highest sensitivity point. This helps address the sensor working point drift due to hydrostatic pressure, water absorption, and/or temperature changes. It is demonstrated that the sensor system has a high resolution with a minimum detectable acoustic pressure of 148 Pa and superior stability compared to a system using a tunable laser. PMID:27557180

  6. Enhancing active and passive remote sensing in the ocean using broadband acoustic transmissions and coherent hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Duong Duy

    The statistics of broadband acoustic signal transmissions in a random continental shelf waveguide are characterized for the fully saturated regime. The probability distribution of broadband signal energies after saturated multi-path propagation is derived using coherence theory. The frequency components obtained from Fourier decomposition of a broadband signal are each assumed to be fully saturated, where the energy spectral density obeys the exponential distribution with 5.6 dB standard deviation and unity scintillation index. When the signal bandwidth and measurement time are respectively larger than the correlation bandwidth and correlation time of its energy spectral density components, the broadband signal energy obtained by integrating the energy spectral density across the signal bandwidth then follows the Gamma distribution with standard deviation smaller than 5.6 dB and scintillation index less than unity. The theory is verified with broadband transmissions in the Gulf of Maine shallow water waveguide in the 300-1200 Hz frequency range. The standard deviations of received broadband signal energies range from 2.7 to 4.6 dB for effective bandwidths up to 42 Hz, while the standard deviations of individual energy spectral density components are roughly 5.6 dB. The energy spectral density correlation bandwidths of the received broadband signals are found to be larger for signals with higher center frequency. Sperm whales in the New England continental shelf and slope were passively localized, in both range and bearing using a single low-frequency (< 2500 Hz), densely sampled, towed horizontal coherent hydrophone array system. Whale bearings were estimated using time-domain beamforming that provided high coherent array gain in sperm whale click signal-to-noise ratio. Whale ranges from the receiver array center were estimated using the moving array triangulation technique from a sequence of whale bearing measurements. The dive profile was estimated for a sperm

  7. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-01

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  8. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-14

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  9. Passive acoustic monitoring using a towed hydrophone array results in identification of a previously unknown beaked whale habitat.

    PubMed

    Yack, Tina M; Barlow, Jay; Calambokidis, John; Southall, Brandon; Coates, Shannon

    2013-09-01

    Beaked whales are diverse and species rich taxa. They spend the vast majority of their time submerged, regularly diving to depths of hundreds to thousands of meters, typically occur in small groups, and behave inconspicuously at the surface. These factors make them extremely difficult to detect using standard visual survey methods. However, recent advancements in acoustic detection capabilities have made passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) a viable alternative. Beaked whales can be discriminated from other odontocetes by the unique characteristics of their echolocation clicks. In 2009 and 2010, PAM methods using towed hydrophone arrays were tested. These methods proved highly effective for real-time detection of beaked whales in the Southern California Bight (SCB) and were subsequently implemented in 2011 to successfully detect and track beaked whales during the ongoing Southern California Behavioral Response Study. The three year field effort has resulted in (1) the successful classification and tracking of Cuvier's (Ziphius cavirostris), Baird's (Berardius bairdii), and unidentified Mesoplodon beaked whale species and (2) the identification of areas of previously unknown beaked whale habitat use. Identification of habitat use areas will contribute to a better understanding of the complex relationship between beaked whale distribution, occurrence, and preferred habitat characteristics on a relatively small spatial scale. These findings will also provide information that can be used to promote more effective management and conservation of beaked whales in the SCB, a heavily used Naval operation and training region. PMID:23968056

  10. Estimation of Acoustic Particle Motion and Source Bearing Using a Drifting Hydrophone Array Near a River Current Turbine to Assess Disturbances to Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Paul G.

    River hydrokinetic turbines may be an economical alternative to traditional energy sources for small communities on Alaskan rivers. However, there is concern that sound from these turbines could affect sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), an important resource for small, subsistence based communities, commercial fisherman, and recreational anglers. The hearing sensitivity of sockeye salmon has not been quantified, but behavioral responses to sounds at frequencies less than a few hundred Hertz have been documented for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and particle motion is thought to be the primary mode of stimulation. Methods of measuring acoustic particle motion are well-established, but have rarely been necessary in energetic areas, such as river and tidal current environments. In this study, the acoustic pressure in the vicinity of an operating river current turbine is measured using a freely drifting hydrophone array. Analysis of turbine sound reveals tones that vary in frequency and magnitude with turbine rotation rate, and that may sockeye salmon may sense. In addition to pressure, the vertical components of particle acceleration and velocity are estimated by calculating the finite difference of the pressure signals from the hydrophone array. A method of determining source bearing using an array of hydrophones is explored. The benefits and challenges of deploying drifting hydrophone arrays for marine renewable energy converter monitoring are discussed.

  11. Site specific probability of passive acoustic detection of humpback whale calls from single fixed hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Hildebrand, John A; Campbell, Gregory S; Campbell, Richard L; Heaney, Kevin D

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. A common mistake in the analysis of marine mammal acoustic data is formulating conclusions about these animals without first understanding how environmental properties such as bathymetry, sediment properties, water column sound speed, and ocean acoustic noise influence the detection and character of vocalizations in the acoustic data. The approach in this paper is to use Monte Carlo simulations with a full wave field acoustic propagation model to characterize the site specific probability of detection of six types of humpback whale calls at three passive acoustic monitoring locations off the California coast. Results show that the probability of detection can vary by factors greater than ten when comparing detections across locations, or comparing detections at the same location over time, due to environmental effects. Effects of uncertainties in the inputs to the propagation model are also quantified, and the model accuracy is assessed by comparing calling statistics amassed from 24,690 humpback units recorded in the month of October 2008. Under certain conditions, the probability of detection can be estimated with uncertainties sufficiently small to allow for accurate density estimates. PMID:23968053

  12. AUV-portable temperature-compensating fiber optic hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu Fiesler; Guzman, Narciso; Hui, Kaleonui J.; Pflanze, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring hydrophones with low power consumption for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are desirable for long term unmanned monitoring of ocean acoustics including marine mammal acoustics as well as those due to human activity. Fiber-optic hydrophones offer wider bandwidth and high sensitivity alternatives to conventional piezoelectric transducer (PZT) devices. Deployment on board AUVs requires operation under a wide range of temperature and pressure conditions that change with depth and location, hence, maintaining the sensitivity and reliability over the operating range is crucial. A read-out mechanism for a resonant hydrophone using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) transducer is described. The read-out uses a temperature tuned DFB laser diode to compensate for FBG changes with temperature and depth, enabling operation over a wide temperature range. Its compact footprint and battery-powered readout system operation enables portability on AUVs.

  13. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  14. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  15. Phase generated carrier technique for fiber laser hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rizhong; Wang, Xinbing; Huang, Junbin; Gu, Hongcan

    2013-08-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser is compact, and is very suitable for using as a hydrophone to sense acoustic pressure. A DFB fiber laser hydrophone was researched. In the fiber laser hydrophone signal demodulating system, an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer and a Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) method were used. The PGC method can be used to demodulating the acoustic signal from the interference signal. Comparing with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) method and Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) method, the digitized PGC method requires a greater amount of computation because of the high signal sampling, but it demands only one interference signal which makes the less fiber connections of the fiber laser hydrophone array. So the fiber laser hydrophone array based on the PGC method has lower complexity and higher reliability than that based on the NRL method or NPS method. The experimental results approve that the PGC method can demodulate acoustic signal between 20~2000 Hz frequency range with good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the PZT driving frequency is 20 kHz.

  16. Monitoring fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) acoustic presence by means of a low frequency seismic hydrophone in Western Ionian Sea, EMSO site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciacca, Virginia; Caruso, Francesco; Chierici, Francesco; De Domenico, Emilio; Embriaco, Davide; Favali, Paolo; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Larosa, Giuseppina; Pavan, Gianni; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Viola, Salvatore; Beranzoli, Laura; Marinaro, Giuditta

    2015-04-01

    In 2012, the NEMO-SN1 multidisciplinary seafloor platform was deployed in the Gulf of Catania at a depth of 2100 m. By using the low bandwidth seismic hydrophone SMID DT405D (1Hz acoustically monitored for the first time, over a yearlong campaign, fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) acoustic activity in the area. The presence of a genetically isolated population of fin whales has been confirmed in recent years in highly productive areas of the Mediterranean Sea. The species acoustic activity has also been monitored in the past within the Western Mediterranean. Despite this, still very little is known about the routes the population follows seasonally throughout the whole basin and, particularly, in the Ionian area. The most common vocalizations attributed to this population are known as "20Hz pulses" and they are grouped in two main types of calls: type "A", downsweep (17Hz acoustic data were continuously acquired, saved in 10 minutes long files and analyzed through a MATLAB® software developed for the study, which automatically saves the spectrogram of the band below 50Hz. About 7.000 hours of acoustic recordings have been investigated through spectrograms analysis. The low frequency hydrophone installed aboard the NEMO-SN1/SMO station allowed the detection of both types of the Mediterranean fin whale acoustic signals, recorded for the first time in the area. Furthermore, our results show a previous unknown acoustic presence of fin whales offshore Eastern Sicily throughout all seasons of the investigated year. The new long-term multidisciplinary projects connected to "KM3NeT" and "EMSO" will give us the chance to better understand the animals' occurrence in the area and to investigate their acoustic behavior and population dynamics.

  17. Time delay spectrometry for hydrophone calibrations below 1 MHz.

    PubMed

    Gammell, P M; Harris, G R

    1999-11-01

    Knowing the response of miniature ultrasonic hydrophones at frequencies below 1 MHz is important for assessing the accuracy of acoustic pressure pulse measurements in medical ultrasound applications. Therefore, a time delay spectrometry (TDS) system was developed as an efficient means to measure hydrophone sensitivity in this frequency range. In TDS a swept-frequency signal is transmitted. A tracking receiver distinguishes arrivals with different propagation delays by their frequency offset relative to the signal being transmitted, thus eliminating spurious signals such as those reflected from the water surface or tank walls. Two piezoelectric ceramic source transducers were used: a standard planar disk and a disk with varying thickness to broaden the thickness-resonance. This latter design was preferred for its more uniform response without significant sensitivity loss. TDS is not an absolute method, but it was demonstrated to provide efficient, accurate calibrations via comparison with a reference hydrophone using a substitution technique. PMID:10573913

  18. Liquid crystal-based hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzeli, Zourab; Silvestri, Leonardo; Michie, Andrew; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Guo, Qi; Pozhidaev, Eugene P.; Kiselev, Alexei D.; Ladouceur, Francois

    2012-09-01

    We describe a fiber optic hydrophone array system that could be used for underwater acoustic surveillance applications (e.g. military, counter terrorist, and customs authorities in protecting ports and harbors), offshore production facilities or coastal approaches as well as various marine applications. In this paper, we propose a new approach to underwater sonar systems using the voltage-controlled liquid crystals and simple multiplexing method. The proposed method permits measurement of sound under water at multiple points along an optical fiber using the low cost components and standard single mode fiber, without complex interferometric measurement techniques, electronics or demodulation software.

  19. The evolution and exploitation of the fiber-optic hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David J.

    2007-07-01

    In the late 1970s one of the first applications identified for fibre-optic sensing was the fibre-optic hydrophone. It was recognised that the technology had the potential to provide a cost effective solution for large-scale arrays of highly sensitive hydrophones which could be interrogated over large distances. Consequently both the United Kingdom and United States navies funded the development of this sonar technology to the point that it is now deployed on submarines and as seabed arrays. The basic design of a fibre-optic hydrophone has changed little; comprising a coil of optical fibre wound on a compliant mandrel, interrogated using interferometric techniques. Although other approaches are being investigated, including the development of fibre-laser hydrophones, the interferometric approach remains the most efficient way to create highly multiplexed arrays of acoustic sensors. So much so, that the underlying technology is now being exploited in civil applications. Recently the exploration and production sector of the oil and gas industry has begun funding the development of fibre-optic seismic sensing using seabed mounted, very large-scale arrays of four component (three accelerometers and a hydrophone) packages based upon the original technology developed for sonar systems. This has given new impetus to the development of the sensors and the associated interrogation systems which has led to the technology being adopted for other commercial uses. These include the development of networked in-road fibre-optic Weigh-in-Motion sensors and of intruder detection systems which are able to acoustically monitor long lengths of border, on both land and at sea. After two decades, the fibre-optic hydrophone and associated technology has matured and evolved into a number of highly capable sensing solutions used by a range of industries.

  20. Investigations of a novel mechanical anti-aliasing filtering fiber-optic hydrophone with a cylindrical Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zefeng; Hu, Yongming

    2008-11-01

    In general, an operational sonar system will require an anti-aliasing low-pass filter if any high frequency components are present in the sensor phase information. A mechanical filter must be used in the sensor since anti-aliasing filtering must be performed before sampling. Fiber-optic hydrophones with mechanical anti-aliasing filter, which consists of soft closed-cell sponge rubber, have been reported, but they have poor ability of resistance to hydrostatic pressure due to the softness of the rubber. Furthermore, the theoretical analysis and design of the hydrophone are difficult due to the uncertainty of the rubber's mechanical properties. To effectively eliminate the aliasing in a practical sonar system based on interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones, a novel mechanical anti-aliasing filtering fiber-optic hydrophone with a cylindrical Helmholtz resonator has been proposed. The low frequency lumped parameters model of the fiber-optic hydrophone is given based on the theories of electro-acoustic analogy, and the acoustic properties are analyzed using the standard circuit analysis methods. The acoustic sensitivity frequency response is measured in a standing-wave tube using a comparative measurement method. Experimental results show that this new type of fiber-optic hydrophones has good acoustic low-pass filtering performance. The low frequency response, as determined by the sensing mandrel and the fiber optical interferometer, is very flat and the average acoustic phase sensitivity is about -140 dB re 1rad/μPa with a fluctuation within +/-1.0 dB. The response curve has a resonant frequency determined by the hydrophone structure. Apart from the resonant frequencies and the high frequency responses, the measured response curves are well in agreement with the simulation results, which show the correction of the model and the theories. It is expected that this new type of mechanical anti-aliasing fiber-optic hydrophone will have wide potential applications in

  1. A fiber-optic hydrophone with a cylindrical Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zefeng; Hu, Yongming; Ni, Ming; Meng, Zhou; Luo, Hong

    2007-11-01

    A passive homodyne Michelson interferometric fiber-optic hydrophone with a single-hole cylindrical Helmholtz resonator has been manufactured. To validate the theoretical results that the fluid coefficient of viscosity has great influence on the maximum sensitivity at the resonant frequency, the acoustic sensitivity frequency response of the fiber-optic hydrophone has been measured in a standing-wave tank filled with castor oil. The viscosity coefficient of castor oil will change with the variation of the temperature. Experimental Results show that the fiber-optic hydrophone frequency responses of different temperature have identical form except that the maximum sensitivities are different. The acoustic sensitivities of low frequency are about -159dB re 1rad/μPa. While the maximum sensitivities near the measured resonant frequency of 800Hz go down with the fall of the temperature, i.e. with the increase of the viscosity coefficient, which is agree with the theoretical conclusions. This fiber-optic hydrophone is a prototype device for a class of sensors that used to eliminate aliasing in the future sonar systems.

  2. Acoustic detection of a seafloor spreading episode on the Juan de Fuca Ridge using military hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Christopher G.; Radford, W. Eddie; Dziak, Robert P.; Lau, Tai-Kwan; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi; Schreiner, Anthony E.

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, no practical method has been available to continuously monitor seismicity of seafloor spreading centers. The availability of the U.S. Navy's SOund SUrveillance System (SOSUS) for environmental research has allowed the continuous monitoring of low-level seismicity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeast Pacific. On June 22, 1993, NOAA installed a prototype system at U.S Naval Facility Whidbey Island to allow real-time acoustic monitoring of the Juan de Fuca Ridge using SOSUS. On June 26, 2145 GMT, a burst of low-level seismic activity, with accompanying harmonic tremor, was observed and subsequently located near 46 deg 15 min N, 129 deg 53 min W, on the spreading axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Over the following 2 days, the activity migrated to the NNE along the spreading axis with the final locus of activity near 46 deg 31.5 min N, 129 deg 35 min W. The nature of the seismicity was interpreted to represent a lateral dike injection with the possibility of eruption on the seafloor. Based on this interpretation, a response effort was initated by U.S. and Canadian research vessels, and both warm water plumes and fresh lavas were subsequently identified at the site.

  3. Air backed mandrel type fiber optic hydrophone with low noise floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, R.; V, Sreehari C.; N, Praveen Kumar; Awasthi, R. L.; K, Vivek; B, Vishnu M.; Santhanakrishnan, T.; Moosad, K. P. B.; Mathew, Basil

    2014-10-01

    Low noise fiber optic hydrophone based on optical fiber coil wound on air-backed mandrel was developed. The sensor can be effectively used for underwater acoustic sensing. The design and characterization of the hydrophone is illustrated in this paper. A fiber Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) was developed and coupled with a Distributed Feedback (DFB) fiber laser source and an optical phase demodulation system, with an active modulation in one of the arms. The sensor head design was optimized to achieve noise spectral density <10 μrad/√Hz, for yielding sufficient sensitivity to sense acoustic pressure close to Deep Sea Sate Zero (DSS0).

  4. Fiber laser vector hydrophone: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Zhang, Faxiang; Ma, Rui; He, Jun; Li, Fang; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-05-01

    A novel fiber laser vector hydrophone (FLVH) based on accelerometers is presented. Three fiber laser accelerometers (FLA), perpendicular to each other, are used to detect the acoustic induced particle acceleration. Theoretical analyses of the acoustic sensitivity and the natural frequency are given. Experiment shows a sensitivity of 0.1 pm/Pa@100 Hz is achieved, which results in a minimum detectable acoustic signal of 100 μPa/@Hz@100 Hz. Field demonstration shows that the proposed vector hydrophone has good directivity.

  5. Killer whale caller localization using a hydrophone array in an oceanarium pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Ann E.; Greenlaw, Charles F.; McGehee, Duncan E.; van Holliday, D.

    2001-05-01

    A system to localize calling killer whales was designed around a ten-hydrophone array in a pool at SeaWorld San Diego. The array consisted of nine ITC 8212 and one ITC 6050H hydrophones mounted in recessed 30×30 cm2 niches. Eight of the hydrophones were connected to a Compaq Armada E500 laptop computer through a National Instruments DAQ 6024E PCMCIA A/D data acquisition card and a BNC-2120 signal conditioner. The system was calibrated with a 139-dB, 4.5-kHz pinger. Acoustic data were collected during four 48-72 h recording sessions, simultaneously with video recorded from a four-camera array. Calling whales were localized by one of two methods, (1) at the hydrophone reporting the highest sound exposure level and (2) using custom-designed 3-D localization software based on time-of-arrival (ORCA). Complex reverberations in the niches and pool made locations based on time of arrival difficult to collect. Based on preliminary analysis of data from four sessions (400+ calls/session), the hydrophone reporting the highest level reliably attributed callers 51%-100% of the time. This represents a substantial improvement over attribution rates of 5%-15% obtained with single hydrophone recordings. [Funding provided by Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute and the Hubbs Society.

  6. Research of DOA Estimation Based on Single MEMS Vector Hydrophone

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen Dong; Guan, Ling Gang; Zhang, Guo Jun; Xue, Chen Yang; Zhang, Kai Rui; Wang, Jian Ping

    2009-01-01

    The MEMS vector hydrophone is a novel acoustic sensor with a “four-beam-cilia” structure. Based on the MEMS vector hydrophone with this structure, the paper studies the method of estimated direction of arrival (DOA). According to various research papers, many algorithms can be applied to vector hydrophones. The beam-forming approach and bar graph approach are described in detail. Laboratory tests by means of the a standing-wave tube are performed to validate the theoretical results. Both the theoretical analysis and the results of tests prove that the proposed MEMS vector hydrophone possesses the desired directional function. PMID:22423200

  7. Research of DOA Estimation Based on Single MEMS Vector Hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen Dong; Guan, Ling Gang; Zhang, Guo Jun; Xue, Chen Yang; Zhang, Kai Rui; Wang, Jian Ping

    2009-01-01

    The MEMS vector hydrophone is a novel acoustic sensor with a "four-beam-cilia" structure. Based on the MEMS vector hydrophone with this structure, the paper studies the method of estimated direction of arrival (DOA). According to various research papers, many algorithms can be applied to vector hydrophones. The beam-forming approach and bar graph approach are described in detail. Laboratory tests by means of the a standing-wave tube are performed to validate the theoretical results. Both the theoretical analysis and the results of tests prove that the proposed MEMS vector hydrophone possesses the desired directional function. PMID:22423200

  8. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  9. Calibration of Hydrophone Stations: Lessons Learned from the Ascension Island Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P E; Rodgers, A J

    2000-07-11

    Calibration of hydroacoustic stations for nuclear explosion monitoring is important for increasing monitoring capability and confidence from newly installed stations and from existing stations. Calibration of hydroacoustic stations is herein defined as the near-field precision location of the hydrophones and determination of the amplitude response; and the regional-scale calibration of acoustic traveltimes, bathymetric shadowing, diffraction, and reflection as recorded at a particular station. An important type of calibration not considered here is ocean-basin-scale calibration of a hydroacoustic monitoring system. To understand how to best conduct hydroacoustic station calibrations, an experiment was conducted in May 1999 at Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. The experiment made use of a British oceanographic research vessel towing an airgun array and collected data over three MILS hydrophones that were in use by the National Data Center and the International Data Center. From the towed airgun data we were able to determine the location for each of the three hydrophones to accuracy better than 100 meters in latitude, longitude, and depth. The agreement with the nominal locations was excellent in depth and to within 1 km in latitude and longitude. The depths determined for the hydrophones and the ocean bottom depths determined from the ship's sonar system force the conclusion that all three hydrophones are located at or near the ocean bottom. Amplitude frequency response of the hydrophones was also calibrated using a calibrated temporarily deployed hydrophone to determine the airgun source function. With the source function known, the amplitude and phase response of the hydrophones could be deconvolved from the recorded waveforms provided a ''pure'' source waveform arrival is identified on the recording. Unfortunately, since the hydrophones are located near the ocean bottom, the recording is contaminated by reflections and scattered energy, making a

  10. Comparison of Light Spot Hydrophone (LSHD) and Fiber Optic Probe Hydrophone (FOPH) for Lithotripter Field Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitao, Victor A.; Simmons, W. Neal; Zhou, Yufeng; Qin, Jun; Sankin, Georgii; Cocks, Franklin H.; Fehre, Jens; Granz, Bernd; Nanke, Ralf; Preminger, Glenn M.; Zhong, Pei

    2007-04-01

    Characterization of the acoustic field of a shock wave lithotripter is important for determining the performance of the device. In this study, we compare the performance of a newly developed Light Spot Hydrophone (LSHD) with the current standard, i.e., the Fiber Optic Probe Hydrophone (FOPH). An electromagnetic (EM) shock wave lithotripter was selected and each hydrophone was used to map the acoustic field of the lithotripter. The peak positive pressure P+, peak negative pressure P-, pulse duration, and effective acoustic energy were calculated using the collected data. Both the LSHD and the FOPH have similar measurement characteristics. They both provide excellent P+ measurement accuracy and response. Although the LSHD was found to provide more repeatable P- pressure measurements, both devices provide excellent pressure measurement of lithotripter shock fields.

  11. Dual polarization fiber grating laser hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Guan, Bai-Ou; Tan, Yan-Nan; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2009-10-26

    A novel fiber optic hydrophone based on the integration of a dual polarization fiber grating laser and an elastic diaphragm is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The diaphragm transforms the acoustic pressure into transversal force acting on the laser cavity which changes the fiber birefringence and therefore the beat frequency between the two polarization lines. The proposed hydrophone has advantages of ease of interrogation, absolute frequency encoding, and capability to multiplex a number of sensors on a single fiber by use of frequency division multiplexing technique. PMID:19997174

  12. GENERAL: Experimental Investigation on a Fibre-Optic Hydrophone with a Cylindrical Helmholtz Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze-Feng; Hung, Yong-Ming; Meng, Zhou; Ni, Ming

    2008-05-01

    A novel mechanical anti-aliasing filtering fibre-optic hydrophone with a cylindrical Helmholtz resonator is constructed and tested. The experimental results show that the hydrophone has a function of low-pass filtering. The low frequency acoustic sensitivity is about -160 dB (1 rad/μPa), and the response curve has a resonance determined by the Helmholtz resonator. Theoretical and experimental results both show that the resonant frequency moves towards high frequency with the increasing orifice diameters. The sensitivity attenuation of high frequency is larger than 10 dB. This new fibre-optic hydrophone is a prototype device for a class of sensors used to eliminate the aliasing in future sonar systems.

  13. Distributed hydrophone array based on liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzeli, Zourab; Ladouceur, Francois; Silvestri, Leonardo; Michie, Andrew; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Guo, Grace Qi; Pozhidaev, Eugene P.; Kiselev, Alexei D.

    2012-02-01

    We describe a fibre optic hydrophone array system that could be used for underwater acoustic surveillance applications e.g. military, counter terrorist and customs authorities in protecting ports and harbors, offshore production facilities or coastal approaches as well as various marine applications. In this paper we propose a new approach to underwater sonar systems using voltage-controlled Liquid Crystals (LC) and simple multiplexing method. The proposed method permits measurements of sound under water at multiple points along an optical fibre using low cost components (LC cells), standard single mode fibre, without complex interferometric measurement techniques, electronics or demodulation software.

  14. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  15. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones

    PubMed Central

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale. PMID:27612092

  16. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Maksymov, Ivan S; Greentree, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale. PMID:27612092

  17. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  18. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  19. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  20. A comparison of light spot hydrophone and fiber optic probe hydrophone for lithotripter field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N.; Sankin, G. N.; Simmons, W. N.; Nanke, R.; Fehre, J.; Zhong, P.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a newly developed light spot hydrophone (LSHD) in lithotripter field characterization was compared to that of the fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). Pressure waveforms produced by a stable electromagnetic shock wave source were measured by the LSHD and FOPH under identical experimental conditions. In the low energy regime, focus and field acoustic parameters matched well between the two hydrophones. At clinically relevant high energy settings for shock wave lithotripsy, the measured leading compressive pressure waveforms matched closely with each other. However, the LSHD recorded slightly larger |P-| (p < 0.05) and secondary peak compressive pressures (p < 0.01) than the FOPH, leading to about 20% increase in total acoustic pulse energy calculated in a 6 mm radius around the focus (p = 0.06). Tensile pulse durations deviated ˜5% (p < 0.01) due to tensile wave shortening from cavitation activity using the LSHD. Intermittent compression spikes and laser light reflection artifacts have been correlated to bubble activity based on simultaneous high-speed imaging analysis. Altogether, both hydrophones are adequate for lithotripter field characterization as specified by the international standard IEC 61846.

  1. A comparison of light spot hydrophone and fiber optic probe hydrophone for lithotripter field characterization.

    PubMed

    Smith, N; Sankin, G N; Simmons, W N; Nanke, R; Fehre, J; Zhong, P

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a newly developed light spot hydrophone (LSHD) in lithotripter field characterization was compared to that of the fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). Pressure waveforms produced by a stable electromagnetic shock wave source were measured by the LSHD and FOPH under identical experimental conditions. In the low energy regime, focus and field acoustic parameters matched well between the two hydrophones. At clinically relevant high energy settings for shock wave lithotripsy, the measured leading compressive pressure waveforms matched closely with each other. However, the LSHD recorded slightly larger |P_| (p < 0.05) and secondary peak compressive pressures (p < 0.01) than the FOPH, leading to about 20% increase in total acoustic pulse energy calculated in a 6 mm radius around the focus (p = 0.06). Tensile pulse durations deviated ~5% (p < 0.01) due to tensile wave shortening from cavitation activity using the LSHD. Intermittent compression spikes and laser light reflection artifacts have been correlated to bubble activity based on simultaneous high-speed imaging analysis. Altogether, both hydrophones are adequate for lithotripter field characterization as specified by the international standard IEC 61846. PMID:22299970

  2. Measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound fields using miniaturized all-silica fiber-optic Fabry-Perot hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ping-Gang; Ke, Ding; Wang, Dai-Hua; Zeng, Lu-Yu; Jiang, Xin-Yin; Liu, Lei

    2014-11-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasounds (HIFUs), as a novel non-invasive surgery technology, have been used effectively for cancer therapy. In order to ensure the HIFU treatment safety, the acoustic pressure distributions and the size of the focal regions of HIFU fields need to be measured accurately. In this paper, the lateral sensitive and tip-sensitive all-silica fiberoptic Fabry-Perot ultrasonic hydrophone systems and the corresponding experimental setups are established to measure HIFU fields, respectively. The acoustic pressure distributions of the HIFU field along the X-axis, Y-axis, and Z-axis are compared in the degassed water by the lateral sensitive and tip-sensitive fiber-optic Fabry-Perot ultrasonic hydrophones. Experimental results show that the tip-sensitive configuration can measure the acoustic pressure distribution in the focal region with high accuracy than the lateral-sensitive configuration.

  3. Underwater hydrophone location survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Jack B.

    1993-01-01

    The Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) is a U.S. Navy test range located on Andros Island, Bahamas, and a Division of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC), Newport, RI. The Headquarters of AUTEC is located at a facility in West Palm Beach, FL. AUTEC's primary mission is to provide the U.S. Navy with a deep-water test and evaluation facility for making underwater acoustic measurements, testing and calibrating sonars, and providing accurate underwater, surface, and in-air tracking data on surface ships, submarines, aircraft, and weapon systems. Many of these programs are in support of Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW), undersea research and development programs, and Fleet assessment and operational readiness trials. Most tests conducted at AUTEC require precise underwater tracking (plus or minus 3 yards) of multiple acoustic signals emitted with the correct waveshape and repetition criteria from either a surface craft or underwater vehicle.

  4. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  5. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  6. Fiber laser hydrophone as possible detector of UHE neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccioni, E.; Bagnoli, P. E.; Beverini, N.; Bouhadef, B.; Castorina, E.; Falchini, E.; Falciai, R.; Flaminio, V.; Morganti, M.; Stefani, F.; Trono, C.

    2007-03-01

    The possibility to use a single mode erbium-doped fiber laser as hydrophone for deep sea acoustic detection is considered. The high sensitivity of these sensors, their immunity from electromagnetic fields and their faculty to work at high environmental pressure, make them particularly suitable for a wide range of deep sea acoustic applications, and in particular as acoustic detectors in under-water telescopes for high-energy neutrinos.

  7. Erbium-doped fiber lasers as deep-sea hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, P. E.; Beverini, N.; Bouhadef, B.; Castorina, E.; Falchini, E.; Falciai, R.; Flaminio, V.; Maccioni, E.; Morganti, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Stefani, F.; Trono, C.

    2006-11-01

    The present work describes the development of a hydrophone prototype for deep-sea acoustic detection. The base-sensitive element is a single-mode erbium-doped fiber laser. The high sensitivity of these sensors makes them particularly suitable for a wide range of deep-sea acoustic applications, including geological and marine mammals surveys and above all as acoustic detectors in under-water telescopes for high-energy neutrinos.

  8. Comparison of PAM Systems for Acoustic Monitoring and Further Risk Mitigation Application.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Stefan; Kreimeyer, Roman; Knoll, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    We present results of the SIRENA 2011 research cruises conducted by the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) and joined by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics (FWG), Bundeswehr Technical Centre (WTD 71) and the Universities of Kiel and Pavia. The cruises were carried out in the Ligurian Sea. The main aim of the FWG was to test and evaluate the newly developed towed hydrophone array as a passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tool for risk mitigation applications. The system was compared with the PAM equipment used by the other participating institutions. Recorded sounds were used to improve an automatic acoustic classifier for marine mammals, and validated acoustic detections by observers were compared with the results of the classifier. PMID:26611016

  9. NEMO-SMO acoustic array: A deep-sea test of a novel acoustic positioning system for a km3-scale underwater neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, S.; Ardid, M.; Bertin, V.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Keller, P.; Lahmann, R.; Larosa, G.; Llorens, C. D.; NEMO Collaboration; SMO Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Within the activities of the NEMO project, the installation of a 8-floors tower (NEMO-Phase II) at a depth of 3500 m is foreseen in 2012. The tower will be installed about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero, in Sicily. On board the NEMO tower, an array of 18 acoustic sensors will be installed, permitting acoustic detection of biological sources, studies for acoustic neutrino detection and primarily acoustic positioning of the underwater structures. For the latter purpose, the sensors register acoustic signals emitted by five acoustic beacons anchored on the sea-floor. The data acquisition system of the acoustic sensors is fully integrated with the detector data transport system and is based on an “all data to shore” philosophy. Signals coming from hydrophones are continuously sampled underwater at 192 kHz/24 bit and transmitted to shore through an electro-optical cable for real-time analysis. A novel technology for underwater GPS time-stamping of data has been implemented and tested. The operation of the acoustic array will permit long-term test of sensors and electronics technologies that are proposed for the acoustic positioning system of KM3NeT.

  10. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  11. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  12. P wave detection thresholds, Pn velocity estimates, and T wave location uncertainty from oceanic hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Philip D.; Fox, Christopher G.; Dziak, Robert P.

    1999-06-01

    P wave arrivals recorded by the U.S. Navy's SOund SUrveillance System (SOSUS) hydrophone arrays were used to estimate earthquake detection thresholds and Pn velocities in the northeast Pacific Ocean. The Navy hydrophones have been used successfully to detect and locate oceanic earthquakes using their waterborne acoustic tertiary (T) waves; however, use of these hydrophones for seismic body wave detection allows regional seismic analyses to be extended to the oceanic environment. The P wave detection threshold of the SOSUS hydrophones was quantified using the epicentral distance and magnitude of 250 northeast Pacific Ocean earthquakes. Earthquakes with body wave magnitudes as low as 2 have detectable P wave arrivals at epicentral distances of ≤500 km. Earthquakes with mb between 3.5 and 5 were detected ˜50% of the time at distances of 100-1500 km, while events with mb > 5 were all detected, even out to distances of 1000-1500 km. Both P and T wave hydrophone arrival times were used to estimate the epicenters of 100 earthquakes. The peak amplitude of the T wave coda and the onset of the P wave were used as the earthquake arrival times to estimate event locations. T wave arrival time residuals have a Gaussian distribution with zero mean, which implies that using T wave peak amplitude is consistent with using the P wave onset as the arrival time. There are typically ≤6 stations used to derive a T wave based location, hence location error ellipses are not well constrained. A Monte Carlo technique was employed to estimate T wave event location uncertainty. T wave locations have error bars of ˜1 km in latitude and longitude when >3 hydrophones are used for a location estimate. The detected P wave arrivals and earthquake locations were used to measure Pn velocities. Pn velocity values of 7.9 ± 0.1 and 8.0 ± 0.1 km/s were found for the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates, respectively. A Pn velocity of 7.5 ± 0.1 km/s was measured for rays traveling northward from the

  13. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice D.

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces some of the highest acoustic loading over a broad frequency for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle but there are challenges. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests; i.e. static firings conducted in the 1960's, to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. These data sets are used to predict the liftoff acoustic environments for launch vehicles. To facilitate the accuracy and quality of acoustic loading, predictions at liftoff for future launch vehicles such as the Space Launch System (SLS), non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two forms which included a simulated hold-down phase and the entire launch phase. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semiempirical methods. This consisted, initially, of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares IX flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  14. Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage

  15. Pressure compensated fiber laser hydrophone: modeling and experimentation.

    PubMed

    Chandrika, Unnikrishnan Kuttan; Pallayil, Venugopalan; Lim, Kian Meng; Chew, Chye Heng

    2013-10-01

    A pressure compensated metal diaphragm based fiber laser hydrophone configuration that can provide good sensitivity, large bandwidth, and sea state zero noise floor is proposed in this paper. A simplified theoretical model of the proposed sensor configuration is developed in which the acoustic elements of the sensor configuration are modeled using a four-pole acoustic transfer matrix and the structural elements are modeled as second order single degree of freedom elements. This model is then used to optimize the design parameters of the sensor system to achieve the performance objectives. An axisymmetric finite element analysis of the sensor configuration is also carried out to validate the results from the simplified theoretical model. Prototype sensors were fabricated and hydrostatic testing in a pressure vessel validated the static pressure compensation performance of the sensor. Frequency dependent sensitivity of the sensor system was measured through acoustic testing in a water tank. The prototype sensor gave a flat frequency response up to 5 kHz and experimental results compared well with theoretical predictions. The sensor has an acceleration rejection figure on the order of 0 dB ref 1 m/s(2) Pa and the pressure compensation approach worked reasonably well up to a hydrostatic pressures equivalent to a depth of 50 m. PMID:24116409

  16. Acoustic counter-sniper system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Gregory L.; Gilbert, Douglas C.; Barger, James E.

    1997-02-01

    BBN has developed, tested, and fielded pre-production versions of a versatile acoustics-based counter-sniper system. This system was developed by BBN for the DARPA Tactical Technology Office to provide a low cost and accurate sniper detection and localization system. The system uses observations of the shock wave from supersonic bullets to estimate the bullet trajectory, Mach number, and caliber. If muzzle blast observations are also available from unsilenced weapons, the exact sniper location along the trajectory is also estimated. A newly developed and very accurate model of the bullet ballistics and acoustic radiation is used which includes bullet deceleration. This allows the use of very flexible acoustic sensor types and placements, since the system can model the bullet's flight, and hence the acoustic observations, over a wide area very accurately. System sensor configurations can be as simple as two small four element tetrahedral microphone arrays on either side of the area to be protected, or six omnidirectional microphones spread over the area to be monitored. Increased performance can be obtained by expanding the sensor field in size or density, and the system software is easily reconfigured to accommodate this at deployment time. Sensor nodes can be added using wireless network telemetry or hardwired cables to the command node processing and display computer. The system has been field tested in three government sponsored tests in both rural and simulated urban environments at the Camp Pendleton MOUT facility. Performance was characterized during these tests for various shot geometries and bullet speeds and calibers.

  17. Development of Hydrophone and Its Aapplications Use in OBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. R.; Kuo, B. Y.; Wang, C. C.; Chang, H. K.; Jang, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic wave is translated to T-wave when earthquakes occur below seafloor with a traveling speed of 1500 m/s in the SOFAR channel which centers roughly at 1000 m water depths (Tolstoy and Ewing, 1950). Many studies have shown that hydrophone can be set up in the SOFAR channel to collect acoustic data to investigate plate movement (Fox and Dziak, 1999), seismisity (Fox et.al, 2001), characteristic of T-wave (Park et.al, 2001), seafloor volcanism (Nicolas, 1989), among others. Institute of Earth Sciences of Academia Sinica has been collaborating with Taiwan Ocean Research Institute (TORI) and the Institute of Undersea Technology (IUT) of the National Sun Yat-sen University (NSYSU) to succefully build a new wide-band OBS (Yardbird). We hope that Yardbird is not only an OBS but also a multi-function underwater recording plotform. Therefor we are developing a low-power consumption, inexpensive hydrophone to catch acoustic signals. The protoypte of it has passed a series of tests and got some seismic seafloor data. This paper describes the design goal of hydrophone, component specifications, field data analyzed, and discusses the future directions of instrument development. Keywords: T-wave; Hydrophone; OBS; acoustic signal Referance: 1 Fox, C. G. and R. P. Dziak, Intenal deformation of the Gorda Plate observedb y hydroacoustimc onitoring, J . Geophys Res., 104, 17603-17615, 1999. 2 Fox, C. G., H. Matsumoto and T.K.Lau, Monitoring Pacific Ocean seismicity from an autonomous hydrophone array. , J . Geophys. Res., 106,4183-4206, 2001. 3 Nicolas, A., Structures of ophiolites and dynamics of oceanic lithosphere. Dordrecht ; Boston : Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1989. 4. Park, M., R.I. Odom, and D.J. Soukup (2001). Modal scattering: a key to understanding oceanic T-waves, Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 3401-3404. 5. Tolstoy, I. and M. Ewing (1950). The T phase of shallow-focus earthquakes, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 40, 25-51.

  18. Near-bottom hydrophone measurements of ambient noise and sperm whale vocalizations in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomb, Joal; Fisher, Robert; Field, Robert; Turgut, Altan; Ioup, George; Ioup, Juliette; Rayborn, Grayson; Kuczaj, Stan; Caruthers, Jerald; Goodman, Ralph; Sidorovskaia, Natalia

    2002-05-01

    Three bottom-moored hydrophones, 50 m above the bottom, were placed on a downslope line, ending at the largest concentration of sperm whale sightings in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in 600 m, 800 m, and 1000 m water depths. These depths were chosen after upslope propagation modeling, using historical databases, showed transmission losses greater than 110 dB at hydrophones near the bottom in water shallower than 600 m for a 500 m deep source at the 1000 m contour. These autonomously recording hydrophones were environmental acoustic recording system (EARS) buoys obtained from the Naval Oceanographic Office. They were capable of recording signals up to 5500 Hz continuously for 36 days and were deployed from July 17 through August 21. During this period a major marine mammal exercise was being conducted at the surface by the Minerals Management Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service, with other government and university scientists, in which temporary acoustic recording devices were attached to the whales and the whales were monitored by a surface towed array. Our near-bottom measurements of ambient noise and sperm whale vocalizations are discussed and compared to those surface and on-whale measurements. [Research supported by ONR.

  19. Tracking marine mammals and ships with small and large-aperture hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, Martin

    implemented for a volumetric hydrophone array (< 2 m element spacing) that was coupled to an autonomous acoustic seafloor recorder. This allows for the tracking and measurement of underwater radiated sound from ships of opportunity with a single instrument deployment and without depending on track information from the automatic information system (AIS).

  20. Research on fiber optic gradient hydrophone based on two interferometers scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuyin; Xiong, Shuidong; Luo, Hong

    2011-11-01

    Fiber optic vector hydrophone gets the acoustic field pressure gradient information by finite difference approximation, smaller as the separation D between the two sensing elements in the same direction is, more accurately the acoustic field information can be obtained. Because the sensitivity of the hydrophone is proportional to the separation D, the reduction of D is limited by the sensing element's geometry and the sensitivity of the hydrophone. For one-dimensional fiber optic gradient hydrophone, D is less than λ/4 as the measurement error of pressure gradient is smaller than 1dB. To achieve more outputs, the hydrophone can be configured by two interferometers scheme, then the pressure in acoustic center of the hydrophone can be acquired by the arithmetic average of the two interferometers' output of pressure, thus λ/7 as the upper limit of D for pressure measurement error 1dB maximum should be obeyed. The sensitivity decreases as the frequence of sound going down when D value is confirmed, so the lower limit of frequency band is mainly determined by optical noise, its minimum detectable signal grows quickly as frequency decrease, hence, good noise cancellation in two interferometers scheme can great improve the low frequency detection.

  1. Geoacoustic Inversion Based on a Vector Hydrophone Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Han-Shu; Li, Feng-Hua

    2007-07-01

    We propose a geoacoustic inversion scheme employing a vector hydrophone array based on the fact that vector hydrophone can provide more acoustic field information than traditional pressure hydrophones. Firstly, the transmission loss of particle velocities is discussed. Secondly, the sediment sound speed is acquired by a matched-field processing (MFP) procedure, which is the optimization in combination of the pressure field and vertical particle velocity field. Finally, the bottom attenuation is estimated from the transmission loss difference between the vertical particle velocity and the pressure. The inversion method based on the vector hydrophone array mainly has two advantages: One is that the MFP method based on vector field can decrease the uncertain estimation of the sediment sound speed. The other is that the objective function based on the transmission loss difference has good sensitivity to the sediment attenuation and the inverted sediment attenuation is independent of source level. The validity of the inverted parameters is examined by comparison of the numerical results with the experimental data.

  2. Design and first tests of an acoustic positioning and detection system for KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeone, F.; Ameli, F.; Ardid, M.; Bertin, V.; Bonori, M.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Calì, C.; D'Amico, A.; Giovanetti, G.; Imbesi, M.; Keller, P.; Larosa, G.; Llorens, C. D.; Masullo, R.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Speziale, F.; Viola, S.; KM3NeT Consortium

    2012-01-01

    In a deep-sea neutrino telescope it is mandatory to locate the position of the optical sensors with a precision of about 10 cm. To achieve this requirement, an innovative Acoustic Positioning System (APS) has been designed in the frame work of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope. The system will also be able to provide an acoustic guide during the deployment of the telescope’s components and seafloor infrastructures (junction boxes, cables, etc.). A prototype of the system based on the successful acoustic systems of ANTARES and NEMO is being developed. It will consist of an array of hydrophones and a network of acoustic transceivers forming the Long Baseline. All sensors are connected to the telescope data acquisition system and are in phase and synchronised with the telescope master clock. Data from the acoustic sensors, continuously sampled at 192 kHz, will be sent to shore where signal recognition and analysis will be carried out. The design and first tests of the system elements will be presented. This new APS is expected to have better precision compared to the systems used in ANTARES and NEMO, and can also be used as a real-time monitor of acoustic sources and environmental noise in deep sea.

  3. Acoustic system for material transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An object within a chamber is acoustically moved by applying wavelengths of different modes to the chamber to move the object between pressure wells formed by the modes. In one system, the object is placed in one end of the chamber while a resonant mode, applied along the length of the chamber, produces a pressure well at the location. The frequency is then switched to a second mode that produces a pressure well at the center of the chamber, to draw the object. When the object reaches the second pressure well and is still traveling towards the second end of the chamber, the acoustic frequency is again shifted to a third mode (which may equal the first model) that has a pressure well in the second end portion of the chamber, to draw the object. A heat source may be located near the second end of the chamber to heat the sample, and after the sample is heated it can be cooled by moving it in a corresponding manner back to the first end of the chamber. The transducers for levitating and moving the object may be all located at the cool first end of the chamber.

  4. Fibre laser hydrophones for cosmic ray particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buis, E. J.; Doppenberg, E. J. J.; Nieuwland, R. A.; Toet, P. M.

    2014-03-01

    The detection of ultra high energetic cosmic neutrinos provides a unique means to search for extragalactic sources that accelerate particles to extreme energies. It allows to study the neutrino component of the GZK cut-off in the cosmic ray energy spectrum and the search for neutrinos beyond this limit. Due to low expected flux and small interaction cross-section of neutrinos with matter large experimental set-ups are needed to conduct this type of research. Acoustic detection of cosmic rays may provide a means for the detection of ultra-high energetic neutrinos. Using relative low absorption of sound in water, large experimental set-ups in the deep sea are possible that are able to detect these most rare events, but it requires highly sensitive hydrophones as the thermo-acoustic pulse originating from a particle shower in water has a typical amplitude as low as a mPa. It has been shown in characterisation measurements that the fibre optic hydrophone technology as designed and realised at TNO provides the required sensitivity. Noise measurements and pulse reconstruction have been conducted that show that the hydrophone is suited as a particle detector.

  5. Experimentally Determined Coordinates for Three MILS Hydrophones Near Ascension Island

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P. E.; Hollfelder, J. R.; Rodgers, A. J.

    1999-11-19

    We conducted an airgun survey in the waters of Ascension Island in May 1999 to determine new locations and depths for three Missile Impact Location System (MILS) hydrophones (ASC23, ASC24, and ASC26) currently in use by the Prototype International Data Center (PIDC) and the National Data Center (NDC). The nominal and new locations are summarized in Table 1. Although not rigorous, errors in the new locations and depths are conservatively estimated to be less than 100 m. The hydrophones are either on or near the ocean bottom in all three cases. The new depths are consistent with the following: Direct-phase airgun arrivals; Bathymetry determined along the track of the ship used for this airgun survey; Reflected phases from the airgun data; and Depths given in the original hydrophone installation report.

  6. Demonstration of an advanced fibre laser hydrophone array in Gulf St Vincent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Scott; Tikhomirov, Alexei; Harrison, Joanne; van Velzen, John

    2015-09-01

    We have developed an 8-element fibre laser seabed array demonstrating state-of-the art performance characteristics for a fibre laser sensing system. The system employs sea-state-zero sensitivity hydrophones with a flat acoustic response over a bandwidth exceeding 5kHz and very low inertial sensitivity. The system contains no outboard electronics and few metal components making it extremely light, compact, and low complexity. The array may be deployed up to 4 km from a land or sea based platform to a depth of up to 80m. Power delivery and telemetry for all 8 sensors is achieved via a single 2mm diameter optical fibre cable weighing less than 5kg per km. We report here results of the first field trials of this system.

  7. Field demonstration of an eight-element fiber laser hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Scott; Tikhomirov, Alexei; Harrison, Joanne; van Velzen, John

    2014-05-01

    We have developed an 8-element fibre laser seabed array demonstrating state-of-the art performance characteristics for a fibre laser sensing system and highlighting the advantage this technology provides in the underwater sensing domain. The system employs sea-state-zero sensitivity hydrophones with a flat acoustic response over a bandwidth exceeding 5kHz and very low inertial sensitivity. The system contains no outboard electronics and few metal components making it extremely light, compact, and low complexity. The array may be deployed up to 4 km from a land or sea based platform to a depth of up to 80m. Power delivery and telemetry for all 8 sensors is achieved via a single 2mm diameter optical fibre cable weighing less than 5kg per km. We report here results of the first field trials of this system.

  8. Comparison of bedload transport measurements at the Suggadinbach stream with geophones and modified pipe hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Berktold, Maximilian; Jäger, Gerald; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    A new bedload transport monitoring station has been designed by the Institute of Mountain Risk engineering at the Suggadinbach in Austria (Vorarlberg). In cooperation with the Austrian Service for Torrent and Avalanche Control the station has been installed in June 2013 in a check dam. Two different types of measuring systems are installed: 13 Swiss type geophone sensors record the vibrations of the transported sediment. Additionally 3 modified Japanese pipe hydrophones are mounted under steel plates in order to record the acoustic signal produced by the sediment transport. Both systems can be compared directly because they are arranged consecutively in flow direction. For calibration of the sensors a series of systematic tests have been carried out during low water conditions. Sediment has been fed by a crane with a concrete container. A flume has been installed in order to obtain controlled flow and transport over the measuring system. Four different grain classes up to 64 mm and a mixture of all classes were tested. A total amount of 4 tons were fed during the experiments. The signal was recorded with 9.6 kHz. Frequency analyses were performed for different grain-classes in order to investigate the influence of the grain-size distribution on the shape of the signal and the influence of neighbouring sensors. The standard evaluation and storage procedure for 1 minute aggregated data show that the modified pipe hydrophone is able to detect finer grain-sizes than the geophone sensor.

  9. Acoustically induced structural fatigue of piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.; Francis, J.T.

    1999-11-01

    Piping systems handling high-pressure and high-velocity steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been previously shown that the acoustic fatigue of the piping system is governed by the relationship between fluid pressure drop and downstream Mach number, and the dimensionless pipe diameter/wall thickness geometry parameter. In this paper, the devised relationship is extended to cover acoustic fatigue considerations of medium and smaller-diameter piping systems.

  10. Vector Sensor Arrays in Underwater Acoustic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Paulo; Felisberto, Paulo; Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Traditionally, ocean acoustic signals have been acquired using hydrophones, which measure the pressure field and are typically omnidirectional. A vector sensor measures both the acoustic pressure and the three components of particle velocity. Assembled into an array, a vector sensor array (VSA) improves spatial filtering capabilities when compared with arrays of same length and same number of hydrophones. The objective of this work is to show the advantage of the use of vector sensors in underwater acoustic applications such as direction of arrival (DOA) estimation and geoacoustic inversion. Beyond the improvements in DOA estimation, it will be shown the advantages of using the VSA in bottom parameters estimation. Additionally, is tested the possibility of using high frequency signals (say 8-14 kHz band), acquired during the MakaiEx 2005, to allow a small aperture array, reducing the cost of actual sub-bottom profilers and providing a compact and easy-to-deploy system.

  11. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  12. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. In an effort to update the accuracy and quality of liftoff acoustic loading predictions, non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two flight phases: simulated hold-down and liftoff. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semi-empirical methods. This consisted of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares I-X flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  13. Calculating the performance of 1{endash}3 piezoelectric composites for hydrophone applications: An effective medium approach

    SciTech Connect

    Avellaneda, M.; Swart, P.J.

    1998-03-01

    A new method is presented for evaluating the performance of 1{endash}3 polymer/piezoelectric ceramic composites for hydrophone applications. The Poisson`s ratio effect, i.e., the enhancement of the hydrostatic performance which can be achieved by mixing piezoelectric ceramics with polymers, is studied in detail. Using an `effective medium` approach, algebraic expressions are derived for the composite hydrostatic charge coefficient d{sub h}, the hydrostatic figure of merit d{sub h}g{sub h}, and the hydrostatic electromechanical coupling coefficient k{sub h} in terms of the properties of the constituent materials, the ceramic volume fraction, and a microstructural parameter p. The high contrast in stiffness and dielectric constants existing between the two phases can be exploited to derive simple, geometry-independent approximations which explain quantitatively the Poisson`s ratio effect. It is demonstrated that the stiffness and the Poisson`s ratio of the polymer matrix play a crucial role in enhancing hydrophone performance. Using a differential scheme to model the parameter p, we evaluate d{sub h}, d{sub h}g{sub h}, and k{sub h} for polymer/piezoelectric ceramic systems at varying compositions. Several examples involving Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} and (Pb,Ca)TiO{sub 3} piezoelectric ceramics are given to illustrate the theory. {copyright} {ital 1998 Acoustical Society of America.}

  14. Marine cable location system

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariadis, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    An acoustic positioning system locates a marine cable at an exploration site, such cable employing a plurality of hydrophones at spaced-apart positions along the cable. A marine vessel measures water depth to the cable as the vessel passes over the cable and interrogates the hydrophones with sonar pulses along a slant range as the vessel travels in a parallel and horizontally offset path to the cable. The location of the hydrophones is determined from the recordings of water depth and slant range.

  15. Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system

    DOEpatents

    Galkowski, Joseph J.

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

  16. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of acoustic pressure and temperature in the HIFU fields using all-silica fiber optic Fabry-Perot hydorophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-Hua; Zeng, Lu-Yu; Jia, Ping-Gang; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Xin-Yin

    2014-11-01

    Accurately measuring the acoustic pressure distributions and the size of the focal regions of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields, as well as the temperature induced by the HIFUs, are significant for ensuring the efficiency and safety of treatments. In our previous work, a tip-sensitive all-silica fiber-optic Fabry-Perot (TAFOFP) ultrasonic hydrophone for measuring HIFU fields is developed. In this paper, we explore the possibility that utilizing the TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone to simultaneously measure the acoustic pressure of HIFU fields and the induced temperature. The TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone for simultaneously measuring the acoustic pressure and temperature is developed and the experiment setup for measuring the HIFU fields based on the developed TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone is established. The developed TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone is experimentally tested in the degassed water and tissue phantom to verify the possibility of simultaneously measuring the acoustic pressure and temperature. Experimental results show that the sensing system can simultaneously measure the acoustic pressure and temperature.

  18. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Z. Daniel; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

  19. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-05-26

    In Part 1 of this paper [1], we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.05 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the case study at John Day Dam during 2008, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities.

  20. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 2. Three-dimensional tracking and passage outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z Daniel; Weiland, Mark A; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Carlson, Thomas J; Eppard, M Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

  1. Acoustic design of the QCSEE propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, I. J.; Smith, E. B.; Sowers, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic design features and techniques employed in the Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Program are described. The role of jet/flap noise in selecting the engine fan pressure ratio for powered lift propulsion systems is discussed. The QCSEE acoustic design features include a hybrid inlet (near-sonic throat velocity with acoustic treatment); low fan and core pressure ratios; low fan tip speeds; gear-driven fans; high and low frequency stacked core noise treatment; multiple-thickness treatment; bulk absorber treatment; and treatment on the stator vanes. The QCSEE designs represent and anticipated acoustic technology improvement of 12 to 16 PNdb relative to the noise levels of the low-noise engines used on current wide-body commercial jet transport aircraft.

  2. Acoustic vs VHF Lightning Location Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Erives, H.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    A single acoustic array can determine the 3-D location of lightning sources by using time of arrival differences arriving at the microphones and ranging techniques. The range is obtained from the time difference between the electromagnetic emission (detected by the acoustic data logger) and the acoustic signal produced by lightning. Audio frequency acoustic location systems are sensitive to the gas dynamic expansion of portions of a rapidly heating lightning channel, and so acoustic signatures are produced by a wide variety of different lightning discharge processes including: return strokes, K changes, M components, leader stepping and more. Infrasonic frequency range acoustic sensors are also sensitive to gas dynamic expansion, and in addition are also sensitive to processes which are electro-static in nature. RF location systems such as the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and the Continuous Sampling Broadband VHF Digital Interferometer (DITF) from New Mexico Tech (NMT) produce high quality maps of lightning discharges; however, they are sensitive to breakdown processes only and can not locate sources originating in already well conducting channels. During the summer of 2013 an acoustic audio-range array and an infrasound array were co-located with the NMT DITF in the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico, where an LMA is also operating. The audio-range acoustic array consists of custom-designed GPS-synced data loggers with a 50 kHz sampling rate and audio range omnidirectional dynamic microphones. The infrasound array uses GPS time-synced data logger and custom-designed broadband microphones with flat response in the band of 0.01 to 500 Hz. The DITF uses flat plate dE/dt antennas bandpass filtered to 20 to 80 MHz, providing 2D maps of lightning emissions with very high (sub-microsecond) timing resolution. Both acoustic and interferometric arrays of antennas determine location of sources by coherently comparing the signals arriving at the antennas (or

  3. Calibration of miniature medical ultrasonic hydrophones for frequencies in the range 100 to 500 kHz using an ultrasonically absorbing waveguide.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Srinath; Zeqiri, Bajram; Gélat, Pierre N

    2014-05-01

    Enhancements to the existing primary standard optical interferometer and narrowband tone-burst comparison calibration methods for miniature medical ultrasonic hydrophones of the membrane type over the frequency range 100 to 500 kHz are described. Improvements were realized through application of an ultrasonically absorbing waveguide made of a low-frequency-absorbing tile used in sonar applications which narrows the spatial extent of the broad acoustic field. The waveguide was employed in conjunction with a sonar multilayered polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) hydrophone used as a transmitting transducer covering a frequency range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The acoustic field emanating from the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide reduced the significance of diffracted acoustic waves from the membrane hydrophone ring and the consequent interference of this wave with the direct acoustic wave received by the active element of the hydrophone during calibration. Four membrane hydrophone make/ models with ring sizes (defined as the inner diameter of the annular mounting ring of the hydrophone) in the range 50 to 100 mm were employed along with a needle hydrophone. A reference membrane hydrophone, calibrated using the NPL primary standard optical interferometer in combination with the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide, was subsequently used to calibrate the other four hydrophones by comparison, again using the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide. In comparison to existing methods, the use of the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide enabled the low-frequency calibration limit of a membrane hydrophone with a ring diameter of 50 mm to be reduced from 400 kHz to 200 kHz. PMID:24803021

  4. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  5. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Parent, Philippe; Reinholdtsen, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respected to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations.

  6. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Parent, P.; Reinholdtsen, P.A.

    1991-02-26

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method are described in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respect to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations. 7 figures.

  7. A synthetic aperture acoustic prototype system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Robert H.; Bishop, Steven S.; Chan, Aaron M.; Gugino, Peter M.; Donzelli, Thomas P.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    A novel quasi-monostatic system operating in a side-scan synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging mode is presented. This research project's objectives are to explore the military utility of outdoor continuous sound imaging of roadside foliage and target detection. The acoustic imaging method has several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution as compared to 0.8-2.4 GHz ground penetrating radar (GPR), capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to GPR technologies. The prototype system's broadband 2-17 kHz LFM chirp transceiver is mounted on a manned all-terrain vehicle. Targets are positioned within the acoustic main beam at slant ranges of two to seven meters and on surfaces such as dirt, grass, gravel and weathered asphalt and with an intervening metallic chain link fence. Acoustic image reconstructions and signature plots result in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses.

  8. Offshore killer whale tracking using multiple hydrophone arrays.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Martin; Henderson, E Elizabeth; Wiggins, Sean M; Roch, Marie A; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    To study delphinid near surface movements and behavior, two L-shaped hydrophone arrays and one vertical hydrophone line array were deployed at shallow depths (<125 m) from the floating instrument platform R/P FLIP, moored northwest of San Clemente Island in the Southern California Bight. A three-dimensional propagation-model based passive acoustic tracking method was developed and used to track a group of five offshore killer whales (Orcinus orca) using their emitted clicks. In addition, killer whale pulsed calls and high-frequency modulated (HFM) signals were localized using other standard techniques. Based on these tracks sound source levels for the killer whales were estimated. The peak to peak source levels for echolocation clicks vary between 170-205 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, for HFM calls between 185-193 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, and for pulsed calls between 146-158 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m. PMID:24180762

  9. A new method for matched field localization based on two-hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Fang, Shi-liang

    2015-03-01

    The conventional matched field processing (MFP) uses large vertical arrays to locate an underwater acoustic target. However, the use of large vertical arrays increases equipment and computational cost, and causes some problems such as element failures, and array tilting to degrade the localization performance. In this paper, the matched field localization method using two-hydrophone is proposed for underwater acoustic pulse signals with an unknown emitted signal waveform. Using the received signal of hydrophones and the ocean channel pulse response which can be calculated from an acoustic propagation model, the spectral matrix of the emitted signal for different source locations can be estimated by employing the method of frequency domain least squares. The resulting spectral matrix of the emitted signal for every grid region is then multiplied by the ocean channel frequency response matrix to generate the spectral matrix of replica signal. Finally, the matched field localization using two-hydrophone for underwater acoustic pulse signals of an unknown emitted signal waveform can be estimated by comparing the difference between the spectral matrixes of the received signal and the replica signal. The simulated results from a shallow water environment for broadband signals demonstrate the significant localization performance of the proposed method. In addition, the localization accuracy in five different cases are analyzed by the simulation trial, and the results show that the proposed method has a sharp peak and low sidelobes, overcoming the problem of high sidelobes in the conventional MFP due to lack of the number of elements.

  10. Low-cost dipole hydrophone for use in towed arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.

    1996-04-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a low-cost acoustic particle velocity sensor are described. The primary design parameters for the dipole hydrophone are low-cost, low-mass, and small size. The sensor uses commercially available geophones to locally measure one or more components of the acoustic particle velocity field. The geophones are encapsulated in a syntactic foam to reduce their average density and hence increase their acoustic sensitivity. This method of fabrication greatly reduces costs compared to conventional methods which use machined cases. The on-axis voltage sensitivity was measured experimentally using two methods. The first used a uniaxial vibration shaker to estimate the intrinsic velocity sensitivity of the encapsulated geophone with the case fixed to the shaker head. The second measured the {ital in} {ital situ} acoustic sensitivity in water. Theoretical models of the voltage sensitivity for these two cases are developed and the results compare very well with the experimental data. Additionally, rotator tests were performed at frequencies of 100, 500, 600, and 1000 Hz to measure the quality of the dipole directivity pattern in water. Near-theoretical dipole patterns, with nulls better than 30 dB, were measured. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  12. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  13. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  14. Acoustic imaging systems (for robotic object acquisition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. M.; Martin, J. F.; Marsh, K. A.; Schoenwald, J. S.

    1985-03-01

    The long-term objective of the effort is to establish successful approaches for 3D acoustic imaging of dense solid objects in air to provide the information required for acquisition and manipulation of these objects by a robotic system. The objective of this first year's work was to achieve and demonstrate the determination of the external geometry (shape) of such objects with a fixed sparse array of sensors, without the aid of geometrical models or extensive training procedures. Conventional approaches for acoustic imaging fall into two basic categories. The first category is used exclusively for dense solid objects. It involves echo-ranging from a large number of sensor positions, achieved either through the use of a larger array of transducers or through extensive physical scanning of a small array. This approach determines the distance to specular reflection points from each sensor position; with suitable processing an image can be inferred. The second category uses the full acoustic waveforms to provide an image, but is strictly applicable only to weak inhomogeneities. The most familiar example is medical imaging of the soft tissue portions of the body where the range of acoustic impedance is relatively small.

  15. Benthic microbial fuel cell as direct power source for an acoustic modem and seawater oxygen/temperature sensor system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanming; Radachowsky, Sage E; Wolf, Michael; Nielsen, Mark E; Girguis, Peter R; Reimers, Clare E

    2011-06-01

    Supported by the natural potential difference between anoxic sediment and oxic seawater, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) promise to be ideal power sources for certain low-power marine sensors and communication devices. In this study a chambered BMFC with a 0.25 m(2) footprint was used to power an acoustic modem interfaced with an oceanographic sensor that measures dissolved oxygen and temperature. The experiment was conducted in Yaquina Bay, Oregon over 50 days. Several improvements were made in the BMFC design and power management system based on lessons learned from earlier prototypes. The energy was harvested by a dynamic gain charge pump circuit that maintains a desired point on the BMFC's power curve and stores the energy in a 200 F supercapacitor. The system also used an ultralow power microcontroller and quartz clock to read the oxygen/temperature sensor hourly, store data with a time stamp, and perform daily polarizations. Data records were transmitted to the surface by the acoustic modem every 1-5 days after receiving an acoustic prompt from a surface hydrophone. After jump-starting energy production with supplemental macroalgae placed in the BMFC's anode chamber, the average power density of the BMFC adjusted to 44 mW/m(2) of seafloor area which is better than past demonstrations at this site. The highest power density was 158 mW/m(2), and the useful energy produced and stored was ≥ 1.7 times the energy required to operate the system. PMID:21545151

  16. Acoustical pipe lagging systems design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.D.; Chapnik, B.V.; Howe, B.

    1998-10-30

    HGC Engineering was retained by the PRC International at the American Gas Association, to undertake a study of acoustical pipe lagging systems. The study included gathering input from PRCI member companies regarding their concerns and their established material specifications for lagging systems; conducting a comprehensive acoustical measurement program; using the measured results in conjunction with computer modeling to identify optimal lagging configurations; and developing material specifications for several standardized lagging systems for use by PRCI member companies. For all the lagging configurations, the measurement and modeling results showed amplification of sound at frequencies less than about 315 Hz. This result is a well known phenomenon, widely discussed the published acoustical literature, which means that pipe lagging is only effective for controlling higher frequencies noise (above about 500 Hz). Fortunately, in many gas piping applications, it is this higher frequency range that is of concern. The measurement and modeling results further showed that the high frequency performance of a lagging system is dependent primarily on having sufficient jacket mass and insulation thickness. The performance can be improved using an intermediate mass loaded barrier layer.

  17. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  18. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    PubMed

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry. PMID:26871188

  19. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  20. Thin Film Metal Coated Fiber Optic Hydrophone Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, R.; Arora, P.; Gandhi, G.; Daryoush, A.S.; El-Sherif, M.; Lewin, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve on sensitivity performance of fiber sensor employed as Fiber Optic Hydrophone Probe (FOHP) by nano-scale thin film gold coating. The fiber is designed to provide a uniform and spatial averaging free response up to 100 MHz by etching down to an active diameter of about 9 μm. The sensitivity performance of straight cleaved (i.e. full size core and cladding) uncoated, tapered uncoated and tapered thin film gold coated fiber sensors were compared in the frequency range of 1.5 MHz to 20 MHz in the presence of acoustic pressure amplitude levels of up to 6 MPa. An unprecedented voltage sensitivity of −245 dB re 1V/uPa (560 mV/ MPa) was measured for thin film gold coated FOHP by optimizing the gold coating thickness. PMID:19881652

  1. Flow-induced noise on pressure gradient hydrophones

    SciTech Connect

    Lauchle, G.C.; McEachern, J.F.; Jones, A.R.; McConnell, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    Moored or drifting hydrophones are subject to a variety of potential self-noise sources. Flow-induced self noise arises when the sensors are subjected to oceanic currents such as those due to wave motion and changing tides. Research at Penn State, in cooperation with the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), has been concerned with the basic mechanisms of flow-induced self noise on velocity gradient hydrophones of various shapes and sizes. These sensors are configured as finite-length cylinders in cross flow and as spheres. The sensors are sensitive to acoustic particle velocity, and one of the sensors is sensitive to acoustic intensity. With the diameter of the sensor as the characteristic dimension, and for operational flow velocities in the 0.5 to 2.0 knot range, the Reynolds number range of interest is from values less than 100 (for some miniature sensors) to about 27,000 (for standard-size sonobuoy hydrophones). Experiments are conducted for the higher ranges of Reynolds number by towing the sensors over the given range of speeds in quiet basins of water (9 meter tow tank at Penn State and a flooded quarry at the NAWC). To achieve the lower range of Reynolds numbers over the same range of velocities, but without having in hand actual miniature sensors, some of the experiments are performed in glycerine. Glycerine has a kinematic viscosity some three orders of magnitude greater than that of water; therefore, a large sensor can be subjected to a velocity in the range of interest but yield an operational Reynolds number that is three orders of magnitude smaller. In this paper, we will show the broadband spectral characteristics of finite-length cylindrical sensors in cross flow, as well as spherical-shaped sensors. The Reynolds number of the flow is the independent variable. The threshold of velocity-dependent noise increase is found to correlate with the occurrence of turbulent flow not necessarily in the wake, but on the surface of the body itself.

  2. Flow-induced noise on pressure gradient hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauchle, G. C.; McEachern, J. F.; Jones, A. R.; McConnell, J. A.

    1996-04-01

    Moored or drifting hydrophones are subject to a variety of potential self-noise sources. Flow-induced self noise arises when the sensors are subjected to oceanic currents such as those due to wave motion and changing tides. Research at Penn State, in cooperation with the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), has been concerned with the basic mechanisms of flow-induced self noise on velocity gradient hydrophones of various shapes and sizes. These sensors are configured as finite-length cylinders in cross flow and as spheres. The sensors are sensitive to acoustic particle velocity, and one of the sensors is sensitive to acoustic intensity. With the diameter of the sensor as the characteristic dimension, and for operational flow velocities in the 0.5 to 2.0 knot range, the Reynolds number range of interest is from values less than 100 (for some miniature sensors) to about 27,000 (for standard-size sonobuoy hydrophones). Experiments are conducted for the higher ranges of Reynolds number by towing the sensors over the given range of speeds in quiet basins of water (9 meter tow tank at Penn State and a flooded quarry at the NAWC). To achieve the lower range of Reynolds numbers over the same range of velocities, but without having in hand actual miniature sensors, some of the experiments are performed in glycerine. Glycerine has a kinematic viscosity some three orders of magnitude greater than that of water; therefore, a large sensor can be subjected to a velocity in the range of interest but yield an operational Reynolds number that is three orders of magnitude smaller. In this paper, we will show the broadband spectral characteristics of finite-length cylindrical sensors in cross flow, as well as spherical-shaped sensors. The Reynolds number of the flow is the independent variable. The threshold of velocity-dependent noise increase is found to correlate with the occurrence of turbulent flow not necessarily in the wake, but on the surface of the body itself. The flow field is

  3. Investigation on fiber laser vector hydrophone: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Zhang, Faxiang; Ma, Rui; Li, Fang; Liu, Yuliang

    2010-08-01

    A novel underwater fiber laser vector hydrophone is presented. Theoretical and experimental analyses are carried out to test the performance of the hydrophone, which shows a sensitivity of 25 pm/g and a flat frequency response in the range of 5 Hz~200 Hz are achieved. Field demonstration shows that the vector hydrophone has good directivity.

  4. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory motion in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. The customary approach to modeling acoustic waves inside a rocket chamber is to apply the classical inhomogeneous wave equation to the combustion gas. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while the acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients in pressure, density, and velocity become large, is a notable region where this approach is not applicable. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. An accurate model of the acoustic behavior within this region where acoustic modes are influenced by the presence of a steady mean flow is required for reliable stability predictions. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, (del squared)(psi) - (lambda/c)(exp 2)(psi) - M(dot)[M(dot)(del)(del(psi))] - 2(lambda(M/c) + (M(dot)del(M))(dot)del(psi)-2(lambda)(psi)[M(dot)del(1/c)]=0 (1) with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and lambda as the complex eigenvalue. French apply the finite volume method to solve the steady flow field within the combustion chamber and nozzle with inviscid walls. The complex eigenvalues and eigenvector are determined with the use of the ARPACK eigensolver. The

  5. System for Multiplexing Acoustic Emission (AE) Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor); Gorman, Michael R. (Inventor); Scales, Edgar F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic monitoring device has at least two acoustic sensors with a triggering mechanism and a multiplexing circuit. After the occurrence of a triggering event at a sensor, the multiplexing circuit allows a recording component to record acoustic emissions at adjacent sensors. The acoustic monitoring device is attached to a solid medium to detect the occurrence of damage.

  6. Characterization of a Multi-element Clinical HIFU System Using Acoustic Holography and Nonlinear Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Yuldashev, Petr V.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment modality that relies on the delivery of acoustic energy to remote tissue sites to induce thermal and/or mechanical tissue ablation. To ensure the safety and efficacy of this medical technology, standard approaches are needed for accurately characterizing the acoustic pressures generated by clinical ultrasound sources under operating conditions. Characterization of HIFU fields is complicated by nonlinear wave propagation and the complexity of phased-array transducers. Previous work has described aspects of an approach that combines measurements and modeling, and here we demonstrate this approach for a clinical phased array transducer. First, low-amplitude hydrophone measurements were performed in water over a scan plane between the array and the focus. Second, these measurements were used to holographically reconstruct the surface vibrations of the transducer and to set a boundary condition for a 3-D acoustic propagation model. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the acoustic field were carried out over a range of source power levels. Simulation results were compared to pressure waveforms measured directly by hydrophone at both low and high power levels, demonstrating that details of the acoustic field including shock formation are quantitatively predicted. PMID:25004539

  7. Whales Localization Using a Large Hydrophone Array: Performance Relative to Cramer-Rao Bounds and Confidence Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudal, Frédéric; Glotin, Hervé

    This paper provides a real-time passive underwater acoustic method to track multiple emitting whales using four or more omni-directional widely-spaced bottom-mounted hydrophones and to evaluate the performance of the system via the Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) and Monte Carlo simulations. After a non-parametric Teager-Kaiser-Mallat signal filtering, rough Time Delays Of Arrival are calculated, selected and filtered, and used to estimate the positions of whales for a linear sound speed profile. The complete algorithm is tested on real data from the NUWC and the AUTEC. The CRLB and Monte Carlo simulations are computed and compared with the tracking results. Our model is validated by similar results from the US Navy and Hawaii univ labs in the case of one whale, and by similar whales counting from the Columbia univ. ROSA lab in the case of multiple whales.

  8. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  9. Acoustic emission monitoring of composite containment systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, John R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper considers two different types of composite containment system, and two different types of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring approach. The first system is a composite reinforced pressure vessel (CRPV) which is monitored both during construction and in-service using a broadband modal acoustic emission (MAE) technique. The second system is a membrane cargo containment system which is monitored using both a global as well as a local AE technique. For the CRPV, the damage assessment is concerned mainly with the integrity of the composite outer layer at the construction stage, and possible fatigue cracking of the inner steel liner at the in-service stage. For the membrane tank, the damage assessment is concerned with locating and quantifying any abnormal porosities that might develop in-service. By comparing and contrasting the different types of structural system and different monitoring approaches inferences are drawn as to what role AE monitoring could take in the damage assessment of other types of composite containment system. (Detailed technical data have not been included, due to client confidentiality constraints.)

  10. Speaker verification system using acoustic data and non-acoustic data

    DOEpatents

    Gable, Todd J.; Ng, Lawrence C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.

    2006-03-21

    A method and system for speech characterization. One embodiment includes a method for speaker verification which includes collecting data from a speaker, wherein the data comprises acoustic data and non-acoustic data. The data is used to generate a template that includes a first set of "template" parameters. The method further includes receiving a real-time identity claim from a claimant, and using acoustic data and non-acoustic data from the identity claim to generate a second set of parameters. The method further includes comparing the first set of parameters to the set of parameters to determine whether the claimant is the speaker. The first set of parameters and the second set of parameters include at least one purely non-acoustic parameter, including a non-acoustic glottal shape parameter derived from averaging multiple glottal cycle waveforms.

  11. Wide-frequency-bandwidth whisker-inspired MEMS vector hydrophone encapsulated with parylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renxin; Liu, Yuan; Bai, Bing; Guo, Nan; Guo, Jing; Wang, Xubo; Liu, Mengran; Zhang, Guojun; Zhang, Binzhen; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-02-01

    In order to eliminate polyurethane hat resonance frequency intervention and reduce fluid influence, a whisker-inspired MEMS vector hydrophone (WIVH) encapsulated with parylene is proposed to broaden frequency bandwidth and improve sensitivity-frequency response performance, compared to the lateral line-inspired MEMS vector hydrophone (LLIVH). Parylene that is conformally deposited on the device surface replaces polyurethane encapsulating hat and silicone oil existing in current encapsulation technology. The main advantage of WIVH as demonstrated by modelling and characterization is the enhanced bandwidth response, which is the critical factor in hydrophone design. Acoustic pressure gradient properties of the WIVH and LLIVH are analyzed to demonstrate the influence of the polyurethane hat. The interactions of the parylene membrane with fluid and the influences on vibrating performance are also investigated. Resonance measurement and sensitivity-frequency response analysis demonstrate the frequency bandwidth of the WIVH could be extended twice compared to that of the LLIVH. Moreover, the WIVH is proved to act as a typical pressure gradient hydrophone with an increment of 6 dB per octave in the linear region.

  12. Hydrophone calibration for MERMAID seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, C.; Nolet, G.; Sukhovich, A.; Ogé, A.; Argentino, J.; Hello, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The MERMAID float (Mobile Earthquake Recorder in Marine Areas by Independent Divers) is a new oceanic seismometer which has already successfully recorded P-waves from teleseismic events, when deployed in the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. The frequency band of teleseismic acquisition is for frequencies up to 2 Hz. The P-waves are recorded with a Rafos II hydrophone. The hydrophone has a flat frequency response from 5 Hz to 10 kHz but its behavior below 5 Hz is not documented. In this work we determine the Rafos II response with the electronic card used for MERMAID in the frequency band of 0.1 to 2 Hz. A simple and low-cost calibration method at low frequencies was developed and applied to the Rafos II but can be used for any hydrophone. In this calibration method a brief pressure increase of 1000 Pa is applied to the hydrophone. We record response after filtering and digitizing by the electronic card. To create the pressure increase, the hydrophone is placed in a calibration chamber filled with water and making sure no air bubbles are present. By opening a solenoid valve connected to a tube with 10 cm extra water on top of the chamber, an abrupt pressure of 1000 Pa is applied. The output signal is fitted to an empirical response function, that characterizes it with four parameters: A, B, α and τ which control the shape of the signal: h(t) = t^(ατ) e^(-αt) (A + Bt). A represents the magnification, α defines the exponential relaxation of the signal, B models the overshoot and τ allows for a slightly delayed response due to the low-pass filtering in the electronics. A set of 20 experiments is used to characterize the Rafos II instrumental response in association with the electronic card. The method developed here offers a good and simple way to estimate the response at low frequencies. The MERMAID hydrophone response to the step function input of 1000 Pa can be defined by A = 0.36 × 0.02 mV/Pa, B = - 0.08 × 0.01 mV Pa^(-1) s^(-1), α = 0.28 × 0.02 s

  13. Miniature acoustic guidance system for endotracheal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Eduardo J.

    Ensuring that the distal end of an endotracheal tube is properly located within the trachea, and that the tube is not obstructed by mucous deposition, is a major clinical concern in patients that require mechanical ventilation. A novel acoustic system was developed to allow for the continuous monitoring of endotracheal tube position and patency. A miniature sound source and two sensing microphones are placed in-line between the ventilator hose and the proximal end of the endotracheal tube. Reflections of an acoustic pulse from the endotracheal tube lumen and the airways are digitally analyzed to estimate the location and degree of obstruction, as well as the position of the distal end of the tube in the airway. The system was evaluated through computer simulations, in vitro studies, and in a rabbit model. The system noninvasively estimated tube position in vivo to within roughly 4.5 mm, and differentiated between proper tracheal, and erroneous bronchial or esophageal intubation in all cases. In addition, the system estimated the area and location of lumen obstructions in vitro to within 14% and 3.5 mm, respectively. These findings indicate that this miniature technology could improve the quality of care provided to the ventilated adult and infant.

  14. Acoustic Flow Monitor System - User Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaHusen, Richard

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Acoustic Flow Monitor (AFM) is a portable system that was designed by the U.S. Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory to detect and monitor debris flows associated with volcanoes. It has been successfully used internationally as part of real-time warning systems in valleys threatened by such flows (Brantley, 1990; Marcial and others, 1996; Lavigne and others, 2000). The AFM system has also been proven to be an effective tool for monitoring some non-volcanic debris flows. This manual is intended to serve as a basic guide for the installation, testing, and maintenance of AFM systems. An overview of how the system works, as well as instructions for installation and guidelines for testing, is included. Interpretation of data is not covered in this manual; rather, the user should refer to the references provided for published examples of AFM data.

  15. Combining COMSOL modeling with acoustic pressure maps to design sono-reactors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Weavers, Linda K

    2016-07-01

    Scaled-up and economically viable sonochemical systems are critical for increased use of ultrasound in environmental and chemical processing applications. In this study, computational simulations and acoustic pressure maps were used to design a larger-scale sono-reactor containing a multi-stepped ultrasonic horn. Simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics showed ultrasonic waves emitted from the horn neck and tip, generating multiple regions of high acoustic pressure. The volume of these regions surrounding the horn neck were larger compared with those below the horn tip. The simulated acoustic field was verified by acoustic pressure contour maps generated from hydrophone measurements in a plexiglass box filled with water. These acoustic pressure contour maps revealed an asymmetric and discrete distribution of acoustic pressure due to acoustic cavitation, wave interaction, and water movement by ultrasonic irradiation. The acoustic pressure contour maps were consistent with simulation results in terms of the effective scale of cavitation zones (∼ 10 cm and <5 cm above and below horn tip, respectively). With the mapped acoustic field and identified cavitation location, a cylindrically-shaped sono-reactor with a conical bottom was designed to evaluate the treatment capacity (∼ 5 L) for the multi-stepped horn using COMSOL simulations. In this study, verification of simulation results with experiments demonstrates that coupling of COMSOL simulations with hydrophone measurements is a simple, effective and reliable scientific method to evaluate reactor designs of ultrasonic systems. PMID:26964976

  16. A large-aperture low-cost hydrophone array for tracking whales from small boats.

    PubMed

    Miller, B; Dawson, S

    2009-11-01

    A passive sonar array designed for tracking diving sperm whales in three dimensions from a single small vessel is presented, and the advantages and limitations of operating this array from a 6 m boat are described. The system consists of four free floating buoys, each with a hydrophone, built-in recorder, and global positioning system receiver (GPS), and one vertical stereo hydrophone array deployed from the boat. Array recordings are post-processed onshore to obtain diving profiles of vocalizing sperm whales. Recordings are synchronized using a GPS timing pulse recorded onto each track. Sensitivity analysis based on hyperbolic localization methods is used to obtain probability distributions for the whale's three-dimensional location for vocalizations received by at least four hydrophones. These localizations are compared to those obtained via isodiachronic sequential bound estimation. Results from deployment of the system around a sperm whale in the Kaikoura Canyon in New Zealand are shown. PMID:19894806

  17. Acoustic Propagation Studies For Sperm Whale Phonation Analysis During LADC Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Caruthers, Jerald W.

    2004-11-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) conducted a series of passive acoustic experiments in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and the Ligurian Sea in 2001 and 2002. Environmental and acoustic moorings were deployed in areas of large concentrations of marine mammals (mainly, sperm whales). Recordings and analysis of whale phonations are among the objectives of the project. Each mooring had a single autonomously recording hydrophone (Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS)) obtained from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office after modification to record signals up to 5,859 Hz in the Gulf of Mexico and up to 12,500 Hz in the Ligurian Sea. Self-recording environmental sensors, attached to the moorings, and concurrent environmental ship surveys provided the environmental data for the experiments. The results of acoustic simulations of long-range propagation of the broad-band (500-6,000 Hz) phonation pulses from a hypothetical whale location to the recording hydrophone in the experimental environments are presented. The utilization of the simulation results for an interpretation of the spectral features observed in whale clicks and for the development of tracking algorithms from single hydrophone recordings based on the identification of direct and surface and bottom reflected arrivals are discussed. [Research supported by ONR.

  18. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1982-01-01

    Very little information is available concerning acoustic velocity meter (AVM) operation, performance, and limitations. This report provides a better understanding about the application of AVM instrumentation to streamflow measurment. Operational U.S. Geological Survey systems have proven that AVM equipment is accurate and dependable. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measureable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected, and will measure velocitites as low as 0.1 meter per second which is normally less than the threshold level for mechanical or head-loss meters. In some situations the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Smaller, less-expensive, more conveniently operable microprocessor equipment is now available which should increase use of AVM systems in streamflow applications. (USGS)

  19. Improving intraplate seismicity detection through lake-deployed hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellino, N.; Conder, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Intraplate seismicity is an area of active concern, both scientifically and societally. In areas where there is intraplate seismicity, a substantial fraction of the population is often unaware of the possible hazards and risks due to rarer occurrences of large magnitude earthquakes. The American Midwest gives home to seismically active intraplate fault systems, such as the New Madrid fault zone. The risk of a >7 magnitude earthquake along the New Madrid fault zone is fiercely debated with important implications for potential hazard to structures and populations in the surrounding communities. Intertwined with this debate is that it has proven somewhat difficult to study intraplate seismicity as the reoccurence intervals for intraplate events are much longer than interplate earthquakes, requiring a longer timescale for study. One approach to reduce the longer timescale is to focus on study of smaller events which occur more often, but these will necessarily have their own difficulties with less optimal signal-to-noise ratios. A potential solution to remedy the difficulty is using natural amplifiers, such as lakes, to capture smaller events. Hydrophones suspended in the water column record tertiary (‘T’) waves traveling at the sound speed of water (significantly slower than P and S waves). T-waves lose energy less rapidly than body waves because of low intrinsic attenuation in the absence of a shear modulus. Also, because of typical lake aspect ratios, T-waves propagating within lakes radiate cylindrically rather than spherically. This difference in wave field geometry reduces the amount of energy loss from geometrical spreading as the energy loss scales linearly with distance rather than with distance-squared, thereby allowing quality signals to travel further before attenuating below usable thresholds. Here we present a study to test the viability of using lake-deployed hydrophones to improve the study of intraplate seismicity by detecting smaller events than

  20. Neglect of bandwidth of Odontocetes echo location clicks biases propagation loss and single hydrophone population estimates.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A

    2013-11-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring with a single hydrophone has been suggested as a cost-effective method to monitor population density of echolocating marine mammals, by estimating the distance at which the hydrophone is able to intercept the echolocation clicks and distinguish these from the background. To avoid a bias in the estimated population density, this method relies on an unbiased estimate of the detection range and therefore of the propagation loss (PL). When applying this method, it is common practice to estimate PL at the center frequency of a broadband echolocation click and to assume this narrowband PL applies also to the broadband click. For a typical situation this narrowband approximation overestimates PL, underestimates the detection range and consequently overestimates the population density by an amount that for fixed center frequency increases with increasing pulse bandwidth and sonar figure of merit. PMID:24180761

  1. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Fisher, Karl A.

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  2. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  3. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  4. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1993-06-22

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  5. Resonant frequency of the silicon micro-structure of MEMS vector hydrophone in fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-04-01

    The MEMS vector hydrophone developed by the North University of China has advantages of high Signal to Noise Ratio, ease of array integration, etc. However, the resonance frequency of the MEMS device in the liquid is different from that in the air due to the fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Based on the theory of Fluid-Solid Coupling, a generalized distributed mass attached on the micro-structure has been found, which results in the resonance frequency of the microstructure in the liquid being lower than that in the air. Then, an FSI simulation was conducted by ANSYS software. Finally, the hydrophone was measured by using a shaking table and a vector hydrophone calibration system respectively. Results show that, due to the FSI, the resonance frequency of the MEMS devices of the bionic vector hydrophone in the liquid declines approximately 30% compared to the case in the air.

  6. Investigation on the comparability of the light spot hydrophone and the fiber optic hydrophone in lithotripter field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Abtin Jamshidi; Ueberle, Friedrich; Krueger, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Optical hydrophones are optimized pressure-pulse-sensors used for high-power shockwave sources, such as lithotripters. Recent investigation of Smith et al. ["A Comparison of light spot hydrophone and fiber optic probe hydrophone for lithotripter field characterization," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 014301 (2012)] show discrepancies in the negative pressure peak and tensile pulse duration regarding measurements carried out with two optical hydrophones: the Light Spot Hydrophone (LSHD) and the fiber optic hydro-phone. It was assumed that the differences arise from cavitation effects at the end-face of the LSHD glass-block and filter characteristics of the trans-impedance amplifier of the LSHD. The present study investigates the transfer-function of the LSHD. It is shown that the filter characteristics of the amplifier cause discrepancies in the rarefaction pressure pulse fraction (depending on the energy settings of the source 15 ± 2%).

  7. Investigation on the comparability of the light spot hydrophone and the fiber optic hydrophone in lithotripter field measurements.

    PubMed

    Rad, Abtin Jamshidi; Ueberle, Friedrich; Krueger, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Optical hydrophones are optimized pressure-pulse-sensors used for high-power shockwave sources, such as lithotripters. Recent investigation of Smith et al. ["A Comparison of light spot hydrophone and fiber optic probe hydrophone for lithotripter field characterization," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 014301 (2012)] show discrepancies in the negative pressure peak and tensile pulse duration regarding measurements carried out with two optical hydrophones: the Light Spot Hydrophone (LSHD) and the fiber optic hydro-phone. It was assumed that the differences arise from cavitation effects at the end-face of the LSHD glass-block and filter characteristics of the trans-impedance amplifier of the LSHD. The present study investigates the transfer-function of the LSHD. It is shown that the filter characteristics of the amplifier cause discrepancies in the rarefaction pressure pulse fraction (depending on the energy settings of the source 15 ± 2%). PMID:24517798

  8. Ultra thin fiber laser vector hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Zhang, Wentao; He, Jun; Li, Fang; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a two-axis fiber laser vector hydrophone which uses a V-shaped flexed beam to enhance the sensitivity and reduce the dimensions. Theoretical analyses of the sensitivity and frequent response are given. The key parameters that determine the sensitivity and resonant frequency are discussed. The experimental results show an acceleration sensitivity of 39.2 pm/g and 53.2 pm/g at the x, y axis respectively, a resonant frequency of about 310 Hz, and a directivity resolution larger than 20 dB.

  9. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM), also referred to as an ultrasonic flowmeter, has been an operational tool for the measurement of streamflow since 1965. Very little information is available concerning AVM operation, performance, and limitations. The purpose of this report is to consolidate information in such a manner as to provide a better understanding about the application of this instrumentation to streamflow measurement. AVM instrumentation is highly accurate and nonmechanical. Most commercial AVM systems that measure streamflow use the time-of-travel method to determine a velocity between two points. The systems operate on the principle that point-to-point upstream travel-time of sound is longer than the downstream travel-time, and this difference can be monitored and measured accurately by electronics. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measurable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected. AVM systems used in streamflow measurement generally operate with a resolution of ?0.01 meter per second but this is dependent on system frequency, path length, and signal attenuation. In some applications the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Presently used minicomputer systems, although expensive to purchase and maintain, perform well. Increased use of AVM systems probably will be realized as smaller, less expensive, and more conveniently operable microprocessor-based systems become readily available. Available AVM equipment should be capable of flow measurement in a wide variety of situations heretofore untried. New signal-detection techniques and communication linkages can provide additional flexibility to the systems so that operation is possible in more river and estuary situations.

  10. A fast and accurate decoder for underwater acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, J. M.; Deng, Z. D.; Li, X.; Fu, T.; McMichael, G. A.; Trumbo, B. A.

    2014-07-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has been used to monitor the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through hydroelectric facilities in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Cabled hydrophone arrays deployed at dams receive coded transmissions sent from acoustic transmitters implanted in fish. The signals' time of arrival on different hydrophones is used to track fish in 3D. In this article, a new algorithm that decodes the received transmissions is described and the results are compared to results for the previous decoding algorithm. In a laboratory environment, the new decoder was able to decode signals with lower signal strength than the previous decoder, effectively increasing decoding efficiency and range. In field testing, the new algorithm decoded significantly more signals than the previous decoder and three-dimensional tracking experiments showed that the new decoder's time-of-arrival estimates were accurate. At multiple distances from hydrophones, the new algorithm tracked more points more accurately than the previous decoder. The new algorithm was also more than 10 times faster, which is critical for real-time applications on an embedded system.

  11. A fast and accurate decoder for underwater acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, J M; Deng, Z D; Li, X; Fu, T; McMichael, G A; Trumbo, B A

    2014-07-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has been used to monitor the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through hydroelectric facilities in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Cabled hydrophone arrays deployed at dams receive coded transmissions sent from acoustic transmitters implanted in fish. The signals' time of arrival on different hydrophones is used to track fish in 3D. In this article, a new algorithm that decodes the received transmissions is described and the results are compared to results for the previous decoding algorithm. In a laboratory environment, the new decoder was able to decode signals with lower signal strength than the previous decoder, effectively increasing decoding efficiency and range. In field testing, the new algorithm decoded significantly more signals than the previous decoder and three-dimensional tracking experiments showed that the new decoder's time-of-arrival estimates were accurate. At multiple distances from hydrophones, the new algorithm tracked more points more accurately than the previous decoder. The new algorithm was also more than 10 times faster, which is critical for real-time applications on an embedded system. PMID:25085162

  12. Optimization of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo Fuente, Alberto; Del Val Puente, Lara; Villacorta Calvo, Juan J.; Raboso Mateos, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced. PMID:24616643

  13. Optimization of a biometric system based on acoustic images.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo Fuente, Alberto; Del Val Puente, Lara; Villacorta Calvo, Juan J; Raboso Mateos, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced. PMID:24616643

  14. Application of the method of least squares to a solution of the matched field localization problem with a single hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapin, Sean R.

    The single hydrophone localization problem is considered. Single hydrophone localization is a special case of matched field localization where measurements from only one hydrophone are available. The time series of the pressure at the hydrophone is compared with predicted times series calculated using an ocean acoustic propagation model for many different source locations. The source location that gives the best match between the predicted time series and the measurement is assumed to be the correct source location. Single hydrophone localization algorithms from the literature are reviewed and a new algorithm is introduced. The new algorithm does not require knowledge of the source signal and does not assume the use of a particular ocean acoustic model, unlike some algorithms in the literature. Source location estimates calculated from the new algorithm are compared with ground truth using simulated ocean acoustic measurements and experimental measurements. Source location estimates calculated using other algorithms from the literature are shown for comparison. The simulated measurements use three source signals with bandwidths of 10 Hz, 100 Hz, and 200 Hz and the ocean is modeled as a Pekeris waveguide. The new algorithm estimates the source location accurately for all three source signals when several of the localization algorithms from the literature give inaccurate estimates. Gaussian white noise signals are added to the measured signals to test the impact of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the algorithm. Four signal-to-noise ratios of 60 dB, 40 dB, 20 dB, and 0 dB are used. The new algorithm gives accurate source location estimates down to an SNR of 20 dB for two of the source signal bandwidths. Source location estimates using other algorithms from the literature break down at either 20 dB or 0 dB. Source location estimates are calculated using two hydrophone measurements taken at different depths in an experiment conducted near the Bahamas. The new algorithm

  15. Characterization of the shock pulse-induced cavitation bubble activities recorded by an optical fiber hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gwansuk; Cho, Sung Chan; Coleman, Andrew John; Choi, Min Joo

    2014-03-01

    A shock pressure pulse used in an extracorporeal shock wave treatment has a large negative pressure (<-5 MPa) which can produce cavitation. Cavitation cannot be measured easily, but may have known therapeutic effects. This study considers the signal recorded for several hundred microseconds using an optical hydrophone submerged in water at the focus of shock pressure field. The signal is characterized by shock pulse followed by a long tail after several microseconds; this signal is regarded as a cavitation-related signal (CRS). An experimental investigation of the CRS was conducted in the shock pressure field produced in water using an optical hydrophone (FOPH2000, RP Acoustics, Germany). The CRS was found to contain characteristic information about the shock pulse-induced cavitation. The first and second collapse times (t1 and t2) were identified in the CRS. The collapse time delay (tc = t2 - t1) increased with the driving shock pressures. The signal amplitude integrated for time from t1 to t2 was highly correlated with tc (adjusted R(2) = 0.990). This finding suggests that a single optical hydrophone can be used to measure shock pulse and to characterize shock pulse-induced cavitation. PMID:24606257

  16. Spatial averaging effects of hydrophone on field characterization of planar transducer using Fresnel approximation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Guangzhen; Yang, Ping; He, Longbiao; Feng, Xiujuan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the existing models that allow spatial averaging effects of piezoelectric hydrophones to be accounted for. The model derived in the present study is valid for a planar source and was verified using transducers operating at 5 and 20MHz. It is based on Fresnel approximation and enables corrections for both on-axis and off-axis measurements. A single-integral approximate formula for the axial acoustic pressure was derived, and the validity of the Fresnel approximation in the near field of the planar transducer was examined. The numerical results obtained using 5 and 20MHz planar transmitters with an effective diameter of 12.7mm showed that the derived model could account for spatial averaging effects to within 0.2% with Beissner's exact integral (Beissner, 1981), for k(a+b)2≫π (where k is the circular wavenumber, and a and b are the effective radii of the transmitter and hydrophone, respectively). The field distributions along the acoustic axis and the beam directivity patterns are also included in the model. The spatial averaging effects of the hydrophone were generally observed to cause underestimation of the absolute pressure amplitudes of the acoustic beam, and overestimation of the cross-sectional size of the beam directivity pattern. However, the cross-sectional size of the directivity pattern was also found to be underestimated in the "far zone" (beyond Y0=a(2)/λ) of the transmitter. The results of this study indicate that the spatial averaging effect on the beam directivity pattern is negligible for π(γ(2)+4γ)s≪1 (where γ=b/a, and s is the normalized distance to the planar transducer). PMID:27268164

  17. Development of calibration techniques for ultrasonic hydrophone probes in the frequency range from 1 to 100 MHz

    PubMed Central

    Umchid, S.; Gopinath, R.; Srinivasan, K.; Lewin, P. A.; Daryoush, A. S.; Bansal, L.; El-Sherif, M.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop and optimize the calibration techniques for ultrasonic hydrophone probes used in acoustic field measurements up to 100 MHz. A dependable, 100 MHz calibration method was necessary to examine the behavior of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution fiber optic (FO) sensor and assess the need for such a sensor as an alternative tool for high frequency characterization of ultrasound fields. Also, it was of interest to investigate the feasibility of using FO probes in high intensity fields such as those employed in HIFU (High Intensity Focused Ultrasound) applications. In addition to the development and validation of a novel, 100 MHz calibration technique the innovative elements of this research include implementation and testing of a prototype FO sensor with an active diameter of about 10 μm that exhibits uniform sensitivity over the considered frequency range and does not require any spatial averaging corrections up to about 75 MHz. The results of the calibration measurements are presented and it is shown that the optimized calibration technique allows the sensitivity of the hydrophone probes to be determined as a virtually continuous function of frequency and is also well suited to verify the uniformity of the FO sensor frequency response. As anticipated, the overall uncertainty of the calibration was dependent on frequency and determined to be about ±12% (±1 dB) up to 40 MHz, ±20% (±1.5 dB) from 40 to 60 MHz and ±25% (±2 dB) from 60 to 100 MHz. The outcome of this research indicates that once fully developed and calibrated, the combined acousto-optic system will constitute a universal reference tool in the wide, 100 MHz bandwidth. PMID:19110289

  18. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones. PMID:27213379

  19. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones. PMID:27213379

  20. Imaging marine geophysical environments with vector acoustics.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Dennis

    2006-09-01

    Using vector acoustic sensors for marine geoacoustic surveys instead of the usual scalar hydrophones enables one to acquire three-dimensional (3D) survey data with instrumentation and logistics similar to current 2D surveys. Vector acoustic sensors measure the sound wave direction directly without the cumbersome arrays that hydrophones require. This concept was tested by a scaled experiment in an acoustic water tank that had a well-controlled environment with a few targets. Using vector acoustic data from a single line of sources, the three-dimensional tank environment was imaged by directly locating the source and all reflectors. PMID:17004497

  1. Cavitation Detection Using a Fibre-Optic Hydrophone: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, V.; Civale, J.; Rivens, I.; ter Haar, G. R.

    2011-09-01

    A fibre-optic hydrophone has been used to detect broadband acoustic emissions associated with inertial cavitation activity. Its potential for this application has been investigated in tap water and in agar gels, and compared with signals from a passive cavitation detector (PCD) and a microphone detecting audible frequency emissions. Processing of the fibre-optic hydrophone data to find the total RMS voltage over an integrated frequency range of 15-20 MHz gives a high signal to noise ratio, comparable with that of the PCD. The sensitivity and effective field of view of the fibre tip appear sufficient for detecting even low level cavitation activity, however the precise directional response has yet to be assessed. Emissions from acoustic cavitation in tap water and agar gel from peak negative pressures reaching 5.8 and 3.5 MPa respectively were detectable when the fibre was up to 20 mm and 2 mm respectively from the acoustic axis, whilst retaining a high signal to noise ratio.

  2. Experimental investigations on implementing different PGC algorithms for interrogation of fiber optic hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham Kumar, S.; C. V., Sreehari; Vivek, K.; T. V., Praveen; Moosad, K. P. B.; Rajesh, R.

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses the detailed experimental investigations on the performance of interferometer based fiber optic hydrophones with different Phase Generated Carrier (PGC) demodulation algorithms for their interrogation. The study covers the effect on different parametric variations in the PGC implementations by comparison through Signal to Noise And Distortion (SINAD) and Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) analysis. This paper discusses experiments on most popular algorithms based on PGC like Arctangent, Differential Cross Multiplication (DCM) and Ameliorated PGC. A Distributed Feed-Back Fiber Lasers (DFB-FL) based fiber optic hydrophone, with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer having active phase modulator in reference arm and mechanism to cater polarization related intensity fading were used for the experiments. Experiments were carried out to study the effects of various parameters like the type and configuration of low pass filter, frequency of the modulation signal, frequency of acoustic signal etc. It is observed that all the three factors viz. the type of low pass filter, frequency of modulating and acoustic signal plays important role in retrieving the acoustic signal, based on the type of algorithms used and are discussed here.

  3. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  4. A programmable acoustic recording tag and first results from free-ranging northern elephant seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, W. C.; Tyack, P. L.; Le Boeuf, B. J.; Costa, D. P.

    A hydrophone-equipped tag recorded exposure to noise, as well as physiological and behavioral sounds, on free-ranging northern elephant seals ( Mirounga angustirostris). The compact acoustic probe (CAP) consisted of the hydrophone, a thermistor, and a pressure transducer in a 36 cm long, 10 cm diameter cylindrical hydrodynamic housing capable of withstanding 2000 m depth. The enclosed logging electronics included a programmable "TattleTale 7" data acquisition engine and a 340 Mb hard disk. A custom low-power operating system supported multi-channel interrupt-driven sampling at 5 kHz. The complete tag weighed 0.9 kg in water and displaced 2.1 l. During five deployments on juveniles translocated from and returning to Año Nuevo, California, CAP tags measured dive pattern, ambient and vessel noise exposure, oceanographic ranging (RAFOS) and thermometry (ATOC) beacons, acoustic signatures of swim stroke, surface respiration, and cardiac function, and possible vocalizations.

  5. Preliminary characterization of a one-axis acoustic system. [acoustic levitation for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.; Berge, L. H.; Parker, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The acoustic fields and levitation forces produced along the axis of a single-axis resonance system were measured. The system consisted of a St. Clair generator and a planar reflector. The levitation force was measured for bodies of various sizes and geometries (i.e., spheres, cylinders, and discs). The force was found to be roughly proportional to the volume of the body until the characteristic body radius reaches approximately 2/k (k = wave number). The acoustic pressures along the axis were modeled using Huygens principle and a method of imaging to approximate multiple reflections. The modeled pressures were found to be in reasonable agreement with those measured with a calibrated microphone.

  6. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  7. Aeroelastic-Acoustics Simulation of Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, kajal K.; Choi, S.; Ibrahim, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a numerical finite element (FE) based analysis procedure and a resulting code for the simulation of the acoustics phenomenon arising from aeroelastic interactions. Both CFD and structural simulations are based on FE discretization employing unstructured grids. The sound pressure level (SPL) on structural surfaces is calculated from the root mean square (RMS) of the unsteady pressure and the acoustic wave frequencies are computed from a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the unsteady pressure distribution as a function of time. The resulting tool proves to be unique as it is designed to analyze complex practical problems, involving large scale computations, in a routine fashion.

  8. Investigation of reverberation synthesized by electro-acoustic enhancement systems, from a subjective and physical acoustic standpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yasushi

    2002-05-01

    Current electro-acoustic enhancement technology enables wide control over concert hall acoustics. The goal of sound field synthesis in anechoic space is to reconstruct a specific sound field. However, applying acoustic enhancement technology to existing reverberant spaces is a less developed research direction. This presentation demonstrates a methodology of electro-acoustic enhancement using regenerative reverberation through SAAF (spatially averaged acoustic feedback), an acceptable variation of RT and SPL in enhanced acoustical conditions. That was presented by YAMAHA Acoustic Research Laboratories. SAAF technology can flatten amplitude peaks at the howling frequency of acoustical feedback loops by using time variant finite impulse response filters. Therefore it enables regeneration of reverberated sound by wide band feedback in frequency without coloration. This system has been applied to ``negative absorption control'' and loudness equalization of under-balcony seats in current concert halls, to optimize concert hall acoustics electronically instead of architecturally. Adjusted reverberation time in enhanced condition should be between 1.5 and 2.0 times higher than the natural RT (ex. RTon/Rtoff=1.8). The SPL increases about 1 dB to 3 dB based on measured results of more than 30 performing halls integrated with acoustic enhancement system in Japan. Examples of the major Japanese concert halls with acoustic enhancement systems are presented.

  9. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  10. Vibrations of three-dimensional pipe systems with acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1981-01-01

    A general algorithm is developed to calculate the beam-type dynamic response of three dimensional multiplane finite length pipe systems, consisting of elbow and straight ducts with continuous interfaces. Emphasis is on secondary acoustic wave effects giving rise to coupling mechanisms; and the simulation accounts for one-dimensional elastoacoustic coupling from a plane acoustic wave and secondary loads resulting from wave asymmetries. The transfer matrix approach is adopted in modeling the elastodynamics of each duct, with allowance for distribution loads. Secondary loads from plane wave distortion are considered with a solution of the Helmholtz equation in an equivalent rigid waveguide, and effects of path imperfection are introduced as a perturbation from the hypothetical perfectly straight pipe. Computations indicate that the one-dimensional acoustic assumption is valid for frequencies below one-half the first cut-off frequency, and the three-dimensional acoustic effects produce an increase in response levels near and above cut-off.

  11. Information and data real time transmission acoustic underwater system: TRIDENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubuil, Joel; Labat, Joel; Lapierre, Gerard

    2001-05-01

    The objective of the Groupe d'Etudes Sous-Marines de l'Atlantique (GESMA) is to develop a robust high data rate acoustic link. A real-time receiver recently developed at ENST Bretagne has just been designed to cope with all perturbations induced by such harsh channels. In order to cope with channel features, a spatio-temporal equalizer introduced by J. Labat et al. [Brevet FT no. 9914844, ``Perfectionnements aux dispositifs d'galisation adaptative pour recepteurs de systemes de communications numriques,'' Nov. 1999] was recently implemented and evaluated. This equalizer is the core of the receiver platform [Trubuil et al., ``Real-time high data rate acoustic link based on spatio temporal blind equalization: the TRIDENT acoustic system,'' OCEANS 2002]. This paper provides an overview of this project. The context of the study and the design of high data rate acoustic link are presented. Last Brest harbor experiments (2002, 2003) are described. The real time horizontal acoustic link performances are evaluated. Two carriers frequencies are available (20, 35 kHz). Acoustic communications for bit rate ranging from 10 to 20 kbps and for channel length (shallow water) ranging from 500 to 4000 m have been conducted successfully over several hours.

  12. A field-deployable digital acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, David L.; Wright, Kenneth D., II; Rowland, Wayne D.

    1991-01-01

    A field deployable digital acoustic measurement system was developed to support acoustic research programs at the Langley Research Center. The system digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone, which can be located up to 1000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage, and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 12 microphones is recorded on high density 8mm tape and is analyzed post-test by a microcomputer system. Synchronous and nonsynchronous sampling is available with maximum sample rates of 12,500 and 40,000 samples per second respectively. The high density tape storage system is capable of storing 5 gigabytes of data at transfer rates up to 1 megabyte per second. System overall dynamic range exceeds 83 dB.

  13. HIFU Transducer Characterization Using a Robust Needle Hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Samuel M.; Zanelli, Claudio I.

    2007-05-01

    A robust needle hydrophone has been developed for HIFU transducer characterization and reported on earlier. After a brief review of the hydrophone design and performance, we demonstrate its use to characterize a 1.5 MHz, 10 cm diameter, F-number 1.5 spherically focused source driven to exceed an intensity of 1400 W/cm2at its focus. Quantitative characterization of this source at high powers is assisted by deconvolving the hydrophone's calibrated frequency response in order to accurately reflect the contribution of harmonics generated by nonlinear propagation in the water testing environment. Results are compared to measurements with a membrane hydrophone at 0.3% duty cycle and to theoretical calculations, using measurements of the field at the source's radiating surface as input to a numerical solution of the KZK equation.

  14. An explosive acoustic telemetry system for seabed penetrators

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, G.C.; Hickerson, J.

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the design and past applications of an explosive acoustic telemetry system (EATS) for gathering and transmitting data from seabed penetrators. The system was first fielded in 1982 and has since been used to measure penetrator performance on three other occasions. Descriptions are given of the mechanical hardware, system electronics, and software.

  15. A novel acoustically quiet coil for neonatal MRI system

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Christopher M.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Loew, Wolfgang; Tkach, Jean A.; Pratt, Ronald G.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    MRI acoustic exposure has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in preterm and term infants. To mitigate this risk, a novel acoustically quiet coil was developed to reduce the sound pressure level experienced by neonates during MR procedures. The new coil has a conventional high-pass birdcage RF design, but is built on a framework of sound abating material. We evaluated the acoustic and MR imaging performance of the quiet coil and a conventional body coil on two small footprint NICU MRI systems. Sound pressure level and frequency response measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level, reported for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 82.2 dBA for the acoustically quiet coil, and 91.1 dBA for the conventional body coil. The sound pressure level values measured for the acoustically quiet coil were consistently lower, 9 dBA (range 6-10 dBA) quieter on average. The acoustic frequency response of the two coils showed a similar harmonic profile for all imaging sequences. However, the amplitude was lower for the quiet coil, by as much as 20 dBA. PMID:26457072

  16. Helicopter acoustic alerting system for high-security facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Robert L.; Hansen, Scott; Park, Chris; Power, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    Helicopters present a serious threat to high security facilities such as prisons, nuclear sites, armories, and VIP compounds. They have the ability to instantly bypass conventional security measures focused on ground threats such as fences, check-points, and intrusion sensors. Leveraging the strong acoustic signature inherent in all helicopters, this system would automatically detect, classify, and accurately track helicopters using multi-node acoustic sensor fusion. An alert would be generated once the threat entered a predefined 3-dimension security zone in time for security personnel to repel the assault. In addition the system can precisely identify the landing point on the facility grounds.

  17. Performance evaluation of a biometric system based on acoustic images.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; del Val, Lara; Jiménez, María I; Villacorta, Juan J

    2011-01-01

    An acoustic electronic scanning array for acquiring images from a person using a biometric application is developed. Based on pulse-echo techniques, multifrequency acoustic images are obtained for a set of positions of a person (front, front with arms outstretched, back and side). Two Uniform Linear Arrays (ULA) with 15 λ/2-equispaced sensors have been employed, using different spatial apertures in order to reduce sidelobe levels. Working frequencies have been designed on the basis of the main lobe width, the grating lobe levels and the frequency responses of people and sensors. For a case-study with 10 people, the acoustic profiles, formed by all images acquired, are evaluated and compared in a mean square error sense. Finally, system performance, using False Match Rate (FMR)/False Non-Match Rate (FNMR) parameters and the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, is evaluated. On the basis of the obtained results, this system could be used for biometric applications. PMID:22163708

  18. Performance Evaluation of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; del Val, Lara; Jiménez, María I.; Villacorta, Juan J.

    2011-01-01

    An acoustic electronic scanning array for acquiring images from a person using a biometric application is developed. Based on pulse-echo techniques, multifrequency acoustic images are obtained for a set of positions of a person (front, front with arms outstretched, back and side). Two Uniform Linear Arrays (ULA) with 15 λ/2-equispaced sensors have been employed, using different spatial apertures in order to reduce sidelobe levels. Working frequencies have been designed on the basis of the main lobe width, the grating lobe levels and the frequency responses of people and sensors. For a case-study with 10 people, the acoustic profiles, formed by all images acquired, are evaluated and compared in a mean square error sense. Finally, system performance, using False Match Rate (FMR)/False Non-Match Rate (FNMR) parameters and the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, is evaluated. On the basis of the obtained results, this system could be used for biometric applications. PMID:22163708

  19. Theoretical detection ranges for acoustic based manatee avoidance technology.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Richard; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O

    2006-07-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of watercraft collisions in Florida's coastal waterways. To reduce the number of collisions, warning systems based upon detecting manatee vocalizations have been proposed. One aspect of the feasibility of an acoustically based warning system relies upon the distance at which a manatee vocalization is detectable. Assuming a mixed spreading model, this paper presents a theoretical analysis of the system detection capabilities operating within various background and watercraft noise conditions. This study combines measured source levels of manatee vocalizations with the modeled acoustic properties of manatee habitats to develop a method for determining the detection range and hydrophone spacing requirements for acoustic based manatee avoidance technologies. In quiet environments (background noise approximately 70 dB) it was estimated that manatee vocalizations are detectable at approximately 250 m, with a 6 dB detection threshold, In louder environments (background noise approximately 100dB) the detection range drops to 2.5 m. In a habitat with 90 dB of background noise, a passing boat with a maximum noise floor of 120 dB would be the limiting factor when it is within approximately 100 m of a hydrophone. The detection range was also found to be strongly dependent on the manatee vocalization source level. PMID:16875213

  20. Using a coherent hydrophone array for observing sperm whale range, classification, and shallow-water dive profiles.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duong D; Huang, Wei; Bohn, Alexander C; Wang, Delin; Gong, Zheng; Makris, Nicholas C; Ratilal, Purnima

    2014-06-01

    Sperm whales in the New England continental shelf and slope were passively localized, in both range and bearing, and classified using a single low-frequency (<2500 Hz), densely sampled, towed horizontal coherent hydrophone array system. Whale bearings were estimated using time-domain beamforming that provided high coherent array gain in sperm whale click signal-to-noise ratio. Whale ranges from the receiver array center were estimated using the moving array triangulation technique from a sequence of whale bearing measurements. Multiple concurrently vocalizing sperm whales, in the far-field of the horizontal receiver array, were distinguished and classified based on their horizontal spatial locations and the inter-pulse intervals of their vocalized click signals. The dive profile was estimated for a sperm whale in the shallow waters of the Gulf of Maine with 160 m water-column depth located close to the array's near-field where depth estimation was feasible by employing time difference of arrival of the direct and multiply reflected click signals received on the horizontal array. By accounting for transmission loss modeled using an ocean waveguide-acoustic propagation model, the sperm whale detection range was found to exceed 60 km in low to moderate sea state conditions after coherent array processing. PMID:24907798

  1. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  2. A BIPM/CIPM key comparison covering the calibration of ultrasonic hydrophones over the frequency range 1 MHz to 15 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Lee, Nigel D.

    2002-11-01

    A central objective of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA), signed by national measurement institute (NMI) directors in 1999, is the establishment of the degrees of equivalence of national measurement standards held by each institute. International comparisons, known as key comparisons, represent the sole mechanism for establishing these degrees of equivalence. In this paper we describe a key comparison, undertaken under the auspices of the BIPM/CIPM Consultative Committee for Acoustics, Ultrasound, and Vibration, related to the realization of the acoustic pascal in water at ultrasonic frequencies. This is most appropriately achieved through a comparison of calibrations of stable transfer standard hydrophones; 1 mm active element bilaminar membrane hydrophones, being chosen for this purpose. With NPL acting as the pilot laboratory, two hydrophones were calibrated using the NPL primary standard laser interferometer and circulated sequentially to participant NMI laboratories in Germany, China, The Netherlands, and Denmark. Laboratories were asked to report values for the hydrophone open-circuit free-field sensitivity over the frequency range 1 MHz to 15 MHz. The principal calibration methods used by the NMIs were optical interferometry and/or two-transducer reciprocity. The key comparison process, its results, and the analysis used to derive the key comparison reference values, are all described in detail.

  3. Design of an acoustic telemetry system for rebreathers.

    PubMed

    Egi, S M

    2009-01-01

    Despite the abundance of telemetric applications for ecology, behavior and physiology of marine life, few efforts were reported about the use of acoustic telemetry for SCUBA divers. The objective of this study is to design and test an acoustic telemetry system for monitoring breathing gases of a Dräger Dolphin semi-closed circuit rebreather as well as the depth of the diver. The system is designed around a PC based surface unit and a microcontroller based diver carried module that digitizes the output of CO2 and O2 sensors located in the inhalation side of the canister. One pair of acoustic modems establishes the data link between the microcontroller and the topside PC. The graphical user interface is written in C# and enables the recording of the diving session as well. The system is calibrated in a hyperbaric chamber and tested successfully with four dives in three different environments using 100% O2 and Nitrox (47.9% O2 - 52.1% N2) up to 15 m depth and a distance of 40 m between acoustic modems. The telemetry data cannot be used only for recording physiological data but also provides an important operational safety tool to monitor the rebreather user. The future designs will include actuators for controlling the diluent and oxygen flow to closed circuit mix gas rebreathers. PMID:19341129

  4. High resolution underwater fiber optic threat detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Alexander; Hermesh, Shalmon; Durets, Eugene; Kempen, Lothar U.

    2006-10-01

    Current underwater protection systems are complex expensive devices consisting of multiple electronic sensing elements. The detection and identification of divers and small submerged watercraft requires very high image resolution. The high price of an array of conventional piezoelectric transducers and associated electronic components makes this solution feasible for localized implementations, but the protection of large stretches of coastline requires a different approach. We present a novel multichannel sonar design that augments current active sonar transducers with a passive fiber-optic multichannel acoustic emission sensing array. The system provides continuous monitoring of the acoustic wave reflections emitted by a single projector, yielding information about the size and shape of approaching objects. A novel fiber hydrophone enclosure is utilized to dramatically enhance the sensor response to the sonar frequency, while suppressing out-of-band sound sources and noise. The ability of a fiber hydrophone to respond to acoustic emissions is based on established fiber Bragg grating sensing techniques. In this approach, the energy of an acoustic wave is converted into the modulation of the in-fiber optical transducer's optical properties. The obtained results demonstrate significant response of the designed fiber optic hydrophone to the incident acoustic wave over the frequency domain from 1-80 kHz. Our approach allows selective tuning of the sensor to a particular acoustic frequency, as well as potential extension of the spectral response to 300- 400kHz.2

  5. Seismicity And Accretion Processes Along The Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of the Azores using data from the MARCHE Autonomous Hydrophone Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Julie; Cevatoglu, Melis; Cannat, Mathilde; Escartin, Javier; Maia, Marcia; Tisseau, Chantal; Dziak, Robert; Goslin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    The seismicity of the South Atlantic Ocean has been recorded by the MARCHE network of 4 autonomous underwater hydrophones (AUH) moored within the SOFAR channel on the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The instruments were deployed south of the Azores Plateau between 32° and 39°N from July 2005 to August 2008. The low attenuation properties of the SOFAR channel for earthquake T-wave propagation result in a detection threshold reduction from a magnitude completeness level (Mc) of ~4.3 for MAR events recorded by the land-based seismic networks to Mc=2.1 using this hydrophone array. A spatio-temporal analysis has been performed among the 5600 events recorded inside the MARCHE array. Most events are distributed along the ridge between lat. 39°N on the Azores Platform and the Rainbow (36°N) segment. In the hydrophone catalogue, acoustic magnitude (Source Level, SL) is used as a measure of earthquake size. The source level above which the data set is complete is SLc=205 dB. We look for seismic swarms using the cluster software of the SEISAN package. The criterion used are a minimum SL of 210 to detect a possible mainshock, and a radius of 30 km and a time window of 40 days after this mainshock (Cevatoglu, 2010, Goslin et al., 2012). 7 swarms with more than 15 events are identified using this approach between 32°et 39°N of latitude. The maximum number of earthquake in a swarm is 57 events. This result differs from the study of Simao et al. (2010) as we processed a further year of data and selected sequences with fewer events. Looking at the distribution of the SL as a function of time after the mainshock, we discuss the possible mechanism of these earthquakes : tectonic events with a "mainshock-aftershock" distribution fitting a modified Omori law or volcanic events showing more constant SL values. We also present the geophysical setting of these 7 swarms, using gravity, bathymetry, and available local geological data. This study illustrates the potential of

  6. Resonant acoustic transducer and driver system for a well drilling string communication system

    DOEpatents

    Chanson, Gary J.; Nicolson, Alexander M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic data communication system includes an acoustic transmitter and receiver wherein low frequency acoustic waves, propagating in relatively loss free manner in well drilling string piping, are efficiently coupled to the drill string and propagate at levels competitive with the levels of noise generated by drilling machinery also present in the drill string. The transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring piezoelectric transmitter and amplifier combination that permits self-oscillating resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  7. Observations of Local Seismicity and Harmonic Tremor Using an Ocean Bottom Hydrophone Array at Brothers Volcano, South Kermadec Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Lau, T. K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2005-12-01

    The submarine Brothers volcano is an important link in the volcanic chain of the southern Kermadec Arc system in the Southwest Pacific Ocean north of New Zealand. The 3-3.5 km wide caldera has a center depth of 1850m and steep surrounding walls of 300-450m. Active hydrothermal venting distinguished Brothers as a point of focus for the New Zealand American Submarine Ring of Fire (NZASRoF) expeditions in 2004 and 2005. Due to its remote location, moderate to small magnitude seismicity around the Brothers area is largely unknown. In late September 2004, four ocean bottom hydrophones (OBHs) were deployed on the caldera floor. In April 2005, three of the four instruments were recovered intact. These three OBHs continuously recorded, for seven months, the low frequency (0-110Hz) acoustic field around Brothers volcano, in particular seismic P- and S-waves propagating through the crust and acoustic T-waves in the water column . Preliminary analysis reveals seismicity rates on the order of 106 earthquakes per month. In addition to seismic arrivals, low frequency harmonic tremor is frequently and independently observed on each of the OBH instruments, often occurring subsequent to the larger seismic events. Qualitative comparisons of these signals with tremor observed from the Volcano Islands south of Japan (Dziak and Fox, 2002) show them to be nearly equivalent in frequency structure, suggesting the origin of the tremor observed at Brothers may also be attributed to resonance of a magma-gas mixture in a large chamber or conduit near the water/ seafloor boundary.

  8. Acoustic design criteria in a general system for structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brama, Torsten

    1990-01-01

    Passenger comfort is of great importance in most transport vehicles. For instance, in the new generation of regional turboprop aircraft, a low noise level is vital to be competitive on the market. The possibilities to predict noise levels analytically has improved rapidly in recent years. This will make it possible to take acoustic design criteria into account in early project stages. The development of the ASKA FE-system to include also acoustic analysis has been carried out at Saab Aircraft Division and the Aeronautical Research Institute of Sweden in a joint project. New finite elements have been developed to model the free fluid, porous damping materials, and the interaction between the fluid and structural degrees of freedom. The FE approach to the acoustic analysis is best suited for lower frequencies up to a few hundred Hz. For accurate analysis of interior cabin noise, large 3-D FE-models are built, but 2-D models are also considered to be useful for parametric studies and optimization. The interest is here focused on the introduction of an acoustic design criteria in the general structural optimization system OPTSYS available at the Saab Aircraft Division. The first implementation addresses a somewhat limited class of problems. The problems solved are formulated: Minimize the structural weight by modifying the dimensions of the structure while keeping the noise level in the cavity and other structural design criteria within specified limits.

  9. Designing piping systems against acoustically-induced structural fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.

    1996-12-01

    Piping systems adapted for handling fluids such as steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device at high pressure and velocity conditions can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been determined that such vibrations and fatigue are minimized by relating the acoustic power level (PWL) to being a function of the ratio of downstream pipe inside diameter D{sub 2} to its thickness t{sub 2}. Additionally, such vibration and fatigue can be further minimized by relating the fluid pressure drop and downstream mach number to a function of the ratio of downstream piping inside diameter to the pipe wall thickness, as expressed by M{sub 2} {Delta}p = f(D{sub 2}/t{sub 2}). Pressure-reducing piping systems designed according to these criteria exhibit minimal vibrations and metal fatigue failures and have long operating life.

  10. Synthetic gauge flux and Weyl points in acoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng; Chen, Wen-Jie; He, Wen-Yu; Chan, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    Following the discovery of the quantum Hall effect and topological insulators, the topological properties of classical waves began to draw attention. Topologically non-trivial bands characterized by non-zero Chern numbers are realized through either the breaking of time-reversal symmetry using an external magnetic field or dynamic modulation. Owing to the absence of a Faraday-like effect, the breaking of time-reversal symmetry in an acoustic system is commonly realized with moving background fluids, which drastically increases the engineering complexity. Here we show that we can realize effective inversion symmetry breaking and create an effective gauge flux in a reduced two-dimensional system by engineering interlayer couplings, achieving an acoustic analogue of the topological Haldane model. We show that the synthetic gauge flux is closely related to Weyl points in the three-dimensional band structure and the system supports chiral edge states for fixed values of kz.

  11. PC-based Digital Acoustic Control System (DACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Kamlesh C.

    1991-01-01

    The PC-based Digital Acoustic Control System (DACS), which is a closed-loop system capable of precisely controlling the spectrum in real-time mode, is discussed. The system is based on integrated facility hardware including control microphones, signal conditioners, a real-time analyzer (RTA), a shaper, high capacity power amplifiers, and acoustic horns and generators. The DACS provides both an improved spectrum simulation and realtime information of pertinent test parameters that are stored in five separate files. These files can be hard copied and/or transferred to other programs to obtain a specific format of the test data. It is demonstrated that the computer interface with digital RTA and programmable filters are most effective and efficient. This facility runs independently under the control of a computer with an IEEE-488 interface to the facility hardware.

  12. Robust spot-poled membrane hydrophones for measurement of large amplitude pressure waveforms generated by high intensity therapeutic ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Volker; Sonntag, Sven; Georg, Olga

    2016-03-01

    The output characterization of medical high intensity therapeutic ultrasonic devices poses several challenges for the hydrophones to be used for pressure measurements. For measurements at clinical levels in the focal region, extreme robustness, broad bandwidth, large dynamic range, and small receiving element size are all needed. Conventional spot-poled membrane hydrophones, in principle, meet some of these features and were used to detect large amplitude ultrasonic fields to investigate their applicability. Cavitation in water was the limiting effect causing damage to the electrodes and membrane. A new hydrophone design comprising a steel foil front protection layer has been developed, manufactured, characterized, tested, and optimized. The latest prototypes additionally incorporate a low absorption and acoustic impedance matched backing, and could be used for maximum peak rarefactional and peak compressional pressure measurements of 15 and 75 MPa, respectively, at 1.06 MHz driving frequency. Axial and lateral beam profiles were measured also for a higher driving frequency of 3.32 MHz to demonstrate the applicability for output beam characterization at the focal region at clinical levels. The experimental results were compared with results of numerical nonlinear sound field simulations and good agreement was found if detection bandwidth and spatial averaging were taken into account. PMID:27036269

  13. Issues in acoustic vector-sensor processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Malcolm Alistair

    This dissertation examines the ability of acoustic vector sensors to solve the passive direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation and 3-D localization problems. These sensors measure the three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity vector, as well as the acoustic pressure, at one location. By preserving directional information that is present in the structure of the velocity field, they gain a number of advantages over traditional arrays of scalar sensors, such as hydrophones and microphones. We compute and examine, through the Cramér-Rao bound and beam-forming based methods, the ability of arrays of acoustic vector sensors to estimate direction. We first consider the case of an array in free space then extend these results to account for the presence of a reflecting boundary, such as the seabed or a vessel's hull, located near the array. Next, we derive expressions for the noise correlation structure induced by various ambient noise fields, isotropic and anisotropic, at an acoustic vector sensor array, and use them to examine its localization performance. We then propose a decentralized processing scheme to rapidly locate a wideband target in three dimensions. Finally, we present a general framework for the analysis of errors associated with the estimation of a vector, or system of vectors, that has geometrical interpretations in terms of length, angle, etc. The framework is employed throughout the thesis.

  14. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, I: Analysis technique and parameter matrices of acoustic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    This paper describes the mathematical formulation, equations, and procedures employed in the development of a comprehensive digital computer program for acoustic simulation and analysis of large and complicated piping systems. The analysis technique used is the transfer matrix method in which the piping system, with or without multiple inputs and outputs, is represented by a combination of discrete acoustic elements interconnected to one another at two stations such that the acoustic pressure and volume velocity at one station are uniquely related to those at the other by a two-by-two parameter matrix. Parameter matrices of 19 acoustic elements are included in this paper. By making use of these parameter matrices and the analysis technique, any complicated practical reciprocating compressor piping system can be modelled or analyzed.

  15. Acoustic system for communication in pipelines

    DOEpatents

    Martin, II, Louis Peter; Cooper, John F.

    2008-09-09

    A system for communication in a pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid. The system includes an encoding and transmitting sub-system connected to the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes that transmits a signal in the frequency range of 3-100 kHz into the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid, and a receiver and processor sub-system connected to the pipe, or pipeline, or network of pipes containing a fluid that receives said signal and uses said signal for a desired application.

  16. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  ‑150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  17. Direct video and hydrophone observations of submarine explosive eruptions at NW Rota-1 volcano, Mariana arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Cashman, K. V.; Embley, R. W.; Matsumoto, H.; Dziak, R. P.; de Ronde, C. E. J.; Lau, T. K.; Deardorff, N. D.; Merle, S. G.

    2008-08-01

    Extraordinary video and hydrophone observations of a submarine explosive eruption were made with a remotely operated vehicle in April 2006 at a depth of 550-560 m on NW Rota-1 volcano in the Mariana arc. The observed eruption evolved from effusive to explosive, while the eruption rate increased from near zero to 10-100 m3/h. During the peak in activity, cyclic explosive bursts 2-6 min long were separated by shorter non-eruptive pauses lasting 10-100 s. The size of the ejecta increased with the vigor of the explosions. A portable hydrophone deployed near the vent recorded sounds correlated with the explosive bursts; the highest amplitudes were ˜50 dB higher than ambient noise at frequencies between 10 and 50 Hz. The acoustic data allow us to quantify the durations, amplitudes, and evolution of the eruptive events over time. The low eruption rate, high gas/lava ratio, and rhythmic eruptive behavior at NW Rota-1 are most consistent with a Strombolian eruptive style. We interpret that the eruption was primarily driven by the venting of magmatic gases, which was also the primary source of the sound recorded during the explosive bursts. The rhythmic nature of the bursts can be explained by partial gas segregation in the conduit and upward migration in a transitional regime between bubbly flow and fully developed slug flow. The strongest explosive bursts were accompanied by flashes of red glow and oscillating eruption plumes in the vent, apparently caused by magma-seawater interaction and rapid steam formation and condensation. This is the first time submarine explosive eruptions have been witnessed with simultaneous near-field acoustic recordings.

  18. Early forest fire detection using radio-acoustic sounding system.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Ince, Turker

    2009-01-01

    Automated early fire detection systems have recently received a significant amount of attention due to their importance in protecting the global environment. Some emergent technologies such as ground-based, satellite-based remote sensing and distributed sensor networks systems have been used to detect forest fires in the early stages. In this study, a radio-acoustic sounding system with fine space and time resolution capabilities for continuous monitoring and early detection of forest fires is proposed. Simulations show that remote thermal mapping of a particular forest region by the proposed system could be a potential solution to the problem of early detection of forest fires. PMID:22573967

  19. Early Forest Fire Detection Using Radio-Acoustic Sounding System

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Ince, Turker

    2009-01-01

    Automated early fire detection systems have recently received a significant amount of attention due to their importance in protecting the global environment. Some emergent technologies such as ground-based, satellite-based remote sensing and distributed sensor networks systems have been used to detect forest fires in the early stages. In this study, a radio-acoustic sounding system with fine space and time resolution capabilities for continuous monitoring and early detection of forest fires is proposed. Simulations show that remote thermal mapping of a particular forest region by the proposed system could be a potential solution to the problem of early detection of forest fires. PMID:22573967

  20. Smart acoustic emission system for wireless monitoring of concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Jin; Kim, Young-Gil; Kim, Chi-Yeop; Seo, Dae-Cheol

    2008-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this technique or this kind of principle, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures. Concrete is one of the most widely used materials for constructing civil structures. In the nondestructive evaluation point of view, a lot of AE signals are generated in concrete structures under loading whether the crack development is active or not. Also, it was required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. Therefore we have done a practical study in this work to fabricate compact wireless AE sensor and to develop diagnosis system. First, this study aims to identify the differences of AE event patterns caused by both real damage sources and the other normal sources. Secondly, it was focused to develop acoustic emission diagnosis system for assessing the deterioration of concrete structures such as a bridge, dame, building slab, tunnel etc. Thirdly, the wireless acoustic emission system was developed for the application of monitoring concrete structures. From the previous laboratory study such as AE event patterns analysis under various loading conditions, we confirmed that AE analysis provided a promising approach for estimating the condition of damage and distress in concrete structures. In this work, the algorithm for determining the damage status of concrete structures was developed and typical criteria for decision making was also suggested. For the future application of wireless monitoring, a low energy consumable, compact, and robust wireless acoustic emission sensor module was developed and applied to the concrete beam for performance test. Finally, based on the self-developed diagnosis algorithm and compact wireless AE sensor, new AE system for practical

  1. a Three-Dimensional Acoustical Imaging System for Zooplankton Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGehee, Duncan Ewell

    This dissertation describes the design, testing, and use of a three-dimensional acoustical imaging system, called Fish TV, or FTV, for tracking zooplankton swimming in situ. There is an increasing recognition that three -dimensional tracks of individual plankters are needed for some studies in behavioral ecology including, for example, the role of individual behavior in patch formation and maintenance. Fish TV was developed in part to provide a means of examining zooplankton swimming behavior in a non-invasive way. The system works by forming a set of 64 acoustic beams in an 8 by 8 pattern, each beam 2 ^circ by 2^circ , for a total coverage of 16^circ by 16^circ. The 8 by 8 beams form two dimensions of the image; range provides the third dimension. The system described in the thesis produces three-dimensional images at the rate of approximately one per second. A set of laboratory and field experiments is described that demonstrates the capabilities of the system. The final field experiment was the in situ observation of zooplankton swimming behavior at a site in the San Diego Trough, 15 nautical miles southwest of San Diego. 314 plankters were tracked for one minute. It was observed that there was no connection between the acoustic size of the animals and their repertoire of swimming behaviors. Other contributions of the dissertation include the development of two novel methods for generating acoustic beams with low side lobes. The first is the method of dense random arrays. The second is the optimum mean square quantized aperture method. Both methods were developed originally as ways to "build a better beam pattern" for Fish TV, but also have general significance with respect to aperture theory.

  2. Acoustic leak-detection system for railroad transportation security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, P. C.; Spadaro, J.; Harrison, M. A.; Barzilov, A.; Harper, D.; Hopper, L.; Houchins, E.; Lemoff, B.; Martin, R.; McGrath, C.; Moore, R.; Novikov, I.; Paschal, J.; Rogers, S.

    2007-04-01

    Pressurized rail tank cars transport large volumes of volatile liquids and gases throughout the country, much of which is hazardous and/or flammable. These gases, once released in the atmosphere, can wreak havoc with the environment and local populations. We developed a system which can non-intrusively and non-invasively detect and locate pinhole-sized leaks in pressurized rail tank cars using acoustic sensors. The sound waves from a leak are produced by turbulence from the gas leaking to the atmosphere. For example, a 500 μm hole in an air tank pressurized to 689 kPa produces a broad audio frequency spectrum with a peak near 40 kHz. This signal is detectable at 10 meters with a sound pressure level of 25 dB. We are able to locate a leak source using triangulation techniques. The prototype of the system consists of a network of acoustic sensors and is located approximately 10 meters from the center of the rail-line. The prototype has two types of acoustic sensors, each with different narrow frequency response band: 40 kHz and 80 kHz. The prototype is connected to the Internet using WiFi (802.11g) transceiver and can be remotely operated from anywhere in the world. The paper discusses the construction, operation and performance of the system.

  3. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines is a complication that continues to plague designers and engineers. Many rocket systems experience violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. During sever cases of combustion instability fluctuation amplitudes can reach values equal to or greater than the average chamber pressure. Large amplitude oscillations lead to damaged injectors, loss of rocket performance, damaged payloads, and in some cases breach of case/loss of mission. Historic difficulties in modeling and predicting combustion instability has reduced most rocket systems experiencing instability into a costly fix through testing paradigm or to scrap the system entirely.

  4. Use of acoustic monitoring system for debris flow discharge evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgaro, A. G.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    In 1997 an automated system for monitoring of debris flows has been installed in the Acquabona channel Dolomites, Italy. Induction geophones, with a specific frequency of 10 Hz, measure the amplitude of vertical ground vibrations generated by the passage of a flowing mass along the channel. Continuous acoustic logs and ultrasonic hydrograph recorded at the lower-channel measurement station for the debris flow of August 17, 1998, show a striking correspondence. This correspondence, already observed in different flow sites, is represented by the best fit between flow depth and flow sensor amplitude. Average front velocity for surges, calculated from the signal peak time shift and the distance between the sensors along the flow path, range between 2.00 and 7.7 m/s. As the ultrasonic sensor provides a way to measure the variation of the flow section area with the flow depth, the debris flow peak discharge may be estimated; obtained values of debris flow peak discharge range from 4 and 30 m3/s. Volumes were calculated by integrating instantaneous discharges through the hydrograph and by integrating the geophone log (acoustic flux). Volumes of 13700 m3 and 15500 m3 have been respectively obtained. The slight difference between the two values may result from the fact that acoustic records: i) are sensitive to the high frequencies, typical of the debris flow tails; ii) sum up the contributions sent by the whole flowing mass, while the ecometer detect the flow depth at every time at only one section. As a consequence the rising of the whole geophone log gives a higher value at the integration result. This only acoustic system can give a reasonably proxy for discharge and total volumes involved, which are among the most important parameters for debris flow hazard assessment and planning countermeasures. This methodology can be used in other debris flow sites if they are calibrated by the acoustic characterization of debris, obtained by both seismic surveys and SPT tests, and

  5. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging. PMID:25985096

  6. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging. PMID:25985096

  7. Optimal flushing agents for integrated optical and acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of integrated optical and acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been developed and hold great promise for accurately diagnosing vulnerable plaques and guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, the vascular lumen is filled with blood, a high-scattering source for optical and high-frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to provide clearer images. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent for combined optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions as potential flushing agents for their image-enhancing effects: mannitol, dextran, and iohexol. Testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed-loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits. We found that a high concentration of dextran was the most useful for simultaneous intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging.

  8. Ideal flushing agents for integrated optical acoustic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Minami, Hataka; Steward, Earl; Ma, Teng; Mohar, Dilbahar; Robertson, Claire; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Patel, Pranav M.; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-02-01

    An increased number of integrated optical acoustic intravascular imaging systems have been researched and hold great hope for accurate diagnosing of vulnerable plaques and for guiding atherosclerosis treatment. However, in any intravascular environment, vascular lumen is filled with blood, which is a high-scattering source for optical and high frequency ultrasound signals. Blood must be flushed away to make images clear. To our knowledge, no research has been performed to find the ideal flushing agent that works for both optical and acoustic imaging techniques. We selected three solutions, mannitol, dextran and iohexol, as flushing agents because of their image-enhancing effects and low toxicities. Quantitative testing of these flushing agents was performed in a closed loop circulation model and in vivo on rabbits.

  9. Ray chaos in an architectural acoustic semi-stadium system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Yu

    2013-03-01

    The semi-stadium system is composed of a semicircular cap and a rectilinear platform. In this study, a dynamic model of the side, position, and angle variables is applied to investigate the acoustic ray chaos of the architectural semi-stadium system. The Lyapunov exponent is calculated in order to quantitatively describe ray instability. The model can be reduced to the semi-circular and rectilinear platform systems when the rectilinear length is sufficiently small and large. The quasi-rectilinear platform and the semicircular systems both produce regular trajectories with the maximal Lyapunov exponent approaching zero. Ray localizations, such as flutter-echo and sound focusing, are found in these two systems. However, the semi-stadium system produces chaotic ray behaviors with positive Lyapunov exponents and reduces ray localizations. Furthermore, as the rectilinear length increases, the scaling laws of the Lyapunov exponent of the semi-stadium system are revealed and compared with those of the stadium system. The results suggest the potential application of the proposed model to simulate chaotic dynamics of acoustic ray in architectural enclosed systems. PMID:23556944

  10. COOMET pilot comparison 473/RU-a/09: Comparison of hydrophone calibrations in the frequency range 250 Hz to 200 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chen; Isaev, A. E.; Yuebing, Wang; Enyakov, A. M.; Teng, Fei; Matveev, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    A description is given of the COOMET project 473/RU-a/09: a pilot comparison of hydrophone calibrations at frequencies from 250 Hz to 200 kHz between Hangzhou Applied Acoustics Research Institute (HAARI, China)—pilot laboratory—and Russian National Research Institute for Physicotechnical and Radio Engineering Measurements (VNIIFTRI, Designated Institute of Russia of the CIPM MRA). Two standard hydrophones, B&K 8104 and TC 4033, were calibrated and compared to assess the current state of hydrophone calibration of HAARI (China) and Russia. Three different calibration methods were applied: a vibrating column method, a free-field reciprocity method and a comparison method. The standard facilities of each laboratory were used, and three different sound fields were applied: pressure field, free-field and reverberant field. The maximum deviation of the sensitivities of two hydrophones between the participants' results was 0.36 dB. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV-KCWG.

  11. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  12. A fiber DBR laser based vector hydrophone for ultrasonic medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Guo, Xi; Gao, Jingyi; Lyu, Chengang

    2015-04-01

    An ultrasonic hydrophone based on a dual polarization distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser is described, and its application to detecting the vector medical ultrasound is demonstrated. The principle of the hydrophone is based on the detection of output beat frequency signal modulated by ultrasound. The amplitude, frequency and orientation of the ultrasound can be determined by the using the upper and lower sideband frequency. It has been found that the hydrophone has an orientation recognizable ability which the piezoelectric ultrasonic immersion transducer doesn't have. It suggests that the type of hydrophone can provide an alternative to piezoelectric hydrophone technology.

  13. Design and simulation of MEMS vector hydrophone with reduced cross section based meander beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Dutta, S.; Pal, Ramjay; Jain, K. K.; Gupta, Sudha; Bhan, R. K.

    2016-04-01

    MEMS based vector hydrophone is being one of the key device in the underwater communications. In this paper, we presented a bio-inspired MEMS vector hydrophone. The hydrophone structure consists of a proof mass suspended by four meander type beams with reduced cross-section. Modal patterns of the structure were studied. First three modal frequencies of the hydrophone structure were found to be 420 Hz, 420 Hz and 1646 Hz respectively. The deflection and stress of the hydrophone is found have linear behavior in the 1 µPa - 1Pa pressure range.

  14. Innovative system architecture for spatial volumetric acoustic seeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Eugene; Sergeyev, Aleksandr V.

    2009-04-01

    Situational awareness is a critical issue for the modern battle and security systems improvement of which will increase human performance efficiency. There are multiple research project and development efforts based on omni-directional (fish-eye) electro-optical and other frequency sensor fusion systems implementing head-mounted visualization systems. However, the efficiency of these systems is limited by the human eye-brain system perception limitations. Humans are capable to naturally perceive the situations in front of them, but interpretation of omni-directional visual scenes increases the user's mental workload, increasing human fatigue and disorientation requiring more effort for object recognition. It is especially important to reduce this workload making rear scenes perception intuitive in battlefield situations where a combatant can be attacked from both directions. This paper describes an experimental model of the system fusion architecture of the Visual Acoustic Seeing (VAS) for representation spatial geometric 3D model in form of 3D volumetric sound. Current research in the area of auralization points to the possibility of identifying sound direction. However, for complete spatial perception it is necessary to identify the direction and the distance to an object by an expression of volumetric sound, we initially assume that the distance can be encoded by the sound frequency. The chain: object features -> sensor -> 3D geometric model-> auralization constitutes Volumetric Acoustic Seeing (VAS). Paper describes VAS experimental research for representing and perceiving spatial information by means of human hearing cues in more details.

  15. Two efficient methods for measuring hydrophone frequency response in the 100 kHz to 2 MHz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, G. R.; Maruvada, S.; Gammell, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    As new medical applications of ultrasound emerge with operating frequencies in the hundreds of kilohertz to low megahertz region, it becomes more important to have convenient calibration methods for hydrophones in this frequency range. Furthermore, short diagnostic ultrasound pulses affected by finite amplitude distortion require that the hydrophone frequency response be known well below the center frequency. National standards laboratories can provide accurate calibration data at these frequencies, but the two methods now employed, laser interferometry and three-transducer reciprocity, are both single-frequency techniques, and they can be time-consuming procedures. Therefore, two efficient methods for generating a wideband acoustic pressure spectrum have been implemented to cover this frequency range. In one method a high-voltage pulse generator was used to excite a thick piezoelectric ceramic disk, producing a plane-wave acoustic pressure transient <1 µs in duration with peak amplitude of about 40 kPa. In the other technique, time delay spectrometry (TDS), a purpose-built 1-3 piezoelectric composite source transducer weakly focused at 20 cm was swept over the 0-2 MHz range. Its transmitting voltage response at 1 MHz was 11 kPa/V. The broadband pulse technique has the advantage of being simpler to implement, but TDS has a much greater signal-to-noise ratio because of the frequency-swept narrowband filter employed.

  16. Development of a MEMS acoustic emission sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Wu, Wei; Wright, Amelia P.

    2007-04-01

    An improved multi-channel MEMS chip for acoustic emission sensing has been designed and fabricated in 2006 to create a device that is smaller in size, superior in sensitivity, and more practical to manufacture than earlier designs. The device, fabricated in the MUMPS process, contains four resonant-type capacitive transducers in the frequency range between 100 kHz and 500 kHz on a chip with an area smaller than 2.5 sq. mm. The completed device, with its circuit board, electronics, housing, and connectors, possesses a square footprint measuring 25 mm x 25 mm. The small footprint is an important attribute for an acoustic emission sensor, because multiple sensors must typically be arrayed around a crack location. Superior sensitivity was achieved by a combination of four factors: the reduction of squeeze film damping, a resonant frequency approximating a rigid body mode rather than a bending mode, a ceramic package providing direct acoustic coupling to the structural medium, and high-gain amplifiers implemented on a small circuit board. Manufacture of the system is more practical because of higher yield (lower unit costs) in the MUMPS fabrication task and because of a printed circuit board matching the pin array of the MEMS chip ceramic package for easy assembly and compactness. The transducers on the MEMS chip incorporate two major mechanical improvements, one involving squeeze film damping and one involving the separation of resonance modes. For equal proportions of hole area to plate area, a triangular layout of etch holes reduces squeeze film damping as compared to the conventional square layout. The effect is modeled analytically, and is verified experimentally by characterization experiments on the new transducers. Structurally, the transducers are plates with spring supports; a rigid plate would be the most sensitive transducer, and bending decreases the sensitivity. In this chip, the structure was designed for an order-of-magnitude separation between the first

  17. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  18. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  19. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  20. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  1. Fuel Line Based Acoustic Flame-Out Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, Richard L. (Inventor); Franke, John M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic flame-out detection system that renders a large high pressure combustor safe in the event of a flame-out and possible explosive reignition. A dynamic pressure transducer is placed in the fuel and detects the stabilizing fuel pressure oscillations, caused by the combustion process. An electric circuit converts the signal from the combustion vortices, and transmitted to the fuel flow to a series of pulses. A missing pulse detector counts the pulses and continuously resets itself. If three consecutive pulses are missing, the circuit closes the fuel valve. With fuel denied the combustor is shut down or restarted under controlled conditions.

  2. Acoustic dispersion in a two-dimensional dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Kenneth I.; Kalman, Gabor J.; Donko, Zoltan; Hartmann, Peter

    2008-07-15

    We calculate the full density response function and from it the long-wavelength acoustic dispersion for a two-dimensional system of strongly coupled point dipoles interacting through a 1/r{sup 3} potential at arbitrary degeneracy. Such a system has no random-phase-approximation (RPA) limit and the calculation has to include correlations from the outset. We follow the quasilocalized charge (QLC) approach, accompanied by molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Similarly to what has been recently reported for the closely spaced classical electron-hole bilayer [G. J. Kalman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 236801 (2007)] and in marked contrast to the RPA, we report a long-wavelength acoustic phase velocity that is wholly maintained by particle correlations and varies linearly with the dipole moment p. The oscillation frequency, calculated both in an extended QLC approximation and in the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation [Phys. Rev. 176, 589 (1968)], is invariant in form over the entire classical to quantum domains all the way down to zero temperature. Based on our classical MD-generated pair distribution function data and on ground-state energy data generated by recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations on a bosonic dipole system [G. E. Astrakharchik et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 060405 (2007)], there is a good agreement between the QLC approximation kinetic sound speeds and the standard thermodynamic sound speeds in both the classical and quantum domains.

  3. Listening to distant earthquakes with hydrophones on autonomous oceanic floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Frederik; Nolet, Guust; Babcock, Jeff

    2001-05-01

    We are mounting a hydrophone on autonomous floats capable of drifting below the sound channel and surfacing to communicate data by a satellite link. Using new, intelligent algorithms for the automatic identification and discrimination of seismic phases, we recognize teleseismic arrivals in the presence of local P, S, and T phases, ship and whale noise, and other contaminating factors such as airgun surveys. Our approach combines time-domain methods with spectrogram analysis and with wavelet methods. To maximize battery life, we optimize the efficiency of our algorithms and their numerical implementation. Our algorithms were tested on data from tethered hydrophones from two arrays anchored to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the East Pacific Rise. Our prototype device was succesfully tested in a dive to 700 m off the coast of La Jolla. We acquired a valuable 31-h data stream suitable to characterize the ambient noise and were able to identify a number of engineering problems with the hydrophone sensitivity. We expect detecting teleseisms with magnitudes superior to 6.3, and thus adding at least 200 high-quality recordings to the global catalog over the life span of a single instrument-well worth the $15000 manufacturing price and negligible deployment costs on ships of opportunity.

  4. Acoustic Predictions of Manned and Unmanned Rotorcraft Using the Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) Code System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The Comprehensive Analytical Rotorcraft Model for Acoustics (CARMA) is being developed under the Quiet Aircraft Technology Project within the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The purpose of CARMA is to provide analysis tools for the design and evaluation of efficient low-noise rotorcraft, as well as support the development of safe, low-noise flight operations. The baseline prediction system of CARMA is presented and current capabilities are illustrated for a model rotor in a wind tunnel, a rotorcraft in flight and for a notional coaxial rotor configuration; however, a complete validation of the CARMA system capabilities with respect to a variety of measured databases is beyond the scope of this work. For the model rotor illustration, predicted rotor airloads and acoustics for a BO-105 model rotor are compared to test data from HART-II. For the flight illustration, acoustic data from an MD-520N helicopter flight test, which was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base in September 2003, are compared with CARMA full vehicle flight predictions. Predicted acoustic metrics at three microphone locations are compared for limited level flight and descent conditions. Initial acoustic predictions using CARMA for a notional coaxial rotor system are made. The effect of increasing the vertical separation between the rotors on the predicted airloads and acoustic results are shown for both aerodynamically non-interacting and aerodynamically interacting rotors. The sensitivity of including the aerodynamic interaction effects of each rotor on the other, especially when the rotors are in close proximity to one another is initially examined. The predicted coaxial rotor noise is compared to that of a conventional single rotor system of equal thrust, where both are of reasonable size for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

  5. Synthetic gauge flux and Weyl points in acoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng; Chen, Wen-Jie; He, Wen-Yu; Chan, C. T.

    We consider acoustic systems comprising a honeycomb lattice in the xy plane and periodic along the z direction. As kz is a good quantum number here, for each fixed kz, this system can be treated as a reduced two-dimensional system. By engineering the interlayer coupling in the z-direction, we show that we can realize effective inversion symmetry breaking and synthetic staggered gauge flux in the reduced two-dimensional system. The realizations of chiral edge states for fixed values of kz are direct consequences of the staggered gauge flux. And we then show that the synthetic gauge flux is closely related to the Weyl points in the three-dimensional band structure. This work was supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (Grant No. AoE/P-02/12).

  6. The contamination of acoustic pressure measurements by sensor oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, J.; Kezele, D.; Risley, C.

    1996-04-01

    The significance of micromotion (sensor) noise contamination of low frequency, low level, ambient ocean acoustic measurements has been pursued experimentally and analytically. Oceanographic hydrophones are subject to small motions resulting from various phenomena; the present study focussed on a pressure-sensitive hydrophone exposed to vertical oscillations. While under such imposed motion, the responses from a pressure-sensitive hydrophone and a collocated accelerometer were analyzed relative to a stationary reference hydrophone. The imposed motion was vertical, colored noise (1 to 50 Hz) of various acceleration amplitudes (10 {mu}g to 10 mg), transmitted through an elastic isolation suspension. Formation of Frequency Response Functions between the measured transducer signals, demonstrated that a three component model of the hydrophone signal predicts the response-to-motion contamination of the acoustic signal. In the lower frequency range, the vertical motion through the static head gradient generates a signal similar to the response-to-acoustic signal, while in the upper frequency range, the hydrophone responds inertially to the motion. For acceleration greater than 30 {mu}g, these components masked the laboratory ambient sound, except in a narrow frequency band where the two motion related components canceled each other. The in-water acceleration sensitivity of the hydrophone was found to be higher than the measured in-air value, apparently due to two hydrodynamic effects: water mass loading predicted by a classical added-mass term and a greatly magnifying effect from an adjacent moving body. Extrapolating the results to a deep ocean environment, the hydrophone signals would be contaminated below 5 Hz. A spectral technique is demonstrated to remove both forms of motion contamination from laboratory data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Automatic recognition of T and teleseismic P waves by statistical analysis of their spectra: An application to continuous records of moored hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhovich, Alexey; Irisson, Jean-Olivier; Perrot, Julie; Nolet, Guust

    2014-08-01

    A network of moored hydrophones is an effective way of monitoring seismicity of oceanic ridges since it allows detection and localization of underwater events by recording generated T waves. The high cost of ship time necessitates long periods (normally a year) of autonomous functioning of the hydrophones, which results in very large data sets. The preliminary but indispensable part of the data analysis consists of identifying all T wave signals. This process is extremely time consuming if it is done by a human operator who visually examines the entire database. We propose a new method for automatic signal discrimination based on the Gradient Boosted Decision Trees technique that uses the distribution of signal spectral power among different frequency bands as the discriminating characteristic. We have applied this method to automatically identify the types of acoustic signals in data collected by two moored hydrophones in the North Atlantic. We show that the method is capable of efficiently resolving the signals of seismic origin with a small percentage of wrong identifications and missed events: 1.2% and 0.5% for T waves and 14.5% and 2.8% for teleseismic P waves, respectively. In addition, good identification rates for signals of other types (iceberg and ship generated) are obtained. Our results indicate that the method can be successfully applied to automate the analysis of other (not necessarily acoustic) databases provided that enough information is available to describe statistical properties of the signals to be identified.

  8. Physical oceanography and acoustic propagation during LADC experiment in the Gulf of Mexico in 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Sergey; Caruthers, Jerald W.; Rayborn, Grayson H.; Udovydchenkov, Ilya A.; Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Rypina, Irina I.; Newcomb, Joal J.; Fisher, Robert A.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    2003-04-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) deployed three environmental and acoustic moorings in a downslope line just off the Mississippi River Delta in the northern Gulf of Mexico in an area of a large concentration of sperm whales in July 2001. The measurement of whale vocalizations and, more generally, ambient noise, were the objectives of the experiment. Each mooring had a single hydrophone autonomously recording Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) obtained from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office and modified to recorded signals up to 5859 Hz continuously for 36 days. Also, self-recording, environmental sensors were attached to the moorings to obtain profiles of time series data of temperature and salinity. Satellite imagery and NOAA mooring data were gathered for an analysis of eddy formations and movement in the Gulf. This paper will discuss the possible environmental impact of two events that occurred during the experiment: the passage of Tropical Storm Barry and the movement of the remnants of an eddy in the area. Discussed also will be the expected effects of these events on acoustic propagation based on modeling, which are carried out for long range and low frequency (300 km and 500 Hz) using the normal-mode acoustic model SWAMP (Shallow Water Acoustic Modal Propagation by M. F. Werby and N. A. Sidorovskaia) and for short range and high frequency (10 km and 5000 Hz) using the parabolic-equation acoustic model RAM (Range-dependent Acoustic model by M. Collins). [Work supported by ONR.

  9. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore » using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  10. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  11. Determination of acoustic attenuation in the Hudson River Estuary by means of ship noise observations.

    PubMed

    Roh, Heui-Seol; Sutin, Alexander; Bunin, Barry

    2008-06-01

    Analysis of sound propagation in a complex urban estuary has application to underwater threat detection systems, underwater communication, and acoustic tomography. One of the most important acoustic parameters, sound attenuation, was analyzed in the Hudson River near Manhattan using measurements of acoustic noise generated by passing ships and recorded by a fixed hydrophone. Analysis of the ship noise level for varying distances allowed estimation of the sound attenuation in the frequency band of 10-80 kHz. The effective attenuation coefficient representing the attenuation loss above cylindrical spreading loss had only slight frequency dependence and can be estimated by the frequency independent value of 0.058 dBm. PMID:18537300

  12. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  13. Propagation modeling for sperm whale acoustic clicks in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Udovydchenkov, Ilya A.; Rypina, Irina I.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Caruthers, Jerald W.; Newcomb, Joal; Fisher, Robert

    2001-05-01

    Simulations of acoustic broadband (500-6000 Hz) pulse propagation in the northern Gulf of Mexico, based on environmental data collected as a part of the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) experiments in the summers of 2001 and 2002, are presented. The results of the modeling support the hypothesis that consistent spectrogram interference patterns observed in the LADC marine mammal phonation data cannot be explained by the propagation effects for temporal analysis windows corresponding to the duration of an animal click, and may be due to a uniqueness of an individual animal phonation apparatus. The utilization of simulation data for the development of an animal tracking algorithm based on the acoustic recordings of a single bottom-moored hydrophone is discussed. The identification of the bottom and surface reflected clicks from the same animal is attempted. The critical ranges for listening to a deep-water forging animal by a surface receiving system are estimated. [Research supported by ONR.

  14. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A; Carlson, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  15. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-11-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  16. Improved Calibration Of Acoustic Plethysmographic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Davis, David C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved method of calibration of acoustic plethysmographic sensors involves acoustic-impedance test conditions like those encountered in use. Clamped aluminum tube holds source of sound (hydrophone) inside balloon. Test and reference sensors attached to outside of balloon. Sensors used to measure blood flow, blood pressure, heart rate, breathing sounds, and other vital signs from surfaces of human bodies. Attached to torsos or limbs by straps or adhesives.

  17. Field installation of an acoustic slug-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Dhulesia, H.; Bernicot, M.; Romanet, T.

    1997-02-01

    A pipeline operating in the slug flow regime creates high fluctuations in gas and liquid flow rates at the outlet. The detection of slugs and the estimation of their length and velocity are necessary to minimize the upsets in the operation of downstream process facilities. A new method based on the acoustic principle has been developed by Total and Syminex with two variants--passive and active. The passive method gives the slug length and velocity, whereas the active method also gives the fluid density. The prototype of this system has been installed permanently on a 20-in. multiphase pipeline in Argentina. As this system detects the slugs and determines their characteristics approximately 2 minutes before they arrive at the first-stage separator, the operators take appropriate action in the case of arrival of an excessively long slug and, thus, avoid possible shutdowns. At a later stage, an automatic adjustment of the process control valves will be realized.

  18. Vector Acoustic Sensors for Marine Seismic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, D.

    2005-12-01

    Using vector acoustic sensors for marine seismic and geo-acoustic surveys instead of the usual scalar hydrophones allows for acquiring a 3-D survey with the instrumentation and logistics similar to current 2-D surveys. Vector acoustic sensors measure the wave direction directly without the large and cumbersome arrays that hydrophones require. This concept was tested by a scaled experiment in an acoustic water tank that has a well controlled environment with a few targets. The experiment was scaled to the size of the available water tank and the frequency limits of the sensor. The sensor consists of a three-axis accelerometer as well as a hydrophone. The sound source was a standard hydrophone driven by a short 8 kHz pulse. The sensor was suspended in a fixed location and the hydrophone was moved about the tank by a robotic arm to insonify the tank from many locations. During part of the experiment, several floats (acoustic targets) were placed in the tank at diagonal ranges of approximately one meter. The accelerometer data show the direct source wave as well as the target scattered waves and reflections from the nearby water surface, tank bottom and sides. Vector data from single shots show that the wave motion direction can be readily determined for both direct waves and scattered waves. Without resorting to the usual methods of seismic imaging, which in this case would have only been two dimensional and relied entirely on the use of a synthetic source aperture, the three-dimensional volume of the tank environment was imaged. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, program element 61153N.

  19. Effects of Systemic Hydration on Vocal Acoustics of 18- to 35-Year-Old Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franca, Maria Claudia; Simpson, Kenneth O.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of body hydration and vocal acoustics was investigated in this study. Effects of two levels of hydration on objective measures of vocal acoustics were explored. In an attempt to reduce variability in the degree of systemic hydration and to induce a state of systemic dehydration, participants were instructed to refrain from ingestion…

  20. Detection of impulsive sources from an aerostat-based acoustic array data collection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Wayne E.; Clark, Robert C.; Strickland, Joshua; Frazier, Wm. Garth; Singleton, Jere

    2009-05-01

    An aerostat based acoustic array data collection system was deployed at the NATO TG-53 "Acoustic Detection of Weapon Firing" Joint Field Experiment conducted in Bourges, France during the final two weeks of June 2008. A variety of impulsive sources including mortar, artillery, gunfire, RPG, and explosive devices were fired during the test. Results from the aerostat acoustic array will be presented against the entire range of sources.

  1. Signal characteristics of an underwater explosive acoustic telemetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.M.

    1984-07-01

    Pressure pulses from small (<1 gm) explosive charges detonated between depths of 150 and 1200 m and detected by hydrophones submerged at a depth of 45 m are analyzed. Experimental data on peak pressures, time constants, and shock-wave/bubble-pulse intervals are summarized. The mass of each explosive is converted to its TNT energy-equivalent mass, which is used in fitting semiempirical scaling laws to the data. Equations are obtained for predicting the characteristics of the signal, given the range and depth of the explosive together with its TNT energy-equivalent mass. The parameter values that provide the best fit of the scaling laws to the experimental data are compared with those values applicable to larger explosives (>50 gm) detonated within 150 m of the surface. 20 references, 7 figures, 8 tables.

  2. Fabrication and performance of a single-crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate cylindrical hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeremy A; Dunphy, Kevin; Leadbetter, Jeff R; Adamson, Robert B A; Beslin, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    The development of a piezoelectric hydrophone based on lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate [PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT)] single-crystal piezoelectric as the hydrophone substrate is reported. Although PMN-PT can possess much higher piezoelectric sensitivity than traditional lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectrics, it is highly anisotropic and therefore there is a large gain in sensitivity only when the crystal structure is oriented in a specific direction. Because of this, simply replacing the PZT substrate with a PMN-PT cylinder is not an optimal solution because the crystal orientation does not uniformly align with the circumferential axis of the hydrophone. Therefore, a composite hydrophone that maintains the optimal crystal axis around the hydrophone circumference has been developed. An 11.3 mm diameter composite hydrophone cylinder was fabricated from a single <110> cut PMN-PT rectangular plate. Solid end caps were applied to the cylinder and the sensitivity was directly compared with a solid PZT-5A cylindrical hydrophone of equal dimensions in a hydrophone test tank. The charge sensitivity showed a 9.1 dB improvement over the PZT hydrophone and the voltage sensitivity showed a 3.5 dB improvement. This was in good agreement with the expected theoretical improvements of 10.1 and 4.5 dB, respectively. PMID:23927102

  3. AlN-on-SOI platform-based micro-machined hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghui; Zhang, Xiaolin; Fernando, Sanchitha N.; Chai, Kevin Tshunchuan; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) based micro-machined infrasonic hydrophone. We have conducted a systematic design study for the hydrophone sensor to meet the stringent requirements of underwater applications. The hydrophone sensor was fabricated on a cavity silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate using an in-house CMOS-compatible AlN-on-SOI process platform. A 5 × 5 arrayed hydrophone sensor was characterized thoroughly using an industry-standard hydrophone calibration instrument. The results show that the hydrophone achieved a sound sensitivity of -182.5 dB ± 0.3 dB (ref. to 1 V rms/μPa) and an eligible acceleration sensitivity of only -196.5 dB (ref. to 1 V rms/μg), respectively, a non-linearity of 0.11%, a noise resolution of 57.5 dB referenced to 1 μPa/√Hz within an ultra-low operation bandwidth of 10 Hz˜100 Hz, the highest noise resolution of micro-machined hydrophones reported to date, and better than traditional bulky hydrophones in terms of the same application. The size of the 5 × 5 arrayed hydrophone sensor is about 2 mm × 2 mm.

  4. A Dual Communication and Imaging Underwater Acoustic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tricia C.

    A dual communication and imaging underwater acoustic system is proposed and developed throughout this dissertation. Due to the wide variation in underwater channel characteristics, the research here focuses more on robustness to multipath in the shallow underwater acoustic environment, rather than high bit-rate applications and signaling schemes. Lower bit-rate (in the hundreds of bits per second (bps) to low kbps), applications such as the transfer of ecological telemetry data, e.g. conductivity or temperature data, are the primary focus of this dissertation. The parallels between direct sequence spread spectrum in digital communication and pulse-echo with pulse compression in imaging, and channel estimation in communication and range profile estimation in imaging are drawn, leading to a unified communications and imaging platform. A digital communication algorithm for channel order and channel coefficient estimation and symbol demodulation using Matching Pursuit (MP) with Generalized Multiple Hypothesis Testing (GMHT) is implemented in programmable DSP in real time with field experiment results in varying underwater environments for the single receiver (Rx), single transmitter (Tx) case. The custom and off-the-shelf hardware used in the single receiver, single transmitter set of experiments are detailed as well. This work is then extended to the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) case, and then to the full multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) case. The results of channel estimation are used for simple range profile imaging reconstructions. Successful simulated and experimental results for both transducer array configurations are presented and analyzed. Non-real-time symbol demodulation and channel estimation is performed using experimental data from a scaled testing environment. New hardware based on cost-effective fish-finder transducers for a 6 Rx--1 Tx and 6 Rx--4 Tx transducer array is detailed. Lastly, in an application that is neither communication nor

  5. Acoustic characteristics of externally blown flap systems with mixer nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Dorsch, R. G.; Wagner, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Noise tests were conducted on a large scale, cold flow model of an engine-under-the-wing externally blown flap lift augmentation system employing a mixer nozzle. The mixer nozzle was used to reduce the flap impingement velocity and, consequently, try to attenuate the additional noise caused by the interaction between the jet exhaust and the wing flap. Results from the mixer nozzle tests are summarized and compared with the results for a conical nozzle. The comparison showed that with the mixer nozzle, less noise was generated when the trailing flap was in a typical landing setting (e.g., 60 deg). However, for a takeoff flap setting (20 deg), there was little or no difference in the acoustic characteristics when either the mixer or conical nozzle was used.

  6. Acoustic Filtration, Fractionation, and Mixing in Microfluidic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A; Fisher, K

    2002-02-04

    This project is concerned with the research and development of a technique to manipulate small particles using acoustic energy coupled into a fluid filled plastic or glass sample chamber. These resulting miniaturized systems combine high functionality with an inexpensive, disposable sample chamber. Our approach to this problem is based on a combination of sophisticated modeling tools in conjunction with laboratory experiments. The design methodology is summarized in Figure 1. The process begins by investigating a wide range of device parameters using a one-dimensional analytical approximation. The results of these initial parameter studies are incorporated into a sophisticated three-dimensional multi-physics finite element code. From these simulations the optimized designs are prototyped and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental observations are then used to improve analytical approximations and the process is repeated as necessary.

  7. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  8. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  9. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  10. Diversity of acoustic tracheal system and its role for directional hearing in crickets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sound localization in small insects can be a challenging task due to physical constraints in deriving sufficiently large interaural intensity differences (IIDs) between both ears. In crickets, sound source localization is achieved by a complex type of pressure difference receiver consisting of four potential sound inputs. Sound acts on the external side of two tympana but additionally reaches the internal tympanal surface via two external sound entrances. Conduction of internal sound is realized by the anatomical arrangement of connecting trachea. A key structure is a trachea coupling both ears which is characterized by an enlarged part in its midline (i.e., the acoustic vesicle) accompanied with a thin membrane (septum). This facilitates directional sensitivity despite an unfavorable relationship between wavelength of sound and body size. Here we studied the morphological differences of the acoustic tracheal system in 40 cricket species (Gryllidae, Mogoplistidae) and species of outgroup taxa (Gryllotalpidae, Rhaphidophoridae, Gryllacrididae) of the suborder Ensifera comprising hearing and non hearing species. Results We found a surprisingly high variation of acoustic tracheal systems and almost all investigated species using intraspecific acoustic communication were characterized by an acoustic vesicle associated with a medial septum. The relative size of the acoustic vesicle - a structure most crucial for deriving high IIDs - implies an important role for sound localization. Most remarkable in this respect was the size difference of the acoustic vesicle between species; those with a more unfavorable ratio of body size to sound wavelength tend to exhibit a larger acoustic vesicle. On the other hand, secondary loss of acoustic signaling was nearly exclusively associated with the absence of both acoustic vesicle and septum. Conclusion The high diversity of acoustic tracheal morphology observed between species might reflect different steps in the evolution

  11. Acoustic and Thermal Testing of an Integrated Multilayer Insulation and Broad Area Cooling Shield System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Jessica J.; Foster, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    A Multilayer Insulation (MLI) and Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shield thermal control system shows promise for long-duration storage of cryogenic propellant. The NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project is investigating the thermal and structural performance of this tank-applied integrated system. The MLI/BAC Shield Acoustic and Thermal Test was performed to evaluate the MLI/BAC shield's structural performance by subjecting it to worst-case launch acoustic loads. Identical thermal tests using Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) were performed before and after the acoustic test. The data from these tests was compared to determine if any degradation occurred in the thermal performance of the system as a result of exposure to the acoustic loads. The thermal test series consisted of two primary components: a passive boil-off test to evaluate the MLI performance and an active cooling test to evaluate the integrated MLI/BAC shield system with chilled vapor circulating through the BAC shield tubes. The acoustic test used loads closely matching the worst-case envelope of all launch vehicles currently under consideration for CPST. Acoustic test results yielded reasonable responses for the given load. The thermal test matrix was completed prior to the acoustic test and successfully repeated after the acoustic test. Data was compared and yielded near identical results, indicating that the MLI/BAC shield configuration tested in this series is an option for structurally implementing this thermal control system concept.

  12. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Kent, William H.; Mitchell, Peter G.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  13. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Nardi, Anthony P.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  14. Properties of the Acoustic Vector Field in Underwater Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, David R.

    This thesis focuses on the description and measurement of the underwater acoustic field, based on vector properties of acoustic particle velocity. The specific goal is to interpret vector sensor measurements in underwater waveguides, in particular those measurements made in littoral (shallow) waters. To that end, theoretical models, which include the effects of reflections from the waveguide boundaries, are developed for the acoustic intensity, i.e. the product of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity. Vector properties of acoustic intensity are shown to correspond to a non-dimensional vector property of acoustic particle velocity, its degree of circularity, which describes the trajectory of particle motion. Both experimental measurements and simulations of this non-dimensional vector property are used to analyze characteristics of sound propagation in underwater waveguides. Two measurement techniques are utilized in the experiments described in this thesis. In the first, particle velocity is obtained indirectly by time integration of the measured pressure gradient between two closely spaced (with respect to an acoustic wavelength) conventional pressure sensitive hydrophones. This method was used in ocean experiments conducted with vertical line arrays of hydrophones. In the second technique, particle velocity is measured directly by time integration of the signal generated by an accelerometer. An additional pressure measurement from a co-located hydrophone forms what is known as a "combined sensor" in the Russian literature, which allows for estimation of the vector acoustic intensity. This method was utilized mainly in laboratory experiments.

  15. Towards an Automated Acoustic Detection System for Free Ranging Elephants

    PubMed Central

    Zeppelzauer, Matthias; Hensman, Sean; Stoeger, Angela S.

    2015-01-01

    The human-elephant conflict is one of the most serious conservation problems in Asia and Africa today. The involuntary confrontation of humans and elephants claims the lives of many animals and humans every year. A promising approach to alleviate this conflict is the development of an acoustic early warning system. Such a system requires the robust automated detection of elephant vocalizations under unconstrained field conditions. Today, no system exists that fulfills these requirements. In this paper, we present a method for the automated detection of elephant vocalizations that is robust to the diverse noise sources present in the field. We evaluate the method on a dataset recorded under natural field conditions to simulate a real-world scenario. The proposed method outperformed existing approaches and robustly and accurately detected elephants. It thus can form the basis for a future automated early warning system for elephants. Furthermore, the method may be a useful tool for scientists in bioacoustics for the study of wildlife recordings. PMID:25983398

  16. Field performance of an acoustic scour-depth monitoring system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Sheppard, D. Max

    1994-01-01

    The Herbert C. Bonner Bridge over Oregon Inlet serves as the only land link between Bodie and Hatteras Islands, part of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Periodic soundings over the past 30 years have documented channel migration, local scour, and deposition at several pilings that support the bridge. In September 1992, a data-collection system was installed to permit the off-site monitoring of scour at 16 bridge pilings. The system records channel-bed elevations at 15-minute intervals and transmits the data to a satellite receiver. A cellular phone connection also permits downloading and reviewing of the data as they are being collected. A digitally recording, acoustic fathometer is the main component of the system. In November 1993, current velocity, water-surface elevation, wave characteristics, and water temperature measuring instruments were also deployed at the site. Several performance problems relating to the equipment and to the harsh marine environment have not been resolved, but the system has collected and transmitted reliable scour-depth and water-level data.

  17. A wireless data acquisition system for acoustic emission testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, A. T.; Lynch, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    As structural health monitoring (SHM) systems have seen increased demand due to lower costs and greater capabilities, wireless technologies have emerged that enable the dense distribution of transducers and the distributed processing of sensor data. In parallel, ultrasonic techniques such as acoustic emission (AE) testing have become increasingly popular in the non-destructive evaluation of materials and structures. These techniques, which involve the analysis of frequency content between 1 kHz and 1 MHz, have proven effective in detecting the onset of cracking and other early-stage failure in active structures such as airplanes in flight. However, these techniques typically involve the use of expensive and bulky monitoring equipment capable of accurately sensing AE signals at sampling rates greater than 1 million samples per second. In this paper, a wireless data acquisition system is presented that is capable of collecting, storing, and processing AE data at rates of up to 20 MHz. Processed results can then be wirelessly transmitted in real-time, creating a system that enables the use of ultrasonic techniques in large-scale SHM systems.

  18. Methods And Systems For Using Reference Images In Acoustic Image Processing

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Barter, Robert Henry

    2005-01-04

    A method and system of examining tissue are provided in which a field, including at least a portion of the tissue and one or more registration fiducials, is insonified. Scattered acoustic information, including both transmitted and reflected waves, is received from the field. A representation of the field, including both the tissue and the registration fiducials, is then derived from the received acoustic radiation.

  19. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person's identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual's ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications.

  20. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1998-07-28

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person`s identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual`s ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications. 5 figs.

  1. Bowhead whale localization using asynchronous hydrophones in the Chukchi Sea.

    PubMed

    Warner, Graham A; Dosso, Stan E; Hannay, David E; Dettmer, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This paper estimates bowhead whale locations and uncertainties using non-linear Bayesian inversion of their modally-dispersed calls recorded on asynchronous recorders in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska. Bowhead calls were recorded on a cluster of 7 asynchronous ocean-bottom hydrophones that were separated by 0.5-9.2 km. A warping time-frequency analysis is used to extract relative mode arrival times as a function of frequency for nine frequency-modulated whale calls that dispersed in the shallow water environment. Each call was recorded on multiple hydrophones and the mode arrival times are inverted for: the whale location in the horizontal plane, source instantaneous frequency (IF), water sound-speed profile, seabed geoacoustic parameters, relative recorder clock drifts, and residual error standard deviations, all with estimated uncertainties. A simulation study shows that accurate prior environmental knowledge is not required for accurate localization as long as the inversion treats the environment as unknown. Joint inversion of multiple recorded calls is shown to substantially reduce uncertainties in location, source IF, and relative clock drift. Whale location uncertainties are estimated to be 30-160 m and relative clock drift uncertainties are 3-26 ms. PMID:27475129

  2. Improving acoustic streaming effects in fluidic systems by matching SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane layers.

    PubMed

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the use of acoustic waves for promoting and improving streaming in tridimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cuvettes of 15mm width×14mm height×2.5mm thickness. The acoustic waves are generated by a 28μm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) - PVDF - piezoelectric transducer in its β phase, actuated at its resonance frequency: 40MHz. The acoustic transmission properties of two materials - SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - were numerically compared. It was concluded that PDMS inhibits, while SU-8 allows, the transmission of the acoustic waves to the propagation medium. Therefore, by simulating the acoustic transmission properties of different materials, it is possible to preview the acoustic behavior in the fluidic system, which allows the optimization of the best layout design, saving costs and time. This work also presents a comparison between numerical and experimental results of acoustic streaming obtained with that β-PVDF transducer in the movement and in the formation of fluid recirculation in tridimensional closed domains. Differences between the numerical and experimental results are credited to the high sensitivity of acoustic streaming to the experimental conditions and to limitations of the numerical method. The reported study contributes for the improvement of simulation models that can be extremely useful for predicting the acoustic effects of new materials in fluidic devices, as well as for optimizing the transducers and matching layers positioning in a fluidic structure. PMID:27044029

  3. COOMET.AUV.W-S1 supplementary comparison of free-field hydrophone calibrations in the frequency range 250 Hz to 8 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. E.; Yi, Chen; Matveev, A. N.; Zihong, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A description is given of COOMET.AUV.W-S1 supplementary comparison of free-field hydrophone calibrations in the frequency range 250 Hz to 8 kHz between Hangzhou Applied Acoustics Research Institute—a pilot and Russian National Research Institute for Physicotechnical and Radio Engineering Measurements. Two standard hydrophones of TC 4033 and GI 55 were calibrated in this comparison. Reciprocity method, comparison methods, and their facilities were used to assess the current state of free-field hydrophone calibration in the frequency range 250 Hz to 8 kHz of China and Russia. The consistency of calibration results between two participants was confirmed, and the maximum deviation observed was 0.59 dB at frequency 400 Hz. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Bayesian environmental inversion of airgun modal dispersion using a single hydrophone in the Chukchi Sea.

    PubMed

    Warner, Graham A; Dosso, Stan E; Dettmer, Jan; Hannay, David E

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents estimated water-column and seabed parameters and uncertainties for a shallow-water site in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska, from trans-dimensional Bayesian inversion of the dispersion of water-column acoustic modes. Pulse waveforms were recorded at a single ocean-bottom hydrophone from a small, ship-towed airgun array during a seismic survey. A warping dispersion time-frequency analysis is used to extract relative mode arrival times as a function of frequency for source-receiver ranges of 3 and 4 km which are inverted for the water sound-speed profile (SSP) and subbottom geoacoustic properties. The SSP is modeled using an unknown number of sound-speed/depth nodes. The subbottom is modeled using an unknown number of homogeneous layers with unknown thickness, sound speed, and density, overlying a halfspace. A reversible-jump Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm samples the model parameterization in terms of the number of water-column nodes and subbottom interfaces that can be resolved by the data. The estimated SSP agrees well with a measured profile, and seafloor sound speed is consistent with an independent headwave arrival-time analysis. Environmental properties are required to model sound propagation in the Chukchi Sea for estimating sound exposure levels and environmental research associated with marine mammal localization. PMID:26093393

  5. Piezoelectret-based hydrophone: an alternative device for vibro-acoustography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, L. J.; Kamimura, H. A. S.; Altafim, R. A. P.; Carneiro, A. A. O.; Amorim, M. F.; Altafim, R. A. C.

    2015-09-01

    Piezoelectric polymers are highly desirable for ultrasound applications since their low acoustic impedance is much closer to the impedances of air and water than those of traditional piezoceramics. However, the piezoelectric effect observed in these poled polymers is limited to a few dozen picocoulombs per newton and requires very low-noise amplification. A different class of polymeric material known as piezoelectrets, presents piezoelectric effect in the same order of magnitude as those found on piezoceramics. This new class of materials has been explored in a wide range of applications such as flexible keyboards and airborne ultrasound transducers. Based on these polymers, we present here a new transducer for vibro-acoustography (VA), which is an ultrasonic image technique employed in medical diagnosis or material analysis based on ultrasound scattered by a target object. A calibration was carried out using a standard hydrophone, which is normally employed in VA. The average sensitivity of the transducer in the continuous wave mode was 1.712 mV Pa-1(-182.7 dB re 1 V μ Pa-1) with a maximum sensitivity of 18.25 mV Pa-1 (-154.8 dB re 1 V μ Pa-1) at its resonance frequency around 40 kHz. Subsequently, measurements in the burst mode and of directional sensitivity were taken and are presented here together with VA images obtained from a chicken bone and a metal sphere.

  6. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  7. Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

    2010-10-01

    Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

  8. Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Thode, Aaron M; Kim, Katherine H; Norman, Robert G; Blackwell, Susanna B; Greene, Charles R

    2016-04-01

    Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1 km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15 dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones. PMID:27106345

  9. An echolocation visualization and interface system for dolphin research.

    PubMed

    Amundin, Mats; Starkhammar, Josefin; Evander, Mikael; Almqvist, Monica; Lindström, Kjell; Persson, Hans W

    2008-02-01

    The present study describes the development and testing of a tool for dolphin research. This tool was able to visualize the dolphin echolocation signals as well as function as an acoustically operated "touch screen." The system consisted of a matrix of hydrophones attached to a semitransparent screen, which was lowered in front of an underwater acrylic panel in a dolphin pool. When a dolphin aimed its sonar beam at the screen, the hydrophones measured the received sound pressure levels. These hydrophone signals were then transferred to a computer where they were translated into a video image that corresponds to the dynamic sound pressure variations in the sonar beam and the location of the beam axis. There was a continuous projection of the image back onto the hydrophone matrix screen, giving the dolphin an immediate visual feedback to its sonar output. The system offers a whole new experimental methodology in dolphin research and since it is software-based, many different kinds of scientific questions can be addressed. The results were promising and motivate further development of the system and studies of sonar and cognitive abilities of dolphins. PMID:18247918

  10. Fabry Perot polymer film fibre-optic hydrophones and arrays for ultrasound field characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B. T.; Zhang, E. Z.; Laufer, J. G.; Beard, P. C.

    2004-01-01

    An optical ultrasound sensing method based upon the detection of acoustically-induced changes in the optical thickness of a Fabry Perot (FP) polymer film sensing interferometer has been developed as an alternative to piezoelectric based detection methods for ultrasound measurement applications. The technique provides an inherently broadband (~30 MHz) response and excellent detection sensitivities (<10 kPa), comparable to those of piezoelectric PVDF transducers. An important distinguishing feature however is that the sensing geometry is defined by the area of the polymer sensing film that is optically addressed. As a result, very small element sizes can be obtained to provide low directional sensitivity without compromising detection sensitivity—a key advantage over piezoelectric transducers. It also means that, by spatially sampling over a relatively large aperture, a high density ultrasound array can readily be configured. Other advantages are that, the sensing element can be inexpensively batch fabricated using polymer film deposition techniques, has the ability to self-calibrate, is electrically passive and immune to EMI. A range of measurement devices using this type of sensor have now been developed. These include a miniature (0.25 mm o.d.) optical fibre hydrophone for in situ measurements of diagnostic and therapeutic medical ultrasound exposure. By rapidly scanning a focused laser beam over a planar FP sensor, a notional array of 3 cm aperture, 50 µm element size and 200 µm interelement spacing has also been demonstrated for rapid transducer field mapping applications. It is considered that this ability to fabricate acoustically small, highly sensitive receivers in a variety of configurations offers the prospect of developing a valuable new set of ultrasound measurement tools.

  11. Two women with multiple disabilities sharing an acoustic orientation system and traveling together to indoor destinations.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, G E; Mantini, M

    1998-12-01

    This study assessed whether two women with total blindness and profound intellectual disability could share an acoustic orientation system and travel together simultaneously to common indoor destinations to perform occupational and vocational activities. The orientation system provided acoustic cues which indicated the direction to the destinations. Analysis of data indicated that the women were successful in sharing the system and could reach the destinations independently. PMID:10052076

  12. NW-MILO Acoustic Data Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2010-02-17

    There is an enduring requirement to improve our ability to detect potential threats and discriminate these from the legitimate commercial and recreational activity ongoing in the nearshore/littoral portion of the maritime domain. The Northwest Maritime Information and Littoral Operations (NW-MILO) Program at PNNL’s Coastal Security Institute in Sequim, Washington is establishing a methodology to detect and classify these threats - in part through developing a better understanding of acoustic signatures in a near-shore environment. The purpose of the acoustic data collection described here is to investigate the acoustic signatures of small vessels. The data is being recorded continuously, 24 hours a day, along with radar track data and imagery. The recording began in August 2008, and to date the data contains tens of thousands of signals from small vessels recorded in a variety of environmental conditions. The quantity and variety of this data collection, with the supporting imagery and radar track data, makes it particularly useful for the development of robust acoustic signature models and advanced algorithms for signal classification and information extraction. The underwater acoustic sensing system is part of a multi-modal sensing system that is operating near the mouth of Sequim Bay. Sequim Bay opens onto the Straight of Juan de Fuca, which contains part of the border between the U.S. and Canada. Table 1 lists the specific components used for the NW-MILO system. The acoustic sensor is a hydrophone permanently deployed at a mean depth of about 3 meters. In addition to a hydrophone, the other sensors in the system are a marine radar, an electro-optical (EO) camera and an infra-red (IR) camera. The radar is integrated with a vessel tracking system (VTS) that provides position, speed and heading information. The data from all the sensors is recorded and saved to a central server. The data has been validated in terms of its usability for characterizing the

  13. Broadband time reversed acoustic focusing and steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen; Montaldo, Gabriel; Palacio, Delphine; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2001-05-01

    We present results of experimental testing and theoretical modeling of a time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing system based on a multifaceted aluminum resonator with 15 piezoceramic transducers glued to the resonator facets. One of the facets of the resonator, a pentagon with characteristic dimension of about 30 mm, was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array which provided ultrasound focusing and beam steering in a wide frequency band (0.7-3 MHz). Ultrasonic pulses with different carrier frequencies and various complex waveforms were focused; the focal length was varied in the range of 10-55 mm and the focused beam was steered in a range of angles of +/-60 deg. The amplitude of the signal in the focal region reached 40 MPa. A theoretical model was based on an assumption that the radiating part of the resonator works as a phase conjugation screen for a spherical wave radiated from the focal point. Theoretical dependencies of the field structure on the position of the focus point and ultrasound frequency are in a good agreement with experimental results. TRA based focusing of ultrasound has numerous applications in medical diagnostics, surgery and therapy. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  14. Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Transmitter Downsize Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Myjak, Mitchell J.

    2010-04-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the use of an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to reduce the weight and volume of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters while retaining current functionality. Review of the design of current JSATS transmitters identified components that could be replaced by an ASIC while retaining the function of the current transmitter and offering opportunities to extend function if desired. ASIC design alternatives were identified that could meet transmitter weight and volume targets of 200 mg and 100 mm3. If alternatives to the cylindrical batteries used in current JSATS transmitters can be identified, it could be possible to implant ASIC-based JSATS transmitters by injection rather than surgery. Using criteria for the size of fish suitable for surgical implantation of current JSATS transmitters, it was concluded that fish as small as 70 mm in length could be implanted with an ASIC-based transmitter, particularly if implantation by injection became feasible.

  15. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  16. Tsunami Observations on Hydrophones and Island Seismic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, J. A.; Bowman, J. R.; Reasoner, C. L.; Shields, G.

    2007-12-01

    The tsunami generated by the great Indonesian earthquake of 26 December 2004 was recorded across a myriad of technologies, many of which had not been designed, nor expected, to record tsunami signals. We reported on the tsunami signals from this event observed at hydrophones, intended for nuclear test monitoring, and broadband seismometers that are part of the global seismic network (GSN). Our observations led us to examine more recently reported tsunamis and other historic tsunamis. The great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.1) produced high-frequency (greater than 5 mHz) dispersed tsunami signals, in addition to the destructive wave, recorded by hydrophone stations offshore from Diego Garcia and Cape Leeuwin, Australia, and by many seismic stations in the Indian Ocean and on the coast of Antarctica. Dispersed energy was observed to 60 mHz. The details within the dispersed signal provided source information to which tide gauge data are insensitive. The source of high-frequency signals could be determined using event- to-station distances estimated from the dispersion. Fine structure in the tsunami signal indicated a possible secondary high-frequency source. The dispersion observations and modeling also identified individual reflector sources over basin-wide distances. Two other recent tsunamis were observed in the Indian Ocean. The 28 March 2005 earthquake (Mw 8.6) produced high-frequency tsunami waves (to 20 mHz) observed at the Diego Garcia hydrophone station and the AIS seismic station. In addition, the lower frequency, non-dispersed tsunami waves were seen at four other seismic stations. The Mw 7.7 earthquake on 17 July 2006 south of Java also generated high frequency tsunami waves (to 10 mHz). Clear, dispersed signals were observed on hydrophone stations and seismic stations at the Cocos-Keeling Islands, and Casey, Antarctica. The first arriving energy is consistent with a source located at the earthquake epicenter. However, the strongest signals at Cocos

  17. Feature extraction from time domain acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Christine; Goldman, Geoffrey H.

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Army is interested in developing algorithms to classify weapons systems fire based on their acoustic signatures. To support this effort, an algorithm was developed to extract features from acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire and applied to over 1300 signatures. The algorithm filtered the data using standard techniques then estimated the amplitude and time of the first five peaks and troughs and the location of the zero crossing in the waveform. The results were stored in Excel spreadsheets. The results are being used to develop and test acoustic classifier algorithms.

  18. Vector Acoustics, Vector Sensors, and 3D Underwater Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, D.

    2007-12-01

    Vector acoustic data has two more dimensions of information than pressure data and may allow for 3D underwater imaging with much less data than with hydrophone data. The vector acoustic sensors measures the particle motions due to passing sound waves and, in conjunction with a collocated hydrophone, the direction of travel of the sound waves. When using a controlled source with known source and sensor locations, the reflection points of the sound field can be determined with a simple trigonometric calculation. I demonstrate this concept with an experiment that used an accelerometer based vector acoustic sensor in a water tank with a short-pulse source and passive scattering targets. The sensor consists of a three-axis accelerometer and a matched hydrophone. The sound source was a standard transducer driven by a short 7 kHz pulse. The sensor was suspended in a fixed location and the hydrophone was moved about the tank by a robotic arm to insonify the tank from many locations. Several floats were placed in the tank as acoustic targets at diagonal ranges of approximately one meter. The accelerometer data show the direct source wave as well as the target scattered waves and reflections from the nearby water surface, tank bottom and sides. Without resorting to the usual methods of seismic imaging, which in this case is only two dimensional and relied entirely on the use of a synthetic source aperture, the two targets, the tank walls, the tank bottom, and the water surface were imaged. A directional ambiguity inherent to vector sensors is removed by using collocated hydrophone data. Although this experiment was in a very simple environment, it suggests that 3-D seismic surveys may be achieved with vector sensors using the same logistics as a 2-D survey that uses conventional hydrophones. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, program element 61153N.

  19. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. B.

    2010-03-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by Portland District, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used at hydroelectric projects and in the laboratory for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a measurement and calibration system for evaluating the JSATS component, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The system consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated system has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. It provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The measurement and calibration system has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  20. Software for neutrino acoustic detection and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhadef, B.

    2009-06-01

    The evidence of the existing of UHE (E>10eV) cosmic rays and its possible connection to UHE neutrino suggests the building of an acoustic telescope for neutrino, exploiting thermo-acoustic effect. We present software for neutrino acoustic signal detection and localization. The main points discussed here are the sea noise model, the determination of time differences of arrival (TDOA) between hydrophones signals, the source localization algorithm, and the telescope geometry effect. The effect of TDOAs errors and telescope geometry on the localization accuracy is also discussed.

  1. Time and timing in the acoustic recognition system of crickets

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, R. Matthias; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Clemens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The songs of many insects exhibit precise timing as the result of repetitive and stereotyped subunits on several time scales. As these signals encode the identity of a species, time and timing are important for the recognition system that analyzes these signals. Crickets are a prominent example as their songs are built from sound pulses that are broadcast in a long trill or as a chirped song. This pattern appears to be analyzed on two timescales, short and long. Recent evidence suggests that song recognition in crickets relies on two computations with respect to time; a short linear-nonlinear (LN) model that operates as a filter for pulse rate and a longer integration time window for monitoring song energy over time. Therefore, there is a twofold role for timing. A filter for pulse rate shows differentiating properties for which the specific timing of excitation and inhibition is important. For an integrator, however, the duration of the time window is more important than the precise timing of events. Here, we first review evidence for the role of LN-models and integration time windows for song recognition in crickets. We then parameterize the filter part by Gabor functions and explore the effects of duration, frequency, phase, and offset as these will correspond to differently timed patterns of excitation and inhibition. These filter properties were compared with known preference functions of crickets and katydids. In a comparative approach, the power for song discrimination by LN-models was tested with the songs of over 100 cricket species. It is demonstrated how the acoustic signals of crickets occupy a simple 2-dimensional space for song recognition that arises from timing, described by a Gabor function, and time, the integration window. Finally, we discuss the evolution of recognition systems in insects based on simple sensory computations. PMID:25161622

  2. Acoustic challenges of the A400M for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitbach, Harald; Sachau, Delf; Böhme, Sten

    2006-03-01

    In some types of aircraft tonal interior noise with high sound pressure level (up to 110 dB(A)) occurs at low frequencies (f < 500 Hz). Typical examples are propeller driven aircraft, for which the excitation frequencies are given by the blade passage frequency (BPF) and its higher harmonics. The high tonal noise levels at these frequencies can occur due to the fact that the blades' profiles are only optimized in terms of aerodynamics. The acoustic properties are usually not taken into account. In order to obtain an acceptable interior noise level, and to guarantee both work-safety and comfort in the aircraft interiors, passive methods are commonly used - e.g. adding material with high damping or vibration absorbing qualities. Especially when low frequency noise has to be reduced, adding material results in a lot of unwanted additional weight. In order to avoid this extra weight, the concept of active noise reduction (ANR) and tunable vibration absorber systems (TVA), which focus on the unwanted tonal noise, are a good compromise of treating noise and the amount of additional weight in aircraft design. This paper briefly discusses two different possible methods to reduce the low frequency noise. The noise reduction of tuned vibration absorbers (TVA) mounted on the airframe are nowadays commonly used in propeller driven aircraft and can be predicted by vibroacoustic finite element calculations, which is described in this paper. In order to abide to industrial safety regulations, the noise level inside the semi closed loadmaster area (LMA) must be reduced down to a noise level, which is even 8 dB(A) below the specified cargo hold noise level. The paper describes also the phases of development of an ANR system that could be used to control the sound pressure level inside the LMA. The concept is verified by experimental investigations within a mock up of the LMA.

  3. Acoustic-electromagnetic effects of tectonic movements of the crust - borehole survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, V. N.; Malkin, E. I.; Druzhin, G. I.; Sannikov, D. V.; Pukhov, V. M.

    2015-04-01

    Borehole radiophysical properties are briefly described. Borehole investigation of lithosphere acoustic-electromagnetic radiation was carried out in a seismically active region. Four main types of anomalies of acoustic-electromagnetic radiation were distinguished. They correspond to shear and bulk relaxations of tectonic stress. Stability of phase relations of acoustic and electromagnetic signals in the region of anomalies was detected that allows us to state their coherence. It was concluded that the reason of mutual coherence of acoustic and electromagnetic signals is the magnetoelastic effect of the casing pipe. A mechanism of generation of rock self-induced vibrations during tectonic stress relaxation causing acoustic-electromagnetic emission was suggested. It was concluded that "sigmoid" anomalies may correlate with excitation of eigen vibrations in a fracture cavity during brittle shear relaxation of rock tectonic stress. An explanation of the change of anomalous "sigmoid" signal frequency was given. It is considered to be the result of growth of rock fracture cavity and the decrease of tectonic stress relaxation. It was concluded that a borehole, cased in a steel pipe, together with a system of inductance coils and a hydrophone is the effective sounding sensor for acoustic fields of interior deep layers. It may be applied to investigate and to monitor the geodynamic activity, in particular, in earthquake forecasts and in monitoring of hydrocarbon deposits during their production.

  4. A review of underwater acoustic systems and methods for locating objects lost at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Information related to the location of objects lost at sea is presented. Acoustic devices attached to an object prior to being transported is recommended as a homing beacon. Minimum requirements and some environmental constraints are defined. Methods and procedures for search and recovery are also discussed. Both an interim system and a more advanced system are outlined. Controlled acoustic emission to enhance security is the theme followed.

  5. High-power acoustic insult to living cultured cells as studied by high-frequency scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2002-06-01

    A plurality of articles discussing combined effects of acoustic high-pressure (mechanical factor) and heat (thermal factor) caused by acoustic vibration on biological tissues and cells has been published. Herein, we contribute the preliminary results describing the behavior of living human skin cells when separately applying shock waves and thermal insult to them. First, we gradually increased temperature of a culturing medium from 37.5 to 52 degree(s)C using the heat plate with temperature controller, and carried out in-situ observation of the cells grown on a substrate via the medium using a scanning acoustic microscope. Second, we provided the pressure using high power ultrasonic pulses generated by a laser induced ultrasonic shock wave system to the cells, wherein the pressure caused by the pulses was measured by a hydrophone, and wherein temperature was monitored by thermocouples. The cells were observed just after giving the impact. The difference between phenomena indicating cellular insult and injury (e.g., shrinkage or lift-off) were clearly visualized by the scanning acoustic microscope with frequency at 1.0 GHz.

  6. Feasibility of tracking fish with acoustic transmitters in the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, John M; Deng, Z Daniel; Martinez, Jayson J; Trumbo, Bradly A; Mueller, Robert P; Weiland, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) has been used at many dams but has never been deployed in the near-dam tailrace environment. The use of JSATS in the tailrace is of interest to fishery managers to evaluate downstream passage behavior of juvenile salmonids and dam approach behavior of upstream migrating adult salmon and lamprey. The acoustic noise level and detection range of JSATS were studied to determine the feasibility of deploying JSATS in the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace. The noise level measured from the powerhouse deck was less than 104 dB re 1 μPa except for the turbine outlet near the spillway, and 350 m downstream of the dam, the noise level was less than 106 dB. The measured noise levels would allow a theoretical detection range of 100 m to 350 m and 85 m to 320 m, respectively. Validation experiments showed that the detection range is 113 to 184 m using hydrophones deployed from the powerhouse deck and 148 m using hydrophones deployed 500 m downstream of the dam. PMID:24522516

  7. Feasibility of Tracking Fish with Acoustic Transmitters in the Ice Harbor Dam Tailrace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, John M.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Martinez, Jayson J.; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) has been used at many dams but has never been deployed in the near-dam tailrace environment. The use of JSATS in the tailrace is of interest to fishery managers to evaluate downstream passage behavior of juvenile salmonids and dam approach behavior of upstream migrating adult salmon and lamprey. The acoustic noise level and detection range of JSATS were studied to determine the feasibility of deploying JSATS in the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace. The noise level measured from the powerhouse deck was less than 104 dB re 1 μPa except for the turbine outlet near the spillway, and 350 m downstream of the dam, the noise level was less than 106 dB. The measured noise levels would allow a theoretical detection range of 100 m to 350 m and 85 m to 320 m, respectively. Validation experiments showed that the detection range is 113 to 184 m using hydrophones deployed from the powerhouse deck and 148 m using hydrophones deployed 500 m downstream of the dam.

  8. Feasibility of Tracking Fish with Acoustic Transmitters in the Ice Harbor Dam Tailrace

    PubMed Central

    Ingraham, John M.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Martinez, Jayson J.; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) has been used at many dams but has never been deployed in the near-dam tailrace environment. The use of JSATS in the tailrace is of interest to fishery managers to evaluate downstream passage behavior of juvenile salmonids and dam approach behavior of upstream migrating adult salmon and lamprey. The acoustic noise level and detection range of JSATS were studied to determine the feasibility of deploying JSATS in the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace. The noise level measured from the powerhouse deck was less than 104 dB re 1 μPa except for the turbine outlet near the spillway, and 350 m downstream of the dam, the noise level was less than 106 dB. The measured noise levels would allow a theoretical detection range of 100 m to 350 m and 85 m to 320 m, respectively. Validation experiments showed that the detection range is 113 to 184 m using hydrophones deployed from the powerhouse deck and 148 m using hydrophones deployed 500 m downstream of the dam. PMID:24522516

  9. Development and Evaluation of New Coupling System for Lower Limb Prostheses with Acoustic Alarm System

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Arezoo; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ahmadian, Jalil; Rahmati, Bizhan; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with lower limb amputation need a secure suspension system for their prosthetic devices. A new coupling system was developed that is capable of suspending the prosthesis. The system's safety is ensured through an acoustic alarm system. This article explains how the system works and provides an in vivo evaluation of the device with regard to pistoning during walking. The system was designed to be used with silicone liners and is based on the requirements of prosthetic suspension systems. Mechanical testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The pistoning during walking was measured using a motion analysis system. The new coupling device produced significantly less pistoning compared to a common suspension system (pin/lock). The safety alarm system would buzz if the suspension was going to fail. The new coupling system could securely suspend the prostheses in transtibial amputees and produced less vertical movement than the pin/lock system. PMID:23881340

  10. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  11. Estimating animal population density using passive acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Martin, Stephen W; Mellinger, David K; Ward, Jessica A; Moretti, David J; Harris, Danielle; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Reliable estimation of the size or density of wild animal populations is very important for effective wildlife management, conservation and ecology. Currently, the most widely used methods for obtaining such estimates involve either sighting animals from transect lines or some form of capture-recapture on marked or uniquely identifiable individuals. However, many species are difficult to sight, and cannot be easily marked or recaptured. Some of these species produce readily identifiable sounds, providing an opportunity to use passive acoustic data to estimate animal density. In addition, even for species for which other visually based methods are feasible, passive acoustic methods offer the potential for greater detection ranges in some environments (e.g. underwater or in dense forest), and hence potentially better precision. Automated data collection means that surveys can take place at times and in places where it would be too expensive or dangerous to send human observers. Here, we present an overview of animal density estimation using passive acoustic data, a relatively new and fast-developing field. We review the types of data and methodological approaches currently available to researchers and we provide a framework for acoustics-based density estimation, illustrated with examples from real-world case studies. We mention moving sensor platforms (e.g. towed acoustics), but then focus on methods involving sensors at fixed locations, particularly hydrophones to survey marine mammals, as acoustic-based density estimation research to date has been concentrated in this area. Primary among these are methods based on distance sampling and spatially explicit capture-recapture. The methods are also applicable to other aquatic and terrestrial sound-producing taxa. We conclude that, despite being in its infancy, density estimation based on passive acoustic data likely will become an important method for surveying a number of diverse taxa, such as sea mammals, fish, birds

  12. Estimating animal population density using passive acoustics.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Martin, Stephen W; Mellinger, David K; Ward, Jessica A; Moretti, David J; Harris, Danielle; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-05-01

    Reliable estimation of the size or density of wild animal populations is very important for effective wildlife management, conservation and ecology. Currently, the most widely used methods for obtaining such estimates involve either sighting animals from transect lines or some form of capture-recapture on marked or uniquely identifiable individuals. However, many species are difficult to sight, and cannot be easily marked or recaptured. Some of these species produce readily identifiable sounds, providing an opportunity to use passive acoustic data to estimate animal density. In addition, even for species for which other visually based methods are feasible, passive acoustic methods offer the potential for greater detection ranges in some environments (e.g. underwater or in dense forest), and hence potentially better precision. Automated data collection means that surveys can take place at times and in places where it would be too expensive or dangerous to send human observers. Here, we present an overview of animal density estimation using passive acoustic data, a relatively new and fast-developing field. We review the types of data and methodological approaches currently available to researchers and we provide a framework for acoustics-based density estimation, illustrated with examples from real-world case studies. We mention moving sensor platforms (e.g. towed acoustics), but then focus on methods involving sensors at fixed locations, particularly hydrophones to survey marine mammals, as acoustic-based density estimation research to date has been concentrated in this area. Primary among these are methods based on distance sampling and spatially explicit capture-recapture. The methods are also applicable to other aquatic and terrestrial sound-producing taxa. We conclude that, despite being in its infancy, density estimation based on passive acoustic data likely will become an important method for surveying a number of diverse taxa, such as sea mammals, fish, birds

  13. An AUV underwater acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Spain, Gerald L.; Lepper, Paul A.; Zimmerman, Richard

    2002-11-01

    An eight-element hydrophone array has been installed within the shroud of an Odyssey IIb AUV. Each array channel is digitized and recorded with 10-kHz bandwidth by an autonomous, PC-104+ data acquisition system. To determine the effects of the AUV body itself on the acoustic field measured by the array, tones at low (200-800 Hz) and mid- (2-8 kHz) frequencies were transmitted in a large water tank to the AUV by a source continuously varying in azimuth but fixed range. Bartlett beamforming for source azimuth using both plane wave replicas and replicas calculated using a 2-D time domain, finite-difference code that accounts for the scattering from the two glass spheres in the AUV shows that (1) not accounting for scattering results in 2- to 6-dB signal gain degradation, but (2) scattering moves the ambiguity surface sidelobes closer to the main lobe location, thus improving localization capability. The effect of scattering from the AUV on an azimuthally isotropic noise field, estimated by averaging over pings at all azimuths, is a decrease in spatial coherence at low frequencies over that in free space, thus increasing detection capability. [Work supported by ONR.

  14. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M. Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS. PMID:22319288

  15. Design and instrumentation of a measurement and calibration system for an acoustic telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS. PMID:22319288

  16. Calibration of a pipe hydrophone through bedload traps in a glacierized mountain basin (Saldur river, Eastern Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agnese, Andrea; Huincache, Carolina; Mao, Luca; Comiti, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The quantification of sediment transport in small mountain basins is of great relevance to assess the morphological and ecological dynamics of the entire channel network and as well as to predict flood hazards. Bedload transport in small mountain basins is highly variable in space and time due to the complexity of flow resistance sources, to the marked non-uniformity of bed sediments, to the relevance of bed armouring, as well as to varying activity and connectivity of the different sediment sources at the basin scale. In high-elevation, glaciarized basins, seasonal variability in sediment transport is known to be dramatic, but despite the relevance of such basins in many regions worldwide, very few investigations have tried to quantify it. Unfortunately, the measurement of bedload transport via direct methods is time-consuming and practically challenging at high flows. Therefore, indirect surrogate methods for bedload transport allowing its continuous measurements over time are highly desirable. Nonetheless these have to be calibrated to provide reliable estimations. This study focuses on the calibration of a pipe hydrophone in the recently established (spring 2011) monitoring station in the Saldur basin, a high-elevation glacierized watershed in the Eastern Italian Alps (18.6 km2 drainage area, about 3 km2 covered by the glacier). The hydrophone is a 0.5 m-long steel pipe closed at both ends, air-filled, with one microphone at one end, and it was developed and built in Japan. Sediment particles hitting the pipe induce an acoustic wave which is registered by the microphone. The wave is then amplified and transmitted through 6 channels, each having a different sensitivity, so that small impacts due to little particles and bigger impacts generated by coarser material are both recorded. The hydrophone was installed at about 2100 m a.s.l. within a wood log spanning the 2.9 m wide channel, where a rounded slot had been previously carved to allow half of the pipe

  17. Acoustic Characterization and Impact Sensing for Ceramic Thermal Protection Systems (TPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhr, S. J.; Reibel, R.; Sathish, S.; Jata, K. V.

    2006-03-06

    A study was conducted to understand acoustic wave propagation characteristics in a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) wrapped tile thermal protection system (CMC+ Foam+ RTV+ SIP+ RTV+ Al) and ceramic foam. Sound velocities were measured in three orthogonal directions on the above material. The attenuation coefficients were also determined for a uncoated ceramic foam. Commercially available standard acoustic emission transducers, piezo-wafers and polymer based PVDF (polyvinylidiene fluoride) film were employed in the experiments to acquire the acoustic data. The performance characteristics of these sensors will be discussed in light of impact detection. Variation in the wave propagation characteristics along different directions and the role of processing in causing anisotropic acoustic properties in thermal protection systems will be discussed.

  18. Influence of viscoelastic property on laser-generated surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi; Xu Baiqiang

    2011-04-01

    Taking account of the viscoelasticity of materials, the pulsed laser generation of surface acoustic waves in coating-substrate systems has been investigated quantitatively by using the finite element method. The displacement spectra of the surface acoustic waves have been calculated in frequency domain for different coating-substrate systems, in which the viscoelastic properties of the coatings and substrates are considered separately. Meanwhile, the temporal displacement waveforms have been obtained by applying inverse fast Fourier transforms. The numerical results of the normal surface displacements are presented for different configurations: a single plate, a slow coating on a fast substrate, and a fast coating on a slow substrate. The influences of the viscoelastic properties of the coating and the substrate on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves have been studied. In addition, the influence of the coating thickness on the attenuation of the surface acoustic waves has been also investigated in detail.

  19. The Hebrew Vowel System: Raw and Normalized Acoustic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Amir, Ofer; Tobin, Yishai

    2000-01-01

    Identified the acoustic features of the vowels produced by Hebrew speakers differing in age and sex. Ninety speakers were recorded. Vowels were presented in a nonword context that was placed in a meaningful Hebrew sentence. Results are discussed. (Author/VWL)

  20. Eliminating Nonlinear Acoustical Effects From Thermoacoustic Refrigeration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Steven L.; Smith, Robert W. M.; Poese, Matthew E.

    2006-05-01

    Nonlinear acoustical effects dissipate energy that degrades thermoacoustic refrigerator performance. The largest of these effects occur in acoustic resonators and include shock formation; turbulence and boundary layer disruption; and entry/exit (minor) losses induced by changes in resonator cross-sectional area. Effects such as these also make the creation of accurate performance models more complicated. Suppression of shock formation by intentional introduction of resonator anharmonicity has been common practice for the past two decades. Recent attempts to increase cooling power density by increasing pressure amplitudes has required reduction of turbulence and minor loss by using an new acousto-mechanical resonator topology. The hybrid resonator still stores potential energy in the compressibility of the gaseous working fluid, but stores kinetic energy in the moving (solid) mass of the motor and piston. This talk will first present nonlinear acoustical loss measurements obtained in a "conventional" double-Helmholtz resonator geometry (TRITON) that dissipated four kilowatts of acoustic power. We will then describe the performance of the new "bellows bounce" resonator configuration and "vibromechanical multiplier" used in the first successful implementation of this approach that created an ice cream freezer produced at Penn State for Ben & Jerry's.

  1. Prediction of Acoustic Loads Generated by Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Linamaria; Allgood, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center is one of the nation's premier facilities for conducting large-scale rocket engine testing. As liquid rocket engines vary in size, so do the acoustic loads that they produce. When these acoustic loads reach very high levels they may cause damages both to humans and to actual structures surrounding the testing area. To prevent these damages, prediction tools are used to estimate the spectral content and levels of the acoustics being generated by the rocket engine plumes and model their propagation through the surrounding atmosphere. Prior to the current work, two different acoustic prediction tools were being implemented at Stennis Space Center, each having their own advantages and disadvantages depending on the application. Therefore, a new prediction tool was created, using NASA SP-8072 handbook as a guide, which would replicate the same prediction methods as the previous codes, but eliminate any of the drawbacks the individual codes had. Aside from replicating the previous modeling capability in a single framework, additional modeling functions were added thereby expanding the current modeling capability. To verify that the new code could reproduce the same predictions as the previous codes, two verification test cases were defined. These verification test cases also served as validation cases as the predicted results were compared to actual test data.

  2. Geo-acoustic inversion with a vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenghua; Zhang, Renhe; Sun, Mei

    2012-11-01

    Geo-acoustic inversion has been paid much attention in the last several decades. Various geo-acoustic inversion methods based on hydrophone arrays have been developed. However, few studies on inverting the bottom parameters with a vector sensor array have been performed. In this paper, theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that in comparison with pressure, the vertical particle velocity has different spatial distribution, which can provide more information for geo-acoustic inversion. Two geo-acoustic inversion methods, based on coherent and incoherent matched field processing with a vector sensor array, have been developed. To establish the validity of the proposed methods, a shallow water experiment was performed in 2009. The experimental data indicates that the uncertainty of the inversion results is decreased by the coherent inversion method with a vector sensor array in comparison with the results obtained by a hydrophone array only.

  3. A survey on acoustic signature recognition and classification techniques for persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Alkilani, Amjad

    2012-06-01

    Application of acoustic sensors in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS) has received considerable attention over the last two decades because they can be rapidly deployed and have low cost. Conventional utilization of acoustic sensors in PSS spans a wide range of applications including: vehicle classification, target tracking, activity understanding, speech recognition, shooter detection, etc. This paper presents a current survey of physics-based acoustic signature classification techniques for outdoor sounds recognition and understanding. Particularly, this paper focuses on taxonomy and ontology of acoustic signatures resulted from group activities. The taxonomy and supportive ontology considered include: humanvehicle, human-objects, and human-human interactions. This paper, in particular, exploits applicability of several spectral analysis techniques as a means to maximize likelihood of correct acoustic source detection, recognition, and discrimination. Spectral analysis techniques based on Fast Fourier Transform, Discrete Wavelet Transform, and Short Time Fourier Transform are considered for extraction of features from acoustic sources. In addition, comprehensive overviews of most current research activities related to scope of this work are presented with their applications. Furthermore, future potential direction of research in this area is discussed for improvement of acoustic signature recognition and classification technology suitable for PSS applications.

  4. AMADEUS—The acoustic neutrino detection test system of the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cassano, B.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Chon Sen, N.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Le Provost, H.; Lefèvre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2011-01-01

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic sensors, installed at water depths between 2050 and 2300 m, employ piezo-electric elements for the broad-band recording of signals with frequencies ranging up to 125 kHz. The typical sensitivity of the sensors is around -145 dB re 1 V/μPa (including preamplifier). Completed in May 2008, AMADEUS consists of six “acoustic clusters”, each comprising six acoustic sensors that are arranged at distances of roughly 1 m from each other. Two vertical mechanical structures (so-called lines) of the ANTARES detector host three acoustic clusters each. Spacings between the clusters range from 14.5 to 340 m. Each cluster contains custom-designed electronics boards to amplify and digitise the acoustic signals from the sensors. An on-shore computer cluster is used to process and filter the data stream and store the selected events. The daily volume of recorded data is about 10 GB. The system is operating continuously and automatically, requiring only little human intervention. AMADEUS allows for extensive studies of both transient signals and ambient noise in the deep sea, as well as signal correlations on several length scales and localisation of acoustic point sources. Thus the system is excellently suited to assess the background conditions for the measurement of the bipolar pulses expected to originate from neutrino interactions.

  5. Nano-optomechanical system based on microwave frequency surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Semere Ayalew

    Cavity optomechnics studies the interaction of cavity confined photons with mechanical motion. The emergence of sophisticated nanofabrication technology has led to experimental demonstrations of a wide range of novel optomechanical systems that exhibit strong optomechanical coupling and allow exploration of interesting physical phenomena. Many of the studies reported so far are focused on interaction of photons with localized mechanical modes. For my doctoral research, I did experimental investigations to extend this study to propagating phonons. I used surface travelling acoustic waves as the mechanical element of my optomechanical system. The optical cavities constitute an optical racetrack resonator and photonic crystal nanocavity. This dissertation discusses implementation of this surface acoustic wave based optomechanical system and experimental demonstrations of important consequences of the optomechanical coupling. The discussion focuses on three important achievements of the research. First, microwave frequency surface acoustic wave transducers were co-integrated with an optical racetrack resonator on a piezoelectric aluminum nitride film deposited on an oxidized silicon substrate. Acousto-optic modulation of the resonance modes at above 10 GHz with the acoustic wavelength significantly below the optical wavelength was achieved. The phase and modal matching conditions in this paradigm were investigated for efficient optmechanical coupling. Second, the optomechanical coupling was pushed further into the sideband resolved regime by integrating the high frequency surface acoustic wave transducers with a photonic crystal nanocavity. This device was used to demonstrate optomecahnically induced transparency and absorption, one of the interesting consequences of cavity optomechanics. Phase coherent interaction of the acoustic wave with multiple nanocavities was also explored. In a related experiment, the photonic crystal nanoscavity was placed inside an acoustic

  6. Characterization of a 40-MHz Focused Transducer with a Fiber Grating Laser Hydrophone

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Sien-Ting; Shao, Li-Yang; Chan, Helen Lai-Wa; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; Hu, Chang-Hong; Kim, Hyung-Ham; Liu, Ruibin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    A novel fiber-optic hydrophone based on a dual-polarization, short-cavity fiber grating laser as the sensing element is described. Wet chemical etching was used to fabricate a thinned fiber sensor to extend its frequency response as well as spatial resolution. The lateral beam profile at the focal plane of a 40-MHz lens-focused lithium niobate (LiNbO3) transducer was measured with the fiber sensor, and a tomographic technique was used to compute the transducer profile, which is compared with that obtained by a PVDF hydrophone. The fiber hydrophone has a sensitivity of approximately −259 dB re 1V/µPa up to 40 MHz, which is higher than that of a commercial PVDF hydrophone. Moreover, it is capable of accurately characterizing the beam generated by high-frequency transducer. PMID:19126496

  7. Effect of orientation of euphausiids and copepods on acoustic target strength: Implications for measurements from down-looking and side-looking acoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutor, Malinda; Cowles, Timothy J.

    2001-05-01

    Multifrequency acoustics is a potentially useful tool for zooplankton ecologists to rapidly map distributional patterns and determine taxonomic and size composition of scatterers. This is typically done with down-looking or side-looking acoustic systems. The ability to estimate taxonomic and size composition acoustically depends upon accurate models of scattering from zooplankton. In this study, distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) models of individual zooplankton were used to illustrate that the frequency dependence of expected scattering is different for down-looking and side-looking acoustic systems due to the differences in orientation of scatters within the sampled volume. The results show that peaks and nulls occur at different frequencies for each system with maximum target strength differences of 30 dB. The models were used to predict volume scattering (SV) based on zooplankton collected from MOCNESS tows. Predicted SV was compared to SV measured by both a down-looking HTI acoustic system and a side-looking TAPS. The results showed that changes in orientation can have large effects on predicted total SV, particularly at higher frequencies, and demonstrate that choice of orientation parameters is important and different parameters should be used when comparing predicted SV with measured SV from down-looking or side-looking acoustic systems.

  8. A system for acoustical and optical analysis of encapsulated microbubbles at ultrahigh hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Zhushma, Aleksandr; Lebedeva, Natalia; Sen, Pabitra; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    Acoustics are commonly used for borehole (i.e., oil well) imaging applications, under conditions where temperature and pressure reach extremes beyond that of conventional medical ultrasonics. Recently, there has been an interest in the application of encapsulated microbubbles as borehole contrast agents for acoustic assessment of fluid composition and flow. Although such microbubbles are widely studied under physiological conditions for medical imaging applications, to date there is a paucity of information on the behavior of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles at high pressures. One major limitation is that there is a lack of experimental systems to assess both optical and acoustic data of micrometer-sized particles data at these extremes. In this paper, we present the design and application of a high-pressure cell designed for acoustical and optical studies of microbubbles at hydrostatic pressures up to 27.5 MPa (271 atm). PMID:23742587

  9. Acoustic monitoring of earthquakes along the Blanco Transform Fault zone and Gorda Plate and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, Robert Paul

    Hydroacoustic tertiary (T-) waves are seismically generated acoustic waves that propagate over great distances in the ocean sound channel with little loss in signal strength. Hydrophone recorded T-waves can provide a lower earthquake detection threshold and an improved epicenter location accuracy for oceanic earthquakes than land-based seismic networks. Thus detection and location of NE Pacific ocean earthquakes along the Blanco Transform Fault (BTFZ) and Gorda plate using the U.S. Navy's SOSUS (SOund SUrveillance System) hydrophone arrays afford greater insight into the current state of stress and crustal deformation mechanics than previously available. Acoustic earthquake information combined with bathymetry, submersible observations, earthquake source- parameter estimates, petrologic samples, and water-column chemistry renders a new tectonic view of the southern Juan de Fuca plate boundaries. Chapter 2 discusses development of seismo-acoustic analysis techniques using the well-documented April 1992 Cape Mendocino earthquake sequence. Findings include a hydrophone detection threshold estimate (M ~ 2.4), and T-wave propagation path modeling to approximate earthquake acoustic source energy. Empirical analyses indicate that acoustic energy provides a reasonable magnitude and seismic moment estimate of oceanic earthquakes not detected by seismic networks. Chapters 3 documents a probable volcanogenic T-wave event swarm along a pull-apart basin within the western BTFZ during January 1994. Response efforts yielded evidence of anomalous water-column 3He concentrations, pillow- lava volcanism, and the first discovery of active hydrothermal vents along an oceanic fracture zone. Chapter 4 discusses the detection of a NE-SW trending microearthquake band along the mid-Gorda plate which was active from initiation of SOSUS recording in August 1991 through July 1992, then abruptly ceased. It is proposed that eventual termination of the Gorda plate seismicity band is due to

  10. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  11. Acoustic performance evaluation of an advanced UH-1 helicopter main rotor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, D. R.; Conner, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the high-speed impulsive noise characteristics of an advanced main rotor system for the UH-1 helicopter has been conducted. Models of both the advanced main rotor system and the UH-1 main rotor system were tested at one-quarter scale in the Langley 4- by 7-meter (V/STOL) Tunnel using the General Rotor Model System (GRMS). Tests were conducted over a range of simulated flight and descent velocities. The tunnel was operated in the open-throat configuration with acoustic treatment to improve the acoustic characteristics of the test chamber. In-plane acoustic measurements of the high-speed impulsive noise demonstrated a 7 to 8 dB reduction in noise generation is available by using the advanced rotor system on the UH-1 helicopter.

  12. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy) debris flow monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgaro, A.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys).

  13. Measurements of acoustic pressure at high amplitudes and intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L. A.; Bailey, M. R.; Kaczkowski, P.; McAteer, J. A.; Pishchalnikov, Y. A.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2004-01-01

    In our research group, we desire measurements of the large pressure amplitudes generated by the shock waves used in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the large acoustic intensities used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Conventional piezoelectric or PVDF hydrophones can not be used for such measurements as they are damaged either by cavitation, in SWL applications, or heat, in HIFU applications. In order to circumvent these difficulties, we have utilized optical fiber hydrophones in SWL that do not cavitate, and small glass probes and a scattering technique for measurements of large HIFU intensities. Descriptions of these techniques will be given as well as some typical data.

  14. Fricative Consonants: AN Articulatory, Acoustic, and Systems Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the articulatory and acoustic details of human speech is crucial for better understanding and modeling of our speech production mechanisms. Such knowledge is important for the development of high-quality speech synthesis, low bit rate speech coding, and improved automatic speech recognition strategies. This dissertation addresses the analysis and modeling of fricatives, a class of speech sounds characterized by turbulence generation in the vocal tract. Extensive data were collected using novel measurement techniques from four phonetically-trained native talkers of American English. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provided a detailed characterization of the 3D geometry of the human vocal-tract shapes and dimensions. Dynamic electropalatography (EPG) was useful for analyzing inter - and intra-speaker variabilities while high-quality recordings provided acoustic data necessary for modeling. Results showed similarities in the general vocal -tract shapes and the corresponding area-function patterns, across subjects. The vocal-tract dimensions showed, however, significant inter-subject differences which are related to differences in the corresponding acoustic spectra. These differences are attributed to variabilities both in the individual's oral morphology and in the way a particular consonant may be articulated. Distinct tongue body shapes were associated with the different fricative places of articulation. For example, the anterior tongue body shapes were concave for the alveolar fricatives and flat/convex in the postalveolars, implying differences in their aerodynamics. Voiced lingual fricatives showed a tendency towards enlarged supraglottal volumes due to tongue-root advancement. Results of the acoustic modeling indicate that a linear source-filter model is fairly adequate for capturing the essential spectral characteristics of sustained fricatives below 10 kHz. The hybrid source models employed a combination of acoustic monopole and dipole

  15. Acoustic gaze adjustments during active target selection in echolocating porpoises.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Johnson, Mark; Beedholm, Kristian; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2012-12-15

    Visually dominant animals use gaze adjustments to organize perceptual inputs for cognitive processing. Thereby they manage the massive sensory load from complex and noisy scenes. Echolocation, as an active sensory system, may provide more opportunities to control such information flow by adjusting the properties of the sound source. However, most studies of toothed whale echolocation have involved stationed animals in static auditory scenes for which dynamic information control is unnecessary. To mimic conditions in the wild, we designed an experiment with captive, free-swimming harbor porpoises tasked with discriminating between two hydrophone-equipped targets and closing in on the selected target; this allowed us to gain insight into how porpoises adjust their acoustic gaze in a multi-target dynamic scene. By means of synchronized cameras, an acoustic tag and on-target hydrophone recordings we demonstrate that porpoises employ both beam direction control and range-dependent changes in output levels and pulse intervals to accommodate their changing spatial relationship with objects of immediate interest. We further show that, when switching attention to another target, porpoises can set their depth of gaze accurately for the new target location. In combination, these observations imply that porpoises exert precise vocal-motor control that is tied to spatial perception akin to visual accommodation. Finally, we demonstrate that at short target ranges porpoises narrow their depth of gaze dramatically by adjusting their output so as to focus on a single target. This suggests that echolocating porpoises switch from a deliberative mode of sensorimotor operation to a reactive mode when they are close to a target. PMID:23175527

  16. A Galerkin method for linear PDE systems in circular geometries with structural acoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A Galerkin method for systems of PDE's in circular geometries is presented with motivating problems being drawn from structural, acoustic, and structural acoustic applications. Depending upon the application under consideration, piecewise splines or Legendre polynomials are used when approximating the system dynamics with modifications included to incorporate the analytic solution decay near the coordinate singularity. This provides an efficient method which retains its accuracy throughout the circular domain without degradation at singularity. Because the problems under consideration are linear or weakly nonlinear with constant or piecewise constant coefficients, transform methods for the problems are not investigated. While the specific method is developed for the two dimensional wave equations on a circular domain and the equation of transverse motion for a thin circular plate, examples demonstrating the extension of the techniques to a fully coupled structural acoustic system are used to illustrate the flexibility of the method when approximating the dynamics of more complex systems.

  17. An acoustic dual filter in the audio frequencies with two local resonant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-qun; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shu-yi; Fan, Li

    2014-08-01

    We report an acoustic dual filter to realize the sound regulation in the audio frequency range, in which resonant vibrations of two membrane-air and metal-elastomer systems generate two sound transmission peaks and a sound blocking below 3000 Hz. The local vibrational profiles manifest that the transmission peak at lower frequency is mainly dependent on the resonant vibration of the membrane-air system, and the coupling vibrations of two systems generate the blocking frequency and transmission peak at higher frequency. Importantly, two transmission peaks can be controlled independently. It is feasible to realize the acoustic device in sound shield and dual filters.

  18. Development of an accelerometer-based underwater acoustic intensity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kang; Gabrielson, Thomas B.; Lauchle, Gerald C.

    2004-12-01

    An underwater acoustic intensity sensor is described. This sensor derives acoustic intensity from simultaneous, co-located measurement of the acoustic pressure and one component of the acoustic particle acceleration vector. The sensor consists of a pressure transducer in the form of a hollow piezoceramic cylinder and a pair of miniature accelerometers mounted inside the cylinder. Since this sensor derives acoustic intensity from measurement of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle acceleration, it is called a p-a intensity probe. The sensor is ballasted to be nearly neutrally buoyant. It is desirable for the accelerometers to measure only the rigid body motion of the assembled probe and for the effective centers of the pressure sensor and accelerometer to be coincident. This is achieved by symmetric disposition of a pair of accelerometers inside the ceramic cylinder. The response of the intensity probe is determined by comparison with a reference hydrophone in a predominantly reactive acoustic field. .

  19. Exhaust System Experiments at NASA's AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the planned testing in the AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab (AAPL) in the coming 15 months. It was stressed in the presentation that these are plans that are subject to change due to changes in funding and/or programmatic direction. The first chart shows a simplified schedule of test entries with funding sponsor and dates for each. In subsequent charts are pages devoted to the Objectives and Issues with each test entry, along with a graphic intended to represent the test activity. The chart for each test entry also indicates sponsorship of the activity, and a contact person.!

  20. Statistical analysis of storm electrical discharges reconstituted from a lightning mapping system, a lightning location system, and an acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Defer, Eric; Rison, William; Schulz, Wolfgang; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment project, a field campaign devoted to the study of electrical activity during storms took place in the south of France in 2012. An acoustic station composed of four microphones and four microbarometers was deployed within the coverage of a Lightning Mapping Array network. On the 26 October 2012, a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Fifty-six natural thunder events, due to cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes, were recorded. This paper studies the acoustic reconstruction, in the low frequency range from 1 to 40 Hz, of the recorded flashes and their comparison with detections from electromagnetic networks. Concurrent detections from the European Cooperation for Lightning Detection lightning location system were also used. Some case studies show clearly that acoustic signal from thunder comes from the return stroke but also from the horizontal discharges which occur inside the clouds. The huge amount of observation data leads to a statistical analysis of lightning discharges acoustically recorded. Especially, the distributions of altitudes of reconstructed acoustic detections are explored in detail. The impact of the distance to the source on these distributions is established. The capacity of the acoustic method to describe precisely the lower part of nearby cloud-to-ground discharges, where the Lightning Mapping Array network is not effective, is also highlighted.

  1. Identifying individual sperm whales acoustically using self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioup, Juliette W.; Ioup, George E.

    2005-09-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) is a consortium at Stennis Space Center comprising the University of New Orleans, the University of Southern Mississippi, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. LADC deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summer of 2001 to study ambient noise and marine mammals. Each LADC EARS was an autonomous, self-recording buoy capable of 36 days of continuous recording of a single channel at an 11.7-kHz sampling rate (bandwidth to 5859 Hz). The hydrophone selected for this analysis was approximately 50 m from the bottom in a water depth of 800 m on the continental slope off the Mississippi River delta. This paper contains recent analysis results for sperm whale codas recorded during a 3-min period. Results are presented for the identification of individual sperm whales from their codas, using the acoustic properties of the clicks within each coda. The recorded time series, the Fourier transform magnitude, and the wavelet transform coefficients are each used separately with a self-organizing map procedure for 43 codas. All show the codas as coming from four or five individual whales. [Research supported by ONR.

  2. Aircraft IR/acoustic detection evaluation. Volume 2: Development of a ground-based acoustic sensor system for the detection of subsonic jet-powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of a ground-based acoustic sensor system for the detection of subsonic jet-powered aircraft is described and specified. The acoustic detection system performance criteria will subsequently be used to determine target detection ranges for the subject contract. Although the defined system has never been built and demonstrated in the field, the design parameters were chosen on the basis of achievable technology and overall system practicality. Areas where additional information is needed to substantiate the design are identified.

  3. Comparison of acoustic and net sampling systems to determine patterns in zooplankton distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutor, Malinda; Cowles, Timothy J.; Peterson, William T.; Lamb, Jesse

    2005-10-01

    An analysis was conducted of the strengths and limitations of acoustic methods to determine biomass and taxonomic distribution patterns over the Oregon continental shelf. Measurements of volume backscatter from two different acoustic instruments were compared with each other and with predicted volume backscatter calculated from a coincident net tow. Spatially and temporally coincident data were collected from a six-frequency bioacoustic system (Tracor Acoustic Profiling System (TAPS)) and from a 1 m2 Multiple Opening Closing Net and Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS). The combined net/acoustic tows were conducted over the Oregon continental shelf in August 2001, during both day and night. The TAPS was mounted on the upper frame of the MOCNESS and ensonified a volume of water directly in front of the net mouth. A four-frequency echosounder (Hydroacoustic Technologies Inc. (HTI)) with downward looking transducers was towed off the port side of the ship during the MOCNESS/TAPS tows. Fine-scale vertical distributions of zooplankton that were resolved acoustically were not apparent within the integrated depth strata of the individual MOCNESS net samples. The taxonomic and size composition of the zooplankton community had strong effects on volume backscatter (SV), although the magnitude of SV was not linearly related to zooplankton biomass. Predicted SV calculated from scattering models and the contents of the MOCNESS nets agreed best (sometimes within 5 dB) with measured SV from the TAPS at 420 and 700 kHz and measured SV at 420 kHz from the HTI.

  4. Perceptual and Acoustic Reliability Estimates for the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Potter, Nancy L.; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    A companion paper describes three extensions to a classification system for paediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). The SDCS uses perceptual and acoustic data reduction methods to obtain information on a speaker's speech, prosody, and voice. The present paper provides reliability estimates for…

  5. Characterization Test Report for the Mnemonics-UCS Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Joshua J.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this testing includes the Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System delivered to KSC: two interrogator (transceiver) systems, four temperature sensors, with wooden mounting blocks, two antennas, two power supplies, network cables, and analysis software. Also included are a number of additional temperature sensors and newly-developed hydrogen sensors

  6. Use of an Acoustic Orientation System for Indoor Travel with a Spatially Disabled Blind Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, G. E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    An acoustic orientation system was developed that employed a portable remote control device keyed to trigger audio tones from modules placed at key locations throughout the user's home and work environments. Results found that the system helped a blind subject to move and work successfully in both settings, and the subject found it easy and…

  7. Acoustic response modeling of energetics systems in confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, David R.; Hixon, Ray; Liou, William W.; Sanford, Matthew

    2007-04-01

    In recent times, warfighting has been taking place not in far-removed areas but within urban environments. As a consequence, the modern warfighter must adapt. Currently, an effort is underway to develop shoulder-mounted rocket launcher rounds suitable with reduced acoustic signatures for use in such environments. Of prime importance is to ensure that these acoustic levels, generated by propellant burning, reflections from enclosures, etc., are at tolerable levels without requiring excessive hearing protection. Presented below is a proof-of-concept approach aimed at developing a computational tool to aid in the design process. Unsteady, perfectly-expanded-jet simulations at two different Mach numbers and one at an elevated temperature ratio were conducted using an existing computational aeroacoustics code. From the solutions, sound pressure levels and frequency spectra were then obtained. The results were compared to sound pressure levels collected from a live-fire test of the weapon. Lastly, an outline of work that is to continue and be completed in the near future will be presented.

  8. FEASIBILITY OF ACOUSTIC METHODS FOR IMPURITY GAS MONITORING IN DRY STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cuta, Judith M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores the feasibility of monitoring impurities in dry storage containers (DSCs) for spent nuclear fuel using non-invasive acoustic sensing. The conceived implementation considers measurements based on changes in acoustic velocity at successive measurement intervals. Uncertainty contributions from the measurement system and temperature variability are estimated. Sources of temperature variability considered include changes in the decay heat source over time and ambient temperature variation. The results show that performance of a system which does not incorporate temperature compensation will be dependent upon geographic location and the decay heat source strength. The results also indicate that an annual measurement interval is optimal.

  9. An iterative algorithm for analysis of coupled structural-acoustic systems subject to random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guo-Zhong; Chen, Gang; Kang, Zhan

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyzes the random response of structural-acoustic coupled systems. Most existing works on coupled structural-acoustic analysis are limited to systems under deterministic excitations due to high computational cost required by a random response analysis. To reduce the computational burden involved in the coupled random analysis, an iterative procedure based on the Pseudo excitation method has been developed. It is found that this algorithm has an overwhelming advantage in computing efficiency over traditional methods, as demonstrated by some numerical examples given in this paper.

  10. Time dependent inflow-outflow boundary conditions for 2D acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Myers, Michael K.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the number and form of the required inflow-outflow boundary conditions for the full two-dimensional time-dependent nonlinear acoustic system in subsonic mean flow is performed. The explicit predictor-corrector method of MacCormack (1969) is used. The methodology is tested on both uniform and sheared mean flows with plane and nonplanar sources. Results show that the acoustic system requires three physical boundary conditions on the inflow and one on the outflow boundary. The most natural choice for the inflow boundary conditions is judged to be a specification of the vorticity, the normal acoustic impedance, and a pressure gradient-density gradient relationship normal to the boundary. Specification of the acoustic pressure at the outflow boundary along with these inflow boundary conditions is found to give consistent reliable results. A set of boundary conditions developed earlier, which were intended to be nonreflecting is tested using the current method and is shown to yield unstable results for nonplanar acoustic waves.

  11. Seismic airgun sounds recorded on moored hydrophones near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, D. K.; Nieukirk, S. L.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.; Fox, C. G.

    2003-12-01

    Sounds of seismic airguns were detected in two years of data collected from large, remote areas near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR). From February 1999-February 2001, six autonomous hydrophones were moored near the MAR between 15-35 N and 33-50 W, and six more were moored in the EPR between 8 N - 8 S and 95-110 W. Continuous acoustic data recovered from both arrays were examined for sounds associated with seismic airgun activity. This was done using an automatic detection algorithm designed to identify repetitive sounds in the 20-60 Hz band. Airgun impulses occurred every 10-20 s and were recorded frequently on all hydrophones. In the Atlantic, airgun activity peaked in the summer months, and airgun impulses were detected in nearly 100% of the hours examined; Pacific seasonal trends were less obvious. Because of the high source level of the airgun signals, it was possible to estimate the locations of ships conducting seismic surveys despite their great distance, often over 3,000 km from our array. In the Atlantic, we located seismic vessels, presumably commercial, working off the coast of Nova Scotia during summer, and off western Africa and northeast Brazil in spring, summer,and fall. During summer 1999, research airguns were recorded on the MAR near 26 N 50 W. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the predominant source of airgun sounds was seismic vessels in the nearshore waters of southern Ecuador and northern Peru. All of the areas in which intense airgun activity was detected include important habitat for marine mammals; one area included habitat of the critically endangered northern right whale. Sounds from airguns appear to be a major contributor to the sound field in the Atlantic and parts of the Pacific Ocean, and may be of concern given the recent interest in ocean noise and its effects on marine mammals. Acoustic pressure levels of earthquakes are also investigated, and received levels in some common marine mammal habitats are

  12. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  13. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  14. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  15. Passive tracking of multiple diving sperm whales using single hydrophones at two mobile locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahl, Rajendar; Nakatani, Takeshi; Ura, Tamaki; Kojima, Junichi; Fukuchi, Tetsuo; Sakata, Masao; Nose, Yoshiaki; Ura, Junya; Mori, Kyoichi; Sugimatsu, Harumi; Yanagisawa, Masao; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2001-05-01

    A simple method using only two hydrophones, each loosely deployed from separate mobile platforms, has been developed to simultaneously track several vocalizing sperm whales. The separation distance of several hundred meters between the hydrophones implies that a particular whale could present vastly different beam orientations towards them, thus precluding use of any specific relationship between the click signal levels at the two locations for the purpose of whale localization. This method utilizes time-of-arrival of the direct clicks and their surface reflections and matches them at the two hydrophone locations. Whales are segregated on the basis of the set of observed time delays. Click parameters such as interpulse interval and average click frequency are proposed to be used as secondary data for the purpose of track refinement. Depth profile of the whales is obtained independent of the separation distance between the two hydrophones. However, knowledge of the separation distance between the hydrophones provides the 3D coordinates of the whales within a left-right ambiguity. Whale tracks have been obtained using actual data collected off Ogasawara Islands in Japan. These results demonstrate the utility of this method for studying the bioacoustics and behavior of deep diving sperm whales.

  16. Acoustic field interaction with a boiling system under terrestrial gravity and microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sitter, J S; Snyder, T J; Chung, J N; Marston, P L

    1998-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments from a platinum wire heater in FC-72 liquid were conducted under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, both with and without the presence of a high-intensity acoustic standing wave within the fluid. The purpose of this research was to study the interaction between an acoustic field and a pool boiling system in normal gravity and microgravity. The absence of buoyancy in microgravity complicates the process of boiling. The acoustic force on a vapor bubble generated from a heated wire in a standing wave was shown to be able to play the role of buoyancy in microgravity. The microgravity environment was achieved with 0.6 and 2.1-s drop towers. The sound was transmitted through the fluid medium by means of a half wavelength sonic transducer driven at 10.18 kHz. At high enough acoustic pressure amplitudes cavitation and streaming began playing an important role in vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. Several different fixed heat fluxes were chosen for the microgravity experiment and the effects of acoustics on the surface temperature of the heater were recorded and the vapor bubble movement was filmed. Video images of the pool boiling processes and heat transfer data are presented. PMID:9821335

  17. The Doppler Effect based acoustic source separation for a wayside train bearing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Shangbin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-01-01

    Wayside acoustic condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for train bearings depend on acquired acoustic signals, which consist of mixed signals from different train bearings with obvious Doppler distortion as well as background noises. This study proposes a novel scheme to overcome the difficulties, especially the multi-source problem in wayside acoustic diagnosis system. In the method, a time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) strategy is applied to weaken the Heisenberg's uncertainty limit for a signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) of high resolution. Due to the Doppler Effect, the signals from different bearings have different time centers even with the same frequency. A Doppler feature matching search (DFMS) algorithm is then put forward to locate the time centers of different bearings in the TFD spectrogram. With the determined time centers, time-frequency filters (TFF) are designed with thresholds to separate the acoustic signals in the time-frequency domain. Then the inverse STFT (ISTFT) is taken and the signals are recovered and filtered aiming at each sound source. Subsequently, a dynamical resampling method is utilized to remove the Doppler Effect. Finally, accurate diagnosis for train bearing faults can be achieved by applying conventional spectrum analysis techniques to the resampled data. The performance of the proposed method is verified by both simulated and experimental cases. It shows that it is effective to detect and diagnose multiple defective bearings even though they produce multi-source acoustic signals.

  18. Acoustic and optical multi-sensor threat detection system for border patrol against aerial threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsawadi, Motasem S.; Ismail, Ahmad; Al-Azem, Badeea F.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Alghamdi, Sultan; Alghamdi, Mansour

    2012-10-01

    Saudi Arabia has borders covering over 4,300 km that are shared with seven countries. Such large borders pose many challenges for security and patrol. Thermal imagers are considered the most reliable means of threat detection, however, they are quite costly, which can prevent using them over large areas. This work discusses a multi-sensor acoustic and optical implementation for threat detection as an effort to reduce system cost. The acoustic sensor provides position and direction recognition by using a four microphone setup. The data analysis of field tests will be discussed in this work.

  19. Acoustic natural frequency analysis of tree-structure pipeline systems by personal computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Györi, I.; Joó, Gy.

    1986-02-01

    The paper gives the extension of the Schmidt-Kuhlmann method for reciprocating compressor pipeline systems having a tree-structure, consisting of receivers and pipes with an optional number of branchings. It gives a generalized algorithm which makes it possible to mechanize program constructing for the purpose of determining acoustic natural frequencies of complex structures, and it illustrates the use of personal computers—besides the actual numerical calculations—for automatic program-writing as well. The program developed is very useful in design practice for determining the effects caused by modification of the geometric dimensions, and it permits one to shift and avoid harmful acoustic resonances in preliminary planning.

  20. Response of a thermal barrier system to acoustic excitation in a gas turbine nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, W.S. Jr.; Blevins, R.D.

    1980-11-01

    A gas turbine located within a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) induces high acoustic sound pressure levels into the primary coolant (helium). This acoustic loading induces high cycle fatigue stresses which may control the design of the thermal barrier system. This study examines the dynamic response of a thermal barrier configuration consisting of a fibrous insulation compressed against the reactor vessel by a coverplate which is held in position by a central attachment fixture. The results of dynamic vibration analyses indicate the effect of the plate size and curvature and the attachment size on the response of the thermal barrier.

  1. Opti-acoustic stereo imaging: on system calibration and 3-D target reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Negahdaripour, Shahriar; Sekkati, Hicham; Pirsiavash, Hamed

    2009-06-01

    Utilization of an acoustic camera for range measurements is a key advantage for 3-D shape recovery of underwater targets by opti-acoustic stereo imaging, where the associated epipolar geometry of optical and acoustic image correspondences can be described in terms of conic sections. In this paper, we propose methods for system calibration and 3-D scene reconstruction by maximum likelihood estimation from noisy image measurements. The recursive 3-D reconstruction method utilized as initial condition a closed-form solution that integrates the advantages of two other closed-form solutions, referred to as the range and azimuth solutions. Synthetic data tests are given to provide insight into the merits of the new target imaging and 3-D reconstruction paradigm, while experiments with real data confirm the findings based on computer simulations, and demonstrate the merits of this novel 3-D reconstruction paradigm. PMID:19380272

  2. Micro-battery Development for Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Honghao; Cartmell, Samuel S.; Wang, Qiang; Lozano, Terence J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Li, Huidong; Chen, Xilin; Yuan, Yong; Gross, Mark E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-21

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) project supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has yielded the smallest acoustic fish tag transmitter commercially available to date. In order to study even smaller fish populations and make the transmitter injectable by needles, the JSATS acoustic micro transmitter needs to be further downsized. This study focuses on the optimization of microbattery design based on Li/CFx chemistry. Through appropriate modifications, a steady high-rate pulse current with desirable life time has been achieved while the weight and volume of the battery is largely reduced. The impedance variation in as-designed microbatteries is systematically compared with that of currently used watch batteries in JSATS with an attempt to understand the intrinsic factors that control the performances of microbatteries under the real testing environments.

  3. Dynamical energy analysis for built-up acoustic systems at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, D J; Giani, S; Tanner, G

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods for describing the intensity distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave fields in the high frequency asymptotic limit are often based on flow transport equations. Common techniques are statistical energy analysis, employed mostly in the context of vibro-acoustics, and ray tracing, a popular tool in architectural acoustics. Dynamical energy analysis makes it possible to interpolate between standard statistical energy analysis and full ray tracing, containing both of these methods as limiting cases. In this work a version of dynamical energy analysis based on a Chebyshev basis expansion of the Perron-Frobenius operator governing the ray dynamics is introduced. It is shown that the technique can efficiently deal with multi-component systems overcoming typical geometrical limitations present in statistical energy analysis. Results are compared with state-of-the-art hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin finite element simulations. PMID:21895083

  4. Adaptations of Acoustic Technology for Detection of Hidden Insect Infestations in Trees and Their Root Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insects that attack the trunks and roots of trees are difficult to detect and control because the tree structures hide and protect them. The vibrations caused by insects moving and feeding within the root systems can travel over long distances; consequently, acoustic technology is a likely candidat...

  5. Designing an Acoustic Suspension Speaker System in the General Physics Laboratory: A Divergent experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Philip B.

    1969-01-01

    Describes a student laboratory project involving the design of an "acoustic suspension speaker system. The characteristics of the loudspeaker used are measured as an extension of the inertia-balance experiment. The experiment may be extended to a study of Stelmholtz resonators, coupled oscillators, electromagnetic forces, thermodynamics and…

  6. A Mobile Acoustic Subsurface Sensing (MASS) System for Rapid Roadway Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yifeng; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Yinghong; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2013-01-01

    Surface waves are commonly used for vibration-based nondestructive testing for infrastructure. Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) has been used to detect subsurface properties for geologic inspections. Recently, efforts were made to scale down these subsurface detection approaches to see how they perform on small-scale structures such as concrete slabs and pavements. Additional efforts have been made to replace the traditional surface-mounted transducers with non-contact acoustic transducers. Though some success has been achieved, most of these new approaches are inefficient because they require point-to-point measurements or off-line signal analysis. This article introduces a Mobile Acoustic Subsurface Sensing system as MASS, which is an improved surface wave based implementation for measuring the subsurface profile of roadways. The compact MASS system is a 3-wheeled cart outfitted with an electromagnetic impact source, distance register, non-contact acoustic sensors and data acquisition/processing equipment. The key advantage of the MASS system is the capability to collect measurements continuously at walking speed in an automatic way. The fast scan and real-time analysis advantages are based upon the non-contact acoustic sensing and fast air-coupled surface wave analysis program. This integration of hardware and software makes the MASS system an efficient mobile prototype for the field test. PMID:23698266

  7. Interaction of reed and acoustic resonator in clarinetlike systems.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fabrice; Kergomard, Jean; Vergez, Christophe; Gilbert, Joël

    2008-11-01

    Sound emergence in clarinetlike instruments is investigated in terms of instability of the static regime. Various models of reed-bore coupling are considered, from the pioneering work of Wilson and Beavers ["Operating modes of the clarinet," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 56, 653-658 (1974)] to more recent modeling including viscothermal bore losses and vena contracta at the reed inlet. The pressure threshold above which these models may oscillate as well as the frequency of oscillation at threshold are calculated. In addition to Wilson and Beavers' previous conclusions concerning the role of the reed damping in the selection of the register the instrument will play on, the influence of the reed motion induced flow is also emphasized, particularly its effect on playing frequencies, contributing to reduce discrepancies between Wilson and Beavers' experimental results and theory, despite discrepancies still remain concerning the pressure threshold. Finally, analytical approximations of the oscillating solution based on Fourier series expansion are obtained in the vicinity of the threshold of oscillation. This allows to emphasize the conditions which determine the nature of the bifurcation (direct or inverse) through which the note may emerge, with therefore important consequences on the musical playing performances. PMID:19045811

  8. An investigation of thermally driven acoustical oscillations in helium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    The phenomenon of thermal-acoustic oscillation is seen to arise spontaneously in gas columns subjected to steep temperature gradients, particularly in tubes connecting liquid helium reservoirs with the ambient environment. This if often the arrangement for installed cryogenic instrumentation and is accompanied by undesirably large heat transfer rates to the cold region. Experimental data are collected and matched to theoretical predictions of oscillatory behavior; these results are in good agreement with the analytical model and with previously collected data. The present experiment places the open ends of oscillating tubes of the various lengths and cross sections in communication with flowing helium in the subcooled, 2-phase, or superheated state while the other ends are maintained at some controlled, elevated temperature. Assorted cold end conditions are achieved through adjustments to the Fermilab Tevatron satellite test refrigerator to which the test cryostat is connected. The warm, closed ends of the tubes are maintained by isothermal baths of liquid nitrogen, ice water, and boiling water. The method is contrasted to previous arrangements whereby tubes are run from room temperature into or adjacent to a stagnant pool of liquid helium. Additionally, the effect of pulsations in the flowing helium stream is explored through operation of the refrigerator's wet and dry expanders during data collection. These data confirm the theory to which try were compared and support its use in the design of cryogenic sensing lines for avoidance of thermoacoustic oscillation.

  9. Coded acoustic wave sensors and system using time diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for distinguishing between sensors that are to be wirelessly detected is provided. An interrogator device uses different, distinct time delays in the sensing signals when interrogating the sensors. The sensors are provided with different distinct pedestal delays. Sensors that have the same pedestal delay as the delay selected by the interrogator are detected by the interrogator whereas other sensors with different pedestal delays are not sensed. Multiple sensors with a given pedestal delay are provided with different codes so as to be distinguished from one another by the interrogator. The interrogator uses a signal that is transmitted to the sensor and returned by the sensor for combination and integration with the reference signal that has been processed by a function. The sensor may be a surface acoustic wave device having a differential impulse response with a power spectral density consisting of lobes. The power spectral density of the differential response is used to determine the value of the sensed parameter or parameters.

  10. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J.; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation—based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking—to reduce the dimensions of images—and binarization—to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements. PMID:26091392

  11. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation-based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking-to reduce the dimensions of images-and binarization-to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements. PMID:26091392

  12. Acoustic-Modal Testing of the Ares I Launch Abort System Attitude Control Motor Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Fischbach, Sean R.

    2010-01-01

    The Attitude Control Motor (ACM) is being developed for use in the Launch Abort System (LAS) of NASA's Ares I launch vehicle. The ACM consists of a small solid rocket motor and eight actuated pintle valves that directionally allocate.thrust_- 1t.has-been- predicted-that significant unsteady. pressure.fluctuations.will.exist. inside the-valves during operation. The dominant frequencies of these oscillations correspond to the lowest several acoustic natural frequencies of the individual valves. An acoustic finite element model of the fluid volume inside the valve has been critical to the prediction of these frequencies and their associated mode shapes. This work describes an effort to experimentally validate the acoustic finite model of the valve with an acoustic modal test. The modal test involved instrumenting a flight-like valve with six microphones and then exciting the enclosed air with a loudspeaker. The loudspeaker was configured to deliver broadband noise at relatively high sound pressure levels. The aquired microphone signals were post-processed and compared to results generated from the acoustic finite element model. Initial comparisons between the test data and the model results revealed that additional model refinement was necessary. Specifically, the model was updated to implement a complex impedance boundary condition at the entrance to the valve supply tube. This boundary condition models the frequency-dependent impedance that an acoustic wave will encounter as it reaches the end of the supply tube. Upon invoking this boundary condition, significantly improved agreement between the test data and the model was realized.

  13. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  14. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data Processing System manual [ADCP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cote, Jessica M.; Hotchkiss, Frances S.; Martini, Marinna; Denham, Charles R.; revisions by Ramsey, Andree L.; Ruane, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This open-file report describes the data processing software currently in use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC), to process time series of acoustic Doppler current data obtained by Teledyne RD Instruments Workhorse model ADCPs. The Sediment Transport Instrumentation Group (STG) at the WHCMSC has a long-standing commitment to providing scientists high quality oceanographic data published in a timely manner. To meet this commitment, STG has created this software to aid personnel in processing and reviewing data as well as evaluating hardware for signs of instrument malfunction. The output data format for the data is network Common Data Form (netCDF), which meets USGS publication standards. Typically, ADCP data are recorded in beam coordinates. This conforms to the USGS philosophy to post-process rather than internally process data. By preserving the original data quality indicators as well as the initial data set, data can be evaluated and reprocessed for different types of analyses. Beam coordinate data are desirable for internal and surface wave experiments, for example. All the code in this software package is intended to run using the MATLAB program available from The Mathworks, Inc. As such, it is platform independent and can be adapted by the USGS and others for specialized experiments with non-standard requirements. The software is continuously being updated and revised as improvements are required. The most recent revision may be downloaded from: http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/operations/stg/Pubs/ADCPtools/adcp_index.htm The USGS makes this software available at the user?s discretion and responsibility.

  15. Developing a system for blind acoustic source localization and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra

    This dissertation presents innovate methodologies for locating, extracting, and separating multiple incoherent sound sources in three-dimensional (3D) space; and applications of the time reversal (TR) algorithm to pinpoint the hyper active neural activities inside the brain auditory structure that are correlated to the tinnitus pathology. Specifically, an acoustic modeling based method is developed for locating arbitrary and incoherent sound sources in 3D space in real time by using a minimal number of microphones, and the Point Source Separation (PSS) method is developed for extracting target signals from directly measured mixed signals. Combining these two approaches leads to a novel technology known as Blind Sources Localization and Separation (BSLS) that enables one to locate multiple incoherent sound signals in 3D space and separate original individual sources simultaneously, based on the directly measured mixed signals. These technologies have been validated through numerical simulations and experiments conducted in various non-ideal environments where there are non-negligible, unspecified sound reflections and reverberation as well as interferences from random background noise. Another innovation presented in this dissertation is concerned with applications of the TR algorithm to pinpoint the exact locations of hyper-active neurons in the brain auditory structure that are directly correlated to the tinnitus perception. Benchmark tests conducted on normal rats have confirmed the localization results provided by the TR algorithm. Results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of this source localization can be as high as the micrometer level. This high precision localization may lead to a paradigm shift in tinnitus diagnosis, which may in turn produce a more cost-effective treatment for tinnitus than any of the existing ones.

  16. Detachable Acoustofluidic System for Particle Separation via a Traveling Surface Acoustic Wave.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Collins, David J; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Components in biomedical analysis tools that have direct contact with biological samples, especially biohazardous materials, are ideally discarded after use to prevent cross-contamination. However, a conventional acoustofluidic device is typically a monolithic integration that permanently bonds acoustic transducers with microfluidic channels, increasing processing costs in single-use platforms. In this study, we demonstrate a detachable acoustofluidic system comprised of a disposable channel device and a reusable acoustic transducer for noncontact continuous particle separation via a traveling surface acoustic wave (TSAW). The channel device can be placed onto the SAW transducer with a high alignment tolerance to simplify operation, is made entirely of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and does not require any additional coupling agent. A microstructured pillar is used to couple acoustic waves into the fluid channel for noncontact particle manipulation. We demonstrate the separation of 10 and 15 μm particles at high separation efficiency above 98% in a 49.5 MHz TSAW using the developed detachable acoustofluidic system. Its disposability and ease of assembly should enable broad use of noncontact, disposable particle manipulation techniques in practical biomedical applications related to sample preparation. PMID:27086552

  17. Visualizing underwater acoustic matched-field processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lawrence; Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Karahalios, Margarida; Heitmeyer, Richard

    1991-06-01

    Matched-field processing is a new technique for processing ocean acoustic data measured by an array of hydrophones. It produces estimates of the location of sources of acoustic energy. This method differs from source localization techniques in other disciplines in that it uses the complex underwater acoustic environment to improve the accuracy of the source localization. An unexplored problem in matched-field processing has been to separate multiple sources within a matched-field ambiguity function. Underwater acoustic processing is one of many disciplines where a synthesis of computer graphics and image processing is producing new insight. The benefits of different volume visualization algorithms for matched-field display are discussed. The authors show how this led to a template matching scheme for identifying a source within the matched-field ambiguity function that can help move toward an automated source localization process.

  18. Experimental and theoretical identification of a four- acoustic-inputs/two-vibration-outputs hearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, P. A.

    1999-07-01

    A cricket's ear is a directional acoustic sensor. It has a remarkable level of sensitivity to the direction of sound propagation in a narrow frequency bandwidth of 4-5 KHz. Because of its complexity, the directional sensitivity has long intrigued researchers. The cricket's ear is a four-acoustic-inputs/two-vibration-outputs system. In this dissertation, this system is examined in depth, both experimentally and theoretically, with a primary goal to understand the mechanics involved in directional hearing. Experimental identification of the system is done by using random signal processing techniques. Theoretical identification of the system is accomplished by analyzing sound transmission through complex trachea of the ear. Finally, a description of how the cricket achieves directional hearing sensitivity is proposed. The fundamental principle involved in directional heating of the cricket has been utilized to design a device to obtain a directional signal from non- directional inputs.

  19. Estimating suspended sediment using acoustics in a fine-grained riverine system, Kickapoo Creek at Bloomington, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manaster, Amanda D.; Domanski, Marian M.; Straub, Timothy D.; Boldt, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic technologies have the potential to be used as a surrogate for measuring suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). This potential was examined in a fine-grained (97-100 percent fines) riverine system in central Illinois by way of installation of an acoustic instrument. Acoustic data were collected continuously over the span of 5.5 years. Acoustic parameters were regressed against SSC data to determine the accuracy of using acoustic technology as a surrogate for measuring SSC in a fine-grained riverine system. The resulting regressions for SSC and sediment acoustic parameters had coefficients of determination ranging from 0.75 to 0.97 for various events and configurations. The overall Nash-Sutcliffe model-fit efficiency was 0.95 for the 132 observed and predicted SSC values determined using the sediment acoustic parameter regressions. The study of using acoustic technologies as a surrogate for measuring SSC in fine-grained riverine systems is ongoing. The results at this site are promising in the realm of surrogate technology.

  20. Detection of Mantle and Core P- Arrivals, and Analysis of T-waves, Recorded on Ocean Sound-Channel Hydrophones Along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (10°-35°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R.; Haxel, J.; Matsumoto, H.; Fowler, M.; Fox, C.; Smith, D.; Bohnenstiehl, D.; Tolstoy, M.

    2002-12-01

    consistent with acoustic conversion of seismic phases at the seafloor interface and propagation through the water-column. One goal of this study is to use the regional P- arrivals to estimate Pn velocity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 10° and 35°N. The hydrophone arrays provide a unique opportunity to measure Pn velocities in the Atlantic Ocean upper mantle due to the difficulty in placing seismometers on the seafloor for an extended period of time. At this time, a preliminary MAR Pn velocity of 7.9 +/- 0.1 km/sec has been estimated from only 17 Pn arrival times. It is anticipated that with more arrival data we will be able to quantify variations in Pn velocity along the east and west sides of the MAR and southward along the MAR from the Azore hotspot.

  1. Operational experience with a long-range, multi-channel acoustic telemetry system

    SciTech Connect

    High, G.; Carman, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the design, installation, and long-term operation of a modular subsea acoustic data acquisition system in the Duncan/Argyll field, North Sea. This equipment is presently providing on-demand pressure data from eight satellite locations at ranges in excess of seven kilometres. The discussion covers the use of in-field noise measurements for optimizing system performance in a high noise environment. Two main sections cover firstly platform installation and seabed installation of the subsea transceiver. Secondly at the remote wellhead locations, the acoustic transponders are described. Cost factors, as compared with hardwired or diver-monitored data acquisition systems are discussed. Modular design permits convenient addition of other data channels and/or extra remote subsea units. The surface equipment installed at the platform is software controlled so that display and data logging can be configured according to operator needs. Variations of the same basis system are discussed, as currently in use for subsea pipeline valve actuation, and submersible flowline tow-out instrumentation. Results of several years of operational experience in various offshore applications give confidence that, when properly considered in system design, an acoustic telemetry system can function reliably at useful ranges in the offshore environment.

  2. Tracking sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) dive profiles using a towed passive acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, Aaron

    2004-07-01

    A passive acoustic method is presented for tracking sperm whale dive profiles, using two or three hydrophones deployed as either a vertical or large-aperture towed array. The relative arrival times between the direct and surface-reflected acoustic paths are used to obtain the ranges and depths of animals with respect to the array, provided that the hydrophone depths are independently measured. Besides reducing the number of hydrophones required, exploiting surface reflections simplifies automation of the data processing. Experimental results are shown from 2002 and 2003 cruises in the Gulf of Mexico for two different towed array deployments. The 2002 deployment consisted of two short-aperture towed arrays separated by 170 m, while the 2003 deployment placed an autonomous acoustic recorder in tandem with a short-aperture towed array, and used ship noise to time-align the acoustic data. The resulting dive profiles were independently checked using single-hydrophone localizations, whenever multipath reflections from the ocean bottom could be exploited to effectively create a large-aperture vertical array. This technique may have applications for basic research and for real-time mitigation for seismic airgun surveys.

  3. Tracking sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) dive profiles using a towed passive acoustic array.

    PubMed

    Thode, Aaron

    2004-07-01

    A passive acoustic method is presented for tracking sperm whale dive profiles, using two or three hydrophones deployed as either a vertical or large-aperture towed array. The relative arrival times between the direct and surface-reflected acoustic paths are used to obtain the ranges and depths of animals with respect to the array, provided that the hydrophone depths are independently measured. Besides reducing the number of hydrophones required, exploiting surface reflections simplifies automation of the data processing. Experimental results are shown from 2002 and 2003 cruises in the Gulf of Mexico for two different towed array deployments. The 2002 deployment consisted of two short-aperture towed arrays separated by 170 m, while the 2003 deployment placed an autonomous acoustic recorder in tandem with a short-aperture towed array, and used ship noise to time-align the acoustic data. The resulting dive profiles were independently checked using single-hydrophone localizations, whenever multipath reflections from the ocean bottom could be exploited to effectively create a large-aperture vertical array. This technique may have applications for basic research and for real-time mitigation for seismic airgun surveys. PMID:15295984

  4. The acoustic field of singing humpback whales in the vertical plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Pack, Adam A.; Lammers, Marc O.; Herman, Louis; Andrews, Kimberly; Deakos, Mark

    2003-04-01

    A vertical array of five hydrophones was used to measure the acoustic field of singing humpback whales. Once a singer was located, two swimmers with snorkel gear were deployed to determine the orientation of the whale and to position the boat so that the array could be deployed in front of the whale at a minimum standoff distance of 10 m. The spacing of the hydrophones was 7 m with the deepest hydrophone deployed at depth of 35 m. An 8-channel TASCAM recorder having a bandwidth of 24 kHz was used to record the hydrophone signals. The location of the singer was determined by computing the time of arrival differences between the hydrophone signals. The maximum source level varied between individual units in a song, with values between 180 and 190 dB. The acoustic field determined by considering the relative intensity of higher frequency harmonics in the signals indicate that the sounds are projected in the horizontal direction with the singer's head canted downward 45 to 60°. High-frequency harmonics extended beyond 24 kHz, suggesting that humpback whales may have an upper frequency limit of hearing as high as 24 kHz.

  5. Acoustic containerless experiment system: A non-contact surface tension measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.; Barmatz, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Acoustic Containerless Experiment System (ACES) was flown on STS 41-B in February 1984 and was scheduled to be reflown in 1986. The primary experiment that was to be conducted with the ACES module was the containerless melting and processing of a fluoride glass sample. A second experiment that was to be conducted was the verification of a non-contact surface tension measurement technique using the molten glass sample. The ACES module consisted of a three-axis acoustic positioning module that was inside an electric furnace capable of heating the system above the melting temperature of the sample. The acoustic module is able to hold the sample with acoustic forces in the center of the chamber and, in addition, has the capability of applying a modulating force on the sample along one axis of the chamber so that the molten sample or liquid drop could be driven into one of its normal oscillation modes. The acoustic module could also be adjusted so that it could place a torque on the molten drop and cause the drop to rotate. In the ACES, a modulating frequency was applied to the drop and swept through a range of frequencies that would include the n = 2 mode. A maximum amplitude of the drop oscillation would indicate when resonance was reached and from that data the surface tension could be calculated. For large viscosity samples, a second technique for measuring surface tension was developed. The results of the ACES experiment and some of the problems encountered during the actual flight of the experiment will be discussed.

  6. Accuracy of acoustic velocity metering systems for measurement of low velocity in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Curtis, R.E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) accuracy depends on equipment limitations, the accuracy of acoustic-path length and angle determination, and the stability of the mean velocity to acoustic-path velocity relation. Equipment limitations depend on path length and angle, transducer frequency, timing oscillator frequency, and signal-detection scheme. Typically, the velocity error from this source is about +or-1 to +or-10 mms/sec. Error in acoustic-path angle or length will result in a proportional measurement bias. Typically, an angle error of one degree will result in a velocity error of 2%, and a path-length error of one meter in 100 meter will result in an error of 1%. Ray bending (signal refraction) depends on path length and density gradients present in the stream. Any deviation from a straight acoustic path between transducer will change the unique relation between path velocity and mean velocity. These deviations will then introduce error in the mean velocity computation. Typically, for a 200-meter path length, the resultant error is less than one percent, but for a 1,000 meter path length, the error can be greater than 10%. Recent laboratory and field tests have substantiated assumptions of equipment limitations. Tow-tank tests of an AVM system with a 4.69-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of 9.3 mms/sec, and the field tests of an AVM system with a 20.5-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of a 4 mms/sec. (USGS)

  7. The development of a biomimetic acoustic direction finding system for use on multiple platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligeorges, Socrates; Anderson, David; Browning, Cassandra A.; Cohen, Howard; Freedman, David; Gore, Tyler; Karl, Christian; Kelsall, Sarah; Mountain, David; Nourzad, Marianne; Pu, Yirong; Sandifer, Matt; Xue, Shuwan; Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Hubbard, Allyn

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the flow of scientific and technological achievements beginning with a stationary "small, smart, biomimetic acoustic processor" designed for DARPA that led to a program aimed at acoustic characterization and direction finding for multiple, mobile platforms. ARL support and collaboration has allowed us to adapt the core technology to multiple platforms including a Packbot robotic platform, a soldier worn platform, as well as a vehicle platform. Each of these has varying size and power requirements, but miniaturization is an important component of the program for creating practical systems which we address further in companion papers. We have configured the system to detect and localize gunfire and tested system performance with live fire from numerous weapons such as the AK47, the Dragunov, and the AR15. The ARL-sponsored work has led to connections with Natick Labs and the Future Force Warrior program, and in addition, the work has many and obvious applications to homeland defense, police, and civilian needs.

  8. Sound velocity estimation: A system theoretic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1993-07-30

    A system-theoretic approach is proposed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing a sound velocity profile (SVP) from acoustical hydrophone measurements. This problem is based on a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model. It is shown that this representation can be utilized to investigate the so-called observability of the SVP from noisy measurement data. A model-based processor is developed to extract this information and it is shown that even in cases where limited SVP information is available, the SVP can be estimated using this approach.

  9. DARPA counter-sniper program: Phase 1 Acoustic Systems Demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, Edward M.; Law, David B.; Csanadi, Christina J.

    1997-02-01

    During October 1995 through May 1996, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency sponsored the development of prototype systems that exploit acoustic muzzle blast and ballistic shock wave signatures to accurately predict the location of gunfire events and associated shooter locations using either single or multiple volumetric arrays. The output of these acoustic systems is an estimate of the shooter location and a classification estimate of the caliber of the shooter's weapon. A portable display and control unit provides both graphical and alphanumeric shooter location related information integrated on a two- dimensional digital map of the defended area. The final Phase I Acoustic Systems Demonstration field tests were completed in May. These these tests were held at USMC Base Camp Pendleton Military Operations Urban Training (MOUT) facility. These tests were structured to provide challenging gunfire related scenarios with significant reverberation and multi-path conditions. Special shot geometries and false alarms were included in these tests to probe potential system vulnerabilities and to determine the performance and robustness of the systems. Five prototypes developed by U.S. companies and one Israeli developed prototype were tested. This analysis quantifies the spatial resolution estimation capability (azimuth, elevation and range) of these prototypes and describes their ability to accurately classify the type of bullet fired in a challenging urban- like setting.

  10. Measurements of the horizontal directionality of the ambient acoustic noise in Monterey Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, M. J.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of some of the horizontal characteristics of acoustic ambient noise were carried out in the south-eastern parts of Monterey Bay, California, at a limited number of stations and for a limited number of ambient conditions. Directional hydrophones on buoys located at ranges of two to four miles from shore were used which have a steerable, cardioid-shaped pattern. The beam was successively aimed along the four cardinal directions and the frequency spectrum of the output was obtained. The frequency range of the system response was from 10 to 2500 Hz. Results are presented in the form of differences between the spectral energy bins in each direction and the average over all directions. Experimental difficulties with sonobuoy reliability prevented collection of extensive data. Some tentative conclusions are drawn from the results.

  11. Investigation of an acoustical holography system for real-time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecht, Barbara A.; Andre, Michael P.; Garlick, George F.; Shelby, Ronald L.; Shelby, Jerod O.; Lehman, Constance D.

    1998-07-01

    A new prototype imaging system based on ultrasound transmission through the object of interest -- acoustical holography -- was developed which incorporates significant improvements in acoustical and optical design. This system is being evaluated for potential clinical application in the musculoskeletal system, interventional radiology, pediatrics, monitoring of tumor ablation, vascular imaging and breast imaging. System limiting resolution was estimated using a line-pair target with decreasing line thickness and equal separation. For a swept frequency beam from 2.6 - 3.0 MHz, the minimum resolution was 0.5 lp/mm. Apatite crystals were suspended in castor oil to approximate breast microcalcifications. Crystals from 0.425 - 1.18 mm in diameter were well resolved in the acoustic zoom mode. Needle visibility was examined with both a 14-gauge biopsy needle and a 0.6 mm needle. The needle tip was clearly visible throughout the dynamic imaging sequence as it was slowly inserted into a RMI tissue-equivalent breast biopsy phantom. A selection of human images was acquired in several volunteers: a 25 year-old female volunteer with normal breast tissue, a lateral view of the elbow joint showing muscle fascia and tendon insertions, and the superficial vessels in the forearm. Real-time video images of these studies will be presented. In all of these studies, conventional sonography was used for comparison. These preliminary investigations with the new prototype acoustical holography system showed favorable results in comparison to state-of-the-art pulse-echo ultrasound and demonstrate it to be suitable for further clinical study. The new patient interfaces will facilitate orthopedic soft tissue evaluation, study of superficial vascular structures and potentially breast imaging.

  12. Multipoint dynamically reconfigure adaptive distributed fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense) system for condition based maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Connie; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes preliminary results obtained under a Navy SBIR contract by Redondo Optics Inc. (ROI), in collaboration with Northwestern University towards the development and demonstration of a next generation, stand-alone and fully integrated, dynamically reconfigurable, adaptive fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense™) system for the in-situ unattended detection and localization of shock events, impact damage, cracks, voids, and delaminations in new and aging critical infrastructures found in ships, submarines, aircraft, and in next generation weapon systems. ROI's FAESense™ system is based on the integration of proven state-of-the-art technologies: 1) distributed array of in-line fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors sensitive to strain, vibration, and acoustic emissions, 2) adaptive spectral demodulation of FBG sensor dynamic signals using two-wave mixing interferometry on photorefractive semiconductors, and 3) integration of all the sensor system passive and active optoelectronic components within a 0.5-cm x 1-cm photonic integrated circuit microchip. The adaptive TWM demodulation methodology allows the measurement of dynamic high frequnency acoustic emission events, while compensating for passive quasi-static strain and temperature drifts. It features a compact, low power, environmentally robust 1-inch x 1-inch x 4-inch small form factor (SFF) package with no moving parts. The FAESense™ interrogation system is microprocessor-controlled using high data rate signal processing electronics for the FBG sensors calibration, temperature compensation and the detection and analysis of acoustic emission signals. Its miniaturized package, low power operation, state-of-the-art data communications, and low cost makes it a very attractive solution for a large number of applications in naval and maritime industries, aerospace, civil structures, the oil and chemical industry, and for homeland security applications.

  13. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  14. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  15. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  16. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  17. Reflection and refraction of acoustic waves at the interface between a gas and a disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Sarapulova, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The reflection and refraction of acoustic waves at different angles of incidence on the interface between a vapor-gas-droplet system and air are studied. From an analysis of analytical solutions, it has been found that in the case of incidence on the interface from the side of the vapor-gas-droplet medium, there is a critical angle of incidence at which the wave is completely reflected from the boundary, i.e., total internal reflection takes place. It is shown that for a certain angle of incidence on the interface both from the air side and from the mixture side and for a certain volume fraction of water in the disperse system, complete transmission of the acoustic wave through the medium is observed.

  18. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  19. Search for acoustic effects from extensive atmospheric showers in Baikal

    SciTech Connect

    Lyashuk, V.I. Novikov, E.G.

    2006-11-15

    The search for acoustic effects from showers by means of hydrophones was realized in a trigger scheme of recording sound files when atmospheric showers were detected by the scintillation installation. A method of peaks and noncoincidences was proposed to search for weak sound sources. The algorithm of the method is amplitude independent. Processing of a great body of data (obtained for different geometries, different noise background during three expeditions to Baikal) allows one to indicate the closely analogous phenomena at the instant of time of expected sound signals from showers. In spite of their low power, the effects appear in the different hydrophones and have similar time distributions, which points to the detection of the acoustic effects.

  20. Implantable acoustic-beacon automatic fish-tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhue, R. J.; Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.; Richards, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A portable automatic fish tracking system was developed for monitoring the two dimensional movements of small fish within fixed areas of estuarine waters and lakes. By using the miniature pinger previously developed for this application, prototype tests of the system were conducted in the York River near the Virginia Institute of Marine Science with two underwater listening stations. Results from these tests showed that the tracking system could position the miniature pinger signals to within + or - 2.5 deg and + or - 135 m at ranges up to 2.5 km. The pingers were implanted in small fish and were successfully tracked at comparable ranges. No changes in either fish behavior or pinger performance were observed as a result of the implantation. Based on results from these prototype tests, it is concluded that the now commercially available system provides an effective approach to underwater tracking of small fish within a fixed area of interest.

  1. A Hardware-and-Software System for Experimental Studies of the Acoustic Startle Response in Laboratory Rodents.

    PubMed

    Pevtsov, E F; Storozheva, Z I; Proshin, A T; Pevtsova, E I

    2016-02-01

    We developed and tested a novel hardware-and-software system for recording the amplitude of the acoustic startle response in rodents. In our experiments, the baseline indexes of acoustic startle response in laboratory rats and pre-stimulation inhibition under the standard delivery of acoustic stimulation were similar to those evaluated by other investigators on foreign devices. The proposed system is relatively cheap and provides the possibility of performing experiments on freely moving specimens. It should be emphasized that the results of studies can be processed with free-access software. PMID:26902348

  2. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  3. An acoustically controlled tetherless underwater vehicle for installation and maintenance of neutrino detectors in the deep ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, Philip J.

    1997-02-01

    The task of installing and servicing high energy neutrino detectors in the deep ocean from a surface support vessel is problematic using conventional tethered systems. An array of multiple detector strings rising 500 m from the ocean floor, and forming a grid with 50 m spacing between the strings, presents a substantial entanglement hazard for equipment cables deployed from the surface. Such tasks may be accomplished with fewer risks using a tetherless underwater remotely operated vehicle that has a local acoustic telemetry link to send control commands and sensor data between the vehicle and a stationary hydrophone suspended above or just outside the perimeter of the work site. The Phase I effort involves the development of an underwater acoustic telemetry link for vehicle control and sensor feedback, the evaluation of video compression methods for real-time acoustic transmission of video through the water, and the defining of local control routines on board the vehicle to allow it to perform certain basic maneuvering tasks autonomously, or to initiate a self-rescue if the acoustic control link should be lost. In Phase II, a prototype tetherless vehicle system will be designed and constructed to demonstrate the ability to install cable interconnections within a detector array at 4 km depth. The same control technology could be used with a larger more powerful vehicle to maneuver the detector strings into desired positions as they are being lowered to the ocean floor.

  4. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range. PMID:23927100

  5. Experimental research of the Multi-frequency Acoustic Backscatter System using the field sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, wenxiang

    2014-05-01

    The measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size profiles are very important to the engineering and environmental applications, especially in the estuarine and coastal areas. In recent years acoustic method has obtained increasing acceptance by many researchers. The theory of this method for measuring them is based on the acoustic backscattering and attenuation properties of the sediment in suspension. The Multi-frequency Acoustic Backscatter System (MABS), which has four acoustic sensors with different frequencies, can be measuring the profiles in the shallow water environment (no more than 10 meters). The experiments were conducted for AQUAscat1000 (MABS) (Made in UK) by the 'test tower' (φ600mm by 1500mm) in Laboratory. The frequency of the acoustic transducer is 0.5MHz, 1MHz, 2MHz and 4MHz, respectively. Two different places sediment were obtained from the Yangtze estuary. The average particle size is about 15μm and 115μm, respectively. Suspended sediment concentration in the 'test tower' was relatively constant during each phase of the sampling. The experimental procedures were as follows: (1) obtaining the background value of the instrument system; (2) add the field sediment to the tower according to the weight and allowing the mixture to homogenize; (3) obtaining water samples in different depths from the 'test tower'; (4) analyzing the water samples. These preliminary results show that (1) the MABS sensors are estimated from a complex function, depending on the receiving information (Voltage), measured at range, the speed of sound in water and the attenuation of sound by water, the sediment density and radius, and backscattering property of the sediment; (2) the appropriate calibration and regression approaches should be selected so as to obtain the reliable results of suspended sediment concentration(**R2 >0.7) and particle size(**R2 >0.5) measurements; (3) the MABS could be applied in the relative fine sediment condition, and

  6. Method and system to synchronize acoustic therapy with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Neil (Inventor); Bailey, Michael R. (Inventor); Hossack, James (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Interference in ultrasound imaging when used in connection with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is avoided by employing a synchronization signal to control the HIFU signal. Unless the timing of the HIFU transducer is controlled, its output will substantially overwhelm the signal produced by ultrasound imaging system and obscure the image it produces. The synchronization signal employed to control the HIFU transducer is obtained without requiring modification of the ultrasound imaging system. Signals corresponding to scattered ultrasound imaging waves are collected using either the HIFU transducer or a dedicated receiver. A synchronization processor manipulates the scattered ultrasound imaging signals to achieve the synchronization signal, which is then used to control the HIFU bursts so as to substantially reduce or eliminate HIFU interference in the ultrasound image. The synchronization processor can alternatively be implemented using a computing device or an application-specific circuit.

  7. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  8. A Non-Intrusive GMA Welding Process Quality Monitoring System Using Acoustic Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cayo, Eber Huanca; Alfaro, Sadek Crisostomo Absi

    2009-01-01

    Most of the inspection methods used for detection and localization of welding disturbances are based on the evaluation of some direct measurements of welding parameters. This direct measurement requires an insertion of sensors during the welding process which could somehow alter the behavior of the metallic transference. An inspection method that evaluates the GMA welding process evolution using a non-intrusive process sensing would allow not only the identification of disturbances during welding runs and thus reduce inspection time, but would also reduce the interference on the process caused by the direct sensing. In this paper a nonintrusive method for weld disturbance detection and localization for weld quality evaluation is demonstrated. The system is based on the acoustic sensing of the welding electrical arc. During repetitive tests in welds without disturbances, the stability acoustic parameters were calculated and used as comparison references for the detection and location of disturbances during the weld runs. PMID:22399990

  9. Estimation of the detection range of a hydroacoustic system based on the acoustic power flux receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, V. A.; Krasnopistsev, N. V.; Nasedkin, A. V.; Nekrasov, V. N.

    2007-11-01

    Approaches to estimating the detection range of systems based on vector receivers are considered. The approaches rely on a detailed analysis of the process of signal’s acoustic power flux formation in the presence of ambient sea noise and uncover the signal information parameters at the receiver output that provide the required statistically confident range of weak signal detection under these conditions. Based on the sonar equations and the known fundamental relationships between the outputs of a pressure receiver and a vector receiver for signal and noise, estimates of the maximum possible gain in the detection range of an acoustic power flux receiver are considered as a function of anisotropy of the ambient noise field in the area.

  10. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  11. Acoustic characteristics of the vowel systems of six regional varieties of American English

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Pisoni, David B.; de Jong, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Previous research by speech scientists on the acoustic characteristics of American English vowel systems has typically focused on a single regional variety, despite decades of sociolinguistic research demonstrating the extent of regional phonological variation in the United States. In the present study, acoustic measures of duration and first and second formant frequencies were obtained from five repetitions of 11 different vowels produced by 48 talkers representing both genders and six regional varieties of American English. Results revealed consistent variation due to region of origin, particularly with respect to the production of low vowels and high back vowels. The Northern talkers produced shifted low vowels consistent with the Northern Cities Chain Shift, the Southern talkers produced fronted back vowels consistent with the Southern Vowel Shift, and the New England, Midland, and Western talkers produced the low back vowel merger. These findings indicate that the vowel systems of American English are better characterized in terms of the region of origin of the talkers than in terms of a single set of idealized acoustic-phonetic baselines of “General” American English and provide benchmark data for six regional varieties. PMID:16240825

  12. Parameter estimation in a structural acoustic system with fully nonlinear coupling conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for estimating physical parameters in a class of structural acoustic systems is presented. The general model under consideration consists of an interior cavity which is separated from an exterior noise source by an enclosing elastic structure. Piezoceramic patches are bonded to or embedded in the structure; these can be used both as actuators and sensors in applications ranging from the control of interior noise levels to the determination of structural flaws through nondestructive evaluation techniques. The presence and excitation of patches, however, changes the geometry and material properties of the structure as well as involves unknown patch parameters, thus necessitating the development of parameter estimation techniques which are applicable in this coupled setting. In developing a framework for approximation, parameter estimation and implementation, strong consideration is given to the fact that the input operator is unbonded due to the discrete nature of the patches. Moreover, the model is weakly nonlinear. As a result of the coupling mechanism between the structural vibrations and the interior acoustic dynamics. Within this context, an illustrating model is given, well-posedness and approximations results are discussed and an applicable parameter estimation methodology is presented. The scheme is then illustrated through several numerical examples with simulations modeling a variety of commonly used structural acoustic techniques for systems excitations and data collection.

  13. Acoustic characteristics of the vowel systems of six regional varieties of American English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Pisoni, David B.; de Jong, Kenneth

    2005-09-01

    Previous research by speech scientists on the acoustic characteristics of American English vowel systems has typically focused on a single regional variety, despite decades of sociolinguistic research demonstrating the extent of regional phonological variation in the United States. In the present study, acoustic measures of duration and first and second formant frequencies were obtained from five repetitions of 11 different vowels produced by 48 talkers representing both genders and six regional varieties of American English. Results revealed consistent variation due to region of origin, particularly with respect to the production of low vowels and high back vowels. The Northern talkers produced shifted low vowels consistent with the Northern Cities Chain Shift, the Southern talkers produced fronted back vowels consistent with the Southern Vowel Shift, and the New England, Midland, and Western talkers produced the low back vowel merger. These findings indicate that the vowel systems of American English are better characterized in terms of the region of origin of the talkers than in terms of a single set of idealized acoustic-phonetic baselines of ``General'' American English and provide benchmark data for six regional varieties.

  14. Comparison study of time reversal OFDM acoustic communication with vector and scalar sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongkang; Zhang, Hongtao; Xie, Zhe

    2012-11-01

    To compare the performance of time reversal orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) acoustic communication on vector and scalar sensors, the vector and scalar acoustic fields were modeled. Time reversal OFDM acoustic communication was then simulated for each sensor type. These results are compared with data from the CAPEx'09 experiment. The abilityof particle velocity channels to achieve reliable acoustic communication, as predicted by the model, is confirmed with the experiment data. Experimental results show that vector receivers can reduce the required array size, in comparisonto hydrophone arrays, whileproviding comparable communication performance.

  15. Optimization of computation efficiency in underwater acoustic navigation system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hua

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the estimation of the relative bearing angle between the unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) and the base station for the homing and docking operations. The key requirement of this project includes computation efficiency and estimation accuracy for direct implementation onto the UUV electronic hardware, subject to the extreme constraints of physical limitation of the hardware due to the size and dimension of the UUV housing, electric power consumption for the requirement of UUV survey duration and range coverage, and heat dissipation of the hardware. Subsequent to the design and development of the algorithm, two phases of experiments were conducted to illustrate the feasibility and capability of this technique. The presentation of this paper includes system modeling, mathematical analysis, and results from laboratory experiments and full-scale sea tests. PMID:27106337

  16. Acoustic Characteristics of Stridor in Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Young; Joo, Eun Yeon; Nam, Hyunwoo

    2016-01-01

    Nocturnal stridor is a breathing disorder prevalent in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). An improved understanding of this breathing disorder is essential since nocturnal stridor carries a poor prognosis (an increased risk of sudden death). In this study, we aimed to classify types of stridor by sound analysis and to reveal their clinical significance. Patients who met the criteria for probable MSA and had undergone polysomnography (PSG) were recruited. Patients were then assessed clinically with sleep questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Nocturnal stridor and snoring were analyzed with the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program. Nocturnal stridor was recorded in 22 patients and snoring in 18 patients using the PSG. Waveforms of stridors were classified into rhythmic or semirhythmic after analysis of the oscillogram. Formants and harmonics were observed in both types of stridor, but not in snoring. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with stridor during the present study, fifteen have subsequently died, with the time to death after the PSG study being 1.9 ± 1.4 years (range 0.8 to 5.0 years). The rhythmic waveform group presented higher scores on the Hoehn and Yahr scale and the survival outcome of this group was lower compared to the semirhythmic waveform group (p = 0.030, p = 0.014). In the Kaplan Meier’s survival curve, the outcome of patients with rhythmic waveform was significantly less favorable than the outcome of patients with semirhythmic waveform (log-rank test, p < 0.001). Stridor in MSA can be classified into rhythmic and semirhythmic types and the rhythmic component signifies a poorer outcome. PMID:27093692

  17. Testing and verification of a scale-model acoustic propagation system.

    PubMed

    Sagers, Jason D; Ballard, Megan S

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a measurement apparatus used to conduct scale-model underwater acoustic propagation experiments, presents experimental results for an idealized waveguide, and compares the measured results to data generated by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of the apparatus for a simple waveguide that primarily exhibits 2D acoustic propagation. The apparatus contains a computer-controlled positioning system that accurately moves a receiving transducer in the water layer above a scale-model bathymetry while a stationary source transducer emits broadband pulsed waveforms. Experimental results are shown for a 2.133 m × 1.219 m bathymetric part possessing a flat-bottom bathymetry with a translationally invariant wedge of 10° slope along one edge. Beamformed results from a synthetic horizontal line array indicate the presence of strong in-plane arrivals along with weaker diffracted and horizontally refracted arrivals. A simulated annealing inversion method is applied to infer values for five waveguide parameters with the largest measurement uncertainty. The inferred values are then used in a 2D method of images model and a 3D adiabatic normal-mode model to simulate the measured acoustic data. PMID:26723314

  18. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  19. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, Jr., James R.; Balogh, Lajos P.; Milas, Susanne M.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Hollman, Kyle W.

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  20. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  1. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  2. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Dushaw, Brian D; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Heaney, Kevin D; D'Spain, Gerald L; Colosi, John A; Stephen, Ralph A; Kemp, John N; Howe, Bruce M; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Wage, Kathleen E

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments conducted in the Philippine Sea during 2009-2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise in this oceanographically and geologically complex region: (i) the 2009 North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) Pilot Study/Engineering Test, (ii) the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment, and (iii) the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation of the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment. The experimental goals included (a) understanding the impacts of fronts, eddies, and internal tides on acoustic propagation, (b) determining whether acoustic methods, together with other measurements and ocean modeling, can yield estimates of the time-evolving ocean state useful for making improved acoustic predictions, (c) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves and spice, (d) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal variability of ambient noise, and (e) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor. In these experiments, moored and ship-suspended low-frequency acoustic sources transmitted to a newly developed distributed vertical line array receiver capable of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also recorded by a towed hydrophone array, by acoustic Seagliders, and by ocean bottom seismometers. PMID:24116529

  3. Numerical simulation of geodesic acoustic modes in a multi-ion system

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lei; Guo, Wenfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Wang, Shaojie

    2013-07-15

    Based on the semi-Lagrangian method, a δf drift kinetic continuum code incorporating magnetic flux coordinate was developed and applied to investigate the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) oscillation in a multi-ion plasma system. This work proves clearly that the effective ion mass number affects the GAM in a multi-ion system. In this simulation, GAM frequency and damping rate are seen to vary with the proportion of impurity ions. The numerical result is consistent with the theoretical prediction in terms of both frequency and damping rate.

  4. Characterisation and testing of the KM3NeT acoustic positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, S.; Simeone, F.; Saldaña, M.

    2016-04-01

    In underwater neutrino telescopes, the search of point-like sources through the Cherenkov detection technique requires a precise knowledge of the positions of thousands of optical sensors, spread in a volume of a few cubic kilometres. In KM3NeT the optical sensors are hosted in 700 m high semi-rigid structures, called detection units, which move under the effects of underwater currents. These movements are continuously monitored through an underwater positioning system based on acoustic emitters and receivers. In this work, the tests performed on the key elements of the positioning system are presented.

  5. A smart pattern recognition system for the automatic identification of aerospace acoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Fuller, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An intelligent air-noise recognition system is described that uses pattern recognition techniques to distinguish noise signatures of five different types of acoustic sources, including jet planes, propeller planes, a helicopter, train, and wind turbine. Information for classification is calculated using the power spectral density and autocorrelation taken from the output of a single microphone. Using this system, as many as 90 percent of test recordings were correctly identified, indicating that the linear discriminant functions developed can be used for aerospace source identification.

  6. Focus Adjustment System of Laser Probe for Radio Frequency Surface and Bulk Acoustic Wave Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Kashiwa, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Ken-ya; Omori, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Masatsune; Kasai, Naoki

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a focus adjustment system designed especially for a fast-mechanical-scanning laser probe for radio-frequency surface and bulk acoustic wave devices. When high spatial resolution is necessary for the observation, one needs an objective lens of large magnifying power with extremely shallow focal depth. Then, a small inclination of a measurement device may cause severe defocus resulting in blurred images. We installed the focus adjustment system in the laser probe, and showed that even with inclination, high-quality information of the wave field can be acquired without reducing the scanning speed.

  7. Passive pavement-mounted acoustical linguistic drive alert system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger A.; Anderson, Richard L.; Carnal, Charles L.; Hylton, James O.; Stevens, Samuel S.

    2001-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for passive pavement-mounted acoustical alert of the occupants of a vehicle. A method of notifying a vehicle occupant includes providing a driving medium upon which a vehicle is to be driven; and texturing a portion of the driving medium such that the textured portion interacts with the vehicle to produce audible signals, the textured portion pattern such that a linguistic message is encoded into the audible signals. The systems and methods provide advantages because information can be conveyed to the occupants of the vehicle based on the location of the vehicle relative to the textured surface.

  8. Effects of acoustic hood on noise, CFC-11, and particulate matter in a recycling system for waste refrigerator cabinet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jie; Fang, Wenxiong; Yang, Yichen; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical-physical process was proven to be technologically feasible for waste refrigerator recycling and has been widely used in the typical e-waste recycling factories in China. In this study, effects of the acoustic hood on the reduction of noise level, CFC-11, and heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb) in particulate matter (PM) were evaluated. For noise pollution, the noise level inside and outside the acoustic hood was 96.4 and 78.9 dB, respectively. Meanwhile, it had a significant effect on A-weighted sound level with a reduction from 98.3 to 63.6 dB. For CFC-11 exposure, abundant CFC-11 (255 mg/m(3)) was detected in the acoustic hood. However, the mean concentration of CFC-11 at the outline of polyurethane foam collection was obviously diminished to 14 mg/m(3), and no CFC-11 was monitored around the acoustic hood. The concentrations of PM and heavy metals in PM outside the acoustic hood were lower than those inside the acoustic hood due to the physical barriers of the acoustic hood. Based on the risk assessment, only adverse health effect caused by Pb might likely appear. All the results can provide the basic data for pollution control and risk assessment in waste refrigerator recycling system. PMID:24965005

  9. Acoustic vector fields in underwater waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapids, Brian

    2005-09-01

    The ability to compute the sound pressure level as well as the vectors associated with the acoustic particle motion has existed for some time. However, propagation studies and ambient noise investigations have typically focused only upon the sound pressure levels that would be observed by an omnidirectional hydrophone or array of hydrophones. Recent interest in geophones and accelerometers for use as vector and dyadic sensors should encourage the investigation and analysis of the underlying vector fields contributing to the acoustic intensity and energy density fields. The frequency domain properties of the acoustic vector field generated by monopole sources having frequencies <1kHz in a simple iso-velocity waveguide are presented in order to build a fundamental understanding of the related quantities. Subsequently, similar field quantities computed for more realistic environments such as downward refracting profiles and deep-water profiles supporting convergence zone propagation will be discussed. Regions and phenomena associated with perturbations in the energy flux density will be highlighted.

  10. Real-time analysis system for gas turbine ground test acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robert T

    2003-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a data system upgrade to the Pratt and Whitney facility designed for making acoustic measurements on aircraft gas turbine engines. A data system upgrade was undertaken because the return-on-investment was determined to be extremely high. That is, the savings on the first test series recovered the cost of the hardware. The commercial system selected for this application utilizes 48 input channels, which allows either 1/3 octave and/or narrow-band analyses to be preformed real-time. A high-speed disk drive allows raw data from all 48 channels to be stored simultaneously while the analyses are being preformed. Results of tests to ensure compliance of the new system with regulations and with existing systems are presented. Test times were reduced from 5 h to 1 h of engine run time per engine configuration by the introduction of this new system. Conservative cost reduction estimates for future acoustic testing are 75% on items related to engine run time and 50% on items related to the overall length of the test. PMID:14582877

  11. Acoustic Performance of a Real-Time Three-Dimensional Sound-Reproduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, Kenneth J., II; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Aumann, Aric R.

    2013-01-01

    The Exterior Effects Room (EER) is a 39-seat auditorium at the NASA Langley Research Center and was built to support psychoacoustic studies of aircraft community noise. The EER has a real-time simulation environment which includes a three-dimensional sound-reproduction system. This system requires real-time application of equalization filters to compensate for spectral coloration of the sound reproduction due to installation and room effects. This paper describes the efforts taken to develop the equalization filters for use in the real-time sound-reproduction system and the subsequent analysis of the system s acoustic performance. The acoustic performance of the compensated and uncompensated sound-reproduction system is assessed for its crossover performance, its performance under stationary and dynamic conditions, the maximum spatialized sound pressure level it can produce from a single virtual source, and for the spatial uniformity of a generated sound field. Additionally, application examples are given to illustrate the compensated sound-reproduction system performance using recorded aircraft flyovers

  12. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, WIlliam O.; Chang, Li, C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007-2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their "t-junctions" connecting the 12 inch supply line to their respective 4 inch branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed "t-junction" connections through non-destructive evaluation testing . Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the "t-junction" connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  13. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, William O.; Chang, Li C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007 to 2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cubic feet in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their T-junctions connecting the 12 in. supply line to their respective 4 in. branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed T-junction connections through non-destructive evaluation testing. Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the T-junction connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  14. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  15. Acoustic signal propagation and measurement in natural stream channels for application to surrogate bed load measurements: Halfmoon Creek, Colorado.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring sediment-generated noise using submerged hydrophones is a surrogate method for measuring bed load transport in streams with the potential for improving estimates of bed load transport through widespread, inexpensive monitoring. Understanding acoustic signal propagation in natural stream e...

  16. Three-component all polarization-maintaining optical fiber vector hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianfei; Luo, Hong; Meng, Zhou; Hu, Yongming

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports a new-style all polarization maintaining optical fiber vector hydrophone which is orthogonal and unitized in three components. The signal fading caused by random phase-shift in the interferometer is eliminated by phase generated carrier (PGC) technology. The sensitivity and frequency band of the sensor is increased by optimizing the structure. Experimental results indicate that the acceleration sensitivity reaches 33dB and the fluctuation is less than 1dB over the frequency range of 20~2000Hz. The phase sensitivity is -155dB at 1000Hz. The optical vector hydrophone has an excellent directivity. The maximum asymmetric index is less than 0.4dB, while the directivity index is greater than 45dB.

  17. Modeling the Behavior of an Underwater Acoustic Relative Positioning System Based on Complementary Set of Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Joaquín; Jiménez, Ana; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Ureña, Jesús; De Marziani, Carlos; Diego, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The great variability usually found in underwater media makes modeling a challenging task, but helpful for better understanding or predicting the performance of future deployed systems. In this work, an underwater acoustic propagation model is presented. This model obtains the multipath structure by means of the ray tracing technique. Using this model, the behavior of a relative positioning system is presented. One of the main advantages of relative positioning systems is that only the distances between all the buoys are needed to obtain their positions. In order to obtain the distances, the propagation times of acoustic signals coded by Complementary Set of Sequences (CSS) are used. In this case, the arrival instants are obtained by means of correlation processes. The distances are then used to obtain the position of the buoys by means of the Multidimensional Scaling Technique (MDS). As an early example of an application using this relative positioning system, a tracking of the position of the buoys at different times is performed. With this tracking, the surface current of a particular region could be studied. The performance of the system is evaluated in terms of the distance from the real position to the estimated one. PMID:22247661

  18. Modeling the behavior of an underwater acoustic relative positioning system based on complementary set of sequences.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Joaquín; Jiménez, Ana; Alvarez, Fernando J; Ureña, Jesús; De Marziani, Carlos; Diego, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The great variability usually found in underwater media makes modeling a challenging task, but helpful for better understanding or predicting the performance of future deployed systems. In this work, an underwater acoustic propagation model is presented. This model obtains the multipath structure by means of the ray tracing technique. Using this model, the behavior of a relative positioning system is presented. One of the main advantages of relative positioning systems is that only the distances between all the buoys are needed to obtain their positions. In order to obtain the distances, the propagation times of acoustic signals coded by Complementary Set of Sequences (CSS) are used. In this case, the arrival instants are obtained by means of correlation processes. The distances are then used to obtain the position of the buoys by means of the Multidimensional Scaling Technique (MDS). As an early example of an application using this relative positioning system, a tracking of the position of the buoys at different times is performed. With this tracking, the surface current of a particular region could be studied. The performance of the system is evaluated in terms of the distance from the real position to the estimated one. PMID:22247661

  19. On the acoustic analysis and optimization of ducted ventilation systems using a sub-structuring approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Cui, F S; Cheng, L

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a general sub-structuring approach to predict the acoustic performance of ducted ventilation systems. The modeling principle is to determine the subsystem characteristics by calculating the transfer functions at their coupling interfaces, and the assembly is enabled by using a patch-based interface matching technique. For a particular example of a bended ventilation duct connecting an inlet and an outlet acoustic domain, a numerical model is developed to predict its sound attenuation performance. The prediction accuracy is thoroughly validated against finite element models. Through numerical examples, the rigid-walled duct is shown to provide relatively weak transmission loss (TL) across the frequency range of interest, and exhibit only the reactive behavior for sound reflection. By integrating sound absorbing treatment such as micro-perforated absorbers into the system, the TL can be significantly improved, and the system is seen to exhibit hybrid mechanisms for sound attenuation. The dissipative effect dominates at frequencies where the absorber is designed to be effective, and the reactive effect provides compensations at the absorption valleys attributed to the resonant behavior of the absorber. This ultimately maintains the system TL at a relatively high level across the entire frequency of interest. The TL of the system can be tuned or optimized in a very efficient way using the proposed approach due to its modular nature. It is shown that a balance of the hybrid mechanism is important to achieve an overall broadband attenuation performance in the design frequency range. PMID:26827024

  20. Characterization of Pump-Induced Acoustics in Space Launch System Main Propulsion System Liquid Hydrogen Feedline Using Airflow Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhart, C. J.; Snellgrove, L. M.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity acoustic edgetones located upstream of the RS-25 Low Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (LPFTP) were previously observed during Space Launch System (STS) airflow testing of a model Main Propulsion System (MPS) liquid hydrogen (LH2) feedline mated to a modified LPFTP. MPS hardware has been adapted to mitigate the problematic edgetones as part of the Space Launch System (SLS) program. A follow-on airflow test campaign has subjected the adapted hardware to tests mimicking STS-era airflow conditions, and this manuscript describes acoustic environment identification and characterization born from the latest test results. Fluid dynamics responsible for driving discrete excitations were well reproduced using legacy hardware. The modified design was found insensitive to high intensity edgetone-like discretes over the bandwidth of interest to SLS MPS unsteady environments. Rather, the natural acoustics of the test article were observed to respond in a narrowband-random/mixed discrete manner to broadband noise thought generated by the flow field. The intensity of these responses were several orders of magnitude reduced from those driven by edgetones.

  1. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  2. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  3. Sound reproduction in personal audio systems using the least-squares approach with acoustic contrast control constraint.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yefeng; Wu, Ming; Yang, Jun

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a method for focusing the reproduced sound in the bright zone without disturbing other people in the dark zone in personal audio systems. The proposed method combines the least-squares and acoustic contrast criteria. A constrained parameter is introduced to tune the balance between two performance indices, namely, the acoustic contrast and the spatial average error. An efficient implementation of this method using convex optimization is presented. Offline simulations and real-time experiments using a linear loudspeaker array are conducted to evaluate the performance of the presented method. Results show that compared with the traditional acoustic contrast control method, the proposed method can improve the flatness of response in the bright zone by sacrificing the level of acoustic contrast. PMID:25234882

  4. Acoustic radiation of a submerged cylindrical shell in low frequency.

    PubMed

    Van de Loock, Julien; Décultot, Dominique; Léon, Fernand; Chati, Farid; Maze, Gérard; Rajaona, Dominique Raphael; Klauson, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of sound pressure levels produced by submerged structures is a part of regulations on underwater noise pollution. The purpose of this work is the study of the underwater acoustic radiation of a stainless steel tube subjected to vibrations generated by a shock obtained by using a hammer. The vibrations of the tube, placed successively in air and in water, are measured by using accelerometers. In water, the acoustic radiation measurements are performed by using a hydrophone. Results are presented as frequency spectra and are confronted with results of the elastic theory. PMID:23298014

  5. Experimental evaluation on the effectiveness of acoustic-laser technique towards the FRP-bonded concrete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qiwen; Lau, Denvid

    2015-04-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is essential for the detection of defects in the externally bonded fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) concrete, especially such bonded system can be readily found in strengthened and retrofitted structures nowadays. Among all the current NDE methods, acoustic-laser technique is a non-contact methodology with a high applicability to detect near-surface defect in composite structures, which is very suitable to be used for detecting defect in FRP retrofitted and strengthened concrete structures. The methodology is based on the acoustic excitation on the target surface and the measurement of its vibration using laser beam. To our best knowledge, no comprehensive study has been conducted to examine how the acoustic location and other related parameters affect the measurement sensitivity. In fact, several operational parameters affecting the performance of the test system are discussed here including (i) distance between the acoustic source and the object, (ii) sound pressure level (SPL), (iii) angle of the laser beam incidence and (iv) angle of the acoustic incidence. Here, we perform a series of parametric studies against these four operational parameters. Based on our experimental measurements, all parameters show significant effects on the measurement sensitivity of the acoustic-laser technique. Recommendations on an optimal range of each concerned parameter are provided.

  6. Ice/berm interaction study using rotary sidescan sonar and acoustic profiling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.R.; Anderson, K.G.; Lanzier, H.H.

    1984-05-01

    Tarsiut Island, in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, was the first dredged caisson retained island built for exploration drilling operations in the Arctic offshore. Due to the island's configuration location, a large first-year ice rubble pile would result from the ice/structure interaction. This paper outlines how a rotary side-scan sonar and a mechanically scanning, narrow-beam acoustic profiling system were used to determine the geometry and the contact area of the underside of heavily rubbled first-year ice. The results of this study are to be used to further the understanding of the nature and mechanism of the ice/structure interaction in Arctic offshore structures.

  7. Underwater acoustic positioning system for the SMO and KM3NeT - Italia projects

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, S.; Barbagallo, G.; Cacopardo, G.; Calí, C.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amato, V.; D'Amico, A.; De Luca, V.; Del Tevere, F.; Distefano, C.; Ferrera, F.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Imbesi, M.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; and others

    2014-11-18

    In the underwater neutrino telescopes, the positions of the Cherenkov light sensors and their movements must be known with an accuracy of few tens of centimetres. In this work, the activities of the SMO and KM3NeT-Italia teams for the development of an acoustic positioning system for KM3NeT-Italia project are presented. The KM3NeT-Italia project foresees the construction, within two years, of 8 towers in the view of the several km{sup 3}-scale neutrino telescope KM3NeT.

  8. Dispersion of low frequency surface acoustic waves of different polarizations in multilayered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosachev, V. V.; Shchegrov, A. V.

    1995-02-01

    Dispersion of surface acoustic waves (SAW) of sagittal and shear horizontal (SH) polarizations in a multilayered system of n isotropic layers on an isotropic substrate is investigated by the technique of effective boundary conditions in the framework of perturbation theory. The ratio of the total layer thickness to the wavelength of SAW is chosen to be a small parameter. Under such assumptions the dispersion relations for the SAW of both sagittal and SH-polarizations are derived. The results for sagittally polarized SAW derived by means of perturbation theory are compared with numerical solution for a bilayered structure. Possible applications of the results obtained are discussed.

  9. Acoustic mapping of shallow water gas releases using shipborne multibeam systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Peter; Köser, Kevin; Weiß, Tim; Greinert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Water column imaging (WCI) shipborne multibeam systems are effective tools for investigating marine free gas (bubble) release. Like single- and splitbeam systems they are very sensitive towards gas bubbles in the water column, and have the advantage of the wide swath opening angle, 120° or more allowing a better mapping and possible 3D investigations of targets in the water column. On the downside, WCI data are degraded by specific noise from side-lobe effects and are usually not calibrated for target backscattering strength analysis. Most approaches so far concentrated on manual investigations of bubbles in the water column data. Such investigations allow the detection of bubble streams (flares) and make it possible to get an impression about the strength of detected flares/the gas release. Because of the subjective character of these investigations it is difficult to understand how well an area has been investigated by a flare mapping survey and subjective impressions about flare strength can easily be fooled by the many acoustic effects multibeam systems create. Here we present a semi-automated approach that uses the behavior of bubble streams in varying water currents to detect and map their exact source positions. The focus of the method is application of objective rules for flare detection, which makes it possible to extract information about the quality of the seepage mapping survey, perform automated noise reduction and create acoustic maps with quality discriminators indicating how well an area has been mapped.

  10. A prototype system of microwave induced thermo-acoustic tomography for breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaozhang; Zhao, Zhiqin; Yang, Kai; Nie, Zaiping; Liu, Qinghuo

    2012-01-01

    Microwave-induced thermo-acoustic tomography (MITAT) is an innovative technique for tumor's detection. Due to there has high contrast in terms with permittivity and electrical conductivity of tumor versus normal tissue, even if the tumor still in the early phase it can be imaged clearly. For the proposed MITAT system, low energy microwave pulses are used as the irradiating signals, while the received signals are ultrasound, high contrast and high resolution images can be obtained. After some theoretical research and basic fundamental experiments, the first prototype of experimental system is designed and built. It includes the microwave radiator, the arrayed sensor bowl, the circular scanning platform, the system controller and the signal processor. Based on the experimental results using this integral MITAT clinic system, the images contrast can be reached higher than 383:1; while the sub-millimeter special resolution is obtained for a 1cm(3) scale tumor mimic. PMID:23365929

  11. Prediction of thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) in the CLAES solid CO2/neon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, I. E.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a study initiated to investigate the possibility that the existence of thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) in the Cryogenic Limb Atmospheric Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) neon plumbing system ground configuration could be the cause of higher-than-predicted heat rates measured during thermal ground testing. Tests were conducted between warm boundary temperatures ranging from 40 to 100 K, which simulated the actual test conditions of the CLAES CO2/neon system. TAOs were observed between 6 and 106 Torr, which agreed with the analytical predictions, and verified the possible existence of TAOs in the CLAES system during ground testing. The presence of TAOs was eventually confirmed in the CLAES system during a subsequent thermal test and were determined to have caused the higher heat rates measured during the prior thermal test.

  12. Multiplex transmission system for gate drive signals of inverter circuit using surface acoustic wave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akifumi; Ueda, Kensuke; Goka, Shigeyoshi; Wada, Keiji; Kakio, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    We propose and fabricate a multiplexed transmission system based on frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) with surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. SAW filters are suitable for use in wide-gap switching devices and multilevel inverters because of their capability to operate at high temperatures, good electrical isolation, low cost, and high reliability. Our proposed system reduces the number of electrical signal wires needed to control each switching device and eliminates the need for isolation circuits, simplifying the transmission system and gate drive circuits. We successfully controlled two switching devices with a single coaxial line and confirmed the operation of a single-phase half-bridge inverter at a supply voltage of 100 V, and the total delay time to control the switching devices was less than 2.5 µs. Our experimental results validated our proposed system.

  13. Passive acoustic monitoring to detect spawning in large-bodied catostomids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Straight, Carrie A.; Freeman, Byron J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Documenting timing, locations, and intensity of spawning can provide valuable information for conservation and management of imperiled fishes. However, deep, turbid or turbulent water, or occurrence of spawning at night, can severely limit direct observations. We have developed and tested the use of passive acoustics to detect distinctive acoustic signatures associated with spawning events of two large-bodied catostomid species (River Redhorse Moxostoma carinatum and Robust Redhorse Moxostoma robustum) in river systems in north Georgia. We deployed a hydrophone with a recording unit at four different locations on four different dates when we could both record and observe spawning activity. Recordings captured 494 spawning events that we acoustically characterized using dominant frequency, 95% frequency, relative power, and duration. We similarly characterized 46 randomly selected ambient river noises. Dominant frequency did not differ between redhorse species and ranged from 172.3 to 14,987.1 Hz. Duration of spawning events ranged from 0.65 to 11.07 s, River Redhorse having longer durations than Robust Redhorse. Observed spawning events had significantly higher dominant and 95% frequencies than ambient river noises. We additionally tested software designed to automate acoustic detection. The automated detection configurations correctly identified 80–82% of known spawning events, and falsely indentified spawns 6–7% of the time when none occurred. These rates were combined over all recordings; rates were more variable among individual recordings. Longer spawning events were more likely to be detected. Combined with sufficient visual observations to ascertain species identities and to estimate detection error rates, passive acoustic recording provides a useful tool to study spawning frequency of large-bodied fishes that displace gravel during egg deposition, including several species of imperiled catostomids.

  14. Comparison of acoustic performance of five muffler configurations on a small helicopter. [acoustic properties of modified helicopter exhaust system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, R. J.; Hilton, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    A field noise measurement program has been conducted on a standard Bell 47 series helicopter and on one that had been modified with specially designed, airframe-mounted mufflers to reduce the engine exhaust noise. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the acoustic performance of five experimental exhaust muffler configurations for a helicopter reciprocating engine in an operational environment. All muffler configurations produced beneficial engine exhaust noise reductions but some configurations were markedly better than others. Flyover noise results indicated that maximum overall noise reductions of approximately 8 db were obtained with the various mufflers. The rotor noise was judged to be the dominant noise component for the muffler-equipped helicopters whereas the engine noise was the dominant component for the basic configuration.

  15. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This work also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.

  16. Ultrasonic database development for the acoustic inspection device: the velocity-attenuation measurement system (VAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Burghard, Brion J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2004-07-01

    The inspection of sealed containers is a critical task for personnel charged with enforcing government policies, maintaining public safety, and ensuring national security. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, handheld acoustic inspection device (AID) that provides non-invasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities. The AID technology has been deployed worldwide and user"s are providing feedback and requesting additional capabilities and functionality. Recently, PNNL has developed a laboratory-based system for automated, ultrasonic characterization of fluids to support database development for the AID. Using pulse-echo ultrasound, ultrasonic pulses are launched into a container or bulk-solid commodity. The return echoes from these pulses are analyzed in terms of time-of-flight and frequency content (as a function of temperature) to extract physical property measurements (acoustic velocity and attenuation) of the material under test. These measured values are then compared to a tailored database of materials and fluids property data acquired using the Velocity-Attenuation Measurement System (VAMS). This bench-top platform acquires key ultrasonic property measurements as a function of temperature and frequency. This paper describes the technical basis for operation of the VAMS, recent enhancements to the measurement algorithms for both the VAMS and AID technologies, and new measurement data from laboratory testing and performance demonstration activities. Applications for homeland security and counterterrorism, law enforcement, drug-interdiction and fuel transportation compliance activities will be discussed.

  17. Vibro-acoustic characterization of flexible hose in CO2 car air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, F.; Bergami, A.; Martarelli, M.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2008-06-01

    Following the EU directive 2006/40/EC proscribing from 2011 that refrigerant fluids must have a global warming potential not higher than 150, it will not be allowed anymore to employ the current R134a on car air conditioning systems. Maflow s.p.a (automotive hose maker) is developing products for each possible new refrigerant. This paper is focused on hoses for CO2 refrigerants operating in the worst conditions because of the high pressures and temperatures at which they are working (with R134a the high pressure is 18 bar and low pressure is 3 bar; with CO2 the high pressure is 100 bar and low pressure is 35 bar). Therefore the noise emission control of the CO2 air conditioning systems is very important. The aim of this study is to develop a standard measurement method for the vibro - acoustic characterization of High Pressure (HP - Shark F4) and Low Pressure (LP - ULEV) hoses to reduce noise emission and raise car passenger comfort; in particular deep research on high pressure hose. The method is based on the measurement of the vibration level of the hoses in a standard test bench by means of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and its acoustic emission by a sound intensity probe.

  18. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This workmore » also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.« less

  19. Uniform mixing in paper-based microfluidic systems using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Amgad R; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James R; Li, Wai Ho; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-02-21

    Paper-based microfluidics has recently received considerable interest due to their ease and low cost, making them extremely attractive as point-of-care diagnostic devices. The incorporation of basic fluid actuation and manipulation schemes on paper substrates, however, afford the possibility to extend the functionality of this simple technology to a much wider range of typical lab-on-a-chip operations, given its considerable advantages in terms of cost, size and integrability over conventional microfluidic substrates. We present a convective actuation mechanism in a simple paper-based microfluidic device using surface acoustic waves to drive mixing. Employing a Y-channel structure patterned onto paper, the mixing induced by the 30 MHz acoustic waves is shown to be consistent and rapid, overcoming several limitations associated with its capillary-driven passive mixing counterpart wherein irreproducibilities and nonuniformities are often encountered in the mixing along the channel--capillary-driven passive mixing offers only poor control, is strongly dependent on the paper's texture and fibre alignment, and permits backflow, all due to the scale of the fibres being significant in comparison to the length scales of the features in a microfluidic system. Using a novel hue-based colourimetric technique, the mixing speed and efficiency is compared between the two methods, and used to assess the effects of changing the input power, channel tortuousity and fibre/flow alignment for the acoustically-driven mixing. The hue-based technique offers several advantages over grayscale pixel intensity analysis techniques in facilitating quantification without limitations on the colour contrast of the samples, and can be used, for example, for quantification in on-chip immunochromatographic assays. PMID:22193520

  20. PC-based real-time acoustic source locator and sound capture system for teleconferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morde, Ashutosh; Grove, Deborah; Utama, Robert

    2002-05-01

    A PC-based real time acoustic source locator and sound capture system has been developed. The system is implemented using Frontier Design A/D converters and the Intel Signal Processing Library directly on a 1 GHz Pentium III machine, without a DSP board. The source locator uses the cross-power spectral phase to locate a moving talker. The algorithm also uses an energy detector that minimizes incorrect location estimates by neglecting frames with high background noise. The source locator provides 8 location estimates per second. A 16-element 0.90 m linear delay-sum beamformer has also been implemented in the system as a method for selective sound capture. The ability of the source locator to detect talkers in a typical office environment is evaluated. In addition, the array response is measured. [Work supported by Intel.

  1. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication.

    PubMed

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically. PMID:27057558

  2. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication

    PubMed Central

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically. PMID:27057558

  3. Nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by vibrating obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, J. C.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of the generation of sum- and difference-frequency waves produced via the scattering of an acoustic wave by an obstacle whose surface vibrates harmonically was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical approach involved solving the nonlinear wave equation, subject to appropriate boundary conditions, by the use of a perturbation expansion of the fields and a Green's function method. In addition to ordinary rigid-body scattering, Censor predicted nongrowing waves at frequencies equal to the sum and to the difference of the frequencies of the primary waves. The solution to the nonlinear wave equation also yields scattered waves at the sum and difference frequencies. However, the nonlinearity of the medium causes these waves to grow with increasing distance from the scatter's surface and, after a very small distance, dominate those predicted by Censor. The simple-source formulation of the second-order nonlinear wave equation for a lossless fluid medium has been derived for arbitrary primary wave fields. This equation was used to solve the problem of nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by a vibrating obstacle for three geometries: (1) a plane-wave scattering by a vibrating plane, (2) cylindrical-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder, and (3) plane-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder. Successful experimental validation of the theory was inhibited by previously unexpected levels of nonlinearity in the hydrophones used. Such high levels of hydrophone nonlinearity appeared in hydrophones that, by their geometry of construction, were expected to be fairly linear.

  4. Tip-sensitive all-silica fiber-optic Fabry-Perot ultrasonic hydrophone for charactering high intensity focused ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. H.; Jia, P. G.; Wang, S. J.; Zhao, C. L.; Zeng, D. P.; Wang, H.; Li, F. Q.

    2013-07-01

    This Letter reports on a tip-sensitive all-silica fiber-optic Fabry-Perot (TAFOFP) ultrasonic hydrophone for measuring high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields. The all-silica fiber-optic structure ensures that the TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone can withstand HIFU fields and the tip-sensitive configuration ensures that the TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone can achieve a high spatial resolution of 125 μm. The experimental results have shown that the TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone could stably measure the peak positive ultrasonic pressure as high as 4.34 MPa, and the measured ultrasonic pressure distributions of the HIFU field by the fabricated TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone agreed well with those by the piezoceramic needle hydrophone.

  5. Reverberant acoustic energy in auditoria that comprise systems of coupled rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason Erik

    A frequency-dependent model for levels and decay rates of reverberant energy in systems of coupled rooms is developed and compared with measurements conducted in a 1:10 scale model and in Bass Hall, Fort Worth, TX. Schroeder frequencies of subrooms, fSch, characteristic size of coupling apertures, a, relative to wavelength lambda, and characteristic size of room surfaces, l, relative to lambda define the frequency regions. At high frequencies [HF (f >> f Sch, a >> lambda, l >> lambda)], this work improves upon prior statistical-acoustics (SA) coupled-ODE models by incorporating geometrical-acoustics (GA) corrections for the model of decay within subrooms and the model of energy transfer between subrooms. Previous researchers developed prediction algorithms based on computational GA. Comparisons of predictions derived from beam-axis tracing with scale-model measurements indicate that systematic errors for coupled rooms result from earlier tail-correction procedures that assume constant quadratic growth of reflection density. A new algorithm is developed that uses ray tracing rather than tail correction in the late part and is shown to correct this error. At midfrequencies [MF (f >> f Sch, a ˜ lambda)], HF models are modified to account for wave effects at coupling apertures by including analytically or heuristically derived power transmission coefficients tau. This work improves upon prior SA models of this type by developing more accurate estimates of random-incidence tau. While the accuracy of the MF models is difficult to verify, scale-model measurements evidence the expected behavior. The Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin-Svensson (BTMS) time-domain edge-diffraction model is newly adapted to study transmission through apertures. Multiple-order BTMS scattering is theoretically and experimentally shown to be inaccurate due to the neglect of slope diffraction. At low frequencies (f ˜ f Sch), scale-model measurements have been qualitatively explained by application of

  6. Parallel direct numerical simulation of wake vortex detection using monostatic and bistatic radio acoustic sounding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluriaan Esfahaani, Said

    A parallel two-dimensional code is developed in this thesis to numerically simulate wake vortex detection using a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). The Maxwell equations for media with non-uniform permittivity and the linearized Euler equations for media with non-uniform mean flow are the main framework for the simulations. The code is written in Fortran 90 with the Message Passing Interface (MPI) for parallel implementation. The main difficulty encountered with a time accurate simulation of a RASS is the number of samples required to resolve the Doppler shift in the scattered electromagnetic signal. Even for a 1D simulation with a typical scatterer size, the CPU time required to run the code is far beyond currently available computer resources. Two solutions that overcome this problem are described. In the first the actual electromagnetic wave propagation speed is replaced with a much lower value. This allows an explicit, time accurate numerical scheme to be used. In the second the governing differential equations are recast in order to remove the carrier frequency and solve only for the frequency shift using an implicit scheme with large time steps. The numerical stability characteristics of the resulting discretized equation with complex coefficients are examined. A number of cases for both the monostatic and bistatic configurations are considered. First, a uniform mean flow is considered and the RASS simulation is performed for two different types of incident acoustic field, namely a short single frequency acoustic pulse and a continuous broadband acoustic source. Both the explicit and implicit schemes are examined and the mean flow velocity is determined from the spectrum of the backscattered electromagnetic signal with very good accuracy. Second, the Taylor and Oseen vortex models are considered and their velocity field along the incident electromagnetic beam is retrieved. The Abel transform is then applied to the velocity profiles determined by both

  7. Comparison between experimental and computational methods for the acoustic and thermal characterization of therapeutic ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, Subha; Liu, Yunbo; Soneson, Joshua E; Herman, Bruce A; Harris, Gerald R

    2015-04-01

    For high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) devices, pre-clinical testing can include measurement of power, pressure/intensity and temperature distribution, acoustic and thermal simulations, and assessment of targeting accuracy and treatment monitoring. Relevant International Electrotechnical Commission documents recently have been published. However, technical challenges remain because of the often focused, large amplitude pressure fields encountered. Measurement and modeling issues include using hydrophones and radiation force balances at HITU power levels, validation of simulation models, and tissue-mimicking material (TMM) development for temperature measurements. To better understand these issues, a comparison study was undertaken between simulations and measurements of the HITU acoustic field distribution in water and TMM and temperature rise in TMM. For the specific conditions of this study, the following results were obtained. In water, the simulated values for p+ and p- were 3% lower and 10% higher, respectively, than those measured by hydrophone. In TMM, the simulated values for p+ and p- were 2% and 10% higher than those measured by hydrophone, respectively. The simulated spatial-peak temporal-average intensity values in water and TMM were greater than those obtained by hydrophone by 3%. Simulated and measured end-of-sonication temperatures agreed to within their respective uncertainties (coefficients of variation of approximately 20% and 10%, respectively). PMID:25920823

  8. Image formation and system analysis of a scanning tomographic acoustic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Samuel Davis, III

    This dissertation focuses on research that has been conducted to implement an automated Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscope (STAM), and research that has been performed to increase the understanding of the performance characteristics of the STAM. STAM technology permits high resolution microscopy which yields important information on the internal structure and acoustic properties of thick specimens, provided that technology is utilized in a cohesive manner. Prior to the research conducted for this dissertation, only a proof-of-concept STAM had been developed; actual STAM imaging was difficult and impractical. This dissertation describes the hardware and software development that has led to the first automated STAM. It focuses on significant problems that were encountered and their solutions. Specifically, accurate data acquisition necessitated the development of special-purpose data acquisition hardware, rotational controls, frequency controls, and automation controls. Inaccuracies in the laser scanning hardware were identified as a significant source of reconstruction error. This error was removed by estimation and correction algorithms. Rotation of the specimen for multiple-angle tomography required the development of a noise-tolerant projection-pose estimation algorithm. An iterative technique for image enhancement is also presented. The resulting STAM system is evaluated to determine its performance characteristics. A component-wise resolution analysis is presented that specifies the resolution-limit in both range and cross-range. The dependency of reconstruction quality on accurate representation of the magnitude and phase of the detected wave fields is also provided.

  9. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  10. Acoustic system for the estimation of the temporary blood chamber volume of the POLVAD heart supporting prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The paper presents a newly researched acoustic system for blood volume measurements for the developed family of Polish ventricular assist devices. The pneumatic heart-supporting devices are still the preferred solution in some cases, and monitoring of their operation, especially the temporary blood volume, is yet to be solved. Methods The prototype of the POLVAD-EXT prosthesis developed by the Foundation of Cardiac Surgery Development, Zabrze, Poland, is equipped with the newly researched acoustic blood volume measurement system based on the principle of Helmholtz’s acoustic resonance. The results of static volume measurements acquired using the acoustic sensor were verified by measuring the volume of the liquid filling the prosthesis. Dynamic measurements were conducted on the hybrid model of the human cardiovascular system at the Foundation, with the Transonic T410 (11PLX transducer - 5% uncertainty) ultrasound flow rate sensor, used as the reference. Results The statistical analysis of a series of static tests have proved that the sensor solution provides blood volume measurement results with uncertainties (understood as a standard mean deviation) of less than 10%. Dynamic tests show a high correlation between the results of the acoustic system and those obtained by flow rate measurements using an ultrasound transit time type sensor. Conclusions The results show that noninvasive, online temporary blood volume measurements in the POLVAD-EXT prosthesis, making use of the newly developed acoustic system, provides accurate static and dynamic measurements results. Conducted research provides the preliminary view on the possibility of reducing the additional sensor chamber volume in future. PMID:22998766

  11. Assisting the Visually Impaired: Obstacle Detection and Warning System by Acoustic Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Alberto; Yebes, J. Javier; Alcantarilla, Pablo F.; Bergasa, Luis M.; Almazán, Javier; Cela, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is focused on the design of an obstacle detection system for assisting visually impaired people. A dense disparity map is computed from the images of a stereo camera carried by the user. By using the dense disparity map, potential obstacles can be detected in 3D in indoor and outdoor scenarios. A ground plane estimation algorithm based on RANSAC plus filtering techniques allows the robust detection of the ground in every frame. A polar grid representation is proposed to account for the potential obstacles in the scene. The design is completed with acoustic feedback to assist visually impaired users while approaching obstacles. Beep sounds with different frequencies and repetitions inform the user about the presence of obstacles. Audio bone conducting technology is employed to play these sounds without interrupting the visually impaired user from hearing other important sounds from its local environment. A user study participated by four visually impaired volunteers supports the proposed system. PMID:23247413

  12. Ion-acoustic compressive and rarefactive solitons in an electron-beam plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, L.L.; Tiwari, R.S.; Sharma, S.R. )

    1994-03-01

    Using the general formulation of reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg--de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for an electron-beam plasma with hot isothermal beam and plasma electrons and warm ions. The soliton solution of the KdV equation is discussed in detail. It is found that above a critical velocity of electron-beam two additional ion-acoustic soliton branches appear. It is found that corresponding to two linear modes, the system supports the existence of compressive as well as rarefactive solitons depending upon the plasma parameters, while corresponding to other two wave modes, the system supports only rarefactive solitons. The effect of different parameters on the characteristics of solitons have been investigated in detail.

  13. Measurement of the acoustic-to-optical phonon coupling in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caretta, Antonio; Donker, Michiel C.; Perdok, Diederik W.; Abbaszadeh, Davood; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the acoustic-to-optical up-conversion phonon processes in a multicomponent system. These processes take place during heat transport and limit the efficiency of heat flow. By combining time-resolved optical and heat capacity experiments we quantify the thermal coupling constant to be g ˜0.4 1017 W/Km3 . The method is based on selective excitation of a part of a multicomponent system, and the measurement of the thermalization dynamics by probing the linear birefringence of the sample with femtosecond resolution. In particular, we study a layered multiferroic organic-inorganic hybrid, in the vicinity of the ferroelectric phase transition. A diverging term of the heat capacity is associated to soft-mode dynamics, in agreement with previous spectroscopy measurements.

  14. Thermal-Acoustic Analysis of a Metallic Integrated Thermal Protection System Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Marlana N.; Sharma, Anurag; Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A study is undertaken to investigate the response of a representative integrated thermal protection system structure under combined thermal, aerodynamic pressure, and acoustic loadings. A two-step procedure is offered and consists of a heat transfer analysis followed by a nonlinear dynamic analysis under a combined loading environment. Both analyses are carried out in physical degrees-of-freedom using implicit and explicit solution techniques available in the Abaqus commercial finite-element code. The initial study is conducted on a reduced-size structure to keep the computational effort contained while validating the procedure and exploring the effects of individual loadings. An analysis of a full size integrated thermal protection system structure, which is of ultimate interest, is subsequently presented. The procedure is demonstrated to be a viable approach for analysis of spacecraft and hypersonic vehicle structures under a typical mission cycle with combined loadings characterized by largely different time-scales.

  15. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, II: Program structure and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    The main objectives of the investigation reported in this paper, Part II, and its companion paper, Part I, are (a) to provide a formulation, including the mean flow effects and suitable for digital computer automation, of the acoustics of complicated piping systems, and (b) to develop a comprehensive digital computer program for the simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems. In this paper, the digital computer program structure and applications of the program developed, written in Fortran IV, are described. It is concluded that the computer program is versatile and user-friendly. It is capable of providing a great deal of information from one set of input data, and is open-ended and modular for updating.

  16. Vibro-acoustic propagation of gear dynamics in a gear-bearing-housing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yi; Eritenel, Tugan; Ericson, Tristan M.; Parker, Robert G.

    2014-10-01

    This work developed a computational process to predict noise radiation from gearboxes. It developed a system-level vibro-acoustic model of an actual gearbox, including gears, bearings, shafts, and housing structure, and compared the results to experiments. The meshing action of gear teeth causes vibrations to propagate through shafts and bearings to the housing radiating noise. The vibration excitation from the gear mesh and the system response were predicted using finite element and lumped-parameter models. From these results, the radiated noise was calculated using a boundary element model of the housing. Experimental vibration and noise measurements from the gearbox confirmed the computational predictions. The developed tool was used to investigate the influence of standard rolling element and modified journal bearings on gearbox radiated noise.

  17. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Passive acoustic threat detection in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Brian; Sutin, Alexander; Roh, Heui-Seol; Bunin, Barry

    2008-04-01

    The Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) at Stevens Institute of Technology supports research in a range of areas relevant to harbor security, including passive acoustic detection of underwater threats. The difficulties in using passive detection in an urban estuarine environment include intensive and highly irregular ambient noise and the complexity of sound propagation in shallow water. MSL conducted a set of tests in the Hudson River near Manhattan in order to measure the main parameters defining the detection distance of a threat: source level of a scuba diver, transmission loss of acoustic signals, and ambient noise. The source level of the diver was measured by comparing the diver's sound with a reference signal from a calibrated emitter placed on his path. Transmission loss was measured by comparing noise levels of passing ships at various points along their routes, where their distance from the hydrophone was calculated with the help of cameras and custom software. The ambient noise in the Hudson River was recorded under varying environmental conditions and amounts of water traffic. The passive sonar equation was then applied to estimate the range of detection. Estimations were done for a subset of the recorded noise levels, and we demonstrated how variations in the noise level, attenuation, and the diver's source level influence the effective range of detection. Finally, we provided analytic estimates of how an array improves upon the detection distance calculated by a single hydrophone.

  19. Using IMS hydrophone data for detecting submarine volcanic activity: Insights from Monowai, 26°S Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony B.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Rodgers, Mel; Paulatto, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Only little is known on active volcanism in the ocean. As eruptions are attenuated by seawater and fallout does not regularly reach the sea surface, eruption rates and mechanisms are poorly understood. Estimations on the number of active volcanoes across the modern seas range from hundreds to thousands, but only very few active sites are known. Monowai is a submarine volcanic centre in the northern Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of five days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic tertiary waves ('T-phases'), recorded at three broadband seismic stations in the region. We show, using windowed cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that T-phases associated with this eruption are detected as far as Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean, where two bottom-moored hydrophone arrays are operated as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). We observe a high incidence of T-phase arrivals during the time of the eruption, with the angle of arrival stabilizing at the geodesic azimuth between the IMS arrays and Monowai. T-phases from the volcanic centre must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans and over a total geodesic range of approximately 15,800 km, one of the longest source-receiver distances of any naturally occurring underwater signal ever observed. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and two dimensional, long-range, parabolic equation modelling, highlight the exceptional capabilities of the hydroacoustic waveform component of the IMS for remotely detecting episodes of submarine volcanic activity. Using Monowai and the hydrophone arrays at Ascension Island as a natural laboratory, we investigate the long-term eruptive record of a submarine volcano from

  20. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  1. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL. PMID:26978361

  2. AUV Positioning Method Based on Tightly Coupled SINS/LBL for Underwater Acoustic Multipath Propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Hongfei; Chen, Liping; Li, Yao; Tong, Jinwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper researches an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) positioning method based on SINS (Strapdown Inertial Navigation System)/LBL (Long Base Line) tightly coupled algorithm. This algorithm mainly includes SINS-assisted searching method of optimum slant-range of underwater acoustic propagation multipath, SINS/LBL tightly coupled model and multi-sensor information fusion algorithm. Fuzzy correlation peak problem of underwater LBL acoustic propagation multipath could be solved based on SINS positional information, thus improving LBL positional accuracy. Moreover, introduction of SINS-centered LBL locating information could compensate accumulative AUV position error effectively and regularly. Compared to loosely coupled algorithm, this tightly coupled algorithm can still provide accurate location information when there are fewer than four available hydrophones (or within the signal receiving range). Therefore, effective positional calibration area of tightly coupled system based on LBL array is wider and has higher reliability and fault tolerance than loosely coupled. It is more applicable to AUV positioning based on SINS/LBL. PMID:26978361

  3. A wideband connection to sperm whales: A fiber-optic, deep-sea hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerfordt, Anders; Møhl, Bertel; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2007-03-01

    A 10-element, 950 m long, vertical hydrophone array based on fiber-optic data transmission has been developed primarily for studying the beam pattern from deep diving cetaceans emitting sonar pulses. The array elements have a configurable sampling rate and resolution with a maximum signal bandwidth of 90 kHz and a maximum dynamic range of 133 dB. The array has been deployed from a 14 m ketch with a crew of four. In the course of the development a number of mechanical and electrical problems have been solved.

  4. Breadboard sized photo-acoustic spectroscopy system using an FPGA based lock-in amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, John F.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Giza, Mark M.

    2015-05-01

    Over the past several years we have developed a photo-acoustic spectroscopic (PAS) technique for trace gas detection that is capable of parts per trillion (ppt) detection limits. The desire to reduce the size of the system has led to several efforts that have reduced the size of the various components of the system. We have reduced the dimensions of the resonant cell to micrometer scale (MEMS). We have worked with Daylight Solutions to reduce the size of the tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) used in the system. In this paper we demonstrate the reduction in size of the entire system to a 12" x 12" footprint. We do this by implementing the lock-in amplifier on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) demonstration board that is also capable of acting as the system controller and data output device. We briefly describe the digital lock-in amplifier and sketch our implementation on the FPGA. We go on to compare the spectroscopic data we collected using this system with data we collected using a large rack mounted Stanford Research Systems SR830 lock-in amplifier and a PC.

  5. A debugging system for azimuthally acoustic logging tools based on modular and hierarchical design ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Ju, X. D.; Lu, J. Q.; Men, B. Y.

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of modular and hierarchical design ideas, this study presents a debugging system for an azimuthally sensitive acoustic bond tool (AABT). The debugging system includes three parts: a personal computer (PC), embedded front-end machine and function expansion boards. Modular and hierarchical design ideas are conducted in all design and debug processes. The PC communicates with the front-end machine via the Internet, and the front-end machine and function expansion boards connect each other by the extended parallel bus. In this method, the three parts of the debugging system form stable and high-speed data communication. This study not only introduces the system-level debugging and sub-system level debugging of the tool but also the debugging of the analogue signal processing board, which is important and greatly used in logging tools. Experiments illustrate that the debugging system can greatly improve AABT verification and calibration efficiency and that, board-level debugging can examine and improve analogue signal processing boards. The design thinking is clear and the design structure is reasonable, thus making it easy to extend and upgrade the debugging system.

  6. Wind, waves, and acoustic background levels at Station ALOHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duennebier, Fred K.; Lukas, Roger; Nosal, Eva-Marie; Aucan, JéRome; Weller, Robert A.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency spectra from deep-ocean near-bottom acoustic measurements obtained contemporaneously with wind, wave, and seismic data are described and used to determine the correlations among these data and to discuss possible causal relationships. Microseism energy appears to originate in four distinct regions relative to the hydrophone: wind waves above the sensors contribute microseism energy observed on the ocean floor; a fraction of this local wave energy propagates as seismic waves laterally, and provides a spatially integrated contribution to microseisms observed both in the ocean and on land; waves in storms generate microseism energy in deep water that travels as seismic waves to the sensor; and waves reflected from shorelines provide opposing waves that add to the microseism energy. Correlations of local wind speed with acoustic and seismic spectral time series suggest that the local Longuet-Higgins mechanism is visible in the acoustic spectrum from about 0.4 Hz to 80 Hz. Wind speed and acoustic levels at the hydrophone are poorly correlated below 0.4 Hz, implying that the microseism energy below 0.4 Hz is not typically generated by local winds. Correlation of ocean floor acoustic energy with seismic spectra from Oahu and with wave spectra near Oahu imply that wave reflections from Hawaiian coasts, wave interactions in the deep ocean near Hawaii, and storms far from Hawaii contribute energy to the seismic and acoustic spectra below 0.4 Hz. Wavefield directionality strongly influences the acoustic spectrum at frequencies below about 2 Hz, above which the acoustic levels imply near-isotropic surface wave directionality.

  7. Multi-system Acoustic Survey in Hecate Basin for Geohazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, S. F.; Rohr, K. M.; Chapman, N.; Beaudet, F.; Sutherland, G.

    2002-12-01

    In May and June of 2002, a geophysical survey was performed in southern Hecate Strait to assess sea floor and subsurface geohazards. The survey comprises a portion of a research program to study the impact of potential hydrocarbon exploration and production in Hecate Basin as part of the multidisciplinary NSERC/SSHRC funded Coast Under Stress project. Data were collected on 100 miles of survey lines over a grid consisting of 10 north-south lines crossed by 10 east-west lines with a line separation of 0.5 mile. Water depths were relatively uniform, ranging from 230-260 m over the area. 64-channel multichannel seismic data using a 120 cu in airgun source were collected for deep subsurface structural mapping. The shallow subsurface was imaged using the Huntec high-resolution seismic system with a boomer source. 50 KHz Simrad echosounder data suitable for seafloor classification were collected using Quester Tangent Corporation's QTC-V system. A standard geophysical seismic facies interpretation of the Huntec data suggested the shallow subsurface is composed of 3 units: (a) The lowest unit is composed of Tertiary siltstones/sandstones. This unit is highly folded/faulted, due to Miocene/Pliocene tectonism, and often is incised by paleochannels. (b) Overlying these sediments is a unit that has a relatively transparent acoustic facies. This unit likely represents Pleistocene glacial till. Its upper surface often outcrops at the seafloor, forming prominent moraine-like features at the seafloor. When overlain by the uppermost unit, it forms a strong reflector at that interface, though its continuity is often disrupted by gas that is present near that contact (c) The uppermost acoustic unit is relatively transparent and infills topographic lows and reaches a maximum thickness of 15 meters. It is likely composed of silts/sands. Seafloor classification of the echosounder data using feature extraction and cluster analysis indicates that this unit is somewhat acoustically

  8. Deconvolution methods and systems for the mapping of acoustic sources from phased microphone arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for mapping acoustic sources determined from a phased microphone array. A plurality of microphones are arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations thereof. A linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can be formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. A full-rank equation derived from the linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can then be iteratively determined. A full-rank can be attained by the solution requirement of the positivity constraint equivalent to the physical assumption of statically independent noise sources at each N location. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with the phased microphone array in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing the beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  9. Research on ponderomotive driven Vlasov–Poisson system in electron acoustic wave parametric region

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, C. Z.; Huang, T. W.; Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; He, X. T.; Qiao, B.

    2014-03-15

    Theoretical analysis and corresponding 1D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of ponderomotive driven Vlasov–Poisson system in electron acoustic wave (EAW) parametric region are demonstrated. Theoretical analysis identifies that under the resonant condition, a monochromatic EAW can be excited when the wave number of the drive ponderomotive force satisfies 0.26≲k{sub d}λ{sub D}≲0.53. If k{sub d}λ{sub D}≲0.26, nonlinear superposition of harmonic waves can be resonantly excited, called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear waves. Numerical simulations have demonstrated these wave excitation and evolution dynamics, in consistence with the theoretical predictions. The physical nature of these two waves is supposed to be interaction of harmonic waves, and their similar phase space properties are also discussed.

  10. The stability of freely-propagating ion acoustic waves in 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    The stability of a freely-propagating ion acoustic wave (IAW) is a basic science problem that is made difficult by the need to resolve electron kinetic effects over a timescale that greatly exceeds the IAW period during numerical simulation. Recent results examining IAW stability using a 1D+1V Vlasov-Poisson solver indicate that instability is a fundamental property of IAWs that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to ICF experiments. We present here new results addressing the fundamental question of IAW stability across a broad range of plasma conditions in a 2D+2V system using LOKI, ranging from a regime of relatively weak to a regime of relatively strong ion kinetic effects. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL (DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD Program at LLNL (12-ERD-061).

  11. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-12-01

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive-inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and dramatically

  12. Validation of an acoustic location system to monitor Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) long calls.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Brigitte; van Noordwijk, Maria A; Willems, Erik P; Mitra Setia, Tatang; Wipfli, Urs; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-07-01

    The long call is an important vocal communication signal in the widely dispersed, semi-solitary orangutan. Long calls affect individuals' ranging behavior and mediate social relationships and regulate encounters between dispersed individuals in a dense rainforest. The aim of this study was to test the utility of an Acoustic Location System (ALS) for recording and triangulating the loud calls of free-living primates. We developed and validated a data extraction protocol for an ALS used to record wild orangutan males' long calls at the Tuanan field site (Central Kalimantan). We installed an ALS in a grid of 300 ha, containing 20 SM2+ recorders placed in a regular lattice at 500 m intervals, to monitor the distribution of calling males in the area. The validated system had the following main features: (i) a user-trained software algorithm (Song Scope) that reliably recognized orangutan long calls from sound files at distances up to 700 m from the nearest recorder, resulting in a total area of approximately 900 ha that could be monitored continuously; (ii) acoustic location of calling males up to 200 m outside the microphone grid, which meant that within an area of approximately 450 ha, call locations could be calculated through triangulation. The mean accuracy was 58 m, an error that is modest relative to orangutan mobility and average inter-individual distances. We conclude that an ALS is a highly effective method for detecting long-distance calls of wild primates and triangulating their position. In combination with conventional individual focal follow data, an ALS can greatly improve our knowledge of orangutans' social organization, and is readily adaptable for studying other highly vocal animals. PMID:25773926

  13. Comparative evaluation of Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the OSS-1 payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    On, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) payload is presented. The results provide insight into the characteristics of vibroacoustic response of pallet payload components in the payload bay during STS flights.

  14. NASA/Army Rotorcraft Technology. Volume 2: Materials and Structures, Propulsion and Drive Systems, Flight Dynamics and Control, and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Conference Proceedings is a compilation of over 30 technical papers presented which report on the advances in rotorcraft technical knowledge resulting from NASA, Army, and industry research programs over the last 5 to 10 years. Topics addressed in this volume include: materials and structures; propulsion and drive systems; flight dynamics and control; and acoustics.

  15. Design and utilization of a portable seismic/acoustic calibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, B.W.; Pearson, D.C.

    1996-10-01

    Empirical results from the current GSETT-3 illustrate the need for source specific information for the purpose of calibrating the monitoring system. With the specified location design goal of 1,000 km{sup 2}, preliminary analysis indicates the importance of regional calibration of travel times. This calibration information can be obtained in a passive manner utilizing locations derived from local seismic array arrival times and assumes the resulting locations are accurate. Alternatively, an active approach to the problem can be undertaken, attempting to make near-source observations of seismic sources of opportunity to provide specific information on the time, location and characteristics of the source. Moderate to large mining explosions are one source type that may be amenable to such calibration. This paper describes an active ground truthing procedure for regional calibration. A prototype data acquisition system that includes the primary ground motion component for source time and location determination, and secondary, optional acoustic and video components for improved source phenomenology is discussed. The system costs approximately $25,000 and can be deployed and operated by one to two people thus providing a cost effective system for calibration and documentation of sources of interest. Practical implementation of the system is illustrated, emphasizing the minimal impact on an active mining operation.

  16. Elements for a conformity assessment system in acoustics, vibrations and ultrasound in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria-Villagomez, Salvador; Elias-Juarez, Alfredo

    2002-11-01

    Conformity assessment in acoustics, vibrations, and ultrasound have great relevance for human health, safety, and environmental protection. Due to this fact, it is usually the government and public agencies that promote, together with the National Standards Institute (NSI) and representatives from the whole society, the development and continuous updating of standards and regulations. Besides appropriate regulations, conformity evaluation requires the existence and fitness of, at least, two other elements: adequate measuring capabilities and a proper system of consequences. The measuring capabilities are embodied in the infrastructure that goes from the National Metrology Institute (NMI) to the calibration and testing laboratories and verification units. The system of consequences, the means by which compliance with regulations can be verified and required, can be established by the same government and public agencies (GPA) of the field of work in which the regulation has been developed. In Mexico, a conformity assessment system of this kind has been evolving rapidly during the past 10 years, since the establishment of CENAM. The paper will present a proposed conformity assessment system, arising from a comparison of the Mexican system with those of other countries.

  17. A training system of orientation and mobility for blind people using acoustic virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yoshikazu; Sato, Tetsuji

    2011-02-01

    A new auditory orientation training system was developed for blind people using acoustic virtual reality (VR) based on a head-related transfer function (HRTF) simulation. The present training system can reproduce a virtual training environment for orientation and mobility (O&M) instruction, and the trainee can walk through the virtual training environment safely by listening to sounds such as vehicles, stores, ambient noise, etc., three-dimensionally through headphones. The system can reproduce not only sound sources but also sound reflection and insulation, so that the trainee can learn both sound location and obstacle perception skills. The virtual training environment is described in extensible markup language (XML), and the O&M instructor can edit it easily according to the training curriculum. Evaluation experiments were conducted to test the efficiency of some features of the system. Thirty subjects who had not acquired O&M skills attended the experiments. The subjects were separated into three groups: a no-training group, a virtual-training group using the present system, and a real-training group in real environments. The results suggested that virtual-training can reduce "veering" more than real-training and also can reduce stress as much as real training. The subjective technical and anxiety scores also improved. PMID:20805059

  18. Range estimation of bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) calls in the Arctic using a single hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Julien; Thode, Aaron M; Blackwell, Susanna B; Kim, Katherine; Macrander, A Michael

    2014-07-01

    Bowhead whales generate low-frequency calls in shallow-water Arctic environments, whose dispersive propagation characteristics are well modeled by normal mode theory. As each mode propagates with a different group speed, a call's range can be inferred by the relative time-frequency dispersion of the modal arrivals. Traditionally, at close ranges modal arrivals are separated using synchronized hydrophone arrays. Here a nonlinear signal processing method called "warping" is used to filter the modes on just a single hydrophone. The filtering works even at relatively short source ranges, where distinct modal arrivals are not separable in a conventional spectrogram. However, this warping technique is limited to signals with monotonically increasing or decreasing frequency modulations, a relatively common situation for bowhead calls. Once modal arrivals have been separated, the source range can be estimated using conventional modal dispersion techniques, with the original source signal structure being recovered as a by-product. Twelve bowhead whale vocalizations recorded near Kaktovik (Alaska) in 2010, with signal-to-noise ratios between 6 and 23 dB, are analyzed, and the resulting single-receiver range estimates are consistent with those obtained independently via triangulation from widely-distributed vector sensor arrays. Geoacoustic inversions for each call are necessary in order to obtain the correct ranges. PMID:24993202

  19. Three-dimensional tracking of Cuvier's beaked whales' echolocation sounds using nested hydrophone arrays.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2015-10-01

    Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) were tracked using two volumetric small-aperture (∼1 m element spacing) hydrophone arrays, embedded into a large-aperture (∼1 km element spacing) seafloor hydrophone array of five nodes. This array design can reduce the minimum number of nodes that are needed to record the arrival of a strongly directional echolocation sound from 5 to 2, while providing enough time-differences of arrivals for a three-dimensional localization without depending on any additional information such as multipath arrivals. To illustrate the capabilities of this technique, six encounters of up to three Cuvier's beaked whales were tracked over a two-month recording period within an area of 20 km(2) in the Southern California Bight. Encounter periods ranged from 11 min to 33 min. Cuvier's beaked whales were found to reduce the time interval between echolocation clicks while alternating between two inter-click-interval regimes during their descent towards the seafloor. Maximum peak-to-peak source levels of 179 and 224 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m were estimated for buzz sounds and on-axis echolocation clicks (directivity index = 30 dB), respectively. Source energy spectra of the on-axis clicks show significant frequency components between 70 and 90 kHz, in addition to their typically noted FM upsweep at 40-60 kHz. PMID:26520330

  20. Passive geoacoustic inversion with a single hydrophone using broadband ship noise.

    PubMed

    Gervaise, C; Kinda, B G; Bonnel, J; Stéphan, Y; Vallez, S

    2012-03-01

    An inversion scheme is proposed, relying upon the inversion of the noise of a moving ship measured on a single distant hydrophone. The spectrogram of the measurements exhibits striations which depend on waveguide parameters. The periodic behavior of striations versus range are used to estimate the differences of radial wavenumber between couples of propagative modes at a given frequency. These wavenumber differences are stacked for several frequencies to form the relative dispersion curves. Such relative dispersion curves can be synthesized using a propagation model feeded with a bottom geoacoustic model. Inversion is performed by looking for the bottom properties that optimize the fit between measured and predicted relative dispersion curves. The inversion scheme is tested on simulated data. The conclusions are twofold: (1) a minimum 6 dB signal to noise ratio is required to obtained an unbiased estimate of compressional sound speed in the bottom with a 3 m s(-1) standard deviation; however, even with low signal to noise ratio, the estimation error remains bounded and (2) in the case of a multi-layer bottom, the scheme produces a single depth-average compressional sound speed. The inversion scheme is applied on experimental data. The results are fully consistent with a core sample measured around the receiving hydrophone. PMID:22423697

  1. Coherent acoustic communication in a tidal estuary with busy shipping traffic.

    PubMed

    van Walree, Paul A; Neasham, Jeffrey A; Schrijver, Marco C

    2007-12-01

    High-rate acoustic communication experiments were conducted in a dynamic estuarine environment. Two current profilers deployed in a shipping lane were interfaced with acoustic modems, which modulated and transmitted the sensor readings every 200 s over a period of four days. QPSK modulation was employed at a raw data rate of 8 kbits on a 12-kHz carrier. Two 16-element hydrophone arrays, one horizontal and one vertical, were deployed near the shore. A multichannel decision-feedback equalizer was used to demodulate the modem signals received on both arrays. Long-term statistical analysis reveals the effects of the tidal cycle, subsea unit location, attenuation by the wake of passing vessels, and high levels of ship-generated noise on the fidelity of the communication links. The use of receiver arrays enables vast improvement in the overall reliability of data delivery compared with a single-receiver system, with performance depending strongly on array orientation. The vertical array offers the best performance overall, although the horizontal array proves more robust against shipping noise. Spatial coherence estimates, variation of array aperture, and inspection of array angular responses point to adaptive beamforming and coherent combining as the chief mechanisms of array gain. PMID:18247758

  2. Mach-Zehnder interferometric photonic crystal fiber for low acoustic frequency detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Dnyandeo; Rao, Ch. N.; Choubey, Ravi Kant; Kale, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency under-water acoustic signal detections are challenging, especially for marine applications. A Mach-Zehnder interferometric hydrophone is demonstrated using polarization-maintaining photonic-crystal-fiber (PM-PCF), spliced between two single-mode-fibers, operated at 1550 nm source. These data are compared with standard hydrophone, single-mode and multimode fiber. The PM-PCF sensor shows the highest response with a power shift (2.32 dBm) and a wavelength shift (392.8 pm) at 200 Hz. High birefringence values and the effect of the imparted acoustic pressure on this fiber, introducing the difference between the fast and slow axis changes, owing to the phase change in the propagation waves, demonstrate the strain-optic properties of the sensor.

  3. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  4. Acoustic monitoring system to quantify ingestive behavior of free-grazing cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to estimate intake in grazing livestock include using markers, visual observation, mechanical sensors that respond to jaw movement and acoustic recording. In most of the acoustic monitoring studies, the microphone is inverted on the forehead of the grazing livestock and the skull is utilize...

  5. Systems and methods of monitoring acoustic pressure to detect a flame condition in a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Krull, Anthony Wayne; Healy, Timothy Andrew , Yilmaz, Ertan

    2011-05-17

    A method may detect a flashback condition in a fuel nozzle of a combustor. The method may include obtaining a current acoustic pressure signal from the combustor, analyzing the current acoustic pressure signal to determine current operating frequency information for the combustor, and indicating that the flashback condition exists based at least in part on the current operating frequency information.

  6. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  7. Time-reversal acoustic focusing system as a virtual random phased array.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Fillinger, Laurent; Gavrilov, Leonid

    2010-04-01

    This paper compares the performance of two different systems for dynamic focusing of ultrasonic waves: conventional 2-D phased arrays (PA) and a focusing system based on the principles of time-reversed acoustics (TRA). Focused ultrasound fields obtained in the experiments with the TRA focusing system (TRA FS), which employs a liquid-filled reverberator with 4 piezotransducers attached to its wall, are compared with the focused fields obtained by mathematical simulation of PAs comprised from several tens to several hundreds of elements distributed randomly on the array surface. The experimental and simulated focusing systems had the same aperture and operated at a frequency centered about 600 kHz. Experimental results demonstrated that the TRA FS with a small number of channels can produce complex focused patterns and can steer them with efficiency comparable to that of a PA with hundreds of elements. It is shown that the TRA FS can be realized using an extremely simple means, such as a reverberator made of a water-filled plastic bottle with just a few piezotransducers attached to its walls. PMID:20378444

  8. Surface acoustic wave sensor array system for trace organic vapor detection using pattern recognition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Grate, Jay W.; Klusty, Mark

    1993-03-01

    A sensor system using surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors has been fabricated and tested against hazardous organic vapors, simulants of these vapors, and potential background vapors. The vapor tests included two- and three-component mixtures, and covered a wide relative humidity range. The sensor system was compared of four SAW devices coated with different sorbent materials with different vapor selectivities. Preconcentrators were included to improve sensitivity. The vapor experiments were organized into a large data set analyzed using pattern recognition techniques. Pattern recognition algorithms were developed to identify two different classes of hazards. The algorithms were verified against a second data set not included in the training. Excellent sensitivity was achieved by the sensor coatings, and the pattern recognition analysis, and was also examined by the preconcentrators. The system can detect hazardous vapors of interest in the ppb range even in varying relative humidity and in the presence of background vapors. The system does not false alarm to a variety of other vapors including gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel and cigarette smoke.

  9. A wireless demodulation system for passive surface acoustic wave torque sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiaojun; Fan, Yanping; Qi, Hongli; Chen, Jing; Han, Tao; Cai, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are utilized as torque sensors for their passive and wireless features. However, the response of a SAW torque sensor is difficult to detect because of the transient response duration and interruption of channel noise, which limit the application of SAW torque sensors. The sensitive mechanism and response function of a passive wireless SAW torque sensor are analyzed in this study. A novel demodulation system involving both hardware and software is developed for the SAW torque sensor. A clipping amplifier is utilized in the hardware to widen the dynamic response range and increase the length of the valid signal. Correlation extension and centroid algorithms are designed to lengthen the received signal and improve the estimation accuracy of the center frequency of the response signal, respectively. Meanwhile, a fast binary search algorithm is proposed to accelerate the scanning cycle according to the developed response function. Finally, the SAW torque sensor demodulation system is set up and SAW resonators with high sensitivity are fabricated on a quartz substrate. The presented demodulation system is tested, and a standard deviation of 0.28 kHz is achieved. This value is much smaller than that of classic and modern spectrum estimation methods. The sensitivity of resonance frequency shift versus torque on the shaft of the assembled senor is 2.03 kHz/Nm; the coefficient of determination is 0.999, and the linearity is 0.87%. Experimental results verify the validity and feasibility of the proposed SAW torque sensor demodulation system.

  10. Properties of materials using acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apfel, R. E.

    1984-10-01

    Our goal of characterizing materials using acoustic waves was forwarded through a number of projects: (1) We have refined our modulated radiation pressure technique for characterizing the interfaces between liquids so that we can automatically track changes in interfacial tension over time due to contaminants, surfactants, etc. (2) We have improved and simplified our acoustic scattering apparatus for measuring distributions of the properties of microparticle samples, which will allow us to distinguish particulates in liquids by size, compressibility, and density. (3) We are continuing work on theoretical approaches to nonlinear acoustics which should permit us to cast problems with geometric and other complexities into a manageable form. (4) Our studies of cavitation have enabled us to derive an analytic expression which predicts the acoustic pressure threshold for cavitation at the micrometer scale - where surface tension effects are important. This work has relevance to the consideration of possible bioeffects from diagnostic ultrasound. (5) Other projects include the calibration of hydrophones using acoustically levitated samples, and the investigation of solitary waves of the sort discovered by Wu, Keolian and Rudnick.

  11. Vertical Acoustic Arrays in the Deep Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, F.

    2002-12-01

    The R/P FLIP has made possible the deployments of vertical arrays to study sound propagation and ambient noise in the deep ocean in ways never before possible from existing research vessels. Long vertical arrays can be deployed without the flow noise contamination from platform motion, long a bane for making such studies. The vertical stability of FLIP combined with the deep mooring capability developed by Earl D. Bronson made it possible to deploy multi-element arrays beginning with a versatile 20 element array with variable spacing developed by Bill Whitney in Fred Spiess's group. The 20 element array consisted of bungee mounted hydrophones in metal cages at either uniform spacing or variable spacing to meet directivity or other requirements. It was assembled on station in the vertical and deployed to the desired depths for the elements. Gerald Morris at MPL conducted ambient noise studies using variable spacing of the elements to below the critical depth as well as in the water column above. Vic Anderson used it for his DIMUS processing system for detecting low level signals masked by ambient noise. As a 500 meter array, I used it for a series of CONTRACK (Continuous Tracking of signals at long range) experiments to resolve multipaths so they wouldn't interfere with one another. The VEKA vertical array developed by Rick Swenson of NORDA was deployed in very deep (below 3300 m) water by Dan Ramsdale of NORDA using the winch and double lay armored cable on FLIP, the same cable system for the MPL 20 element array. In my group Bruce Williams designed a rapidly deployable array to study vertical anisotropy of ambient noise as a function of range from near shore shipping via downslope conversion in a series of 48 hours FLIP stations 350, 1000 and 1500 miles from the Pacific coast. A short 120 element array, 1000 meters long, was built by John Hildebrands's group for a test of matched field processing and the SLICE experiment in acoustic tomography research of Peter

  12. In-plane ultrasonic needle tracking using a fiber-optic hydrophone

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Wenfeng Desjardins, Adrien E.; Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon J.; Ginsberg, Yuval; David, Anna L.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate and efficient guidance of needles to procedural targets is critically important during percutaneous interventional procedures. Ultrasound imaging is widely used for real-time image guidance in a variety of clinical contexts, but with this modality, uncertainties about the location of the needle tip within the image plane lead to significant complications. Whilst several methods have been proposed to improve the visibility of the needle, achieving accuracy and compatibility with current clinical practice is an ongoing challenge. In this paper, the authors present a method for directly visualizing the needle tip using an integrated fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in conjunction with the imaging probe used to acquire B-mode ultrasound images. Methods: Needle visualization and ultrasound imaging were performed with a clinical ultrasound imaging system. A miniature fiber-optic ultrasound hydrophone was integrated into a 20 gauge injection needle tip to receive transmissions from individual transducer elements of the ultrasound imaging probe. The received signals were reconstructed to create an image of the needle tip. Ultrasound B-mode imaging was interleaved with needle tip imaging. A first set of measurements was acquired in water and tissue ex vivo with a wide range of insertion angles (15°–68°) to study the accuracy and sensitivity of the tracking method. A second set was acquired in an in vivo swine model, with needle insertions to the brachial plexus. A third set was acquired in an in vivo ovine model for fetal interventions, with insertions to different locations within the uterine cavity. Two linear ultrasound imaging probes were used: a 14–5 MHz probe for the first and second sets, and a 9–4 MHz probe for the third. Results: During insertions in tissue ex vivo and in vivo, the imaged needle tip had submillimeter axial and lateral dimensions. The signal-to-noise (SNR) of the needle tip was found to depend on the insertion angle. With

  13. Remote ballistic emplacement of an electro-optical and acoustic target detection and localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Aaron; Mellini, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled non line of sight (NLOS) and beyond line of sight (BLOS) environments is critical in the asymmetric battlefield of future conflicts. The ability to detect and accurately locate hostile forces in difficult terrain or urban environments can dramatically increase the survivability and effectiveness of dismounted soldiers, especially when they are limited to the resources available only to the small unit. The Sensor Mortar Network (SMortarNet) is a 60mm Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mortar designed to give the Squad near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled NLOS environments. SMortarNet is designed to track targets both acoustically and electro optically and can fuse tracks between, the acoustic, EO, and magnetic modalities on board. The system is linked to other mortar nodes and the user via a masterless frequency hopping spread spectrum ad-hoc mesh radio network. This paper will discuss SMortarNet in the context of a squad level dismounted soldier, its technical capabilities, and its benefit to the small unit Warfighter. The challenges with ballistic remote emplacement of sensitive components and the on board signal processing capabilities of the system will also be covered. The paper will also address how the sensor network can be integrated with existing soldier infrastructure, such as the NettWarrior platform, for rapid transition to soldier systems. Networks of low power sensors can have many forms, but the more practical networks for warfighters are ad hoc radio-based systems that can be rapidly deployed and can leverage a range of assets available at a given time. The low power long life networks typically have limited bandwidth and may have unreliable communication depending on the network health, which makes autonomous sensors a critical component of the network. SMortarNet reduces data to key information features at the sensor itself. The smart sensing approach enables

  14. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera

    PubMed Central

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera. PMID:27089344

  15. An Alignment Method for the Integration of Underwater 3D Data Captured by a Stereovision System and an Acoustic Camera.

    PubMed

    Lagudi, Antonio; Bianco, Gianfranco; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Bruno, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The integration of underwater 3D data captured by acoustic and optical systems is a promising technique in various applications such as mapping or vehicle navigation. It allows for compensating the drawbacks of the low resolution of acoustic sensors and the limitations of optical sensors in bad visibility conditions. Aligning these data is a challenging problem, as it is hard to make a point-to-point correspondence. This paper presents a multi-sensor registration for the automatic integration of 3D data acquired from a stereovision system and a 3D acoustic camera in close-range acquisition. An appropriate rig has been used in the laboratory tests to determine the relative position between the two sensor frames. The experimental results show that our alignment approach, based on the acquisition of a rig in several poses, can be adopted to estimate the rigid transformation between the two heterogeneous sensors. A first estimation of the unknown geometric transformation is obtained by a registration of the two 3D point clouds, but it ends up to be strongly affected by noise and data dispersion. A robust and optimal estimation is obtained by a statistical processing of the transformations computed for each pose. The effectiveness of the method has been demonstrated in this first experimentation of the proposed 3D opto-acoustic camera. PMID:27089344

  16. The multipath propagation effect in gunshot acoustics and its impact on the design of sniper positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, António L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald

    2013-06-01

    Counter sniper systems rely on the detection and parameter estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast in order to determine the sniper location. In real-world situations, these acoustical signals can be disturbed by natural phenomena like weather and climate conditions, multipath propagation effect, and background noise. While some of these issues have received some attention in recent publications with application to gunshot acoustics, the multipath propagation phenomenon whose effect can not be neglected, specially in urban environments, has not yet been discussed in details in the technical literature in the same context. Propagating sound waves can be reflected at the boundaries in the vicinity of sound sources or receivers, whenever there is a difference in acoustical impedance between the reflective material and the air. Therefore, the received signal can be composed of a direct-path signal plus N scaled delayed copies of that signal. This paper presents a discussion on the multipath propagation effect and its impact on the performance and reliability of sniper positioning systems. In our formulation, propagation models for both the shockwave and the muzzle blast are considered and analyzed. Conclusions following the theoretical analysis of the problem are fully supported by actual gunshots acoustical signatures.

  17. Parametrized data-driven decomposition for bifurcation analysis, with application to thermo-acoustically unstable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter J.; Richecoeur, Franck; Durox, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) belongs to a class of data-driven decomposition techniques, which extracts spatial modes of a constant frequency from a given set of numerical or experimental data. Although the modal shapes and frequencies are a direct product of the decomposition technique, the determination of the respective modal amplitudes is non-unique. In this study, we introduce a new algorithm for defining these amplitudes, which is capable of capturing physical growth/decay rates of the modes within a transient signal and is otherwise not straightforward using the standard DMD algorithm. In addition, a parametric DMD algorithm is introduced for studying dynamical systems going through a bifurcation. The parametric DMD alleviates multiple applications of the DMD decomposition to the system with fixed parametric values by including the bifurcation parameter in the decomposition process. The parametric DMD with amplitude correction is applied to a numerical and experimental data sequence taken from thermo-acoustically unstable systems. Using DMD with amplitude correction, we are able to identify the dominant modes of the transient regime and their respective growth/decay rates leading to the final limit-cycle. In addition, by applying parametrized DMD to images of an oscillating flame, we are able to identify the dominant modes of the bifurcation diagram.

  18. Detection of nonlinear distortions in the vibration of acoustically driven mechanical systems using heterodyne vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, J. R. M.; Dirckx, J. J. J.; Pintelon, R.

    2008-06-01

    Recently, a measurement set-up was presented to detect small nonlinear distortions in the vibration of acoustically driven mechanical systems. A speaker generates a specially designed multisine excitation signal that drives the vibration of a test object. The generated sound pressure is measured with a probe microphone in front of the test object, and an heterodyne vibrometer measures the corresponding vibration. Due to the high degree of linearity of the heterodyne technique, very small nonlinear distortions can be detected. In this paper the set-up is used to verify whether small nonlinear distortions are present in the vibration of the middle ear system, which is classically considered to be a completely linear system. In vitro measurements on the right ear of an adult male gerbil proved that nonlinear distortions are present in the vibration of the tympanic membrane. Similar results were seen in measurements on the left ear. The influence of post-mortem changes on the nonlinear behaviour of the middle ear was verified in a number of successive measurements. These indicated that the nonlinear behaviour of the middle ear decreases in time.

  19. Test-bench system for a borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianping; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Liu, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool (BAAR) is a new generation of imaging logging tool, which is able to investigate stratums in a relatively larger range of space around the borehole. The BAAR is designed based on the idea of modularization with a very complex structure, so it has become urgent for us to develop a dedicated test-bench system to debug each module of the BAAR. With the help of a test-bench system introduced in this paper, test and calibration of BAAR can be easily achieved. The test-bench system is designed based on the client/server model. The hardware system mainly consists of a host computer, an embedded controlling board, a bus interface board, a data acquisition board and a telemetry communication board. The host computer serves as the human machine interface and processes the uploaded data. The software running on the host computer is designed based on VC++. The embedded controlling board uses Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Machines 7 (ARM7) as the micro controller and communicates with the host computer via Ethernet. The software for the embedded controlling board is developed based on the operating system uClinux. The bus interface board, data acquisition board and telemetry communication board are designed based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and provide test interfaces for the logging tool. To examine the feasibility of the test-bench system, it was set up to perform a test on BAAR. By analyzing the test results, an unqualified channel of the electronic receiving cabin was discovered. It is suggested that the test-bench system can be used to quickly determine the working condition of sub modules of BAAR and it is of great significance in improving production efficiency and accelerating industrial production of the logging tool.

  20. Acoustic Monitoring System for Frog Population Estimation Using In-Situ Progressive Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboudan, Adam

    Frog populations are considered excellent bio-indicators and hence the ability to monitor changes in their populations can be very useful for ecological research and environmental monitoring. This thesis presents a new population estimation approach based on the recognition of individual frogs of the same species, namely the Pseudacris Regilla (Pacific Chorus Frog), which does not rely on the availability of prior training data. An in-situ progressive learning algorithm is developed to determine whether an incoming call belongs to a previously detected individual frog or a newly encountered individual frog. A temporal call overlap detector is also presented as a pre-processing tool to eliminate overlapping calls. This is done to prevent the degrading of the learning process. The approach uses Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) and multivariate Gaussian models to achieve individual frog recognition. In the first part of this thesis, the MFCC as well as the related linear predictive cepstral coefficients (LPCC) acoustic feature extraction processes are reviewed. The Gaussian mixture models (GMM) are also reviewed as an extension to the classical Gaussian modeling used in the proposed approach. In the second part of this thesis, the proposed frog population estimation system is presented and discussed in detail. The proposed system involves several different components including call segmentation, feature extraction, overlap detection, and the in-situ progressive learning process. In the third part of the thesis, data description and system performance results are provided. The process of synthetically generating test sequences of real frog calls, which are applied to the proposed system for performance analysis, is described. Also, the results of the system performance are presented which show that the system is successful in distinguishing individual frogs, hence capable of providing reasonable estimates of the frog population. The system can readily be