Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic telemetry array

  1. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  2. Embedded Acoustic Sensor Array for Engine Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Feasibility of Noise Telemetry via Wireless Smart Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Bauch, Matthew; Raible, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines have evolved into a highly complex system to meet ever-increasing demands. The evolution of engine technologies has primarily been driven by fuel efficiency, reliability, as well as engine noise concerns. One of the sources of engine noise is pressure fluctuations that are induced on the stator vanes. These local pressure fluctuations, once produced, propagate and coalesce with the pressure waves originating elsewhere on the stator to form a spinning pressure pattern. Depending on the duct geometry, air flow, and frequency of fluctuations, these spinning pressure patterns are self-sustaining and result in noise which eventually radiate to the far-field from engine. To investigate the nature of vane pressure fluctuations and the resulting engine noise, unsteady pressure signatures from an array of embedded acoustic sensors are recorded as a part of vane noise source diagnostics. Output time signatures from these sensors are routed to a control and data processing station adding complexity to the system and cable loss to the measured signal. "Smart" wireless sensors have data processing capability at the sensor locations which further increases the potential of wireless sensors. Smart sensors can process measured data locally and transmit only the important information through wireless communication. The aim of this wireless noise telemetry task was to demonstrate a single acoustic sensor wireless link for unsteady pressure measurement, and thus, establish the feasibility of distributed smart sensors scheme for aircraft engine vane surface unsteady pressure data transmission and characterization.

  3. Optimization of an acoustic telemetry array for detecting transmitter-implanted fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Jepsen, D.; Karnowski, M.; Schreck, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    The development of miniature acoustic transmitters and economical, robust automated receivers has enabled researchers to study the movement patterns and survival of teleosts in estuarine and ocean environments, including many species and age-classes that were previously considered too small for implantation. During 2001-2003, we optimized a receiver mooring system to minimize gear and data loss in areas where current action or wave action and acoustic noise are high. In addition, we conducted extensive tests to determine (1) the performance of a transmitter and receiver (Vemco, Ltd.) that are widely used, particularly in North America and Europe and (2) the optimal placement of receivers for recording the passage of fish past a point in a linear-flow environment. Our results suggest that in most locations the mooring system performs well with little loss of data; however, boat traffic remains a concern due to entanglement with the mooring system. We also found that the reception efficiency of the receivers depends largely on the method and location of deployment. In many cases, we observed a range of 0-100% reception efficiency (the percentage of known transmissions that are detected while the receiver is within range of the transmitter) when using a conventional method of mooring. The efficiency was improved by removal of the mounting bar and obstructions from the mooring line. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  4. An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-03-24

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The oil and gas industry has led in most of the attempts to develop this type of telemetry system; however, very substantial efforts have also been made through government sponsored work in the geothermal industry. None of these previous attempts have lead to a commercial telemetry system. Conceptually, the problem looks easy. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quite low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal Waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested

  5. An overview of acoustic telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quire low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested; existing field test data need to be analyzed for transmission bandwidth and attenuation; and the new and less expensive methods of collecting data on transmission path quality need to be incorporated into this effort. 11 refs.

  6. Acoustic telemetry study to improve drilling data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    Scientists at Sandia Natl. Laboratories hope to master a technique to improve measurement-while-drilling information rates 100-fold. These researchers are advancing acoustic telemetry--the transmission of data by means of sound waves along drillpipe from deep within a well--at a new surface-simulation facility in Albuquerque, NM, after years of unsuccessful, short-term studies by many private companies. The existing data-transmission system, called mud pulse, constricts drilling fluid with a downhole valve to send a series of pulses similar to a Morse code to provide information about the bit location. But mud pulse delivers data at low rates--about one data bit per second. Acoustic telemetry could dramatically improve those rates. The basic idea of acoustic telemetry is to produce a sound wave at the bottom of a well and allow the wave to run up the drillpipe to the surface. The hardware, or transducer, emitting the wave must produce sounds with wavelengths that can negotiate the long drill string. The wavelengths also must be compatible with power supplies available deep in the well. At the surface, data can be extracted form the sound waves to complete the transmission.

  7. Results of wide-angle underwater acoustic-telemetry tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, D.E.

    1982-03-01

    Acoustic telemetry provides wireless communication between subsurface ocean instrumentation systems and surface receiving equipment. Sandia National Laboratories' high data rate acoustic telemetry system has previously been demonstrated in water depths to 1600 feet and vertical cone angles to 70/sup 0/. Design changes and tests of the system are discussed showing that it can operate within vertical cone angles of 145/sup 0/.

  8. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  9. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1993-06-22

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  10. Acoustic telemetry: The new MWD system

    SciTech Connect

    Tochikawa, T.; Sakai, T.; Taniguchi, R.; Shimada, T.

    1996-12-31

    A new MWD system utilizing acoustic telemetry system has been researched, based on the principle of elastic wave propagation and magnetostrictive technology. The system is intended for data transmission through jointed drill strings with much higher reliability and transmitting efficiency. In order to achieve a good acoustical propagation characteristics through the drillstring the elastic wave signal requirements have had to be less than 1 kHz. The development of an optimum oscillator that generates such a low elastic wave frequency under harsh drilling conditions has been one of the technical breakthroughs. In this regard, one of the features of the system is the use of a magnetostrictive material as an oscillator in the transmitter. Utilzing the phenomena in which a magnetostrictive material as an oscillator in the transmitter. Utilizing the phenomena in which a magnetostrictive material drastically distorts by applying magnetic field to it, the oscillator generates and elastic wave for propagation and transmission through the drill strings. Several field tests have proven that the system could transmit canned data from the depth of 1914 meters and data demodulation at the surface free from troubles while drilling forty nine (49) degrees deviated well. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of wave propagation characteristics which the authors are assured that practical MWD equipment with higher than normal transmission rates can be developed and commercialized. Since the system can offer several unique features especially in terms of miniaturization and non-dependence on drilling fluids it can be applied to the emerging technologies such as slim-hole drilling, coiled tubing drilling, local communication on the bottom hole assembly. Furthermore it can offer wider application for the drilling environment such as underbalanced drilling.

  11. A fast and accurate decoder for underwater acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, J. M.; Deng, Z. D.; Li, X.; Fu, T.; McMichael, G. A.; Trumbo, B. A.

    2014-07-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has been used to monitor the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through hydroelectric facilities in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Cabled hydrophone arrays deployed at dams receive coded transmissions sent from acoustic transmitters implanted in fish. The signals' time of arrival on different hydrophones is used to track fish in 3D. In this article, a new algorithm that decodes the received transmissions is described and the results are compared to results for the previous decoding algorithm. In a laboratory environment, the new decoder was able to decode signals with lower signal strength than the previous decoder, effectively increasing decoding efficiency and range. In field testing, the new algorithm decoded significantly more signals than the previous decoder and three-dimensional tracking experiments showed that the new decoder's time-of-arrival estimates were accurate. At multiple distances from hydrophones, the new algorithm tracked more points more accurately than the previous decoder. The new algorithm was also more than 10 times faster, which is critical for real-time applications on an embedded system.

  12. A fast and accurate decoder for underwater acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, J M; Deng, Z D; Li, X; Fu, T; McMichael, G A; Trumbo, B A

    2014-07-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has been used to monitor the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through hydroelectric facilities in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Cabled hydrophone arrays deployed at dams receive coded transmissions sent from acoustic transmitters implanted in fish. The signals' time of arrival on different hydrophones is used to track fish in 3D. In this article, a new algorithm that decodes the received transmissions is described and the results are compared to results for the previous decoding algorithm. In a laboratory environment, the new decoder was able to decode signals with lower signal strength than the previous decoder, effectively increasing decoding efficiency and range. In field testing, the new algorithm decoded significantly more signals than the previous decoder and three-dimensional tracking experiments showed that the new decoder's time-of-arrival estimates were accurate. At multiple distances from hydrophones, the new algorithm tracked more points more accurately than the previous decoder. The new algorithm was also more than 10 times faster, which is critical for real-time applications on an embedded system. PMID:25085162

  13. An explosive acoustic telemetry system for seabed penetrators

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, G.C.; Hickerson, J.

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the design and past applications of an explosive acoustic telemetry system (EATS) for gathering and transmitting data from seabed penetrators. The system was first fielded in 1982 and has since been used to measure penetrator performance on three other occasions. Descriptions are given of the mechanical hardware, system electronics, and software.

  14. Design of an acoustic telemetry system for rebreathers.

    PubMed

    Egi, S M

    2009-01-01

    Despite the abundance of telemetric applications for ecology, behavior and physiology of marine life, few efforts were reported about the use of acoustic telemetry for SCUBA divers. The objective of this study is to design and test an acoustic telemetry system for monitoring breathing gases of a Dräger Dolphin semi-closed circuit rebreather as well as the depth of the diver. The system is designed around a PC based surface unit and a microcontroller based diver carried module that digitizes the output of CO2 and O2 sensors located in the inhalation side of the canister. One pair of acoustic modems establishes the data link between the microcontroller and the topside PC. The graphical user interface is written in C# and enables the recording of the diving session as well. The system is calibrated in a hyperbaric chamber and tested successfully with four dives in three different environments using 100% O2 and Nitrox (47.9% O2 - 52.1% N2) up to 15 m depth and a distance of 40 m between acoustic modems. The telemetry data cannot be used only for recording physiological data but also provides an important operational safety tool to monitor the rebreather user. The future designs will include actuators for controlling the diluent and oxygen flow to closed circuit mix gas rebreathers.

  15. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  16. Upscaling behavioural studies to the field using acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Gustav; Klaminder, Jonatan; Jonsson, Micael; Fick, Jerker; Brodin, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory-based behavioural assays are often used in ecotoxicological studies to assess the environmental risk of aquatic contaminants. While results from such laboratory-based risk assessments may be difficult to extrapolate to natural environments, technological advancements over the past decade now make it possible to perform risk assessments through detailed studies of exposed individuals in natural settings. Acoustic telemetry is a technology to monitor movement and behaviour of aquatic organism in oceans, lakes, and rivers. The technology allows for tracking of multiple individuals simultaneously with very high temporal and spatial resolution, with the option to incorporate sensors to measure various physiological and environmental parameters. Although frequently used in fisheries research, aquatic ecotoxicology has been slow to adopt acoustic telemetry as a tool in field-based studies. This mini-review intends to introduce acoustic telemetry to aquatic ecotoxicologists, focusing on the potential of the technology to bridge the gap between laboratory assays and natural behaviours when making toxicological risk assessments. PMID:26683267

  17. Acoustic Telemetry Studies of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Survival at the Lower Columbia Projects in 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; McComas, Roy L.

    2008-02-01

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct three studies using acoustic telemetry to estimate detection probabilities and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon at three hydropower projects on the lower Columbia River. The primary goals were to estimate detection and survival probabilities based on sampling with JSATS equipment, assess the feasibility of using JSATS for survival studies, and estimate sample sizes needed to obtain a desired level of precision in future studies. The 2006 JSATS arrays usually performed as well or better than radio telemetry arrays in the JDA and TDA tailwaters, and underperformed radio arrays in the BON tailwater, particularly in spring. Most of the probabilities of detection on at least one of all arrays in a tailwater exceeded 80% for each method, which was sufficient to provide confidence in survival estimates. The probability of detection on one of three arrays includes survival and detection probabilities because fish may die or pass all three arrays undetected but alive.

  18. Acoustic telemetry reveals cryptic residency of whale sharks.

    PubMed

    Cagua, E Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E M; Rohner, Christoph A; Prebble, Clare E M; Sinclair-Taylor, Tane H; Pierce, Simon J; Berumen, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Although whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) have been documented to move thousands of kilometres, they are most frequently observed at a few predictable seasonal aggregation sites. The absence of sharks at the surface during visual surveys has led to the assumption that sharks disperse to places unknown during the long 'off-seasons' at most of these locations. Here we compare 2 years of R. typus visual sighting records from Mafia Island in Tanzania to concurrent acoustic telemetry of tagged individuals. Sightings revealed a clear seasonal pattern with a peak between October and February and no sharks observed at other times. By contrast, acoustic telemetry demonstrated year-round residency of R. typus. The sharks use a different habitat in the off-season, swimming deeper and further away from shore, presumably in response to prey distributions. This behavioural change reduces the sharks' visibility, giving the false impression that they have left the area. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, year-round residency of unprovisioned, individual R. typus at an aggregation site, and highlight the importance of using multiple techniques to study the movement ecology of marine megafauna.

  19. Acoustic telemetry reveals cryptic residency of whale sharks

    PubMed Central

    Cagua, E. Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E. M.; Rohner, Christoph A.; Prebble, Clare E. M.; Sinclair-Taylor, Tane H.; Pierce, Simon J.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Although whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) have been documented to move thousands of kilometres, they are most frequently observed at a few predictable seasonal aggregation sites. The absence of sharks at the surface during visual surveys has led to the assumption that sharks disperse to places unknown during the long ‘off-seasons’ at most of these locations. Here we compare 2 years of R. typus visual sighting records from Mafia Island in Tanzania to concurrent acoustic telemetry of tagged individuals. Sightings revealed a clear seasonal pattern with a peak between October and February and no sharks observed at other times. By contrast, acoustic telemetry demonstrated year-round residency of R. typus. The sharks use a different habitat in the off-season, swimming deeper and further away from shore, presumably in response to prey distributions. This behavioural change reduces the sharks' visibility, giving the false impression that they have left the area. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, year-round residency of unprovisioned, individual R. typus at an aggregation site, and highlight the importance of using multiple techniques to study the movement ecology of marine megafauna. PMID:25832816

  20. Microcontroller-based underwater acoustic ECG telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Istepanian, R S; Woodward, B

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents a microcontroller-based underwater acoustic telemetry system for digital transmission of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The system is designed for the real time, through-water transmission of data representing any parameter, and it was used initially for transmitting in multiplexed format the heart rate, breathing rate and depth of a diver using self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA). Here, it is used to monitor cardiovascular reflexes during diving and swimming. The programmable capability of the system provides an effective solution to the problem of transmitting data in the presence of multipath interference. An important feature of the paper is a comparative performance analysis of two encoding methods, Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) and Pulse Position Modulation (PPM).

  1. A compact presentation of DSN array telemetry performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The telemetry performance of an arrayed receiver system, including radio losses, is often given by a family of curves giving bit error rate vs bit SNR, with tracking loop SNR at one receiver held constant along each curve. This study shows how to process this information into a more compact, useful format in which the minimal total signal power and optimal carrier suppression, for a given fixed bit error rate, are plotted vs data rate. Examples for baseband-only combining are given. When appropriate dimensionless variables are used for plotting, receiver arrays with different numbers of antennas and different threshold tracking loop bandwidths look much alike, and a universal curve for optimal carrier suppression emerges.

  2. Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Transmitter Downsize Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Myjak, Mitchell J.

    2010-04-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the use of an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to reduce the weight and volume of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters while retaining current functionality. Review of the design of current JSATS transmitters identified components that could be replaced by an ASIC while retaining the function of the current transmitter and offering opportunities to extend function if desired. ASIC design alternatives were identified that could meet transmitter weight and volume targets of 200 mg and 100 mm3. If alternatives to the cylindrical batteries used in current JSATS transmitters can be identified, it could be possible to implant ASIC-based JSATS transmitters by injection rather than surgery. Using criteria for the size of fish suitable for surgical implantation of current JSATS transmitters, it was concluded that fish as small as 70 mm in length could be implanted with an ASIC-based transmitter, particularly if implantation by injection became feasible.

  3. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  4. Acoustically driven arrayed waveguide grating.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Poveda, A; Hernández-Mínguez, A; Gargallo, B; Biermann, K; Tahraoui, A; Santos, P V; Muñoz, P; Cantarero, A; de Lima, M M

    2015-08-10

    We demonstrate compact tunable phased-array wavelength-division multiplexers driven by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in the low GHz range. The devices comprise two couplers, which respectively split and combine the optical signal, linked by an array of single-mode waveguides (WGs). Two different layouts are presented, in which multi-mode interference couplers or free propagating regions were separately employed as couplers. The multiplexers operate on five equally distributed wavelength channels, with a spectral separation of 2 nm. A standing SAW modulates the refractive index of the arrayed WGs. Each wavelength component periodically switches paths between the output channel previously asigned by the design and the adjacent channels, at a fixed applied acoustic power. The devices were monolithically fabricated on (Al,Ga)As. A good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved.

  5. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  6. Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage

  7. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Smith, James A.; Jewell, James Keith

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  8. Using passive acoustic telemetry to infer mortality events in adult herbivorous coral reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, J. A.; Welsh, J. Q.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2016-06-01

    Mortality is considered to be an important factor shaping the structure of coral reef fish communities, but data on the rate and nature of mortality of adult coral reef fishes are sparse. Mortality on coral reefs is intrinsically linked with predation, with most evidence suggesting that predation is highest during crepuscular periods. We tested this hypothesis using passive acoustic telemetry data to determine the time of day of potential mortality events (PMEs) of adult herbivorous reef fishes. A total of 94 fishes were tagged with acoustic transmitters, of which 43 exhibited a PME. Furthermore, we identified five categories of PMEs based on the nature of change in acoustic signal detections from tagged fishes. The majority of PMEs were characterised by an abrupt stop in detections, possibly as a result of a large, mobile predator. Overall, mortality rates were estimated to be approximately 59 % per year using passive acoustic telemetry. The time of day of PMEs suggests that predation was highest during the day and crepuscular periods and lowest at night, offering only partial support for the crepuscular predation hypothesis. Visually oriented, diurnal and crepuscular predators appear to be more important than their nocturnal counterparts in terms of predation on adult reef fishes. By timing PMEs, passive acoustic telemetry may offer an important new tool for investigating the nature of predation on coral reefs.

  9. An acoustic telemetry system for a sahllow-eater under-ice Arctic environment

    SciTech Connect

    DePinto, V.; Kosalos, J.G.; Lanter, S.

    1983-05-01

    A new underwater acoustic telemetry system has been developed for long-range medium-rate, full duplex digital data transmission in a shallow water, under-ice Arctic environment. Prior to design of the system, acoustic properties of three ice-covered transmission channels were evaluated in experiments in the Canadian Arctic, near Resolute Bay. The three channels, each ranging to 4500 m in length, were characterized by their water depth profiles: In the first, one end of the channel was 100 m deep, while the other end was 10 m deep; in the second, one end was 100 m deep, while the other end was 200 m deep; in the third, the water depth was constant at 100 m. Results of the Arctic experiment are presented here, along with a discussion of the design concepts used to optimize the telemetry system for low error rates in a severe multipath environment. Acoustic telemetry can be used to advantage whenever digital data must be transmitted under water. The present system was developed under contract with the Canadian Government, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, for a remotely piloted vehicle being developed by the Bedford Institute of Oceanography for evaluation and use by the Canadian Hydrographic Service. The telemetry system will be used to transmit control signals and data, both to and from the vehicle.

  10. Integrating acoustic telemetry into mark-recapture models to improve the precision of apparent survival and abundance estimates.

    PubMed

    Dudgeon, Christine L; Pollock, Kenneth H; Braccini, J Matias; Semmens, Jayson M; Barnett, Adam

    2015-07-01

    Capture-mark-recapture models are useful tools for estimating demographic parameters but often result in low precision when recapture rates are low. Low recapture rates are typical in many study systems including fishing-based studies. Incorporating auxiliary data into the models can improve precision and in some cases enable parameter estimation. Here, we present a novel application of acoustic telemetry for the estimation of apparent survival and abundance within capture-mark-recapture analysis using open population models. Our case study is based on simultaneously collecting longline fishing and acoustic telemetry data for a large mobile apex predator, the broadnose sevengill shark (Notorhynchus cepedianus), at a coastal site in Tasmania, Australia. Cormack-Jolly-Seber models showed that longline data alone had very low recapture rates while acoustic telemetry data for the same time period resulted in at least tenfold higher recapture rates. The apparent survival estimates were similar for the two datasets but the acoustic telemetry data showed much greater precision and enabled apparent survival parameter estimation for one dataset, which was inestimable using fishing data alone. Combined acoustic telemetry and longline data were incorporated into Jolly-Seber models using a Monte Carlo simulation approach. Abundance estimates were comparable to those with longline data only; however, the inclusion of acoustic telemetry data increased precision in the estimates. We conclude that acoustic telemetry is a useful tool for incorporating in capture-mark-recapture studies in the marine environment. Future studies should consider the application of acoustic telemetry within this framework when setting up the study design and sampling program.

  11. Application of surface acoustic wave devices to radio telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strasilla, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experimental Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators (SAWR) are developed and evaluated. A desired center frequency is obtained by correct spacing of the Inter-Digital Transducers (IDT). Transmitting and receiving IDT's must be close for adequate coupling and a sufficient number of reflectors are required to create a high quality standing wave. A review of oscillator theory is given and current technology evaluated.

  12. A Methodological Framework to Estimate the Site Fidelity of Tagged Animals Using Passive Acoustic Telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Capello, Manuela; Robert, Marianne; Soria, Marc; Potin, Gael; Itano, David; Holland, Kim; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Dagorn, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of the use of passive acoustic telemetry technologies has facilitated unprecedented opportunities for studying the behavior of marine organisms in their natural environment. This technological advance would greatly benefit from the parallel development of dedicated methodologies accounting for the variety of timescales involved in the remote detection of tagged animals related to instrumental, environmental and behavioral events. In this paper we propose a methodological framework for estimating the site fidelity (“residence times”) of acoustic tagged animals at different timescales, based on the survival analysis of continuous residence times recorded at multiple receivers. Our approach is validated through modeling and applied on two distinct datasets obtained from a small coastal pelagic species (bigeye scad, Selar crumenophthalmus) and a large, offshore pelagic species (yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares), which show very distinct spatial scales of behavior. The methodological framework proposed herein allows estimating the most appropriate temporal scale for processing passive acoustic telemetry data depending on the scientific question of interest. Our method provides residence times free of the bias inherent to environmental and instrumental noise that can be used to study the small scale behavior of acoustic tagged animals. At larger timescales, it can effectively identify residence times that encompass the diel behavioral excursions of fish out of the acoustic detection range. This study provides a systematic framework for the analysis of passive acoustic telemetry data that can be employed for the comparative study of different species and study sites. The same methodology can be used each time discrete records of animal detections of any nature are employed for estimating the site fidelity of an animal at different timescales. PMID:26261985

  13. A Methodological Framework to Estimate the Site Fidelity of Tagged Animals Using Passive Acoustic Telemetry.

    PubMed

    Capello, Manuela; Robert, Marianne; Soria, Marc; Potin, Gael; Itano, David; Holland, Kim; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Dagorn, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of the use of passive acoustic telemetry technologies has facilitated unprecedented opportunities for studying the behavior of marine organisms in their natural environment. This technological advance would greatly benefit from the parallel development of dedicated methodologies accounting for the variety of timescales involved in the remote detection of tagged animals related to instrumental, environmental and behavioral events. In this paper we propose a methodological framework for estimating the site fidelity ("residence times") of acoustic tagged animals at different timescales, based on the survival analysis of continuous residence times recorded at multiple receivers. Our approach is validated through modeling and applied on two distinct datasets obtained from a small coastal pelagic species (bigeye scad, Selar crumenophthalmus) and a large, offshore pelagic species (yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares), which show very distinct spatial scales of behavior. The methodological framework proposed herein allows estimating the most appropriate temporal scale for processing passive acoustic telemetry data depending on the scientific question of interest. Our method provides residence times free of the bias inherent to environmental and instrumental noise that can be used to study the small scale behavior of acoustic tagged animals. At larger timescales, it can effectively identify residence times that encompass the diel behavioral excursions of fish out of the acoustic detection range. This study provides a systematic framework for the analysis of passive acoustic telemetry data that can be employed for the comparative study of different species and study sites. The same methodology can be used each time discrete records of animal detections of any nature are employed for estimating the site fidelity of an animal at different timescales.

  14. A Methodological Framework to Estimate the Site Fidelity of Tagged Animals Using Passive Acoustic Telemetry.

    PubMed

    Capello, Manuela; Robert, Marianne; Soria, Marc; Potin, Gael; Itano, David; Holland, Kim; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Dagorn, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of the use of passive acoustic telemetry technologies has facilitated unprecedented opportunities for studying the behavior of marine organisms in their natural environment. This technological advance would greatly benefit from the parallel development of dedicated methodologies accounting for the variety of timescales involved in the remote detection of tagged animals related to instrumental, environmental and behavioral events. In this paper we propose a methodological framework for estimating the site fidelity ("residence times") of acoustic tagged animals at different timescales, based on the survival analysis of continuous residence times recorded at multiple receivers. Our approach is validated through modeling and applied on two distinct datasets obtained from a small coastal pelagic species (bigeye scad, Selar crumenophthalmus) and a large, offshore pelagic species (yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares), which show very distinct spatial scales of behavior. The methodological framework proposed herein allows estimating the most appropriate temporal scale for processing passive acoustic telemetry data depending on the scientific question of interest. Our method provides residence times free of the bias inherent to environmental and instrumental noise that can be used to study the small scale behavior of acoustic tagged animals. At larger timescales, it can effectively identify residence times that encompass the diel behavioral excursions of fish out of the acoustic detection range. This study provides a systematic framework for the analysis of passive acoustic telemetry data that can be employed for the comparative study of different species and study sites. The same methodology can be used each time discrete records of animal detections of any nature are employed for estimating the site fidelity of an animal at different timescales. PMID:26261985

  15. Tracking Three-Dimensional Fish Behavior with a New Marine Acoustic Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosnan, Ian G.; McGarry, Louise P.; Greene, Charles H.; Steig, Tracey W.; Johnston, Samuel V.; Ehrenberg, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The persistent monitoring capability provided by acoustic telemetry systems allows us to study behavior, movement, and resource selection of mobile marine animals. Current marine acoustic telemetry systems are challenged by localization errors and limits in the number of animals that can be tracked simultaneously. We designed a new system to provide detection ranges of up to 1 km, to reduce localization errors to less than 1 m, and to increase to 500 the number of unique tags simultaneously tracked. The design builds on HTIs experience of more than a decade developing acoustic telemetry systems for freshwater environments. A field trial of the prototype system was conducted at the University of Washingtons Friday Harbor Marine Laboratory (Friday Harbor, WA). Copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) were selected for field trials of this new system because their high site-fidelity and small home ranges provide ample opportunity to track individual fish behavior while testing our ability to characterize the movements of a species of interest to management authorities.

  16. Home range and diel behavior of the ballan wrasse, Labrus bergylta, determined by acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Ríos, David; Alós, Josep; March, David; Palmer, Miquel; Mucientes, Gonzalo; Saborido-Rey, Fran

    2013-07-01

    Effective fisheries management needs to consider spatial behavior in addition to more traditional aspects of population dynamics. Acoustic telemetry has been extensively used to provide information on fish movements over different temporal and spatial scales. Here, we used a fixed-receiver array to examine the movement patterns of Labrus bergylta Ascanius 1767, a species highly targeted by the artisanal fleet of Galicia, NW Spain. Data from 25 individuals was assessed for a period of 71 days between September and November 2011 in the Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park. Fish were present within the monitored area more than 92% of the monitored time. The estimated size of individual home ranges, i.e. the area where fish spent most of their time, was small. The total minimum convex polygons area based on all the estimated positions was 0.133 ± 0.072 km2, whereas the home range size estimated using a 95% kernel distribution of the estimated positions was 0.091 ± 0.031 km2. The core area (50% kernel) was 0.019 ± 0.006 km2. L. bergylta exhibited different patterns of movement in the day versus the night, with 92% of the fish detected more frequently and traveling longer distances during the daytime. In addition, 76% of the fish displayed a larger home range during the day versus during the night. The linearity index was less than 0.005 for all fish suggesting random movements but within a relatively small area, and the volume of intersection index between consecutive daily home ranges was 0.75 ± 0.13, suggesting high site fidelity. The small home range and the sedentary behavior of L. bergylta highlight the potential use of small MPAs as a management tool to ensure a sustainable fishery for this important species.

  17. Acoustic Telemetry Validates a Citizen Science Approach for Monitoring Sharks on Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Gabriel M. S.; Meekan, Mark G.; Bornovski, Tova H.; Meeuwig, Jessica J.

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science is promoted as a simple and cost-effective alternative to traditional approaches for the monitoring of populations of marine megafauna. However, the reliability of datasets collected by these initiatives often remains poorly quantified. We compared datasets of shark counts collected by professional dive guides with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks collected at the same coral reef sites over a period of five years. There was a strong correlation between the number of grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) observed by dive guides and the telemetry data at both daily and monthly intervals, suggesting that variation in relative abundance of sharks was detectable in datasets collected by dive guides in a similar manner to data derived from telemetry at these time scales. There was no correlation between the number or mean depth of sharks recorded by telemetry and the presence of tourist divers, suggesting that the behaviour of sharks was not affected by the presence of divers during our study. Data recorded by dive guides showed that current strength and temperature were important drivers of the relative abundance of sharks at monitored sites. Our study validates the use of datasets of shark abundance collected by professional dive guides in frequently-visited dive sites in Palau, and supports the participation of experienced recreational divers as contributors to long-term monitoring programs of shark populations. PMID:24760081

  18. Acoustic telemetry validates a citizen science approach for monitoring sharks on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Gabriel M S; Meekan, Mark G; Bornovski, Tova H; Meeuwig, Jessica J

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science is promoted as a simple and cost-effective alternative to traditional approaches for the monitoring of populations of marine megafauna. However, the reliability of datasets collected by these initiatives often remains poorly quantified. We compared datasets of shark counts collected by professional dive guides with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks collected at the same coral reef sites over a period of five years. There was a strong correlation between the number of grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) observed by dive guides and the telemetry data at both daily and monthly intervals, suggesting that variation in relative abundance of sharks was detectable in datasets collected by dive guides in a similar manner to data derived from telemetry at these time scales. There was no correlation between the number or mean depth of sharks recorded by telemetry and the presence of tourist divers, suggesting that the behaviour of sharks was not affected by the presence of divers during our study. Data recorded by dive guides showed that current strength and temperature were important drivers of the relative abundance of sharks at monitored sites. Our study validates the use of datasets of shark abundance collected by professional dive guides in frequently-visited dive sites in Palau, and supports the participation of experienced recreational divers as contributors to long-term monitoring programs of shark populations. PMID:24760081

  19. Acoustic telemetry validates a citizen science approach for monitoring sharks on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Gabriel M S; Meekan, Mark G; Bornovski, Tova H; Meeuwig, Jessica J

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science is promoted as a simple and cost-effective alternative to traditional approaches for the monitoring of populations of marine megafauna. However, the reliability of datasets collected by these initiatives often remains poorly quantified. We compared datasets of shark counts collected by professional dive guides with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks collected at the same coral reef sites over a period of five years. There was a strong correlation between the number of grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) observed by dive guides and the telemetry data at both daily and monthly intervals, suggesting that variation in relative abundance of sharks was detectable in datasets collected by dive guides in a similar manner to data derived from telemetry at these time scales. There was no correlation between the number or mean depth of sharks recorded by telemetry and the presence of tourist divers, suggesting that the behaviour of sharks was not affected by the presence of divers during our study. Data recorded by dive guides showed that current strength and temperature were important drivers of the relative abundance of sharks at monitored sites. Our study validates the use of datasets of shark abundance collected by professional dive guides in frequently-visited dive sites in Palau, and supports the participation of experienced recreational divers as contributors to long-term monitoring programs of shark populations.

  20. Acoustic pressure-vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dehua; Elswick, Roy C.; McEachern, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Pressure-vector sensors measure both scalar and vector components of the acoustic field. December 2003 measurements at the NUWC Seneca Lake test facility verify previous observations that acoustic ambient noise spectrum levels measured by acoustic intensity sensors are reduced relative to either acoustic pressure or acoustic vector sensor spectrum levels. The Seneca measurements indicate a reduction by as much as 15 dB at the upper measurement frequency of 2500 Hz. A nonlinear array synthesis theory for pressure-vector sensors will be introduced that allows smaller apertures to achieve narrow beams. The significantly reduced ambient noise of individual pressure-vector elements observed in the ocean by others, and now at Seneca Lake, should allow a nonlinearly combined array to detect significantly lower levels than has been observed in previous multiplicative processing of pressure sensors alone. Nonlinear array synthesis of pressure-vector sensors differs from conventional super-directive algorithms that linearly combine pressure elements with positive and negative weights, thereby reducing the sensitivity of conventional super-directive arrays. The much smaller aperture of acoustic pressure-vector sensor arrays will be attractive for acoustic systems on underwater vehicles, as well as for other applications that require narrow beam acoustic receivers. [The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of ONR and NUWC.

  1. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Mark A; Deng, Z Daniel; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J; Thronas, Aaron I; Eppard, M Brad

    2011-01-01

    In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS. PMID:22163918

  2. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: Part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-05-26

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District started development of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS), a nonproprietary technology, in 2001 to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 federal dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters, and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in 2 or 3-dimensions as the fish passed at the facility for determining route of passage. The additional route of passage information, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities and through the FCRPS.

  3. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Mark A; Deng, Z Daniel; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J; Thronas, Aaron I; Eppard, M Brad

    2011-01-01

    In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS.

  4. Micro-battery Development for Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Honghao; Cartmell, Samuel S.; Wang, Qiang; Lozano, Terence J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Li, Huidong; Chen, Xilin; Yuan, Yong; Gross, Mark E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-21

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) project supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has yielded the smallest acoustic fish tag transmitter commercially available to date. In order to study even smaller fish populations and make the transmitter injectable by needles, the JSATS acoustic micro transmitter needs to be further downsized. This study focuses on the optimization of microbattery design based on Li/CFx chemistry. Through appropriate modifications, a steady high-rate pulse current with desirable life time has been achieved while the weight and volume of the battery is largely reduced. The impedance variation in as-designed microbatteries is systematically compared with that of currently used watch batteries in JSATS with an attempt to understand the intrinsic factors that control the performances of microbatteries under the real testing environments.

  5. A digital correlative accumulation and its application to underwater acoustic telemetry, telecontrol and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianzeng

    1984-12-01

    A specific digital time correlative accumulation has been developed. It is an adaptable scheme of signal processing for underwater acoustic technology used in telemetry., telecontrol and some remote sensing. Its basic principle is here introduced and the prospects for successful use in an acoustic channel with multipath, time-space variables and high noise level are amply discussed. The performances of this scheme are analysed. The digital time auto-correlative accumulation has been used in two types of acoustic releases, and the cross-correlative accumulation has been used in a shallow water targets telementer. There are some advantageous performances with these devices, for example, the effective range of release can reach about 4 nautical miles in a much complex shallow water area such as that in Xiamen Harbor where the depth ranges from 3 to 30 m, and the targets telemeter can normally keep working in even shallower water area.

  6. Interagency telemetry arraying for Voyager-Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. W.; Brundage, W. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Kent, S. S.; Bartos, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The reception capability of the Deep Space Network (DSN) has been improved over the years by increasing both the size and number of antennas at each complex to meet spacecraft-support requirements. However, even more aperture was required for the final planetary encounters of the Voyager 2 spacecraft. This need was met by arraying one radio astronomy observatory with the DSN complex in the United States and another with the complex in Australia. Following a review of augmentation for the Uranus encounter, both the preparation at the National Radio Astronomy (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) and the Neptune encounter results for the Parkes-Canberra and VLA-Goldstone arrays are presented.

  7. Numerical comparison of acoustic wedge models, with application to ultrasonic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Lü, B; Darmon, M; Fradkin, L; Potel, C

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic telemetry imaging systems are used to monitor such immersed structures as main vessels of nuclear reactors. The interaction between acoustic beams and targets involves scattering phenomena, mainly specular reflection and tip diffraction. In order to assist in the design of imaging systems, a simulation tool is required for the accurate modeling of such phenomena. Relevant high-frequency scattering models have been developed in electromagnetic applications, in particular, the geometrical optics (GO), Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and its uniform corrections (UAT and UTD), Kirchhoff approximation (KA) and Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD). Before adopting any of them for simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by edged immersed rigid bodies, it is important to realize that in acoustics the characteristic dimension to the wave length ratio is usually considerably smaller than in electromagnetics and a further study is required to identify models' advantages, disadvantages and regions of applicability. In this paper their numerical comparison is carried out. As the result, the most suitable algorithm is identified for simulating ultrasonic telemetry of immersed rigid structures. PMID:26476465

  8. Numerical comparison of acoustic wedge models, with application to ultrasonic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Lü, B; Darmon, M; Fradkin, L; Potel, C

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic telemetry imaging systems are used to monitor such immersed structures as main vessels of nuclear reactors. The interaction between acoustic beams and targets involves scattering phenomena, mainly specular reflection and tip diffraction. In order to assist in the design of imaging systems, a simulation tool is required for the accurate modeling of such phenomena. Relevant high-frequency scattering models have been developed in electromagnetic applications, in particular, the geometrical optics (GO), Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and its uniform corrections (UAT and UTD), Kirchhoff approximation (KA) and Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD). Before adopting any of them for simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by edged immersed rigid bodies, it is important to realize that in acoustics the characteristic dimension to the wave length ratio is usually considerably smaller than in electromagnetics and a further study is required to identify models' advantages, disadvantages and regions of applicability. In this paper their numerical comparison is carried out. As the result, the most suitable algorithm is identified for simulating ultrasonic telemetry of immersed rigid structures.

  9. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival Proportions at John Day Dam, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Kim, Jin A.; Johnson, Gary E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Khan, Fenton; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, J. R.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Meyer, Matthew M.

    2011-09-28

    The overall purpose of the acoustic telemetry study at JDA during 2009 was to determine the best configuration and operation for JDA prior to conducting BiOp performance standard tests. The primary objective was to determine the best operation between 30% and 40% spill treatments. Route-specific and JDA to TDA forebay survival estimates, passage distribution, and timing/behavior metrics were used for comparison of 30% to a 40% spill treatments. A secondary objective was to evaluate the performance of TSWs installed in spill bays 15 and 16 and to estimate fish survival rates and passage efficiencies under 30% and 40% spill-discharge treatments each season.

  10. Acoustic telemetry reveals large-scale migration patterns of walleye in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayden, Todd A.; Holbrook, Christopher; Fielder, David G.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Fish migration in large freshwater lacustrine systems such as the Laurentian Great Lakes is not well understood. The walleye (Sander vitreus) is an economically and ecologically important native fish species throughout the Great Lakes. In Lake Huron walleye has recently undergone a population expansion as a result of recovery of the primary stock, stemming from changing food web dynamics. During 2011 and 2012, we used acoustic telemetry to document the timing and spatial scale of walleye migration in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. Spawning walleye (n = 199) collected from a tributary of Saginaw Bay were implanted with acoustic tags and their migrations were documented using acoustic receivers (n = 140) deployed throughout U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. Three migration pathways were described using multistate mark-recapture models. Models were evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion. Fish sex did not influence migratory behavior but did affect migration rate and walleye were detected on all acoustic receiver lines. Most (95%) tagged fish migrated downstream from the riverine tagging and release location to Saginaw Bay, and 37% of these fish emigrated from Saginaw Bay into Lake Huron. Remarkably, 8% of walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay were detected at the acoustic receiver line located farthest from the release location more than 350 km away. Most (64%) walleye returned to the Saginaw River in 2012, presumably for spawning. Our findings reveal that fish from this stock use virtually the entirety of U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron.

  11. Acoustic Telemetry Reveals Large-Scale Migration Patterns of Walleye in Lake Huron

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Todd A.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Fielder, David G.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Fish migration in large freshwater lacustrine systems such as the Laurentian Great Lakes is not well understood. The walleye (Sander vitreus) is an economically and ecologically important native fish species throughout the Great Lakes. In Lake Huron walleye has recently undergone a population expansion as a result of recovery of the primary stock, stemming from changing food web dynamics. During 2011 and 2012, we used acoustic telemetry to document the timing and spatial scale of walleye migration in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. Spawning walleye (n = 199) collected from a tributary of Saginaw Bay were implanted with acoustic tags and their migrations were documented using acoustic receivers (n = 140) deployed throughout U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. Three migration pathways were described using multistate mark-recapture models. Models were evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion. Fish sex did not influence migratory behavior but did affect migration rate and walleye were detected on all acoustic receiver lines. Most (95%) tagged fish migrated downstream from the riverine tagging and release location to Saginaw Bay, and 37% of these fish emigrated from Saginaw Bay into Lake Huron. Remarkably, 8% of walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay were detected at the acoustic receiver line located farthest from the release location more than 350 km away. Most (64%) walleye returned to the Saginaw River in 2012, presumably for spawning. Our findings reveal that fish from this stock use virtually the entirety of U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. PMID:25506913

  12. Migration behaviour of silver eels (Anguilla anguilla) in a large estuary of Western Europe inferred from acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultel, Elise; Lasne, Emilien; Acou, Anthony; Guillaudeau, Julien; Bertier, Christine; Feunteun, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive research on eels, the behaviour of silver eels in estuaries during their migration remains poorly documented which creates serious gaps in planning the restoration of the European eel population. Estuaries are complex environments that can be exposed to large human pressures which could impede, delay migration or impact fish reproductive potential. This study investigated the estuarine migration of female silver eels in the Loire River using an acoustic telemetry system. An array of 31 hydrophones was deployed in the Loire estuary and 51 female seaward migrants were tagged with acoustic transmitters and released 20 km upstream of the estuary, at 100 km from the river mouth. 94% of the silver eels could be followed down to the river mouth. Mean global estuarine speed was 4.5 km days-1, i.e., 0.05 m s-1 and residence times varied significantly between upstream and lower compartments. Mean directional migration speed was found to be 48.6 km days-1, i.e., 0.56 m s-1, and appeared correlated with total length and body weight. Also, daily escapement rate was highly influenced by river flow.

  13. Demodulation of acoustic telemetry binary phase shift keying signal based on high-order Duffing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing-Nan; Liu, Chong-Xin; Ni, Jun-Kang; Zhao, Liang

    2016-10-01

    In order to grasp the downhole situation immediately, logging while drilling (LWD) technology is adopted. One of the LWD technologies, called acoustic telemetry, can be successfully applied to modern drilling. It is critical for acoustic telemetry technology that the signal is successfully transmitted to the ground. In this paper, binary phase shift keying (BPSK) is used to modulate carrier waves for the transmission and a new BPSK demodulation scheme based on Duffing chaos is investigated. Firstly, a high-order system is given in order to enhance the signal detection capability and it is realized through building a virtual circuit using an electronic workbench (EWB). Secondly, a new BPSK demodulation scheme is proposed based on the intermittent chaos phenomena of the new Duffing system. Finally, a system variable crossing zero-point equidistance method is proposed to obtain the phase difference between the system and the BPSK signal. Then it is determined that the digital signal transmitted from the bottom of the well is ‘0’ or ‘1’. The simulation results show that the demodulation method is feasible. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51177117) and the National Key Science & Technology Special Projects, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05021-005).

  14. Deep-water riser fatigue monitoring systems based on acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baojun; Wang, Haiyan; Shen, Xiaohong; Yan, Yongsheng; Yang, Fuzhou; Hua, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Marine risers play a key role in the deep and ultra-deep water oil and gas production. The vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of marine risers constitutes an important problem in deep water oil exploration and production. VIV will result in high rates of structural failure of marine riser due to fatigue damage accumulation and diminishes the riser fatigue life. In-service monitoring or full scale testing is essential to improve our understanding of VIV response and enhance our ability to predict fatigue damage. One marine riser fatigue acoustic telemetry scheme is proposed and an engineering prototype machine has been developed to monitor deep and ultra-deep water risers' fatigue and failure that can diminish the riser fatigue life and lead to economic losses and eco-catastrophe. Many breakthroughs and innovation have been achieved in the process of developing an engineering prototype machine. Sea trials were done on the 6th generation deep-water drilling platform HYSY-981 in the South China Sea. The inclination monitoring results show that the marine riser fatigue acoustic telemetry scheme is feasible and reliable and the engineering prototype machine meets the design criterion and can match the requirements of deep and ultra-deep water riser fatigue monitoring. The rich experience and field data gained in the sea trial which provide much technical support for optimization in the engineering prototype machine in the future.

  15. Spatial ecology of the steephead parrotfish ( Chlorurus microrhinos): an evaluation using acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, J. Q.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2012-03-01

    Herbivory and other ecosystem processes are widely accepted as important factors in maintaining coral reef resilience. While the spatial scales over which these processes occur have been evaluated, the spatial ecology of individual taxa responsible for shaping these processes is almost entirely unknown. This study combined acoustic telemetry and ecological assessments to evaluate the movement patterns and feeding range of a functionally important coral reef fish, Chlorurus microrhinos (f. Labridae). The diurnal home range and feeding areas of C. microrhinos, on Orpheus Island, Great Barrier Reef, were quantified using active acoustic telemetry. The average diurnal home range of C. microrhinos was 7,830 m2 ± 940 (SE). Core areas of activity (50% kernel utilization distributions) were relatively small, encompassing approximately 22% of an individual's home range (1,690 m2 ± 220). Core areas exhibited greater topographic complexity. C. microrhinos may select these areas because of decreased predation risk. Feeding intensities were not homogenous throughout the home range. Core areas were found to have a greater number of feeding scars and are thus exposed to increased bioerosion and algal removal by C. microrhinos. While important in shaping key ecosystem processes, the ecosystem impact of individual C. microrhinos in Pioneer Bay appears to be restricted to small areas within a narrow band along the reef crest.

  16. Symbol Stream Combining Versus Baseband Combining for Telemetry Arraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to investigate and analyze the problem of combining symbol streams from many Deep Space Network stations to enhance bit signal-to-noise ratio and to compare the performance of this combining technique with baseband combining. Symbol stream combining (SSC) has some advantages and some disadvantages over baseband combining (BBC). The SSC suffers almost no loss in combining the digital data and no loss due to the transmission of the digital data by microwave links between the stations. The BBC suffers 0.2 dB loss due to alignment and combining the IF signals and 0.2 dB loss due to transmission of signals by microwave links. On the other hand, the losses in the subcarrier demodulation assembly (SDA) and in the symbol synchronization assembly (SSA) for SSC are more than the losses in the SDA and SSA for BBC. It is shown that SSC outperforms BBC by about 0.35 dB (in terms of the required bit energy-to-noise spectral density for a bit error rate of 1,000) for an array of three DSN antennas, namely 64 m, 34m(T/R) and 34m(R).

  17. Passive acoustic telemetry reveals highly variable home range and movement patterns among unicornfish within a marine reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshell, A.; Mills, J. S.; Rhodes, K. L.; McIlwain, J.

    2011-09-01

    Marine reserves are the primary management tool for Guam's reef fish fishery. While a build-up of fish biomass has occurred inside reserve boundaries, it is unknown whether reserve size matches the scale of movement of target species. Using passive acoustic telemetry, we quantified movement patterns and home range size of two heavily exploited unicornfish Naso unicornis and Naso lituratus. Fifteen fish ( N. unicornis: n = 7; N. lituratus: n = 4 male, n = 4 female) were fitted with internal acoustic tags and tracked continuously over four months within a remote acoustic receiver array located in a decade-old marine reserve. This approach provided robust estimates of unicornfish movement patterns and home range size. The mean home range of 3.2 ha for N. unicornis was almost ten times larger than that previously recorded from a three-week tracking study of the species in Hawaii. While N. lituratus were smaller in body size, their mean home range (6.8 ha) was over twice that of N. unicornis. Both species displayed strong site fidelity, particularly during nocturnal and crepuscular periods. Although there was some overlap, individual movement patterns and home range size were highly variable within species and between sexes. N. unicornis home range increased with body size, and only the three largest fish home ranges extended into the deeper outer reef slope beyond the shallow reef flat. Both Naso species favoured habitat dominated by corals. Some individuals made predictable daily crepuscular migrations between different locations or habitat types. There was no evidence of significant spillover from the marine reserve into adjacent fished areas. Strong site fidelity coupled with negligible spillover suggests that small-scale reserves, with natural habitat boundaries to emigration, are effective in protecting localized unicornfish populations.

  18. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. B.

    2010-03-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by Portland District, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used at hydroelectric projects and in the laboratory for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a measurement and calibration system for evaluating the JSATS component, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The system consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated system has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. It provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The measurement and calibration system has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  19. Design and instrumentation of a measurement and calibration system for an acoustic telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  20. Acoustic positioning using multiple microphone arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Milios, Evangelos

    2005-05-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are presented to solve the localization problem of a sound source in three-dimensional space using off-the-shelf hardware. Multiple microphone arrays are employed, which operate independently, in estimating the direction of arrival of sound, or, equivalently, a direction vector from the array's geometric center towards the source. Direction vectors and array centers are communicated to a central processor, where the source is localized by finding the intersection of the direction lines defined by the direction vectors and the associated array centers. The performance of the method in the air is demonstrated experimentally and compared with a state-of-the-art method that requires centralized digitization of the signals from the microphones of all the arrays. PMID:15957748

  1. Acoustic sensor array extracts physiology during movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2001-08-01

    An acoustic sensor attached to a person's neck can extract heart and breath sounds, as well as voice and other physiology related to their health and performance. Soldiers, firefighters, law enforcement, and rescue personnel, as well as people at home or in health care facilities, can benefit form being remotely monitored. ARLs acoustic sensor, when worn around a person's neck, picks up the carotid artery and breath sounds very well by matching the sensor's acoustic impedance to that of the body via a gel pad, while airborne noise is minimized by an impedance mismatch. Although the physiological sounds have high SNR, the acoustic sensor also responds to motion-induced artifacts that obscure the meaningful physiology. To exacerbate signal extraction, these interfering signals are usually covariant with the heart sounds, in that as a person walks faster the heart tends to beat faster, and motion noises tend to contain low frequency component similar to the heart sounds. A noise-canceling configuration developed by ARL uses two acoustic sensor on the front sides of the neck as physiology sensors, and two additional acoustic sensor on the back sides of the neck as noise references. Breath and heart sounds, which occur with near symmetry and simultaneously at the two front sensor, will correlate well. The motion noise present on all four sensor will be used to cancel the noise on the two physiology sensors. This report will compare heart rate variability derived from both the acoustic array and from ECG data taken simultaneously on a treadmill test. Acoustically derived breath rate and volume approximations will be introduced as well. A miniature 3- axis accelerometer on the same neckband provides additional noise references to validate footfall and motion activity.

  2. Acoustic performance of a large-aperture, seabed, fiber-optic hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranch, G. A.; Crickmore, R.; Kirkendall, C. K.; Bautista, A.; Daley, K.; Motley, S.; Salzano, J.; Latchem, J.; Nash, P. J.

    2004-06-01

    A large-aperture, seabed mounted, fiber-optic hydrophone array has been constructed and characterized. The system is designed for use as a large area surveillance array for deployment in shallow water regions. The underwater portion comprises two arrays of 48 hydrophones separated by a 3 km fiber-optic link, which are connected to a shore station by 40 km of single-mode optical fiber. The hydrophone is based on a fiber-optic Michelson interferometer and the acoustic transduction mechanism is a fiber-wrapped mandrel design. No electrical power is required in the underwater portion. The performance of the system is described, characterized during laboratory measurements and during a recent sea trial. Specifically, measurements of the acoustic resolution, array shape, beam patterns, array gain, and target tracking capability of this array. The system demonstrates self-noise levels up to 20 dB (typically 10 dB) lower than the ambient acoustic noise experienced in the sea trial and array gains close to the theoretical maximum. The system telemetry and electronics have been designed to be expandable to accommodate several hundred hydrophones.

  3. Acoustic transmission through compound subwavelength slit arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, G. P.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.; Smith, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    The angular dependence of the transmission of sound in air through four types of two-dimensional slit arrays formed of aluminium slats is explored, both experimentally and numerically. For a simple, subwavelength periodic slit array, it is well known that Fabry-Perot-like waveguide resonances, supported by the slit cavities, coupled to diffracted evanescent waves, result in enhanced acoustic transmission at frequencies determined by the length, width, and separation of each slit cavity. We demonstrate that altering the spacing or width of some of the slits to form a compound array (i.e., an array having a basis comprised of more than one slit) results in sharp dips in the transmission spectra, which may have a strong angular dependence. These features correspond to phase resonances, which have been studied extensively in the electromagnetic case. This geometry allows for additional near-field configurations compared to the simple array, whereby the field in adjacent cavities can be out of phase. Several types of compound slit arrays are investigated; one such structure is optimized to minimize the effect of boundary-layer loss mechanisms present in each slit cavity, thereby achieving a deep, sharp transmission minimum in a broad maximum.

  4. Acoustic telemetry and network analysis reveal the space use of multiple reef predators and enhance marine protected area design.

    PubMed

    Lea, James S E; Humphries, Nicolas E; von Brandis, Rainer G; Clarke, Christopher R; Sims, David W

    2016-07-13

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are commonly employed to protect ecosystems from threats like overfishing. Ideally, MPA design should incorporate movement data from multiple target species to ensure sufficient habitat is protected. We used long-term acoustic telemetry and network analysis to determine the fine-scale space use of five shark and one turtle species at a remote atoll in the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, and evaluate the efficacy of a proposed MPA. Results revealed strong, species-specific habitat use in both sharks and turtles, with corresponding variation in MPA use. Defining the MPA's boundary from the edge of the reef flat at low tide instead of the beach at high tide (the current best in Seychelles) significantly increased the MPA's coverage of predator movements by an average of 34%. Informed by these results, the larger MPA was adopted by the Seychelles government, demonstrating how telemetry data can improve shark spatial conservation by affecting policy directly. PMID:27412274

  5. Acoustic telemetry and network analysis reveal the space use of multiple reef predators and enhance marine protected area design.

    PubMed

    Lea, James S E; Humphries, Nicolas E; von Brandis, Rainer G; Clarke, Christopher R; Sims, David W

    2016-07-13

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are commonly employed to protect ecosystems from threats like overfishing. Ideally, MPA design should incorporate movement data from multiple target species to ensure sufficient habitat is protected. We used long-term acoustic telemetry and network analysis to determine the fine-scale space use of five shark and one turtle species at a remote atoll in the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, and evaluate the efficacy of a proposed MPA. Results revealed strong, species-specific habitat use in both sharks and turtles, with corresponding variation in MPA use. Defining the MPA's boundary from the edge of the reef flat at low tide instead of the beach at high tide (the current best in Seychelles) significantly increased the MPA's coverage of predator movements by an average of 34%. Informed by these results, the larger MPA was adopted by the Seychelles government, demonstrating how telemetry data can improve shark spatial conservation by affecting policy directly.

  6. Contrasting movements and connectivity of reef-associated sharks using acoustic telemetry: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Mario; Lédée, Elodie J I; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Tobin, Andrew J; Heupel, Michelle R

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the efficacy of marine protected areas (MPAs) for wide-ranging predators is essential to designing effective management and conservation approaches. The use of acoustic monitoring and network analysis can improve our understanding of the spatial ecology and functional connectivity of reef-associated species, providing a useful approach for reef-based conservation planning. This study compared and contrasted the movement and connectivity of sharks with different degrees of reef association. We examined the residency, dispersal, degree of reef connectivity, and MPA use of grey reef (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos), silvertip (C. albimarginatus), and bull (C. leucas) sharks monitored in the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR). An array of 56 acoustic receivers was used to monitor shark movements on 17 semi-isolated reefs. Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and C. albimarginatus were detected most days at or near their tagging reef. However, while C. amblyrhynchos spent 80% of monitoring days in the array, C. albimarginatus was only detected 50% of the time. Despite both species moving similar distances (< 50 km), a large portion of the population of C. albimarginatus (71%) was detected on multiple reefs and moved more frequently between reefs and management zones than C. amblyrhynchos. Carcharhinus leucas was detected less than 20% of the time within the tagging array, and 42% of the population undertook long-range migrations to other arrays in the GBR. Networks derived for C. leucas were larger and more complex than those for C. amblyrhynchos and C. albimarginatus. Our findings suggest that protecting specific reefs based on prior knowledge (e.g., healthier reefs with high fish biomass) and increasing the level of protection to include nearby, closely spaced reef habitats (< 20 km) may perform better for species like C. albimarginatus than having either a single or a network of isolated MPAs. This design would also provide protection for larger male C. amblyrhynchos

  7. Contrasting movements and connectivity of reef-associated sharks using acoustic telemetry: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Mario; Lédée, Elodie J I; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Tobin, Andrew J; Heupel, Michelle R

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the efficacy of marine protected areas (MPAs) for wide-ranging predators is essential to designing effective management and conservation approaches. The use of acoustic monitoring and network analysis can improve our understanding of the spatial ecology and functional connectivity of reef-associated species, providing a useful approach for reef-based conservation planning. This study compared and contrasted the movement and connectivity of sharks with different degrees of reef association. We examined the residency, dispersal, degree of reef connectivity, and MPA use of grey reef (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos), silvertip (C. albimarginatus), and bull (C. leucas) sharks monitored in the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR). An array of 56 acoustic receivers was used to monitor shark movements on 17 semi-isolated reefs. Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and C. albimarginatus were detected most days at or near their tagging reef. However, while C. amblyrhynchos spent 80% of monitoring days in the array, C. albimarginatus was only detected 50% of the time. Despite both species moving similar distances (< 50 km), a large portion of the population of C. albimarginatus (71%) was detected on multiple reefs and moved more frequently between reefs and management zones than C. amblyrhynchos. Carcharhinus leucas was detected less than 20% of the time within the tagging array, and 42% of the population undertook long-range migrations to other arrays in the GBR. Networks derived for C. leucas were larger and more complex than those for C. amblyrhynchos and C. albimarginatus. Our findings suggest that protecting specific reefs based on prior knowledge (e.g., healthier reefs with high fish biomass) and increasing the level of protection to include nearby, closely spaced reef habitats (< 20 km) may perform better for species like C. albimarginatus than having either a single or a network of isolated MPAs. This design would also provide protection for larger male C. amblyrhynchos

  8. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Fisher, Karl A.

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  9. Ku- and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna for the Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  10. Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project Ku-Band and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  11. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-11-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  12. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  13. Acoustic field and array response uncertainties in stratified ocean media.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J; Dhakal, Sagar

    2012-07-01

    The change-of-variables theorem of probability theory is applied to compute acoustic field and array beam power probability density functions (pdfs) in uncertain ocean environments represented by stratified, attenuating ocean waveguide models. Computational studies for one and two-layer waveguides investigate the functional properties of the acoustic field and array beam power pdfs. For the studies, the acoustic parameter uncertainties are represented by parametric pdfs. The field and beam response pdfs are computed directly from the parameter pdfs using the normal-mode representation and the change-of-variables theorem. For two-dimensional acoustic parameter uncertainties of sound speed and attenuation, the field and beam power pdfs exhibit irregular functional behavior and singularities associated with stationary points of the mapping, defined by acoustic propagation, from the parameter space to the field or beam power space. Implications for the assessment of orthogonal polynomial expansion and other methods for computing acoustic field pdfs are discussed.

  14. Parametric acoustic arrays: A state of the art review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenlon, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to the concept of parametric acoustic interactions, the basic properties of parametric transmitting and receiving arrays are considered in the light of conceptual advances resulting from experimental and theoretical investigations that have taken place since 1963.

  15. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions.

  16. Large aperture acoustic arrays in support of reverberation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, John A.

    1990-04-01

    In preparation for a major field experiment this report addresses the development of acoustic arrays which are needed in order to make carefully controlled and well-documented measurements of bottom reverberation. The purpose of these measurements is to study the physics of the backscattering process and to quantify backscattering characteristics as a function of physically meaningful parameters (e.g., ensonified area, grazing angle, bottom material properties, bottom roughness, etc.). Specific array systems which are addressed include the following: (1) towed horizontal array, (2) horizontal and vertical array, (3) ship-tethered 64-element vertical array, and (4) self-contained, 16-element vertical array.

  17. Can you hear me now? Range-testing a submerged passive acoustic receiver array in a Caribbean coral reef habitat.

    PubMed

    Selby, Thomas H; Hart, Kristen M; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Smith, Brian J; Pollock, Clayton J; Hillis-Starr, Zandy; Lundgren, Ian; Oli, Madan K

    2016-07-01

    Submerged passive acoustic technology allows researchers to investigate spatial and temporal movement patterns of many marine and freshwater species. The technology uses receivers to detect and record acoustic transmissions emitted from tags attached to an individual. Acoustic signal strength naturally attenuates over distance, but numerous environmental variables also affect the probability a tag is detected. Knowledge of receiver range is crucial for designing acoustic arrays and analyzing telemetry data. Here, we present a method for testing a relatively large-scale receiver array in a dynamic Caribbean coastal environment intended for long-term monitoring of multiple species. The U.S. Geological Survey and several academic institutions in collaboration with resource management at Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM), off the coast of St. Croix, recently deployed a 52 passive acoustic receiver array. We targeted 19 array-representative receivers for range-testing by submersing fixed delay interval range-testing tags at various distance intervals in each cardinal direction from a receiver for a minimum of an hour. Using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM), we estimated the probability of detection across the array and assessed the effect of water depth, habitat, wind, temperature, and time of day on the probability of detection. The predicted probability of detection across the entire array at 100 m distance from a receiver was 58.2% (95% CI: 44.0-73.0%) and dropped to 26.0% (95% CI: 11.4-39.3%) 200 m from a receiver indicating a somewhat constrained effective detection range. Detection probability varied across habitat classes with the greatest effective detection range occurring in homogenous sand substrate and the smallest in high rugosity reef. Predicted probability of detection across BIRNM highlights potential gaps in coverage using the current array as well as limitations of passive acoustic technology within a complex coral reef environment

  18. Can you hear me now? Range-testing a submerged passive acoustic receiver array in a Caribbean coral reef habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selby, Thomas H.; Hart, Kristen M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Smith, Brian J.; Pollock, Clayton J; Hillis-Star, Zandy M; Lundgren, Ian; Oli, Madan K.

    2016-01-01

    Submerged passive acoustic technology allows researchers to investigate spatial and temporal movement patterns of many marine and freshwater species. The technology uses receivers to detect and record acoustic transmissions emitted from tags attached to an individual. Acoustic signal strength naturally attenuates over distance, but numerous environmental variables also affect the probability a tag is detected. Knowledge of receiver range is crucial for designing acoustic arrays and analyzing telemetry data. Here, we present a method for testing a relatively large-scale receiver array in a dynamic Caribbean coastal environment intended for long-term monitoring of multiple species. The U.S. Geological Survey and several academic institutions in collaboration with resource management at Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM), off the coast of St. Croix, recently deployed a 52 passive acoustic receiver array. We targeted 19 array-representative receivers for range-testing by submersing fixed delay interval range-testing tags at various distance intervals in each cardinal direction from a receiver for a minimum of an hour. Using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM), we estimated the probability of detection across the array and assessed the effect of water depth, habitat, wind, temperature, and time of day on the probability of detection. The predicted probability of detection across the entire array at 100 m distance from a receiver was 58.2% (95% CI: 44.0–73.0%) and dropped to 26.0% (95% CI: 11.4–39.3%) 200 m from a receiver indicating a somewhat constrained effective detection range. Detection probability varied across habitat classes with the greatest effective detection range occurring in homogenous sand substrate and the smallest in high rugosity reef. Predicted probability of detection across BIRNM highlights potential gaps in coverage using the current array as well as limitations of passive acoustic technology within a complex coral reef

  19. Acoustic Source Localization in Aircraft Interiors Using Microphone Array Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklanka, Bernard J.; Tuss, Joel R.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Klos, Jacob; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    Using three microphone array configurations at two aircraft body stations on a Boeing 777-300ER flight test, the acoustic radiation characteristics of the sidewall and outboard floor system are investigated by experimental measurement. Analysis of the experimental data is performed using sound intensity calculations for closely spaced microphones, PATCH Inverse Boundary Element Nearfield Acoustic Holography, and Spherical Nearfield Acoustic Holography. Each method is compared assessing strengths and weaknesses, evaluating source identification capability for both broadband and narrowband sources, evaluating sources during transient and steady-state conditions, and quantifying field reconstruction continuity using multiple array positions.

  20. Feasibility of a phased acoustic array for monitoring acoustic signatures from meshing gear teeth.

    PubMed

    Hood, Adrian A; Pines, Darryll J

    2002-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of sensing damage emanating from rotating drivetrain elements such as bearings, gear teeth, and drive shafts via airborne paths. A planar phased acoustic array is evaluated as a potential fault detection scheme for detecting spatially filtered acoustic signatures radiating from gearbox components. Specifically, the use of beam focusing and steering to monitor individual tooth mesh dynamics is analyzed taking into consideration the constraints of the array/gearbox geometry and the spectral content of typical gear noise. Experimental results for a linear array are presented to illustrate the concepts of adaptive beam steering and spatial acoustic filtering. This feasibility study indicates that the planar array can be used to track the acoustic signatures at higher harmonics of the gear mesh frequency.

  1. Use of acoustic telemetry to evaluate survival and behavior of juvenile salmonids at hydroelectric dams: A case study from Rocky Reach Dam, Columbia River, USA: Chapter 8.1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steigl, Tracy W.; Holbrook, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Telemetry provides a powerful and flexible tool for studying fish and other aquatic animals, and its use has become increasingly commonplace. However, telemetry is gear intensive and typically requires more specialized knowledge and training than many other field techniques. As with other scientific methods, collecting good data is dependent on an understanding of the underlying principles behind the approach, knowing how to use the equipment and techniques properly, and recognizing what to do with the data collected. This book provides a road map for using telemetry to study aquatic animals, and provides the basic information needed to plan, implement, and conduct a telemetry study under field conditions. Topics include acoustic or radio telemetry study design, tag implantation techniques, radio and acoustic telemetry principles and case studies, and data management and analysis. Chapters are written by biologists, technicians, and engineers from the private, academic, and government sectors, with decades of experience using these technologies.

  2. Enchanced interference cancellation and telemetry reception in multipath environments with a single paraboic dish antenna using a focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Ryan (Inventor); Vilnrotter, Victor A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An Advanced Focal Plane Array ("AFPA") for parabolic dish antennas that exploits spatial diversity to achieve better channel equalization performance in the presence of multipath (better than temporal equalization alone), and which is capable of receiving from two or more sources within a field-of-view in the presence of multipath. The AFPA uses a focal plane array of receiving elements plus a spatio-temporal filter that keeps information on the adaptive FIR filter weights, relative amplitudes and phases of the incoming signals, and which employs an Interference Cancelling Constant Modulus Algorithm (IC-CMA) that resolves multiple telemetry streams simultaneously from the respective aero-nautical platforms. This data is sent to an angle estimator to calculate the target's angular position, and then on to Kalman filters FOR smoothing and time series prediction. The resulting velocity and acceleration estimates from the time series data are sent to an antenna control unit (ACU) to be used for pointing control.

  3. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  4. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 2. Three-dimensional tracking and passage outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z Daniel; Weiland, Mark A; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Carlson, Thomas J; Eppard, M Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

  5. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 2. Three-dimensional tracking and passage outcomes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z Daniel; Weiland, Mark A; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Carlson, Thomas J; Eppard, M Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities.

  6. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-05-26

    In Part 1 of this paper [1], we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.05 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the case study at John Day Dam during 2008, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities.

  7. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Z. Daniel; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. Brad

    2011-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

  8. Seismo-acoustic array installed in Vrancea seismogenic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Constantin; Moldovan, Adrian-Septimiu; Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Ghica, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    The National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) has installed two infrasound networks: a four-element seismo-acoustic array with an 1.2 km aperture (IPLOR) and a three-element array with a 400m aperture (IOANE). Both arrays are installed in Vrancea seismogenic area. Each array element of IPLOR consists of three sensors (a seismic 3C broad-band instrument with 1000V/m/s sensitivity, an accelerometer +/-2g EpiSensor type, and an infrasound Chaparral type sensor) and a 24-bit digitizer (Quanterra Q330). The BB sensors and accelerometers are located in 3 meters deep boreholes, while the infrasound sensors are installed in a plastic 1 mc container connected to a porous flexible pipe or plastic tube (for the central element). Inter-array communication is achieved by radio link (2.4 GHz frequency band) which transmits the data from the six-channel digitizers to the local acquisition system. Each power array element consisted of a 12 V DC source powered by the commercial power line or solar panels. The data acquisition system is based on the Seiscomp3 software; a sampling rate of 100 samples per second is applied for BB seismic instruments and accelerometers, whilst for the infrasound sensor a 20 sps rate is used. Each array element of IPLOR consists of a MBAZEL2007 microbarometer and a 24-bit digitizer. Inter-array communication is achieved by a fiber optic link. The sampling rate is 10 sps. The Vrancea seismo-acoustic array is used to identify and locate events associated with industrial blasts, to detect local and regional events, as well for the complex studies on the Vrancea seismogenic area. Moreover, the array data accelerometers are used in the early warning system for Bucharest. At NIEP, several programs are running to analyze each type of data (seismic and acoustic): for BB seismic data, a software for event detection and characterization, kindly provided by NORSAR, is applied, acceleration data recorded by the episensors are processed with a software developed

  9. Acoustic Array Development for Wind Turbine Noise Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, S.; Roadman, J.; Moriarty, P.; Palo, S.

    2013-11-01

    This report discusses the design and use of a multi-arm, logarithmic spiral acoustic array by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for measurement and characterization of wind turbine-generated noise. The array was developed in collaboration with a team from the University of Colorado Boulder. This design process is a continuation of the elliptical array design work done by Simley. A description of the array system design process is presented, including array shape design, mechanical design, design of electronics and the data acquisition system, and development of post-processing software. System testing and calibration methods are detailed. Results from the initial data acquisition campaign are offered and discussed. Issues faced during this initial deployment of the array are presented and potential remedies discussed.

  10. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

    2009-12-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

  11. Scaling of membrane-type locally resonant acoustic metamaterial arrays.

    PubMed

    Naify, Christina J; Chang, Chia-Ming; McKnight, Geoffrey; Nutt, Steven R

    2012-10-01

    Metamaterials have emerged as promising solutions for manipulation of sound waves in a variety of applications. Locally resonant acoustic materials (LRAM) decrease sound transmission by 500% over acoustic mass law predictions at peak transmission loss (TL) frequencies with minimal added mass, making them appealing for weight-critical applications such as aerospace structures. In this study, potential issues associated with scale-up of the structure are addressed. TL of single-celled and multi-celled LRAM was measured using an impedance tube setup with systematic variation in geometric parameters to understand the effects of each parameter on acoustic response. Finite element analysis was performed to predict TL as a function of frequency for structures with varying complexity, including stacked structures and multi-celled arrays. Dynamic response of the array structures under discrete frequency excitation was investigated using laser vibrometry to verify negative dynamic mass behavior. PMID:23039544

  12. Residency, site fidelity and habitat use of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at an offshore wind farm using acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Reubens, Jan T; Pasotti, Francesca; Degraer, Steven; Vincx, Magda

    2013-09-01

    Because offshore wind energy development is fast growing in Europe it is important to investigate the changes in the marine environment and how these may influence local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. One of the species affected by these ecosystem changes is Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), a heavily exploited, commercially important fish species. In this research we investigated the residency, site fidelity and habitat use of Atlantic cod on a temporal scale at windmill artificial reefs in the Belgian part of the North Sea. Acoustic telemetry was used and the Vemco VR2W position system was deployed to quantify the movement behaviour. In total, 22 Atlantic cod were tagged and monitored for up to one year. Many fish were present near the artificial reefs during summer and autumn, and demonstrated strong residency and high individual detection rates. When present within the study area, Atlantic cod also showed distinct habitat selectivity. We identified aggregation near the artificial hard substrates of the wind turbines. In addition, a clear seasonal pattern in presence was observed. The high number of fish present in summer and autumn alternated with a period of very low densities during the winter period. PMID:23937893

  13. A new seafloor electromagnetic station with an Overhauser magnetometer, a magnetotelluric variograph and an acoustic telemetry modem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Hiroaki; Goto, Tadanori; Hamano, Yozo

    1998-11-01

    A new type of SeaFloor ElectroMagnetic Station (SFEMS) has been newly developed by adding a magnetotelluric (MT) variograph to its prototype built previously (Toh and Hamano, 1997). New SFEMS is able to conduct long-term electromagnetic (EM) observations at the seafloor, which is one of the principal goals of the Ocean Hemisphere Project (OHP). Long-term seafloor EM observations enable us to probe into the deep Earth (both the mantle and the core) by improving the spatial coverage of the existing EM observation network. The SFEMS has been tested in three sea experiments to yield 3 components of the geomagnetic field, 2 horizontal components of the geoelectric field and 2 components of tilts in addition to the absolute geomagnetic total force. The SFEMS is designed for measuring these EM signals at the seafloor continuously for as long as 2 yrs. The SFEMS mainly consists of the following three parts: (1) An Overhauser proton precession magnetometer for the absolute measurements of the geomagnetic total force with a possible bias of less than 10 nT. (2) An MT variograph that measures the rest of the EM components and tilt. (3) An Acoustic Telemetry Modem (ATM) that allows us to control/monitor the seafloor instrument as well as data transmission at the maximum rate of 1200 baud. Construction of seafloor EM observatories in regions where significant EM data have never been collected is now quite feasible by development of the SFEMS.

  14. Residency, site fidelity and habitat use of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at an offshore wind farm using acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Reubens, Jan T; Pasotti, Francesca; Degraer, Steven; Vincx, Magda

    2013-09-01

    Because offshore wind energy development is fast growing in Europe it is important to investigate the changes in the marine environment and how these may influence local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. One of the species affected by these ecosystem changes is Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), a heavily exploited, commercially important fish species. In this research we investigated the residency, site fidelity and habitat use of Atlantic cod on a temporal scale at windmill artificial reefs in the Belgian part of the North Sea. Acoustic telemetry was used and the Vemco VR2W position system was deployed to quantify the movement behaviour. In total, 22 Atlantic cod were tagged and monitored for up to one year. Many fish were present near the artificial reefs during summer and autumn, and demonstrated strong residency and high individual detection rates. When present within the study area, Atlantic cod also showed distinct habitat selectivity. We identified aggregation near the artificial hard substrates of the wind turbines. In addition, a clear seasonal pattern in presence was observed. The high number of fish present in summer and autumn alternated with a period of very low densities during the winter period.

  15. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

  16. Comparing Distribution of Harbour Porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) Derived from Satellite Telemetry and Passive Acoustic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Lonnie; Rigét, Frank F; Kyhn, Line A; Sveegaard, Signe; Dietz, Rune; Tougaard, Jakob; Carlström, Julia A K; Carlén, Ida; Koblitz, Jens C; Teilmann, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Cetacean monitoring is essential in determining the status of a population. Different monitoring methods should reflect the real trends in abundance and patterns in distribution, and results should therefore ideally be independent of the selected method. Here, we compare two independent methods of describing harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) relative distribution pattern in the western Baltic Sea. Satellite locations from 13 tagged harbour porpoises were used to build a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) model of suitable habitats. The data set was subsampled to one location every second day, which were sufficient to make reliable models over the summer (Jun-Aug) and autumn (Sep-Nov) seasons. The modelled results were compared to harbour porpoise acoustic activity obtained from 36 static acoustic monitoring stations (C-PODs) covering the same area. The C-POD data was expressed as the percentage of porpoise positive days/hours (the number of days/hours per day with porpoise detections) by season. The MaxEnt model and C-POD data showed a significant linear relationship with a strong decline in porpoise occurrence from west to east. This study shows that two very different methods provide comparable information on relative distribution patterns of harbour porpoises even in a low density area. PMID:27463509

  17. Comparing Distribution of Harbour Porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) Derived from Satellite Telemetry and Passive Acoustic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rigét, Frank F.; Kyhn, Line A.; Sveegaard, Signe; Dietz, Rune; Tougaard, Jakob; Carlström, Julia A. K.; Carlén, Ida; Koblitz, Jens C.; Teilmann, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Cetacean monitoring is essential in determining the status of a population. Different monitoring methods should reflect the real trends in abundance and patterns in distribution, and results should therefore ideally be independent of the selected method. Here, we compare two independent methods of describing harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) relative distribution pattern in the western Baltic Sea. Satellite locations from 13 tagged harbour porpoises were used to build a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) model of suitable habitats. The data set was subsampled to one location every second day, which were sufficient to make reliable models over the summer (Jun-Aug) and autumn (Sep-Nov) seasons. The modelled results were compared to harbour porpoise acoustic activity obtained from 36 static acoustic monitoring stations (C-PODs) covering the same area. The C-POD data was expressed as the percentage of porpoise positive days/hours (the number of days/hours per day with porpoise detections) by season. The MaxEnt model and C-POD data showed a significant linear relationship with a strong decline in porpoise occurrence from west to east. This study shows that two very different methods provide comparable information on relative distribution patterns of harbour porpoises even in a low density area. PMID:27463509

  18. Defining winter trophic habitat of juvenile Gulf Sturgeon in the Suwannee and Apalachicola rivermouth estuaries, acoustic telemetry investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sulak, K.J.; Randall, M.T.; Edwards, R.E.; Summers, T.M.; Luke, K.E.; Smith, W.T.; Norem, A.D.; Harden, William M.; Lukens, R.H.; Parauka, F.; Bolden, S.; Lehnert, R.

    2009-01-01

    Three automated listening post-telemetry studies were undertaken in the Suwannee and Apalachicola estuaries to gain knowledge of habitats use by juvenile Gulf Sturgeons (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi) on winter feeding grounds. A simple and reliable method for external attachment of small acoustic tags to the dorsal fin base was developed using shrink-tubing. Suspending receivers on masts below anchored buoys improved reception and facilitated downloading; a detection range of 500–2500 m was realized. In the Apalachicola estuary, juvenile GS stayed in shallow water (< 2 m) within the estuarine transition zone all winter in the vicinity of the Apalachicola River mouth. Juvenile GS high-use areas did not coincide with high density benthic macrofauna areas from the most recent (1999) benthos survey. In the Suwannee estuary, juveniles ranged widely and individually throughout oligohaline to mesohaline subareas of the estuary, preferentially using mesohaline subareas seaward of Suwannee Reef (52% of acoustic detections). The river mouth subarea was important only in early and late winter, during the times of adult Gulf Sturgeon migrations (41% of detections). Preferred winter feeding subareas coincided spatially with known areas of dense macrofaunal benthos concentrations. Following a dramatic drop in air and water temperatures, juvenile GS left the river mouth and estuary, subsequently being detected 8 km offshore in polyhaline open Gulf of Mexico waters, before returning to the estuary. Cold-event offshore excursions demonstrate that they can tolerate full-salinity polyhaline waters in the open Gulf of Mexico, for at least several days at a time. For juvenile sturgeons, the stress and metabolic cost of enduring high salinity (Jarvis et al., 2001; McKenzie et al., 2001; Singer and Ballantyne, 2002) for short periods in deep offshore waters seems adaptively advantageous relative to the risk of cold-event mortality in shallow inshore waters of lower salinity. Thus

  19. Micro-battery Development for Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Honghao; Cartmell, Samuel; Wang, Qiang; Lozano, Terence; Deng, Z. Daniel; Li, Huidong; Chen, Xilin; Yuan, Yong; Gross, Mark E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act requires actions that improve the passage and survival rates for migrating salmonoids and other fish species that sustain injury and mortality when passing through hydroelectric dams. To develop a low-cost revolutionary acoustic transmitter that may be injected instead of surgically implanted into the fish, one major challenge that needs to be addressed is the micro-battery power source. This work focuses on the design and fabrication of micro-batteries for injectable fish tags. High pulse current and required service life have both been achieved as well as doubling the gravimetric energy density of the battery. The newly designed micro-batteries have intrinsically low impedance, leading to significantly improved electrochemical performances at low temperatures as compared with commercial SR416 batteries. Successful field trial by using the micro-battery powered transmitters injected into fish has been demonstrated, providing an exemplary model of transferring fundamental research into practical devices with controlled qualities. PMID:24445689

  20. Micro-battery development for juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honghao; Cartmell, Samuel; Wang, Qiang; Lozano, Terence; Deng, Z Daniel; Li, Huidong; Chen, Xilin; Yuan, Yong; Gross, Mark E; Carlson, Thomas J; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act requires actions that improve the passage and survival rates for migrating salmonoids and other fish species that sustain injury and mortality when passing through hydroelectric dams. To develop a low-cost revolutionary acoustic transmitter that may be injected instead of surgically implanted into the fish, one major challenge that needs to be addressed is the micro-battery power source. This work focuses on the design and fabrication of micro-batteries for injectable fish tags. High pulse current and required service life have both been achieved as well as doubling the gravimetric energy density of the battery. The newly designed micro-batteries have intrinsically low impedance, leading to significantly improved electrochemical performances at low temperatures as compared with commercial SR416 batteries. Successful field trial by using the micro-battery powered transmitters injected into fish has been demonstrated, providing an exemplary model of transferring fundamental research into practical devices with controlled qualities. PMID:24445689

  1. Micro-battery Development for Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Honghao; Cartmell, Samuel; Wang, Qiang; Lozano, Terence; Deng, Z. Daniel; Li, Huidong; Chen, Xilin; Yuan, Yong; Gross, Mark E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act requires actions that improve the passage and survival rates for migrating salmonoids and other fish species that sustain injury and mortality when passing through hydroelectric dams. To develop a low-cost revolutionary acoustic transmitter that may be injected instead of surgically implanted into the fish, one major challenge that needs to be addressed is the micro-battery power source. This work focuses on the design and fabrication of micro-batteries for injectable fish tags. High pulse current and required service life have both been achieved as well as doubling the gravimetric energy density of the battery. The newly designed micro-batteries have intrinsically low impedance, leading to significantly improved electrochemical performances at low temperatures as compared with commercial SR416 batteries. Successful field trial by using the micro-battery powered transmitters injected into fish has been demonstrated, providing an exemplary model of transferring fundamental research into practical devices with controlled qualities.

  2. Micro-battery development for juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honghao; Cartmell, Samuel; Wang, Qiang; Lozano, Terence; Deng, Z Daniel; Li, Huidong; Chen, Xilin; Yuan, Yong; Gross, Mark E; Carlson, Thomas J; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-21

    The Endangered Species Act requires actions that improve the passage and survival rates for migrating salmonoids and other fish species that sustain injury and mortality when passing through hydroelectric dams. To develop a low-cost revolutionary acoustic transmitter that may be injected instead of surgically implanted into the fish, one major challenge that needs to be addressed is the micro-battery power source. This work focuses on the design and fabrication of micro-batteries for injectable fish tags. High pulse current and required service life have both been achieved as well as doubling the gravimetric energy density of the battery. The newly designed micro-batteries have intrinsically low impedance, leading to significantly improved electrochemical performances at low temperatures as compared with commercial SR416 batteries. Successful field trial by using the micro-battery powered transmitters injected into fish has been demonstrated, providing an exemplary model of transferring fundamental research into practical devices with controlled qualities.

  3. Non-linear, adaptive array processing for acoustic interference suppression.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Elizabeth; Roan, Michael

    2009-06-01

    A method is introduced where blind source separation of acoustical sources is combined with spatial processing to remove non-Gaussian, broadband interferers from space-time displays such as bearing track recorder displays. This differs from most standard techniques such as generalized sidelobe cancellers in that the separation of signals is not done spatially. The algorithm performance is compared to adaptive beamforming techniques such as minimum variance distortionless response beamforming. Simulations and experiments using two acoustic sources were used to verify the performance of the algorithm. Simulations were also used to determine the effectiveness of the algorithm under various signal to interference, signal to noise, and array geometry conditions. A voice activity detection algorithm was used to benchmark the performance of the source isolation.

  4. Acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sipei; Qiu, Xiaojun; Burnett, Ian

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a method of creating acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array. The boundary of the arc-shaped area is treated as the envelope of the tangent lines that can be formed by manipulating the phase profile of the loudspeakers in the array. When compared with the existing acoustic contrast control method, the proposed method is able to generate sound field inside an arc-shaped area and achieve a trade-off between acoustic uniformity and acoustic contrast. The acoustic contrast created by the proposed method increases while the acoustic uniformity decreases with frequency.

  5. Investigation of methods for successful installation and operation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) hydrophones in the Willamette River, Oregon, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutz, Gary L.; Sholtis, Matthew D.; Adams, Noah S.; Beeman, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry equipment was installed at three sites in the Willamette River during October 2012 to test the effectiveness of using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System to monitor the movements of fish in a high-flow, high-velocity riverine environment. Hydrophones installed on concrete blocks were placed on the bottom of the river, and data cables were run from the hydrophones to shore where they were attached to anchor points. Under relatively low-flow conditions (less than approximately 10,000 cubic feet per second) the monitoring system remained in place and could be used to detect tagged fish as they traveled downstream during their seaward migration. At river discharge over approximately 10,000 cubic feet per second, the hydrophones were damaged and cables were lost because of the large volume of woody debris in the river and the increase in water velocity. Damage at two of the sites was sufficient to prevent data collection. A limited amount of data was collected from the equipment at the third site. Site selection and deployment strategies were re-evaluated, and an alternate deployment methodology was designed for implementation in 2013.

  6. Tunable arrayed waveguide grating driven by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Poveda, Antonio; Hernández-Mínguez, Alberto; Biermann, Klaus; Tahraoui, Abbes; Gargallo, Bernardo; Muñoz, Pascual; Santos, Paulo V.; Cantarero, Andrés.; de Lima, Maurício M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a design approach for compact reconfigurable phased-array wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) devices with N access waveguides (WGs) based on multimode interference (MMI) couplers. The proposed devices comprise two MMI couplers which are employed as power splitters and combiners, respectively, linked by an array of N single-mode WGs. First, passive devices are explored. Taking advantage of the transfer phases between the access ports of the MMI couplers, we derive very simple phase relations between the arms that provide wavelength dispersion at the output plane of the devices. When the effective refractive index of the WGs is modulated with the proper relative optical phase difference, each wavelength component can switch paths between the preset output channel and the remaining output WGs. Moreover, very simple phase relations between the modulated WGs that enable the reconfiguration of the output channel distribution when the appropriated coupling lengths of the MMI couplers are chosen are also derived. In this way, a very compact expression to calculate the channel assignment of the devices as a function of the applied phase shift is derived for the general case of N access WGs. Finally, the experimental results corresponding to an acoustically driven phased-array WDM device with five access WGs fabricated on (Al,Ga)As are shown.

  7. Solid Micro Horn Array (SMIHA) for Acoustic Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, S.; Bao, X.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Transduction of electrical signals to mechanical signals and vice-versa in piezoelectric materials is controlled by the material coupling coefficient. In general in a loss-less material the ratio of energy conversion per cycle is proportional to the square of the coupling coefficient. In practical transduction however the impedance mismatch between the piezoelectric material and the electrical drive circuitry or the mechanical structure can have a significant impact on the power transfer. This paper looks at novel methods of matching the acoustic impedance of structures to the piezoelectric material in an effort to increase power transmission and efficiency. In typical methods the density and acoustic velocity of the matching layer is adjusted to give good matching between the transducer and the load. The approach discussed in this paper utilizes solid micro horn arrays in the matching layer which channel the stress and increase the strain in the layer. This approach is found to have potential applications in energy harvesting, medical ultrasound and in liquid and gas coupled transducers.

  8. Design of Optimal Directional Parametric Acoustic Arrays in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Glenwood, III

    The nonlinear interaction of propagating acoustic waves in air is exploited as a means of generating highly directional sound beams at both audio frequencies and ultrasonic frequencies. A solution for the third-order intermodulation (IM3) products generated by the nonlinearity of air with a two-tone source waveform is derived by using cascaded secondorder nonlinearities. This method is applied to collinear sources as well as noncollinear sources. With collinear sources, the third-order interaction of two ultrasonic primary tones, where one is approximately the second harmonic of the other, produces an IM3 tone in the audio band. This IM3 tone is shown both theoretically and experimentally to have greater directivity than the difference tone produced by a traditional parametric array which utilizes second-order effects. With noncollinear sources, the third-order interaction of two ultrasonic primary tones closely spaced in frequency produces IM3 upper and IM3 lower tones that are also closely spaced in frequency to the primary tones. The IM3 upper and IM3 lower tones are shown both theoretically and experimentally to have greater directivity than either of the primary tones. Third-order intermodulation distortion generated by the electronic amplifiers and piezoelectric transducers is also shown to contribute to the third-order intermodulation products generated by air. The nonlinear contributions of the amplifier and transducer are modeled using power series expansions and measurements are performed to determine the power series coefficients. A new geometry for the optimum placement of ultrasonic transducers in a multi-element array is derived using the genetic algorithm and results in sparsely packed transducer elements. For primary ultrasonic tones closely spaced in frequency, the sparsely packed array is shown both theoretically and experimentally to produce a difference tone with greater directivity than obtained with a traditional densely packed hexagonal array

  9. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  10. Telemetry Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1990, Avtec Systems, Inc. developed its first telemetry boards for Goddard Space Flight Center. Avtec products now include PC/AT, PCI and VME-based high speed I/O boards and turn-key systems. The most recent and most successful technology transfer from NASA to Avtec is the Programmable Telemetry Processor (PTP), a personal computer- based, multi-channel telemetry front-end processing system originally developed to support the NASA communication (NASCOM) network. The PTP performs data acquisition, real-time network transfer, and store and forward operations. There are over 100 PTP systems located in NASA facilities and throughout the world.

  11. Application of Acoustic Telemetry to Assess Residency and Movements of Rockfish and Lingcod at Created and Natural Habitats in Prince William Sound

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Brad F.; Powers, Sean P.; Bishop, Mary Anne

    2010-01-01

    Loss and/or degradation of nearshore habitats have led to increased efforts to restore or enhance many of these habitats, particularly those that are deemed essential for marine fishes. Copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) and lingcod (Ophiodon enlongatus) are dominant members of the typical reef fish community that inhabit rocky and high-relief substrates along the Pacific Northwest. We used acoustic telemetry to document their residency and movements in the nearshore waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska in order to assess use of created reef habitat in an individual-based manner. A total of 57 fish were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters. Forty-five fish were captured and monitored in three habitats: artificial reef, low-relief natural reef, and patchy high-relief natural reef. Within each habitat, both rockfish and lingcod exhibited long periods of residency with limited movements. Twelve rockfish were captured at the natural reefs and displaced a distance of 4.0 km to the artificial reef. Five of the 12 rockfish returned within 10 d of their release to their initial capture site. Another five of the 12 displaced fish established residency at the artificial reef through the duration of our study. Our results suggest the potential for artificial reefs to provide rockfish habitat in the event of disturbances to natural habitat. PMID:20730090

  12. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  13. Medical Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Telemetry is the process whereby physiological or other data is acquired by instruments, translated into radio signals and j sent to a receiving station where the signals are decoded and recorded. Extensively used in I space operations, it is finding new Earth applications, among them transmission of medical data between emergency vehicles and hospitals. For example, transmission of an electrocardiogram from an ambulance to a hospital enables a physician to read the telemetered EKG and advise ambulance attendants on emergency procedures. Central Medical Emergency Dispatch (CMED) operates as a regional emergency medical communications center for Cleveland, Ohio and Cuyahoga County. The CMED system includes radio and telephone communications from hospital-to-hospital and from ambulance-to-hospital, but for improved emergency life support CMED sought to add a county-wide telemetry capability. The problem was that there were only eight radio frequencies available for telemetry and there were more than 30 potential users in Cleveland alone. NASA's Lewis Research Center volunteered its expert assistance. The Center's engineers studied the systems of other telemetry using cities, surveyed area hospitals to assure compatibility of telemetry equipment, and advised what types of equipment would be needed in emergency vehicles and at the various hospitals. The Lewis plan suggested that CMED be designated the central coordinating agency for the Cuyahoga County system, monitoring all telemetry frequencies and, when requested, assigning one not in use or one to be used at a sufficient distance that it would create no interference problem.

  14. Non-intrusive telemetry applications in the oilsands: from visible light and x-ray video to acoustic imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John M.

    2013-06-01

    While the production, transport and refining of oils from the oilsands of Alberta, and comparable resources elsewhere is performed at industrial scales, numerous technical and technological challenges and opportunities persist due to the ill defined nature of the resource. For example, bitumen and heavy oil comprise multiple bulk phases, self-organizing constituents at the microscale (liquid crystals) and the nano scale. There are no quantitative measures available at the molecular level. Non-intrusive telemetry is providing promising paths toward solutions, be they enabling technologies targeting process design, development or optimization, or more prosaic process control or process monitoring applications. Operation examples include automated large object and poor quality ore during mining, and monitoring the thickness and location of oil water interfacial zones within separation vessels. These applications involve real-time video image processing. X-ray transmission video imaging is used to enumerate organic phases present within a vessel, and to detect individual phase volumes, densities and elemental compositions. This is an enabling technology that provides phase equilibrium and phase composition data for production and refining process development, and fluid property myth debunking. A high-resolution two-dimensional acoustic mapping technique now at the proof of concept stage is expected to provide simultaneous fluid flow and fluid composition data within porous inorganic media. Again this is an enabling technology targeting visualization of diverse oil production process fundamentals at the pore scale. Far infrared spectroscopy coupled with detailed quantum mechanical calculations, may provide characteristic molecular motifs and intermolecular association data required for fluid characterization and process modeling. X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS/USAXS) provides characteristic supramolecular structure information that impacts fluid rheology and process

  15. Movement Patterns and Residency of the Critically Endangered Horseshoe Crab Tachypleus tridentatus in a Semi-Enclosed Bay Determined Using Acoustic Telemetry.

    PubMed

    Wada, Toshifumi; Mitsushio, Takahiro; Inoue, Shinya; Koike, Hiroko; Kawabe, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    The horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus is critically endangered in Japan due to rapidly decreasing numbers resulting from the loss of tidal flats and sandy beaches, and the deterioration of coastal environments. We monitored the year-round migratory patterns and residency of this species in a coastal embayment at Tsuyazaki, Japan, using acoustic telemetry. Total 20 adult crabs (15 males and 5 females) were tagged with ultrasonic transmitters and tracked during two periods (2006-2008; n = 10 and 2007-2009; n = 10). Adult crabs were more active during periods of higher water temperatures and their activity peaked in July, during the spawning period. Water temperature appeared to be one of the key factors influencing the movement patterns for the species. Moreover, the crabs tended to be more active at night than in the day. The nocturnal activity pattern was clearly evident before and during the reproductive period (May-August). Tracking data also showed that one pair-bond was maintained for a maximum of 17 days after the pair-bonded female had spawned. Overall, 11 males (73% of 15 individuals) remained in the bay area over winter, whereas three females (60% of 5 individuals) overwintered outside of the bay. Telemetry data showed that over 60% (13 of 20) of tagged crabs overwintered within the bay where there are sandy beaches, mudflats, and scattered seagrass beds. This year-round residence by adult T. tridentatus in the bay area identifies it as a critical habitat for the management of this species, regardless of life-stage. Not only is it a comprehensive management strategy that effectively reflects this species' habitat use patterns but also its implementation, such as the establishment of a protected area, would contribute to its conservation.

  16. Movement Patterns and Residency of the Critically Endangered Horseshoe Crab Tachypleus tridentatus in a Semi-Enclosed Bay Determined Using Acoustic Telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Toshifumi; Mitsushio, Takahiro; Inoue, Shinya; Koike, Hiroko; Kawabe, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    The horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus is critically endangered in Japan due to rapidly decreasing numbers resulting from the loss of tidal flats and sandy beaches, and the deterioration of coastal environments. We monitored the year-round migratory patterns and residency of this species in a coastal embayment at Tsuyazaki, Japan, using acoustic telemetry. Total 20 adult crabs (15 males and 5 females) were tagged with ultrasonic transmitters and tracked during two periods (2006–2008; n = 10 and 2007–2009; n = 10). Adult crabs were more active during periods of higher water temperatures and their activity peaked in July, during the spawning period. Water temperature appeared to be one of the key factors influencing the movement patterns for the species. Moreover, the crabs tended to be more active at night than in the day. The nocturnal activity pattern was clearly evident before and during the reproductive period (May–August). Tracking data also showed that one pair-bond was maintained for a maximum of 17 days after the pair-bonded female had spawned. Overall, 11 males (73% of 15 individuals) remained in the bay area over winter, whereas three females (60% of 5 individuals) overwintered outside of the bay. Telemetry data showed that over 60% (13 of 20) of tagged crabs overwintered within the bay where there are sandy beaches, mudflats, and scattered seagrass beds. This year-round residence by adult T. tridentatus in the bay area identifies it as a critical habitat for the management of this species, regardless of life-stage. Not only is it a comprehensive management strategy that effectively reflects this species’ habitat use patterns but also its implementation, such as the establishment of a protected area, would contribute to its conservation. PMID:26863205

  17. Movement Patterns and Residency of the Critically Endangered Horseshoe Crab Tachypleus tridentatus in a Semi-Enclosed Bay Determined Using Acoustic Telemetry.

    PubMed

    Wada, Toshifumi; Mitsushio, Takahiro; Inoue, Shinya; Koike, Hiroko; Kawabe, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    The horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus is critically endangered in Japan due to rapidly decreasing numbers resulting from the loss of tidal flats and sandy beaches, and the deterioration of coastal environments. We monitored the year-round migratory patterns and residency of this species in a coastal embayment at Tsuyazaki, Japan, using acoustic telemetry. Total 20 adult crabs (15 males and 5 females) were tagged with ultrasonic transmitters and tracked during two periods (2006-2008; n = 10 and 2007-2009; n = 10). Adult crabs were more active during periods of higher water temperatures and their activity peaked in July, during the spawning period. Water temperature appeared to be one of the key factors influencing the movement patterns for the species. Moreover, the crabs tended to be more active at night than in the day. The nocturnal activity pattern was clearly evident before and during the reproductive period (May-August). Tracking data also showed that one pair-bond was maintained for a maximum of 17 days after the pair-bonded female had spawned. Overall, 11 males (73% of 15 individuals) remained in the bay area over winter, whereas three females (60% of 5 individuals) overwintered outside of the bay. Telemetry data showed that over 60% (13 of 20) of tagged crabs overwintered within the bay where there are sandy beaches, mudflats, and scattered seagrass beds. This year-round residence by adult T. tridentatus in the bay area identifies it as a critical habitat for the management of this species, regardless of life-stage. Not only is it a comprehensive management strategy that effectively reflects this species' habitat use patterns but also its implementation, such as the establishment of a protected area, would contribute to its conservation. PMID:26863205

  18. Undersea acoustic telemetry across the North Anatolian Fault, Marmara Sea: results from the first 6 months of monitoring of the fault displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, J. Y.; Deschamps, A.; Piete, H.; Sakic, P.; Ballu, V.; Apprioual, R.; Kopp, H.; Lange, D.; Ruffine, L.; Géli, L.

    2015-12-01

    Located in the Marmara Sea, the Istanbul-Silivri segment of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is known to be a seismic gap since 1766, although, in the last century, the NAF has caused major devastating earthquakes over most of its extent. This fault segment, void of seismicity, may be either creeping aseismically or blocked and accumulating enough strain to produce an earthquake of magnitude 7 or greater. This section of the NAF may thus represent a major seismic and tsunamigenic hazard for the Istanbul megalopolis, located only 40 km away. The objective of the MARSITE project, funded by the European Union and coordinated by the Observatory of the University of Kandilli (KOERI), is to determine the blocking state of the Istanbul-Silivri fault segment. In this context, an array of 10 acoustic transponders has been deployed on either sides of the fault, in the eastern part of the Kumburgaz Basin, to measure the displacements of the fault over a period of 3 to 5 years. The telemetric beacons (4 from the University of Brest and 6 from the GEOMAR Institute in Kiel) form two arrays fitted in one another. The principle of the experiment is to repeatedly measure the distance (ie two-way-travel time of acoustic pings) between pairs of beacons and thus to monitor the deformation of an array of 9 baselines, 500m to 3000m long, of which 5 cross obliquely the assumed fault trace. The French and German arrays are independent but ensure a redundancy of rangings along common baselines. Each acoustic transponder also monitors the temperature, pressure, sound-velocity and attitude (tiltmeters), every one or two hours. Data are stored in each beacon and can be downloaded from the surface using an acoustic modem. We present here the first 6 months of recording by the French array, from November 1st, 2014 to April 25, 2015. All acoustic transponders worked nominally for 6 months and appear to have remained stable on the seafloor. Recorded sea-bottom temperatures provide evidence for

  19. Thin-film sparse boundary array design for passive acoustic mapping during ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Christian M; Kozick, Richard J; Hurrell, Andrew; Smith, Penny Probert; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-10-01

    A new 2-D hydrophone array for ultrasound therapy monitoring is presented, along with a novel algorithm for passive acoustic mapping using a sparse weighted aperture. The array is constructed using existing polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) ultrasound sensor technology, and is utilized for its broadband characteristics and its high receive sensitivity. For most 2-D arrays, high-resolution imagery is desired, which requires a large aperture at the cost of a large number of elements. The proposed array's geometry is sparse, with elements only on the boundary of the rectangular aperture. The missing information from the interior is filled in using linear imaging techniques. After receiving acoustic emissions during ultrasound therapy, this algorithm applies an apodization to the sparse aperture to limit side lobes and then reconstructs acoustic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution. Experiments show verification of the theoretical point spread function, and cavitation maps in agar phantoms correspond closely to predicted areas, showing the validity of the array and methodology. PMID:23143581

  20. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) Determined from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Current processing of acoustic array data is burdened with considerable uncertainty. This study reports an original methodology that serves to demystify array results, reduce misinterpretation, and accurately quantify position and strength of acoustic sources. Traditional array results represent noise sources that are convolved with array beamform response functions, which depend on array geometry, size (with respect to source position and distributions), and frequency. The Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) method removes beamforming characteristics from output presentations. A unique linear system of equations accounts for reciprocal influence at different locations over the array survey region. It makes no assumption beyond the traditional processing assumption of statistically independent noise sources. The full rank equations are solved with a new robust iterative method. DAMAS is quantitatively validated using archival data from a variety of prior high-lift airframe component noise studies, including flap edge/cove, trailing edge, leading edge, slat, and calibration sources. Presentations are explicit and straightforward, as the noise radiated from a region of interest is determined by simply summing the mean-squared values over that region. DAMAS can fully replace existing array processing and presentations methodology in most applications. It appears to dramatically increase the value of arrays to the field of experimental acoustics.

  1. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) Determined from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Current processing of acoustic array data is burdened with considerable uncertainty. This study reports an original methodology that serves to demystify array results, reduce misinterpretation, and accurately quantify position and strength of acoustic sources. Traditional array results represent noise sources that are convolved with array beamform response functions, which depend on array geometry, size (with respect to source position and distributions), and frequency. The Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) method removes beamforming characteristics from output presentations. A unique linear system of equations accounts for reciprocal influence at different locations over the array survey region. It makes no assumption beyond the traditional processing assumption of statistically independent noise sources. The full rank equations are solved with a new robust iterative method. DAMAS is quantitatively validated using archival data from a variety of prior high-lift airframe component noise studies, including flap edge/cove, trailing edge, leading edge, slat, and calibration sources. Presentations are explicit and straightforward, as the noise radiated from a region of interest is determined by simply summing the mean-squared values over that region. DAMAS can fully replace existing array processing and presentations methodology in most applications. It appears to dramatically increase the value of arrays to the field of experimental acoustics.

  2. Tunable optical lens array using viscoelastic material and acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Daisuke Kashihara, Yuta; Matsukawa, Mami; Hatanaka, Megumi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-10-28

    A movable optical lens array that uses acoustic radiation force was investigated. The lens array consists of a glass plate, two piezoelectric bimorph transducers, and a transparent viscoelastic gel film. A cylindrical lens array with a lens pitch of 4.6 mm was fabricated using the acoustic radiation force generated by the flexural vibration of the glass plate. The focal point and the positioning of the lenses can be changed using the input voltage and the driving phase difference between the two transducers, respectively.

  3. Performance of an underwater acoustic volume array using time-reversal focusing.

    PubMed

    Root, Joseph A; Rogers, Peter H

    2002-11-01

    Time reversal permits acoustic focusing and beam forming in inhomogeneous and/or high-scattering environments. A volumetric array geometry can suppress back lobes and can fit a large, powerful array of elements into small spaces, like the free-water spaces on submarines. This research investigates applying the time-reversal method to an underwater acoustic volume array. The experiments evaluate the focusing performance of a 27-element volume array when different scattering structures are present within the volume of the array. The array is arranged in a 3x3x3 cubic matrix configuration with 18.75-cm vertical and horizontal element spacing. The system utilizes second-derivative Gaussian pulses to focus on a point 30 cm from the array. Results include a comparison between time-reversal focusing and standard focusing, an evaluation of the volume array's ability to suppress back lobes, and an analysis of how different scattering environments affect focal region size. Potential underwater applications for a volume array using time reversal include acoustic imaging, naval mine hunting, sonar, and underwater communications.

  4. Tracking sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) dive profiles using a towed passive acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, Aaron

    2004-07-01

    A passive acoustic method is presented for tracking sperm whale dive profiles, using two or three hydrophones deployed as either a vertical or large-aperture towed array. The relative arrival times between the direct and surface-reflected acoustic paths are used to obtain the ranges and depths of animals with respect to the array, provided that the hydrophone depths are independently measured. Besides reducing the number of hydrophones required, exploiting surface reflections simplifies automation of the data processing. Experimental results are shown from 2002 and 2003 cruises in the Gulf of Mexico for two different towed array deployments. The 2002 deployment consisted of two short-aperture towed arrays separated by 170 m, while the 2003 deployment placed an autonomous acoustic recorder in tandem with a short-aperture towed array, and used ship noise to time-align the acoustic data. The resulting dive profiles were independently checked using single-hydrophone localizations, whenever multipath reflections from the ocean bottom could be exploited to effectively create a large-aperture vertical array. This technique may have applications for basic research and for real-time mitigation for seismic airgun surveys.

  5. Acoustic Field Calculation of Ultrasonic Linear Phased Array Transducers with Curve Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunguang; Wang, Lijiu; Xiao, Dingguo; Zhou, Shiyuan

    2011-06-01

    The focus law and acoustic field computation method about circular arc linear phased array have been discussed in the paper. Acoustic field of transducers is given by the use of the coordinate transformation and an approximation with rectangle element instead of circular arc element, and was validated using Rayleigh-Sommerfeld Integral and nonparallel multiple Gaussian beam model respectively. The results of two methods match well.

  6. Assessment of Microphone Phased Array for Measuring Launch Vehicle Lift-off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The specific purpose of the present work was to demonstrate the suitability of a microphone phased array for launch acoustics applications via participation in selected firings of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test is a part of the discontinued Constellation Program Ares I Project, but the basic understanding gained from this test is expected to help development of the Space Launch System vehicles. Correct identification of sources not only improves the predictive ability, but provides guidance for a quieter design of the launch pad and optimization of the water suppression system. This document contains the results of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center assessment.

  7. Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary.

    PubMed

    Matich, Philip; Heithaus, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how natural and anthropogenic drivers affect extant food webs is critical to predicting the impacts of climate change and habitat alterations on ecosystem dynamics. In the Florida Everglades, seasonal reductions in freshwater flow and precipitation lead to annual migrations of aquatic taxa from marsh habitats to deep-water refugia in estuaries. The timing and intensity of freshwater reductions, however, will be modified by ongoing ecosystem restoration and predicted climate change. Understanding the importance of seasonally pulsed resources to predators is critical to predicting the impacts of management and climate change on their populations. As with many large predators, however, it is difficult to determine to what extent predators like bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the coastal Everglades make use of prey pulses currently. We used passive acoustic telemetry to determine whether shark movements responded to the pulse of marsh prey. To investigate the possibility that sharks fed on marsh prey, we modelled the predicted dynamics of stable isotope values in bull shark blood and plasma under different assumptions of temporal variability in shark diets and physiological dynamics of tissue turnover and isotopic discrimination. Bull sharks increased their use of upstream channels during the late dry season, and although our previous work shows long-term specialization in the diets of sharks, stable isotope values suggested that some individuals adjusted their diets to take advantage of prey entering the system from the marsh, and as such this may be an important resource for the nursery. Restoration efforts are predicted to increase hydroperiods and marsh water levels, likely shifting the timing, duration and intensity of prey pulses, which could have negative consequences for the bull shark population and/or induce shifts in behaviour. Understanding the factors influencing the propensity to specialize or adopt more flexible trophic interactions

  8. Multi-tissue stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry reveal seasonal variability in the trophic interactions of juvenile bull sharks in a coastal estuary.

    PubMed

    Matich, Philip; Heithaus, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how natural and anthropogenic drivers affect extant food webs is critical to predicting the impacts of climate change and habitat alterations on ecosystem dynamics. In the Florida Everglades, seasonal reductions in freshwater flow and precipitation lead to annual migrations of aquatic taxa from marsh habitats to deep-water refugia in estuaries. The timing and intensity of freshwater reductions, however, will be modified by ongoing ecosystem restoration and predicted climate change. Understanding the importance of seasonally pulsed resources to predators is critical to predicting the impacts of management and climate change on their populations. As with many large predators, however, it is difficult to determine to what extent predators like bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the coastal Everglades make use of prey pulses currently. We used passive acoustic telemetry to determine whether shark movements responded to the pulse of marsh prey. To investigate the possibility that sharks fed on marsh prey, we modelled the predicted dynamics of stable isotope values in bull shark blood and plasma under different assumptions of temporal variability in shark diets and physiological dynamics of tissue turnover and isotopic discrimination. Bull sharks increased their use of upstream channels during the late dry season, and although our previous work shows long-term specialization in the diets of sharks, stable isotope values suggested that some individuals adjusted their diets to take advantage of prey entering the system from the marsh, and as such this may be an important resource for the nursery. Restoration efforts are predicted to increase hydroperiods and marsh water levels, likely shifting the timing, duration and intensity of prey pulses, which could have negative consequences for the bull shark population and/or induce shifts in behaviour. Understanding the factors influencing the propensity to specialize or adopt more flexible trophic interactions

  9. Effects of a tropical cyclone on the distribution of hatchery-reared black-spot tuskfish Choerodon schoenleinii determined by acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Y; Okuyama, J; Asami, K; Okuzawa, K; Yoseda, K; Arai, N

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a tropical cyclone on the distribution of hatchery-reared black-spot tuskfish Choerodon schoenleinii were examined using acoustic telemetry. Nine fish were released in Urasoko Bay, Ishigaki Island, Japan, in September 2006, and another nine were released in June to July 2007, before a cyclone's passing through the area in September 2007. Data for the fish released in 2006 were used as the cyclone-inexperienced group to compare their distribution pattern to that of the 2007 cyclone-experienced group. Both groups of fish were monitored for up to 150 days. Of the nine fish in each group, four (44%) and two (22%) were monitored for over 150 days in the cyclone-inexperienced and the cyclone-experienced groups, respectively. Three of the five fish that had settled in the monitoring area left the area within a few days of the cyclone event. To estimate the time of disappearance of the fish, maximum wind speed during a period of 7 days (indicating the occurrence and intensity of the tropical cyclone), fish size and release year were evaluated as explanatory variables using a Cox proportional hazards model with Akaike's information criterion. The best predictive model included the effect of maximum wind speed. One fish that left the monitoring area displayed movement patterns related to strong winds, suggesting that wind-associated strong currents swept the fish away. No relationships were found between the movement patterns of the other two fish and any physical environmental data. The daily detection periods of one of the two fish gradually decreased after the cyclone hit, and this fish eventually left the monitoring area within 3 days, suggesting that it shifted to a habitat outside the monitoring area. These results indicate that tropical cyclones have both direct and indirect effects on the distribution of hatchery-reared C. schoenleinii.

  10. Can marine reserves conserve vulnerable sharks in the deep sea? A case study of Centrophorus zeehaani (Centrophoridae), examined with acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Ross K.; Williams, Alan; Green, Mark; Barker, Bruce; Brodie, Pamela

    2015-05-01

    Centrophorus zeehaani is one of at least 10 deep-sea shark species globally suffering major population declines attributable to expanding human resource use. Spatial closures have the potential to contribute to recovery of populations if home range and movements can be studied and understood. We implemented the first passive acoustic tracking study of sharks in the deep ocean (300-700 m depths) to evaluate the effectiveness of a large (~100 km long) fishery closure off southern Australia implemented to protect C. zeehaani. Using an array of 21 moored acoustic receivers, we passively tracked 71 tagged individuals over a 15-month period. Sixty-one sharks were detected repeatedly over an average duration of 408±153 days. The average along-slope range was 19.2±12.2 km and the maximum was 75 km - the full width of the array. Each month an average of 0.71 fewer males were detected; the number of females detected did not vary significantly between months. Individual males left the closure, but returned during the study period. Movement along-slope was influenced by month and release point, with shifts south and eastward occurring during austral winter - particularly by some males. Detection depth was strongly correlated with seafloor depth confirming that synchronous diel vertical migration (night time ascent) between population average depths of 640 m and 340 m occurred mainly on the seafloor. Different individuals occupied different depths on the seafloor. We conclude that the closure studied is effectively located to help conserve C. zeehaani because it has sufficient along-slope extent and depth range to encompass the home range of a high proportion of the individuals in the local population. Our work demonstrates the utility and uncertainties associated with acoustic tracking in the deep ocean, and the need to evaluate species movement and behaviour when relying on spatial closures to meet conservation objectives.

  11. The effects of correlated noise in intra-complex DSN arrays for S-band Galileo telemetry reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewey, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of the proposals for supporting a Galileo S-band (2.3-GHz) mission involve arraying several antennas to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (and bit rate) obtainable from a given set of antennas. Arraying is no longer a new idea, having been used successfully during the Voyager encounters with Uranus and Neptune. However, arraying for Galileo's tour of Jupiter is complicated by Jupiter's strong radio emission, which produces correlated noise effects. This article discusses the general problem of correlated noise due to a planet, or other radio source, and applies the results to the specific case of an array of antennas at the DSN's Tidbinbilla, Australia, complex (DSS 42, DSS 43, DSS 45, and the yet-to-be-built DSS 34). The effects of correlated noise are highly dependent on the specific geometry of the array and on the spacecraft-planet configuration; in some cases, correlated noise effects produce an enhancement, rather than a degradation, of the signal-to-noise ratio. For the case considered here--an array of the DSN's Australian antennas observing Galileo and Jupiter--there are three regimes of interest. If the spacecraft-planet separation is approximately less than 75 arcsec, the average effect of correlated noise is a loss of signal to noise (approximately 0.2 dB as the spacecraft-planet separation approaches zero). For spacecraft-planet separations approximately greater than 75 arcsec, but approximately less than 400 arcsec, the effects of correlated noise cause signal-to-noise variations as large as several tenths of a decibel over time scales of hours or changes in spacecraft-planet separation of tens of arcseconds; however, on average its effects are small (less than 0.01 dB). When the spacecraft is more than 400 arcsec from Jupiter (as is the case for about half of Galileo's tour), correlated noise is a less than 0.05-dB effect.

  12. Unique gel-coupled acoustic sensor array monitors human voice and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael

    2002-11-01

    The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. The Army Research Laboratory's gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin that facilitate the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repel ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. Acoustic signal processing detects physiological events such as heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. Acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Although the physiological sounds have high SNR, the acoustic sensor also responds to motion-induced artifacts that sometimes obscure meaningful physiology. A noise-canceling sensor array configuration helps remove motion noise by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and 2 additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. The motion noise detected on all 4 sensors will be dissimilar and out of phase, yet the physiology on all 4 sensors is covariant. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist will indicate systolic blood pressure. Data from a firefighter experiment will be presented.

  13. Acoustic phonon spectrum and thermal transport in nanoporous alumina arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kargar, Fariborz; Ramirez, Sylvester; Debnath, Bishwajit; Malekpour, Hoda; Lake, Roger; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2015-10-28

    We report results of a combined investigation of thermal conductivity and acoustic phonon spectra in nanoporous alumina membranes with the pore diameter decreasing from D=180 nm to 25 nm. The samples with the hexagonally arranged pores were selected to have the same porosity Ø ≈13%. The Brillouin-Mandelstam spectroscopy measurements revealed bulk-like phonon spectrum in the samples with D = 180 nm pores and spectral features, which were attributed to spatial confinement, in the samples with 25 nm and 40 nm pores. The velocity of the longitudinal acoustic phonons was reduced in the samples with smaller pores. As a result, analysis of the experimental data and calculated phonon dispersion suggests that both phonon-boundary scattering and phonon spatial confinement affect heat conduction in membranes with the feature sizes D < 40 nm.

  14. Acoustic phonon spectrum and thermal transport in nanoporous alumina arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kargar, Fariborz; Ramirez, Sylvester; Debnath, Bishwajit; Malekpour, Hoda; Lake, Roger; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2015-10-28

    We report results of a combined investigation of thermal conductivity and acoustic phonon spectra in nanoporous alumina membranes with the pore diameter decreasing from D=180 nm to 25 nm. The samples with the hexagonally arranged pores were selected to have the same porosity Ø ≈13%. The Brillouin-Mandelstam spectroscopy measurements revealed bulk-like phonon spectrum in the samples with D=180-nm pores and spectral features, which were attributed to spatial confinement, in the samples with 25-nm and 40-nm pores. The velocity of the longitudinal acoustic phonons was reduced in the samples with smaller pores. As a result, analysis of the experimental data and calculated phonon dispersion suggests that both phonon-boundary scattering and phonon spatial confinement affect heat conduction in membranes with the feature sizes D<40 nm.

  15. Acoustic phonon spectrum and thermal transport in nanoporous alumina arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Kargar, Fariborz; Ramirez, Sylvester; Debnath, Bishwajit; Malekpour, Hoda; Lake, Roger; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2015-10-28

    We report results of a combined investigation of thermal conductivity and acoustic phonon spectra in nanoporous alumina membranes with the pore diameter decreasing from D=180 nm to 25 nm. The samples with the hexagonally arranged pores were selected to have the same porosity Ø ≈13%. The Brillouin-Mandelstam spectroscopy measurements revealed bulk-like phonon spectrum in the samples with D = 180 nm pores and spectral features, which were attributed to spatial confinement, in the samples with 25 nm and 40 nm pores. The velocity of the longitudinal acoustic phonons was reduced in the samples with smaller pores. As a result, analysismore » of the experimental data and calculated phonon dispersion suggests that both phonon-boundary scattering and phonon spatial confinement affect heat conduction in membranes with the feature sizes D < 40 nm.« less

  16. A methodology for analyzing an acoustic scene in sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Hong; Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi

    2007-10-01

    Presented here is a novel clustering method for Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and its application in acoustic scene analysis. In this method, HMMs are clustered based on a similarity measure for stochastic models defined as the generalized probability product kernel (GPPK), which can be efficiently evaluated according to a fast algorithm introduced by Chen and Man (2005) [1]. Acoustic signals from various sources are partitioned into small frames. Frequency features are extracted from each of the frames to form observation vectors. These frames are further grouped into segments, and an HMM is trained from each of such segments. An unknown segment is categorized with a known event if its HMM has the closest similarity with the HMM from the corresponding labeled segment. Experiments are conducted on an underwater acoustic dataset from Steven Maritime Security Laboratory, Data set contains a swimmer signature, a noise signature from the Hudson River, and a test sequence with a swimmer in the Hudson River. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully associate the test sequence with the swimmer signature at very high confidence, despite their different time behaviors.

  17. Spontaneous assembly of chemically encoded two-dimensional coacervate droplet arrays by acoustic wave patterning

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Liangfei; Martin, Nicolas; Bassindale, Philip G.; Patil, Avinash J.; Li, Mei; Barnes, Adrian; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Mann, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous assembly of chemically encoded, molecularly crowded, water-rich micro-droplets into periodic defect-free two-dimensional arrays is achieved in aqueous media by a combination of an acoustic standing wave pressure field and in situ complex coacervation. Acoustically mediated coalescence of primary droplets generates single-droplet per node micro-arrays that exhibit variable surface-attachment properties, spontaneously uptake dyes, enzymes and particles, and display spatial and time-dependent fluorescence outputs when exposed to a reactant diffusion gradient. In addition, coacervate droplet arrays exhibiting dynamical behaviour and exchange of matter are prepared by inhibiting coalescence to produce acoustically trapped lattices of droplet clusters that display fast and reversible changes in shape and spatial configuration in direct response to modulations in the acoustic frequencies and fields. Our results offer a novel route to the design and construction of ‘water-in-water' micro-droplet arrays with controllable spatial organization, programmable signalling pathways and higher order collective behaviour. PMID:27708286

  18. Spontaneous assembly of chemically encoded two-dimensional coacervate droplet arrays by acoustic wave patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Liangfei; Martin, Nicolas; Bassindale, Philip G.; Patil, Avinash J.; Li, Mei; Barnes, Adrian; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Mann, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous assembly of chemically encoded, molecularly crowded, water-rich micro-droplets into periodic defect-free two-dimensional arrays is achieved in aqueous media by a combination of an acoustic standing wave pressure field and in situ complex coacervation. Acoustically mediated coalescence of primary droplets generates single-droplet per node micro-arrays that exhibit variable surface-attachment properties, spontaneously uptake dyes, enzymes and particles, and display spatial and time-dependent fluorescence outputs when exposed to a reactant diffusion gradient. In addition, coacervate droplet arrays exhibiting dynamical behaviour and exchange of matter are prepared by inhibiting coalescence to produce acoustically trapped lattices of droplet clusters that display fast and reversible changes in shape and spatial configuration in direct response to modulations in the acoustic frequencies and fields. Our results offer a novel route to the design and construction of `water-in-water' micro-droplet arrays with controllable spatial organization, programmable signalling pathways and higher order collective behaviour.

  19. Seismo-acoustic Signals Recorded at KSIAR, the Infrasound Array Installed at PS31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. S.; Che, I. Y.; Jeon, J. S.; Chi, H. C.; Kang, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    One of International Monitoring System (IMS)'s primary seismic stations, PS31, called Korea Seismic Research Station (KSRS), was installed around Wonju, Korea in 1970s. It has been operated by US Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC) for more than 40 years. KSRS is composed of 26 seismic sensors including 19 short period, 6 long period and 1 broad band seismometers. The 19 short period sensors were used to build an array with a 10-km aperture while the 6 long period sensors were used for a relatively long period array with a 40-km aperture. After KSRS was certified as an IMS station in 2006 by Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) which is the Korea National Data Center started to take over responsibilities on the operation and maintenance of KSRS from AFTAC. In April of 2014, KIGAM installed an infrasound array, KSIAR, on the existing four short period seismic stations of KSRS, the sites KS05, KS06, KS07 and KS16. The collocated KSIAR changed KSRS from a seismic array into a seismo-acoustic array. The aperture of KSIAR is 3.3 km. KSIAR also has a 100-m small aperture infrasound array at KS07. The infrasound data from KSIAR except that from the site KS06 is being transmitted in real time to KIGAM with VPN and internet line. An initial analysis on seismo-acoustic signals originated from local and regional distance ranges has been performed since May 2014. The analysis with the utilization of an array process called Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation (PMCC) detected seismo-acoustic signals caused by various sources including small explosions in relation to constructing local tunnels and roads. Some of them were not found in the list of automatic bulletin of KIGAM. The seismo-acoustic signals recorded by KSIAR are supplying a useful information for discriminating local and regional man-made events from natural events.

  20. Acoustic and vibration performance evaluations of a velocity sensing hull array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Christman, Russell A.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic and vibration measurements were conducted at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Seneca Lake Facility to investigate the in situ signal response of a linear array of velocity sensors (sensors that measure either acoustic particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement have generically been denoted as velocity sensors) on a coating. The coating used at Seneca Lake consisted of air-voided elastomeric tiles with an overall coating thickness of approximately 3 inches. The accelerometer array and coating were mounted on the Seneca Lake Hull Fixture, which measures 33 feet lengthwise with an arc length of 20 feet. The fixture weighs approximately 30 tons. Specifically, measurements of in situ sensitivity, velocity reduction, reflection gain, array beam response, and equivalent planewave self-noise levels are presented.

  1. Performance assessment of two whole-lake acoustic positional telemetry systems--is reality mining of free-ranging aquatic animals technologically possible?

    PubMed

    Baktoft, Henrik; Zajicek, Petr; Klefoth, Thomas; Svendsen, Jon C; Jacobsen, Lene; Pedersen, Martin Wæver; March Morla, David; Skov, Christian; Nakayama, Shinnosuke; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic positional telemetry systems (APTs) represent a novel approach to study the behaviour of free ranging aquatic animals in the wild at unprecedented detail. System manufactures promise remarkably high temporal and spatial resolution. However, the performance of APTs has rarely been rigorously tested at the level of entire ecosystems. Moreover, the effect of habitat structure on system performance has only been poorly documented. Two APTs were deployed to cover two small lakes and a series of standardized stationary tests were conducted to assess system performance. Furthermore, a number of tow tests were conducted to simulate moving fish. Based on these data, we quantified system performance in terms of data yield, accuracy and precision as a function of structural complexity in relation to vegetation. Mean data yield of the two systems was 40% (Lake1) and 60% (Lake2). Average system accuracy (acc) and precision (prec) were Lake1: acc = 3.1 m, prec = 1.1 m; Lake2: acc = 1.0 m, prec = 0.2 m. System performance was negatively affected by structural complexity, i.e., open water habitats yielded far better performance than structurally complex vegetated habitats. Post-processing greatly improved data quality, and sub-meter accuracy and precision were, on average, regularly achieved in Lake2 but remained the exception in the larger and structurally more complex Lake1. Moving transmitters were tracked well by both systems. Whereas overestimation of moved distance is inevitable for stationary transmitters due to accumulation of small tracking errors, moving transmitters can result in both over- and underestimation of distances depending on circumstances. Both deployed APTs were capable of providing high resolution positional data at the scale of entire lakes and are suitable systems to mine the reality of free ranging fish in their natural environment. This opens important opportunities to advance several fields of study such as movement ecology and animal social

  2. Performance Assessment of Two Whole-Lake Acoustic Positional Telemetry Systems - Is Reality Mining of Free-Ranging Aquatic Animals Technologically Possible?

    PubMed Central

    Baktoft, Henrik; Zajicek, Petr; Klefoth, Thomas; Svendsen, Jon C.; Jacobsen, Lene; Pedersen, Martin Wæver; March Morla, David; Skov, Christian; Nakayama, Shinnosuke; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic positional telemetry systems (APTs) represent a novel approach to study the behaviour of free ranging aquatic animals in the wild at unprecedented detail. System manufactures promise remarkably high temporal and spatial resolution. However, the performance of APTs has rarely been rigorously tested at the level of entire ecosystems. Moreover, the effect of habitat structure on system performance has only been poorly documented. Two APTs were deployed to cover two small lakes and a series of standardized stationary tests were conducted to assess system performance. Furthermore, a number of tow tests were conducted to simulate moving fish. Based on these data, we quantified system performance in terms of data yield, accuracy and precision as a function of structural complexity in relation to vegetation. Mean data yield of the two systems was 40 % (Lake1) and 60 % (Lake2). Average system accuracy (acc) and precision (prec) were Lake1: acc = 3.1 m, prec = 1.1 m; Lake2: acc = 1.0 m, prec = 0.2 m. System performance was negatively affected by structural complexity, i.e., open water habitats yielded far better performance than structurally complex vegetated habitats. Post-processing greatly improved data quality, and sub-meter accuracy and precision were, on average, regularly achieved in Lake2 but remained the exception in the larger and structurally more complex Lake1. Moving transmitters were tracked well by both systems. Whereas overestimation of moved distance is inevitable for stationary transmitters due to accumulation of small tracking errors, moving transmitters can result in both over- and underestimation of distances depending on circumstances. Both deployed APTs were capable of providing high resolution positional data at the scale of entire lakes and are suitable systems to mine the reality of free ranging fish in their natural environment. This opens important opportunities to advance several fields of study such as movement ecology and animal social

  3. Short-Term Fidelity, Habitat Use and Vertical Movement Behavior of the Black Rockfish Sebastes schlegelii as Determined by Acoustic Telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingqiu; Xu, Qiang; Alós, Josep; Liu, Hui; Xu, Qinzeng; Yang, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The recent miniaturization of acoustic tracking devices has allowed fishery managers and scientists to collect spatial and temporal data for sustainable fishery management. The spatial and temporal dimensions of fish behavior (movement and/or vertical migrations) are particularly relevant for rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) because most rockfish species are long-lived and have high site fidelity, increasing their vulnerability to overexploitation. In this study, we describe the short-term (with a tracking period of up to 46 d) spatial behavior, as determined by acoustic tracking, of the black rockfish Sebastes schlegelii, a species subject to overexploitation in the Yellow Sea of China. The average residence index (the ratio of detected days to the total period from release to the last detection) in the study area was 0.92 ± 0.13, and most of the tagged fish were detected by only one region of the acoustic receiver array, suggesting relatively high site fidelity to the study area. Acoustic tracking also suggested that this species is more frequently detected during the day than at night in our study area. However, the diel detection periodicity (24 h) was only evident for certain periods of the tracking time, as revealed by a continuous wavelet transform. The habitat selection index of tagged S. schlegelii suggested that S. schlegelii preferred natural reefs, mixed sand/artificial reef bottoms and mixed bottoms of boulder, cobble, gravel and artificial reefs. The preference of this species for the artificial reefs that were recently deployed in the study area suggests that artificial seascapes may be effective management tools to attract individuals. The vertical movement of tagged S. schlegelii was mostly characterized by bottom dwelling behavior, and there was high individual variability in the vertical migration pattern. Our results have important implications for S. schlegelii catchability, the implementation of marine protected areas, and the identification of key

  4. Acoustic contrast, planarity and robustness of sound zone methods using a circular loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Philip; Jackson, Philip J B; Olik, Marek; Møller, Martin; Olsen, Martin; Abildgaard Pedersen, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Since the mid 1990s, acoustics research has been undertaken relating to the sound zone problem-using loudspeakers to deliver a region of high sound pressure while simultaneously creating an area where the sound is suppressed-in order to facilitate independent listening within the same acoustic enclosure. The published solutions to the sound zone problem are derived from areas such as wave field synthesis and beamforming. However, the properties of such methods differ and performance tends to be compared against similar approaches. In this study, the suitability of energy focusing, energy cancelation, and synthesis approaches for sound zone reproduction is investigated. Anechoic simulations based on two zones surrounded by a circular array show each of the methods to have a characteristic performance, quantified in terms of acoustic contrast, array control effort and target sound field planarity. Regularization is shown to have a significant effect on the array effort and achieved acoustic contrast, particularly when mismatched conditions are considered between calculation of the source weights and their application to the system.

  5. Single-shot measurements of the acoustic field of an electrohydraulic lithotripter using a hydrophone array

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Filoux, Erwan; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Piezopolymer-based hydrophone arrays consisting of 20 elements were fabricated and tested for use in measuring the acoustic field from a shock-wave lithotripter. The arrays were fabricated from piezopolymer films and were mounted in a housing to allow submersion into water. The motivation was to use the array to determine how the shot-to-shot variability of the spark discharge in an electrohydraulic lithotripter affects the resulting focused acoustic field. It was found that the dominant effect of shot-to-shot variability was to laterally shift the location of the focus by up to 5 mm from the nominal acoustic axis of the lithotripter. The effect was more pronounced when the spark discharge was initiated with higher voltages. The lateral beamwidth of individual, instantaneous shock waves were observed to range from 1.5 mm to 24 mm. Due to the spatial variation of the acoustic field, the average of instantaneous beamwidths were observed to be 1 to 2 mm narrower than beamwidths determined from traditional single-point measurements that average the pressure measured at each location before computing beamwidth. PMID:23654419

  6. An acoustic-array based structural health monitoring technique for wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kai; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Baqersad, Javad; Inalpolat, Murat; Heilmann, Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a non-contact measurement technique for health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic beamforming techniques. The technique works by mounting an audio speaker inside a wind turbine blade and observing the sound radiated from the blade to identify damage within the structure. The main hypothesis for the structural damage detection is that the structural damage (cracks, edge splits, holes etc.) on the surface of a composite wind turbine blade results in changes in the sound radiation characteristics of the structure. Preliminary measurements were carried out on two separate test specimens, namely a composite box and a section of a wind turbine blade to validate the methodology. The rectangular shaped composite box and the turbine blade contained holes with different dimensions and line cracks. An acoustic microphone array with 62 microphones was used to measure the sound radiation from both structures when the speaker was located inside the box and also inside the blade segment. A phased array beamforming technique and CLEAN-based subtraction of point spread function from a reference (CLSPR) were employed to locate the different damage types on both the composite box and the wind turbine blade. The same experiment was repeated by using a commercially available 48-channel acoustic ring array to compare the test results. It was shown that both the acoustic beamforming and the CLSPR techniques can be used to identify the damage in the test structures with sufficiently high fidelity.

  7. Acoustic contrast, planarity and robustness of sound zone methods using a circular loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Philip; Jackson, Philip J B; Olik, Marek; Møller, Martin; Olsen, Martin; Abildgaard Pedersen, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Since the mid 1990s, acoustics research has been undertaken relating to the sound zone problem-using loudspeakers to deliver a region of high sound pressure while simultaneously creating an area where the sound is suppressed-in order to facilitate independent listening within the same acoustic enclosure. The published solutions to the sound zone problem are derived from areas such as wave field synthesis and beamforming. However, the properties of such methods differ and performance tends to be compared against similar approaches. In this study, the suitability of energy focusing, energy cancelation, and synthesis approaches for sound zone reproduction is investigated. Anechoic simulations based on two zones surrounded by a circular array show each of the methods to have a characteristic performance, quantified in terms of acoustic contrast, array control effort and target sound field planarity. Regularization is shown to have a significant effect on the array effort and achieved acoustic contrast, particularly when mismatched conditions are considered between calculation of the source weights and their application to the system. PMID:25234991

  8. Customization of the acoustic field produced by a piezoelectric array through interelement delays

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Barbone, Paul E.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2008-01-01

    A method for producing a prescribed acoustic pressure field from a piezoelectric array was investigated. The array consisted of 170 elements placed on the inner surface of a 15 cm radius spherical cap. Each element was independently driven by using individual pulsers each capable of generating 1.2 kV. Acoustic field customization was achieved by independently controlling the time when each element was excited. The set of time delays necessary to produce a particular acoustic field was determined by using an optimization scheme. The acoustic field at the focal plane was simulated by using the angular spectrum method, and the optimization searched for the time delays that minimized the least squared difference between the magnitudes of the simulated and desired pressure fields. The acoustic field was shaped in two different ways: the −6 dB focal width was increased to different desired widths and the ring-shaped pressure distributions of various prescribed diameters were produced. For both cases, the set of delays resulting from the respective optimization schemes were confirmed to yield the desired pressure distributions by using simulations and measurements. The simulations, however, predicted peak positive pressures roughly half those obtained from the measurements, which was attributed to the exclusion of nonlinearity in the simulations. PMID:18537369

  9. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  10. Design of acoustic logging signal source of imitation based on field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Ju, X. D.; Lu, J. Q.; Men, B. Y.

    2014-08-01

    An acoustic logging signal source of imitation is designed and realized, based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to improve the efficiency of examining and repairing acoustic logging tools during research and field application, and to inspect and verify acoustic receiving circuits and corresponding algorithms. The design of this signal source contains hardware design and software design,and the hardware design uses an FPGA as the control core. Four signals are made first by reading the Random Access Memory (RAM) data which are inside the FPGA, then dealing with the data by digital to analog conversion, amplification, smoothing and so on. Software design uses VHDL, a kind of hardware description language, to program the FPGA. Experiments illustrate that the ratio of signal to noise for the signal source is high, the waveforms are stable, and also its functions of amplitude adjustment, frequency adjustment and delay adjustment are in accord with the characteristics of real acoustic logging waveforms. These adjustments can be used to imitate influences on sonic logging received waveforms caused by many kinds of factors such as spacing and span of acoustic tools, sonic speeds of different layers and fluids, and acoustic attenuations of different cementation planes.

  11. A history of telemetry in fishery research: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hockersmith, Eric; Beeman, John W.; Adams, Noah S.; Beeman, John W.; Eiler, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Telemetry provides a powerful and flexible tool for studying fish and other aquatic animals, and its use has become increasingly commonplace. However, telemetry is gear intensive and typically requires more specialized knowledge and training than many other field techniques. As with other scientific methods, collecting good data is dependent on an understanding of the underlying principles behind the approach, knowing how to use the equipment and techniques properly, and recognizing what to do with the data collected. This book provides a road map for using telemetry to study aquatic animals, and provides the basic information needed to plan, implement, and conduct a telemetry study under field conditions. Topics include acoustic or radio telemetry study design, tag implantation techniques, radio and acoustic telemetry principles and case studies, and data management and analysis.

  12. Optimization of radio telemetry receiving systems: Chapter 5.2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, Scott D.; Stevenson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Telemetry provides a powerful and flexible tool for studying fish and other aquatic animals, and its use has become increasingly commonplace. However, telemetry is gear intensive and typically requires more specialized knowledge and training than many other field techniques. As with other scientific methods, collecting good data is dependent on an understanding of the underlying principles behind the approach, knowing how to use the equipment and techniques properly, and recognizing what to do with the data collected. This book provides a road map for using telemetry to study aquatic animals, and provides the basic information needed to plan, implement, and conduct a telemetry study under field conditions. Topics include acoustic or radio telemetry study design, tag implantation techniques, radio and acoustic telemetry principles and case studies, and data management and analysis.

  13. Source Localization with Acoustic Sensor Arrays Using Generative Model Based Fitting with Sparse Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Jose; Pizarro, Daniel; Macias-Guarasa, Javier

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for indoor acoustic source localization using sensor arrays. The proposed solution starts by defining a generative model, designed to explain the acoustic power maps obtained by Steered Response Power (SRP) strategies. An optimization approach is then proposed to fit the model to real input SRP data and estimate the position of the acoustic source. Adequately fitting the model to real SRP data, where noise and other unmodelled effects distort the ideal signal, is the core contribution of the paper. Two basic strategies in the optimization are proposed. First, sparse constraints in the parameters of the model are included, enforcing the number of simultaneous active sources to be limited. Second, subspace analysis is used to filter out portions of the input signal that cannot be explained by the model. Experimental results on a realistic speech database show statistically significant localization error reductions of up to 30% when compared with the SRP-PHAT strategies. PMID:23202021

  14. Estimation of low-altitude moving target trajectory using single acoustic array.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jianfei; Xie, Wei; Hu, Yu-Hen; Bao, Ming; Li, Xiaodong; He, Wei

    2016-04-01

    An acoustic-signature based method of estimating the flight trajectory of low-altitude flying aircraft that only requires a stationary microphone array is proposed. This method leverages the Doppler shifts of engine sound to estimate the closest point of approach distance, time, and speed. It also leverages the acoustic phase shift over the microphone array to estimate the direction of arrival of the target. Combining these parameters, this algorithm provides a total least square estimate of the target trajectory under the assumption of constant target height, direction, and speed. Analytical bounds of potential performance degradation due to noise are derived and the estimation error caused by signal propagation delay is analyzed, and both are verified with extensive simulation. The proposed algorithm is also validated by processing the data collected in field experiments. PMID:27106332

  15. System gain function calculation for acoustic arrays using ray optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, O.; Vonwinterfeld, C.

    1980-11-01

    The gain function of an acoustic antenna array is calculated with respect to waves, propagating from a point source into an homogeneous medium (water) with a sinusoidally varying surface of known phase statistics, treating antenna and environment as one system. An asymptotic solution (high frequency approximation) is developed. For distances of several wavelengths between the array and the surface of the medium, the propagation mechanism is described by a geometrical theory of diffraction applied to scalar waves. The gain function of the antenna together with the reflecting surface is obtained from the cross correlations of the resulting sound fields of each antenna element.

  16. Helmet-mounted acoustic array for hostile fire detection and localization in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2008-04-01

    The detection and localization of hostile weapons firing has been demonstrated successfully with acoustic sensor arrays on unattended ground sensors (UGS), ground-vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Some of the more mature systems have demonstrated significant capabilities and provide direct support to ongoing counter-sniper operations. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is conducting research and development for a helmet-mounted system to acoustically detect and localize small arms firing, or other events such as RPG, mortars, and explosions, as well as other non-transient signatures. Since today's soldier is quickly being asked to take on more and more reconnaissance, surveillance, & target acquisition (RSTA) functions, sensor augmentation enables him to become a mobile and networked sensor node on the complex and dynamic battlefield. Having a body-worn threat detection and localization capability for events that pose an immediate danger to the soldiers around him can significantly enhance their survivability and lethality, as well as enable him to provide and use situational awareness clues on the networked battlefield. This paper addresses some of the difficulties encountered by an acoustic system in an urban environment. Complex reverberation, multipath, diffraction, and signature masking by building structures makes this a very harsh environment for robust detection and classification of shockwaves and muzzle blasts. Multifunctional acoustic detection arrays can provide persistent surveillance and enhanced situational awareness for every soldier.

  17. A compact array calibrator to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardid, M.; Camarena, F.; Felis, I.; Herrero, A.; Llorens, C. D.; Martínez-Mora, J.; Saldaña, M.

    2016-04-01

    Underwater acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos was proposed already in 1950s: when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water, the resulting particle cascade produces a pressure pulse that has a bipolar temporal structure and propagates within a flat disk-like volume. A telescope that consists of thousands of acoustic sensors deployed in the deep sea can monitor hundreds of cubic kilometres of water looking for these signals and discriminating them from acoustic noise. To study the feasibility of the technique it is critical to have a calibrator able to mimic the neutrino "signature" that can be operated from a vessel. Due to the axial-symmetry of the signal, their very directive short bipolar shape and the constraints of operating at sea, the development of such a calibrator is very challenging. Once the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was validated with the first compact array calibrator prototype, in this paper we describe the new design for such a calibrator composed of an array of piezo ceramic tube transducers emitting in axial direction.

  18. Robotic vehicle uses acoustic array for detection and localization in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2001-09-01

    Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites are quickly replacing the eyes and ears of soldiers on the complex battlefield. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Maryland has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing or door slam, and activate a pan-tilt to orient a visible and infrared camera toward the detected sound. Once the cameras are cued to the target, onboard image processing can then track the target and/or transmit the imagery to a remote operator for navigation, situational awareness, and target detection. Such a vehicle can provide reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition for soldiers, law enforcement, and rescue personnel, and remove these people from hazardous environments. ARL's primary robotic platforms contain 16-in. diameter, eight-element acoustic arrays. Additionally, a 9- in. array is being developed in support of DARPA's Tactical Mobile Robot program. The robots have been tested in both urban and open terrain. The current acoustic processing algorithm has been optimized to detect the muzzle blast from a sniper's weapon, and reject many interfering noise sources such as wind gusts, generators, and self-noise. However, other detection algorithms for speech and vehicle detection/tracking are being developed for implementation on this and smaller robotic platforms. The collaboration between two robots, both with known positions and orientations, can provide useful triangulation information for more precise localization of the acoustic events. These robots can be mobile sensor nodes in a larger, more expansive, sensor network that may include stationary ground sensors, UAVs, and other command and control assets. This report will document the performance of the robot's acoustic localization, describe the algorithm, and outline future work.

  19. Using 3D Acoustic Telemetry to Assess the Response of Resident Salmonids to Strobe Lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington; Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Russlee; Farley, M.; Hansen, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse. In response to finding high entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam, the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) recommended investigating the use of strobe lights to repel fish from the forebay of the third powerhouse. Therefore, our study focused on the third powerhouse and how strobe lights affected fish behavior in this area. The primary objective of our study was to assess the behavioral response of kokanee and rainbow trout to strobe lights using 3D acoustic telemetry, which yields explicit spatial locations of fish in three dimensions. Our secondary objectives were to (1) use a 3D acoustic system to mobile track tagged fish in the forebay and upriver of Grand Coulee Dam and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting fish using a hydrophone mounted in the tailrace of the third powerhouse. Within the fixed hydrophone array located in the third powerhouse cul-de-sac, we detected 50 kokanee and 30 rainbow trout, accounting for 47% and 45% respectively, of the fish released. Kokanee had a median residence time of 0.20 h and rainbow trout had a median residence time of 1.07 h. We detected more kokanee in the array at night compared to the day, and we detected more rainbow trout during the day compared to the night. In general, kokanee and rainbow trout approached along the eastern shore and the relative frequency of kokanee and rainbow trout detections was highest along the eastern shoreline of the 3D array. However, because we

  20. Modeling the acoustic receptions at the NPAL array from the Kauai source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Michael D.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic transmissions from a 75-Hz source near Kauai to a vertical line array near California were recorded as part of the North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) experiment. Extensive environmental measurements were also performed as part of the experiment and were intended to ensure correspondence between numerical simulations and the data. Despite the availability of this information, the process of identifying the recorded arrivals with predictions has not been a simple one. Since the source is near the seafloor at about 800 m depth, and the depth at the receiver is approximately 1800 m, acoustic interaction with the bathymetry has been explored as a possible complication. Ray simulations that allow for specular reflection from the bottom indicate that fully-refracted and bottom-interacting paths can reach the receiver range (about 3900 km) at similar travel times. The simultaneous presence of both kinds of acoustic energy could contribute to the identification difficulties. A series of parabolic-equation simulations have been performed for different geoacoustic parameters in an attempt to correspond more closely to the data. The sensitivity of the predictions to the method used to extract and interpolate the sound speeds has also been investigated. [Work supported by ONR.] a)J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, B. M. Howe, J. A. Mercer, R. C. Spindel, and P. F. Worcester.

  1. Low acoustic attenuation silicone rubber lens for medical ultrasonic array probe.

    PubMed

    Itsumi, Kazuhiro; Hosono, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Noriko; Yamashita, Yohachi John

    2009-04-01

    Effects of heavy density (rho = 9.2 x 10(3) kg/m(3)) Yb(2)O(3) fine dopant (16 nm in diameter) on the acoustic properties of a high-temperature-vulcanization (HTV) silicone rubber have been investigated, to develop a new acoustic lens material with a low acoustic attenuation (alpha) for the medical array probe application. The HTV silicone rubber has advantages in that it shows a lower alpha than that of a room-temperature-vulcanization (RTV) silicone rubber and it can be mixed by applying shear stress, using roll-milling equipment. Roll-milling time dependence of the HTV silicone rubber indicates that the alpha is closely affected by the dispersion of nanopowders in the rubber matrix. The 8 vol% Yb(2)O(3)-doped HTV silicone rubber mixed for 30 min showed the lowest alpha of 0.73 dB/mm MHz with an acoustic impedance [AI = sound speed (c) x density (rho)] of 1.43 x 10(6) kg/m(2)s at 37 degrees C. Moreover, simulation results reveal that a 5 MHz linear probe using the HTV silicone rubber doped with Yb(2)O(3) powder showed relative sensitivity around 2.6 to 3.0 dB higher than a probe using RTV silicone rubber doped with Yb(2)O(3) powder or SiO2-doped conventional silicone rubber for the ultrasonic medical application. PMID:19406717

  2. Dynamic response of an array of flexural plates in acoustic medium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Khuri-Yakub, Brutus T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic response of a transducer array made up of circular flexural plates in immersion is analytically calculated. The calculation method includes three steps: (1) the calculation of parallel resonant frequency and the velocity profile of each plate, (2) the calculation of mutual acoustic impedance between the plates, and (3) the calculation of velocity response, including the mechanical and acoustic impedance. The calculation method is validated by both finite element analysis and measurement results of a fabricated capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer. Based on the calculated velocity, the near-field pressure and the near-to-far field radiation patterns are presented. The flexural plate array in immersion displays two modes of operation. At low frequency, the mode shape of the transducer array is similar to that of a suspended plate and, at certain frequencies, two groups of plates move in opposite phase, which results in the cancellation of the average velocity. At high frequency, the mode shape is similar to that of a piston transducer; however, the near-field pressure distribution is similar to that of a resilient disk. PMID:23039426

  3. Acoustic investigation of wall jet over a backward-facing step using a microphone phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perschke, Raimund F.; Ramachandran, Rakesh C.; Raman, Ganesh

    2015-02-01

    The acoustic properties of a wall jet over a hard-walled backward-facing step of aspect ratios 6, 3, 2, and 1.5 are studied using a 24-channel microphone phased array at Mach numbers up to M=0.6. The Reynolds number based on inflow velocity and step height assumes values from Reh = 3.0 ×104 to 7.2 ×105. Flow without and with side walls is considered. The experimental setup is open in the wall-normal direction and the expansion ratio is effectively 1. In case of flow through a duct, symmetry of the flow in the spanwise direction is lost downstream of separation at all but the largest aspect ratio as revealed by oil paint flow visualization. Hydrodynamic scattering of turbulence from the trailing edge of the step contributes significantly to the radiated sound. Reflection of acoustic waves from the bottom plate results in a modulation of power spectral densities. Acoustic source localization has been conducted using a 24-channel microphone phased array. Convective mean-flow effects on the apparent source origin have been assessed by placing a loudspeaker underneath a perforated flat plate and evaluating the displacement of the beamforming peak with inflow Mach number. Two source mechanisms are found near the step. One is due to interaction of the turbulent wall jet with the convex edge of the step. Free-stream turbulence sound is found to be peaked downstream of the step. Presence of the side walls increases free-stream sound. Results of the flow visualization are correlated with acoustic source maps. Trailing-edge sound and free-stream turbulence sound can be discriminated using source localization.

  4. Telemetry Ranging: Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Telemetry ranging is a proposed alternative to conventional two-way ranging for determining the two-way time delay between a Deep Space Station (DSS) and a spacecraft. The advantage of telemetry ranging is that the ranging signal on the uplink is not echoed to the downlink, so that telemetry alone modulates the downlink carrier. The timing information needed on the downlink, in order to determine the two-way time delay, is obtained from telemetry frames. This article describes the phase and timing estimates required for telemetry ranging, and how two-way range is calculated from these estimates. It explains why the telemetry ranging architecture does not require the spacecraft transponder to have a high-frequency or high-quality oscillator, and it describes how a telemetry ranging system can be infused in the Deep Space Network.

  5. Shallow water acoustic backscatter and reverberation measurements using a 68-kHz cylindrical array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaudet, Timothy Cole

    2001-10-01

    The characterization of high frequency, shallow water acoustic backscatter and reverberation is important because acoustic systems are used in many scientific, commercial, and military applications. The approach taken is to use data collected by the Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS), a 68 kHz multibeam sonar capable of 360° imaging in a vertical plane perpendicular to its direction of travel. With this unique capability, acoustic backscatter imagery of the seafloor, sea surface, and horizontal and vertical planes in the volume are constructed from data obtained in 200m deep waters in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico when the TVSS was towed 78m below the surface, 735m astern of a towship. The processed imagery provide a quasi-synoptic characterization of the spatial and temporal structure of boundary and volume acoustic backscatter and reverberation. Diffraction, element patterns, and high sidelobe levels are shown to be the most serious problems affecting cylindrical arrays such as the TVSS, and an amplitude shading method is presented for reducing the peak sidelobe levels of irregular-line and non-coplanar arrays. Errors in the towfish's attitude and motion sensor, and irregularities in the TVSS's transmitted beampattern produce artifacts in the TVSS-derived bathymetry and seafloor acoustic backscatter imagery. Correction strategies for these problems are described, which are unique in that they use environmental information extracted from both ocean boundaries. Sea surface and volume acoustic backscatter imagery are used to explore and characterize the structure of near-surface bubble clouds, schooling fish, and zooplankton. The simultaneous horizontal and vertical coverage provided by the TVSS is shown to be a primary advantage, motivating further use of multibeam sonars in these applications. Whereas boundary backscatter fluctuations are well described by Weibull, K, and Rayleigh mixture probability distributions, those corresponding to volume backscatter are

  6. Standoff photoacoustic detections with high-sensitivity microphones and acoustic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Chen-Chia; Khurgin, Jacob; Samuels, Alan; Trivedi, Sudhir; Gupta, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    Standoff detection of dangerous chemicals like explosives, nerve gases, and harmful aerosols has continuously been an important subject due to the serious concern about terrorist threats to both overseas and homeland lives and facility. Compared with other currently available standoff optical detection techniques, like Raman, photo-thermal, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy,...etc., photoacoustic (PA) sensing has the advantages of background free and very high detection sensitivity, no need of back reflection surfaces, and 1/R instead of 1/R2 signal decay distance dependence. Furthermore, there is still a great room for PA sensitivity improvement by using different PA techniques, including lockin amplifier, employing new microphones, and microphone array techniques. Recently, we have demonstrated standoff PA detection of isopropanol vapor, solid phase TNT and RDX at a standoff distance. To further calibrate the detection sensitivity, we use nerve gas simulants that were generated and calibrated by a commercial vapor generator. For field operations, array of microphones and microphone-reflector pairs can be utilized to achieve noise rejection and signal enhancement. We have experimentally demonstrated signal enhancement and noise reduction using an array of 4 microphone/4 reflector system as well as an array of 16-microphone/1 reflector. In this work we will review and compare different standoff techniques and discuss the advantages of using different photoacoustic techniques. We will also discuss new advancement of using new types of microphone and the performance comparison of using different structure of microphone arrays and combining lock-in amplifier with acoustic arrays. Demonstration of out-door real-time operations with high power mid-IR laser and microphone array will be presented.

  7. Use of oviduct-inserted acoustic transmitters and positional telemetry to estimate timing and location of spawning: a feasibility study in lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Binder, Thomas R.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Miehls, Scott M.; Thompson, Henry T.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Our results satisfied the three assumptions of oviduct tagging and suggested that oviduct transmitters can be used with positional telemetry to estimate time and location of spawning in lake trout and other species. In situations where oviduct transmitters may be difficult to position once expelled into substrate, pairing oviduct transmitters with a normal-sized fish transmitter that remains in the fish is recommended, with spawning inferred when the two tags separate in space. Optimal transmitter delay will depend on expected degree of spawning site residency and swim speed.

  8. Deconvolution methods and systems for the mapping of acoustic sources from phased microphone arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for mapping acoustic sources determined from a phased microphone array. A plurality of microphones are arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations thereof. A linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can be formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. A full-rank equation derived from the linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can then be iteratively determined. A full-rank can be attained by the solution requirement of the positivity constraint equivalent to the physical assumption of statically independent noise sources at each N location. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with the phased microphone array in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing the beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  9. Deconvolution Methods and Systems for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Mapping coherent/incoherent acoustic sources as determined from a phased microphone array. A linear configuration of equations and unknowns are formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more cross-beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. An equation derived from the linear configuration of equations and unknowns can then be iteratively determined. The equation can be attained by the solution requirement of a constraint equivalent to the physical assumption that the coherent sources have only in phase coherence. The size of the problem may then be reduced using zoning methods. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with a phased microphone array (microphones arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations) in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  10. Phased Acoustic Array Measurements of a 5.75 Percent Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Nathan J.; Horne, William C.; Elmer, Kevin R.; Cheng, Rui; Brusniak, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Detailed acoustic measurements of the noise from the leading-edge Krueger flap of a 5.75 percent Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft model were recently acquired with a traversing phased microphone array in the AEDC NFAC (Arnold Engineering Development Complex, National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The spatial resolution of the array was sufficient to distinguish between individual support brackets over the full-scale frequency range of 100 to 2875 Hertz. For conditions representative of landing and take-off configuration, the noise from the brackets dominated other sources near the leading edge. Inclusion of flight-like brackets for select conditions highlights the importance of including the correct number of leading-edge high-lift device brackets with sufficient scale and fidelity. These measurements will support the development of new predictive models.

  11. THE BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATION BROADBAND AND BROAD-BEAM ARRAY: DESIGN OVERVIEW AND SENSITIVITY FORECASTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; McQuinn, Matthew; Ali, Zaki; DeBoer, David R.; McDonald, Patrick; Aguirre, James E.; Bradley, Richard F.; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Morales, Miguel F.

    2013-03-15

    This work describes a new instrument optimized for a detection of the neutral hydrogen 21 cm power spectrum between redshifts of 0.5 and 1.5: the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Broadband and Broad-beam (BAOBAB) array. BAOBAB will build on the efforts of a first generation of 21 cm experiments that are targeting a detection of the signal from the Epoch of Reionization at z {approx} 10. At z {approx} 1, the emission from neutral hydrogen in self-shielded overdense halos also presents an accessible signal, since the dominant, synchrotron foreground emission is considerably fainter than at redshift 10. The principle science driver for these observations are baryon acoustic oscillations in the matter power spectrum which have the potential to act as a standard ruler and constrain the nature of dark energy. BAOBAB will fully correlate dual-polarization antenna tiles over the 600-900 MHz band with a frequency resolution of 300 kHz and a system temperature of 50 K. The number of antennas will grow in staged deployments, and reconfigurations of the array will allow for both traditional imaging and high power spectrum sensitivity operations. We present calculations of the power spectrum sensitivity for various array sizes, with a 35 element array measuring the cosmic neutral hydrogen fraction as a function of redshift, and a 132 element system detecting the BAO features in the power spectrum, yielding a 1.8% error on the z {approx} 1 distance scale, and, in turn, significant improvements to constraints on the dark energy equation of state over an unprecedented range of redshifts from {approx}0.5 to 1.5.

  12. A new sparse design method on phased array-based acoustic emission sensor for partial discharge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qing; Cheng, Shuyi; Lü, Fangcheng; Li, Yanqing

    2014-03-01

    The acoustic detecting performance of a partial discharge (PD) ultrasonic sensor array can be improved by increasing the number of array elements. However, it will increase the complexity and cost of the PD detection system. Therefore, a sparse sensor with an optimization design can be chosen to ensure good acoustic performance. In this paper, first, a quantitative method is proposed for evaluating the acoustic performance of a square PD ultrasonic array sensor. Second, a method of sparse design is presented to combine the evaluation method with the chaotic monkey algorithm. Third, an optimal sparse structure of a 3 × 3 square PD ultrasonic array sensor is deduced. It is found that, under different sparseness and sparse structure, the main beam width of the directivity function shows a small variation, while the sidelobe amplitude shows a bigger variation. For a specific sparseness, the acoustic performance under the optimal sparse structure is close to that using a full array. Finally, some simulations based on the above method show that, for certain sparseness, the sensor with the optimal sparse structure exhibits superior positioning accuracy compared to that with a stochastic one. The sensor array structure may be chosen according to the actual requirements for an actual engineering application.

  13. A comparison of the survival and migratory behavior of hatchery-reared and naturally reared steelhead smolts in the Alsea river and estuary, Oregon, using acoustic telemetry

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tracked three groups of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss smolts implanted with acoustic transmitters to determine whether the degree of hatchery domestication or the juvenile rearing environment (hatchery raceway versus natural stream) influenced migration timing and survival in ...

  14. Gigahertz Acoustic Vibrations of Elastically Anisotropic Indium-Tin-Oxide Nanorod Arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peijun; Schaller, Richard D; Ocola, Leonidas E; Ketterson, John B; Chang, Robert P H

    2016-09-14

    Active control of light is important for photonic integrated circuits, optical switches, and telecommunications. Coupling light with acoustic vibrations in nanoscale optical resonators offers optical modulation capabilities with high bandwidth and small footprint. Instead of using noble metals, here we introduce indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays (ITO-NRAs) as the operating media and demonstrate optical modulation covering the visible spectral range (from 360 to 700 nm) with ∼20 GHz bandwidth through the excitation of coherent acoustic vibrations in ITO-NRAs. This broadband modulation results from the collective optical diffraction by the dielectric ITO-NRAs, and a high differential transmission modulation up to 10% is achieved through efficient near-infrared, on-plasmon-resonance pumping. By combining the frequency signatures of the vibrational modes with finite-element simulations, we further determine the anisotropic elastic constants for single-crystalline ITO, which are not known for the bulk phase. This technique to determine elastic constants using coherent acoustic vibrations of uniform nanostructures can be generalized to the study of other inorganic materials.

  15. Gigahertz Acoustic Vibrations of Elastically Anisotropic Indium-Tin-Oxide Nanorod Arrays.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peijun; Schaller, Richard D; Ocola, Leonidas E; Ketterson, John B; Chang, Robert P H

    2016-09-14

    Active control of light is important for photonic integrated circuits, optical switches, and telecommunications. Coupling light with acoustic vibrations in nanoscale optical resonators offers optical modulation capabilities with high bandwidth and small footprint. Instead of using noble metals, here we introduce indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays (ITO-NRAs) as the operating media and demonstrate optical modulation covering the visible spectral range (from 360 to 700 nm) with ∼20 GHz bandwidth through the excitation of coherent acoustic vibrations in ITO-NRAs. This broadband modulation results from the collective optical diffraction by the dielectric ITO-NRAs, and a high differential transmission modulation up to 10% is achieved through efficient near-infrared, on-plasmon-resonance pumping. By combining the frequency signatures of the vibrational modes with finite-element simulations, we further determine the anisotropic elastic constants for single-crystalline ITO, which are not known for the bulk phase. This technique to determine elastic constants using coherent acoustic vibrations of uniform nanostructures can be generalized to the study of other inorganic materials. PMID:27526053

  16. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range.

  17. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range. PMID:23927100

  18. Three-Dimensional Mid-Air Acoustic Manipulation by Ultrasonic Phased Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method. PMID:24849371

  19. Indirect calibration of a large microphone array for in-duct acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Q.; Pereira, A.; Finez, A.; Souchotte, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of in situ calibration of a pin hole-mounted microphone array for in-duct acoustic measurements. One approach is to individually measure the frequency response of each microphone, by submitting the probe to be calibrated and a reference microphone to the same pressure field. Although simple, this task may be very time consuming for large microphone arrays and eventually suffer from lack of access to microphones once they are installed on the test bench. An alternative global calibration procedure is thus proposed in this paper. The approach is based on the fact that the acoustic pressure can be expanded onto an analytically known spatial basis. A projection operator is defined allowing the projection of measurements onto the duct modal basis. The main assumption of the method is that the residual resulting from the difference between actual and projected measurements is mainly dominated by calibration errors. An iterative procedure to estimate the calibration factors of each microphone is proposed and validated through an experimental set-up. In addition, it is shown that the proposed scheme allows an optimization of physical parameters such as the sound speed and parameters associated to the test bench itself, such as the duct radius or the termination reflection coefficient.

  20. Three-dimensional mid-air acoustic manipulation by ultrasonic phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method.

  1. Three-dimensional mid-air acoustic manipulation by ultrasonic phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method. PMID:24849371

  2. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ryan M; O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-07-21

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337-43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source's emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system's resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring techniques currently exist.

  3. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337–43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring technique currently exists. PMID:23807573

  4. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-07-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337-43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring techniques currently exist.

  5. Statistical analysis of storm electrical discharges reconstituted from a lightning mapping system, a lightning location system, and an acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Defer, Eric; Rison, William; Schulz, Wolfgang; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment project, a field campaign devoted to the study of electrical activity during storms took place in the south of France in 2012. An acoustic station composed of four microphones and four microbarometers was deployed within the coverage of a Lightning Mapping Array network. On the 26 October 2012, a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Fifty-six natural thunder events, due to cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes, were recorded. This paper studies the acoustic reconstruction, in the low frequency range from 1 to 40 Hz, of the recorded flashes and their comparison with detections from electromagnetic networks. Concurrent detections from the European Cooperation for Lightning Detection lightning location system were also used. Some case studies show clearly that acoustic signal from thunder comes from the return stroke but also from the horizontal discharges which occur inside the clouds. The huge amount of observation data leads to a statistical analysis of lightning discharges acoustically recorded. Especially, the distributions of altitudes of reconstructed acoustic detections are explored in detail. The impact of the distance to the source on these distributions is established. The capacity of the acoustic method to describe precisely the lower part of nearby cloud-to-ground discharges, where the Lightning Mapping Array network is not effective, is also highlighted.

  6. On the acoustic radiation modes of compact regular polyhedral arrays of independent loudspeakers.

    PubMed

    Pasqual, Alexander Mattioli; Martin, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    Compact spherical loudspeaker arrays can be used to provide control over their directivity pattern. Usually, this is made by adjusting the gains of preprogrammed spatial filters corresponding to a finite set of spherical harmonics, or to the acoustic radiation modes of the loudspeaker array. Unlike the former, the latter are closely related to the radiation efficiency of the source and span the subspace of the directivities it can produce. However, the radiation modes depend on frequency for arbitrary distributions of transducers on the sphere, which yields complex directivity filters. This work focuses on the most common loudspeaker array configurations, those following the regular shape of the Platonic solids. It is shown that the radiation modes of these sources are frequency independent, and simple algebraic expressions are derived for their radiation efficiencies. In addition, since such modes are vibration patterns driven by electrical signals, the transduction mechanism of compact multichannel sources is also investigated, which is an important issue, especially if the transducers interact inside a shared cabinet. For Platonic solid loudspeakers, it is shown that the common enclosure does not lead to directivity filters that depend on frequency.

  7. Spitzer Telemetry Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanboli, Alice; Martinez, Elmain M.; McAuley, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer Telemetry Processing System (SirtfTlmProc) was designed to address objectives of JPL's Multi-mission Image Processing Lab (MIPL) in processing spacecraft telemetry and distributing the resulting data to the science community. To minimize costs and maximize operability, the software design focused on automated error recovery, performance, and information management. The system processes telemetry from the Spitzer spacecraft and delivers Level 0 products to the Spitzer Science Center. SirtfTlmProc is a unique system with automated error notification and recovery, with a real-time continuous service that can go quiescent after periods of inactivity. The software can process 2 GB of telemetry and deliver Level 0 science products to the end user in four hours. It provides analysis tools so the operator can manage the system and troubleshoot problems. It automates telemetry processing in order to reduce staffing costs.

  8. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  9. Confined acoustic and optical plasmons in double-layered quantum-wire arrays with strong tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, A. F.; Heyn, Ch.; Heitmann, D.; Schüller, C.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate electronic excitations in GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs double-layered quantum wire arrays with strong tunneling coupling by resonant inelastic light scattering. By applying an external electric field, we can change the one-dimensional (1D) electron density and the symmetry of the double quantum-well (DQW) structure at the same time. We identify confined optical 1D intersubband plasmons (COP) and confined acoustic 1D intersubband plasmons (CAP). Due to the tunneling coupling, the energies of the CAP exhibit a minimum for a symmetric DQW potential, whereas the energies of the COP are dominated by the total carrier density, and are nearly insensitive to the symmetry of the potential.

  10. Telemetry-based mortality estimates of juvenile spot in two North Carolina estuarine creeks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedl, Sarah E.; Buckel, Jeffery A.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Scharf, Frederick S.; Pollock, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    We estimated natural mortality rates (M) of age-1 Spot Leiostomus xanthurus by using a sonic telemetry approach. Sonic transmitters were surgically implanted into a total of 123 age-1 Spot in two North Carolina estuarine creeks during spring 2009 and 2010, and the fish were monitored by using a stationary acoustic receiver array and manual tracking. Fates of telemetered Spot were inferred based on telemetry information from estimated locations and swimming speeds. Potential competitors of age-1 Spot were assessed through simultaneous otter trawl sampling, while potential predators of Spot were collected using gill nets and trammel nets. The number of inferred natural mortalities was zero in 2009 (based on 29 telemetered Spot at risk) and four in 2010 (based on 52 fish at risk), with fish being at risk for up to about 70 d each year. Catches of potential competitors or predators did not differ between years, and age-1 Spot were not found in analyzed stomach contents of potential predators. Our estimated 30-d M of 0.03 (95% credible interval = 0.01–0.07) was lower than that predicted from weight-based (M = 0.07) and life-history-based (M = 0.06–0.36) estimates. Our field-based estimate of M for age-1 Spot in this estuarine system can assist in the assessment and management of Spot by allowing a direct comparison with M-values predicted from fish size or life history characteristics. The field telemetry and statistical analysis techniques developed here provide guidance for future telemetry studies of relatively small fish in open, dynamic habitat systems, as they highlight strengths and weaknesses of using a telemetry approach to estimate M.

  11. Self-adapting root-MUSIC algorithm and its real-valued formulation for acoustic vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Guo-jun; Xue, Chen-yang; Zhang, Wen-dong; Xiong, Ji-jun

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, based on the root-MUSIC algorithm for acoustic pressure sensor array, a new self-adapting root-MUSIC algorithm for acoustic vector sensor array is proposed by self-adaptive selecting the lead orientation vector, and its real-valued formulation by Forward-Backward(FB) smoothing and real-valued inverse covariance matrix is also proposed, which can reduce the computational complexity and distinguish the coherent signals. The simulation experiment results show the better performance of two new algorithm with low Signal-to-Noise (SNR) in direction of arrival (DOA) estimation than traditional MUSIC algorithm, and the experiment results using MEMS vector hydrophone array in lake trails show the engineering practicability of two new algorithms.

  12. Autonomous hydrophone array for long-term acoustic monitoring in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Eu, J.-F.; Brachet, C.; Goslin, J.; Royer, J.-Y.; Ammann, J.

    2009-04-01

    We are developing an array of new autonomous hydrophones, benefiting from a long-lasting collaboration with the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (NOAA and Oregon state University). The hydrophones are deployed on a mooring line anchored to the seafloor by an expendable anchor weight. The length of the line is adjusted so that the sensor (and buoy) lies in the middle of the SOFAR channel at about 1000m depth for mid-latitudes (depending on the speed-of-sound profile). The buoy at depth keeps the line under tension and prevents wave-motion noise from the sensor. The instrument continuously samples and records the acoustic signals at 240Hz for seismic studies, or 480Hz (or more) for marine mammal studies. The SOFAR channel acts as an acoustic wave-guide in the ocean so that acoustic waves can propagate with little attenuation over long distances. Autonomous hydrophones allow the detection and localization of the low-magnitude (Mw>2.5) seismic activity along oceanic ridges and in deformed intraplate areas, which remains generally undetected or poorly localized by land-based seismic networks. An array of hydrophones can monitor a much wider area (more than 1000 km across) than ocean-bottom seismometers, which suffer from the rapid attenuation of seismic waves in the crust and upper mantle. Arrays of autonomous hydrophones thus succeed in detecting and locating 30 to 50 times more earthquakes than those listed in the catalogs from land-based seismograph stations. Data are buffered on flash cards and then regularly stored on hard disks or on solid-state drives (e.g. 20Gb of data per year at 240Hz sampling rate). We use 24-bit sigma-delta converters with programmable gain amplifiers. As timing is a key issue for an accurate localisation of the seismic events, instruments are synchronized with GPS time and have a low-power, highly stable calibrated clock (10-8 drift). All electronics and batteries (Li or alcaline) are placed in titanium pressure cases for long

  13. Three-dimensional acoustic imaging with planar microphone arrays and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Fangli; Wei, Jingang; Qiu, Lianfang; Shi, Hongbing; Li, Xiaofan

    2016-10-01

    For obtaining super-resolution source maps, we extend compressive sensing (CS) to three-dimensional acoustic imaging. Source maps are simulated with a planar microphone array and a CS algorithm. Comparing the source maps of the CS algorithm with those of the conventional beamformer (CBF) and Tikhonov Regularization (TIKR), we find that the CS algorithm is computationally more effective and can obtain much higher resolution source maps than the CBF and TIKR. The effectiveness of the CS algorithm is analyzed. The CS algorithm can locate the sound sources exactly when the frequency is above 4000 Hz and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is above 12 dB. The location error of the CS algorithm increases as the frequency drops below the threshold, and the errors in location and power increase as SNR decreases. The further from the array the source is, the larger the location error is. The lateral resolution of the CS algorithm is much better than the range resolution. Finally, experimental measurements are conducted in a semi-anechoic room. Two mobile phones are served as sound sources. The results show that the CS algorithm can reconstruct two sound sources near the bottom of the two mobile phones where the speakers are located. The feasibility of the CS algorithm is also validated with the experiment.

  14. Array model interpolation and subband iterative adaptive filters applied to beamforming-based acoustic echo cancellation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Chi, Li-Wen; Liang, Li-Huang; Lo, Yi-Yang

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an evolutionary exposition is given in regard to the enhancing strategies for acoustic echo cancellers (AECs). A fixed beamformer (FBF) is utilized to focus on the near-end speaker while suppressing the echo from the far end. In reality, the array steering vector could differ considerably from the ideal freefield plane wave model. Therefore, an experimental procedure is developed to interpolate a practical array model from the measured frequency responses. Subband (SB) filtering with polyphase implementation is exploited to accelerate the cancellation process. Generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC) composed of an FBF and an adaptive blocking module is combined with AEC to maximize cancellation performance. Another enhancement is an internal iteration (IIT) procedure that enables efficient convergence in the adaptive SB filters within a sample time. Objective tests in terms of echo return loss enhancement (ERLE), perceptual evaluation of speech quality (PESQ), word recognition rate for automatic speech recognition (ASR), and subjective listening tests are conducted to validate the proposed AEC approaches. The results show that the GSC-SB-AEC-IIT approach has attained the highest ERLE without speech quality degradation, even in double-talk scenarios. PMID:26936567

  15. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liu, Jiuling; He, Shitang

    2014-01-01

    A new surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu) dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours) frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz·deg·s−1) and good linearity were observed. PMID:24577520

  16. Programmable telemetry test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadiana, J. M.

    A portable programmable telemetry test system was designed to test shipboard telemetry systems used for evaluating performance of missile systems in the surface missile fleet. The test system accurately simulates any missile in the current Navy inventory, and provides test and calibration signals to verify telemetry systems. The total test system weighs just over 15 lbs and occupies less than 1 cubic foot. Internal batteries allow testing or calibration of RF front ends out on weather decks. The modulation section consists of an FM/PAM/PCM simulator and simple control circuitry, and is programmable via an Intel 2715 EPROM, the frame format memory. A second EPROM provides a wave-form library.

  17. Downhole telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, R.A.; Kadlec, E.R.

    1994-11-08

    A downhole telemetry system is described for optically communicating to the surface operating parameters of a drill bit during ongoing drilling operations. The downhole telemetry system includes sensors mounted with a drill bit for monitoring at least one operating parameter of the drill bit and generating a signal representative thereof. The downhole telemetry system includes means for transforming and optically communicating the signal to the surface as well as means at the surface for producing a visual display of the optically communicated operating parameters of the drill bit. 7 figs.

  18. Downhole telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Kadlec, Emil R.

    1994-01-01

    A downhole telemetry system is described for optically communicating to the surface operating parameters of a drill bit during ongoing drilling operations. The downhole telemetry system includes sensors mounted with a drill bit for monitoring at least one operating parameter of the drill bit and generating a signal representative thereof. The downhole telemetry system includes means for transforming and optically communicating the signal to the surface as well as means at the surface for producing a visual display of the optically communicated operating parameters of the drill bit.

  19. Room acoustics analysis using circular arrays: an experimental study based on sound field plane-wave decomposition.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ana M; Lopez, Jose J; Pueo, Basilio; Cobos, Maximo

    2013-04-01

    Plane-wave decomposition (PWD) methods using microphone arrays have been shown to be a very useful tool within the applied acoustics community for their multiple applications in room acoustics analysis and synthesis. While many theoretical aspects of PWD have been previously addressed in the literature, the practical advantages of the PWD method to assess the acoustic behavior of real rooms have been barely explored so far. In this paper, the PWD method is employed to analyze the sound field inside a selected set of real rooms having a well-defined purpose. To this end, a circular microphone array is used to capture and process a number of impulse responses at different spatial positions, providing angle-dependent data for both direct and reflected wavefronts. The detection of reflected plane waves is performed by means of image processing techniques applied over the raw array response data and over the PWD data, showing the usefulness of image-processing-based methods for room acoustics analysis.

  20. Theory and investigation of acoustic multiple-input multiple-output systems based on spherical arrays in a room.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Hai; Rafaely, Boaz; Zotter, Franz

    2015-11-01

    Spatial attributes of room acoustics have been widely studied using microphone and loudspeaker arrays. However, systems that combine both arrays, referred to as multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems, have only been studied to a limited degree in this context. These systems can potentially provide a powerful tool for room acoustics analysis due to the ability to simultaneously control both arrays. This paper offers a theoretical framework for the spatial analysis of enclosed sound fields using a MIMO system comprising spherical loudspeaker and microphone arrays. A system transfer function is formulated in matrix form for free-field conditions, and its properties are studied using tools from linear algebra. The system is shown to have unit-rank, regardless of the array types, and its singular vectors are related to the directions of arrival and radiation at the microphone and loudspeaker arrays, respectively. The formulation is then generalized to apply to rooms, using an image source method. In this case, the rank of the system is related to the number of significant reflections. The paper ends with simulation studies, which support the developed theory, and with an extensive reflection analysis of a room impulse response, using the platform of a MIMO system.

  1. Theory and investigation of acoustic multiple-input multiple-output systems based on spherical arrays in a room.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Hai; Rafaely, Boaz; Zotter, Franz

    2015-11-01

    Spatial attributes of room acoustics have been widely studied using microphone and loudspeaker arrays. However, systems that combine both arrays, referred to as multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems, have only been studied to a limited degree in this context. These systems can potentially provide a powerful tool for room acoustics analysis due to the ability to simultaneously control both arrays. This paper offers a theoretical framework for the spatial analysis of enclosed sound fields using a MIMO system comprising spherical loudspeaker and microphone arrays. A system transfer function is formulated in matrix form for free-field conditions, and its properties are studied using tools from linear algebra. The system is shown to have unit-rank, regardless of the array types, and its singular vectors are related to the directions of arrival and radiation at the microphone and loudspeaker arrays, respectively. The formulation is then generalized to apply to rooms, using an image source method. In this case, the rank of the system is related to the number of significant reflections. The paper ends with simulation studies, which support the developed theory, and with an extensive reflection analysis of a room impulse response, using the platform of a MIMO system. PMID:26627773

  2. Anechoic aquarium for ultrasonic neural telemetry.

    PubMed Central

    Mensinger, A F; Deffenbaugh, M

    2000-01-01

    An acoustic neural telemetry tag has been developed for recording from free-swimming aquatic animals. Microwire electrodes were implanted into the VIIIth nerve of the toadfish, Opsanus tau, and interfaced to the subdermally implanted tag. The telemetry tag frequency modulates the neural signal, converting it into a varying frequency, which is amplified and transmitted acoustically (centre frequency of 90 kHz and a 20 kHz bandwidth). This acoustic signal is detected by a receiver hydrophone, and the receiver reconstructs the full neural waveform from the acoustic signal. However, due to the multipath environment in the experimental aquarium, the acoustic signal is quickly degraded as the hydrophone is moved away from the source. In order to receive the signal independent of fish position, an anechoic aquarium was designed. Streams of microbubbles (ca. 70 microm diameter) were generated to produce a curtain of sound-absorptive material along the walls and water surface of the aquarium. Microbubble generation significantly reduced the multipath artefacts, and allowed signal discrimination independent of fish and hydrophone position. The anechoic aquarium will allow the recording of neural activity from free-swimming fishes in quasi-natural habitats, thus allowing better understanding of the neural mechanisms of behaviour. PMID:11079420

  3. Telemetry-Based Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Shambayati, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    A telemetry-based ranging scheme was developed in which the downlink ranging signal is eliminated, and the range is computed directly from the downlink telemetry signal. This is the first Deep Space Network (DSN) ranging technology that does not require the spacecraft to transmit a separate ranging signal. By contrast, the evolutionary ranging techniques used over the years by NASA missions, including sequential ranging (transmission of a sequence of sinusoids) and PN-ranging (transmission of a pseudo-noise sequence) whether regenerative (spacecraft acquires, then regenerates and retransmits a noise-free ranging signal) or transparent (spacecraft feeds the noisy demodulated uplink ranging signal into the downlink phase modulator) relied on spacecraft power and bandwidth to transmit an explicit ranging signal. The state of the art in ranging is described in an emerging CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standard, in which a pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is transmitted from the ground to the spacecraft, acquired onboard, and the PN sequence is coherently retransmitted back to the ground, where a delay measurement is made between the uplink and downlink signals. In this work, the telemetry signal is aligned with the uplink PN code epoch. The ground station computes the delay between the uplink signal transmission and the received downlink telemetry. Such a computation is feasible because symbol synchronizability is already an integral part of the telemetry design. Under existing technology, the telemetry signal cannot be used for ranging because its arrival-time information is not coherent with any Earth reference signal. By introducing this coherence, and performing joint telemetry detection and arrival-time estimation on the ground, a high-rate telemetry signal can provide all the precision necessary for spacecraft ranging.

  4. Detection and localization using an acoustic array on a small robotic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated autonomous and semi-autonomous ground, air and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  5. Techniques for telemetry transmitter attachment and evaluation of transmitter effects on fish performance: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Wargo Rub, A. Michelle; Adams, Noah S.; Beeman, John W.; Eiler, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Telemetry provides a powerful and flexible tool for studying fish and other aquatic animals, and its use has become increasingly commonplace. However, telemetry is gear intensive and typically requires more specialized knowledge and training than many other field techniques. As with other scientific methods, collecting good data is dependent on an understanding of the underlying principles behind the approach, knowing how to use the equipment and techniques properly, and recognizing what to do with the data collected. This book provides a road map for using telemetry to study aquatic animals, and provides the basic information needed to plan, implement, and conduct a telemetry study under field conditions. Topics include acoustic or radio telemetry study design, tag implantation techniques, radio and acoustic telemetry principles and case studies, and data management and analysis.

  6. Propagation of acoustic waves in a one-dimensional array of noncohesive cylinders.

    PubMed

    Huillard, Guillaume; Noblin, Xavier; Rajchenbach, Jean

    2011-07-01

    By means of a photoelastic method, we access the visualization of acoustic waves propagating in a one-dimensional array of noncohesive cylinders. As pointed by Nesterenko in the case of spherical grains [V. F. Nesterenko, J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 24, p. 567 (1983)], the nonlinearity of the contact law between the grains induces a dependence of the wave velocity both on its amplitude and on the confinement force. Our experimental method allows one to access the evolution in time of the internal state of stress of individual grains with excellent accuracy. We show that the velocity of the sound presents two regimes as a function of the confining force. For low forces, the dependence is strongly nonlinear, while it weakens for higher forces. By means of the direct visualization of the contact zone, we show that both micro- and macroscale imperfections of the surface of contact explain the low forces behavior. We test the consistency of our experimental findings results with both the theoretical expectations and with the experimental determination of the force-displacement dependence. We show, moreover, that the main damping process originates in solid friction. PMID:21867329

  7. Acoustic anechoic layers with singly periodic array of scatterers: Computational methods, absorption mechanisms, and optimal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-Bin; Li, Yue; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Wen, Ji-Hong; Wen, Xi-Sen

    2014-10-01

    The acoustic properties of anechoic layers with a singly periodic array of cylindrical scatterers are investigated. A method combined plane wave expansion and finite element analysis is extended for out-of-plane incidence. The reflection characteristics of the anechoic layers with cavities and locally resonant scatterers are discussed. The backing is a steel plate followed by an air half space. Under this approximate zero transmission backing condition, the reflection reduction is induced by the absorption enhancement. The absorption mechanism is explained by the scattering/absorption cross section of the isolated scatterer. Three types of resonant modes which can induce efficient absorption are revealed. Due to the fact that the frequencies of the resonant modes are related to the size of the scatterers, anechoic layers with scatterers of mixed size can broaden the absorption band. A genetic optimization algorithm is adopted to design the anechoic layer with scatterers of mixed size at a desired frequency band from 2 kHz to 10 kHz for normal incidence, and the influence of the incident angle is also discussed.

  8. Extraction of acoustic normal mode depth functions using vertical line array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Westwood, Evan K.

    2002-02-01

    A method for extracting the normal modes of acoustic propagation in the shallow ocean from sound recorded on a vertical line array (VLA) of hydrophones as a source travels nearby is presented. The mode extraction is accomplished by performing a singular value decomposition (SVD) of individual frequency components of the signal's temporally averaged, spatial cross-spectral density matrix. The SVD produces a matrix containing a mutually orthogonal set of basis functions, which are proportional to the depth-dependent normal modes, and a diagonal matrix containing the singular values, which are proportional to the modal source excitations and mode eigenvalues. The conditions under which the method is expected to work are found to be (1) sufficient depth sampling of the propagating modes by the VLA receivers; (2) sufficient source-VLA range sampling, and (3) sufficient range interval traversed by the source. The mode extraction method is applied to data from the Area Characterization Test II, conducted in September 1993 in the Hudson Canyon Area off the New Jersey coast. Modes are successfully extracted from cw tones recorded while (1) the source traveled along a range-independent track with constant bathymetry and (2) the source traveled up-slope with gradual changes in bathymetry. In addition, modes are successfully extracted at multiple frequencies from ambient noise.

  9. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of under-balcony acoustics with real and simulated arrays of multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Youngmin

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively identify the acoustics of the under-balcony areas in music performance halls under realistic conditions that are close to an orchestral performance in consideration of multiple music instrumental sources and their diverse sound propagation patterns. The study executed monaural and binaural impulse response measurements with an array of sixteen directional sources (loudspeakers) for acoustical assessments. Actual measurements in a performance hall as well as computer simulations were conducted for the quantitative assessments. Psycho-acoustical listening tests were conducted for the qualitative assessments using the music signals binaurally recorded in the hall with the same source array. The results obtained from the multiple directional source tests were analyzed by comparing them to those obtained from the tests performed with a single omni-directional source. These two sets of results obtained in the under-balcony area were also compared to those obtained in the main orchestra area. The quantitative results showed that the use of a single source conforming to conventional measurement protocol seems to be competent for measurements of the room acoustical parameters such as EDTmid, RTmid, C80500-2k, IACCE3 and IACCL3. These quantitative measures, however, did not always agree with the results of the qualitative assessments. The primary reason is that, in many other acoustical analysis respects, the acoustical phenomena shown from the multiple source measurements were not similar to those shown from the single source measurements. Remarkable differences were observed in time-domain impulse responses, frequency content, spectral distribution, directional distribution of the early reflections, and in sound energy density over time. Therefore, the room acoustical parameters alone should not be the acoustical representative characterizing a performance hall or a specific area such as the under

  10. Fully automatic telemetry data processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, F. B.; Keipert, F. A.; Lee, R. C.

    1968-01-01

    Satellite Telemetry Automatic Reduction System /STARS 2/, a fully automatic computer-controlled telemetry data processor, maximizes data recovery, reduces turnaround time, increases flexibility, and improves operational efficiency. The system incorporates a CDC 3200 computer as its central element.

  11. Seismic and Acoustic Studies from a Seafloor Array on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mark Armstrong

    This dissertation consists of two related but separate studies, one a refraction seismic study of the oceanic crust and the other an acoustic study of whale behavior in the presence of noise, both using seafloor array data. The goal of the first study was to measure the lateral thickness variability in the extrusive volcanic layer on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Juan de Fuca Ridge is a medium rate (6 cm per year full rate), active spreading center, separating the Juan de Fuca and Pacific plates. It is a site of volcanic eruptions, associated with creation of new oceanic crust, and hydrothermal vents which are important in the chemical balance of the oceans. To better understand the mechanisms controlling hydrothermal venting and the creation of new crust, a seismic refraction survey was conducted over a 20 km by 30 km area of the ridge. This survey, conducted in August of 1990, used airguns as energy sources and ocean bottom seismometers as recorders. A 3-dimensional traveltime inversion was used to interpret extrusive volcanic layer thickness changes of 300 m, occurring over less than several kilometers laterally. These thickness changes are interpreted as lava accumulations on the low side of listric faults in an episodic spreading system. The traveltime inversion also reveals a large horizontal seismic velocity anisotropy which is confined to the upper 500 m of crust. Compressional velocities are 3.35 km/s in the ridge strike direction and 2.25 km/s across strike. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by oriented fractures within the extrusive layer. The second study involved the tracking and analysis of whale vocalizations which were recorded on the array 10 percent of the time. The goal was to determine if noises such as generated by the airguns, shipping or earthquakes affected the behavior of these fin and blue whales. The vocalization patterns allow analysis of swimming speed, direction, respiration cycle and call interaction. While no clear noise

  12. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) microsensor array for measuring VOCs in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Groves, W A; Grey, A B; O'Shaughnessy, P T

    2006-09-01

    Exposure to volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in drinking water has been linked to a number of adverse health effects including cancer, liver, and kidney damage. However, the large number of potential contaminants and the cost and complexity of existing analytical methods limits the extent to which water quality is routinely characterized. This project focused on the laboratory development and evaluation of an instrument for field analysis of VOCs in drinking water. The instrument is based on an array of six polymer-coated surface-acoustic-wave microsensors. A test-set consisting of dichloromethane, chloroform, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, perchloroethylene, and m-xylene was used in a series of experiments designed to optimize the purge-trap preconcentration system, calibrate the instrument over the concentration range of 0.2-2 times the USEPA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), and compare results to those of a reference laboratory. The primary goal was to develop a cost-effective alternative for on-site evaluation of VOCs in water. Calibration and evaluation test results for spiked water samples demonstrate adequate sensitivity for 19 of the 21 regulated VOCs considered using a ten minute sampling and analysis cycle. Monte Carlo simulations characterized the performance of trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) which had correct classification rates of 99%, 90%, and 80% for the five individual test-set vapors and their binary and ternary mixtures, respectively. These results demonstrate the excellent potential of this technology for addressing the need for improved VOC field-screening methods for water supplies.

  13. The Acoustic Signal of a Helicopter can be Used to Track it With Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Eva P. S.; Lokmer, Ivan; Bean, Christopher J.; Akerlie, Eggert

    2016-04-01

    We apply traditional frequency domain methods usually applied to volcanic tremor on seismic recordings of a helicopter. On a volcano the source can be repeating, closely spaced earthquakes whereas for a helicopter the source are repeating pressure pulses from the rotor blades that are converted through acoustic-to-seismic coupling. In both cases the seismic signal is referred to as tremor. As frequency gliding is in this case merely caused by the Doppler effect, not a change in the source, we can use its shape to deduce properties of the helicopter. We show in this analysis that the amount of rotor blades, rotor revolutions per minute (RPM), flight direction, height and location can be deduced. The signal was recorded by a seven station broadband array with an aperture of 1.6 km. Our spacing is close enough to record the signal at all stations and far enough to observe traveltime differences. We perform a detailed spectral and location analysis of the signal, and compare our results with the known information on the helicopter's speed, location, height, the frequency of the blades rotation and the amount of blades. This analysis is based on the characteristic shape of the curve i.e. speed of the gliding, minimum and maximum fundamental frequency, amplitudes at the inflection points at different stations and traveltimes deduced from the inflection points at different stations. The helicopter GPS track gives us a robust way of testing the method. This observation has an educative value, because the same principles can be applied to signals in different disciplines.

  14. Rapidly Deployed Modular Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a telemetry system, and more specifically is a rapidly deployed modular telemetry apparatus which utilizes of SDR technology and the FPGA programming capability to reduce the number of hardware components and programming required to deploy a telemetry system.

  15. Near-field/far-field array manifold of an acoustic vector-sensor near a reflecting boundary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue Ivan; Lau, Siu-Kit; Wong, Kainam Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic vector-sensor (a.k.a. the vector hydrophone) is a practical and versatile sound-measurement device, with applications in-room, open-air, or underwater. It consists of three identical uni-axial velocity-sensors in orthogonal orientations, plus a pressure-sensor-all in spatial collocation. Its far-field array manifold [Nehorai and Paldi (1994). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 42, 2481-2491; Hawkes and Nehorai (2000). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 48, 2981-2993] has been introduced into the technical field of signal processing about 2 decades ago, and many direction-finding algorithms have since been developed for this acoustic vector-sensor. The above array manifold is subsequently generalized for outside the far field in Wu, Wong, and Lau [(2010). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 58, 3946-3951], but only if no reflection-boundary is to lie near the acoustic vector-sensor. As for the near-boundary array manifold for the general case of an emitter in the geometric near field, the far field, or anywhere in between-this paper derives and presents that array manifold in terms of signal-processing mathematics. Also derived here is the corresponding Cramér-Rao bound for azimuth-elevation-distance localization of an incident emitter, with the reflected wave shown to play a critical role on account of its constructive or destructive summation with the line-of-sight wave. The implications on source localization are explored, especially with respect to measurement model mismatch in maximum-likelihood direction finding and with regard to the spatial resolution between coexisting emitters. PMID:27369140

  16. Phoenix Telemetry Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanboli, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Phxtelemproc is a C/C++ based telemetry processing program that processes SFDU telemetry packets from the Telemetry Data System (TDS). It generates Experiment Data Records (EDRs) for several instruments including surface stereo imager (SSI); robotic arm camera (RAC); robotic arm (RA); microscopy, electrochemistry, and conductivity analyzer (MECA); and the optical microscope (OM). It processes both uncompressed and compressed telemetry, and incorporates unique subroutines for the following compression algorithms: JPEG Arithmetic, JPEG Huffman, Rice, LUT3, RA, and SX4. This program was in the critical path for the daily command cycle of the Phoenix mission. The products generated by this program were part of the RA commanding process, as well as the SSI, RAC, OM, and MECA image and science analysis process. Its output products were used to advance science of the near polar regions of Mars, and were used to prove that water is found in abundance there. Phxtelemproc is part of the MIPL (Multi-mission Image Processing Laboratory) system. This software produced Level 1 products used to analyze images returned by in situ spacecraft. It ultimately assisted in operations, planning, commanding, science, and outreach.

  17. Wideband EMG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosatino, S. A.; Westbrook, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Miniature, individual crystal-controlled RF transmitters located in EMG pressure sensors simplifies multichannel EMG telemetry for electronic gait monitoring. Transmitters which are assigned operating frequencies within 174 - 216 MHz band have linear frequency response from 20 - 2000 Hz and operate over range of 15 m.

  18. Generic telemetry processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Flight Operations Center (SFOC) is a generic suite of ground data systems software. One main subsystem of SFOC is the Telemetry Input Subsystem (TIS). Utilizing techniques for the abstract representation of data, the TIS has provided a flexible software base that can be used as a baseline for multiple spacecraft missions.

  19. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  20. Orchestrator Telemetry Processing Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark; Mittman, David; Joswig, Joseph; Crockett, Thomas; Norris, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Orchestrator is a software application infrastructure for telemetry monitoring, logging, processing, and distribution. The architecture has been applied to support operations of a variety of planetary rovers. Built in Java with the Eclipse Rich Client Platform, Orchestrator can run on most commonly used operating systems. The pipeline supports configurable parallel processing that can significantly reduce the time needed to process a large volume of data products. Processors in the pipeline implement a simple Java interface and declare their required input from upstream processors. Orchestrator is programmatically constructed by specifying a list of Java processor classes that are initiated at runtime to form the pipeline. Input dependencies are checked at runtime. Fault tolerance can be configured to attempt continuation of processing in the event of an error or failed input dependency if possible, or to abort further processing when an error is detected. This innovation also provides support for Java Message Service broadcasts of telemetry objects to clients and provides a file system and relational database logging of telemetry. Orchestrator supports remote monitoring and control of the pipeline using browser-based JMX controls and provides several integration paths for pre-compiled legacy data processors. At the time of this reporting, the Orchestrator architecture has been used by four NASA customers to build telemetry pipelines to support field operations. Example applications include high-volume stereo image capture and processing, simultaneous data monitoring and logging from multiple vehicles. Example telemetry processors used in field test operations support include vehicle position, attitude, articulation, GPS location, power, and stereo images.

  1. Sub-10 nm Ytterbium Oxide Nanopowder-doped Silicone Rubber Acoustic Lens Material for Medical Echo Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yohachi (John); Hosono, Yasuharu; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2007-09-01

    The effects of 8-nm-Yb2O3-nanopowders dopant, on the physical and acoustical properties of high-temperature-vulcanization (HTV) silicone (Q) rubber have been investigated, to develop a low acoustic attenuation (α) lens material for medical array probes. A 35 wt % (6 vol %) Yb2O3-doped HTV Q rubber showed a sound velocity (c) = 867 m/s, an acoustic impedance (Z) = 1.36× 106 kg\\cdotm-2\\cdots-1, an acoustic attenuation α = 0.66 dB\\cdotmm-1\\cdotMHz-1, and an α-figure of merits (FOM) (α× c) = 574 at 37 °C. The α-FOM value with Z = 1.36× 106 kg\\cdotm-2\\cdots-1 for a Q rubber lens material is the lowest attenuation ever reported. Microstructure observation revealed that the low-α rubber showed a uniform Yb2O3 nanopowder distribution in the rubber matrix.

  2. Acoustic tracking of an unmanned underwater vehicle using a passive ultrashort baseline array and a single long baseline beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Kyle L.

    This thesis discusses a new approach to tracking the REMUS 100 AUV using a modified version of the Florida Atlantic University (FAU) ultrashort baseline (USBL) acoustic positioning system (APS). The REMUS 100 is designed to utilize a long baseline (LBL) acoustic positioning system to obtain positioning data in mid-mission. If the placement of one of the transponders of the LBL field is known, then tracking the position of the REMUS 100 AUV using a passive USBL array is possible. As part of the research for this thesis, the FAU USBL system was used to find a relative range between the REMUS 100 ranger and a LBL transponder. This relative range was then combined with direction of arrival information and LBL field component position information to determine an absolute position of the REMUS 100 ranger. The outcome was the demonstration of a passive USBL based tracking system.

  3. Acoustic Beam Forming Array Using Feedback-Controlled Microphones for Tuning and Self-Matching of Frequency Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radcliffe, Eliott (Inventor); Naguib, Ahmed (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A feedback-controlled microphone includes a microphone body and a membrane operatively connected to the body. The membrane is configured to be initially deflected by acoustic pressure such that the initial deflection is characterized by a frequency response. The microphone also includes a sensor configured to detect the frequency response of the initial deflection and generate an output voltage indicative thereof. The microphone additionally includes a compensator in electric communication with the sensor and configured to establish a regulated voltage in response to the output voltage. Furthermore, the microphone includes an actuator in electric communication with the compensator, wherein the actuator is configured to secondarily deflect the membrane in opposition to the initial deflection such that the frequency response is adjusted. An acoustic beam forming microphone array including a plurality of the above feedback-controlled microphones is also disclosed.

  4. Acoustic Holographic Rendering with Two-dimensional Metamaterial-based Passive Phased Array

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yangbo; Shen, Chen; Wang, Wenqi; Li, Junfei; Suo, Dingjie; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Jing, Yun; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic holographic rendering in complete analogy with optical holography are useful for various applications, ranging from multi-focal lensing, multiplexed sensing and synthesizing three-dimensional complex sound fields. Conventional approaches rely on a large number of active transducers and phase shifting circuits. In this paper we show that by using passive metamaterials as subwavelength pixels, holographic rendering can be achieved without cumbersome circuitry and with only a single transducer, thus significantly reducing system complexity. Such metamaterial-based holograms can serve as versatile platforms for various advanced acoustic wave manipulation and signal modulation, leading to new possibilities in acoustic sensing, energy deposition and medical diagnostic imaging. PMID:27739472

  5. Acoustic Holographic Rendering with Two-dimensional Metamaterial-based Passive Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Shen, Chen; Wang, Wenqi; Li, Junfei; Suo, Dingjie; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Jing, Yun; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic holographic rendering in complete analogy with optical holography are useful for various applications, ranging from multi-focal lensing, multiplexed sensing and synthesizing three-dimensional complex sound fields. Conventional approaches rely on a large number of active transducers and phase shifting circuits. In this paper we show that by using passive metamaterials as subwavelength pixels, holographic rendering can be achieved without cumbersome circuitry and with only a single transducer, thus significantly reducing system complexity. Such metamaterial-based holograms can serve as versatile platforms for various advanced acoustic wave manipulation and signal modulation, leading to new possibilities in acoustic sensing, energy deposition and medical diagnostic imaging.

  6. Telemetry methods for monitoring physiological parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.; Sandler, H.

    1982-01-01

    The use of telemetry to monitor various physiological functions is discussed. The advantages of the technique and the parameters that it can monitor are assessed, and the main telemetry systems, including pressure telemetry, flow telemetry, and multichannel telemetry, are detailed. Human applications of implanted flow transducers, total implant versus backpack telemetry, the use of power sources and integrated circuits in telemetry, and the future prospects of the technique in hypertension treatment and research are discussed.

  7. Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1995-12-19

    A system is described for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver. 7 figs.

  8. Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver.

  9. Developing a quality assurance plan for telemetry studies: A necessary management tool for an effective study: Chapter 9.3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardiman, Jill M.; Walker, Christopher E.; Counihan, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Telemetry provides a powerful and flexible tool for studying fish and other aquatic animals, and its use has become increasingly commonplace. However, telemetry is gear intensive and typically requires more specialized knowledge and training than many other field techniques. As with other scientific methods, collecting good data is dependent on an understanding of the underlying principles behind the approach, knowing how to use the equipment and techniques properly, and recognizing what to do with the data collected. This book provides a road map for using telemetry to study aquatic animals, and provides the basic information needed to plan, implement, and conduct a telemetry study under field conditions. Topics include acoustic or radio telemetry study design, tag implantation techniques, radio and acoustic telemetry principles and case studies, and data management and analysis.

  10. Bias from false-positive detections and strategies for their removal in studies using telemetry: Chapter 9.5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, John W.; Perry, Russell W.

    2012-01-01

    Telemetry provides a powerful and flexible tool for studying fish and other aquatic animals, and its use has become increasingly commonplace. However, telemetry is gear intensive and typically requires more specialized knowledge and training than many other field techniques. As with other scientific methods, collecting good data is dependent on an understanding of the underlying principles behind the approach, knowing how to use the equipment and techniques properly, and recognizing what to do with the data collected. This book provides a road map for using telemetry to study aquatic animals, and provides the basic information needed to plan, implement, and conduct a telemetry study under field conditions. Topics include acoustic or radio telemetry study design, tag implantation techniques, radio and acoustic telemetry principles and case studies, and data management and analysis.

  11. Design and performance of radio telemetry systems for assessing juvenile fish passage at three hydroelectric dams: Chapter 6.5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, John W.; Hockersmith, Eric; Stevenson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Telemetry provides a powerful and flexible tool for studying fish and other aquatic animals, and its use has become increasingly commonplace. However, telemetry is gear intensive and typically requires more specialized knowledge and training than many other field techniques. As with other scientific methods, collecting good data is dependent on an understanding of the underlying principles behind the approach, knowing how to use the equipment and techniques properly, and recognizing what to do with the data collected. This book provides a road map for using telemetry to study aquatic animals, and provides the basic information needed to plan, implement, and conduct a telemetry study under field conditions. Topics include acoustic or radio telemetry study design, tag implantation techniques, radio and acoustic telemetry principles and case studies, and data management and analysis.

  12. Flight parameter estimation using instantaneous frequency and time delay measurements from a three-element planar acoustic array.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kam W

    2016-05-01

    The acoustic signal emitted by a turbo-prop aircraft consists of a strong narrowband tone superimposed on a broadband random component. A ground-based three-element planar acoustic array can be used to estimate the full set of flight parameters of a turbo-prop aircraft in transit by measuring the time delay (TD) between the signal received at the reference sensor and the signal received at each of the other two sensors of the array over a sufficiently long period of time. This paper studies the possibility of using instantaneous frequency (IF) measurements from the reference sensor to improve the precision of the flight parameter estimates. A simplified Cramer-Rao lower bound analysis shows that the standard deviations in the estimates of the aircraft velocity and altitude can be greatly reduced when IF measurements are used together with TD measurements. Two flight parameter estimation algorithms that utilize both IF and TD measurements are formulated and their performances are evaluated using both simulated and real data. PMID:27250134

  13. Next-Generation Telemetry Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A next-generation telemetry workstation has been developed to replace the one currently used to test and control Range Safety systems. Improving upon the performance of the original system, the new telemetry workstation uses dual-channel telemetry boards for better synchronization of the two uplink telemetry streams. The new workstation also includes an Interrange Instrumentation Group/Global Positioning System (IRIG/GPS) time code receiver board for independent, local time stamping of return-link data. The next-generation system will also record and play back return-link data for postlaunch analysis.

  14. Acoustic counter-sniper system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Gregory L.; Gilbert, Douglas C.; Barger, James E.

    1997-02-01

    BBN has developed, tested, and fielded pre-production versions of a versatile acoustics-based counter-sniper system. This system was developed by BBN for the DARPA Tactical Technology Office to provide a low cost and accurate sniper detection and localization system. The system uses observations of the shock wave from supersonic bullets to estimate the bullet trajectory, Mach number, and caliber. If muzzle blast observations are also available from unsilenced weapons, the exact sniper location along the trajectory is also estimated. A newly developed and very accurate model of the bullet ballistics and acoustic radiation is used which includes bullet deceleration. This allows the use of very flexible acoustic sensor types and placements, since the system can model the bullet's flight, and hence the acoustic observations, over a wide area very accurately. System sensor configurations can be as simple as two small four element tetrahedral microphone arrays on either side of the area to be protected, or six omnidirectional microphones spread over the area to be monitored. Increased performance can be obtained by expanding the sensor field in size or density, and the system software is easily reconfigured to accommodate this at deployment time. Sensor nodes can be added using wireless network telemetry or hardwired cables to the command node processing and display computer. The system has been field tested in three government sponsored tests in both rural and simulated urban environments at the Camp Pendleton MOUT facility. Performance was characterized during these tests for various shot geometries and bullet speeds and calibers.

  15. A directional microphone array for acoustic studies of wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.; Noble, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    An end-fire microphone array that utilizes a digital time delay system has been designed and evaluated for measuring noise in wind tunnels. The directional response of both a four- and eight-element linear array of microphones has enabled substantial rejection of background noise and reverberations in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. In addition, it is estimated that four- and eight-element arrays reject 6 and 9 dB, respectively, of microphone wind noise, as compared with a conventional omnidirectional microphone with nose cone. Array response to two types of jet engine models in the wind tunnel is presented. Comparisons of array response to loudspeakers in the wind tunnel and in free field are made.

  16. Reentry vehicle adaptive telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kidner, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    In RF telemetry (TM) the allowable RF bandwidth limits the amount of data in the telemetered data set. Typically the data set is less than ideal to accommodate all aspects of a test. In the case of diagnostic data, the compromise often leaves insufficient diagnostic data when problems occur. As a solution, intelligence was designed into a TM, allowing it to adapt to changing data requirements. To minimize the computational requirements for an intelligent TM, a fuzzy logic inference engine was developed. This reference engine was simulated on a PC and then loaded into a TM hardware package for final testing.

  17. Reentry vehicle adaptive telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidner, R. E.

    1993-09-01

    In RF telemetry (TM) the allowable RF bandwidth limits the amount of data in the telemetered data set. Typically the data set is less than ideal to accommodate all aspects of a test. In the case of diagnostic data, the compromise often leaves insufficient diagnostic data when problems occur. As a solution, intelligence was designed into a TM allowing it to adapt to changing data requirements. To minimize the computational requirements for an intelligent TM, a fuzzy logic inference engine was developed. This reference engine was simulated on a PC and then loaded into a TM hardware package for final testing.

  18. Acoustic tracking of sperm whales in the Gulf of Alaska using a two-element vertical array and tags.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Delphine; Thode, Aaron M; Straley, Jan; Andrews, Russel D

    2013-09-01

    Between 15 and 17 August 2010, a simple two-element vertical array was deployed off the continental slope of Southeast Alaska in 1200 m water depth. The array was attached to a vertical buoy line used to mark each end of a longline fishing set, at 300 m depth, close to the sound-speed minimum of the deep-water profile. The buoy line also served as a depredation decoy, attracting seven sperm whales to the area. One animal was tagged with both a LIMPET dive depth-transmitting satellite and bioacoustic "B-probe" tag. Both tag datasets were used as an independent check of various passive acoustic schemes for tracking the whale in depth and range, which exploited the elevation angles and relative arrival times of multiple ray paths recorded on the array. Analytical tracking formulas were viable up to 2 km range, but only numerical propagation models yielded accurate locations up to at least 35 km range at Beaufort sea state 3. Neither localization approach required knowledge of the local bottom bathymetry. The tracking system was successfully used to estimate the source level of an individual sperm whale's "clicks" and "creaks" and predict the maximum detection range of the signals as a function of sea state.

  19. Reception of Multiple Telemetry Signals via One Dish Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Ryan; Vilnrotter, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A microwave aeronautical-telemetry receiver system includes an antenna comprising a seven-element planar array of receiving feed horns centered at the focal point of a paraboloidal dish reflector that is nominally aimed at a single aircraft or at multiple aircraft flying in formation. Through digital processing of the signals received by the seven feed horns, the system implements a method of enhanced cancellation of interference, such that it becomes possible to receive telemetry signals in the same frequency channel simultaneously from either or both of two aircraft at slightly different angular positions within the field of view of the antenna, even in the presence of multipath propagation. The present system is an advanced version of the system described in Spatio- Temporal Equalizer for a Receiving-Antenna Feed Array NPO-43077, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 2 (February 2010), page 32. To recapitulate: The radio-frequency telemetry signals received by the seven elements of the array are digitized, converted to complex baseband form, and sent to a spatio-temporal equalizer that consists mostly of a bank of seven adaptive finite-impulse-response (FIR) filters (one for each element in the array) plus a unit that sums the outputs of the filters. The combination of the spatial diversity of the feedhorn array and the temporal diversity of the filter bank affords better multipath suppression performance than is achievable by means of temporal equalization alone. The FIR filter bank adapts itself in real time to enable reception of telemetry at a low bit error rate, even in the presence of frequency-selective multipath propagation like that commonly found at flight-test ranges. The combination of the array and the filter bank makes it possible to constructively add multipath incoming signals to the corresponding directly arriving signals, thereby enabling reductions in telemetry bit-error rates.

  20. Wide-range frequency selectivity in an acoustic sensor fabricated using a microbeam array with non-uniform thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Zusho, Kazuki; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we have demonstrated the fabrication of a microbeam array (MBA) with various thicknesses and investigated the suitability it for an acoustic sensor with wide-range frequency selectivity. For this, an MBA composed of 64 beams, with thicknesses varying from 2.99-142 µm, was fabricated by using single gray-scale lithography and a thick negative photoresist. The vibration of the beams in air was measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer; the resonant frequencies of the beams were measured to be from 11.5 to 290 kHz. Lastly, the frequency range of the MBA with non-uniform thickness was 10.9 times that of the MBA with uniform thickness.

  1. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiède, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [-35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study.

  2. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors.

    PubMed

    Cassiède, M; Shaw, J M

    2015-04-01

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [-35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study. PMID:25933884

  3. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Cassiède, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-04-15

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [−35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study.

  4. An intelligent sensor array distributed system for vibration analysis and acoustic noise characterization of a linear switched reluctance actuator.

    PubMed

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications.

  5. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications. PMID:22969364

  6. Measured and calculated acoustic attenuation rates of tuned resonator arrays for two surface impedance distribution models with flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Abrahamson, A. Louis; Jones, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment was performed to validate two analytical models for predicting low frequency attenuation of duct liner configurations built from an array of seven resonators that could be individually tuned via adjustable cavity depths. These analytical models had previously been developed for high frequency aero-engine inlet duct liner design. In the low frequency application, the liner surface impedance distribution is unavoidably spatially varying by virtue of available fabrication techniques. The characteristic length of this spatial variation may be a significant fraction of the acoustic wavelength. Comparison of measured and predicted attenuation rates and transmission losses for both modal decomposition and finite element propagation models were in good to excellent agreement for a test frequency range that included the first and second cavity resonance frequencies. This was true for either of two surface impedance distribution modeling procedures used to simplify the impedance boundary conditions. In the presence of mean flow, measurements revealed a fine scale structure of acoustic hot spots in the attenuation and phase profiles. These details were accurately predicted by the finite element model. Since no impedance changes due to mean flow were assumed, it is concluded that this fine scale structure was due to convective effects of the mean flow interacting with the surface impedance nonuniformities.

  7. Passive acoustic monitoring using a towed hydrophone array results in identification of a previously unknown beaked whale habitat.

    PubMed

    Yack, Tina M; Barlow, Jay; Calambokidis, John; Southall, Brandon; Coates, Shannon

    2013-09-01

    Beaked whales are diverse and species rich taxa. They spend the vast majority of their time submerged, regularly diving to depths of hundreds to thousands of meters, typically occur in small groups, and behave inconspicuously at the surface. These factors make them extremely difficult to detect using standard visual survey methods. However, recent advancements in acoustic detection capabilities have made passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) a viable alternative. Beaked whales can be discriminated from other odontocetes by the unique characteristics of their echolocation clicks. In 2009 and 2010, PAM methods using towed hydrophone arrays were tested. These methods proved highly effective for real-time detection of beaked whales in the Southern California Bight (SCB) and were subsequently implemented in 2011 to successfully detect and track beaked whales during the ongoing Southern California Behavioral Response Study. The three year field effort has resulted in (1) the successful classification and tracking of Cuvier's (Ziphius cavirostris), Baird's (Berardius bairdii), and unidentified Mesoplodon beaked whale species and (2) the identification of areas of previously unknown beaked whale habitat use. Identification of habitat use areas will contribute to a better understanding of the complex relationship between beaked whale distribution, occurrence, and preferred habitat characteristics on a relatively small spatial scale. These findings will also provide information that can be used to promote more effective management and conservation of beaked whales in the SCB, a heavily used Naval operation and training region.

  8. Cuspidal caustic and focusing of acoustical waves generated by a parametric array onto a concave reflecting surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnède, Bernard; Sahraoui, Sohbi; Tournat, Vincent; Tahani, Najat

    2009-09-01

    The present Note is devoted to the study of the so-called cuspidal caustic at the surface of a hemi-cylindrical reflector illuminated with plane waves. In order to generate low frequency (e.g. in the range of 4 kHz) acoustical plane waves, a commercially available parametric array has been used. It produces powerful ultrasonic carrier waves at 40 kHz which can be electronically modulated between 200 Hz and 10 kHz. Further self-demodulation process during propagation in air generates an ultra-directive acoustical field (i.e. quasi-planar wavefronts) enabling to accurately study the focusing process occurring along the cuspidal caustic. The focusing coefficient can be computed locally by using two numerical tools, on one hand by computing the density of tangent rays to the caustic, and on the other hand by using some numerical results provided by a ray tracing algorithm. Some preliminary experimental data are then provided in order to validate the numerical predictions (spatial position of the caustic and focusing coefficient). To cite this article: B. Castagnède et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  9. A source array for generating higher order acoustic modes in circular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyerman, B. R.; Reethof, G.

    1976-01-01

    A unique source array has been developed for the generation of both spinning and non-spinning higher order modes in a circular duct. The array consists of two concentric rings of sources. Through individual control of the response of each element, the array provided phase and amplitude control in the radial as well as circumferential directions. Radial modes shapes were measured in a 12-inch diameter anechoically-terminated hollow duct. These modes could be generated at their cut-off frequency and throughout a frequency range extending to the cut-off frequency for the next higher order radial mode. Comparisons are given between theory and experiment for the generation of specific modes. The radial dependence of the measured mode shapes was enhanced considerably by the design of this array. The results indicate a significant improvement over previous mode generation mechanisms. The contamination of the generated mode by additional spurious modes is also considered for variations between individual elements within the source array.

  10. Enhancing active and passive remote sensing in the ocean using broadband acoustic transmissions and coherent hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Duong Duy

    The statistics of broadband acoustic signal transmissions in a random continental shelf waveguide are characterized for the fully saturated regime. The probability distribution of broadband signal energies after saturated multi-path propagation is derived using coherence theory. The frequency components obtained from Fourier decomposition of a broadband signal are each assumed to be fully saturated, where the energy spectral density obeys the exponential distribution with 5.6 dB standard deviation and unity scintillation index. When the signal bandwidth and measurement time are respectively larger than the correlation bandwidth and correlation time of its energy spectral density components, the broadband signal energy obtained by integrating the energy spectral density across the signal bandwidth then follows the Gamma distribution with standard deviation smaller than 5.6 dB and scintillation index less than unity. The theory is verified with broadband transmissions in the Gulf of Maine shallow water waveguide in the 300-1200 Hz frequency range. The standard deviations of received broadband signal energies range from 2.7 to 4.6 dB for effective bandwidths up to 42 Hz, while the standard deviations of individual energy spectral density components are roughly 5.6 dB. The energy spectral density correlation bandwidths of the received broadband signals are found to be larger for signals with higher center frequency. Sperm whales in the New England continental shelf and slope were passively localized, in both range and bearing using a single low-frequency (< 2500 Hz), densely sampled, towed horizontal coherent hydrophone array system. Whale bearings were estimated using time-domain beamforming that provided high coherent array gain in sperm whale click signal-to-noise ratio. Whale ranges from the receiver array center were estimated using the moving array triangulation technique from a sequence of whale bearing measurements. The dive profile was estimated for a sperm

  11. Seismo-acoustic analysis of the ocean swell sources observed with Romanian infrasound array and seismic stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Grecu, Bogdan; Popa, Mihaela

    2015-04-01

    Romanian Plostina infrasound array (IPLOR) is deployed in the central part of the country, in Vrancea region. Presently, IPLOR array configuration includes 6 elements equipped with Chaparral Physics sensors and with aperture of about 2.5 km. For the purpose of assessing the IPLOR performance in observing various types of infrasound sources, over five years of data (since June 2009 to present) were processed. Signal interactive analysis was performed using WinPMCC software. The detection results show that the station response was gradually improved, as the number of array elements increased from three to six, and wind noise reduction conditions were enhanced. A larger number of detected signals and a better array resolution at lower frequency were noticed as well. Microbaroms - the interaction of ocean swell with the atmosphere - represent a relevant type of infrasonic source present in the IPLOR detection plots, for which the signal characterization has been enhanced with the array upgrading process. IPLOR detection capability related to this energetic long-period infrasound waves, which propagate over large distances, shows an alternating behavior, being strongly influenced by the upper atmospheric winds, i.e. seasonally dependent stratospheric winds. The ocean swell can be considered as a seismo-acoustic source, leaving an imprint on both seismic and infrasonic recordings. The interaction with the atmosphere generates infrasound (microbarom), while the interaction with the sea floor emits seismic signal (microseism). Microbaroms have a sinusoidal wave character with a dominant period of 5 s. Due to low damping at this period in stratospheric wave duct, microbaroms are observed over large distance ranges up to a few thousand kilometres. Microseisms occur as an increasing of seismic background noise between 2 and 20 s; in this range, primary and secondary peaks, at 5 and 14 s, are observed. Common broad-band seismic data, recorded with Romanian dense seismic

  12. Advanced Telemetry Data Capturing

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, G.A.

    2000-05-16

    This project developed a new generation or advanced data capturing process specifically designed for use in future telemetry test systems at the Kansas City Plant (KCP). Although similar data capturing processes are performed both commercially and at other DOE weapon facilities, the equipment used is not specifically designed to perform acceptance testing requirements unique to the KCP. Commercially available equipment, despite very high cost (up to $125,000), is deficient in reliability and long-term maintainability necessary in test systems at this facility. There are no commercial sources for some requirements, specifically Terminal Data Analyzer (TDA) data processing. Although other custom processes have been developed to satisfy these test requirements, these designs have become difficult to maintain and upgrade.

  13. Telemetry of intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.; Corbin, S. D.; Silverberg, G. D.; Schmidt, E. V.; Ream, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    A completely implantable epidural pressure telemetry system designed for accurate measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is described. The implant device is batteryless, providing unlimited operating life. The described system uses a capacitive pressure transducer with excellent long-term stability. Once detected with the transducer and converted to a frequency with the oscillator electronics, the pressure signal is digitized. It is then telemetered without the possibility of further degradation. After detection with the small external module, the data can be retransmitted by a radio link for complete patient mobility or the energizer signal pickup module can be wired to a bedside readout unit. Continuous data are available from the system so that the dynamic ICP changes reflecting arterial blood pressure can be observed and used for diagnosis.

  14. Concepts and Development of Bio-Inspired Distributed Embedded Wired/Wireless Sensor Array Architectures for Acoustic Wave Sensing in Integrated Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Prosser, William H.; Kirikera, Goutham; Schulz, Mark J.; Hughes, Derke J.; Orisamolu, Wally

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of acoustic emissions in plate structures and their sensing by embedded or surface bonded piezoelectric sensor arrays. Three different modeling efforts for acoustic emission (AE) wave generation and propagation are discussed briefly along with their advantages and disadvantages. Continuous sensors placed at right angles on a plate are being discussed as a new approach to measure and locate the source of acoustic waves. Evolutionary novel signal processing algorithms and bio-inspired distributed sensor array systems are used on large structures and integrated aerospace vehicles for AE source localization and preliminary results are presented. These systems allow for a great reduction in the amount of data that needs to be processed and also reduce the chances of false alarms from ambient noises. It is envisioned that these biomimetic sensor arrays and signal processing techniques will be useful for both wireless and wired sensor arrays for real time health monitoring of large integrated aerospace vehicles and earth fixed civil structures. The sensor array architectures can also be used with other types of sensors and for other applications.

  15. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  16. Telemetry link for an automatic salmon migration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, H. A.; Freyman, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The antenna and transmitter described in this report were designed for integration into the remote acoustic assessment system for detection of sockeye salmon in the Bristol Bay region of the Bering Sea. The assessment system configuration consists of an upward directed sonar buoy anchored 150 ft below the surface and attached by cable to a spar buoy tethered some 300 ft laterally. The spar buoy contains a telemetry transmitter, power supply, data processing electronics, an antenna and a beacon light.

  17. Acoustic interferometers based on two-dimensional arrays of rigid cylinders in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis, Lorenzo; Håkansson, Andreas; Cervera, Francisco; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2003-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of acoustic interferometers based on sonic crystals, such as the one reported by Cervera et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 023902 (2002). This kind of interferometers consist of a slab of rigid cylinders in air put in a periodic configuration. Their performance as a function of thickness and symmetry configuration (square and hexagonal) is analyzed by our setup, which obtains the reflectance spectra using the standing wave ratio technique. Experimental observations are fairly well simulated by a self-consistent wave theory that incorporates all orders of multiple scattering. An homogenization procedure shows that sound propagation inside the hexagonal-based crystals is isotropic while it is biaxial inside the square-based crystals. A method able to extract the acoustic band structure from the reflectance spectra of the finite crystals under study is also described. Finally, the robustness of the interference effects is also studied as a function of positional disorder inside the unit cells in the lattice.

  18. Development of a Nonlinear Acoustic Phased Array and its Interaction with Thin Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzel, Paul; Donahue, Carly; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    Numerous technologies are based on the principle of focusing acoustic energy. We propose a new device to focus sound waves which exploits highly nonlinear dynamics. The advantages of this device are the capability of generating very highly powerful acoustic pulses and potential operation in high-temperature environments where traditional piezoelectrics may fail. This device is composed of rows of ball bearings placed in contact with a medium of interest and with an actuator on the top. Elastic spherical particles have a contact force that grows with their relative displacement to the three-halves power (Hertzian contact). When several spheres are placed in a row, the particles support the propagation of ``solitary waves''--strong, compact stress-wave pulses whose tendency to disperse is counteracted by the nonlinearity of the sphere's contact force. We present results regarding the experimental operation of the device and its comparison to theory and numerical simulations. We will show how well this system is capable of focusing energy at various locations in the medium, and the limits imposed by pre-compression. Finally, the effects of timing error on energy focusing will be demonstrated. This research has been supported by a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  19. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, Pierre; ter Haar, Gail; Saffari, Nader

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  20. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs.

    PubMed

    Gélat, Pierre; Ter Haar, Gail; Saffari, Nader

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  1. Orion Telemetry Testing in MCC

    NASA Video Gallery

    In preparation for Exploration Flight Test-1, Orion telemetry was recently tested at the Mission Control Center in Houston. The Flight Control Room (FCR) that was formerly used for shuttle will be ...

  2. Adaptable Transponder for Multiple Telemetry Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor); Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a stackable telemetry circuit board for use in telemetry systems for satellites and other purposes. The present invention incorporates previously-qualified interchangeable circuit boards, or "decks," that perform functions such as power, signal receiving and transmission, and processing. Each deck is adapted to serve a range of telemetry applications. This provides flexibility in the construction of the stackable telemetry circuit board and significantly reduces the cost and time necessary to develop a telemetry system.

  3. Development of electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) phased arrays for SFR inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît

    2014-02-18

    A long-standing problem for Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) instrumentation is the development of efficient under-sodium visualization systems adapted to the hot and opaque sodium environment. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMAT) are potential candidates for a new generation of Ultrasonic Testing (UT) probes well-suited for SFR inspection that can overcome drawbacks of classical piezoelectric probes in sodium environment. Based on the use of new CIVA simulation tools, we have designed and optimized an advanced EMAT probe for under-sodium visualization. This has led to the development of a fully functional L-wave EMAT sensing system composed of 8 elements and a casing withstanding 200° C sodium inspection. Laboratory experiments demonstrated the probe's ability to sweep an ultrasonic beam to an angle of 15 degrees. Testing in a specialized sodium facility has shown that it was possible to obtain pulse-echo signals from a target under several different angles from a fixed position.

  4. Development of electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) phased arrays for SFR inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît

    2014-02-01

    A long-standing problem for Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) instrumentation is the development of efficient under-sodium visualization systems adapted to the hot and opaque sodium environment. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMAT) are potential candidates for a new generation of Ultrasonic Testing (UT) probes well-suited for SFR inspection that can overcome drawbacks of classical piezoelectric probes in sodium environment. Based on the use of new CIVA simulation tools, we have designed and optimized an advanced EMAT probe for under-sodium visualization. This has led to the development of a fully functional L-wave EMAT sensing system composed of 8 elements and a casing withstanding 200° C sodium inspection. Laboratory experiments demonstrated the probe's ability to sweep an ultrasonic beam to an angle of 15 degrees. Testing in a specialized sodium facility has shown that it was possible to obtain pulse-echo signals from a target under several different angles from a fixed position.

  5. Implantable telemetry for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A series of totally implantable telemetry devices for use in measuring deep body parameters in small animals were developed. Under a collaborative agreement with NASA, several of these systems; the continuous wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, the multichannel telemetry system, and the inductively-powered dual channel cardiac pacer were evaluated in a series of ten mongrel dogs (15 to 20 kg.). These systems were used to measure ascending aortic and coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, and subcutaneous EKG.

  6. Implantable telemetry for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    A series of totally implantable telemetry devices for use in measuring deep body parameters in small animals were developed. Under a collaborative agreement with NASA, several of these systems; the continuous wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, the multichannel telemetry system, and the inductively-powered dual channel cardiac pacer were evaluated in a series of ten mongrel dogs (15 to 20 kg.). These systems were used to measure ascending aortic and coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, and subcutaneous EKG.

  7. Advanced techniques of laser telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, S.; Gilardini, A.

    The relationships which govern a laser telemeter; noise sources; and measurement accuracy with pulsed and sinusoidal intensity modulation techniques are discussed. Developments in telemetry instrumention and optical detection are considered. Meteorological interferometers, geodimeters, and military telemeters are described. Propagation attenuation and signal to noise ratios are treated. It is shown that accuracy depends on the product of measurement time and received power. The frequency scanning technique of CW and long pulse telemetry; multifrequency techniques; pulse compression; and vernier technique are outlined.

  8. Telemetry-Enhancing Scripts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimone, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Scripts Providing a Cool Kit of Telemetry Enhancing Tools (SPACKLE) is a set of software tools that fill gaps in capabilities of other software used in processing downlinked data in the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) flight and test-bed operations. SPACKLE tools have helped to accelerate the automatic processing and interpretation of MER mission data, enabling non-experts to understand and/or use MER query and data product command simulation software tools more effectively. SPACKLE has greatly accelerated some operations and provides new capabilities. The tools of SPACKLE are written, variously, in Perl or the C or C++ language. They perform a variety of search and shortcut functions that include the following: Generating text-only, Event Report-annotated, and Web-enhanced views of command sequences; Labeling integer enumerations with their symbolic meanings in text messages and engineering channels; Systematic detecting of corruption within data products; Generating text-only displays of data-product catalogs including downlink status; Validating and labeling of commands related to data products; Performing of convenient searches of detailed engineering data spanning multiple Martian solar days; Generating tables of initial conditions pertaining to engineering, health, and accountability data; Simplified construction and simulation of command sequences; and Fast time format conversions and sorting.

  9. Methods for Room Acoustic Analysis and Synthesis using a Monopole-Dipole Microphone Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, J. S.; Begault, Durand R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In recent work, a microphone array consisting of an omnidirectional microphone and colocated dipole microphones having orthogonally aligned dipole axes was used to examine the directional nature of a room impulse response. The arrival of significant reflections was indicated by peaks in the power of the omnidirectional microphone response; reflection direction of arrival was revealed by comparing zero-lag crosscorrelations between the omnidirectional response and the dipole responses to the omnidirectional response power to estimate arrival direction cosines with respect to the dipole axes.

  10. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  11. Localization of multiple acoustic sources with small arrays using a coherence test.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Satish; Lockwood, Michael E; Kramer, Michael L; Jones, Douglas L

    2008-04-01

    Direction finding of more sources than sensors is appealing in situations with small sensor arrays. Potential applications include surveillance, teleconferencing, and auditory scene analysis for hearing aids. A new technique for time-frequency-sparse sources, such as speech and vehicle sounds, uses a coherence test to identify low-rank time-frequency bins. These low-rank bins are processed in one of two ways: (1) narrowband spatial spectrum estimation at each bin followed by summation of directional spectra across time and frequency or (2) clustering low-rank covariance matrices, averaging covariance matrices within clusters, and narrowband spatial spectrum estimation of each cluster. Experimental results with omnidirectional microphones and colocated directional microphones demonstrate the algorithm's ability to localize 3-5 simultaneous speech sources over 4 s with 2-3 microphones to less than 1 degree of error, and the ability to localize simultaneously two moving military vehicles and small arms gunfire. PMID:18397021

  12. Tripling the detection view of high-frequency linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography by using two planar acoustic reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Xia, Jun; Wang, Kun; Maslov, Konstantin; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) suffers from a limited view. Circular scanning does increase the detection view angle but is time-consuming. Therefore, it is desirable to increase the detection view angle of linear-array-based PACT without sacrificing imaging speed. Methods Two planar acoustic reflectors placed at 120 degrees to each other were added to a linear-array-based PACT system. Each reflector redirects originally undetectable photoacoustic waves back to the transducer array elements, and together they triple the original detection view angle of the PACT system. Results Adding two reflectors increased the detection view angle from 80 to 240 degrees. As a comparison, a single-reflector PACT has a detection view angle of only 160 degrees. A leaf skeleton phantom with a rich vascular network was imaged with the double-reflector PACT, and most of its features were recovered. Conclusions The two acoustic reflectors triple the detection view angle of a linear-array-based PACT without compromising the original imaging speed. This nearly full-view detection capability produces higher-quality images than single-reflector PACT or conventional PACT without reflectors. PMID:25694954

  13. A smart sensor system for trace organic vapor detection using a temperature-controlled array of surface acoustic wave vapor sensors, automated preconcentrator tubes, and pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, J.W.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.; Klusty, M.; Wohltjen, H.

    1993-05-01

    A smart sensor system for the detection, of toxic organophosphorus and toxic organosulfur vapors at trace concentrations has been designed, fabricated, and tested against a wide variety of vapor challenges. The key features of the system are: An array of four surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors, temperature control of the vapor sensors, the use of pattern recognition to analyze the sensor data, and an automated sampling system including thermally-desorbed preconcentrator tubes (PCTs).

  14. A primer for telemetry interfacing in accordance with NASA standards using low cost FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Jake; Schultz, Ted; Tutt, James; Rogers, Thomas; Miles, Drew; McEntaffer, Randall

    2015-08-01

    Photon counting detector systems on sounding rocket payloads often require interfacing asynchronous outputs with a synchronously clocked telemetry stream. Though this can be handled with an on-board computer, there are several low cost alternatives including custom hardware, microcontrollers, and Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). This paper outlines how a telemetry interface for detectors on a sounding rocket with asynchronous parallel digital output can be implemented using low cost FPGAs and minimal custom hardware. It also discusses how this system can be tested with a simulated telemetry chain in the small laboratory setting.

  15. Telemetry data via communications relay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, O. J.; Witchey, Michael

    This paper responds to a test range engineer's need to relay one or more channels of various types of telemetry data from a remotely-located receiving station to the central telemetry station at range headquarters for real-time processing and display. Several types of data are identified, and specific equipment and technology for multiplexing, transmission, and demultiplexing up to eight streams from a variety of sources is discussed. The widely-used T3 communications link, also known as DS-3, can relay data via satellite, microwave link, or other high-speed path at 44.736 megabits per second, of which about 95 percent can be actual telemetry data; other standard links operate at lower aggregate rates. Several links and rates are discussed, with emphasis in the high-rate T3 link.

  16. Test Processor For PCM Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, David; Corbin, Brian

    1990-01-01

    User displays telemetric data in variety of formats. TDPlus system is a data-processing subsystem designed for use in testing pulse-code-modulation (PCM) telemetry equipment. Accommodates variety of PCM formats. Includes custom-built set of four circuit cards that plug into any personal computer compatible with Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) bus. Software written in 'C', very user-friendly, and enables anyone who has basic knowledge of telemetry to use system without instruction manual. Built for about tenth of cost of currently available commercial unit of similar capability.

  17. Estimation of Acoustic Particle Motion and Source Bearing Using a Drifting Hydrophone Array Near a River Current Turbine to Assess Disturbances to Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Paul G.

    River hydrokinetic turbines may be an economical alternative to traditional energy sources for small communities on Alaskan rivers. However, there is concern that sound from these turbines could affect sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), an important resource for small, subsistence based communities, commercial fisherman, and recreational anglers. The hearing sensitivity of sockeye salmon has not been quantified, but behavioral responses to sounds at frequencies less than a few hundred Hertz have been documented for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and particle motion is thought to be the primary mode of stimulation. Methods of measuring acoustic particle motion are well-established, but have rarely been necessary in energetic areas, such as river and tidal current environments. In this study, the acoustic pressure in the vicinity of an operating river current turbine is measured using a freely drifting hydrophone array. Analysis of turbine sound reveals tones that vary in frequency and magnitude with turbine rotation rate, and that may sockeye salmon may sense. In addition to pressure, the vertical components of particle acceleration and velocity are estimated by calculating the finite difference of the pressure signals from the hydrophone array. A method of determining source bearing using an array of hydrophones is explored. The benefits and challenges of deploying drifting hydrophone arrays for marine renewable energy converter monitoring are discussed.

  18. An acoustically controlled tetherless underwater vehicle for installation and maintenance of neutrino detectors in the deep ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, Philip J.

    1997-02-01

    The task of installing and servicing high energy neutrino detectors in the deep ocean from a surface support vessel is problematic using conventional tethered systems. An array of multiple detector strings rising 500 m from the ocean floor, and forming a grid with 50 m spacing between the strings, presents a substantial entanglement hazard for equipment cables deployed from the surface. Such tasks may be accomplished with fewer risks using a tetherless underwater remotely operated vehicle that has a local acoustic telemetry link to send control commands and sensor data between the vehicle and a stationary hydrophone suspended above or just outside the perimeter of the work site. The Phase I effort involves the development of an underwater acoustic telemetry link for vehicle control and sensor feedback, the evaluation of video compression methods for real-time acoustic transmission of video through the water, and the defining of local control routines on board the vehicle to allow it to perform certain basic maneuvering tasks autonomously, or to initiate a self-rescue if the acoustic control link should be lost. In Phase II, a prototype tetherless vehicle system will be designed and constructed to demonstrate the ability to install cable interconnections within a detector array at 4 km depth. The same control technology could be used with a larger more powerful vehicle to maneuver the detector strings into desired positions as they are being lowered to the ocean floor.

  19. Analysis of survival data from telemetry projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Telemetry is an increasingly popular method for studying animal movements and habitat use. Telemetry provides a means for studying survival and causes of mortality. This paper describes some statistical techniques which can provide valid estimates of survival rates based on data from telemetry studies.

  20. 47 CFR 97.217 - Telemetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Telemetry. 97.217 Section 97.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.217 Telemetry. Telemetry transmitted by an amateur station on or within...

  1. 47 CFR 97.217 - Telemetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Telemetry. 97.217 Section 97.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.217 Telemetry. Telemetry transmitted by an amateur station on or within...

  2. 47 CFR 97.217 - Telemetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Telemetry. 97.217 Section 97.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.217 Telemetry. Telemetry transmitted by an amateur station on or within...

  3. 47 CFR 97.217 - Telemetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Telemetry. 97.217 Section 97.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.217 Telemetry. Telemetry transmitted by an amateur station on or within...

  4. 47 CFR 97.217 - Telemetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Telemetry. 97.217 Section 97.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Special Operations § 97.217 Telemetry. Telemetry transmitted by an amateur station on or within...

  5. XTCE. XML Telemetry and Command Exchange Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Kevin; Kizzort, Brad; Simon, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    An XML Telemetry Command Exchange (XTCE) tutoral oriented towards packets or minor frames is shown. The contents include: 1) The Basics; 2) Describing Telemetry; 3) Describing the Telemetry Format; 4) Commanding; 5) Forgotten Elements; 6) Implementing XTCE; and 7) GovSat.

  6. Properties of Noise Cross Correlation Functions Obtained from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Array at Garner Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Lancelle, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.; Chalari, A.; Clarke, A.

    2015-12-01

    The field test of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) conducted at Garner Valley, California on September 11-12, 2013 provided a continuous overnight record of ambient noise. The DAS array recorded ground motions every one meter of optical cable that was arranged approximately in the shape of a rectangle with dimensions of 160 m by 80 m. The long dimension of the array was adjacent to a state highway. Three hours of record were used to compute noise cross-correlation functions (NCFs) in one-minute windows. The trace from each sensor channel was pre-processed by downsampling to 200 Hz, followed by normalization in the time-domain and bandpass filtering between 2 and 20 Hz (Bensen et al., 2007). The one-minute NCFs were then stacked using the time-frequency domain phase-weighted stacking method (Schimmel & Gallart, 2007). The NCFs between channels were asymmetrical reflecting the direction of traffic noise. The group velocities were found using the frequency-time analysis method. The energy was concentrated between 5 and 15 Hz, which falls into the typical traffic noise frequency band. The resulting velocities were between 100 and 300 m/s for frequencies between 10 and 20 Hz, which are in the same range as described in the results for surface-wave dispersion obtained using an active source for the same site (Lancelle et al., 2015). The group velocity starts to decrease for frequencies greater than ~10 Hz, which was expected on the basis of a previous shear-wave velocity model (Steidl et al., 1996). Then, the phase velocity was calculated using the multichannel analysis of surface wave technique (MASW - Park et al., 1999) with 114 NCFs spaced one meter apart. The resulting dispersion curve between 5 and 15 Hz gave phase velocities that ranged from approximately 170 m/s at 15 Hz to 250 m/s at 5 Hz. These results are consistent with other results of active-source DAS and seismometer records obtained at the Garner Valley site (e.g., Stokoe et al. 2004). This analysis is

  7. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-11-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  8. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  9. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A; Carlson, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature. PMID:25427517

  10. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore » using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  11. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z Daniel; Sun, Yannan; Martinez, Jayson J; Fu, Tao; McMichael, Geoffrey A; Carlson, Thomas J

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  12. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  13. BROADBAND DIGITAL GEOPHYSICAL TELEMETRY SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seeley, Robert L.; Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    1984-01-01

    A system has been developed to simultaneously sample and transmit digital data from five remote geophysical data receiver stations to a control station that processes, displays, and stores the data. A microprocessor in each remote station receives commands from the control station over a single telemetry channel.

  14. Report on the acoustic network arctic deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark; Herold, David; Catipovic, Josko

    1995-03-01

    This report describes the March 1994 Arctic deployment undertaken by the Acoustic Telemetry Group of WHOI. The deployment was a part of the 1994 Sea Ice Mechanics Initiative (SIMI) project and was based at the west SIMI camp, approximately 150 Nautical miles north-east of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. The goal of the deployment was to install a network of six high-performance acoustic modems, developed at WHOI, and to obtain a data set demonstrating the communications and acoustic monitoring capabilities of the network. The six modems in the network were deployed over an area of 22 square km and communicated via radio Ethernet with a computer at the SIMI camp. Each modem had a global positioning system, an acoustic source and an 8 element receiving array. The network was operated in a round-robin broadcast mode (i.e., each modern in turn transmitted a packet of data while the others received). The transmissions were 5000 bits-per-second QPSK with a 15kHz carrier. An extensive data set including raw acoustic data, source localization information, and modem position was collected during the deployment. An additional function of the acoustic network was to communicate with, and track, the Odyssey, an autonomous underwater vehicle operated by the Mff group at the SIMI camp. To this end, the Odyssey was equipped with a Datasonics modem configured for periodic QPSK transmission to the network. A data set was obtained from which both the up-link communication and localization capabilities of the network can be determined.

  15. Evaluating the Feasibility of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging of the Uterine Cervix With an Intracavity Array: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Feltovich, Helen; Homyk, Andrew D.; Carlson, Lindsey C.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The uterine cervix softens, shortens, and dilates throughout pregnancy in response to progressive disorganization of its layered collagen microstructure. This process is an essential part of normal pregnancy, but premature changes are associated with preterm birth. Clinically, there are no reliable noninvasive methods to objectively measure cervical softening or assess cervical microstructure. The goal of these preliminary studies was to evaluate the feasibility of using an intracavity ultrasound array to generate acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) excitations in the uterine cervix through simulation, and to optimize the acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation for shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) of the tissue stiffness. The cervix is a unique soft tissue target for SWEI because it has significantly greater acoustic attenuation (α = 1.3 to 2.0 dB·cm−1·MHz−1) than other soft tissues, and the pathology being studied tends to lead to an increase in tissue compliance, with healthy cervix being relatively stiff compared with other soft tissues (E ≈ 25 kPa). Additionally, the cervix can only be accessed in vivo using a transvaginal or catheter-based array, which places additional constraints on the excitation focal characteristics that can be used during SWEI. Finite element method (FEM) models of SWEI show that larger-aperture, catheter-based arrays can utilize excitation frequencies up to 7 MHz to generate adequate focal gain up to focal depths 10 to 15 mm deep, with higher frequencies suffering from excessive amounts of near-field acoustic attenuation. Using full-aperture excitations can yield ~40% increases in ARFI-induced displacements, but also restricts the depth of field of the excitation to ~0.5 mm, compared with 2 to 6 mm, which limits the range that can be used for shear wave characterization of the tissue. The center-frequency content of the shear wave particle velocity profiles ranges from 1.5 to 2.5 kHz, depending on the focal

  16. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision.

    PubMed

    Goavec-Mérou, G; Chrétien, N; Friedt, J-M; Sandoz, P; Martin, G; Lenczner, M; Ballandras, S

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates. PMID:24517814

  17. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: Demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goavec-Mérou, G.; Chrétien, N.; Friedt, J.-M.; Sandoz, P.; Martin, G.; Lenczner, M.; Ballandras, S.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates.

  18. Effects of fine metal oxide particle dopant on the acoustic properties of silicone rubber lens for medical array probe.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Yasuharu; Yamashita, Yohachi; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2007-08-01

    The effects of fine metal oxide particles, particularly those of high-density elements (7.7 to 9.7 x 10(3) kg/m3), on the acoustic properties of silicone rubber have been investigated in order to develop an acoustic lens with a low acoustic attenuation. Silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder having nanoparticle size of 16 nm showed a lower acoustic attenuation than silicone rubber doped with powders of CeO2, Bi2O3, Lu2O3 and HfO2. The silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder showed a sound speed of 0.88 km/s, an acoustic impedance of 1.35 x 10(6) kg/m2s, an acoustic attenuation of 0.93 dB/mmMHz, and a Shore A hardness of 55 at 37 degrees C. Although typical silicone rubber doped with SiO2 (2.6 x 10(3) kg/m3) shows a sound speed of about 1.00 km/s, heavy metal oxide particles decreased the sound velocities to lower than 0.93 km/s. Therefore, an acoustic lens of silicone rubber doped with Yb2O3 powder provides increased sensitivity because it realizes a thinner acoustic lens than is conventionally used due to its low sound speed. Moreover, it has an advantage in that a focus point is not changed when the acoustic lens is pressed to a human body due to its reasonable hardness.

  19. Bidirectional Telemetry Controller for Neuroprosthetic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishnu; McCreery, Douglas B.; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We present versatile multifunctional programmable controller with bidirectional data telemetry, implemented using existing commercial microchips and standard Bluetooth protocol, which adds convenience, reliability, and ease-of-use to neuroprosthetic devices. Controller, weighing 190 g, is placed on animal's back and provides bidirectional sustained telemetry rate of 500 kb/s, allowing real-time control of stimulation parameters and viewing of acquired data. In continuously-active state, controller consumes ∼420 mW and operates without recharge for 8 h. It features independent 16-channel current-controlled stimulation, allowing current steering; customizable stimulus current waveforms; recording of stimulus voltage waveforms and evoked neuronal responses with stimulus artifact blanking circuitry. Flexibility, scalability, cost-efficiency, and a user-friendly computer interface of this device allow use in animal testing for variety of neuroprosthetic applications. Initial testing of the controller has been done in a feline model of brainstem auditory prosthesis. In this model, the electrical stimulation is applied to the array of microelectrodes implanted in the ventral cochlear nucleus, while the evoked neuronal activity was recorded with the electrode implanted in the contralateral inferior colliculus. Stimulus voltage waveforms to monitor the access impedance of the electrodes were acquired at the rate of 312 kilosamples/s. Evoked neuronal activity in the inferior colliculus was recorded after the blanking (transient silencing) of the recording amplifier during the stimulus pulse, allowing the detection of neuronal responses within 100 μs after the end of the stimulus pulse applied in the cochlear nucleus. PMID:19933010

  20. The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort (TAME) is an agile enterprising demonstration sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The project experimented with new approaches to product realization and assessed their impacts on performance, cost, flow time, and agility. The purpose of the project was to design the electrical and mechanical features of an integrated telemetry processor, establish the manufacturing processes, and produce an initial production lot of two to six units. This paper outlines the major methodologies utilized by the TAME, describes the accomplishments that can be attributed to each methodology, and finally, examines the lessons learned and explores the opportunities for improvement associated with the overall effort. The areas for improvement are discussed relative to an ideal vision of the future for agile enterprises. By the end of the experiment, the TAME reduced production flow time by approximately 50% and life cycle cost by more than 30%. Product performance was improved compared with conventional DOE production approaches.

  1. A coded tracking telemetry system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howey, P.W.; Seegar, W.S.; Fuller, M.R.; Titus, K.

    1989-01-01

    We describe the general characteristics of an automated radio telemetry system designed to operate for prolonged periods on a single frequency. Each transmitter sends a unique coded signal to a receiving system that encodes and records only the appropriater, pre-programmed codes. A record of the time of each reception is stored on diskettes in a micro-computer. This system enables continuous monitoring of infrequent signals (e.g. one per minute or one per hour), thus extending operation life or allowing size reduction of the transmitter, compared to conventional wildlife telemetry. Furthermore, when using unique codes transmitted on a single frequency, biologists can monitor many individuals without exceeding the radio frequency allocations for wildlife.

  2. Astronomy. Laser telemetry from space.

    PubMed

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Harwit, Alex; Harwit, Martin

    2002-07-26

    Space missions currently on the drawing boards are expected to gather data at rates exceeding the transmission capabilities of today's telemetry systems by many orders of magnitude. Even on current missions, onboard data compression techniques are being implemented to compensate for lack of transmission speed. But while data compression can minimize the loss of data, it is no substitute for transmitting all of the data through a faster communications link. The transmission problem will soon reach crisis proportions and will affect astronomical, Earth resources, geophysical, meteorological, planetary and other space science missions. To overcome this communications bottleneck, the authors advocate the implementation of telemetry systems based on near-infrared laser transmission techniques. The fiber-optics communications industry has developed most of the basic components required for signal transmission in this wavelength band, which should make such a system affordable on scales relevant to the cost of anticipated space science missions.

  3. Acoustic-speed correction of photoacoustic tomography by ultrasonic computed tomography based on optical excitation of elements of a full-ring transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Huang, Chao; Maslov, Konstantin; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a hybrid technique that combines optical excitation and ultrasonic detection to provide high resolution images in deep tissues. In the image reconstruction, a constant speed of sound (SOS) is normally assumed. This assumption, however, is often not strictly satisfied in deep tissue imaging, due to acoustic heterogeneities within the object and between the object and coupling medium. If these heterogeneities are not accounted for, they will cause distortions and artifacts in the reconstructed images. In this paper, we incorporated ultrasonic computed tomography (USCT), which measures the SOS distribution within the object, into our full-ring array PACT system. Without the need for ultrasonic transmitting electronics, USCT was performed using the same laser beam as for PACT measurement. By scanning the laser beam on the array surface, we can sequentially fire different elements. As a first demonstration of the system, we studied the effect of acoustic heterogeneities on photoacoustic vascular imaging. We verified that constant SOS is a reasonable approximation when the SOS variation is small. When the variation is large, distortion will be observed in the periphery of the object, especially in the tangential direction.

  4. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  5. Preliminary neural response telemetry results.

    PubMed

    Cullington, H

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes the neural response telemetry (NRT) results obtained from the first 30 patients tested at this centre. One hundred per cent of patients tested intra-operatively had NRT responses on at least one electrode; this compared to 82.4% of patients tested post-operatively. Reasonable correlations existed between post-operative NRT thresholds and psychophysical threshold and comfort levels, although there was too much variability for the data to be used to set these parameters directly. Post-operative NRT thresholds were always at levels audible to patients.

  6. Radio telemetry equipment and applications for carnivores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Mark R.; Fuller, Todd K.; Boitani, Luigi; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Radio-telemetry was not included in the first comprehensive manual of wildlife research techniques (Mosby 1960) because the first published papers were about physiological wildlife telemetry (LeMunyan et al. 1959) and because research using telemetry in field ecology was just being initiated (Marshall et al. 1962; Cochran and Lord 1963). Among the first uses of telemetry to study wildlife, however, was a study of carnivores (Craighead et al. 1963), and telemetry has become a common method for studying numerous topics of carnivore biology. Our goals for this chapter are to provide basic information about radio-telemetry equipment and procedures. Although we provide many references to studies using telemetry equipment and methods, we recommend Kenward's (2001) comprehensive book, A manual of wildlife radio tagging for persons who are unfamiliar with radio-telemetry, Fuller et al. (2005), and Tomkiewicz et al. (2010). Compendia of uses of radio-telemetry in animal research appear regularly as chapters in manuals (Cochran 1980; Samuel and Fuller 1994), in books about equipment, field procedures, study design, and applications (Amlaner and Macdonald 1980; Anderka 1987; Amlaner 1989; White and Garrott 1990; Priede and Swift 1992; Kenward 2001; Millspaugh and Marzluff 2001; Mech and Barber 2002), and in reviews highlighting new developments (Cooke et al. 2004; Rutz and Hays 2009; Cagnacci et al. 2010). Some animal telemetry products and techniques have remained almost unchanged for years, but new technologies and approaches emerge and replace previously available equipment at an increasing pace. Here, we emphasize recent studies for which telemetry was used with carnivores.

  7. EATS and APATS telemetry antenna performance comparison in a ballistic missile terminal area support role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. F.; Blackwell, E. G.

    1981-06-01

    A comparative analysis was made of the performance of the U.S. Navy EATS multibeam phased array telemetry antenna, currently under development by Pacific Missile Test Center and the planned APATS antenna intended for use by the U.S. Air Force ARIA Fleet. The comparison was made in the context of a ballistic missile terminal area test support role for the collection of telemetry data from MK-4 and MK-12 instrumented RVs during reentry. In this comparison, two levels of upgrade were examined for the EATS antenna, one as a minimum required upgrade (dual-polarization), and the other as an upgrade with dual-polarization and increased elevation scan angle commensurate with the APATS specification. Study findings indicate that the second EATS upgrade option results in telemetry collection performance essentially equal to that of the APATS. RV telemetry blackout (SNR < 13 dB) for the EATS upgraded antenna lasted slightly longer than the blackout of the APATS antenna. Blackout is relatively unimportant in the MK-4 application, but may be more consequential in the MK-12 application. The minimum EATS antenna upgrade (dual-polarization) does not perform well for ballistic missile telemetry support, so that the full upgrade is indicated for the EATS telemetry antenna in this mission role.

  8. Designing the Optical Interface of a Transcutaneous Optical Telemetry Link

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Kilgore, Kevin L.; Peckham, P. Hunter

    2009-01-01

    Optical telemetry has long been an option for transcutaneous data transfer and has been used in various types of implanted systems. This telemetry modality and the efficiency of these optical links are becoming ever more important as higher bandwidth sources such as cortical recording arrays are being implemented in implanted systems. The design of the transmitter-skin-receiver interface (the “optical interface”) is paramount to the operation of a transcutaneous optical telemetry link. This interface functions to achieve sufficient receiver signal power for data communication. This paper describes a mathematical analysis and supporting data that quantitatively describes the relationship between the primary interface design parameters. These parameters include the thickness of the skin through which the light is transmitted, the size of the integration area of the optics, the degree of transmitter-receiver misalignment, the efficiency of the optics system, and the emitter power. The particular combination of these parameters chosen for the hardware device will determine the receiver signal power and, therefore, the data quality for the link. This paper demonstrates some of the tradeoffs involved in the selection of these design parameters and provides suggestions for link design. This analysis may also be useful for transcutaneous optical powering systems. PMID:18390327

  9. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr.

    2002-10-01

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration.

  10. A three channel telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesho, Jeffery C.; Eaton, Harry A. C.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel telemetry system intended for biomedical applications is described. The transmitter is implemented in a single chip using a 2 micron BiCMOS processes. The operation of the system and the test results from the latest chip are discussed. One channel is always dedicated to temperature measurement while the other two channels are generic. The generic channels carry information from transducers that are interfaced to the system through on-chip general purpose operational amplifiers. The generic channels have different bandwidths: one from dc to 250 Hz and the other from dc to 1300 Hz. Each generic channel modulates a current controlled oscillator to produce a frequency modulated signal. The two frequency modulated signals are summed and used to amplitude modulate the temperature signal which acts as a carrier. A near-field inductive link telemeters the combined signals over a short distance. The chip operates on a supply voltage anywhere from 2.5 to 3.6 Volts and draws less than 1 mA when transmitting a signal. The chip can be incorporated into ingestible, implantable and other configurations. The device can free the patient from tethered data collection systems and reduces the possibility of infection from subcutaneous leads. Data telemetry can increase patient comfort leading to a greater acceptance of monitoring.

  11. Noncausal telemetry data recovery techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, H.; Lee, R.; Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1995-01-01

    Cost efficiency is becoming a major driver in future space missions. Because of the constraints on total cost, including design, implementation, and operation, future spacecraft are limited in terms of their size power and complexity. Consequently, it is expected that future missions will operate on marginal space-to-ground communication links that, in turn, can pose an additional risk on the successful scientific data return of these missions. For low data-rate and low downlink-margin missions, the buffering of the telemetry signal for further signal processing to improve data return is a possible strategy; it has been adopted for the Galileo S-band mission. This article describes techniques used for postprocessing of buffered telemetry signal segments (called gaps) to recover data lost during acquisition and resynchronization. Two methods, one for a closed-loop and the other one for an open-loop configuration, are discussed in this article. Both of them can be used in either forward or backward processing of signal segments, depending on where a gap is specifically situated in a pass.

  12. Effects of Ytterbium Oxide Nanopowder Particle Size on the Acoustic Properties of Silicone Rubber Lens for Medical Echo Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohachi; Yamashita; Hosono, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Noriko; Itsumi, Kazuhiro

    2008-05-01

    The effects of Yb2O3 powder particle size, namely, 2000, 16, and 8 nm, on the physical and acoustic properties of a high-temperature-vulcanization (HTV) silicone (Q) rubber have been investigated in order to develop an acoustic lens material with a low sound velocity (c) and acoustic attenuation coefficient (α). The Yb2O3-doped HTV Q rubber with the large particle size of 2000 nm showed a density (ρ) of 1.6×103 kg/m3, with c = 828 m/s, characteristic acoustic impedance (Z) = 1.32×106 kg·m-2·s-1, α= 1.32 dB·mm-1·MHz-1, and an α-figure of merit (FOM) (α×c) of 1090 at 5 MHz at 37 °C. For the Yb2O3-doped Q rubber with the small particle size of 8 nm, ρ= 1.57×103 kg/m3, c = 864 m/s, Z = 1.36×106 kg·m-2·s-1, α= 0.68 dB·mm-1·MHz-1, and α-FOM = 590. The 16 nm Yb2O3-doped Q rubber had intermediate values of α= 0.88 dB·mm-1·MHz-1 and α-FOM = 760. These results show that there is a clear dopant particle size dependence on the acoustic properties of Yb2O3-doped HTV Q rubbers. The 8-nm-doped HTV Q rubber also showed an excellent mechanical properties for practical application. Microstructure observation revealed that the low-α rubber shows a uniform Yb2O3 nanopowder distribution in the HTV Q rubber matrix.

  13. Impedance-matched drilling telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    2008-04-22

    A downhole telemetry system that uses inductance or capacitance as a mode through which signal is communicated across joints between assembled lengths of pipe wherein efficiency of signal propagation through a drill string, for example, over multiple successive pipe segments is enhanced through matching impedances associated with the various telemetry system components.

  14. System for Configuring Modular Telemetry Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system for configuring telemetry transponder cards uses a database of error checking protocol data structures, each containing data to implement at least one CCSDS protocol algorithm. Using a user interface, a user selects at least one telemetry specific error checking protocol from the database. A compiler configures an FPGA with the data from the data structures to implement the error checking protocol.

  15. Making tough decisions about telemetry monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pelczarski, K M; Barbell, A S

    1993-11-01

    Telemetry monitoring, when used effectively and appropriately, is beneficial and plays an important role in enabling primary caregivers to provide optimum care for their patients. However, it is frequently used ineffectively and inappropriately, which can be extremely costly for hospitals. In this era of health care reform, careful review of this technology and analysis of telemetry utilization can avoid unnecessary expenditures or abuse.

  16. The design of LBT's telemetry source registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgin, Tony; Cushing, Norman

    2010-07-01

    In the current report, we describe the structure of the telemetry logging system of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and its approach to telemeter registration. The telemetry logging system, called Telemetry, has three functions. It will provide system data to LBT Observatory (LBTO) personnel in order to facilitate engineering activities such as commissioning, failure diagnosis and system repair. In order to detect failures as soon as possible after they occur, telemetry will allow for live monitoring of the functional status of key telescope systems. Finally, in order to help personnel understand how the LBT operating characteristics evolve with time, telemetry will provide access to historical telescope system data. Given this range of functions, a key requirement of Telemetry is that it must easily adapt to new sources of data. To minimize the changes required to Telemetry, it has no pre-existing knowledge about the structure of the data it will collect. Instead, it engages in a telemeter registration process, in which the data source must describe its own structure. This registration process requires no external data files to be maintained since the description is built up by a sequence of function calls to a C++ library. So far, this strategy has proven successful, as only minor modifications have been made to accommodate the nearly 400 sources of data introduced to the system in the past year. The current report describes the design of the LBT telemetry system and its source registration process.

  17. Telemetry Simulation Assembly Implementation in the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberda, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The telemetry simulation was implemented as part of the MARK IV network implementation project. The telemetry simulation assembly (TSA) is replacing the Simulation Conversion Assembly (SCA) throughout the DSN. The development of the TSA is discussed, and the design is described to the block diagram level.

  18. Tracking the Galileo spacecraft with the DSCC Galileo Telemetry prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T. T.; Shambayati, S.; Hardi, D. E.; Finley, S. G.

    1994-01-01

    On day of the year 062, 1994, a prototype of the Deep Space Communications Complex Galileo Telemetry subsystem successfully tracked and processed signals from the Galileo spacecraft, under fully suppressed-carrier modulation. The demonstration took place at Goldstone, employing the 70-m antenna and the 34-m high-efficiency antenna. This article presents the findings from that demonstration. Specific issues are the system performance in terms of signal-to-noise (SNR) degradation and the arraying gain. Validation of the test results is via symbol-error-rate measurement and the standard symbol SNR. The analysis is also extended to include characterization of the signal received from Galileo.

  19. Real time telemetry and data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The generation of telemetry and data compression by the flight program was verified. The adequacy of flight program telemetry control and timing is proven by the analysis of simulation laboratory runs of past programs through the use of telemetry. The telemetry data are correctly issued using specific tags called process input/output (P10) tags. Verification is accomplished by ensuring that a specific P10 tag and mode register setting identifies the correct parameter and that the data are properly scaled for subsequent ground station reduction. It was checked that the LVDC telemetry correctly adheres to the general requirements specified by the EDD. Data compression specifications are verified using compressed data from nominal flight simulations and from a series of perturbations designed to test data table overflows, data dump rates, and compression of data for occurrence events.

  20. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  1. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  2. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  3. The Biolink Implantable Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betancourt-Zamora, Rafael J.

    1999-01-01

    Most biotelemetry applications deal with the moderated data rates of biological signals. Few people have studied the problem of transcutaneous data transmission at the rates required by NASA's Life Sciences-Advanced BioTelemetry System (LS-ABTS). Implanted telemetry eliminate the problems associated with wire breaking the skin, and permits experiments with awake and unrestrained subjects. Our goal is to build a low-power 174-216MHz Radio Frequency (RF) transmitter suitable for short range biosensor and implantable use. The BioLink Implantable Telemetry System (BITS) is composed of three major units: an Analog Data Module (ADM), a Telemetry Transmitter Module (TTM), and a Command Receiver Module (CRM). BioLink incorporates novel low-power techniques to implement a monolithic digital RF transmitter operating at 100kbps, using quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation in the 174-216MHz ISM band. As the ADM will be specific for each application, we focused on solving the problems associated with a monolithic implementation of the TTM and CRM, and this is the emphasis of this report. A system architecture based on a Frequency-Locked Loop (FLL) Frequency Synthesizer is presented, and a novel differential frequency that eliminates the need for a frequency divider is also shown. A self sizing phase modulation scheme suitable for low power implementation was also developed. A full system-level simulation of the FLL was performed and loop filter parameters were determined. The implantable antenna has been designed, simulated and constructed. An implant package compatible with the ABTS requirements is also being proposed. Extensive work performed at 200MHz in 0.5um complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) showed the feasibility of integrating the RF transmitter circuits in a single chip. The Hajimiri phase noise model was used to optimize the Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) for minimum power consumption. Two test chips were fabricated in a 0.5pm, 3V CMOS

  4. Downhole tool adapted for telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2010-12-14

    A cycleable downhole tool such as a Jar, a hydraulic hammer, and a shock absorber adapted for telemetry. This invention applies to other tools where the active components of the tool are displaced when the tool is rotationally or translationally cycled. The invention consists of inductive or contact transmission rings that are connected by an extensible conductor. The extensible conductor permits the transmission of the signal before, after, and during the cycling of the tool. The signal may be continuous or intermittent during cycling. The invention also applies to downhole tools that do not cycle, but in operation are under such stress that an extensible conductor is beneficial. The extensible conductor may also consist of an extensible portion and a fixed portion. The extensible conductor also features clamps that maintain the conductor under stresses greater than that seen by the tool, and seals that are capable of protecting against downhole pressure and contamination.

  5. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-08-01

    Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

  6. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aileen

    The term infrasound describes atmospheric sound waves with frequencies below 20 Hz, while acoustics are classified within the audible range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasound and acoustic monitoring in the scientific community is hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and a limited number of studies on regional and short-range noise and source characterization. The JASON Report (2005) suggests the infrasound community focus on more broad-frequency, observational studies within a tactical distance of 10 km. In keeping with that recommendation, this paper presents a study of regional and short-range atmospheric acoustic and infrasonic noise characterization, at a desert site in West Texas, covering a broad frequency range of 0.2 to 100 Hz. To spatially sample the band, a large number of infrasound gauges was needed. A laboratory instrument analysis is presented of the set of low-cost infrasound sensors used in this study, manufactured by Inter-Mountain Laboratories (IML). Analysis includes spectra, transfer functions and coherences to assess the stability and range of the gauges, and complements additional instrument testing by Sandia National Laboratories. The IMLs documented here have been found reliably coherent from 0.1 to 7 Hz without instrument correction. Corrections were built using corresponding time series from the commercially available and more expensive Chaparral infrasound gauge, so that the corrected IML outputs were able to closely mimic the Chaparral output. Arrays of gauges are needed for atmospheric sound signal processing. Our West Texas experiment consisted of a 1.5 km aperture, 23-gauge infrasound/acoustic array of IMLs, with a compact, 12 m diameter grid-array of rented IMLs at the center. To optimize signal recording, signal-to-noise ratio needs to be quantified with respect to both frequency band and coherence length. The higher-frequency grid array consisted of 25 microphones arranged in a five by five pattern with 3 meter spacing, without

  7. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aileen

    The term infrasound describes atmospheric sound waves with frequencies below 20 Hz, while acoustics are classified within the audible range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasound and acoustic monitoring in the scientific community is hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and a limited number of studies on regional and short-range noise and source characterization. The JASON Report (2005) suggests the infrasound community focus on more broad-frequency, observational studies within a tactical distance of 10 km. In keeping with that recommendation, this paper presents a study of regional and short-range atmospheric acoustic and infrasonic noise characterization, at a desert site in West Texas, covering a broad frequency range of 0.2 to 100 Hz. To spatially sample the band, a large number of infrasound gauges was needed. A laboratory instrument analysis is presented of the set of low-cost infrasound sensors used in this study, manufactured by Inter-Mountain Laboratories (IML). Analysis includes spectra, transfer functions and coherences to assess the stability and range of the gauges, and complements additional instrument testing by Sandia National Laboratories. The IMLs documented here have been found reliably coherent from 0.1 to 7 Hz without instrument correction. Corrections were built using corresponding time series from the commercially available and more expensive Chaparral infrasound gauge, so that the corrected IML outputs were able to closely mimic the Chaparral output. Arrays of gauges are needed for atmospheric sound signal processing. Our West Texas experiment consisted of a 1.5 km aperture, 23-gauge infrasound/acoustic array of IMLs, with a compact, 12 m diameter grid-array of rented IMLs at the center. To optimize signal recording, signal-to-noise ratio needs to be quantified with respect to both frequency band and coherence length. The higher-frequency grid array consisted of 25 microphones arranged in a five by five pattern with 3 meter spacing, without

  8. Evolution of the LBT Telemetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, K.; Biddick, C.; De La Peña, M. D.; Summers, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Telescope Control System (TCS) records about 10GB of telemetry data per night. Additionally, the vibration monitoring system records about 9GB of telemetry data per night. Through 2013, we have amassed over 6TB of Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) files and almost 9TB in a MySQL database of TCS and vibration data. The LBT telemetry system, in its third major revision since 2004, provides the mechanism to capture and store this data. The telemetry system has evolved from a simple HDF file system with MySQL stream definitions within the TCS, to a separate system using a MySQL database system for the definitions and data, and finally to no database use at all, using HDF5 files.

  9. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  10. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  11. An inexpensive pressure telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Barber, B J; Quillen, E W; Cowley, A W

    1980-10-01

    An inexpensive telemetry system using transducers and recorders commonly available, i.e., Statham and Grass, is described. The direct-current signal of a Statham transducer is applied to a voltage-controlled oscillator, thereby frequency encoding the pressure sensed by the transducer. This encoded signal frequency modulates a Colpitts oscillator, which acts as a radio-frequency oscillator-transmitter in the 88- to 108-MHz band. This transmitter and transducer, along with a rechargeable NiCd battery pack (total wt 0.5 kg), are mounted in a canvas jacket and worn by a dog previously prepared with a chronic indwelling arterial catheter. With a fully charged battery pack, a signal can be transmitted up to 250 ft for 50 h. A frequency-modulation automotive receiver, powered by and interfaced with a Grass 7B recorder, receives the signal and drives a tachometer circuit that reconverts the audio-frequency signal to a voltage proportional to pressure. This voltage is then applied to the driver amplifier of the Grass to produce a charted record. This system introduces no distortion as seen by comparison of direct and telemetered signals and is drift free for intervals exceeding 24 h. PMID:7425148

  12. Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Li, Xiaowen; Li, Zengyuan; Ma, Mingguo; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Qiang; Che, Tao; Chen, Erxue; Yan, Guangjian; Hu, Zeyong; Zhang, Lixin; Chu, Rongzhong; Su, Peixi; Liu, Qinhuo; Liu, Shaomin; Wang, Jindi; Niu, Zheng; Chen, Yan; Jin, Rui; Wang, Weizhen; Ran, Youhua; Xin, Xiaozhou; Ren, Huazhong

    2009-11-01

    The Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (WATER) is a simultaneous airborne, satellite-borne, and ground-based remote sensing experiment aiming to improve the observability, understanding, and predictability of hydrological and related ecological processes at a catchment scale. WATER consists of the cold region, forest, and arid region hydrological experiments as well as a hydrometeorology experiment and took place in the Heihe River Basin, a typical inland river basin in the northwest of China. The field campaigns have been completed, with an intensive observation period lasting from 7 March to 12 April, from 15 May to 22 July, and from 23 August to 5 September 2008: in total, 120 days. Twenty-five airborne missions were flown. Airborne sensors including microwave radiometers at L, K, and Ka bands, imaging spectrometer, thermal imager, CCD, and lidar were used. Various satellite data were collected. Ground measurements were carried out at four scales, that is, key experimental area, foci experimental area, experiment site, and elementary sampling plot, using ground-based remote sensing instruments, densified network of automatic meteorological stations, flux towers, and hydrological stations. On the basis of these measurements, the remote sensing retrieval models and algorithms of water cycle variables are to be developed or improved, and a catchment-scale land/hydrological data assimilation system is being developed. This paper reviews the background, scientific objectives, experiment design, filed campaign implementation, and current status of WATER. The analysis of the data will continue over the next 2 years, and limited revisits to the field are anticipated.

  13. Label-free and high-sensitive detection of human breast cancer cells by aptamer-based leaky surface acoustic wave biosensor array.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai; Pi, Yan; Lu, Weiping; Wang, Feng; Pan, Feng; Li, Fake; Jia, Shuangrong; Shi, Jianfeng; Deng, Shaoli; Chen, Ming

    2014-10-15

    A label-free and high-sensitive sensing technology for tumor cell recognition and detection was developed based on a novel 2 × 3 model of leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) aptasensor array. In this methodology, every resonator crystal unit of the LSAW aptasensor array had an individual oscillator circuit to work without mutual interference, and could oscillate independently with the phase shift stability of ± 0.15° in air phase and ± 0.3° in liquid phase. The aptamer was firstly assembled to the gold electrode surface of 100 MHz LiTaO3 piezoelectric crystal, which could effectively captured target cells (MCF-7 cells) based on the specific interaction between aptamer and the overexpression of MUC1 protein on tumor cell surface. The aptamer-cell complexes increased the mass loading of LSAW aptasensor and led to phase shifts of LSAW. The plot of phase shift against the logarithm of concentration of MCF-7 cells was linear over the range from 1 × 10(2) cells mL(-1) to 1 × 10(7) cells mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.994. The detection limit as low as 32 cells mL(-1) was achieved for MCF-7 cells. The LSAW aptasensor also exhibited excellent specificity and stability. In addition, this aptasensor could be regenerated for ten times without irreversible loss of activity. Therefore, the LSAW aptasensor may offer a promising approach for tumor cell detection and have great potential in clinical applications. PMID:24836014

  14. Review of research methodologies for tigers: telemetry.

    PubMed

    Miller, Clayton S; Hebblewhite, Mark; Goodrich, John M; Miquelle, Dale G

    2010-12-01

    Over the past half century, wildlife research has relied on technological advances to gain additional insight into the secretive lives of animals. This revolution started in the 1960s with the development of radio telemetry and continues today with the use of Global Positioning System (GPS)-based research techniques. In the present paper we review the history of radio telemetry from its origins with grizzly bears in Yellowstone to its early applications in tiger research and conservation in Asia. We address the different types of data that are available using radio telemetry as opposed to using other research techniques, such as behavioral observations, camera trapping, DNA analysis and scat analysis. In the late 1990s, the rapid development of GPS collar technology revolutionized wildlife research. This new technology has enabled researchers to dramatically improve their ability to gather data on animal movements and ecology. Despite the ecological and conservation benefits of radio telemetry, there have been few telemetry studies of tigers in the wild, and most have been on the Bengal or Amur subspecies. We close with an assessment of the current tiger conservation efforts using GPS technology and discuss how this new information can help to preserve tigers for future generations.

  15. Review of research methodologies for tigers: telemetry.

    PubMed

    Miller, Clayton S; Hebblewhite, Mark; Goodrich, John M; Miquelle, Dale G

    2010-12-01

    Over the past half century, wildlife research has relied on technological advances to gain additional insight into the secretive lives of animals. This revolution started in the 1960s with the development of radio telemetry and continues today with the use of Global Positioning System (GPS)-based research techniques. In the present paper we review the history of radio telemetry from its origins with grizzly bears in Yellowstone to its early applications in tiger research and conservation in Asia. We address the different types of data that are available using radio telemetry as opposed to using other research techniques, such as behavioral observations, camera trapping, DNA analysis and scat analysis. In the late 1990s, the rapid development of GPS collar technology revolutionized wildlife research. This new technology has enabled researchers to dramatically improve their ability to gather data on animal movements and ecology. Despite the ecological and conservation benefits of radio telemetry, there have been few telemetry studies of tigers in the wild, and most have been on the Bengal or Amur subspecies. We close with an assessment of the current tiger conservation efforts using GPS technology and discuss how this new information can help to preserve tigers for future generations. PMID:21392355

  16. Design and Testing of Space Telemetry SCA Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Handler, Louis M.; Quinn, Todd M.

    2006-01-01

    A Software Communications Architecture (SCA) Waveform for space telemetry is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The space telemetry waveform is implemented in a laboratory testbed consisting of general purpose processors, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), and digital-to-analog converters (DACs). The radio hardware is integrated with an SCA Core Framework and other software development tools. The waveform design is described from both the bottom-up signal processing and top-down software component perspectives. Simulations and model-based design techniques used for signal processing subsystems are presented. Testing with legacy hardware-based modems verifies proper design implementation and dynamic waveform operations. The waveform development is part of an effort by NASA to define an open architecture for space based reconfigurable transceivers. Use of the SCA as a reference has increased understanding of software defined radio architectures. However, since space requirements put a premium on size, mass, and power, the SCA may be impractical for today s space ready technology. Specific requirements for an SCA waveform and other lessons learned from this development are discussed.

  17. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  18. High-Performance Wireless Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griebeler, Elmer; Nawash, Nuha; Buckley, James

    2011-01-01

    Prior technology for machinery data acquisition used slip rings, FM radio communication, or non-real-time digital communication. Slip rings are often noisy, require much space that may not be available, and require access to the shaft, which may not be possible. FM radio is not accurate or stable, and is limited in the number of channels, often with channel crosstalk, and intermittent as the shaft rotates. Non-real-time digital communication is very popular, but complex, with long development time, and objections from users who need continuous waveforms from many channels. This innovation extends the amount of information conveyed from a rotating machine to a data acquisition system while keeping the development time short and keeping the rotating electronics simple, compact, stable, and rugged. The data are all real time. The product of the number of channels, times the bit resolution, times the update rate, gives a data rate higher than available by older methods. The telemetry system consists of a data-receiving rack that supplies magnetically coupled power to a rotating instrument amplifier ring in the machine being monitored. The ring digitizes the data and magnetically couples the data back to the rack, where it is made available. The transformer is generally a ring positioned around the axis of rotation with one side of the transformer free to rotate and the other side held stationary. The windings are laid in the ring; this gives the data immunity to any rotation that may occur. A medium-frequency sine-wave power source in a rack supplies power through a cable to a rotating ring transformer that passes the power on to a rotating set of electronics. The electronics power a set of up to 40 sensors and provides instrument amplifiers for the sensors. The outputs from the amplifiers are filtered and multiplexed into a serial ADC. The output from the ADC is connected to another rotating ring transformer that conveys the serial data from the rotating section to

  19. New Jersey Tide Telemetry System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    Each summer the population of the barrier-island communities of New Jersey increases by tens of thousands. When a coastal storm threatens these communities, the limited number of bridges and causeways that connect the islands with the mainland become overcrowded, making evacuations from the barrier islands to the mainland difficult. Timely evacuation depends on well-defined emergency evacuation plans used in conjunction with accurate flood forecasting and up to the minute (real-time) tide-level information. The 'Great Nor'easter' storm that struck the coastal areas of New Jersey on December 11, 1992, caused about $270 million in insured damages to public and private property (Dorr and others, 1995). Most of the damage was due to tidal flooding and storm surge, which were especially severe along the back bay areas. Comprehensive and reliable tide-level and meteorological data for the back bays was needed to make accurate flood forecasts. Collection of tidal data for the ocean and large bays was adequately covered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Ocean Service (NOAA's NOS), but in New Jersey little to no data are available for the back-bay areas. The back bays behave quite differently than the ocean as a result of the complex interaction between the winds and the geometry of the inlets and bays. A slow moving Nor'easter can keep tide levels in back bays several feet higher than the ocean tide by not allowing tides to recede, resulting in flooding of bridges and causeways that link the barrier islands to the mainland. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT), designed and installed the New Jersey Tide Telemetry System (NJTTS) with assistance from NOAA's NOS in 1997. This system is part of a statewide network of tide gages, weather stations, and stream gages that collect data in real time. The NJTTS supplies comprehensive, reliable real-time tide-level and meteorological

  20. The SAS-3 programmable telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Basic concept, system design and operation principles of the telemetry system developed for the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) are analyzed. The concept of programmable format selected for the SAS-3 represents an optical combination of the fixed format system of SAS-1 and SAS-2, and the adaptive format concept. The programmable telemetry system permits a very wide range of changes in the data sampling order by a ground control station, depending on the experimental requirements, so that the maximal amount of useful data can be returned from orbit. The programmable system also allows the data format to differ from one spacecraft to another without changing hardware. Attention is given to the command requirements and redundancy of the SAS-3 telemetry system.

  1. Single frequency RF powered ECG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.; Hynecek, J.; Homa, J.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a radio frequency magnetic field can be used to power implanted electronic circuitry for short range telemetry to replace batteries. A substantial reduction in implanted volume can be achieved by using only one RF tank circuit for receiving the RF power and transmitting the telemetered information. A single channel telemetry system of this type, using time sharing techniques, was developed and employed to transmit the ECG signal from Rhesus monkeys in primate chairs. The signal from the implant is received during the period when the RF powering radiation is interrupted. The ECG signal is carried by 20-microsec pulse position modulated pulses, referred to the trailing edge of the RF powering pulse. Satisfactory results have been obtained with this single frequency system. The concept and the design presented may be useful for short-range long-term implant telemetry systems.

  2. Telemetry Computer System at Wallops Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, H.; Strock, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the Telemetry Computer System in operation at NASA's Wallops Flight Center for real-time or off-line processing, storage, and display of telemetry data from rockets and aircraft. The system accepts one or two PCM data streams and one FM multiplex, converting each type of data into computer format and merging time-of-day information. A data compressor merges the active streams, and removes redundant data if desired. Dual minicomputers process data for display, while storing information on computer tape for further processing. Real-time displays are located at the station, at the rocket launch control center, and in the aircraft control tower. The system is set up and run by standard telemetry software under control of engineers and technicians. Expansion capability is built into the system to take care of possible future requirements.

  3. Miniature infrared data acquisition and telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. H.; Ward, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Miniature Infrared Data Acquisition and Telemetry (MIRDAT) Phase 1 study was performed to determine the technical and commercial feasibility of producing a miniaturized electro-optical telemetry system. This system acquires and transmits experimental data from aircraft scale models for realtime monitoring in wind tunnels. During the Phase 1 study, miniature prototype MIRDAT telemetry devices were constructed, successfully tested in the laboratory and delivered to the user for wind tunnel testing. A search was conducted for commercially available components and advanced hybrid techniques to further miniaturize the system during Phase 2 development. A design specification was generated from laboratory testing, user requirements and discussions with component manufacturers. Finally, a preliminary design of the proposed MIRDAT system was documented for Phase 2 development.

  4. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R E; Sebastian, T

    2013-12-18

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps.

  5. Comparison of ISS Power System Telemetry with Analytically Derived Data for Shadowed Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, H. James

    2002-01-01

    Accurate International Space Station (ISS) power prediction requires the quantification of solar array shadowing. Prior papers have discussed the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) ISS power system tool SPACE (System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation) and its integrated shadowing algorithms. On-orbit telemetry has become available that permits the correlation of theoretical shadowing predictions with actual data. This paper documents the comparison of a shadowing metric (total solar array current) as derived from SPACE predictions and on-orbit flight telemetry data for representative significant shadowing cases. Images from flight video recordings and the SPACE computer program graphical output are used to illustrate the comparison. The accuracy of the SPACE shadowing capability is demonstrated for the cases examined.

  6. Pioneer Venus multiprobe entry telemetry recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. B.; Ramos, R.

    1980-01-01

    The entry phase of the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe Mission involved data transmission over a two hour span. The criticality of recovering those two hours of data, coupled with the fact that there were no radio signals from the probes until their arrival at Venus, dictated unique telemetry recovery approaches on the ground. The result was double redundancy, use of spectrum analyzers to aid in rapid acquisition of the signals, and development of a technique for recovery of telemetry data without the use of real time coherent detection, which is normally employed for all other planetary missions.

  7. Using Onboard Telemetry for MAVEN Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Try; Trawny, Nikolas; Lee, Clifford

    2013-01-01

    Determination of the spacecraft state has been traditional done using radiometric tracking data before and after the atmosphere drag pass. This paper describes our approach and results to include onboard telemetry measurements in addition to radiometric observables to refine the reconstructed trajectory estimate for the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN). Uncertainties in the Mars atmosphere models, combined with non-continuous tracking degrade navigation accuracy, making MAVEN a key candidate for using onboard telemetry data to help complement its orbit determination process.

  8. Test Telemetry And Command System (TTACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, Alvin J.

    1994-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a multimission Test Telemetry and Command System (TTACS) which provides a multimission telemetry and command data system in a spacecraft test environment. TTACS reuses, in the spacecraft test environment, components of the same data system used for flight operations; no new software is developed for the spacecraft test environment. Additionally, the TTACS is transportable to any spacecraft test site, including the launch site. The TTACS is currently operational in the Galileo spacecraft testbed; it is also being provided to support the Cassini and Mars Surveyor Program projects. Minimal personnel data system training is required in the transition from pre-launch spacecraft test to post-launch flight operations since test personnel are already familiar with the data system's operation. Additionally, data system components, e.g. data display, can be reused to support spacecraft software development; and the same data system components will again be reused during the spacecraft integration and system test phases. TTACS usage also results in early availability of spacecraft data to data system development and, as a result, early data system development feedback to spacecraft system developers. The TTACS consists of a multimission spacecraft support equipment interface and components of the multimission telemetry and command software adapted for a specific project. The TTACS interfaces to the spacecraft, e.g., Command Data System (CDS), support equipment. The TTACS telemetry interface to the CDS support equipment performs serial (RS-422)-to-ethernet conversion at rates between 1 bps and 1 mbps, telemetry data blocking and header generation, guaranteed data transmission to the telemetry data system, and graphical downlink routing summary and control. The TTACS command interface to the CDS support equipment is nominally a command file transferred in non-real-time via ethernet. The CDS support equipment is responsible for

  9. Latency Reduction during Telemetry Transmission in Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Oweiss, Karim

    2005-01-01

    Advanced array processing techniques are becoming an indispensable requirement for integrating the rapid developments in wireless high-density electronic interfaces to the central nervous system with computational neuroscience. This work aims at describing a systems approach for latency reduction in telemetry-linked brain machine interfaces to enable real-time transmission of high volumes of neural data. We show that the tradeoff between transmission bit rate and processing complexity requires a smart processing mechanism to strip the redundancy and extract the useful information early in the data stream. The results presented demonstrate that space-time processing offers tremendous savings in communication costs compared to on-chip spike detection followed by off-chip classification. They also demonstrate that the performance asymptotically approaches that of on-chip spike detection and sorting. Detailed performance evaluation is described.

  10. Flexible network wireless transceiver and flexible network telemetry transceiver

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kenneth D.

    2008-08-05

    A transceiver for facilitating two-way wireless communication between a baseband application and other nodes in a wireless network, wherein the transceiver provides baseband communication networking and necessary configuration and control functions along with transmitter, receiver, and antenna functions to enable the wireless communication. More specifically, the transceiver provides a long-range wireless duplex communication node or channel between the baseband application, which is associated with a mobile or fixed space, air, water, or ground vehicle or other platform, and other nodes in the wireless network or grid. The transceiver broadly comprises a communication processor; a flexible telemetry transceiver including a receiver and a transmitter; a power conversion and regulation mechanism; a diplexer; and a phased array antenna system, wherein these various components and certain subcomponents thereof may be separately enclosed and distributable relative to the other components and subcomponents.

  11. 21 CFR 882.1855 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. 882... Electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry system consists of transmitters, receivers, and other components used for remotely monitoring or measuring...

  12. Monitoring fetal pH by telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A.; Donahoe, T.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Ryan, W.

    1980-01-01

    Telemetry unit has been developed for possible use in measuring scalp-tissue pH and heart rate of unborn infant. Unit radius data to receiver as much as 50 ft. away. Application exists during hours just prior to childbirth to give warning of problems that might require cesarean delivery.

  13. Distortion in AM-baseband telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Report presents very thorough and rigorous analysis of bandwidths and filters required to achieve a specific error. Included is an investigation of contribution to error of 3- and 6-pole Chebyschev, Butterworth, and Bessel filters. Also included is methodology for designing DSB/FM telemetry system to make optimum use of available bandwidth while reducing error toward its theoretical minimum.

  14. Instrumentation and telemetry at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a Department of Energy multiprogram engineering and scientific facility with unique design, development, and test capabilities arising from their work in nuclear weapons, energy resources, defense systems, nuclear safeguards, and specialized scientific endeavors. To support these programs, they have developed instrumentation and telemetry expertise not available elsewhere. This technology is applicable to projects in government and industry. Since the 1950s, they have applied our technical competence to meet difficult challenges with innovative solutions to data acquisition and telemetry problems. Sandia - with experience in fields as diverse as parachute design and plasma physics, geology and rocket guidance, human factors and high-speed aerodynamics, non-destructive testing and satellite communications - can use the power of synergism among our many disciplines to solve your complex problems of data and acquisition and analysis. SNL solves difficult data acquisition problems for extreme environments with expertise in advanced telemetry techniques, high data rate telemetry design, specialized electronics packaging, MIL-STD-1553 communications, instrumentation development, real-time data analysis, project management, specialized testers and data encryption.

  15. NESTA: NASA Engineering Shuttle Telemetry Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmel, Glenn S.; Davis, Steven R.; Leucht, Kurt W.; Rowe, Dan A.; Smith, Kevin E.; Boloni, Ladislau

    2005-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing Systems Branch at NASA Kennedy Space Center has developed and deployed an agent based tool to monitor the Space Shuttle's ground processing telemetry stream. The application, the NASA Engineering Shuttle Telemetry Agent, increases situational awareness for system and hardware engineers during ground processing of the Shuttle's subsystems. The agent provides autonomous monitoring of the telemetry stream and automatically alerts system engineers when predefined criteria have been met. Efficiency and safety are improved through increased automation. Sandia National Labs' Java Expert System Shell is employed as the rule engine. The shell's predicate logic lends itself well to capturing the heuristics and specifying the engineering rules of this spaceport domain. The declarative paradigm of the rule-based agent yields a highly modular and scalable design spanning multiple subsystems of the Shuttle. Several hundred monitoring rules have been written thus far with corresponding notifications sent to Shuttle engineers. This paper discusses the rule-based telemetry agent used for Space Shuttle ground processing and explains the problem domain, development of the agent software, benefits of AT technology, and deployment and sustaining engineering of the product.

  16. Eight-channel telephone telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Carr, T.

    1973-01-01

    Portable telemetry system uses conventional telephone link which eliminates mailing or messenger service between physician and analyst. Transmitter is used by physician; receiver is used by analyst. Each unit is inductively coupled to its respective telephone set, transmitter converting EEG into audio frequency and receiver converting this frequency back to EEG.

  17. Controller-Programmer for telemetry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, R. Michael

    1988-10-01

    The development, testing, and implementation of modern, sophisticated telemetry systems requires a controller capable of adequately exercising the telemeter. A flight test requires a programmer to cycle through the flight events. This report describes an adaptable, programmable system that encompasses both of these requirements.

  18. Imaging transverse isotropic properties of muscle by monitoring acoustic radiation force induced shear waves using a 2-D matrix ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael; Byram, Brett; Palmeri, Mark; Rouze, Ned; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    A 2-D matrix ultrasound array is used to monitor acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) induced shear wave propagation in 3-D in excised canine muscle. From a single acquisition, both the shear wave phase and group velocity can be calculated to estimate the shear wave speed (SWS) along and across the fibers, as well as the fiber orientation in 3-D. The true fiber orientation found using the 3-D radon transform on B-mode volumes of the muscle was used to verify the fiber direction estimated from shear wave data. For the simplified imaging case when the ARFI push can be oriented perpendicular to the fibers, the error in estimating the fiber orientation using phase and group velocity measurements was 3.5 ± 2.6° and 3.4 ± 1.4° (mean ± standard deviation), respectively, over six acquisitions in different muscle samples. For the more general case when the push is oblique to the fibers, the angle between the push and the fibers is found using the dominant orientation of the shear wave displacement magnitude. In 30 acquisitions on six different muscle samples with oblique push angles up to 40°, the error in the estimated fiber orientation using phase and group velocity measurements was 5.4 ± 2.9° and 5.3 ± 3.2°, respectively, after estimating and accounting for the additional unknown push angle. Either the phase or group velocity measurements can be used to estimate fiber orientation and SWS along and across the fibers. Although it is possible to perform these measurements when the push is not perpendicular to the fibers, highly oblique push angles induce lower shear wave amplitudes which can cause inaccurate SWS measurements.

  19. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.K.; Hume, W.R.; Douglass, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  20. A Telemetry Browser Built with Java Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupart, E.

    In the context of CNES balloon scientific campaigns and telemetry survey field, a generic telemetry processing product, called TelemetryBrowser in the following, was developed reusing COTS, Java Components for most of them. Connection between those components relies on a software architecture based on parameter producers and parameter consumers. The first one transmit parameter values to the second one which has registered to it. All of those producers and consumers can be spread over the network thanks to Corba, and over every kind of workstation thanks to Java. This gives a very powerful mean to adapt to constraints like network bandwidth, or workstations processing or memory. It's also very useful to display and correlate at the same time information coming from multiple and various sources. An important point of this architecture is that the coupling between parameter producers and parameter consumers is reduced to the minimum and that transmission of information on the network is made asynchronously. So, if a parameter consumer goes down or runs slowly, there is no consequence on the other consumers, because producers don't wait for their consumers to finish their data processing before sending it to other consumers. An other interesting point is that parameter producers, also called TelemetryServers in the following are generated nearly automatically starting from a telemetry description using Flavori component. Keywords Java components, Corba, distributed application, OpenORBii, software reuse, COTS, Internet, Flavor. i Flavor (Formal Language for Audio-Visual Object Representation) is an object-oriented media representation language being developed at Columbia University. It is designed as an extension of Java and C++ and simplifies the development of applications that involve a significant media processing component (encoding, decoding, editing, manipulation, etc.) by providing bitstream representation semantics. (flavor.sourceforge.net) ii Open

  1. Contingency support using adaptive telemetry extractor and expert system technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Thomas; Cruse, Bryant; Wende, Charles

    The 'telemetry analysis logic for operations support' prototype system constitutes an expert system that is charged with contingency planning for the NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST); this system has demonstrated the feasibility of using an adaptive telemetry extractor/reformatter that is integrated with an expert system. A test case generated by a simulator has demonstrated the reduction of the time required for analysis of a complex series of failures to a few minutes, from the hour usually required. The HST's telemetry extractor will be able to read real-time engineering telemetry streams and disk-based data. Telemetry format changes will be handled almost instantaneously.

  2. LANDSAT-D data format control book. Volume 2: Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talipsky, R.

    1982-01-01

    The formats used for the transmission of LANDSAT-D and LANDSAT-D Prime spacecraft telemetry data through either the TDRS/GSTDN via the NASCOM Network to the CSF are described as well as the telemetry flow from the command and data handling subsystem, a telemetry list and telemetry matrix assignment for the mission and engineering formats. The on-board computer (OBC) controlled format and the dwell format are also discussed. The OBCs contribution to telemetry, and the format of the reports, are covered. The high rate data channel includes the payload correction data format, the narrowband tape recorder and the OBC dump formats.

  3. Wireless Telemetry and Command (T and C) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hui; Horan, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The Wireless Telemetry and Command (T&C) program is to investigate methods of using commercial telecommunications service providers to support command and telemetry services between a remote user and a base station. While the initial development is based on ground networks, the development is being done with an eye towards future space communications needs. Both NASA and the Air Force have indicated a plan to consider the use of commercial telecommunications providers to support their space missions. To do this, there will need to be an understanding of the requirements and limitations of interfacing with the commercial providers. The eventual payoff will be the reduced operations cost and the ability to tap into commercial services being developed by the commercial networks. This should enable easier realization of EP services to the end points, commercial routing of data, and quicker integration of new services into the space mission operations. Therefore, the ultimate goal of this program is not just to provide wireless radio communications for T&C services but to enhance those services through wireless networking and provider enhancements that come with the networks. In the following chapters, the detailed technical procedure will be showed step by step. Chapter 2 will talk about the general idea of simulation as well as the implementation of data acquisition including sensor array data and GPS data. Chapter 3 will talk about how to use LabVEEW and Component Works to do wireless communication simulation and how to distribute the real-time information over the Internet by using Visual Basic and ActiveX controls. Also talk about the test configuration and validation. Chapter 4 will show the test results both from In-Lab test and Networking Test. Chapter 5 will summarize the whole procedure and give the perspective for the future consideration.

  4. Telemetry location error in a forested habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chu, D.S.; Hoover, B.A.; Fuller, M.R.; Geissler, P.H.; Amlaner, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    The error associated with locations estimated by radio-telemetry triangulation can be large and variable in a hardwood forest. We assessed the magnitude and cause of telemetry location errors in a mature hardwood forest by using a 4-element Yagi antenna and compass bearings toward four transmitters, from 21 receiving sites. The distance error from the azimuth intersection to known transmitter locations ranged from 0 to 9251 meters. Ninety-five percent of the estimated locations were within 16 to 1963 meters, and 50% were within 99 to 416 meters of actual locations. Angles with 20o of parallel had larger distance errors than other angles. While angle appeared most important, greater distances and the amount of vegetation between receivers and transmitters also contributed to distance error.

  5. Telemetry Data Collection from Oscar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Paul C.; Horan, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the design, configuration, and operation of a satellite station built for the Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Laboratory in the Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Engineering at New Mexico State University (NMSU). This satellite station consists of a computer-controlled antenna tracking system, 2m/70cm transceiver, satellite tracking software, and a demodulator. The satellite station receives satellite,telemetry, allows for voice communications, and will be used in future classes. Currently this satellite station is receiving telemetry from an amateur radio satellite, UoSAT-OSCAR-11. Amateur radio satellites are referred to as Orbiting Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio (OSCAR) satellites as discussed in the next section.

  6. Bluetooth telemetry system for a wearable electrocardiogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Ryan B.

    The rise of wireless networks has led to a new market in medicine: remote patient monitoring. Practitioners now desire to monitor the health conditions of their patients after hospital release. With the large number of cardiac related deaths and this new demand in medicine being the motivation, this study developed a BluetoothRTM telemetry system for a wearable Electrocardiogram. This study also developed a compression t-shirt to hold the ECG and telemetry system. This device communicates the ECG signal of a patient to an Android device within the ISM frequency bands (2.4-2.48 GHz) where the data is displayed and stored in real time. This study is a stepping stone toward more portable heart monitoring that can communicate with the doctor in real time from remote locations.

  7. Recent NASA contributions to biomedical telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, H.; Mccutcheon, E. P.; Fryer, T. B.; Rositano, S.; Westbrook, R.; Haro, P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work reviews technological progress over the past five years in the field of long-term telemetric monitoring of physiological parameters during space flight. Emphasis is placed on those developments that have direct application to animal or human use on earth. An effort was made in these recent developments to free subjects from encumbering wires: a swallowable telemetry capsule for monitoring body temperature and a wristwatch transmitter connected to EKG leads were two of the devices developed.

  8. Telemetry Tests Of The Advanced Receiver II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Bevan, Roland P.; Marina, Miguel

    1993-01-01

    Report describes telemetry tests of Advanced Receiver II (ARX-II): digital radio receiving subsystem operating on intermediate-frequency output of another receiving subsystem called "multimission receiver" (MMR), detecting carrier, subcarrier, and data-symbol signals transmitted by spacecraft, and extracts Doppler information from signals. Analysis of data shows performance of MMR/ARX-II system comparable and sometimes superior to performances of Blk-III/BPA and Blk-III/SDA/SSA systems.

  9. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, R. E.; Sebastian, T.

    2013-01-01

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps. PMID:24346503

  10. Optical Telemetry Improves Persistence and Data Access at Woolsey Mound Observatory, Mississippi Canyon block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, N.; Sleeper, K.; Camilli, R.; Pontbriand, C.; Ware, J.

    2011-12-01

    A suite of geochemical arrays have been developed for the Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory in the northern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate the oceanographic and tectonic forcing factors on the formation and stability of gas hydrate. These arrays are designed to collect sustained, time-series data of chemical concentrations, gradients and flux from the subsurface to the sea floor and into the near bottom water column. A key component of the Observatory is the Benthic Boundary Layer Array (BBLA). The BBLA has two sensor nodes, one near the seafloor and the other 20m above the bottom. Each node has a suite of instruments to collect physical and chemical measurements (O2, T, P, S, pH, ORP, CDOM, Chly-A, and aromatic HC). The array provides a time-series data set, twenty seconds out of every 5 minutes, for evaluating the fate of transiting fluids form the seafloor and on downward, cross, or up welling conditions that are associated with a hydrate destabilization event. We report on the successes of multiple deployments of the BBLA and on the integration of a new underwater optical communication system that provides high data rate communications over a range of >100 meters from a subsurface mooring. Optical communications is capable of high data rates, up to 10 mega bits per second (Mbps), compared to acoustic data rates of 5 Kbps. We have developed an integrated optical/acoustic telemetry system (OTS) that uses an acoustic command system to control a high bandwidth, low latency optical communication system. In June 2011, from the RV Pelican, we deployed the BBLA, which included an inline, mooring mounted, optical modem. Using a lowered OTS mounted on a frame with batteries, and a fiber optic connection to the surface,the OTS was lowered by wire from a surface ship. An optical communication link was established, with a range of >100 meters, and a transmission rate of 2.5 Mbps, which provided successful file transfers. The OTS/BBLA will remain installed at MC118 for one year

  11. Radio frequency interference effects of continuous wave signals on telemetry data, part 2. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The results of radio frequency interference tests and the derived telemetry bit SNR degradation model, which includes the telemetry data rate and the telemetry data power as independent variables for characterizing the continuous wave interference effects on telemetry data, are presented. The telemetry bit SNR degradation model was implemented in the second version of the Deep Space Interference Prediction software.

  12. Group telemetry analysis using the World Wide Web

    SciTech Connect

    Kalibjian, J.

    1996-12-31

    Today it is not uncommon to have large contractor teams involved in the design and deployment of even small satellite systems. The larger (and more geographically remote) the team members, the more difficult it becomes to efficiently manage the disbursement of telemetry data for evaluation and analysis. Further complications are introduced if some of the telemetry data is sensitive. An application is described which can facilitate telemetry data sharing utilizing the National Information Infrastructure (Internet).

  13. User microprogrammable processors for high data rate telemetry preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugsley, J. H.; Ogrady, E. P.

    1973-01-01

    The use of microprogrammable processors for the preprocessing of high data rate satellite telemetry is investigated. The following topics are discussed along with supporting studies: (1) evaluation of commercial microprogrammable minicomputers for telemetry preprocessing tasks; (2) microinstruction sets for telemetry preprocessing; and (3) the use of multiple minicomputers to achieve high data processing. The simulation of small microprogrammed processors is discussed along with examples of microprogrammed processors.

  14. XTCE: XML Telemetry and Command Exchange Tutorial, XTCE Version 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Kevin; Kizzort, Brad

    2008-01-01

    These presentation slides are a tutorial on XML Telemetry and Command Exchange (XTCE). The goal of XTCE is to provide an industry standard mechanism for describing telemetry and command streams (particularly from satellites.) it wiill lower cost and increase validation over traditional formats, and support exchange or native format.XCTE is designed to describe bit streams, that are typical of telemetry and command in the historic space domain.

  15. Efficient Array Design for Sonotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Kruse, Dustin E.; Ergun, Arif S.; Barnes, Stephen; Ming Lu, X.; Ferrara, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    New linear multi-row, multi-frequency arrays have been designed, constructed and tested as fully operational ultrasound probes to produce confocal imaging and therapeutic acoustic intensities with a standard commercial ultrasound imaging system. The triple-array probes and imaging system produce high quality B-mode images with a center row imaging array at 5.3 MHz, and sufficient acoustic power with dual therapeutic arrays to produce mild hyperthermia at 1.54 MHz. The therapeutic array pair in the first probe design (termed G3) utilizes a high bandwidth and peak pressure, suitable for mechanical therapies. The second multi-array design (termed G4) has a redesigned therapeutic array pair which is optimized for high time-averaged power output suitable for mild hyperthermia applications. The “thermal therapy” design produces more than 4 Watts of acoustic power from the low frequency arrays with only a 10.5 °C internal rise in temperature after 100 seconds of continuous use with an unmodified conventional imaging system, or substantially longer operation at lower acoustic power. The low frequency arrays in both probe designs were examined and contrasted for real power transfer efficiency with a KLM model which includes all lossy contributions in the power delivery path from system transmitters to tissue load. Laboratory verification was successfully performed for the KLM derived estimates of transducer parallel model acoustic resistance and dissipation resistance, which are the critical design factors for acoustic power output and undesired internal heating respectively. PMID:18591737

  16. Radio frequency overview of the high explosive radio telemetry project

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.; Dimsdle, J.; Rich, D.; Smith, F.

    1998-12-31

    High explosive radio telemetry (HERT) is a project that is being developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies. The ultimate goal is to develop a small, modular telemetry system capable of high-speed detection of explosive events, with an accuracy on the order of 10 nanoseconds. The reliable telemetry of this data, from a high-speed missile trajectory, is a very challenging opportunity. All captured data must be transmitted in less than 20 microseconds of time duration. This requires a high bits/Hertz microwave telemetry modulation code to insure transmission of the data with the limited time interval available.

  17. Acoustic Imaging in Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Sun, Ming-Tsung; LaBonte, Barry; Chen, Huei-Ru; Yeh, Sheng-Jen; Team, The TON

    1999-04-01

    The time-variant acoustic signal at a point in the solar interior can be constructed from observations at the surface, based on the knowledge of how acoustic waves travel in the Sun: the time-distance relation of the p-modes. The basic principle and properties of this imaging technique are discussed in detail. The helioseismic data used in this study were taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON). The time series of observed acoustic signals on the solar surface is treated as a phased array. The time-distance relation provides the phase information among the phased array elements. The signal at any location at any time can be reconstructed by summing the observed signal at array elements in phase and with a proper normalization. The time series of the constructed acoustic signal contains information on frequency, phase, and intensity. We use the constructed intensity to obtain three-dimensional acoustic absorption images. The features in the absorption images correlate with the magnetic field in the active region. The vertical extension of absorption features in the active region is smaller in images constructed with shorter wavelengths. This indicates that the vertical resolution of the three-dimensional images depends on the range of modes used in constructing the signal. The actual depths of the absorption features in the active region may be smaller than those shown in the three-dimensional images.

  18. Telemetry Boards Interpret Rocket, Airplane Engine Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    For all the data gathered by the space shuttle while in orbit, NASA engineers are just as concerned about the information it generates on the ground. From the moment the shuttle s wheels touch the runway to the break of its electrical umbilical cord at 0.4 seconds before its next launch, sensors feed streams of data about the status of the vehicle and its various systems to Kennedy Space Center s shuttle crews. Even while the shuttle orbiter is refitted in Kennedy s orbiter processing facility, engineers constantly monitor everything from power levels to the testing of the mechanical arm in the orbiter s payload bay. On the launch pad and up until liftoff, the Launch Control Center, attached to the large Vehicle Assembly Building, screens all of the shuttle s vital data. (Once the shuttle clears its launch tower, this responsibility shifts to Mission Control at Johnson Space Center, with Kennedy in a backup role.) Ground systems for satellite launches also generate significant amounts of data. At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, across the Banana River from Kennedy s location on Merritt Island, Florida, NASA rockets carrying precious satellite payloads into space flood the Launch Vehicle Data Center with sensor information on temperature, speed, trajectory, and vibration. The remote measurement and transmission of systems data called telemetry is essential to ensuring the safe and successful launch of the Agency s space missions. When a launch is unsuccessful, as it was for this year s Orbiting Carbon Observatory satellite, telemetry data also provides valuable clues as to what went wrong and how to remedy any problems for future attempts. All of this information is streamed from sensors in the form of binary code: strings of ones and zeros. One small company has partnered with NASA to provide technology that renders raw telemetry data intelligible not only for Agency engineers, but also for those in the private sector.

  19. A detachable mobile and adjustable telemetry system

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tommy S; Persons, William E; Bradley, Joseph G; Gregg, Margaret; Gonzales, Shinelle K; Helton, Jesse S

    2013-01-01

    Many traditional mobile telemetry systems require permanently mounting a rod through the cabin of a vehicle to serve as the mast for a directional antenna. In this article we present an alternative to this configuration by providing a platform that can be placed atop the vehicle in which the antenna mast can be mounted and controlled from the cabin of the vehicle. Thereby making this design a viable option for researchers who share vehicles with others that may not approve of permanent vehicle modifications such as placing a hole in the roof of the vehicle as required by traditional mobile configurations. We tested the precision and accuracy of detachable mobile and adjustable telemetry system (DMATS) in an urban park with varying terrain, tree stands, overhead wires, and other structures that can contribute to signal deflection. We placed three radiocollars 50 m apart and 1.2 m above the ground then established three testing stations ∼280 m from the location of the radiocollars. The DMATS platform required 12 h for completion and cost $1059 USD. Four technicians were randomly assigned radio collars to triangulate using DMATS and a handheld telemetry system. We used a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a Scheffe post hoc test to compare error ellipses between azimuths taken using DMATS and the hand held system. Average error ellipses for all testers was 1.96 ± 1.22 ha. No significant differences were found between error ellipses of testers (P = 0.292). Our design, the DMATS, does not require any vehicle modification; thereby, making this a viable option for researchers sharing vehicles with others that may not approve of permanent vehicle alterations. PMID:23919133

  20. Accuracy of telemetry signal power loss in a filter as an estimate for telemetry degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerner, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    When telemetry data is transmitted through a communication link, some degradation in telemetry performance occurs as a result of the imperfect frequency response of the channel. The term telemetry degradation as used here is the increase in received signal power required to offset this filtering. The usual approach to assessing this degradation is to assume that it is equal to the signal power loss in the filtering, which is easily calculated. However, this approach neglects the effects of the nonlinear phase response of the filter, the effect of any reduction of the receiving system noise due to the filter, and intersymbol interference. Here, an exact calculation of the telemetry degradation, which includes all of the above effects, is compared with the signal power loss calculation for RF filtering of NRZ data on a carrier. The signal power loss calculation is found to be a reasonable approximation when the filter follows the point at which the receiving system noise is introduced, especially if the signal power loss is less than 0.5 dB. The signal power loss approximation is less valid when the receiving system noise is not filtered.

  1. A multichannel electromagnetic flowmeter telemetry system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.; Sandler, H.; Doane, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    An eight-channel biomedical telemetry system provides four channels of blood flow measurements in addition to blood-pressure and EKG data. Emphasis is placed on the amplifiers and signal conditioning circuitry required for interfacing of the electromagnetic flow transducers with the transmission and modulation subsystems. The large number of data channels permits measurement of flow distribution as well as total cardiac output. The batteries and electronics for four channels (blood flow) weigh about 500 g and have a volume of 250 cu cm.

  2. Real Time Telemetry Data Capture and Storage

    1997-05-14

    This program is used to capture telemetry data from remote instrumentation systems. The data can be captured at the rate of 1M bit per second. The data can come in one of several formats, NRZ, RZ, and Bi-Phase. The DECOM software takes the serial data stream and locks on to a unique code word. By tracking the code word the software can strip out the information. Thus the program can display the incoming data realmore » time while saving the data to disk.« less

  3. Telemetry and Science Data Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Lakesha; Hong, Liang

    2011-01-01

    The Telemetry and Science Data Software System (TSDSS) was designed to validate the operational health of a spacecraft, ease test verification, assist in debugging system anomalies, and provide trending data and advanced science analysis. In doing so, the system parses, processes, and organizes raw data from the Aquarius instrument both on the ground and while in space. In addition, it provides a user-friendly telemetry viewer, and an instant pushbutton test report generator. Existing ground data systems can parse and provide simple data processing, but have limitations in advanced science analysis and instant report generation. The TSDSS functions as an offline data analysis system during I&T (integration and test) and mission operations phases. After raw data are downloaded from an instrument, TSDSS ingests the data files, parses, converts telemetry to engineering units, and applies advanced algorithms to produce science level 0, 1, and 2 data products. Meanwhile, it automatically schedules upload of the raw data to a remote server and archives all intermediate and final values in a MySQL database in time order. All data saved in the system can be straightforwardly retrieved, exported, and migrated. Using TSDSS s interactive data visualization tool, a user can conveniently choose any combination and mathematical computation of interesting telemetry points from a large range of time periods (life cycle of mission ground data and mission operations testing), and display a graphical and statistical view of the data. With this graphical user interface (GUI), the data queried graphs can be exported and saved in multiple formats. This GUI is especially useful in trending data analysis, debugging anomalies, and advanced data analysis. At the request of the user, mission-specific instrument performance assessment reports can be generated with a simple click of a button on the GUI. From instrument level to observatory level, the TSDSS has been operating supporting

  4. Sensor data autonomy. [for spacecraft telemetry systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, E. P.; Desjardins, R.

    1978-01-01

    'Smart' sensors onboard NASA space missions will require variable data output bandwidth as they respond to phenomena of interest. An Instrument Telemetry Packet (ITP) approach has been developed which encodes experimental instrument data into an autonomous data package, along with pertinent engineering parameters and ancillary data (time, position, attitude, etc.). New requirements for onboard concentration and buffering, as well as for end-to-end error control, arise from this approach. Emphasis is placed on packet protocols compatible with the data link standard ADCCP, to enable one set of ground support equipment to readily support instrument development, launch site checkout and mission operations phases.

  5. ISS Solar Array Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  6. Towards high-resolution retinal prostheses with direct optical addressing and inductive telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sohmyung; Khraiche, Massoud L.; Akinin, Abraham; Jing, Yi; Damle, Samir; Kuang, Yanjin; Bauchner, Sue; Lo, Yu-Hwa; Freeman, William R.; Silva, Gabriel A.; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Despite considerable advances in retinal prostheses over the last two decades, the resolution of restored vision has remained severely limited, well below the 20/200 acuity threshold of blindness. Towards drastic improvements in spatial resolution, we present a scalable architecture for retinal prostheses in which each stimulation electrode is directly activated by incident light and powered by a common voltage pulse transferred over a single wireless inductive link. Approach. The hybrid optical addressability and electronic powering scheme provides separate spatial and temporal control over stimulation, and further provides optoelectronic gain for substantially lower light intensity thresholds than other optically addressed retinal prostheses using passive microphotodiode arrays. The architecture permits the use of high-density electrode arrays with ultra-high photosensitive silicon nanowires, obviating the need for excessive wiring and high-throughput data telemetry. Instead, the single inductive link drives the entire array of electrodes through two wires and provides external control over waveform parameters for common voltage stimulation. Main results. A complete system comprising inductive telemetry link, stimulation pulse demodulator, charge-balancing series capacitor, and nanowire-based electrode device is integrated and validated ex vivo on rat retina tissue. Significance. Measurements demonstrate control over retinal neural activity both by light and electrical bias, validating the feasibility of the proposed architecture and its system components as an important first step towards a high-resolution optically addressed retinal prosthesis.

  7. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  8. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Briles, Scott D.; Neagley, Daniel L.; Coates, Don M.; Freund, Samuel M.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  9. Internet Distribution of Spacecraft Telemetry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Specht, Ted; Noble, David

    2006-01-01

    Remote Access Multi-mission Processing and Analysis Ground Environment (RAMPAGE) is a Java-language server computer program that enables near-real-time display of spacecraft telemetry data on any authorized client computer that has access to the Internet and is equipped with Web-browser software. In addition to providing a variety of displays of the latest available telemetry data, RAMPAGE can deliver notification of an alarm by electronic mail. Subscribers can then use RAMPAGE displays to determine the state of the spacecraft and formulate a response to the alarm, if necessary. A user can query spacecraft mission data in either binary or comma-separated-value format by use of a Web form or a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) script to automate the query process. RAMPAGE runs on Linux and Solaris server computers in the Ground Data System (GDS) of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and includes components designed specifically to make it compatible with legacy GDS software. The client/server architecture of RAMPAGE and the use of the Java programming language make it possible to utilize a variety of competitive server and client computers, thereby also helping to minimize costs.

  10. MEMS sensors and wireless telemetry for distributed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Warmack, R.J.; Smith, S.F.

    1998-02-01

    Selectively coated cantilevers are being developed at ORNL for chemical and biological sensing. The sensitivity can exceed that of other electro-mechanical devices as parts-per-trillion detection can be demonstrated for certain species. The authors are now proceeding to develop systems that employ electrically readable microcantilevers in a standard MEMS process and standard CMOS processes. One of their primary areas of interest is chemical sensing for environmental applications. Towards this end, they are presently developing electronic readout of a mercury-sensitive coated cantilever. In order to field arrays of distributed sensors, a wireless network for data reporting is needed. For this, the authors are developing on-chip spread-spectrum encoding and modulation circuitry to improve the robustness and security of sensor data in typical interference- and multipath-impaired environments. They have also provided for a selection of distinct spreading codes to serve groups of sensors in a common environment by the application of code-division multiple-access techniques. Most of the RF circuitry they have designed and fabricated in 0.5 {micro}m CMOS has been tested and verified operational to above 1 GHz. The initial intended operation is for use in the 915 MHz Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) band. This paper presents measured data on the microcantilever-based mercury detector. They also present design data and measurements of the RF telemetry chip.

  11. Applicability of implantable telemetry systems in cardiovascular research.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krutz, R. W.; Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henry, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the results of an experimental program undertaken to develop and apply implanted telemetry to cardiovascular research. Because of the role the kidney may play in essential hypertension, emphasis is placed on telemetry's applicability in the study of renal physiology. Consequently, the relationship between pressure, flow, and hydraulic impedance are stressed. Results of an exercise study are given.

  12. 49. VIEW OF ANALOG RECORD BAY OF TELEMETRY CHECKOUT SYSTEM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. VIEW OF ANALOG RECORD BAY OF TELEMETRY CHECKOUT SYSTEM. BAY LOCATED CENTRALLY IN TELEMETRY ROOM (ROOM 106) MIDWAY BETWEEN EAST AND WEST WALLS. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  14. S-NPP VIIRS instrument telemetry and calibration data trend study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, ZiPing; De Luccia, Frank J.; Cardema, Jason C.; Moy, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    The Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) employs a large number of temperature and voltage sensors (telemetry points) to monitor instrument health and performance. We have collected data and built tools to study telemetry and calibration parameters trends. The telemetry points are organized into groups based on locations and functionalities. Examples of the groups are: telescope motor, focal plane array (FPA), scan cavity bulkhead, radiators, solar diffuser and Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor (SDSM). We have performed daily monitoring and long-term trending studies. Daily monitoring processes are automated with alarms built into the software to indicate if pre-defined limits are exceeded. Long-term trending studies focus on instrument performance and sensitivities of Sensor Data Record (SDR) products and calibration look-up tables (LUTs) to instrument temperature and voltage variations. VIIRS uses a DC Restore (DCR) process to periodically correct the analog offsets of each detector of each spectral band to ensure that the FPA output signals are always within the dynamic range of the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). The offset values are updated based on observations of the On-Board Calibrator Blackbody source. We have performed a long-term trend study of DCR offsets and calibration parameters to explore connections of the DCR offsets with onboard calibrators. The study also shows how the instrument and calibration parameters respond to the VIIRS Petulant Mode, spacecraft (SC) anomalies and flight software (FSW) updates. We have also shown that trending studies of telemetry and calibration parameters may help to improve the instrument calibration processes and SDR Quality Flags.

  15. Acoustic Monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    arrays intersect would comprise an ice cap monitoring system. The third subsystem is the energy and telemetry required to run the systems. The geophones are low energy compared to the combustive sound source and might be supplied by batteries and a solar panel (at least for half the year). The combustive sound source needs a large continuously energy supply. Two energy harvesting ideas, which need further investigation, are a wind turbine, and a Stirling engine that runs off the temperature difference between the ocean and the atmosphere. Analysis It is expected that the recording of the acoustics energy, as it travels through the ice and is detected by the geophones, will provide estimates of ice anisotropy and coherence. These give estimates of the ice roughness and thickness, respectively, and are key parameters for modeling the changes in the ice cap cover in the Artic. Reference: P. S. Wilson, T. G. Muir, J. A. Behrens, and J. L. Elizey, "Applications of the combustive sound source," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 97, 3298(A) (1995).

  16. Telemetry ground system development via the component approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, Karen E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's deployment of major space projects such as the Earth Observing System (EOS) will demand increased functionality and ground-based telemetry processing performance well above current capabilities. At the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, custom hardware and software components have been developed and combined into a unique architecture to address this problem. The hardware components utilize Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC's) developed specifically to support NASA's telemetry data systems needs and designed to handle data rates up to 300 Mbps. A generalized set of software components, called the Telemetry Processing Control Environment facilitate the rapid construction of control and monitoring functions for the ground-based telemetry processing systems. This combination of hardware and software elements enables rapid construction of flexible, cost-effective telemetry processing systems capable of meeting the performance requirements facing NASA in the coming decade.

  17. Incorporating CCSDS telemetry standards and philosophy on Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Elson, Anne B.

    1995-01-01

    The Cassini project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is implementing a spacecraft telemetry system based on the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) packet telemetry standards. Resolving the CCSDS concepts with a Ground Data System designed to handle time-division-multiplexed telemetry and also handling constraints unique to a deep-space planetary spacecraft (such as fixed downlink opportunities, small downlink rates and requirements for on-board data storage) have resulted in spacecraft and ground system design challenges. Solving these design challenges involved adapting and extending the CCSDS telemetry standards as well as changes to the spacecraft and ground system designs. The resulting spacecraft/ground system design is an example of how new ideas and philosophies can be incorporated into existing systems and design approaches without requiring significant rework. In addition, it shows that the CCSDS telemetry standards can be successfully applied to deep-space planetary spacecraft.

  18. Acoustic sensor networks for woodpecker localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chen, C. E.; Ali, A.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R. E.; Yao, K.; Estrin, D.; Taylor, C.

    2005-08-01

    Sensor network technology can revolutionize the study of animal ecology by providing a means of non-intrusive, simultaneous monitoring of interaction among multiple animals. In this paper, we investigate design, analysis, and testing of acoustic arrays for localizing acorn woodpeckers using their vocalizations. Each acoustic array consists of four microphones arranged in a square. All four audio channels within the same acoustic array are finely synchronized within a few micro seconds. We apply the approximate maximum likelihood (AML) method to synchronized audio channels of each acoustic array for estimating the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of woodpecker vocalizations. The woodpecker location is estimated by applying least square (LS) methods to DOA bearing crossings of multiple acoustic arrays. We have revealed the critical relation between microphone spacing of acoustic arrays and robustness of beamforming of woodpecker vocalizations. Woodpecker localization experiments using robust array element spacing in different types of environments are conducted and compared. Practical issues about calibration of acoustic array orientation are also discussed.

  19. Analysis of survival data from telemetry projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.; Winterstein, S.R.; Pollock, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    Telemetry techniques can be used to study the survival rates of animal populations and are particularly suitable for species or settings for which band recovery models are not. Statistical methods for estimating survival rates and parameters of survival distributions from observations of radio-tagged animals will be described. These methods have been applied to medical and engineering studies and to the study of nest success. Estimates and tests based on discrete models, originally introduced by Mayfield, and on continuous models, both parametric and nonparametric, will be described. Generalizations, including staggered entry of subjects into the study and identification of mortality factors will be considered. Additional discussion topics will include sample size considerations, relocation frequency for subjects, and use of covariates.

  20. Ultrasonic ranging and data telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Brashear, Hugh R.; Blair, Michael S.; Phelps, James E.; Bauer, Martin L.; Nowlin, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasonic ranging and data telemetry system determines a surveyor's position and automatically links it with other simultaneously taken survey data. An ultrasonic and radio frequency (rf) transmitter are carried by the surveyor in a backpack. The surveyor's position is determined by calculations that use the measured transmission times of an airborne ultrasonic pulse transmitted from the backpack to two or more prepositioned ultrasonic transceivers. Once a second, rf communications are used both to synchronize the ultrasonic pulse transmission-time measurements and to transmit other simultaneously taken survey data. The rf communications are interpreted by a portable receiver and microcomputer which are brought to the property site. A video display attached to the computer provides real-time visual monitoring of the survey progress and site coverage.

  1. Telemetry and Communication IP Video Player

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OFarrell, Zachary L.

    2011-01-01

    Aegis Video Player is the name of the video over IP system for the Telemetry and Communications group of the Launch Services Program. Aegis' purpose is to display video streamed over a network connection to be viewed during launches. To accomplish this task, a VLC ActiveX plug-in was used in C# to provide the basic capabilities of video streaming. The program was then customized to be used during launches. The VLC plug-in can be configured programmatically to display a single stream, but for this project multiple streams needed to be accessed. To accomplish this, an easy to use, informative menu system was added to the program to enable users to quickly switch between videos. Other features were added to make the player more useful, such as watching multiple videos and watching a video in full screen.

  2. Target telemetry in medical isotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickles, R. J.; Votaw, J. R.; Hutchins, G. D.; Rosenthal, M. S.; Funk, K. M.; Sunderland, J. J.; Satter, M. R.

    1985-05-01

    Positron emission tomography reveals the biochemical basis underlying many disease processes. The key step is the labeling of authentic metabolic substrates, generally starting with precursor compounds of the short-lived radionuclides 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F. These, in turn, are produced on accelerators, with small cyclotrons now appearing in hospitals. The success of maintaining a reliable source of imaging agents in a clinical setting hinges more on making effective use of modest beams and energies (50 μA; 10 MeV) rather than scaling up the cyclotron in an engineering overkill. Target performance is observed by telemetry of a number of parameters during irradiation. In particular, the neutron flux can be singled out as an immediate signature of the (p, n) reaction, and serves as an important variable to optimize during the bombardment.

  3. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient. PMID:27106299

  4. Optimizing bandwidth utilization in packet based telemetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalibjian, J.R.

    1995-10-17

    A consistent theme in spacecraft telemetry system design is the desire to obtain maximum bandwidth utilization given a fixed transmission capability (usually due to cost/weight criteria). Extensions to basic packetization telemetry architectures are discussed which can facilitate a reduction in the amount of actual data telemetered, without loss of data quality. Central to the extensions are the establishment of an ``intelligent`` telemetry process, which can evaluate pending data to be telemetered, and act to compress, discard, or re-formulate data before actual transmission to ground stations.

  5. A Real-Time Telemetry Simulator of the IUS Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, Michael E.; Forman, Douglas A.; Baker, Damon M.; Khazoyan, Louis B.; Viazzo, Danilo

    1998-01-01

    A real-time telemetry simulator of the IUS spacecraft has recently entered operation to train Flight Control Teams for the launch of the AXAF telescope from the Shuttle. The simulator has proven to be a successful higher fidelity implementation of its predecessor, while affirming the rapid development methodology used in its design. Although composed of COTS hardware and software, the system simulates the full breadth of the mission: Launch, Pre-Deployment-Checkout, Burn Sequence, and AXAF/IUS separation. Realism is increased through patching the system into the operations facility to simulate IUS telemetry, Shuttle telemetry, and the Tracking Station link (commands and status message).

  6. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  7. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  8. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  9. Self-synchronizing, bi-orthogonal coded PCM telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W.; Muller, R.; Taylor, T.; Yagelowich, J.

    1971-01-01

    Communications and data handling system improves signal to noise ratio when transmission channel is perturbed by noise. Telemetry system consists of airborne source, Gaussian additive noise channel, and ground receiver unit. Advantages of system are given.

  10. Definition and maintenance of a telemetry database dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knopf, William P. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A telemetry dictionary database includes a component for receiving spreadsheet workbooks of telemetry data over a web-based interface from other computer devices. Another component routes the spreadsheet workbooks to a specified directory on the host processing device. A process then checks the received spreadsheet workbooks for errors, and if no errors are detected the spreadsheet workbooks are routed to another directory to await initiation of a remote database loading process. The loading process first converts the spreadsheet workbooks to comma separated value (CSV) files. Next, a network connection with the computer system that hosts the telemetry dictionary database is established and the CSV files are ported to the computer system that hosts the telemetry dictionary database. This is followed by a remote initiation of a database loading program. Upon completion of loading a flatfile generation program is manually initiated to generate a flatfile to be used in a mission operations environment by the core ground system.

  11. Acoustic Location of Lightning Using Interferometric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erives, H.; Arechiga, R. O.; Stock, M.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic arrays have been used to accurately locate thunder sources in lightning flashes. The acoustic arrays located around the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico produce locations which compare quite well with source locations provided by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array. These arrays utilize 3 outer microphones surrounding a 4th microphone located at the center, The location is computed by band-passing the signal to remove noise, and then computing the cross correlating the outer 3 microphones with respect the center reference microphone. While this method works very well, it works best on signals with high signal to noise ratios; weaker signals are not as well located. Therefore, methods are being explored to improve the location accuracy and detection efficiency of the acoustic location systems. The signal received by acoustic arrays is strikingly similar to th signal received by radio frequency interferometers. Both acoustic location systems and radio frequency interferometers make coherent measurements of a signal arriving at a number of closely spaced antennas. And both acoustic and interferometric systems then correlate these signals between pairs of receivers to determine the direction to the source of the received signal. The primary difference between the two systems is the velocity of propagation of the emission, which is much slower for sound. Therefore, the same frequency based techniques that have been used quite successfully with radio interferometers should be applicable to acoustic based measurements as well. The results presented here are comparisons between the location results obtained with current cross correlation method and techniques developed for radio frequency interferometers applied to acoustic signals. The data were obtained during the summer 2013 storm season using multiple arrays sensitive to both infrasonic frequency and audio frequency acoustic emissions from lightning. Preliminary results show that

  12. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  13. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  14. A programmable sampling format telemetry system. [for SAS-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes the programmable sampling format telemetry system to be used by the near-earth Small Astronomy Satellite-C (SAS-C) and possible future SAS missions. The concept of the programmable sampling format is introduced and the features of the system are illustrated by an example. The SAS-C telemetry system is described at the block diagram level and redundancy of the system is discussed briefly.

  15. A Dual Communication and Imaging Underwater Acoustic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tricia C.

    A dual communication and imaging underwater acoustic system is proposed and developed throughout this dissertation. Due to the wide variation in underwater channel characteristics, the research here focuses more on robustness to multipath in the shallow underwater acoustic environment, rather than high bit-rate applications and signaling schemes. Lower bit-rate (in the hundreds of bits per second (bps) to low kbps), applications such as the transfer of ecological telemetry data, e.g. conductivity or temperature data, are the primary focus of this dissertation. The parallels between direct sequence spread spectrum in digital communication and pulse-echo with pulse compression in imaging, and channel estimation in communication and range profile estimation in imaging are drawn, leading to a unified communications and imaging platform. A digital communication algorithm for channel order and channel coefficient estimation and symbol demodulation using Matching Pursuit (MP) with Generalized Multiple Hypothesis Testing (GMHT) is implemented in programmable DSP in real time with field experiment results in varying underwater environments for the single receiver (Rx), single transmitter (Tx) case. The custom and off-the-shelf hardware used in the single receiver, single transmitter set of experiments are detailed as well. This work is then extended to the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) case, and then to the full multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) case. The results of channel estimation are used for simple range profile imaging reconstructions. Successful simulated and experimental results for both transducer array configurations are presented and analyzed. Non-real-time symbol demodulation and channel estimation is performed using experimental data from a scaled testing environment. New hardware based on cost-effective fish-finder transducers for a 6 Rx--1 Tx and 6 Rx--4 Tx transducer array is detailed. Lastly, in an application that is neither communication nor

  16. Experience with the EURECA Packet Telemetry and Packet Telecommand system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Erik Mose; Ferri, Paolo

    1994-01-01

    The European Retrieval Carrier (EURECA) was launched on its first flight on the 31st of July 1992 and retrieved on the 29th of June 1993. EURECA is characterized by several new on-board features, most notably Packet telemetry, and a partial implementation of packet telecommanding, the first ESA packetised spacecraft. Today more than one year after the retrieval the data from the EURECA mission has to a large extent been analysed and we can present some of the interesting results. This paper concentrates on the implementation and operational experience with the EURECA Packet Telemetry and Packet Telecommanding. We already discovered during the design of the ground system that the use of packet telemetry has major impact on the overall design and that processing of packet telemetry may have significant effect on the computer loading and sizing. During the mission a number of problems were identified with the on-board implementation resulting in very strange anomalous behaviors. Many of these problems directly violated basic assumptions for the design of the ground segment adding to the strange behavior. The paper shows that the design of a telemetry packet system should be flexible enough to allow a rapid configuration of the telemetry processing in order to adapt it to the new situation in case of an on-board failure. The experience gained with the EURECA mission control should be used to improve ground systems for future missions.

  17. EM Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey M. Gabelmann

    2005-11-15

    This final report discusses the successful development and testing of a deep operational electromagnetic (EM) telemetry system, produced under a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. This new electromagnetic telemetry system provides a wireless communication link between sensors deployed deep within oil and gas wells and data acquisition equipment located on the earth's surface. EM based wireless telemetry is a highly appropriate technology for oil and gas exploration in that it avoids the need for thousands of feet of wired connections. In order to achieve the project performance objectives, significant improvements over existing EM telemetry systems were made. These improvements included the development of new technologies that have improved the reliability of the communications link while extending operational depth. A key element of the new design is the incorporation of a data-fusion methodology which enhances the communication receiver's ability to extract very weak signals from large amounts of ambient environmental noise. This innovative data-fusion receiver based system adapts advanced technologies, not normally associated with low-frequency communications, and makes them work within the harsh drilling environments associated with the energy exploration market. Every element of a traditional EM telemetry system design, from power efficiency to reliability, has been addressed. The data fusion based EM telemetry system developed during this project is anticipated to provide an EM tool capability that will impact both onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration operations, for conventional and underbalanced drilling applications.

  18. Telemetry experiments with a hibernating black bear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, J. J.; Varney, J. R.; Sumner, J. S.; Craighead, F. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop and test telemetry equipment suitable for monitoring physiological parameters and activity of a hibernating bear in its den, to monitor this data and other environmental information with the Nimbus 3 IRLS data collection system, and to refine immobilizing, handling, and other techniques required in future work with wild bears under natural conditions. A temperature-telemetering transmitter was implanted in the abdominal cavity of a captive black bear and body temperature data was recorded continuously during a 3 month hibernation period. Body temperatures ranging between 37.5 and 31.8 C were observed. Body temperature and overall activity were influenced by disturbances and ambient den temperature. Nychthemeral temperature changes were not noticable. A load cell weight recording device was tested for determining weight loss during hibernation. Monitoring of data by satellite was not attempted. The implanted transmitter was removed and the bear was released with a radiolocation collar at the conclusion of the experiment.

  19. Electromagnetic anti-jam telemetry tool

    DOEpatents

    Ganesan, Harini; Mayzenberg, Nataliya

    2008-02-12

    A mud-pulse telemetry tool includes a tool housing, a motor disposed in the tool housing, and a magnetic coupling coupled to the motor and having an inner shaft and an outer shaft. The tool may also include a stator coupled to the tool housing, a restrictor disposed proximate the stator and coupled to the magnetic coupling, so that the restrictor and the stator adapted to generate selected pulses in a drilling fluid when the restrictor is selectively rotated. The tool may also include a first anti-jam magnet coupled to the too housing, and an second anti-jam magnet disposed proximate the first anti-jam magnet and coupled to the inner shaft and/or the outer shaft, wherein at least one of the first anti-jam magnet and the second anti-jam magnet is an electromagnet, and wherein the first anti-jam magnet and the second anti-jam magnet are positioned with adjacent like poles.

  20. Telemetry via satellites for raptor studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, M.R.; Ellis, D.H.; Klugman, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    Monitoring animal movements by satellite was first ac complished in 1970 with an elk in Wyoming. The large size of early transmitter packages restricted their use to very large animals. Miniaturization of electronic components in the 1980s allowed application of satellite telemetry to large birds. Satellite transmitters have been tested with mixed results on geese, swans, petrels, bustards, eagles, and falcons. Dramatic weight reduction in the 1980s was quickly followed by tests of a variety of transmitter shapes on captive birds. Research on attachment methods helped in selecting those methods least likely to elicit adverse behavior. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to produce more aerodynamically efficient PTT designs. Recently, the utility of satellite tracking has been demonstrated in studies of wandering albatrosses in the Indian Ocean, migrating Bewick's swans, bald eagles, and golden eagles. Two other studies demonstrated the feasibility of tracking cranes by satellite. The types of information from these techniques will be presented and cross-referenced to a poster display and demonstration.

  1. SCA Waveform Development for Space Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Kifle, Multi; Hall, C. Steve; Quinn, Todd M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating and developing suitable reconfigurable radio architectures for future NASA missions. This effort is examining software-based open-architectures for space based transceivers, as well as common hardware platform architectures. The Joint Tactical Radio System's (JTRS) Software Communications Architecture (SCA) is a candidate for the software approach, but may need modifications or adaptations for use in space. An in-house SCA compliant waveform development focuses on increasing understanding of software defined radio architectures and more specifically the JTRS SCA. Space requirements put a premium on size, mass, and power. This waveform development effort is key to evaluating tradeoffs with the SCA for space applications. Existing NASA telemetry links, as well as Space Exploration Initiative scenarios, are the basis for defining the waveform requirements. Modeling and simulations are being developed to determine signal processing requirements associated with a waveform and a mission-specific computational burden. Implementation of the waveform on a laboratory software defined radio platform is proceeding in an iterative fashion. Parallel top-down and bottom-up design approaches are employed.

  2. Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

    1983-08-01

    The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

  3. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind a rib cage using a high-intensity focused ultrasound phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Ilyin, Sergey A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field, and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low-power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to the formation of high-amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W cm-2 in the free field in water and 40 W cm-2 in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue.

  4. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind a rib cage using a high-intensity focused ultrasound phased array.

    PubMed

    Yuldashev, Petr V; Shmeleva, Svetlana M; Ilyin, Sergey A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Gavrilov, Leonid R; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-04-21

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field, and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low-power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to the formation of high-amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W cm(-2) in the free field in water and 40 W cm(-2) in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue.

  5. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. D.; Busse, L. J.; Lemon, D. K.

    1985-07-30

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  6. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. Dale; Busse, Lawrence J.; Lemon, Douglas K.

    1985-01-01

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  7. Experimental verification of acoustic trace wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A

    2015-12-01

    Directivity is essentially a measure of a sonar array's beamwidth that can be obtained in a spherically isotropic ambient noise field; narrow array mainbeam widths are more directive than broader mainbeam widths. For common sonar systems, the directivity factor (or directivity index) is directly proportional to the ratio of an incident acoustic trace wavelength to the sonar array's physical length (which is always constrained). Increasing this ratio, by creating additional trace wavelengths for a fixed array length, will increase array directivity. Embedding periodic structures within an array generates Bragg scattering of the incident acoustic plane wave along the array's surface. The Bragg scattered propagating waves are shifted in a precise manner and create shorter wavelength replicas of the original acoustic trace wavelength. These replicated trace wavelengths (which contain identical signal arrival information) increase an array's wavelength to length ratio and thus directivity. Therefore, a smaller array, in theory, can have the equivalent directivity of a much larger array. Measurements completed in January 2015 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Acoustic Test Facility, in Newport, RI, verified, near perfectly, these replicated, shorter, trace wavelengths. PMID:26723331

  8. Experimental verification of acoustic trace wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A

    2015-12-01

    Directivity is essentially a measure of a sonar array's beamwidth that can be obtained in a spherically isotropic ambient noise field; narrow array mainbeam widths are more directive than broader mainbeam widths. For common sonar systems, the directivity factor (or directivity index) is directly proportional to the ratio of an incident acoustic trace wavelength to the sonar array's physical length (which is always constrained). Increasing this ratio, by creating additional trace wavelengths for a fixed array length, will increase array directivity. Embedding periodic structures within an array generates Bragg scattering of the incident acoustic plane wave along the array's surface. The Bragg scattered propagating waves are shifted in a precise manner and create shorter wavelength replicas of the original acoustic trace wavelength. These replicated trace wavelengths (which contain identical signal arrival information) increase an array's wavelength to length ratio and thus directivity. Therefore, a smaller array, in theory, can have the equivalent directivity of a much larger array. Measurements completed in January 2015 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Acoustic Test Facility, in Newport, RI, verified, near perfectly, these replicated, shorter, trace wavelengths.

  9. Evaluating harvest-based control of invasive fish with telemetry: Performance of sea lamprey traps in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holbrook, Christopher; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Barber, Jessica M.; Bravener, Gale A; Jones, Michael L.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Physical removal (e.g., harvest via traps or nets) of mature individuals may be a cost-effective or socially acceptable alternative to chemical control strategies for invasive species, but requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of a population over time. We used acoustic telemetry to determine the current and possible future role of traps to control and assess invasive sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus, in the St. Marys River, the connecting channel between Lake Superior and Lake Huron. Exploitation rates (i.e., fractions of an adult sea lamprey population removed by traps) at two upstream locations were compared among three years and two points of entry to the system. Telemetry receivers throughout the drainage allowed trap performance (exploitation rate) to be partitioned into two components: proportion of migrating sea lampreys that visited trap sites (availability) and proportion of available sea lampreys that were caught by traps (local trap efficiency). Estimated exploitation rates were well below those needed to provide population control in the absence of lampricides and were limited by availability and local trap efficiency. Local trap efficiency estimates for acoustic-tagged sea lampreys were lower than analogous estimates regularly obtained using traditional mark–recapture methods, suggesting that abundance had been previously underestimated. Results suggested major changes would be required to substantially increase catch, including improvements to existing traps, installation of new traps, or other modifications to attract and retain more sea lampreys. This case study also shows how bias associated with telemetry tags can be estimated and incorporated in models to improve inferences about parameters that are directly relevant to fishery management.

  10. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  11. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  12. Evaluation of a GPS used in conjunction with aerial telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olexa, E.M.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Podruzny, K.M.; Eiler, John; Alcorn, Doris J.; Neuman, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the use of a non-correctable Global Positioning System (NGPS) in association with aerial telemetry to determine animal locations. Average error was determined for 3 components of the location process: use of a NGPS receiver on the ground, use of a NGPS receiver in a aircraft while flying over a visual marker, and use of the same receiver while flying over a location determined by standard aerial telemetry. Average errors were 45.3, 88.1 and 137.4 m, respectively. A directional bias of <35 m was present for the telemetry component only. Tests indicated that use of NGPS to determine aircraft, and thereby animal, location is an efficient alternative to interpolation from topographic maps. This method was more accurate than previously reported Long-Range Navigation system, version C (LORAN-C) and Argos satellite telemetry. It has utility in areas where animal-borne GPS receivers are not practical due to a combination of topography, canopy coverage, weight or cost of animal-borne GPS units. Use of NGPS technology in conjunction with aerial telemetry will provide the location accuracy required for identification of gross movement patterns and coarse-grained habitat use.

  13. Test-bench system for a borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianping; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Liu, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool (BAAR) is a new generation of imaging logging tool, which is able to investigate stratums in a relatively larger range of space around the borehole. The BAAR is designed based on the idea of modularization with a very complex structure, so it has become urgent for us to develop a dedicated test-bench system to debug each module of the BAAR. With the help of a test-bench system introduced in this paper, test and calibration of BAAR can be easily achieved. The test-bench system is designed based on the client/server model. The hardware system mainly consists of a host computer, an embedded controlling board, a bus interface board, a data acquisition board and a telemetry communication board. The host computer serves as the human machine interface and processes the uploaded data. The software running on the host computer is designed based on VC++. The embedded controlling board uses Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Machines 7 (ARM7) as the micro controller and communicates with the host computer via Ethernet. The software for the embedded controlling board is developed based on the operating system uClinux. The bus interface board, data acquisition board and telemetry communication board are designed based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and provide test interfaces for the logging tool. To examine the feasibility of the test-bench system, it was set up to perform a test on BAAR. By analyzing the test results, an unqualified channel of the electronic receiving cabin was discovered. It is suggested that the test-bench system can be used to quickly determine the working condition of sub modules of BAAR and it is of great significance in improving production efficiency and accelerating industrial production of the logging tool.

  14. Origami acoustics: using principles of folding structural acoustics for simple and large focusing of sound energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, Ryan L.; Lynd, Danielle T.

    2016-08-01

    Fixed in spatial distribution, arrays of planar, electromechanical acoustic transducers cannot adapt their wave energy focusing abilities unless each transducer is externally controlled, creating challenges for the implementation and portability of such beamforming systems. Recently, planar, origami-based structural tessellations are found to facilitate great versatility in system function and properties through kinematic folding. In this research we bridge the physics of acoustics and origami-based design to discover that the simple topological reconfigurations of a Miura-ori-based acoustic array yield many orders of magnitude worth of reversible change in wave energy focusing: a potential for acoustic field morphing easily obtained through deployable, tessellated architectures. Our experimental and theoretical studies directly translate the roles of folding the tessellated array to the adaptations in spectral and spatial wave propagation sensitivities for far field energy transmission. It is shown that kinematic folding rules and flat-foldable tessellated arrays collectively provide novel solutions to the long-standing challenges of conventional, electronically-steered acoustic beamformers. While our examples consider sound radiation from the foldable array in air, linear acoustic reciprocity dictates that the findings may inspire new innovations for acoustic receivers, e.g. adaptive sound absorbers and microphone arrays, as well as concepts that include water-borne waves.

  15. The advanced receiver 2: Telemetry test results in CTA 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, S.; Bevan, R.; Marina, M.

    1991-01-01

    Telemetry tests with the Advanced Receiver II (ARX II) in Compatibility Test Area 21 are described. The ARX II was operated in parallel with a Block-III Receiver/baseband processor assembly combination (BLK-III/BPA) and a Block III Receiver/subcarrier demodulation assembly/symbol synchronization assembly combination (BLK-III/SDA/SSA). The telemetry simulator assembly provided the test signal for all three configurations, and the symbol signal to noise ratio as well as the symbol error rates were measured and compared. Furthermore, bit error rates were also measured by the system performance test computer for all three systems. Results indicate that the ARX-II telemetry performance is comparable and sometimes superior to the BLK-III/BPA and BLK-III/SDA/SSA combinations.

  16. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  17. Behavior Of Costas Loop In Reception Of Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien Manh

    1992-01-01

    Report presents study of behavior of Costas loop in reception of binary non-return-to-zero telemetry signal phase-shift-modulated onto sinusoidal or square-wave subcarrier signal in turn phase-modulated onto carrier signal. Equations describe degradation of performance of Costas loop in terms of phase jitter, conditions causing loss of lock, and other effects. Costas loop used to track telemetry signal with residual carrier in presence of Doppler shift. Performance optimized by suitable choice of bit rate, waveform and frequency of subcarrier, and noise bandwidth of filters in arms of Costas loop.

  18. A Primer for Telemetry Interfacing in Accordance with NASA Standards Using Low Cost FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Jake; Schultz, Ted; Tutt, James; Rogers, Thomas; Miles, Drew; McEntaffer, Randall

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting detector systems on sounding rocket payloads often require interfacing asynchronous outputs with a synchronously clocked telemetry (TM) stream. Though this can be handled with an on-board computer, there are several low cost alternatives including custom hardware, microcontrollers and field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). This paper outlines how a TM interface (TMIF) for detectors on a sounding rocket with asynchronous parallel digital output can be implemented using low cost FPGAs and minimal custom hardware. Low power consumption and high speed FPGAs are available as commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products and can be used to develop the main component of the TMIF. Then, only a small amount of additional hardware is required for signal buffering and level translating. This paper also discusses how this system can be tested with a simulated TM chain in the small laboratory setting using FPGAs and COTS specialized data acquisition products.

  19. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  20. Process and methodology of developing Cassini G and C Telemetry Dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Edwin P.

    1994-01-01

    While the Cassini spacecraft telemetry design had taken on the new approach of 'packetized telemetry', the AACS (Attitude and Articulation Subsystem) had further extended into the design of 'mini-packets' in its telemetry system. Such telemetry packet and mini-packet design produced the AACS Telemetry Dictionary; iterations of the latter in turn provided changes to the former. The ultimate goals were to achieve maximum telemetry packing density, optimize the 'freshness' of more time-critical data, and to effect flexibility, i.e., multiple AACS data collection schemes, without needing to change the overall spacecraft telemetry mode. This paper describes such a systematic process and methodology, evidenced by various design products related to, or as part of, the AACS Telemetry Dictionary.

  1. Performance of the image statistics decoder in conjunction with the Goldstone-VLA array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. C.; Pitt, G. H., III

    1989-01-01

    During Voyager's Neptune encounter, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (VLA) will be arrayed with Goldstone antennas to receive the transmitted telemetry data from the spacecraft. The telemetry signal from the VLA will drop out periodically, resulting in a periodic drop in the received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The Image Statistics Decoder (ISD), which assumes a correlation between pixels, can improve the bit error rate (BER) for images during these dropout periods. Simulation results have shown that the ISD, in conjunction with the Goldstone-VLA array can provide a 3-dB gain for uncompressed images at a BER of 5.0 x 10(exp -3).

  2. Acoustic Transmitters for Underwater Neutrino Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A.; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters. PMID:22666022

  3. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihem, Karim; IceCube Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    New detection techniques for (GZK) neutrinos are required for instrumenting a large detector volume needed to observe the low neutrino fluxes at the EeV energy range. Studies on a larger IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole have been intensively investigated in the last decade. A larger effective volume at a reasonable cost is possible if an acoustic array is a part of a large hybrid detector which includes radio and the existing optical array. The feasibility and the physics capabilities of an acoustic array at the South Pole depend on the knowledge of the acoustic properties of the ice such as the sound speed, the attenuation length, the background noise level and the transient rate. To investigate the ice properties, the first three acoustic strings of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) have been deployed in the austral summer 2006/2007, then completed with an additional string in 2007/2008. With its four strings SPATS was able to evaluate in situ the acoustic properties of the South Pole ice in the 10-100 kHz frequency range. In this paper the performance of SPATS is described, results on the acoustic ice properties are presented and a new drilling method to deploy acoustic strings in ice is introduced.

  4. Acoustic transmitters for underwater neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Ardid, Miguel; Martínez-Mora, Juan A; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to achieve the proposed aim. The developed compact array has practical features such as easy manageability and operation. The prototype designs and the results of different tests are described. The techniques applied for these two acoustic systems are so powerful and versatile that may be of interest in other marine applications using acoustic transmitters.

  5. Microfluidic device for acoustic cell lysis

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W.; Cooley, Erika Jane; Smith, Gennifer Tanabe; James, Conrad D.; McClain, Jaime L.

    2015-08-04

    A microfluidic acoustic-based cell lysing device that can be integrated with on-chip nucleic acid extraction. Using a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array, acoustic waves can be coupled into microfluidic cartridges resulting in the lysis of cells contained therein by localized acoustic pressure. Cellular materials can then be extracted from the lysed cells. For example, nucleic acids can be extracted from the lysate using silica-based sol-gel filled microchannels, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, or Nafion-coated electrodes. Integration of cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction on-chip enables a small, portable system that allows for rapid analysis in the field.

  6. The behavior of a Costas loop in the presence of space telemetry signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. M.

    1988-05-01

    The telemetry modulation index, telemetry bit rate, subcarrier waveform, and subcarrier frequency are shown to be the key system parameters that contribute to the performance degradation of a Costas loop in the presence of space telemetry signals. The effects of the Doppler in the loop are also investigated. The results of this study were input to the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) for consideration in the future standard suppressed-carrier space telemetry system.

  7. The behavior of a Costas loop in the presence of space telemetry signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    The telemetry modulation index, telemetry bit rate, subcarrier waveform, and subcarrier frequency are shown to be the key system parameters that contribute to the performance degradation of a Costas loop in the presence of space telemetry signals. The effects of the Doppler in the loop are also investigated. The results of this study were input to the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) for consideration in the future standard suppressed-carrier space telemetry system.

  8. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  9. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  10. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system. PMID:24836252

  11. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  12. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging.

    PubMed

    Potter, J N; Croxford, A J; Wilcox, P D

    2014-10-01

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  13. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  14. Telemetry with an Optical Fiber Revisited: An Alternative Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    With a new data-acquisition system developed by PASCO scientific, an experiment on telemetry with an optical fiber can be made easier and more accurate. For this aim, an alternative strategy of the remote temperature measurements is proposed: the frequency of light pulses transmitted via the light guide numerically equals the temperature using…

  15. Satellite Telemetry and Command using Big LEO Mobile Telecommunications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegel, Fred

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with satellite telemetry and command using Big LEO mobile telecommunications systems are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Commercial Satellite system overviews: Globalstar, ICO, and Iridium; 2) System capabilities and cost reduction; 3) Satellite constellations and contact limitations; 4) Capabilities of Globalstar, ICO and Iridium with emphasis on Globalstar; and 5) Flight transceiver issues and security.

  16. RF Telemetry System for an Implantable Bio-MEMS Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Hall, David G.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a novel miniature inductor and a pick-up antenna for contact less powering and RF telemetry from implantable bio-MEMS sensors are presented. The design of the inductor and the pick-up antenna are discussed. In addition, the measured characteristics at the design frequency of 330 MHz have been shown.

  17. Radio frequency telemetry system for sensors and actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches apparatus for combining Radio Frequency (RF) technology with novel micro-inductor antennas and signal processing circuits for RF telemetry of real time, measured data, from microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors, through electromagnetic coupling with a remote powering/receiving device. Such technology has many applications, but is especially useful in the biomedical area.

  18. Radio Frequency Telemetry System for Sensors and Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches apparatus for combining Radio Frequency (RF) technology with novel micro-inductor antennas and signal processing circuits for RF telemetry of real time, measured data, from microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors, through electromagnetic coupling with a remote poweringheceiving device. Such technology has many applications, but is especially useful in the biomedical area.

  19. Stability analysis of the multimegabit telemetry demodulator/detector design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    Stability of the multimegabit telemetry digital Costas loop is considered. It is shown that the present design is stable with about 35.2 dB gain margin, and therefore is quite stable. The bandpass filter implementation of the data filters is covered.

  20. Networked Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Tighe

    2002-10-01

    A set of independent radiation sensors, coupled with real-time data telemetry, offers the opportunity to run correlation algorithms for the sensor array as well as to incorporate non-radiological data into the system. This may enhance the overall sensitivity of the sensors and provide an opportunity to project the location of a source within the array. In collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), we have conducted field experiments to test a prototype system. Combining the outputs of a set of distributed sensors permits the correlation that the independent sensor outputs. Combined with additional information such as traffic patterns and velocities, this can reduce random/false detections and enhance detection capability. The principle components of such a system include: (1) A set of radiation sensors. These may be of varying type and complexity, including gamma and/or neutron detectors, gross count and spectral-capable sensors, and low to high energy-resolution sensors. (2) A set of non-radiation sensors. These may include sensors such as vehicle presence and imaging sensors. (3) A communications architecture for near real-time telemetry. Depending upon existing infrastructure and bandwidth requirements, this may be a radio or hard-wire based system. (4) A central command console to pole the sensors, correlate their output, and display the data in a meaningful form to the system operator. Both sensitivity and selectivity are important considerations when evaluating the performance of a detection system. Depending on the application, the optimization of sensitivity as well as the rejection of ''nuisance'' radioactive sources may or may not be critical.

  1. Challenges and prospects in the telemetry of insects.

    PubMed

    Daniel Kissling, W; Pattemore, David E; Hagen, Melanie

    2014-08-01

    Radio telemetry has been widely used to study the space use and movement behaviour of vertebrates, but transmitter sizes have only recently become small enough to allow tracking of insects under natural field conditions. Here, we review the available literature on insect telemetry using active (battery-powered) radio transmitters and compare this technology to harmonic radar and radio frequency identification (RFID) which use passive tags (i.e. without a battery). The first radio telemetry studies with insects were published in the late 1980s, and subsequent studies have addressed aspects of insect ecology, behaviour and evolution. Most insect telemetry studies have focused on habitat use and movement, including quantification of movement paths, home range sizes, habitat selection, and movement distances. Fewer studies have addressed foraging behaviour, activity patterns, migratory strategies, or evolutionary aspects. The majority of radio telemetry studies have been conducted outside the tropics, usually with beetles (Coleoptera) and crickets (Orthoptera), but bees (Hymenoptera), dobsonflies (Megaloptera), and dragonflies (Odonata) have also been radio-tracked. In contrast to the active transmitters used in radio telemetry, the much lower weight of harmonic radar and RFID tags allows them to be used with a broader range of insect taxa. However, the fixed detection zone of a stationary radar unit (< 1 km diameter) and the restricted detection distance of RFID tags (usually < 1-5 m) constitute major constraints of these technologies compared to radio telemetry. Most of the active transmitters in radio telemetry have been applied to insects with a body mass exceeding 1 g, but smaller species in the range 0.2-0.5 g (e.g. bumblebees and orchid bees) have now also been tracked. Current challenges of radio-tracking insects in the field are related to the constraints of a small transmitter, including short battery life (7-21 days), limited tracking range on the ground

  2. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  3. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Z. D.; Carlson, T. J.; Li, H.; Xiao, J.; Myjak, M. J.; Lu, J.; Martinez, J. J.; Woodley, C. M.; Weiland, M. A.; Eppard, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems. PMID:25630763

  4. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z D; Carlson, T J; Li, H; Xiao, J; Myjak, M J; Lu, J; Martinez, J J; Woodley, C M; Weiland, M A; Eppard, M B

    2015-01-01

    Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems. PMID:25630763

  5. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. D.; Carlson, T. J.; Li, H.; Xiao, J.; Myjak, M. J.; Lu, J.; Martinez, J. J.; Woodley, C. M.; Weiland, M. A.; Eppard, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

  6. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z D; Carlson, T J; Li, H; Xiao, J; Myjak, M J; Lu, J; Martinez, J J; Woodley, C M; Weiland, M A; Eppard, M B

    2015-01-29

    Salmon recovery and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish have been attracting national attention due to the environmental and economic implications. In recent years acoustic telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing a bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter lasts four times longer and weighs 30% less than other transmitters. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use and may substantially reduce adverse effects of implantation and tag burden, it will allow for study of migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. The new technology will lead to critical information needed for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

  7. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Li, Huidong; Xiao, Jie; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Lu, Jun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2015-01-29

    Salmon recovery, and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish, has been attracting national attention in due to great environmental and economic implications. Acoustic Telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter offers improved performance and 30% weight reduction. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use, substantially reduces adverse effects of implantation, and provides additional biological benefits for tagged fish, it will become the enabling technology for studying migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. This will lead to critical information for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.

  8. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Li, Huidong; Xiao, Jie; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Lu, Jun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2015-01-29

    Salmon recovery, and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish, has been attracting national attention in due to great environmental and economic implications. Acoustic Telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter offers improved performance and 30% weight reduction. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use, substantially reduces adverse effects of implantation,more » and provides additional biological benefits for tagged fish, it will become the enabling technology for studying migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. This will lead to critical information for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.« less

  9. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  10. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  11. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  12. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  13. Holograms for acoustics.

    PubMed

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound. PMID:27652563

  14. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  15. Seafloor Geodetic Monitoring of the Central Andean Subduction Zone: The Geosea Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Lange, D.; Contreras Reyes, E.; Behrmann, J. H.; McGuire, J. J.; Flueh, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy has been identified as one of the central tools in marine geosciences to monitor seafloor deformation at high resolution. To quantify strain accumulation and assess the resultant hazard potential we urgently need systems to resolve seafloor crustal deformation. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor) array consists of a seafloor transponder network comprising a total of 35 units and a wave glider acting as a surface unit (GeoSURF) to ensure satellite correspondence, data transfer and monitor system health. For horizontal direct path measurements, the system utilizes acoustic ranging techniques with a ranging precision better than 15 mm and long term stability over 2 km distance. Vertical motion is obtained from pressure gauges. Integrated inclinometers monitor station settlement in two horizontal directions. Travel time between instruments and the local water sound velocity will be recorded autonomously subsea without system or human intervention for up to 3.5 years. Data from the autonomous network on the seafloor can be retrieved via the integrated high-speed acoustic telemetry link without recovering the seafloor units. In late 2015 GeoSEA will be installed on the Iquique segment of the South America - Nazca convergent plate boundary to monitor crustal deformation. The Iquique seismic gap experienced the 2014 Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake, which apparently occurred within a local locking minimum. It is thus crucial to better resolve resolve strain in the forearc between the mainland and the trench in order to improve our understanding of forearc deformation required for hazard assessment. Mobile autonomous seafloor arrays for continuous measurement of active seafloor deformation in hazard zones have the potential to lead to transformative discoveries of plate boundary/fault zone tectonic processes and address a novel element of marine geophysical research.

  16. Acoustic vs VHF Lightning Location Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Erives, H.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    A single acoustic array can determine the 3-D location of lightning sources by using time of arrival differences arriving at the microphones and ranging techniques. The range is obtained from the time difference between the electromagnetic emission (detected by the acoustic data logger) and the acoustic signal produced by lightning. Audio frequency acoustic location systems are sensitive to the gas dynamic expansion of portions of a rapidly heating lightning channel, and so acoustic signatures are produced by a wide variety of different lightning discharge processes including: return strokes, K changes, M components, leader stepping and more. Infrasonic frequency range acoustic sensors are also sensitive to gas dynamic expansion, and in addition are also sensitive to processes which are electro-static in nature. RF location systems such as the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and the Continuous Sampling Broadband VHF Digital Interferometer (DITF) from New Mexico Tech (NMT) produce high quality maps of lightning discharges; however, they are sensitive to breakdown processes only and can not locate sources originating in already well conducting channels. During the summer of 2013 an acoustic audio-range array and an infrasound array were co-located with the NMT DITF in the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico, where an LMA is also operating. The audio-range acoustic array consists of custom-designed GPS-synced data loggers with a 50 kHz sampling rate and audio range omnidirectional dynamic microphones. The infrasound array uses GPS time-synced data logger and custom-designed broadband microphones with flat response in the band of 0.01 to 500 Hz. The DITF uses flat plate dE/dt antennas bandpass filtered to 20 to 80 MHz, providing 2D maps of lightning emissions with very high (sub-microsecond) timing resolution. Both acoustic and interferometric arrays of antennas determine location of sources by coherently comparing the signals arriving at the antennas (or

  17. Performance Assessment of Suture Type in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.

    2009-02-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the best overall suture material to close incisions from the surgical implantation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The effects of seven suture materials, four surgeons, and two water temperatures on suture retention, incision openness, tag retention, tissue inflammation, and tissue ulceration were quantified. The laboratory study, conducted by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supports a larger effort under way for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, aimed at determining the suitability of acoustic telemetry for estimating short- and longer-term (30-60 days) juvenile-salmonid survival at Columbia and Snake River dams and through the lower Columbia River.

  18. Bayesian State-Space Modelling of Conventional Acoustic Tracking Provides Accurate Descriptors of Home Range Behavior in a Small-Bodied Coastal Fish Species

    PubMed Central

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Balle, Salvador; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2016-01-01

    State-space models (SSM) are increasingly applied in studies involving biotelemetry-generated positional data because they are able to estimate movement parameters from positions that are unobserved or have been observed with non-negligible observational error. Popular telemetry systems in marine coastal fish consist of arrays of omnidirectional acoustic receivers, which generate a multivariate time-series of detection events across the tracking period. Here we report a novel Bayesian fitting of a SSM application that couples mechanistic movement properties within a home range (a specific case of random walk weighted by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) with a model of observational error typical for data obtained from acoustic receiver arrays. We explored the performance and accuracy of the approach through simulation modelling and extensive sensitivity analyses of the effects of various configurations of movement properties and time-steps among positions. Model results show an accurate and unbiased estimation of the movement parameters, and in most cases the simulated movement parameters were properly retrieved. Only in extreme situations (when fast swimming speeds are combined with pooling the number of detections over long time-steps) the model produced some bias that needs to be accounted for in field applications. Our method was subsequently applied to real acoustic tracking data collected from a small marine coastal fish species, the pearly razorfish, Xyrichtys novacula. The Bayesian SSM we present here constitutes an alternative for those used to the Bayesian way of reasoning. Our Bayesian SSM can be easily adapted and generalized to any species, thereby allowing studies in freely roaming animals on the ecological and evolutionary consequences of home ranges and territory establishment, both in fishes and in other taxa. PMID:27119718

  19. Trophic ecology of reef sharks determined using stable isotopes and telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speed, C. W.; Meekan, M. G.; Field, I. C.; McMahon, C. R.; Abrantes, K.; Bradshaw, C. J. A.

    2012-06-01

    Establishing the ecological role of predators within an ecosystem is central to understanding community dynamics and is useful in designing effective management and conservation strategies. We analysed differences in the trophic ecology of four species of reef sharks ( Carcharhinus melanopterus, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, Triaenodon obesus and Negaprion acutidens) at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, by analysing tissue stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C). We also monitored animals using acoustic telemetry to determine long-term residency patterns in a bay at the southern end of the reef, Coral Bay. Overall, mean δ13C was similar among species, ranging between -10.9 and -11.8‰, suggesting a food-web dependency on coastal producers. Classification and regression tree analysis identified an effect of species on δ15N that separated C. amblyrhynchos and C. melanopterus from N. acutidens and T. obesus. For C. amblyrhynchos and C. melanopterus, animals were also divided by size classes, with smaller sharks having lower average δ15N than larger animals; this suggests that δ15N increases with size for these two species. Juvenile C. melanopterus, juvenile N. acutidens and adult T. obesus had trophic levels of 3.7, for juvenile C. amblyrhynchos and adult C. melanopterus it was 4, and adult C. amblyrhynchos had a value of 4.3. Trophic-level estimates for C. melanopterus and C. amblyrhynchos corroborate previous conclusions based on diet studies. We found no evidence for a difference in isotopic composition between resident and non-resident sharks. The lack of variation in isotopic composition was consistent with high mean residency of these species recorded using acoustic telemetry, which was 79% (±0.09 SE) of days monitored for T. obesus, followed by N. acutidens (57 ± 19.55%), C. amblyrhynchos (54 ± 13%) and C. melanopterus (33 ± 8.28%). High δ13C composition in reef sharks and long-term residency behaviour suggest that coastal marine reserves might provide

  20. First images of thunder: Acoustic imaging of triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Evans, N. D.; Fuselier, S. A.; Trevino, J.; Ramaekers, J.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    An acoustic camera comprising a linear microphone array is used to image the thunder signature of triggered lightning. Measurements were taken at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in Camp Blanding, FL, during the summer of 2014. The array was positioned in an end-fire orientation thus enabling the peak acoustic reception pattern to be steered vertically with a frequency-dependent spatial resolution. On 14 July 2014, a lightning event with nine return strokes was successfully triggered. We present the first acoustic images of individual return strokes at high frequencies (>1 kHz) and compare the acoustically inferred profile with optical images. We find (i) a strong correlation between the return stroke peak current and the radiated acoustic pressure and (ii) an acoustic signature from an M component current pulse with an unusual fast rise time. These results show that acoustic imaging enables clear identification and quantification of thunder sources as a function of lightning channel altitude.

  1. Gas sensing with acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.; Spates, J.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    A survey is made of acoustic devices that are suitable as gas and vapor sensors. This survey focuses on attributes such as operating frequency, mass sensitivity, quality factor (Q), and their ability to be fabricated on a semiconductor substrate to allow integration with electronic circuitry. The treatment of the device surface with chemically-sensitive films to detect species of interest is discussed. Strategies for improving discrimination are described, including sensor arrays and species concentration and separation schemes. The advantages and disadvantages of integrating sensors with microelectronics are considered, along with the effect on sensitivity of scaling acoustic gas sensors to smaller size.

  2. Acoustic-emission linear-pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Lemon, D.K.; Busse, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography which combines the advantages of linear imaging and acoustic emission into a single NDE inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. Conventional linear holographic imaging uses an ultrasonic transducer to transmit energy into the volume being imaged. When the crack or defect reflects that energy, the crack acts as a new source of acoustic waves. To formulate an image of that source, a receiving transducer is scanned over the volume of interest and the phase of the received signals is measured at successive points on the scan. The innovation proposed here is the utilization of the crack generated acoustic emission as the acoustic source and generation of a line image of the crack as it grows. A thirty-two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The phases are calculated using the pulse time-of-flight (TOF) times from the reference transducer to the array of receivers. Computer reconstruction of the image is accomplished using a one-dimensional FFT algorithm (i.e., backward wave). Experimental results are shown which graphically illustrate the unique acoustic emission images of a single point and a linear crack in a 100 mm x 1220 mm x 1220 mm aluminum plate.

  3. Optical transcutaneous link for low power, high data rate telemetry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianyi; Bihr, Ulrich; Anis, Syed M; Ortmanns, Maurits

    2012-01-01

    A low power and high data rate wireless optical link for implantable data transmission is presented in this paper. In some neural prosthetic applications particularly in regard to neural recording system, there is a demand for high speed communication between an implanted device and an external device. An optical transcutaneous link is a promising implantable telemetry solution, since it shows lower power requirements than RF telemetry. In this paper, this advantage is further enhanced by using a modified on-off keying and a simple custom designed low power VCSEL driver. This transmitter achieves an optical transcutaneous link capable of transmitting data at 50 Mbps through the 4 mm tissue, with a tolerance of 2 mm misalignment and a BER of less than 10(-5), while the power consumption is only 4.1 mW or less. PMID:23366690

  4. The ESA standard for telemetry and telecommand packet utilisation: PUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufeler, Jean-Francois

    1994-01-01

    ESA has developed standards for packet telemetry and telecommand, which are derived from the recommendations of the Inter-Agency Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS). These standards are now mandatory for future ESA programs as well as for many programs currently under development. However, while these packet standards address the end-to-end transfer of telemetry and telecommand data between applications on the ground and Application Processes on-board, they leave open the internal structure or content of the packets. This paper presents the ESA Packet Utilization Standard (PUS) which addresses this very subject and, as such, serves to extend and complement the ESA packet standards. The goal of the PUS is to be applicable to future ESA missions in all application areas (Telecommunications, Science, Earth Resources, microgravity, etc.). The production of the PUS falls under the responsibility of the ESA Committee for Operations and EGSE Standards (COES).

  5. A miniaturized digital telemetry system for physiological data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portnoy, W. M.; Stotts, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiological date telemetry system, consisting basically of a portable unit and a ground base station was designed, built, and tested. The portable unit to be worn by the subject is composed of a single crystal controlled transmitter with AM transmission of digital data and narrowband FM transmission of voice; a crystal controlled FM receiver; thirteen input channels follwed by a PCM encoder (three of these channels are designed for ECG data); a calibration unit; and a transponder control system. The ground base station consists of a standard telemetry reciever, a decoder, and an FM transmitter for transmission of voice and transponder signals to the portable unit. The ground base station has complete control of power to all subsystems in the portable unit. The phase-locked loop circuit which is used to decode the data, remains in operation even when the signal from the portable unit is interrupted.

  6. A multichannel physiological data/voice telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portnoy, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    A seven channel physiological telemetry system was designed, constructed, and tested for a space environment to transfer physiological and voice information to and from an astronaut. Three ECG leads were monitored simultaneously, and two-way voice communication was achieved. The portable unit operated properly under ground based station (GBS) control. The major design problem was associated with the constraints of a wide bandwidth FM transmitter with crystal control combined with the tri-state logic format used. However, by using an ''indirect FM'' scheme and incorporating additional waveshaping circuits at the GBS, proper operation of the system was obtained. In the present form, the telemetry system has capability for seven channels of low level (2.5 mv peak maximum) physiological signals with bandwidths between 0.03 Hz and 100 Hz. Additional signal conditioning and modification of the instrumentation amplifier gains are required for other signals.

  7. A portable computer-augmented telemetry system (PCATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, L.; Shaw, H.

    The design and operation of PCATS, an integrated PC-based telemetry ground station developed for the U.S. Army, are described and illustrated with extensive block diagrams. The PCATS hardware includes an 8-MHz 80286-based computer with mathematics coprocessor, a PCM bit synchronizer/decoder, a decommutator, a 16-channel D/A converter, and a 120-Mb hard disk and a 9-track digital tape drive for telemetry data storage. Consideration is given to the performance of real-time data logging, data scaling and display, and analog output; playback capabilities; hard-copy reports; and data analysis. The PCATS software is menu-driven and provides setup, analysis, and utility functions while minimizing hardware requirements.

  8. CCSDS telemetry systems experience at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Richard D.; Stallings, William H., III

    1990-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) designs, builds, manages, and operates science and applications spacecraft in near-earth orbit, and provides data capture, data processing, and flight control services for these spacecraft. In addition, GSFC has the responsibility of providing space-ground and ground-ground communications for near-earth orbiting spacecraft, including those of the manned spaceflight programs. The goal of reducing both the developmental and operating costs of the end-to-end information system has led the GSFC to support and participate in the standardization activities of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), including those for packet telemetry. The environment in which such systems function is described, and the GSFC experience with CCSDS packet telemetry in the context of the Gamma-Ray Observatory project is discussed.

  9. CCSDS telemetry systems experience at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carper, Richard D.; Stallings, William H., III

    1990-09-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) designs, builds, manages, and operates science and applications spacecraft in near-earth orbit, and provides data capture, data processing, and flight control services for these spacecraft. In addition, GSFC has the responsibility of providing space-ground and ground-ground communications for near-earth orbiting spacecraft, including those of the manned spaceflight programs. The goal of reducing both the developmental and operating costs of the end-to-end information system has led the GSFC to support and participate in the standardization activities of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), including those for packet telemetry. The environment in which such systems function is described, and the GSFC experience with CCSDS packet telemetry in the context of the Gamma-Ray Observatory project is discussed.

  10. A spatial mark–resight model augmented with telemetry data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sollmann, Rachel; Gardner, Beth; Parsons, Arielle W.; Stocking, Jessica J.; McClintock, Brett T.; Simons, Theodore R.; Pollock, Kenneth H.; O’Connell, Allan F.

    2013-01-01

    Abundance and population density are fundamental pieces of information for population ecology and species conservation, but they are difficult to estimate for rare and elusive species. Mark-resight models are popular for estimating population abundance because they are less invasive and expensive than traditional mark-recapture. However, density estimation using mark-resight is difficult because the area sampled must be explicitly defined, historically using ad-hoc approaches. We develop a spatial mark-resight model for estimating population density that combines spatial resighting data and telemetry data. Incorporating telemetry data allows us to inform model parameters related to movement and individual location. Our model also allows 2. The model presented here will have widespread utility in future applications, especially for species that are not naturally marked.

  11. Telemetry, tracking, and command consolidation in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Odea, J. Andrew; Bryant, Scott H.; Guerreo, Ana Maria P.; Louie, John J.

    2001-01-01

    Currently, in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) functions are distributed between multiple subsystem computers. Control design of these subsystems did not consider the interaction necessary between the functions, which create opportunities for loss of data. Also, the current controller design can force the use of equipment that is not needed for the task at hand, to the detriment of others. As part of the Network Simplification Project (NSP), the TTC implementation has been re-examined, New telemetry and commanding equipment is being built, and the control of the TT&C functions is being consolidated into two controllers, Uplink and Downlink. The new equipment uses commercial components, as opposed to the custom built equipment it is replacing, which improves reliability and simplifies maintenance.

  12. Using Geostationary Communications Satellites as a Sensor: Telemetry Search Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, K.; Carlton, A.; Lohmeyer, W. Q.

    2014-12-01

    For decades, operators and manufacturers have collected large amounts of telemetry from geostationary (GEO) communications satellites to monitor system health and performance, yet this data is rarely mined for scientific purposes. The goal of this work is to mine data archives acquired from commercial operators using new algorithms that can detect when a space weather (or non-space weather) event of interest has occurred or is in progress. We have developed algorithms to statistically analyze power amplifier current and temperature telemetry and identify deviations from nominal operations or other trends of interest. We then examine space weather data to see what role, if any, it might have played. We also closely examine both long and short periods of time before an anomaly to determine whether or not the anomaly could have been predicted.

  13. Ground equipment for the support of packet telemetry and telecommand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hell, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes ground equipment for packet telemetry and telecommand which has been recently developed by industry for the European Space Agency. The architectural concept for this type of equipment is outlined and the actual implementation is presented. Focus is put on issues related to cross support and telescience as far as they affect the design of the interfaces to the users of the services provided by the equipment and to the management entities in charge of equipment control and monitoring.

  14. High speed preprocessing in real time telemetry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, O. J.; O'Brien, Michael

    A versatile high-speed preprocessor, the EMR 8715, is described which is used as a closed-coupled input device for the host computer in a telemetry system. Much of the data and time merging, number conversion, floating-point processing, and data distribution are performed by the system, reducing the host load. The EMR 8715 allows a choice of serial processing, parallel processing, or a combination of the two, on a measurement-by-measurement basis.

  15. A multichannel EEG telemetry system utilizing a PCM subcarrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1974-01-01

    A multichannel personal-type telemetry system is described that utilizes PCM encoding for the most effective range with minimum RF bandwidth and noise interference. Recent IC developments (COS MOS) make it possible to implement a sophisticated encoding system (PCM) within the low power and size constraints necessary for a personal biotelemetry system. This system includes low-level high-impedance preamplifiers to make the system suitable for EEG recording.

  16. Systems utilization enhancement data system overview. [for PCM telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, J. Andre

    1987-01-01

    An overview of the Systems Utilization Enhancement (SUE) data system is presented. The subsystems are described, including the telemetry processor, communications processor, digital maintenance and control subsystem, link console subsystem, digital recording subsystem, communications processor SUE system interface unit, data quality monitoring subsystem, analog parameter and event recorder, status SUE system interface unit, and portable maintenance subsystem. Hardware design considerations are discussed, including architecture, coupling, commonality, modularity. reliability, fault-tolerance, and growth.

  17. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Dushaw, Brian D; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Heaney, Kevin D; D'Spain, Gerald L; Colosi, John A; Stephen, Ralph A; Kemp, John N; Howe, Bruce M; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Wage, Kathleen E

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments conducted in the Philippine Sea during 2009-2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise in this oceanographically and geologically complex region: (i) the 2009 North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) Pilot Study/Engineering Test, (ii) the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment, and (iii) the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation of the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment. The experimental goals included (a) understanding the impacts of fronts, eddies, and internal tides on acoustic propagation, (b) determining whether acoustic methods, together with other measurements and ocean modeling, can yield estimates of the time-evolving ocean state useful for making improved acoustic predictions, (c) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves and spice, (d) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal variability of ambient noise, and (e) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor. In these experiments, moored and ship-suspended low-frequency acoustic sources transmitted to a newly developed distributed vertical line array receiver capable of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also recorded by a towed hydrophone array, by acoustic Seagliders, and by ocean bottom seismometers.

  18. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Dushaw, Brian D; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Heaney, Kevin D; D'Spain, Gerald L; Colosi, John A; Stephen, Ralph A; Kemp, John N; Howe, Bruce M; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Wage, Kathleen E

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments conducted in the Philippine Sea during 2009-2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise in this oceanographically and geologically complex region: (i) the 2009 North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) Pilot Study/Engineering Test, (ii) the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment, and (iii) the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation of the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment. The experimental goals included (a) understanding the impacts of fronts, eddies, and internal tides on acoustic propagation, (b) determining whether acoustic methods, together with other measurements and ocean modeling, can yield estimates of the time-evolving ocean state useful for making improved acoustic predictions, (c) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves and spice, (d) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal variability of ambient noise, and (e) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor. In these experiments, moored and ship-suspended low-frequency acoustic sources transmitted to a newly developed distributed vertical line array receiver capable of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also recorded by a towed hydrophone array, by acoustic Seagliders, and by ocean bottom seismometers. PMID:24116529

  19. Advanced telemetry systems for payloads. Technology needs, objectives and issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The current trends in advanced payload telemetry are the new developments in advanced modulation/coding, the applications of intelligent techniques, data distribution processing, and advanced signal processing methodologies. Concerted efforts will be required to design ultra-reliable man-rated software to cope with these applications. The intelligence embedded and distributed throughout various segments of the telemetry system will need to be overridden by an operator in case of life-threatening situations, making it a real-time integration issue. Suitable MIL standards on physical interfaces and protocols will be adopted to suit the payload telemetry system. New technologies and techniques will be developed for fast retrieval of mass data. Currently, these technology issues are being addressed to provide more efficient, reliable, and reconfigurable systems. There is a need, however, to change the operation culture. The current role of NASA as a leader in developing all the new innovative hardware should be altered to save both time and money. We should use all the available hardware/software developed by the industry and use the existing standards rather than inventing our own.

  20. Advanced telemetry systems for payloads. Technology needs, objectives and issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-08-01

    The current trends in advanced payload telemetry are the new developments in advanced modulation/coding, the applications of intelligent techniques, data distribution processing, and advanced signal processing methodologies. Concerted efforts will be required to design ultra-reliable man-rated software to cope with these applications. The intelligence embedded and distributed throughout various segments of the telemetry system will need to be overridden by an operator in case of life-threatening situations, making it a real-time integration issue. Suitable MIL standards on physical interfaces and protocols will be adopted to suit the payload telemetry system. New technologies and techniques will be developed for fast retrieval of mass data. Currently, these technology issues are being addressed to provide more efficient, reliable, and reconfigurable systems. There is a need, however, to change the operation culture. The current role of NASA as a leader in developing all the new innovative hardware should be altered to save both time and money. We should use all the available hardware/software developed by the industry and use the existing standards rather than inventing our own.