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Sample records for acoustic thermography acat

  1. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (acat) Inspection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Yost, W. T.

    2008-02-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of +/-6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  2. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) Inspection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph; Winfree, William P.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of plus or minus 6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  3. Application of air-coupled acoustic thermography (ACAT) for inspection of honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Pergantis, Charles G.; DeSchepper, Daniel; Flanagan, David

    2009-05-01

    The application of a noncontact air coupled acoustic heating technique is investigated for the inspection of advanced honeycomb composite structures. A weakness in the out of plane stiffness of the structure, caused by a delamination or core damage, allows for the coupling of acoustic energy and thus this area will have a higher temperature than the surrounding area. Air coupled acoustic thermography (ACAT) measurements were made on composite sandwich structures with damage and were compared to conventional flash thermography. A vibrating plate model is presented to predict the optimal acoustic source frequency. Improvements to the measurement technique are also discussed.

  4. Application of Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) for Inspection of Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Pergantis, Charles; Flanagan, David; Deschepper, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The application of a noncontact air coupled acoustic heating technique is investigated for the inspection of advanced honeycomb composite structures. A weakness in the out of plane stiffness of the structure, caused by a delamination or core damage, allows for the coupling of acoustic energy and thus this area will have a higher temperature than the surrounding area. Air coupled acoustic thermography (ACAT) measurements were made on composite sandwich structures with damage and were compared to conventional flash thermography. A vibrating plate model is presented to predict the optimal acoustic source frequency. Improvements to the measurement technique are also discussed.

  5. Air-coupled acoustic thermography for in-situ evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic thermography uses a housing configured for thermal, acoustic and infrared radiation shielding. For in-situ applications, the housing has an open side adapted to be sealingly coupled to a surface region of a structure such that an enclosed chamber filled with air is defined. One or more acoustic sources are positioned to direct acoustic waves through the air in the enclosed chamber and towards the surface region. To activate and control each acoustic source, a pulsed signal is applied thereto. An infrared imager focused on the surface region detects a thermal image of the surface region. A data capture device records the thermal image in synchronicity with each pulse of the pulsed signal such that a time series of thermal images is generated. For enhanced sensitivity and/or repeatability, sound and/or vibrations at the surface region can be used in feedback control of the pulsed signal applied to the acoustic sources.

  6. Thermography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cage, Bob N.

    1984-01-01

    Thermography, a diagnostic tool that combines photography and infrared sensing, permits direct measurement of apparent surface temperatures. Building energy losses can be detected and correction measures planned. Criteria for the use of thermography are provided. (MLF)

  7. Dynamic deep temperature recovery by acoustic thermography using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Vilkov, V. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2013-11-01

    In an experiment, the deep temperature, which changed with time, was recovered for a model object, bovine liver. The liver was heated for 6 min by laser radiation (810 nm), transmitted via a light guide to a depth of 1 cm. During heating and subsequent cooling, the deep temperature was measured by acoustic thermography. For independent control, we used three electronic telemeters, the indications of which were also subsequently recovered. Deep temperature was recovered using a neural network with a time delay. During the last 2 min of heating, the mean square error of recovery for an averaging time of 50 s did not exceed 0.5°C. Such a result makes it possible to use this method for solving a number of medical problems.

  8. Monitoring the fracture behavior in ceramic matrix composites by infrared thermography and acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Kordatos, Evangelos Z.; Aggelis, Dimitris G.; Exarchos, Dimitris A.; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2014-04-01

    In this work an innovative methodology was employed for monitoring the fracture behavior in silicon carbide fiberreinforced ceramic matrix composites. This new methodology was based on the combined use of IR thermography and acoustic emission. Compact tension SiC/BMAS specimens were tested with unloading/reloading loops and the thermal dissipation due to crack propagation and other damage mechanisms was monitored by IR thermography. The accuracy of this technique was benchmarked by optical measurements of crack length. In addition, using acoustic emission descriptors, such as activity during the unloading part of the cycles, provided the critical level of damage accumulation in the material. Acoustic emission allowed to closely follow the actual crack growth monitored by IR thermography, enabling quantitative measurements.

  9. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow

    PubMed Central

    Sou, In Mei; Layman, Christopher N.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  10. Damage depth estimation on a fatigue loaded composite structure using thermography and acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Horne, Michael R.

    2017-02-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained on a three stringer panel during periodic fatigue loading. The acoustic emission data were mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. Furthermore, sudden changes in thermally measured damage growth related to a previously measured higher energy acoustic emission event are studied to determine damage depth. A thermal model with a periodic flux heat source is presented to determine the relationship between the damage depth and thermal response. The model results are compared to the measured data. Lastly, the practical application and limitations of this technique are discussed.

  11. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  12. Monitoring of fatigue damage in metal plates by acoustic emission and thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordatos, E. Z.; Aggelis, D. G.; Matikas, T. E.

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) supplies information on the fracturing behavior of different materials. In this study, AE activity was recorded during fatigue experiments in metal CT specimens with a V-shape notch which were loaded in fatigue until final failure. AE parameters exhibit a sharp increase approximately 1000 cycles before than final failure. Therefore, the use of acoustic emission parameters is discussed both in terms of characterization of the damage mechanisms, as well as a tool for the prediction of ultimate life of the material under fatigue. Additionally, an innovative nondestructive methodology based on lock-in thermography is developed to determine the crack growth rate using thermographic mapping of the material undergoing fatigue. The thermographic results on the crack growth rate of aluminium alloys were then correlated with measurements obtained by the conventional compliance method, and found to be in agreement.

  13. Comparison of Detection Capability for Acoustic Thermography, Visual Inspection and Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection on Gas Turbine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Ruhge, F. R.

    2009-03-01

    The innovative NDE inspection system Acoustic Thermography is developed with Sonic Infrared (Sonic IR) technology. Since the probability of detection is sensitive to the flaw characteristics, the fabricated flaws could not simulated the nature flaws with accuracy. The study is focus on gas turbine blades with service induced fatigue cracks. The detection capability of this innovative NDE inspection system is compared with two traditional NDE methods: Visual Inspection and Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection. POD curves for each technique were generated and compared.

  14. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  15. Identification of ACAT1- and ACAT2-specific inhibitors using a novel, cell-based fluorescence assay: individual ACAT uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Lada, Aaron T; Davis, Matthew; Kent, Carol; Chapman, James; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Omura, Satoshi; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2004-02-01

    Acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) and ACAT2 are enzymes responsible for the formation of cholesteryl esters in tissues. While both ACAT1 and ACAT2 are present in the liver and intestine, the cells containing either enzyme within these tissues are distinct, suggesting that ACAT1 and ACAT2 have separate functions. In this study, NBD-cholesterol was used to screen for specific inhibitors of ACAT1 and ACAT2. Incubation of AC29 cells, which do not contain ACAT activity, with NBD-cholesterol showed weak fluorescence when the compound was localized in the membrane. When AC29 cells stably transfected with either ACAT1 or ACAT2 were incubated with NBD-cholesterol, the fluorescent signal localized to the nonpolar core of cytoplasmic lipid droplets was strongly fluorescent and was correlated with two independent measures of ACAT activity. Several compounds were found to have greater inhibitory activity toward ACAT1 than ACAT2, and one compound was identified that specifically inhibits ACAT2. The demonstration of selective inhibition of ACAT1 and ACAT2 provides evidence for uniqueness in structure and function of these two enzymes. To the extent that ACAT2 is confined to hepatocytes and enterocytes, the only two cell types that secrete lipoproteins, selective inhibition of ACAT2 may prove to be most beneficial in the reduction of plasma lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.

  16. Immunological quantitation and localization of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 in human liver and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Sakashita, N; Ornvold, K; Lee, O; Chang, E T; Dong, R; Lin, S; Lee, C Y; Strom, S C; Kashyap, R; Fung, J J; Farese, R V; Patoiseau, J F; Delhon, A; Chang, T Y

    2000-09-08

    By using specific anti-ACAT-1 antibodies in immunodepletion studies, we previously found that ACAT-1, a 50-kDa protein, plays a major catalytic role in the adult human liver, adrenal glands, macrophages, and kidneys but not in the intestine. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the intestine may be largely derived from a different ACAT protein. To test this hypothesis, we produced specific polyclonal anti-ACAT-2 antibodies that quantitatively immunodepleted human ACAT-2, a 46-kDa protein expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. In hepatocyte-like HepG2 cells, ACAT-1 comprises 85-90% of the total ACAT activity, with the remainder attributed to ACAT-2. In adult intestines, most of the ACAT activity can be immunodepleted by anti-ACAT-2. ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 do not form hetero-oligomeric complexes. In differentiating intestinal enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, ACAT-2 protein content increases by 5-10-fold in 6 days, whereas ACAT-1 protein content remains relatively constant. In the small intestine, ACAT-2 is concentrated at the apices of the villi, whereas ACAT-1 is uniformly distributed along the villus-crypt axis. In the human liver, ACAT-1 is present in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. In contrast, ACAT-2 is evident in fetal but not adult hepatocytes. Our results collectively suggest that in humans, ACAT-2 performs significant catalytic roles in the fetal liver and in intestinal enterocytes.

  17. Session 3 in ACAT05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, J.

    2006-04-01

    Activities in Session 3 of AIHENP/ACAT series are reviewed. In the perturbative approaches in high energy physics, this session keeps a special position among several similar other workshops because it deals with the massive usage of computers and/or artificial intelligence, not only physics consequences. In this edition of the series there appear in addition two new topics on the lattice QCD and the quantum computation.

  18. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  19. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  20. A novel technical approach for the measurement of individual ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 enzymatic activity in the testis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Lafond, Julie; Pelletier, R-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is implicated in the esterification of cholesterol when the latter is present at concentrations exceeding metabolic demands. Thus, ACAT contributes to the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis which in testis is essential for the production of fertile gametes. However, the role of individual isoform of the enzyme in the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis in the gonads has not been addressed yet because approaches to measure the enzymatic activity of each isoform were lacking. Here, we used the selective ACAT-1 inhibitor, K-604, to measure the individual enzymatic activity of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 in enriched fractions of mouse seminiferous tubules. K-604 inhibited adult mouse ACAT-1 much more than ACAT-2 with IC(50) values of 100 and 1,000 microM, respectively, in the tubules. Next, the inhibitor concentration (100 microM) that inhibits the activity of ACAT-1 but not the activity of ACAT-2 was determined and applied to measure ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 enzymatic activities in mouse seminiferous tubule-enriched fractions. ACAT-2 activity reached 2173 CPMB/200 microg protein, while ACAT-1 enzymatic activity was 713 CPMB/200 microg proteins in the tubules. We also compared the effect of another inhibitor Manassantin B with K-604. Increasing the concentration (0-1,000 microM) of Manassantin B resulted in the inhibition of the activity of both ACAT-1 and ACAT-2. The results show that only K-604 is a useful tool to determine the individual ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 enzymatic activities in the seminiferous tubules.

  1. ACAT inhibition and amyloid beta reduction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Raja; Kovacs, Dora M

    2010-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Accumulation and deposition of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide generated from its larger amyloid precursor protein (APP) is one of the pathophysiological hallmarks of AD. Intracellular cholesterol was shown to regulate Abeta production. Recent genetic and biochemical studies indicate that not only the amount, but also the distribution of intracellular cholesterol is critical to regulate Abeta generation. Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT) is a family of enzymes that regulates the cellular distribution of cholesterol by converting membrane cholesterol into hydrophobic cholesteryl esters for cholesterol storage and transport. Using pharmacological inhibitors and transgenic animal models, we and others have identified ACAT1 as a potential therapeutic target to lower Abeta generation and accumulation. Here we discuss data focusing on ACAT inhibition as an effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  2. Human ACAT inhibitory effects of shikonin derivatives from Lithospermum erythrorhizon.

    PubMed

    An, Sojin; Park, Yong-Dae; Paik, Young-Ki; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Lee, Woo Song

    2007-02-15

    Three naphthoquinones were isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation from the CHCl(3) extracts of roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon. They were identified as acetylshikonin (1), isobutyrylshikonin (2), and beta-hydroxyisovalerylshikonin (3) on the basis of their spectroscopic analyses. The compounds 1-3 were tested for their inhibitory activities against human ACAT-1 (hACAT-1) or human ACAT-2 (hACAT-2). Compound 2 preferentially inhibited hACAT-2 (IC(50)=57.5microM) than hACAT-1 (32% at 120microM), whereas compounds 1 and 3 showed weak inhibitory activities in both hACAT-1 and -2. To develop more potent hACAT inhibitor, shikonin derivatives (5-11) were synthesized by semi-synthesis of shikonin (4), which was prepared by hydrolysis of 1-3. Among them, compounds 5 and 7 exhibited the strong inhibitory activities against hACAT-1 and -2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that compound 7 behaved as a potent ACAT inhibitor in not only in vitro assay system but also cell-based assay system.

  3. Knockdown of ACAT-1 reduces amyloidogenic processing of APP.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Henri J; Greco, Christopher; Kovacs, Dora M

    2007-04-17

    Previous studies have shown that acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT), an enzyme that controls cellular equilibrium between free cholesterol and cholesteryl esters, modulates proteolytic processing of APP in cell-based and animal models of Alzheimer's disease. Here we report that ACAT-1 RNAi reduced cellular ACAT-1 protein by approximately 50% and cholesteryl ester levels by 22% while causing a slight increase in the free cholesterol content of ER membranes. This correlated with reduced proteolytic processing of APP and 40% decrease in Abeta secretion. These data show that even a modest decrease in ACAT activity can have robust suppressive effects on Abeta generation.

  4. ACAT inhibitors: the search for novel cholesterol lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Pal, Palash; Gandhi, Hardik; Giridhar, Rajani; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2013-06-01

    Increased level of serum cholesterol (hyperlipidemia) is the most significant risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Cholesterol levels are affected by factors such as rate of endogenous cholesterol synthesis, biliary cholesterol excretion and dietary cholesterol absorption. Acyl CoA: Cholesterol O-acyl transferases (ACAT) are a small family of enzymes that catalyze cholesterol esterification and cholesterol absorption in intestinal mucosal cells and maintain the cholesterol homeostasis in the blood. Inhibition of the ACAT enzymes is one of the attractive targets to treat hyperlipidemia. Literature survey shows that structurally diverse compounds possess ACAT inhibitory properties. In this review, a comprehensive presentation of the literature on diverse ACAT inhibitors has been given.

  5. Compared with Acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT) 1 and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, ACAT2 displays the greatest capacity to differentiate cholesterol from sitosterol.

    PubMed

    Temel, Ryan E; Gebre, Abraham K; Parks, John S; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2003-11-28

    The capacity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT) 2 to differentiate cholesterol from the plant sterol, sitosterol, was compared with that of the sterol esterifying enzymes, ACAT1 and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Cholesterol-loaded microsomes from transfected cells containing either ACAT1 or ACAT2 exhibited significantly more ACAT activity than their sitosterol-loaded counterparts. In sitosterol-loaded microsomes, both ACAT1 and ACAT2 were able to esterify sitosterol albeit with lower efficiencies than cholesterol. The mass ratios of cholesterol ester to sitosterol ester formed by ACAT1 and ACAT2 were 1.6 and 7.2, respectively. Compared with ACAT1, ACAT2 selectively esterified cholesterol even when sitosterol was loaded into the microsomes. To further characterize the difference in sterol specificity, ACAT1 and ACAT2 were compared in intact cells loaded with either cholesterol or sitosterol. Despite a lower level of ACAT activity, the ACAT1-expressing cells esterified 4-fold more sitosterol than the ACAT2 cells. The data showed that compared with ACAT1, ACAT2 displayed significantly greater selectively for cholesterol compared with sitosterol. The plasma cholesterol esterification enzyme lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase was also compared. With recombinant high density lipoprotein particles, the esterification rate of cholesterol by LCAT was only 15% greater than for sitosterol. Thus, LCAT was able to efficiently esterify both cholesterol and sitosterol. In contrast, ACAT2 demonstrated a strong preference for cholesterol rather than sitosterol. This sterol selectivity by ACAT2 may reflect a role in the sorting of dietary sterols during their absorption by the intestine in vivo.

  6. Human ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 inhibitory activities of pentacyclic triterpenes from the leaves of Lycopus lucidus TURCZ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Song; Im, Kyung-Ran; Park, Yong-Dae; Sung, Nack-Do; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2006-02-01

    Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes the acylation of cholesterol to cholesteryl ester with long chain fatty acids and ACAT inhibition is a useful strategy for treating hypercholesterolemia or atherosclerosis. Pentacyclic triterpenes, ursolic acid (1), oleanolic acid (2), and betulinic acid (3) were isolated from the methanol extracts of the leaves of Lycopus lucidus TURCZ. by bioassay-guided fractionation. The structures of compounds 1-3 were elucidated by their spectroscopic data analysis. Among them, betulinic acid (3) exhibited more potent human ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 inhibitory activities with IC(50) values of 16.2+/-0.6 and 28.8+/-1.3 microM, respectively.

  7. Identification of potential ACAT-2 selective inhibitors using pharmacophore, SVM and SVR from Chinese herbs.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Xian-Bao; Jiang, Lu-di; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Li, Gong-Yu

    2016-11-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) plays an important role in maintaining cellular and organismal cholesterol homeostasis. Two types of ACAT isozymes with different functions exist in mammals, named ACAT-1 and ACAT-2. Numerous studies showed that ACAT-2 selective inhibitors are effective for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. However, as a typical endoplasmic reticulum protein, ACAT-2 protein has not been purified and revealed, so combinatorial ligand-based methods might be the optimal strategy for discovering the ACAT-2 selective inhibitors. In this study, selective pharmacophore models of ACAT-1 inhibitors and ACAT-2 inhibitors were built, respectively. The optimal pharmacophore model for each subtype was identified and utilized as queries for the Traditional Chinese Medicine Database screening. A total of 180 potential ACAT-2 selective inhibitors were obtained, which were identified using an ACAT-2 pharmacophore and not by our ACAT-1 model. Selective SVM model and bioactive SVR model were generated for further identification of the obtained ACAT-2 inhibitors. Ten compounds were finally obtained with predicted inhibitory activities toward ACAT-2. Hydrogen bond acceptor, 2D autocorrelations, GETAWAY descriptors, and BCUT descriptors were identified as key structural features for selectivity and activity of ACAT-2 inhibitors. This study provides a reasonable ligand-based approach to discover potential ACAT-2 selective inhibitors from Chinese herbs, which could help in further screening and development of ACAT-2 selective inhibitors.

  8. Quantitative analysis of the expression of ACAT genes in human tissues by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffery L; Rangaraj, Kavitha; Simpson, Robert; Maclean, Donald J; Nathanson, Les K; Stuart, Katherine A; Scott, Shaun P; Ramm, Grant A; de Jersey, John

    2004-04-01

    ACAT (also called sterol o-acyltransferase) catalyzes the esterification of cholesterol by reaction with long-chain acyl-CoA derivatives and plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis. Although two human ACAT genes termed ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 have been reported, prior research on differential tissue expression is qualitative and incomplete. We have developed a quantitative multiplex assay for each ACAT isoform after RT treatment of total RNA using TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR normalized to beta-actin in the same reaction tube. This enabled us to calculate the relative abundance of transcripts in several human tissues as an ACAT-2/ACAT-1 ratio. In liver (n = 17), ACAT-1 transcripts were on average 9-fold (range, 1.7- to 167-fold) more abundant than ACAT-2, whereas in duodenal samples (n = 10), ACAT-2 transcripts were on average 3-fold (range, 0.39- to 12.2-fold) more abundant than ACAT-1. ACAT-2 was detected for the first time in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Interesting differences in ACAT-2 mRNA expression were evident in subgroup analysis of samples from different sources. These results demonstrate quantitatively that ACAT-1 transcripts predominate in human liver and ACAT-2 transcripts predominate in human duodenum and support the notion that ACAT-2 has an important regulatory role in liver and intestine.

  9. ACAT-2, a second mammalian acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase. Its cloning, expression, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Cases, S; Novak, S; Zheng, Y W; Myers, H M; Lear, S R; Sande, E; Welch, C B; Lusis, A J; Spencer, T A; Krause, B R; Erickson, S K; Farese, R V

    1998-10-09

    The synthesis of cholesterol esters by acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT, EC 2.3.1.26) is an important component of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Cholesterol ester formation also is hypothesized to be important in several physiologic processes, including intestinal cholesterol absorption, hepatic lipoprotein production, and macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerotic lesions. Mouse tissue expression studies and the disruption of the mouse ACAT gene (Acact) have indicated that more than one ACAT exists in mammals and specifically that another enzyme is important in mouse liver and intestine. We now describe a second mammalian ACAT enzyme, designated ACAT-2, that is 44% identical to the first cloned mouse ACAT (henceforth designated ACAT-1). Infection of H5 insect cells with an ACAT-2 recombinant baculovirus resulted in expression of a approximately 46-kDa protein in cell membranes that was associated with high levels of cholesterol esterification activity. Both ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 also catalyzed the esterification of the 3beta-hydroxyl group of a variety of oxysterols. Cholesterol esterification activities for ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 exhibited different IC50 values when assayed in the presence of several ACAT-specific inhibitors, demonstrating that ACAT inhibitors can selectively target specific forms of ACAT. ACAT-2 was expressed primarily in mouse liver and small intestine, supporting the hypothesis that ACAT-2 contributes to cholesterol esterification in these tissues. The mouse ACAT-2 gene (Acact2) maps to chromosome 15 in a region containing a quantitative trait locus influencing plasma cholesterol levels. The identification and cloning of ACAT-2 will facilitate molecular approaches to understanding the role of ACAT enzymes in mammalian biology.

  10. Polyacetylenic compounds, ACAT inhibitors from the roots of Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Rho, Mun-Chual; Lee, Hyun Sun; Lee, Seung Woong; Chang, Jong Sun; Kwon, Oh Eok; Chung, Mi Yeon; Kim, Young Kook

    2005-02-23

    Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), which plays a role in the absorption, storage, and production of cholesterol, has been explored as a potential target for pharmacological intervention of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerotic disease. In our search for ACAT inhibitors from natural sources, the petroleum ether extract of Panax ginseng showed moderate inhibition of ACAT enzyme from rat liver microsomes. Bioactivity-guided fractionations led to the isolation of one new polyacetylenic compound, (9R,10S)-epoxy-16-heptadecene-4, 6-diyne-3-one (1), in addition to the previously reported polyacetylenic compounds 2 and 3. Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence (UV, IR, NMR, and MS). The compounds 1, 2, and 3 showed significant ACAT inhibition with IC(50) values of 35, 47, and 21 microM, respectively.

  11. Expression of ACAT-1 protein in human atherosclerotic lesions and cultured human monocytes-macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, A; Sakashita, N; Lee, O; Takahashi, K; Horiuchi, S; Hakamata, H; Morganelli, P M; Chang, C C; Chang, T Y

    1998-10-01

    The acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) gene was first cloned in 1993 (Chang et al, J Biol Chem. 1993;268:20747-20755; designated ACAT-1). Using affinity-purified antibodies raised against the N-terminal portion of human ACAT-1 protein, we performed immunohistochemical localization studies and showed that the ACAT-1 protein was highly expressed in atherosclerotic lesions of the human aorta. We also performed cell-specific localization studies using double immunostaining and showed that ACAT-1 was predominantly expressed in macrophages but not in smooth muscle cells. We then used a cell culture system in vitro to monitor the ACAT-1 expression in differentiating monocytes-macrophages. The ACAT-1 protein content increased by up to 10-fold when monocytes spontaneously differentiated into macrophages. This increase occurred within the first 2 days of culturing the monocytes and reached a plateau level within 4 days of culturing, indicating that the increase in ACAT-1 protein content is an early event during the monocyte differentiation process. The ACAT-1 protein expressed in the differentiating monocytes-macrophages was shown to be active by enzyme assay in vitro. The high levels of ACAT-1 present in macrophages maintained in culture can explain the high ACAT-1 contents found in atherosclerotic lesions. Our results thus support the idea that ACAT-1 plays an important role in differentiating monocytes and in forming macrophage foam cells during the development of human atherosclerosis.

  12. ACAT as a drug target for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Henri J; Kovacs, Dora M

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) in the brain regions responsible for memory and cognitive functions is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Cholesterol may be involved in many aspects of Abeta metabolism. It affects generation, aggregation and clearance of Abeta in the brain. Not only the amount but also the distribution of cholesterol within cells appears to modulate Abeta biogenesis. ACAT is an enzyme that regulates subcellular cholesterol distribution by converting membrane cholesterol to cholesteryl esters for storage and transport. We have used various cell- and animal based models to show that inhibition of ACAT strongly reduces Abeta generation and protects from amyloid pathology. Here, we discuss data supporting ACAT inhibition as a strategy to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  13. First identification of xanthone sulfonamides as potent acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honggang; Liao, Hongli; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Weifeng; Yan, Jufang; Yan, Yonghong; Zhao, Qingjie; Zou, Yan; Chai, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shichong; Wu, Qiuye

    2010-05-15

    Inhibitors of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) would be useful anti-atherogenic agents, since an absence of ACAT affects the absorption and transformation of cholesterol, indirectly resulting in the reduction of cholesteryl ester accumulation in blood vessels. This report discloses xanthone sulfonamides as novel class small molecule inhibitors of ACAT. A series of xanthone sulfonamides were synthesized and evaluated to result in the identification of several potent ACAT inhibitors, among which 2n proved to be more potent than the positive control Sandoz58-35. Moreover, a molecular model for the binding between 2n and the active site of ACAT-2 was provided based computational docking results.

  14. Preferential pharmacological inhibition of macrophage ACAT increases plaque formation in mouse and rabbit models of atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Perrey, S; Legendre, C; Matsuura, A; Guffroy, C; Binet, J; Ohbayashi, S; Tanaka, T; Ortuno, J C; Matsukura, T; Laugel, T; Padovani, P; Bellamy, F; Edgar, A D

    2001-04-01

    The cholesteryl ester, foam cell-enriched vulnerable plaque is a principle pharmacological target for reducing athero-thrombosis. Acyl CoA:cholesterol Acyl Transferase (ACAT) catalyzes the esterification of free cholesterol in intestine, liver, adrenal and macrophages, leading in the latter cells to intracellular cholesteryl ester accumulation and foam cell formation in the arterial intima. Previous studies suggested the existence of several isoforms of ACAT with different tissue distribution and this has largely been confirmed by molecular cloning of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2. We developed a series of ACAT inhibitors that preferentially inhibited macrophage ACAT relative to hepatic or intestinal ACAT based on in vitro assays and ex vivo bioavailability studies. Four of these compounds were tested in three models of atherosclerosis at oral doses shown to give sufficient bioavailable monocyte/macrophage ACAT inhibitory activity. In fat-fed C57BL/6 mice, chow fed apo E-/- mice and KHC rabbits, the various ACAT inhibitors had either no effect or increased indices of atherosclerotic foam cell formation. Direct and indirect measurements suggest that the increase in plaque formation may have been related to inhibition of macrophage ACAT possibly leading to cytotoxic effects due to augmented free cholesterol. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibition of macrophage ACAT may not reduce, but actually aggravate, foam cell formation and progression.

  15. Mass-production of human ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 to screen isoform-specific inhibitor: a different substrate specificity and inhibitory regulation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Hyun; An, Sojin; Lee, Woo-Song; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Young-Kook; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2003-10-03

    Recently, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase was found to be present as two isoforms, ACAT-1 and ACAT-2, in mammalian tissues with different metabolic functions and tissue-specific locations. In this study, the isoforms were mass-produced individually from insect cells to establish a more sensitive and reliable screening method for specific inhibitors against each isoform. The expressed hACAT-1 and hACAT-2 appeared as a 50 kDa- and a 46 kDa-band on SDS-PAGE, respectively, from Hi5 cells and they preferred to exist in oligomeric form, from dimer to tetramer, during the purification process. They also exhibited an approximate 3.4 to 3.7-fold increase in activities when compared to rat liver microsomal fractions at the same protein concentration. Known ACAT inhibitors, pyripyropene A, oleic acid anilide, and diethyl pyrocarbonate, were tested to evaluate the inhibitory specificity and sensitivity of the expressed enzymes. Interestingly, pyripyropene A inhibited only the hACAT-2 fraction with IC(50)=0.64 microM but not the hACAT-1 fraction; whereas the fatty acid anilide did not show a significant difference in inhibitory activity with either hACAT-1 or hACAT-2. Furthermore, cholesterol was more rapidly utilized by hACAT-1, but hACAT-2 esterified other cholic acid derivatives more efficiently. These results suggest that the specificity of each substrate and inhibitor was highly different, depending on each isoform from the viewpoint of the regulatory site and the substrate binding site location.

  16. [Development of new antiatherosclerotic agents--ACAT inhibitors and CETP inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, A; Horiuchi, S

    1999-12-01

    Development of new antiatherosclerotic agents were reviewed focusing on ACAT inhibitors and CETP inhibitors. ACAT inhibitors enhance intracellular degradation of VLDL in hepatocytes. Cholesterol absorption in small intestine is inhibited by ACAT inhibitors. Thus, ACAT inhibitors reduce plasma cholesterol levels. In atherosclerotic lesions, ACAT inhibitors suppress foam cell formation (cholesteryl ester accumulation) in macrophages. Since ACAT inhibitors have multiple anti-atherogenic effects, they are considered future drugs controlling hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. CETP inhibitors are expected to increase HDL and decrease LDL. Although the patients with CETP deficiency show high level of HDL, recent studies showed that they are not necessarily resistant to atherosclerosis. The strategy to inhibit CETP for suppressing atherosclerosis has not been established.

  17. Selective ACAT inhibitors as promising antihyperlipidemic, antiathero-sclerotic and anti-Alzheimer drugs.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, M P; Piaz, V Dal; Vergelli, C; Barlocco, D

    2003-09-01

    Inhibition of ACAT, the enzyme which catalyses the intracellular formation of cholesteryl esters, is a very attractive target for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and atherosclerosis. However, in the past years many ACAT inhibitors gave disappointing results in clinical trials showing very low efficacy. In addition, their development was affected by the adrenotoxicity observed in many compounds. The discovery of two isoforms of the enzyme, namely ACAT1 and ACAT2, with different substrate specificity and different potential function, offers a precious information for planning selective inhibitors with reduced secondary effects. Today some potent, bioavailable and non adrenotoxic ACAT inhibitors are under clinical evaluation. Amongst others, a very promising compound is Avasimibe, presently in phase III clinical trials as anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic agent. Finally, ACAT inhibitors have recently been proposed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Acat1 knockdown gene therapy decreases amyloid-β in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephanie R; Chang, Catherine Cy; Dogbevia, Godwin; Bryleva, Elena Y; Bowen, Zachary; Hasan, Mazahir T; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Both genetic inactivation and pharmacological inhibition of the cholesteryl ester synthetic enzyme acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) have shown benefit in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we aimed to test the potential therapeutic applications of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Acat1 gene knockdown in AD mice. We constructed recombinant AAVs expressing artificial microRNA (miRNA) sequences, which targeted Acat1 for knockdown. We demonstrated that our AAVs could infect cultured mouse neurons and glia and effectively knockdown ACAT activity in vitro. We next delivered the AAVs to mouse brains neurosurgically, and demonstrated that Acat1-targeting AAVs could express viral proteins and effectively diminish ACAT activity in vivo, without inducing appreciable inflammation. We delivered the AAVs to the brains of 10-month-old AD mice and analyzed the effects on the AD phenotype at 12 months of age. Acat1-targeting AAV delivered to the brains of AD mice decreased the levels of brain amyloid-β and full-length human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP), to levels similar to complete genetic ablation of Acat1. This study provides support for the potential therapeutic use of Acat1 knockdown gene therapy in AD.

  19. Absence of ACAT-1 attenuates atherosclerosis but causes dry eye and cutaneous xanthomatosis in mice with congenital hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, H; Kitamine, T; Osuga, J; Tozawa, R; Chen, Z; Kaji, Y; Oka, T; Perrey, S; Tamura, Y; Ohashi, K; Okazaki, H; Yahagi, N; Shionoiri, F; Iizuka, Y; Harada, K; Shimano, H; Yamashita, H; Gotoda, T; Yamada, N; Ishibashi, S

    2000-07-14

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes esterification of cellular cholesterol. To investigate the role of ACAT-1 in atherosclerosis, we have generated ACAT-1 null (ACAT-1-/-) mice. ACAT activities were present in the liver and intestine but were completely absent in adrenal, testes, ovaries, and peritoneal macrophages in our ACAT-1-/- mice. The ACAT-1-/- mice had decreased openings of the eyes because of atrophy of the meibomian glands, a modified form of sebaceous glands normally expressing high ACAT activities. This phenotype is similar to dry eye syndrome in humans. To determine the role of ACAT-1 in atherogenesis, we crossed the ACAT-1-/- mice with mice lacking apolipoprotein (apo) E or the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), hyperlipidemic models susceptible to atherosclerosis. High fat feeding resulted in extensive cutaneous xanthomatosis with loss of hair in both ACAT-1-/-:apo E-/- and ACAT-1-/-:LDLR-/- mice. Free cholesterol content was significantly increased in their skin. Aortic fatty streak lesion size as well as cholesteryl ester content were moderately reduced in both double mutant mice compared with their respective controls. These results indicate that the local inhibition of ACAT activity in tissue macrophages is protective against cholesteryl ester accumulation but causes cutaneous xanthomatosis in mice that lack apo E or LDLR.

  20. Human acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and its potential as a target for pharmaceutical intervention against atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine; Dong, Ruhong; Miyazaki, Akira; Sakashita, Naomi; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Jay; Guo, Michael; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2006-03-01

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes the formation of cholesteryl esters from cholesterol and long-chain fatty-acyl-coenzyme A. At the single-cell level, ACAT serves as a regulator of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. In addition, ACAT supplies cholesteryl esters for lipoprotein assembly in the liver and small intestine. Under pathological conditions, the accumulation of cholesteryl esters produced by ACAT in macrophages contributes to foam cell formation, a hallmark of the early stage of atherosclerosis. Several reviews addressing various aspects of ACAT and ACAT inhibitors are available. This review briefly outlines the current knowledge on the biochemical properties of human ACATs, and then focuses on discussing the merit of ACAT as a drug target for pharmaceutical interventions against atherosclerosis.

  1. ACAT inhibition reverses LCAT deficiency and improves plasma HDL in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, N D; Liang, K

    2004-11-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with increased risk of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease and profound alteration of plasma lipid profile. Uremic dyslipidemia is marked by increased plasma concentration of ApoB-containing lipoproteins and impaired high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport. These abnormalities are, in part, due to acquired LCAT deficiency and upregulation of hepatic acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). ACAT catalyzes intracellular esterification of cholesterol, thereby promoting hepatic production of ApoB-containing lipoproteins and constraining HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in the peripheral tissues. In view of the above considerations, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological inhibition of ACAT may ameliorate CRF-induced dyslipidemia. 5/6 Nephrectomized rats were treated with either ACAT inhibitor IC-976 (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) or placebo for 6 wk. Sham-operated rats served as controls. Key cholesterol-regulating enzymes, plasma lipids, and creatinine clearance were measured. The untreated CRF rats exhibited increased plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very LDL (VLDL) cholesterol, unchanged plasma HDL cholesterol, elevated total cholesterol-to-HDL cholesterol ratio, reduced liver microsomal free cholesterol, and diminished creatinine clearance. This was accompanied by reduced plasma LCAT, increased hepatic ACAT-2 mRNA, ACAT-2 protein and ACAT activity, and unchanged hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase. ACAT inhibitor raised plasma HDL cholesterol, lowered LDL and VLDL cholesterol, and normalized total cholesterol-to-HDL cholesterol ratio without changing total cholesterol concentration (hence, a shift from ApoB-containing lipoproteins to HDL). This was accompanied by normalizations of hepatic ACAT activity and plasma LCAT. In conclusion, inhibition of ACAT reversed LCAT deficiency and improved plasma HDL level in CRF rats. Future studies are needed to explore

  2. Evaluation of infrared thermography body temperature and collar-mounted accelerometer and acoustic technology for predicting time of ovulation of cows in a pasture-based system.

    PubMed

    Talukder, S; Thomson, P C; Kerrisk, K L; Clark, C E F; Celi, P

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the specificity of infrared thermography (IRT) in detecting cows about to ovulate could be improved using different body parts that are less likely to be contaminated by fecal matter. In addition, the combined activity and rumination data captured by accelerometers were evaluated to provide a more accurate indication of ovulation than the activity and rumination data alone. Thermal images of 30 cows were captured for different body areas (eye, ear, muzzle, and vulva) twice daily after AM and PM milking sessions during the entire experimental period. Milk progesterone data and insemination records were used to determine the date of ovulation. Cows were fitted with SCR heat and rumination long-distance tags (SCR HR LD) for 1 month. Activity- and rumination-based estrus alerts were initially identified using default threshold values set by the manufacturer; however, a range of thresholds was also created and tested for both activity and rumination to determine the potential for higher levels of accuracy of ovulation detection. Visual assessment of mounting indicators resulted in 75% sensitivity (Se), 100% specificity (Sp), and 100% positive predictive value (PPV). Overall, IRT showed poor performance for detecting cows about to ovulate. Vulval temperature resulted in the greatest (80%) Sp but the poorest (21%) Se compared with the IRT temperatures of other body areas. The SCR HR LD tags default threshold value resulted in 78% Se, 57% Sp, and 70% PPV. Lowering the activity threshold from the default value improved the sensitivity but created a large number of false positives, which resulted in a decrease in specificity. Lowering the activity threshold to 20 resulted in a detection performance of 80% Se, 94% Sp, and 67% PPV, whereas the rumination levels achieved 35% Se, 69% Sp, and 14% PPV. The area under the curve for the activity level, rumination level, and the combined measures of activity and rumination levels

  3. Clinical applications of computerized thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Computerized or digital, thermography is a rapidly growing diagnostic imaging modality. It has superseded contact thermography and analog imaging thermography which do not allow effective quantization. Medical applications of digital thermography can be classified in two groups: static and dynamic imaging. They can also be classified into macro thermography (resolution greater than 1 mm) and micro thermography (resolution less than 100 microns). Both modalities allow a thermal resolution of 0.1 C. The diagnostic power of images produced by any of these modalities can be augmented by the use of digital image enhancement and image recognition procedures. Computerized thermography has been applied in neurology, cardiovascular and plastic surgery, rehabilitation and sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology and ophthalmology. Examples of these applications are shown and their scope and limitations are discussed.

  4. Nondestructive testing with thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Tarpani, José Ricardo; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography is a nondestructive testing (NDT) technique based on the principle that two dissimilar materials, i.e., possessing different thermo-physical properties, would produce two distinctive thermal signatures that can be revealed by an infrared sensor, such as a thermal camera. The fields of NDT applications are expanding from classical building or electronic components monitoring to more recent ones such as inspection of artworks or composite materials. Furthermore, thermography can be conveniently used as a didactic tool for physics education in universities given that it provides the possibility of visualizing fundamental principles, such as thermal physics and mechanics among others.

  5. Real view thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienkowski, L.; Homma, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach for enhancing active thermography for nondestructive testing. In order to make the evaluation of the data more intuitive a Real View setup is presented that uses a projection technique to let the inspector view and interact with the measurement results directly on the part in a very intuitive way. Moreover we present an analysis approach using a Sobel filter of the pulse-phase result data in order to investigate the detectability of flaws by induction thermography. By projecting this information we give a visual feedback to the operator for optimizing the probability of detection.

  6. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and “thermography” and “neurologic”. The chronological period was defined from 2000 to 2014 (the least 15 years). Among the studies included in this review, only seven were with experimental design. It is few to bring thermography as a daily tool in clinical practice. However, these studies have suggested good results. The studies of review and an analyzed patent showed that the authors consider the thermography as a diagnostic tool and they recommend its usage. It can be concluded that thermography is already used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of patients with neuropathies, particularly in complex regional pain syndrome, and stroke. And yet, this tool has great potential for future research about its application in diagnosis of other diseases of neurological origin. PMID:26191090

  7. [The instrument for thermography].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Shinsuke

    2014-07-01

    Thermography is an imaging method using the instrument to detect infrared rays emitted from the body surface, and to plot them as a distribution diagram of the temperature information. Therefore, a thermographic instrument can be assumed to measure the skin temperature of the diseased region. Such an instrument is a useful device for noninvasive and objective assessment of various diseases. Examination using a thermographic instrument can assess the autonomic dysfunction by measuring the skin blood flow involved with the sympathetic innervation. Thermography is useful in assisting the determination of the therapeutic effect. However, autonomic dysfunction should be confirmed correctly with the assessment of thermatome that shows abnormal thermal distribution in the region of the disease. Thermography should make noticeable the difference between the body temperature of abnormal and normal sites, and show the alteration of temperature. Monitoring using thermography is useful to determine the effect of sympathetic nerve block. If a thermographic instrument is used, it is important that examiners should understand the function of the instrument, as well as its advantages and disadvantages.

  8. ACAT inhibitory activity of exudates from Calocedrus macrolepis var. formosana.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Chien, Shih-Chang; Cheng, Wen-Ling; Xiao, Jun-Hong; Wang, Sheng-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an enzyme controlling cholesterol esterification in cells. Large amounts of cholesterol esters accumulate in macrophages and smooth muscle cells of blood vessel walls resulting in the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Thus, atherosclerosis might be inhibited through inhibition of the activity of ACAT. In the present study, we identified by spectral analysis and chromatographic quantification that ferruginol was the most abundant component of exudates secreted from the wounding site of Calocedrus macrolepis Kurz var. formosana. Results obtained from the cholesterol absorption assay revealed that ferruginol exhibited a significant inhibitory activity on cholesterol absorption in mice macrophages (RAW 264.7 cell). Based on the results from analyzing the ratio of cholesterol esterification, ferruginol dose-dependently suppressed cholesterol esterification and the IC50 value was 2.0 microg/mL. In conclusion, ferruginol revealed strong inhibitory activities that retarded the absorption and esterification of cholesterol in cells. Our finding indicates that ferruginol might possess a potential for development as a pharmaceutical product for preventing arteriosclerosis.

  9. Organization of human ACAT-2 gene and its cell-type-specific promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Song, B L; Qi, W; Yang, X Y; Chang, C C; Zhu, J Q; Chang, T Y; Li, B L

    2001-03-30

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) plays important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Two ACAT genes exist in mammals. We report here the genomic organization of human ACAT-2 gene and analysis of its promoter activity in various cell lines. The human ACAT-2 gene spans over 18 kb and contains 15 exons. Three transcription start sites and one poly(A) site are identified by the 5'/3'-RACE. In addition, the human ACAT-2 gene is linked to the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP-6) gene in a head-to-tail manner with a small intergenic region of about 1.2 kb. The 5'-flanking region of human ACAT-2 gene contains many potential cis-acting elements for multiple transcriptional regulatory factors but lacks TATA and CCAAT boxes. Using promoter-luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrate the transcriptional activity of ACAT-2 gene promoter is high in Caco-2 cells, especially after these cells become postconfluent and behave as intestinal enterocytes.

  10. Effect of nitrogen and temperature on the transcription of an ACAT gene in Isochrysis galbana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yijiang; Zheng, Minggang; Wan, Wenwen; Sun, Zhongtao

    2014-11-01

    Thiolases are functionally divided into two groups: 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (ACAT). Acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase plays a key role in the mevalonate pathway. In this study, a novel gene, IgACAT, which encodes ACAT was cloned from Isochrysis galbana and characterized. The cDNA of IgACAT was 1551 bp in length, consisting of an open reading frame of 1173 bp, a 5' untranslated region of 69 bp and a 3' untranslated region of 309 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence of IgACAT was 390 amino acid residues in length with a predicted molecular weight of 53.59 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 9.04. The triterpenes content and the expression of IgACAT under nitrogen and temperature stress were analyzed. When I. galbana was treated with excessive nitrogen and at 35 °C, respectively, both the triterpenes content and the abundance of IgACAT gene transcript increased. Our findings will facilitate the regulation of gene expression and genetic modification of the triterpenes synthesis pathway of I. galbana.

  11. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular docking studies of xanthone sulfonamides as ACAT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Qingjie; Yang, Yan; Wu, Maocheng; Huang, Ting; Hu, Honggang; Wu, Qiuye

    2015-03-01

    Three series of xanthone sulfonamides were synthesized, and their inhibitory activities against acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) were evaluated. Results showed that most of the title compounds exhibited strong inhibitory activity against ACAT, of which compounds 1c, 1e, 1f, 2d, 2e, and 3d were proved to be more active than the positive control Sandoz 58-035. Computational docking experiments indicated that the interaction between inhibitors and ACAT contained the H-bond interaction, the hydrophobic interaction, and the narrow hydrophobic cleft.

  12. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  13. Potential role of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol transferase (ACAT) Inhibitors as hypolipidemic and antiatherosclerosis drugs.

    PubMed

    Leon, Carlos; Hill, John S; Wasan, Kishor M

    2005-10-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol transferase (ACAT) is an integral membrane protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. ACAT catalyzes the formation of cholesteryl esters from cholesterol and fatty acyl coenzyme A. The cholesteryl esters are stored as cytoplasmic lipid droplets inside the cell. This process is very important to the organism as high cholesterol levels have been associated with cardiovascular disease. In mammals, two ACAT genes have been identified, ACAT1 and ACAT2. ACAT1 is ubiquitous and is responsible for cholesteryl ester formation in brain, adrenal glands, macrophages, and kidneys. ACAT2 is expressed in the liver and intestine. The inhibition of ACAT activity has been associated with decreased plasma cholesterol levels by suppressing cholesterol absorption and by diminishing the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins such as very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). ACAT inhibition also prevents the conversion of macrophages into foam cells in the arterial walls, a critical event in the development of atherosclerosis. This review paper will focus on the role of ACAT in cholesterol metabolism, in particular as a target to develop novel therapeutic agents to control hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Intestine-specific MTP and global ACAT2 deficiency lowers acute cholesterol absorption with chylomicrons and HDLs.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Rudel, Lawrence L; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2014-11-01

    Intestinal cholesterol absorption involves the chylomicron and HDL pathways and is dependent on microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and ABCA1, respectively. Chylomicrons transport free and esterified cholesterol, whereas HDLs transport free cholesterol. ACAT2 esterifies cholesterol for secretion with chylomicrons. We hypothesized that free cholesterol accumulated during ACAT2 deficiency may be secreted with HDLs when chylomicron assembly is blocked. To test this, we studied cholesterol absorption in mice deficient in intestinal MTP, global ACAT2, and both intestinal MTP and global ACAT2. Intestinal MTP ablation significantly increased intestinal triglyceride and cholesterol levels and reduced their transport with chylomicrons. In contrast, global ACAT2 deficiency had no effect on triglyceride absorption but significantly reduced cholesterol absorption with chylomicrons and increased cellular free cholesterol. Their combined deficiency reduced cholesterol secretion with both chylomicrons and HDLs. Thus, contrary to our hypothesis, free cholesterol accumulated in the absence of MTP and ACAT2 is unavailable for secretion with HDLs. Global ACAT2 deficiency causes mild hypertriglyceridemia and reduces hepatosteatosis in mice fed high cholesterol diets by increasing hepatic lipoprotein production by unknown mechanisms. We show that this phenotype is preserved in the absence of intestinal MTP in global ACAT2-deficient mice fed a Western diet. Further, we observed increases in hepatic MTP activity in these mice. Thus, ACAT2 deficiency might increase MTP expression to avoid hepatosteatosis in cholesterol-fed animals. Therefore, ACAT2 inhibition might avert hepatosteatosis associated with high cholesterol diets by increasing hepatic MTP expression and lipoprotein production.

  15. Low-energy sputterings with the Monte Carlo Program ACAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Y.; Mizuno, Y.

    1985-05-01

    The Monte Carlo program ACAT was developed to determine the total sputtering yields and angular distributions of sputtered atoms in physical processes. From computer results of the incident-energy dependent sputterings for various ion-target combinations the mass-ratio dependence and the bombarding-angle dependence of sputtering thresholds was obtained with the help of the Matsunami empirical formula for sputtering yields. The mass-ratio dependence of sputtering thresholds is in good agreement with recent theoretical results. The threshold energy of light-ion sputtering is a slightly increasing function of angle of incidence, while that of heavy-ion sputtering has a minimum value near theta = 60 deg. The angular distributions of sputtered atoms are also calculated for heavy ions, medium ions, and light ions, and reasonable agreements between calculated angular distributions and experimental results are obtained.

  16. ACBP and cholesterol differentially alter fatty acyl CoA utilization by microsomal ACAT.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hsu; Zhou, Minglong; McIntosh, Avery; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2003-01-01

    Microsomal acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is stimulated in vitro and/or in intact cells by proteins that bind and transfer both substrates, cholesterol, and fatty acyl CoA. To resolve the role of fatty acyl CoA binding independent of cholesterol binding/transfer, a protein that exclusively binds fatty acyl CoA (acyl CoA binding protein, ACBP) was compared. ACBP contains an endoplasmic reticulum retention motif and significantly colocalized with acyl-CoA cholesteryl acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) and endoplasmic reticulum markers in L-cell fibroblasts and hepatoma cells, respectively. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT was stimulated in the order: ACBP > sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) > liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP). Stimulation was in the same order as the relative affinities of the proteins for fatty acyl CoA. In contrast, in the absence of exogenous cholesterol, these proteins inhibited microsomal ACAT, but in the same order: ACBP > SCP-2 > L-FABP. The extracellular protein BSA stimulated microsomal ACAT regardless of the presence or absence of exogenous cholesterol. Thus, ACBP was the most potent intracellular fatty acyl CoA binding protein in differentially modulating the activity of microsomal ACAT to form cholesteryl esters independent of cholesterol binding/transfer ability.

  17. Using self-organizing map (SOM) and support vector machine (SVM) for classification of selectivity of ACAT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Maolin; Yan, Aixia; Dai, Bin

    2013-02-01

    Using a self-organizing map (SOM) and support vector machine, two classification models were built to predict whether a compound is a selective inhibitor toward the two Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) isozymes, ACAT-1 and ACAT-2. A dataset of 97 ACAT inhibitors was collected. For each molecule, the global descriptors, 2D and 3D property autocorrelation descriptors and autocorrelation of surface properties were calculated from the program ADRIANA.Code. The prediction accuracies of the models (based on the training/ test set splitting by SOM method) for the test sets are 88.9 % for SOM1, 92.6 % for SVM1 model. In addition, the extended connectivity fingerprints (ECFP_4) for all the molecules were calculated and the structure-activity relationship of selective ACAT inhibitors was summarized, which may help find important structural features of inhibitors relating to the selectivity of ACAT isozymes.

  18. Structure of the human acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT-2) gene and its relation to dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Katsuren, K; Tamura, T; Arashiro, R; Takata, K; Matsuura, T; Niikawa, N; Ohta, T

    2001-04-30

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes cholesterol esterification in mammalian cells. Two isoforms of ACAT have been reported to date (ACAT-1 and ACAT-2). ACAT-1 is ubiquitously expressed in tissues except the intestine. In contrast, ACAT-2 is expressed mainly in the intestine in humans. To investigate the relationship between ACAT-2 and dyslipidemia, we determined the structure of the human ACAT-2 gene and then studied the relationship between mutations of the ACAT-2 gene and dyslipidemia. To isolate human ACAT-2 genomic DNA, we designed primers based on the human ACAT-2 cDNA sequence: forward primer 5'-ACACCTCGATCTTGGTCCTGCCATA-3' and reverse primer 5'-GGAATGCAGACAGGGAGTCCT-3'. Using these primers, a human P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) library was screened by PCR-based procedures. Isolated PAC clones were completely digested with BamHI and subcloned into plasmid vector. Subclones that contained exons were screened by dot-blot hybridization using partial ACAT-2 cDNA fragments. The coding region of the ACAT-2 gene was encoded in 15 exons from 51 to 265 base pairs on a 21 kilobase span of genomic DNA. The exonic sequences coincided completely with that of ACAT-2 cDNA, and each exon-intron junction conserved splicing consensus sequences. Next, 187 (91 dyslipidemic and 96 normolipidemic) subjects were screened by PCR single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of the ACAT-2 gene. Three mutations were identified by DNA sequencing: two missense mutations (E14G in exon 1 and T254I in exon 7) and a point mutation in intron 7 (-35G-->A). Mutations in exon 1 and intron 7 were not associated with plasma concentrations of lipids and apolipoproteins (apo). However, plasma apoC-III levels in T254I heterozygotes were significantly higher than those in subjects without mutation. Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels in T254I heterozygotes were similar to those in subjects without mutation. Although further studies are needed, our data suggest that ACAT-2

  19. Aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal infrared scanning from an aircraft is a convenient and commercially available means for determining relative rates of energy loss from building roofs. The need to conserve energy as fuel costs makes the mass survey capability of aerial thermography an attractive adjunct to community energy awareness programs. Background information on principles of aerial thermography is presented. Thermal infrared scanning systems, flight and environmental requirements for data acquisition, preparation of thermographs for display, major users and suppliers of thermography, and suggested specifications for obtaining aerial scanning services were reviewed.

  20. Thermography instruments for predictive maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Palko, E.

    1993-08-12

    Thermography (infrared imaging, or IR scanning) is not only the most versatile predictive maintenance technology available today; it is, in general, the most cost-effective. Plant engineering can apply a virtually unlimited variety of predictive maintenance instruments, but all are restricted regarding the types of existing and incipient problems they can detect. Inplant applications of thermography, however, are truly limited only by the extent of the plant engineer's imagination. Here are ways that thermography can be used to fight downtime in plants, and factors to consider when selecting the best instrument for particular circumstances.

  1. Inhibitors of acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT) as hypocholesterolemic agents: synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel series of sulfonamides, acylphosphonamides and acylphosphoramidates.

    PubMed

    Lee, H T; Roark, W H; Picard, J A; Sliskovic, D R; Roth, B D; Stanfield, R L; Hamelehle, K L; Bousley, R F; Krause, B R

    1998-02-03

    Sulfoacetic acid, phosphoramidate, and phosphoramide analogs of the ACAT inhibitors, CI-999 and CI-1011 were synthesized. The structure-activity relationships of these compounds as ACAT inhibitors are described.

  2. ACAT1 deletion in murine macrophages associated with cytotoxicity and decreased expression of collagen type 3A1

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Annabelle . E-mail: arodrig5@jhmi.edu; Ashen, M. Dominique; Chen, Edward S.

    2005-05-27

    In contrast to some published studies of murine macrophages, we previously showed that ACAT inhibitors appeared to be anti-atherogenic in primary human macrophages in that they decreased foam cell formation without inducing cytotoxicity. Herein, we examined foam cell formation and cytotoxicity in murine ACAT1 knockout (KO) macrophages in an attempt to resolve the discrepancies. Elicited peritoneal macrophages from normal C57BL6 and ACAT1 KO mice were incubated with DMEM containing acetylated LDL (acLDL, 100 {mu}g protein/ml) for 48 h. Cells became cholesterol enriched and there were no differences in the total cholesterol mass. Esterified cholesterol mass was lower in ACAT1 KO foam cells compared to normal macrophages (p < 0.04). Cytotoxicity, as measured by the cellular release of [{sup 14}C]adenine from macrophages, was approximately 2-fold greater in ACAT1 KO macrophages as compared to normal macrophages (p < 0.0001), and this was independent of cholesterol enrichment. cDNA microarray analysis showed that ACAT1 KO macrophages expressed substantially less collagen type 3A1 (26-fold), which was confirmed by RT-PCR. Total collagen content was also significantly reduced (57%) in lung homogenates isolated from ACAT1 KO mice (p < 0.02). Thus, ACAT1 KO macrophages show biochemical changes consistent with increased cytotoxicity and also a novel association with decreased expression of collagen type 3A1.

  3. The ACAT2 expression of human leukocytes is responsible for the excretion of lipoproteins containing cholesteryl/steryl esters.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongqing; Zhang, Xiaowei; Li, Qin; Qian, Lei; Xu, Jiajia; Lu, Ming; Hu, Xihan; Zhu, Ming; Chang, Catherine C Y; Song, Baoliang; Chang, Tayuan; Xiong, Ying; Li, Boliang

    2016-11-01

    Acyl-coenzymeA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) is abundantly expressed in intestine and fetal liver of healthy human. Our previous studies have shown that in monocytic cells the low-level expression of human ACAT2 gene with specific CpG-hypomethylated promoter is regulated by the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factors. In this study, we further report that the ACAT2 gene expression is attributable to the C/EBPs in the human leukocytes and correlated with the excretion of fluorescent lipoproteins containing the ACAT2-catalyzed NBD22-steryl esters. Moreover, this lipoprotein excretion can be inhibited by the ACAT2 isoform-selective inhibitor pyripyropene A (PPPA) in a dose-dependent manner, and employed to determine the half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of PPPA. Significantly, it is found that the differentiation-inducing factor all-trans retinoic acid, but not the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α, enhances this ACAT2-dependent lipoprotein excretion. These data demonstrate that the ACAT2 expression of human leukocytes is responsible for the excretion of lipoproteins containing cholesteryl/steryl esters (CE/SE), and suggest that the excretion of lipoproteins containing the ACAT2-catalyzed CS/SE may avoid cytotoxicity through decreasing the excess intracellular cholesterols/sterols (especially various oxysterols), which is essential for the action of the human leukocytes.

  4. ACAT-selective and nonselective DGAT1 inhibition: adrenocortical effects--a cross-species comparison.

    PubMed

    Floettmann, Jan Eike; Buckett, Linda K; Turnbull, Andrew V; Smith, Tim; Hallberg, Carina; Birch, Alan; Lees, David; Jones, Huw B

    2013-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol O-Acyltransferase (ACAT) and Acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes play important roles in synthesizing neutral lipids, and inhibitors of these enzymes have been investigated as potential treatments for diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Administration of a Acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) inhibitor with very limited cellular selectivity over ACAT resulted in significant adrenocortical degenerative changes in dogs. These changes included macrosteatotic vacuolation associated with adrenocyte cell death in the zonae glomerulosa and fasciculata and minimal to substantial mixed inflammatory cell infiltration and were similar to those described previously for some ACAT inhibitors in dogs. In the mouse, similar but only transient adrenocortical degenerative changes were seen as well as a distinctive nondegenerative reduction in cortical fine vacuolation. In the marmoset, only the distinctive nondegenerative reduction in cortical fine vacuolation was observed, suggesting that the dog, followed by the mouse, is the most sensitive species for cortical degeneration. Biochemical analysis of adrenal cholesterol and cholesteryl ester indicated that the distinctive reduction in cortical fine vacuolation correlated with a significant reduction in cholesteryl ester in the mouse and marmoset, whereas no significant reduction in cholestryl ester, but an increase in free cholesterol was observed in dogs. Administration of a DGAT1 inhibitor with markedly improved selectivity over ACAT to the marmoset and the mouse resulted in no adrenal pathology at exposures sufficient to cause substantial DGAT1 but not ACAT inhibition, thereby implicating ACAT rather than DGAT1 inhibition as the probable cause of the observed adrenal changes. Recognizing that the distinctive nondegenerative reduction in cortical fine vacuolation in the mouse could be used as a histopathological biomarker for an in vivo model of

  5. PREFACE: 16th International workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in physics research (ACAT2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, L.; Lokajicek, M.; Tumova, N.

    2015-05-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 16th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2014), this year the motto was ''bridging disciplines''. The conference took place on September 1-5, 2014, at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. The 16th edition of ACAT explored the boundaries of computing system architectures, data analysis algorithmics, automatic calculations, and theoretical calculation technologies. It provided a forum for confronting and exchanging ideas among these fields, where new approaches in computing technologies for scientific research were explored and promoted. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 140 participants from all over the world. The workshop's 16 invited speakers presented key topics on advanced computing and analysis techniques in physics. During the workshop, 60 talks and 40 posters were presented in three tracks: Computing Technology for Physics Research, Data Analysis - Algorithms and Tools, and Computations in Theoretical Physics: Techniques and Methods. The round table enabled discussions on expanding software, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration in the respective areas. ACAT 2014 was generously sponsored by Western Digital, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hewlett Packard, DataDirect Networks, M Computers, Bright Computing, Huawei and PDV-Systemhaus. Special appreciations go to the track liaisons Lorenzo Moneta, Axel Naumann and Grigory Rubtsov for their work on the scientific program and the publication preparation. ACAT's IACC would also like to express its gratitude to all referees for their work on making sure the contributions are published in the proceedings. Our thanks extend to the conference liaisons Andrei Kataev and Jerome Lauret who worked with the local contacts and made this conference possible as well as to the program

  6. Effects of F-1394, an acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, on ACAT activity in HepG2 cells and on hepatic secretion of lipids in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic rats: possible role of hepatic ACAT in very low density lipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Aragane, K; Kusunoki, J; Kitamine, T; Yamaura, T; Ohnishi, H

    1998-03-01

    We examined the inhibitory potency of F-1394 ((1S,2S)-2-[3-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)-3-nonylureido]cyclohexane -1-yl 3-[(4R)-N-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3-dioxane-4-carbonyl)amino]propionate), an acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, on ACAT activity and its hypolipidemic effect. F-1394 inhibited whole-cell ACAT activity in HepG2 cells with an IC50 value of 42 nM. The potency of F-1394 was greater than that of the five other ACAT inhibitors tested (YM-17E, CI-976, 57-118, CL-277,082 and DL-melinamide). In rats made hyperlipidemic by Triton WR-1339, F-1394 caused a reduction in the hepatic secretion rate of cholesterol. These data suggest that inhibition of hepatic ACAT activity helps to reduce very low density lipoprotein secretion from the liver into the circulation.

  7. The hypolipidemic effect of a new ACAT inhibitor, VULM 1457, in diabetic-hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Adameová, A; Kuzelová, M; Faberová, V; Svec, P

    2005-09-01

    The use of inhibitors of enzyme acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) seems to be a novel potential approach for a therapeutic treatment of dyslipidaemias and atherosclerosis. VULM 1457 is an ACAT inhibitor, which has expressed potent hypolipidemic and antiatherosclerotic effects in previous studies. In this study, we used streptozocin-induced diabetic rats, which were fed a fat-cholesterol diet to evaluate the affect of VULM 1457 on the atherogenic lipids levels in both plasma and liver. VULM 1457, with a slight influence on triglyceride levels, significantly reduced plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations (p < 0.05, p < 0.001; respectively) in the diabetic-hypercholesterolaemic rats.

  8. Localization of human acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) in macrophages and in various tissues.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, N; Miyazaki, A; Takeya, M; Horiuchi, S; Chang, C C; Chang, T Y; Takahashi, K

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) in various human tissues, we examined tissues of autopsy cases immunohistochemically. ACAT-1 was demonstrated in macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, steroid hormone-producing cells, neurons, cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, mesothelial cells, epithelial cells of the urinary tracts, thyroid follicles, renal tubules, pituitary, prostatic, and bronchial glands, alveolar and intestinal epithelial cells, pancreatic acinar cells, and hepatocytes. These findings showed that ACAT-1 is present in a variety of human tissues examined. The immunoreactivities are particularly prominent in the macrophages, steroid hormone-producing cells, followed by hepatocytes, and intestinal epithelia. In cultured human macrophages, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that ACAT-1 was located mainly in the tubular rough endoplasmic reticulum; immunoblot analysis showed that the ACAT-1 protein content did not change with or without cholesterol loading; however, on cholesterol loading, about 30 to 40% of the total immunoreactivity appeared in small-sized vesicles. These vesicles were also enriched in 78-kd glucose-regulated protein (GRP 78), a specific marker for the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunofluorescent microscopy demonstrated extensive colocalization of ACAT-1 and GRP 78 signals in both the tubular and vesicular endoplasmic reticulum before and after cholesterol loading. These results raise the possibility that foam cell formation may activate an endoplasmic reticulum vesiculation process, producing vesicles enriched in the ACAT-1 protein.

  9. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kawali, Ankush A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620) was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis). Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH) and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated “ocular thermographic” camera is today's need of the hour. PMID:24347863

  10. Veterinary applications of infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Rekant, Steven I; Lyons, Mark A; Pacheco, Juan M; Arzt, Jonathan; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal body temperature is a major indicator of disease; infrared thermography (IRT) can assess changes in body surface temperature quickly and remotely. This technology can be applied to a myriad of diseases of various etiologies across a wide range of host species in veterinary medicine. It is used to monitor the physiologic status of individual animals, such as measuring feed efficiency or diagnosing pregnancy. Infrared thermography has applications in the assessment of animal welfare, and has been used to detect soring in horses and monitor stress responses. This review addresses the variety of uses for IRT in veterinary medicine, including disease detection, physiologic monitoring, welfare assessment, and potential future applications.

  11. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs/SOATs): Enzymes with multiple sterols as substrates and as activators.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Maximillian A; Liu, Jay; Song, Bao-Liang; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C Y; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Cholesterol is essential to the growth and viability of cells. The metabolites of cholesterol include: steroids, oxysterols, and bile acids, all of which play important physiological functions. Cholesterol and its metabolites have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple human diseases, including: atherosclerosis, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. Thus, understanding how cells maintain the homeostasis of cholesterol and its metabolites is an important area of study. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs, also abbreviated as SOATs) converts cholesterol to cholesteryl esters and play key roles in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. ACATs are most unusual enzymes because (i) they metabolize diverse substrates including both sterols and certain steroids; (ii) they contain two different binding sites for steroidal molecules. In mammals, there are two ACAT genes that encode two different enzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2. Both are allosteric enzymes that can be activated by a variety of sterols. In addition to cholesterol, other sterols that possess the 3-beta OH at C-3, including PREG, oxysterols (such as 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, etc.), and various plant sterols, could all be ACAT substrates. All sterols that possess the iso-octyl side chain including cholesterol, oxysterols, various plant sterols could all be activators of ACAT. PREG can only be an ACAT substrate because it lacks the iso-octyl side chain required to be an ACAT activator. The unnatural cholesterol analogs epi-cholesterol (with 3-alpha OH in steroid ring B) and ent-cholesterol (the mirror image of cholesterol) contain the iso-octyl side chain but do not have the 3-beta OH at C-3. Thus, they can only serve as activators and cannot serve as substrates. Thus, within the ACAT holoenzyme, there are site(s) that bind sterol as substrate and site(s) that bind sterol as activator; these sites are distinct from each other. These features form

  12. PREFACE: 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Liliana; Britton, David; Glover, Nigel; Heinrich, Gudrun; Lauret, Jérôme; Naumann, Axel; Speer, Thomas; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    ACAT2011 This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011) which took place on 5-7 September 2011 at Brunel University, UK. The workshop series, which began in 1990 in Lyon, France, brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields in order to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. It is a forum for the exchange of ideas among the fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing, data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques in fundamental physics research. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 100 participants from all over the world. 14 invited speakers presented key topics on computing ecosystems, cloud computing, multivariate data analysis, symbolic and automatic theoretical calculations as well as computing and data analysis challenges in astrophysics, bioinformatics and musicology. Over 80 other talks and posters presented state-of-the art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. Panel and round table discussions on data management and multivariate data analysis uncovered new ideas and collaboration opportunities in the respective areas. This edition of ACAT was generously sponsored by the Science and Technology Facility Council (STFC), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP) at Durham University, Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA and Dell. We would like to thank all the participants of the workshop for the high level of their scientific contributions and for the enthusiastic participation in all its activities which were, ultimately, the key factors in the

  13. Review of industrial and research applications of thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlstrom, John

    1990-10-01

    The background and advantages of commercial thermography are reviewed, and applications of thermography in basic research, product development, and medicine are discussed. Industrial applications of thermography to preventive maintenance and production monitoring are also covered.

  14. Regulation of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) synthesis, degradation, and translocation by high-density lipoprotein(2) at a low concentration.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Pownall, H J

    2000-12-01

    (,Although plasma HDL(2) cholesterol concentration stands in inverse relation to risk for atherosclerotic disease, little is known about the mechanism of the apparent cardioprotection. In mouse P388D1 macrophages, HDL(2) at a low concentration (< or = 40 microg/mL) inhibits macrophage acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), the enzyme that catalyzes esterification of intracellular cholesterol. The effects of HDL(2) on ACAT synthesis, degradation, and intracellular translocation were investigated in mouse P388D1 macrophages. HDL(2) at a low concentration enhanced ACAT synthesis but not total ACAT mass. Immunocytochemical studies showed that in the absence of lipoproteins, ACAT associated primarily with the perinuclear region of the cell. The addition of HDL(2), however, induced the transfer of ACAT to vesicular structures and the cell periphery adjacent to the plasma membrane. Subfractionation combined with immunoprecipitation complemented these observations and showed that HDL(2) promoted the transfer of ACAT to the plasma membrane fraction. Brefeldin A, which inhibits vesicular protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi compartment in mammalian cells, blocked ACAT translocation and partially restored ACAT activity. These results suggest that HDL(2) is an initiating factor in a signal transduction pathway that leads to intracellular ACAT translocation and inactivation.

  15. Investigating the allosterism of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) by using various sterols: in vitro and intact cell studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jay; Chang, Catherine C Y; Westover, Emily J; Covey, Douglas F; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2005-10-15

    ACAT1 (acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1) is thought to have two distinct sterol-binding sites: a substrate-binding site and an allosteric-activator site. In the present work, we investigated the structural features of various sterols as substrates and/or activators in vitro. The results show that without cholesterol, the plant sterol sitosterol is a poor substrate for ACAT. In the presence of cholesterol, ACAT1-mediated esterification of sitosterol is highly activated while ACAT2-mediated esterification of sitosterol is only moderately activated. For ACAT1, we show that the stereochemistry of the 3-hydroxy group at steroid ring A is a critical structural feature for a sterol to serve as a substrate, but less critical for activation. Additionally, enantiomeric cholesterol, which has the same biophysical properties as cholesterol in membranes, fails to activate ACAT1. Thus ACAT1 activation by cholesterol is the result of stereo-specific interactions between cholesterol and ACAT1, and is not related to the biophysical properties of phospholipid membranes. To demonstrate the relevance of the ACAT1 allosteric model in intact cells, we showed that sitosterol esterification in human macrophages is activated upon cholesterol loading. We further show that the activation is not due to an increase in ACAT1 protein content, but is partly due to an increase in the cholesterol content in the endoplasmic reticulum where ACAT1 resides. Together, our results support the existence of a distinct sterol-activator site in addition to the sterol-substrate site of ACAT1 and demonstrate the applicability of the ACAT1 allosteric model in intact cells.

  16. Veterinary applications of infrared thermography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abnormal temperature is a major indicator of disease; infrared thermography (IRT) can assess changes in surface temperature quickly and remotely. This technology can be applied to myriad diseases in veterinary medicine, ranging across host species and disease etiologies. It can also be used to deter...

  17. A selective inhibitor of intestinal ACAT, EAB309 suppresses both intestinal and hepatic cholesterol output and stimulates chylomicron removal.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Y; Hirano, T; Kako, Y; Kamagata, K; Okuyama, K; Suzuki, K

    1998-01-01

    The effect of a novel inhibitor of acylcoenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.26, ACAT), EAB309 (EAB) on plasma lipid metabolism was studied in cholesterol-fed rats. Orally administered EAB was not detected in the portal vein or the liver but distributed exclusively in the intestine, suggesting that this agent selectively inhibits intestinal ACAT. The rats were fed with either a cholesterol-diet or a cholesterol-diet containing 0.005% EAB (w/w) ad. libium for three weeks. ACAT activity in intestinal microsomes was significantly inhibited in EAB-treated rats. Hepatic ACAT activity was also decreased in EAB-treated rats, however, this was attenuated by the addition of excess cholesterol to the liver microsome, indicating that substrate availability is tightly associated with this enzyme's activity and the inhibition of hepatic ACAT by EAB is not direct. Incorporation of [3H]-cholesterol to cholesteryl ester (CE) in mesenteric lymph were markedly suppressed by EAB treatment. Chylomicrons (CMs) were doubly labeled with [3H]-vitamin A and [14C]-triglyceride (TG) in EAB-treated or non-treated rats and injected into normal chow-fed rats. The CMs from EAB-treated rats were cleared faster from the plasma and taken up more by the liver compared with the CMs from non-treated rats. The content of CE in newly secreted VLDL was remarkably decreased by EAB treatment without affecting TG output. These results demonstrate that EAB, a novel inhibitor of intestinal ACAT, significantly suppresses both intestinal and hepatic CE output and stimulates CM removal. This suggests that the inhibition of intestinal ACAT can subsequently suppress hepatic ACAT by decreased CE delivery from the intestine to the liver.

  18. Summary of the ACAT Round Table Discussion: Open-source, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Federico; Perret-Gallix, Denis; Riemann, Tord

    2014-06-01

    Round table discussions are in the tradition of ACAT. This year's plenary round table discussion was devoted to questions related to the use of scientific software in High Energy Physics and beyond. The 90 minutes of discussion were lively, and quite a lot of diverse opinions were spelled out. Although the discussion was, in part, controversial, the participants agreed unanimously on several basic issues in software sharing: • The importance of having various licensing models in academic research; • The basic value of proper recognition and attribution of intellectual property, including scientific software; • The user respect for the conditions of use, including licence statements, as formulated by the author. The need of a similar discussion on the issues of data sharing was emphasized and it was recommended to cover this subject at the conference round table discussion of next ACAT. In this contribution, we summarise selected topics that were covered in the introductory talks and in the following discussion.

  19. PREFACE: 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiong

    2014-06-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2013) which took place on 16-21 May 2013 at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. The workshop series brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 120 participants from all over the world. 18 invited speakers presented key topics on the universe in computer, Computing in Earth Sciences, multivariate data analysis, automated computation in Quantum Field Theory as well as computing and data analysis challenges in many fields. Over 70 other talks and posters presented state-of-the-art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. The round table discussions on open-source, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration stimulate us to think over the issue in the respective areas. ACAT 2013 was generously sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NFSC), Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA (BNL), Peking University (PKU), Theoretical Physics Cernter for Science facilities of CAS (TPCSF-CAS) and Sugon. We would like to thank all the participants for their scientific contributions and for the en- thusiastic participation in all its activities of the workshop. Further information on ACAT 2013 can be found at http://acat2013.ihep.ac.cn. Professor Jianxiong Wang Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science Details of committees and sponsors are available in the PDF

  20. Isolation and characterization of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells deficient in acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cadigan, K.M.; Heider, J.G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The specific ACAT inhibitor compound 58-035 has been used to mimic the phenotype of an ACAT deficient mutant in 25-RA cells. 25-RA is a CHO cell line resistant to 25-hydroxycholesterol and contains five times more cholesterol ester than wild-type (WT) cells. 25-RA cells preincubated with 58-035 are 100 to 500 times more resistant to amphotericin B killing than untreated 25-RA. 100 x 10/sup 6/ mutagenized 25-RA cells underwent three rounds of amphotericin B killing and two rounds of 25-hydroxycholesterol killing (to remove WT revertants which are amphotericin B resistant). Thus far, three biochemically distinct mutants have been isolated containing 33% (AC27), 25% (AC90), and 10% (AC232) of the parental ACAT activity as measured by an /sup 3/H-oleate pulse in intact cells. When parental and mutant cell extracts are reconstituted into cholesterol containing liposomes the differences in ACAT activity remain. They have also found that 25-RA cells can survive in cholesterol free medium containing TMD, an inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, presumably because of adequate supply of endogenous cholesterol from hydrolysis of its stored cholesterol ester. In contrast, under the same conditions, mutant AC232 is effectively killed ( greater than or equal to 99%) by cholesterol starvation, thus providing a potential selection procedure for isolating revertants of ACAT mutants.

  1. Immunodepletion experiments suggest that acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) protein plays a major catalytic role in adult human liver, adrenal gland, macrophages, and kidney, but not in intestines.

    PubMed

    Lee, O; Chang, C C; Lee, W; Chang, T Y

    1998-08-01

    The first acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) cDNA cloned and expressed in 1993 is designated as ACAT-1. In various human tissue homogenates, ACAT-1 protein is effectively solubilized with retention of enzymatic activity by the detergent CHAPS along with high salt. After using anti-ACAT-1 antibodies to quantitatively remove ACAT-1 protein from the solubilized enzyme, measuring the residual ACAT activity remaining in the immunodepleted supernatants allows us to assess the functional significance of ACAT-1 protein in various human tissues. The results showed that ACAT activity was immunodepleted 90% in liver (83% in hepatocytes), 98% in adrenal gland, 91% in macrophages, 80% in kidney, and 19% in intestines, suggesting that ACAT-1 protein plays a major catalytic role in all of the human tissue/cell homogenates examined except intestines. Intestinal ACAT activity is largely resistant to immunodepletion and is much more sensitive to inhibition by the ACAT inhibitor Dup 128 than liver ACAT activity.

  2. Moisture map by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, E.; Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to moisture detection in buildings by an optical method is presented. Limits of classical and new methods are discussed. The state of the art about the use of IR thermography is illustrated as well. The new technique exploits characteristics of the materials and takes into account explicitly the heat and mass exchange between surface and environment. A set of experiments in controlled laboratory conditions on different materials is used to better understand the physical problem. The testing procedure and the data reduction are illustrated. A case study on a heritage building points up the features of this technique.

  3. Microwave thermography: principles, methods and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Myers, P C; Sadowsky, N L; Barrett, A H

    1979-06-01

    We review the physical principles, method of operation, measurement limitations, and potential medical applications of microwave thermography. We present detailed results of a study of breast cancer detection at 1.3 and 3.3 GHz, including the dependence of detection rates on microwave frequency, time, tumor depth, and tumor size. At 1.3 GHz, microwave thermography detects breast cancer as well as infrared thermography (true-positive rate = 0.76 when true-negative rate = 0.63). When the two methods are combined, the true-positive rate increases by about 0.1 over that of either method alone.

  4. Apolipoprotein A-I Helsinki promotes intracellular acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Juan D; Garda, Horacio A; Cabaleiro, Laura V; Cuellar, Angela; Pellon-Maison, Magali; Gonzalez-Baro, Maria R; Gonzalez, Marina C

    2013-05-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport is a process of high antiatherogenic relevance in which apolipoprotein AI (apoA-I) plays an important role. The interaction of apoA-I with peripheral cells produces through mechanisms that are still poorly understood the mobilization of intracellular cholesterol depots toward plasma membrane. In macrophages, these mechanisms seem to be related to the modulation of the activity of acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), the enzyme responsible for the intracellular cholesterol ester biosynthesis that is stored in lipid droplets. The activation of ACAT and the accumulation of lipid droplets play a key role in the transformation of macrophages into foam cells, leading to the formation of atheroma or atherosclerotic plaque. ApoA-I Helsinki (or ∆K107) is a natural apoA-I variant with a lysine deletion in the central protein region, carriers of which have increased atherosclerosis risk. We herein show that treatment of cultured RAW macrophages or CHOK1 cells with ∆K107, but not with wild-type apoA-I or a variant containing a similar deletion at the C-terminal region (∆K226), lead to a marked increase (more than 10 times) in the intracellular ACAT1 protein level as detected by western blot analysis. However, we could only detect a slight increase in cholesteryl ester produced by ∆K107 mainly when Chol loading was supplied by low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although a similar choline-phospholipid efflux is evoked by these apoA-I variants, the change in phosphatidylcholine/sphyngomyelin distribution produced by wild-type apoA-I is not observed with either ∆K107 or ∆K226.

  5. Reliable aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.; Bowman, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for energy conservation, the aerial thermography survey, is discussed. It locates sources of energy losses and wasteful energy management practices. An operational map is presented for clear sky conditions. The map outlines the key environmental conditions conductive to obtaining reliable aerial thermography. The map is developed from defined visual and heat loss discrimination criteria which are quantized based on flat roof heat transfer calculations.

  6. Dynamic thermography in diagnostics of onychomycosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryca, Jaroslaw; Nowakowski, Antoni; Urbanowski, Slawomir

    2004-07-01

    The paper shows the results of the research on the active dynamic thermography used for diagnostics of onychomycosis and progress of the healing process. It seems that the most essential factor affecting the development of mycosis in nails is the microcirculation in the tissue close to the nail. Active dynamic thermography may prove to be a new diagnostic method and a sufficient tool for measurements of this parameter.

  7. Absolute stereochemistry of fungal beauveriolide III and ACAT inhibitory activity of four stereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Taichi; Namatame, Ichiji; Nagai, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Takafumi; Doi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takashi; Akasaka, Kazuaki; Rudel, Lawrence L; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Omura, Satoshi

    2006-09-29

    Fungal beauveriolide III (BeauIII, 1b), a cyclodepsipeptide inhibiting acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and showing antiatherogenic activity in mouse models, consists of L-Phe, L-Ala, D-allo-Ile, and 3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoic acid (HMA) moieties, but the stereochemistry of the HMA part has not until now been fully defined. To determine it, four HMA stereoisomers were synthesized and labeled with (S)-(+)-2-(anthracene-2,3-dicarboximido)-1-propyl trifluoromethane sulfonate (AP-OTf), a chiral fluorescent reagent. The derivatives were separated by HPLC and compared with the natural HMA derivative, which was thereby identified as (3S,4S)HMA in BeauIII. Furthermore, the four beauveriolide III isomers ((3S,4S)BeauIII (23a), (3R,4R)BeauIII (23b), (3R,4S)BeauIII (23c), and (3S,4R)BeauIII (23d)) were synthesized, and it was shown that all the spectral data for 23a were identical with those for natural 1b. Isomers 23a and 23d showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages, while the other two isomers caused weak inhibition. Thus, the 3S configuration of BeauIII is important for this activity. Furthermore, 23a and 23d showed rather specific inhibition against the ACAT1 isozyme.

  8. In vitro metabolism of pyripyropene A and ACAT inhibitory activity of its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Daisuke; Ohshiro, Taichi; Ohtawa, Masaki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Pyripyropene A (PPPA, 1) of fungal origin, a selective inhibitor of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), proved orally active in atherogenic mouse models. The in vitro metabolites of 1 in liver microsomes and plasma of human, rabbit, rat and mouse were analyzed by ultra fast liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In the liver microsomes from all species, successive hydrolysis occurred at the 1-O-acetyl residue, then at the 11-O-acetyl residue of 1, while the 7-O-acetyl residue was resistant to hydrolysis. Furthermore, dehydrogenation of the newly generated 11-alcoholic hydroxyl residue occurred in human and mouse-liver microsomes, while oxidation of the pyridine ring occurred in human and rabbit liver microsomes. On the other hand, hydrolysis of the 7-O-acetyl residue proceeded only in the mouse plasma. These data indicated that the in vitro metabolic profiles of 1 have subtle differences among animal species. All of the PPPA metabolites observed in liver microsomes and plasma markedly decreased ACAT2 inhibitory activity. These findings will help us to synthesize new PPPA derivatives more effective in in vivo study than 1.

  9. Triterpenic Acids Present in Hawthorn Lower Plasma Cholesterol by Inhibiting Intestinal ACAT Activity in Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuguang; Vermeer, Mario A; Trautwein, Elke A

    2011-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida) is an edible fruit used in traditional Chinese medicine to lower plasma lipids. This study explored lipid-lowering compounds and underlying mechanisms of action of hawthorn. Hawthorn powder extracts inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in Caco-2 cells. The inhibitory activity was positively associated with triterpenic acid (i.e., oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA)) contents in the extracts. Cholesterol lowering effects of hawthorn and its potential additive effect in combination with plant sterol esters (PSE) were further studied in hamsters. Animals were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.08% (w/w) cholesterol (control) or the same diet supplemented with (i) 0.37% hawthorn dichloromethane extract, (ii) 0.24% PSE, (iii) hawthorn dichloromethane extract (0.37%) plus PSE (0.24%) or (iv) OA/UA mixture (0.01%) for 4 weeks. Compared to the control diet, hawthorn, PSE, hawthorn plus PSE and OA/UA significantly lowered plasma non-HDL (VLDL + LDL) cholesterol concentrations by 8%, 9%, 21% and 6% and decreased hepatic cholesterol ester content by 9%, 23%, 46% and 22%, respectively. The cholesterol lowering effects of these ingredients were conversely associated with their capacities in increasing fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, OA and UA are responsible for the cholesterol lowering effect of hawthorn by inhibiting intestinal ACAT activity. In addition, hawthorn and particularly its bioactive compounds (OA and UA) enhanced the cholesterol lowering effect of plant sterols.

  10. Origin of gene overlap: the case of TCP1 and ACAT2.

    PubMed Central

    Shintani, S; O'hUigin, C; Toyosawa, S; Michalová, V; Klein, J

    1999-01-01

    The human acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 2 gene, ACAT2, codes for a thiolase, an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism. The human T-complex protein 1 gene, TCP1, encodes a molecular chaperone of the chaperonin family. The two genes overlap by their 3'-untranslated regions, their coding sequences being located on opposite DNA strands in a tail-to-tail orientation. To find out how the overlap might have arisen in evolution, the homologous genes of the zebrafish, the African toad, caiman, platypus, opossum, and wallaby were identified. In each species, standard or long polymerase chain reactions were used to determine whether the ACAT2 and TCP1 homologs are closely linked and, if so, whether they overlap. The results reveal that the overlap apparently arose during the transition from therapsid reptiles to mammals and has been retained for >200 million years. Part of the overlapping untranslated region shows remarkable sequence conservation. The overlap presumably arose during the chromosomal rearrangement that brought the two unrelated and previously separated genes together. One or both of the transposed genes found by chance signals that are necessary for the processing of their transcripts to be present on the noncoding strand of the partner gene. PMID:10353914

  11. An approach to identify SNPs in the gene encoding acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase-2 (ACAT-2) and their proposed role in metabolic processes in pig.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Simrinder Singh; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Song, Ki Duk; Sharma, Neelesh; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Nam Eun; Lee, Sung Jin; Kang, Chul Woong; Oh, Sung Jong; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2014-01-01

    The novel liver protein acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase-2 (ACAT2) is involved in the beta-oxidation and lipid metabolism. Its comprehensive relative expression, in silico non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNP) analysis, as well as its annotation in terms of metabolic process with another protein from the same family, namely, acetyl-CoA acyltransferase-2 (ACAA2) was performed in Sus scrofa. This investigation was conducted to understand the most important nsSNPs of ACAT2 in terms of their effects on metabolic activities and protein conformation. The two most deleterious mutations at residues 122 (I to V) and 281 (R to H) were found in ACAT2. Validation of expression of genes in the laboratory also supported the idea of differential expression of ACAT2 and ACAA2 conceived through the in silico analysis. Analysis of the relative expression of ACAT2 and ACAA2 in the liver tissue of Jeju native pig showed that the former expressed significantly higher (P<0.05). Overall, the computational prediction supported by wet laboratory analysis suggests that ACAT2 might contribute more to metabolic processes than ACAA2 in swine. Further associations of SNPs in ACAT2 with production traits might guide efforts to improve growth performance in Jeju native pigs.

  12. Potential applications of ocular thermography.

    PubMed

    Morgan, P B; Soh, M P; Efron, N; Tullo, A B

    1993-07-01

    Thermography is an investigative technique which allows rapid color-coded display of the temperature across a wide surface by means of infrared detection. We describe an ocular thermographic study of a normal population and present case studies describing the application of this technique for patients with ocular disease. We found that 95% of the normal population have an interocular temperature difference (temperature of center of right cornea minus temperature of center of left cornea) of 0.60 degrees or less. There appears to be a greater difference in temperature between the limbus and the center of the cornea in patients with dry eyes. This technique has potential for evaluating tear film disorders and inflammatory conditions, for monitoring the progress of such conditions, and for evaluating the efficacy of various treatments.

  13. Novel N-terminal cleavage of APP precludes Abeta generation in ACAT-defective AC29 cells.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Henri J; Puglielli, Luigi; Ellis, Blake C; MacKenzie Ingano, Laura A; Kovacs, Dora M

    2009-01-01

    A common pathogenic event that occurs in all forms of Alzheimer's disease is the progressive accumulation of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) in brain regions responsible for higher cognitive functions. Inhibition of acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), which generates intracellular cholesteryl esters from free cholesterol and fatty acids, reduces the biogenesis of the Abeta from the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Here we have used AC29 cells, defective in ACAT activity, to show that ACAT activity steers APP either toward or away from a novel proteolytic pathway that replaces both alpha and the amyloidogenic beta cleavages of APP. This alternative pathway involves a novel cleavage of APP holoprotein at Glu281, which correlates with reduced ACAT activity and Abeta generation in AC29 cells. This sterol-dependent cleavage of APP occurs in the endosomal compartment after internalization of cell surface APP. The resulting novel C-terminal fragment APP-C470 is destined to proteasomal degradation limiting the availability of APP for the Abeta generating system. The proportion of APP molecules that are directed to the novel cleavage pathway is regulated by the ratio of free cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in cells. These results suggest that subcellular cholesterol distribution may be an important regulator of the cellular fate of APP holoprotein and that there may exist several competing proteolytic systems responsible for APP processing within the endosomal compartment.

  14. Impact of subdermal norgestrel on hepatic acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol- acyltransferase (ACAT) activity: possible antiatherogenic effect.

    PubMed

    Letterie, G S

    2000-06-01

    The impact of subdermally placed ethinyl estradiol, norgestrel, and the combination of the two on cholesterol metabolism as measured by hepatic acyl:cholesterol-acyltransferase (ACAT) activity was examined in the rat model. A total of 48 rats were assigned to one of 6 groups, receiving either 0.1 mg or 1.0 mg of ethinyl estradiol daily, 1.0 or 10 mg of norgestrel daily, and combinations of either 0.1 mg ethinyl estradiol/1.0 mg norgestrel or 1.0 mg ethinyl estradiol/10 mg norgestrel daily. All drugs were administered through subdermally placed time release capsules. The administration of norgestrel only in either 1.0 mg or 10 mg resulted in significantly lower rates of ACAT activity (0.77 +/- 0.566 and 0.91 +/- 0.239 pmol/mg/min, respectively). The combination of 1.0 ethinyl estradiol and 10 mg norgestrel resulted in a significant increase in ACAT activity to 2.17 +/- 0.873. This combination also resulted in significantly greater weight loss at the conclusion of treatment [247.83 +/- 6.2 g (pre) vs. 205.50 +/- 10.6 (post)]. There were no other differences in ACAT activity between groups and no other differences in weight, both between groups and pre- and post-treatment within groups. In summary, subdermally placed norgestrel resulted in a significant lowering of ACAT activity not seen with either administration of ethinyl estradiol alone or the combination of ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel in doses ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mg of ethinyl estradiol and 1.0 to 10.0 mg of norgestrel. Significantly increased ACAT activity for the combination of 1.0 ethinyl estradiol and 10 mg norgestrel over either ethinyl estradiol or norgestrel alone or a lower dose combination suggests a dose-related threshold and drug-drug interaction for this effect. These results suggest that subdermally placed norgestrel may result in significantly lower ACAT activity and may have a potential role as an antiatherogenic treatment.

  15. Thermography to Inspect Insulation of Large Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Thermography has been used in the past to monitor active, large, cryogenic storage tanks. This approach proposes to use thermography to monitor new or refurbished tanks, prior to filling with cryogenic liquid, to look for insulation voids. Thermography may provide significant cost and schedule savings if voids can be detected early before a tank is returned to service.

  16. IR Thermography NDE of ISS Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, William; Morton, Richard; Wilson, Walter; Reynolds, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers an active and a passive infrared (IR) thermography for detection of delaminations in the radiator panels used for the International Space Station (ISS) program. The passive radiator IR data was taken by a NASA astronaut in an extravehicular activity (EVA) using a modified FLIR EVA hand-held camera. The IR data could be successfully analyzed to detect gross facesheet disbonds. The technique used the internal hot fluid tube as the heat source in analyzing the IR data. Some non-flight ISS radiators were inspected using an active technique of IR flash thermography to detect disbond of face sheet with honeycomb core, and debonds in facesheet overlap areas. The surface temperature and radiated heat emission from flight radiators is stable during acquisition of the IR video data. This data was analyzed to detect locations of unexpected surface temperature gradients. The flash thermography data was analyzed using derivative analysis and contrast evolutions. Results of the inspection are provided.

  17. Narrative review: Diabetic foot and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Contreras, D.; Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Rangel-Magdaleno, J.; Gonzalez-Bernal, J.

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic foot is one of the major complications experienced by diabetic patients. An early identification and appropriate treatment of diabetic foot problems can prevent devastating consequences such as limb amputation. Several studies have demonstrated that temperature variations in the plantar region can be related to diabetic foot problems. Infrared thermography has been successfully used to detect complication related to diabetic foot, mainly because it is presented as a rapid, non-contact and non-invasive technique to visualize the temperature distribution of the feet. In this review, an overview of studies that relate foot temperature with diabetic foot problems through infrared thermography is presented. Through this research, it can be appreciated the potential of infrared thermography and the benefits that this technique present in this application. This paper also presents the different methods for thermogram analysis and the advantages and disadvantages of each one, being the asymmetric analysis the method most used so far.

  18. ACAT inhibition of alkamides identified in the fruits of Piper nigrum.

    PubMed

    Rho, Mun-Chual; Lee, Seung Woong; Park, Hye Ran; Choi, Jung-Ho; Kang, Ji Yun; Kim, Koanhoi; Lee, Hyun Sun; Kim, Young Kook

    2007-03-01

    In this study, via a bioactivity-guided fractionation of MeOH extracts of the fruits of Piper nigrum, alkamide (5) and five previously-identified alkamides were isolated. Their structures were elucidated via spectroscopic analysis ((1)H, (13)C NMR and ESI-MS), as follows: retrofractamide A (1), pipercide (2), piperchabamide D (3), pellitorin (4), dehydroretrofractamide C (5) and dehydropipernonaline (6). The IC(50) values determined for the compounds were 24.5 (1), 3.7 (2), 13.5 (3), 40.5 (4), 60 (5) and 90 microM (6), according to the results of an ACAT enzyme assay system using rat liver microsomes. These compounds all inhibited cholesterol esterification in HepG2 cells.

  19. Fighting Testing ACAT/FRRP: Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology/Fighter Risk Reduction Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Flight testing Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology/Fighter Risk Reduction Project (ACAT/FRRP). The goal of this project is to develop common modular architecture for all aircraft, and to enable the transition of technology from research to production as soon as possible to begin to reduce the rate of mishaps. The automated Ground Collision Avoidance System (GCAS) system is designed to prevent collision with the ground, by avionics that project the future trajectory over digital terrain, and request an evasion maneuver at the last instance. The flight controls are capable of automatically performing a recovery. The collision avoidance is described in the presentation. Also included in the presentation is a description of the flight test.

  20. Secretion of hepatocyte apoB is inhibited by the flavonoids, naringenin and hesperetin, via reduced activity and expression of ACAT2 and MTP.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, L J; Borradaile, N M; de Dreu, L E; Huff, M W

    2001-05-01

    The citrus flavonoids, naringenin and hesperetin, lower plasma cholesterol in vivo. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The ability of these flavonoids to modulate apolipoprotein B (apoB) secretion and cellular cholesterol homeostasis was determined in the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2. apoB accumulation in the media decreased in a dose-dependent manner following 24-h incubations with naringenin (up to 82%, P < 0.00001) or hesperetin (up to 74%, P < 0.002). Decreased apoB secretion was associated with reduced cellular cholesteryl ester mass. Cholesterol esterification was decreased, dose-dependently, up to 84% (P < 0.0001) at flavonoid concentrations of 200 microM. Neither flavonoid demonstrated selective inhibition of either form of acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) as determined using CHO cells stably transfected with either ACAT1 or ACAT2. However, in HepG2 cells, ACAT2 mRNA was selectively decreased (- 50%, P < 0.001) by both flavonoids, whereas ACAT1 mRNA was unaffected. In addition, naringenin and hesperetin decreased both the activity (- 20% to - 40%, P < 0.00004) and expression (- 30% to - 40%, P < 0.02) of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). Both flavonoids caused a 5- to 7-fold increase (P < 0.02) in low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mRNA, which resulted in a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in uptake and degradation of (125)I-LDL. We conclude that both naringenin and hesperetin decrease the availability of lipids for assembly of apoB-containing lipoproteins, an effect mediated by 1) reduced activities of ACAT1 and ACAT2, 2) a selective decrease in ACAT2 expression, and 3) reduced MTP activity. Together with an enhanced expression of the LDL receptor, these mechanisms may explain the hypocholesterolemic properties of the citrus flavonoids.

  1. A selective ACAT-1 inhibitor, K-604, stimulates collagen production in cultured smooth muscle cells and alters plaque phenotype in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaka, Yasunobu; Shibata, Haruki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kuriyama, Hiroki; Shibuya, Kimiyuki; Tanabe, Sohei; Watanabe, Takuya; Miyazaki, Akira

    2010-11-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol O-acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) plays an essential role in macrophage foam cell formation and progression of atherosclerosis. We developed a potent and selective ACAT-1 inhibitor, K-604, and tested its effects in apoE-knockout mice. Administration of K-604 to 8-week-old apoE-knockout mice for 12 weeks at a dose of 60 mg/kg/day significantly reduced macrophage-positive area and increased collagen-positive area in atherosclerotic plaques in the aorta without affecting plasma cholesterol levels or lesion areas, indicating direct plaque-modulating effects of K-604 on vascular walls independent of plasma cholesterol levels. Pactimibe, a nonselective inhibitor of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2, reduced plasma cholesterol levels but did not affect macrophage- or collagen-positive areas. The size of macrophages and cholesteryl ester contents in the aorta were reduced by K-604. Exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells to K-604 resulted in increased procollagen type 1 contents in the culture supernatant and increased procollagen type 1 mRNA levels. Procollagen production was unaffected by pactimibe even at a concentration that inhibited cholesterol esterification to the basal level. Thus, the plaque-modulating effects of K-604 can be explained by stimulation of procollagen production independent of ACAT inhibition in addition to potent inhibition of macrophage ACAT-1.

  2. Recombinant acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) purified to essential homogeneity utilizes cholesterol in mixed micelles or in vesicles in a highly cooperative manner.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Lee, C Y; Chang, E T; Cruz, J C; Levesque, M C; Chang, T Y

    1998-12-25

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum. It catalyzes the formation of cholesteryl esters from cholesterol and long-chain fatty acyl coenzyme A. The first gene encoding the enzyme, designated as ACAT-1, was identified in 1993 through an expression cloning approach. We isolated a Chinese hamster ovary cell line that stably expresses the recombinant human ACAT-1 protein bearing an N-terminal hexahistidine tag. We purified this enzyme approximately 7000-fold from crude cell extracts by first solubilizing the cell membranes with the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate, then proceeding with an ACAT-1 monoclonal antibody affinity column and an immobilized metal affinity column. The final preparation is enzymologically active and migrates as a single band at 54 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pure ACAT-1 dispersed in mixed micelles containing sodium taurocholate, phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol remains catalytically active. The cholesterol substrate saturation curves of the enzyme assayed either in mixed micelles or in reconstituted vesicles are both highly sigmoidal. The oleoyl-coenzyme A substrate saturation curves of the enzyme assayed under the same conditions are both hyperbolic. These results support the hypothesis that ACAT is an allosteric enzyme regulated by cholesterol.

  3. Passive and active thermography for in situ damage monitoring in woven composites during mechanical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, J.-M.; Balageas, D.; Lamboul, B.; Bai, G.; Passilly, F.; Mavel, A.; Grail, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to highlight the contribution of both passive and active infrared thermography for in situ damage detection and monitoring in a 2D woven composite, during a mechanical testing constituted of multiple sequences of loadings and intermediate pauses. During the monotonic tensile loadings, damages such as matrix cracking and fiber-matrix debondings are monitored by passive thermography. Their thermal signatures are analyzed and the released heat, which is assumed to be a relevant index of their severity, is evaluated and correlated to the associated acoustic energies, simultaneously recorded. Finally, the contribution of the TSR (Thermographic Signal Reconstruction) advanced processing technique to provide a qualitative overview of the detected damages is underlined. As for the constant stress plateau levels, a nondestructive damage inspection of the tested specimen is carried out by pulsed thermography. The difficulties, due to the woven structure of the composite, in detecting any damage are put into relief. Once more, it is shown that the TSR technique can be useful.

  4. Synthesis of a novel series of 2-alkylthio substituted naphthoquinones as potent acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong; Cho, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jee Hyun; Goo, Jail; Lee, Sung Yoon; Boovanahalli, Shanthaveerappa K; Yeo, Siok Koon; Lee, Sung-Joon; Kim, Young Kook; Kim, Dong Hee; Choi, Yongseok; Song, Gyu-Yong

    2013-04-01

    We report a new series of naphthoquinone derivatives as potent ACAT inhibitors, which were obtained through structural variations of previously disclosed lead 1. Several analogs represented by 3i-l, 4k-m, 6a-n, 7a, and 7i demonstrated potent human macrophage ACAT inhibitory activity by a cell-based reporter assay with human HepG2 cell lines. In particular, compounds 4l and 6j emerged as highly potent inhibitors, exhibiting significantly high inhibitory potencies with IC50 values of 0.44 μM and 0.6 μM, respectively. Moreover, compound 4l significantly reduced the accumulation of cellular cholesterol in HepG2 cell lines.

  5. Human ACAT-1 and -2 inhibitory activities of saucerneol B, manassantin A and B isolated from Saururus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Song; Lee, Dae-Woo; Baek, Young-Il; An, Sojin; An, So-Jin; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Park, Ho-Yong; Bae, Ki-Hwan; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2004-06-21

    The sesquineolignan, saucerneol B (1), and dineolignans, manassantin A (2), and manassantin B (3), were isolated from the methanol extracts of Saururus chinensis root and elucidated by their spectroscopic data analysis. Compounds 1-3 inhibited hACAT-1 and hACAT-2 with IC(50) values of 43.0 and 124.0 microM for 1, of 39.0 and 8.0 microM for 2, of 82.0 microM and only 32% inhibition at 1mM for 3, respectively. The EtOAc-soluble fraction, which contained compounds 1-3, of methanol extracts of S. chinensis exhibited strong cholesterol-lowering effect in high cholesterol-fed mice.

  6. Sitosterol-containing lipoproteins trigger free sterol-induced caspase-independent death in ACAT-competent macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Liping; Li, Yankun; Deng, Shi-Xian; Landry, Donald; Tabas, Ira

    2006-11-03

    Sitosterolemia is a disease characterized by very high levels of sitosterol and other plant sterols and premature atherothrombotic vascular disease. One theory holds that plant sterols can directly promote atherosclerosis, but the mechanism is not known. Unesterified, or "free," cholesterol (FC) is a potent inducer of macrophage death, which causes plaque necrosis, a precursor to atherothrombosis. FC-induced macrophage death, however, requires dysfunction of the sterol esterifying enzyme acyl-coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), which likely occurs slowly during lesion progression. In contrast, plant sterols are relatively poorly esterified by ACAT, and so they may cause macrophage death and plaque necrosis in an accelerated manner. In support of this hypothesis, we show here that macrophages incubated with sitosterol-containing lipoproteins accumulate free sterols and undergo death in the absence of an ACAT inhibitor. As with FC loading, sitosterol-induced macrophage death requires sterol trafficking to the endoplasmic reticulum, and sitosterol-enriched endoplasmic reticulum membranes show evidence of membrane protein dysfunction. However, whereas FC induces caspase-dependent apoptosis through activation of the unfolded protein response and JNK, sitosterol-induced death is caspase-independent and involves neither the unfolded protein response nor JNK. Rather, cell death shows signs of necroptosis and autophagy and is suppressed by inhibitors of both processes. These data establish two new concepts. First, a relatively subtle change in sterol structure fundamentally alters the type of death program triggered in macrophages. Understanding the basis of this alteration should provide new insights into the molecular basis of death pathway signaling. Second, sitosterol-induced macrophage death does not require ACAT dysfunction and so may occur in an accelerated fashion. Pending future in vivo studies, this concept may provide at least one mechanism for

  7. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  8. Development Of Economic Techniques For Residential Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Lee R.; Allen, Sharon

    1983-03-01

    Infrared thermography has proven to be a valuable tool in the detection of heat loss in both commercial and residential buildings. The field of residential thermography has needed a simple method with which to report the deficiencies found during an infrared scan. Two major obstacles hindering the cost effectiveness of residential thermography have been 1) the ability to quickly transport some high resolution imaging system equipment from job site to job site without having to totally dismount the instruments at each area, and 2) the lack of a standard form with which to report the findings of the survey to the customer. Since the industry has yet to provide us with either, we believed it necessary to develop our own. Through trial and error, we have come up with a system that makes interior residential thermography a profitable venture at a price the homeowner can afford. Insulation voids, or defects can be instantly spotted with the use of a thermal imaging system under the proper conditions. A special hand-held device was developed that enables the thermographer to carry the equipment from house to house without the need to dismantle and set up at each stop. All the necessary components are attached for a total weight of about 40 pounds. The findings are then conveyed to a form we have developed. The form is simple enough that the client without special training in thermography can understand. The client is then able to locate the problems and take corrective measures or give it to a con-tractor to do the work.

  9. Relationships between lipophilicity and biological activities in a series of indoline-based anti-oxidative acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Kunishiro, Kazuyoshi; Kasai, Masayasu; Miike, Tomohiro; Kurahashi, Kazuyoshi; Shirahase, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    A novel series of 1-alkyl-7-amido-indoline-based anti-oxidative acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors have been reported and are expected to lower plasma cholesterol levels due to the inhibition of intestinal and hepatic ACAT, and to inhibit cholesterol accumulation in macrophages due to the inhibition of low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. In the present study, relationships between lipophilicity and biological activities were examined in 13 derivatives. Lipophilicity (logP) increased and water solubility decreased with dependence on the number of carbons in the 1-alkyl chain. Inhibitory activity against both in vitro intestinal ACAT and LDL oxidation positively correlated with logP; however, the optimum logP, at which the level of activity is maximal, differed between these two effects. Inhibitory activity against in vitro plasma oxidation was weakly dependent on logP. Plasma concentrations of the derivatives after oral administration at 10 mg/kg correlated negatively with logP and positively with water solubility. Hypocholesterolemic activity in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet, and the ratio of Cmax and IC50 values for ACAT inhibition, an index of effective plasma concentration, positively and highly correlated with logP, while ex vivo inhibitory activity against plasma oxidation in rats, and the ratio of Cmax and IC50 values for the inhibition of plasma oxidation negatively correlated with logP. In conclusion, in vitro ACAT inhibitory and anti-oxidative activity were differently dependent on logP, and intestinal absorption was inversely dependent on lipophilicity in indoline-based anti-oxidative ACAT inhibitors. The hypocholesterolemic effect positively correlated and the ex vivo anti-oxidative effect negatively correlated with lipophilicity. Optimum logP as a bioavailable dual inhibitor against in vivo ACAT and lipid peroxidation was estimated to be 3.8 (1-pentyl and 1-isopentyl derivatives) in the present series of derivatives.

  10. Effect of valsartan on ACAT-1 and PPAR-γ expression in intima with carotid artery endothelial balloon injury in rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tao; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Du, Xiao-Hui; Yu, Qiu-Shi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of valsartan on ACAT-1 and PPAR-γ expression after vascular endothelial balloon injury in intimal hyperplasia process. Methods: 24 male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups with 8 in each group. Control group: rabbits were fed with normal diet; Balloon injury group: rabbits were fed with 0.5% cholesterol, 5% lard rabbit feed; balloon injury + valsartan group, rabbits were fed with 0.5% cholesterol, 5% lard rabbit feed added with 10 mg/(kg.d) valsartan gavage. RT-PCR and Western blotting method were used to detect the carotid ACAT-1, PPAR-γ mRNA and protein expression after 8 weeks of feeding. Results: In carotid artery balloon injury group, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) proliferation and intimal hyperplasia were significantly higher 14 d after endothelial injury. In 14 days valsartan treatment group VSMC proliferation and intimal hyperplasia were lighter than the surgery group. Compared with the control group, ACAT-1, PPAR-γ mRNA and protein were significantly increased in balloon injury group and valsartan group (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05); the expression of ACAT-1 mRNA and protein were significantly lower in valsartan group and balloon injury group (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). The expression of PPAR-γ mRNA and protein in valsartan group expression was significantly higher than that in the balloon injury group (P < 0.05). The expression level of ACAT-1 and PPAR-γ mRNA in balloon injury group and valsartan group showed negative correlation (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The expression of ACAT-1, PPAR-γ mRNA and protein content were significantly increased in intimal hyperplasia process after vascular endothelial balloon injury. The effect of valsartan suppressed intimal hyperplasia correlated with the expression of down-regulated ACAT-1 and up-regulated PPAR-γ. PMID:26131133

  11. [Digital noninvasive microwave thermography in the diagnosis of breast disease].

    PubMed

    Fan, K H; Fan, J H; Yao, D D; Jin, W D; Yang, B G; Meng, C X; Qu, D B

    1988-05-01

    Thermography is a noninvasive technic of examination. Liquid-Crystal Thermography and Infrared Thermography have provided great help in the general survey of breast diseases during the past twenty years but not without some limitations. Recently, by applying the microwave technic clinically, progress has been made to measure minute temperature changes in the deeper tissues. Differential diagnosis of breast disease is possible by statistical calculating the temperature difference of the two breasts. A prospective study was done in 96 women who had both X ray mammography and digital noninvasive microwave thermography. 70/96 were proved by pathology. In this group of patients, the accuracy rate was 70.00% for digital microwave thermography, 81.82% for X ray mammography and 95.50% for the two combined. The false positive rates and false negative rates, advantages, disadvantages and the for general survey of breast disease of the digital microwave thermography discussed.

  12. Exit Presentation: Infrared Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comeaux, Kayla

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on the internship project that was accomplished during the summer of 2010. The objectives of the project were to: (1) Simulate Flash Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy Flat Bottom hole Specimen and thin void specimens, (2) Obtain Flash Thermography data on Graphite/Epoxy flat bottom hole specimens, (3) Compare experimental results with simulation results, Compare Flat Bottom Hole Simulation with Thin Void Simulation to create a graph to determine size of IR Thermography detected defects

  13. Tomatidine, a tomato sapogenol, ameliorates hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inhibiting acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT).

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Kiyota, Naoko; Tsurushima, Keiichiro; Yoshitomi, Makiko; Horlad, Hasita; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro; Nagai, Ryoji

    2012-03-14

    It was previously revealed that esculeoside A, a new glycoalkaloid, and esculeogenin A, a new aglycon of esculeoside A, contained in ripe tomato ameliorate atherosclerosis in apoE-deficent mice. This study examined whether tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine, which is a major tomato glycoalkaloid, also shows similar inhibitory effects on cholesterol ester (CE) accumulation in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and atherogenesis in apoE-deficient mice. Tomatidine significantly inhibited the CE accumulation induced by acetylated LDL in HMDM in a dose-dependent manner. Tomatidine also inhibited CE formation in Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT)-1 or ACAT-2, suggesting that tomatidine suppresses both ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 activities. Furthermore, the oral administration of tomatidine to apoE-deficient mice significantly reduced levels of serum cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and areas of atherosclerotic lesions. The study provides the first evidence that tomatidine significantly suppresses the activity of ACAT and leads to reduction of atherogenesis.

  14. Cytotoxic and ACAT-inhibitory sesquiterpene lactones from the root of Ixeris dentata forma albiflora.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eun-Mi; Bang, Myun-Ho; Song, Myoung-Chong; Park, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hwa-Young; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Baek, Nam-In

    2006-11-01

    Ixeris dentata forma albiflora was extracted with 80% aqueous MeOH, and the concentrated extract was partitioned with EtOAc, n-BuOH and H2O. Eight sesquiterpenes were isolated through repeated silica gel and octadecyl silica gel (C18, ODS) column chromatography of the EtOAc and n-BuOH fractions. Physicochemical analysis using NMR, MS and IR revealed the chemical structures of the sesquiterpenes, which were zaluzanin (1), 9a-hydroxyguaian-4(15),10(14),11(13)-triene-6,12-olide (2), 3beta-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-8beta-hydroxyguaian-4(15),10(14)-diene-6,12-olide (3), 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-8beta-hydroxyguauan-10(14)-ene-6,12-olide (4), ixerin M (5), glucozaluzanin C (6), crepiside I (7), and ixerin D (8). This is the first time that these sesquiterpene lactones have been isolated from this plant. Compounds 1, 2 and 7 revealed relatively high cytotoxicities on human colon carcinoma cell and lung adenocarcinoma cell, while compounds 5 and 7 showed acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitory activity.

  15. Quantitative Evaluation of Pulsed Thermography, Lock-in Thermography and Vibrothermography on Foreign Object Defect (FOD) in CFRP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-05-21

    In this article, optical excitation thermographic techniques, including pulsed thermography and lock-in thermography, were used to detect foreign object defect (FOD) and delamination in CFRP. Then, vibrothermography as an ultrasonic excitation technique was used to detect these defects for the comparative purposes. Different image processing methods, including cold image subtraction (CIS), principal component thermography (PCT), thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) and Fourier transform (FT), were performed. Finally, a comparison of optical excitation thermography and vibrothermography was conducted, and a thermographic probability of detection was given.

  16. Quantitative Evaluation of Pulsed Thermography, Lock-in Thermography and Vibrothermography on Foreign Object Defect (FOD) in CFRP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    In this article, optical excitation thermographic techniques, including pulsed thermography and lock-in thermography, were used to detect foreign object defect (FOD) and delamination in CFRP. Then, vibrothermography as an ultrasonic excitation technique was used to detect these defects for the comparative purposes. Different image processing methods, including cold image subtraction (CIS), principal component thermography (PCT), thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) and Fourier transform (FT), were performed. Finally, a comparison of optical excitation thermography and vibrothermography was conducted, and a thermographic probability of detection was given. PMID:27213403

  17. Infrared thermography in the architectural field.

    PubMed

    Meola, Carosena

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography is becoming ever more popular in civil engineering/architecture mainly due to its noncontact character which includes two great advantages. On one side, it prevents the object, under inspection, from any alteration and this is worthwhile especially in the presence of precious works of art. On the other side, the personnel operate in a remote manner far away from any hazard and this complies well with safety at work regulations. What is more, it offers the possibility to quickly inspect large surfaces such as the entire facade of a building. This paper would be an overview of the use of infrared thermography in the architectural and civil engineering field. First, some basic testing procedures are described, and then some key examples are presented owing to both laboratory tests and applications in situ spanning from civil habitations to works of art and archaeological sites.

  18. Urban Heat Islands and Urban Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Paolo; Ceriola, Giulio; Daglis, Ioannis A.; de Ridder, Koen; Giannaros, Theodoros; Keramitsoglou, Iphigenia; Maiheu, Bino; Melas, Dimitrios; Montero Herrero, Enrique; Paganini, Marc; Palacios, Marino; Radius, Andrea; Sapage, Tania; Tamame, Maria; Tambuyzer, Han; Viel, Monique

    2010-12-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) and Urban Thermography project is a project funded by ESA under the DUE program. The project started on 1st November 2008 and will last 2.5 years. The UHI project is relying on all satellite missions that embark TIR sensors to analyse the spatial variability of the Urban Heat Islands in the metropolitan areas of 10 European cities over the last 10 years. Moreover, thermography mapping using airborne data have been or will be performed for Athens, Madrid and Brussels. The project is contributing to the 'Reorientation of the Fuegosat Consolidation Phase', through the collection and synthesis of user requirements for a frequent and routine observation of surface and air temperatures in the core of the major European cities and in the surrounding peri-urban areas.

  19. Infrared Thermography in the Architectural Field

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography is becoming ever more popular in civil engineering/architecture mainly due to its noncontact character which includes two great advantages. On one side, it prevents the object, under inspection, from any alteration and this is worthwhile especially in the presence of precious works of art. On the other side, the personnel operate in a remote manner far away from any hazard and this complies well with safety at work regulations. What is more, it offers the possibility to quickly inspect large surfaces such as the entire facade of a building. This paper would be an overview of the use of infrared thermography in the architectural and civil engineering field. First, some basic testing procedures are described, and then some key examples are presented owing to both laboratory tests and applications in situ spanning from civil habitations to works of art and archaeological sites. PMID:24319358

  20. Infrared Thermography of Thermomechanical Couplings in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, M. P.; Parganin, D.; Loizeau, J.

    The present paper aims to illustrate three advantages of infrared thermography as a non destructive, real-time and non-contact technique to mechanically characterise solid materials. It permits observation of the macrostructural aspects of. thermoplasticity describing damage and failure processes in diverse and various engineering materials and their components subjected to monotonous, cyclic or vibratory loading. It usefully suggests the definition of a threshold of acceptable damage TAD for materials related to sport equipment such as leather shoe, leather-like composites or sail synthetics. Particularly in case of metallic products or automotive components subjected to fatigue loading, this newly proposed method could evaluate in a non-destructive manner the fatigue limit FL in a very short time compared to traditional fatigue testing techniques that are much more time-consuming and excessively expensive. In addition owing to the thermomechanical coupling, infrared thermography readily describes the damage location, the dissipative regime and the evolution of structural failure.

  1. NDT of railway components using induction thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzelmann, U.; Walle, G.; Ehlen, A.; Lugin, S.; Finckbohner, M.; Bessert, S.

    2016-02-01

    Induction or eddy current thermography is used to detect surface cracks in ferritic steel. The technique is applied to detect surface cracks in rails from a moving test car. Cracks were detected at a train speed between 2 and 15 km/h. An automated demonstrator system for testing railway wheels after production is described. While the wheel is rotated, a robot guides the detection unit consisting of inductor and infrared camera over the surface.

  2. Corrosion detection on pipelines by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, P.; Marinetti, S.; Cuogo, G.; Molinas, B.; Zonta, P.; Grinzato, E.

    2011-05-01

    IR thermography is applied to detect hidden corrosion on carbon steel pipelines for oil transportation. The research is oriented to set up a robust technique to carry out in situ the early detection of corroded zones that may evolve either towards leakage or failure. The use of thermography associated with a transient thermal technique is investigated on 12.2 mm thick samples, machined to artificially create a reduction of wall thickness that simulates the effect of real corrosion in pipes. The extension and depth of the artificial defects is controlled by ultrasounds which represents the reference for the results obtained by thermography. Two approaches are proposed: the first is based on the processing of a single thermogram taken at the optimum time after a finite pulse heating of a large area of the external surface; the second technique is carried out by scanning the pipeline by means of a device composed of a linear lamp and a thermographic camera which move jointly over the surface to test. A suitable reconstruction provides a map of the tested surface with possible hot spots in correspondence with the corroded areas. The analysis of the thermal problem by Finite Element Method is used to optimize the experimental parameters. The experimental results demonstrate a detection capability starting from 15 % of wall thickness reduction.

  3. Infrared Thermography User Group (IRUG) 2003 Meeting Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2003-10-01

    Infrared thermography is a key component of predictive maintenance programs for fossil and nuclear utilities. EPRI's Technology for Equipment Assessment and Maintenance (TEAM) group and their Maintenance Management & Technology (MM&T) program supported the 13th Infrared Thermography Users' Group (IRUG) meeting, which was hosted and also supported by Progress Energy.

  4. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies on a novel series of naphthylidinoylureas as inhibitors of acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT).

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Satoshi; Muraoka, Masami; Ioriya, Katsuhisa; Ohashi, Naohito

    2004-03-08

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships of N-phenyl-N'-[3-(4-phenylnaphthylidinoyl)]urea derivatives 3 as a novel structural class of potent ACAT inhibitors is described. A 3-methoxy group substituted on the naphthylidinone 4-phenyl ring, together with a 1-N-(n)butyl substitution, SM-32504 (3m), gave a potent ACAT inhibitor, in vitro, respectively. The most potent compound, SM-32504 (3m), decreased the serum cholesterol level significantly in a high fat and high cholesterol-fed mouse model.

  5. Thermography Inspection for Detection and Tracking of Composite Cylinder Damage During Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Seebo, J. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations in a cylinder under different loads. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to nonimmersion ultrasonic results.

  6. Thermography inspection for detection and tracking of composite cylinder damage during load testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.; Seebo, J. P.

    2011-06-23

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to non-immersion ultrasonic results.

  7. The ACAT inhibitor CP-113,818 markedly reduces amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Huttunen, Henri J; Puglielli, Luigi; Eckman, Christopher B; Kim, Doo Yeon; Hofmeister, Alexander; Moir, Robert D; Domnitz, Sarah B; Frosch, Matthew P; Windisch, Manfred; Kovacs, Dora M

    2004-10-14

    Amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) accumulation in specific brain regions is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously reported that a well-characterized acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, CP-113,818, inhibits Abeta production in cell-based experiments. Here, we assessed the efficacy of CP-113,818 in reducing AD-like pathology in the brains of transgenic mice expressing human APP(751) containing the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations. Two months of treatment with CP-113,818 reduced the accumulation of amyloid plaques by 88%-99% and membrane/insoluble Abeta levels by 83%-96%, while also decreasing brain cholesteryl-esters by 86%. Additionally, soluble Abeta(42) was reduced by 34% in brain homogenates. Spatial learning was slightly improved and correlated with decreased Abeta levels. In nontransgenic littermates, CP-113,818 also reduced ectodomain shedding of endogenous APP in the brain. Our results suggest that ACAT inhibition may be effective in the prevention and treatment of AD by inhibiting generation of the Abeta peptide.

  8. Airborne thermography or infrared remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Goillot, C C

    1975-01-01

    Airborne thermography is part of the more general remote sensing activity. The instruments suitable for image display are infrared line scanners. A great deal of interest has developed during the past 10 years in airborne thermal remote sensing and many applications are in progress. Infrared scanners on board a satellite are used for observation of cloud cover; airborne infrared scanners are used for forest fire detection, heat budget of soils, detecting insect attack, diseases, air pollution damage, water stress, salinity stress on vegetation, only to cite some main applications relevant to agronomy. Using this system it has become possible to get a 'picture' of our thermal environment.

  9. Lasers and infrared thermography: advantageous cooperation.

    PubMed

    Vainer, Boris G

    2016-12-01

    In a brief review, the beneficial outcomes that have arisen from simultaneous use of laser- and infrared thermography (IRT)-based techniques are demonstrated. The most recent literary and original experimental results collected from different research and practical areas are presented. It is shown that modern IRT acts as an indispensable laser partner in various biomedical and many other applications and technologies. And vice versa, the laser-based methods and techniques often serve as an appropriate research instrument enriching IRT measurement data with independently obtained information.

  10. Infrared thermography in the restoration of cultural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; Carosena, Meola

    2001-03-01

    Some of the work carried out at DETEC on the use of infrared thermography in the architectural restoration field is examined. Three different techniques, pulse thermography (PT), modulated thermography (MT) and pulse phase thermography (PPT) are analyzed through the control of some art treasures such as mosaics and frescoes. In particular, the following artifacts are considered: mosaics covering some external walls of the building of the Faculty of Engineering of Naples, frescoes in the Duomo of Sarno, frescoes in the Cripta SS. Stefani in Vaste (Le), mosaics and frescoes in the Archeological Museum of Naples coming from Pompeii and Ruvo. It is found that the choice of the technique depends on the specific surface to be tested: if only qualitative information about detachments and cracks are needed the pulse thermography is sufficient; if the surface is not very sensitive to temperature rising, the pulse phase thermography can be applied which gives information about the location of the defected zone. If instead, the analysis regards rare art treasures, lockin thermography is the only response.

  11. Inspection of reinforcement concrete structures with active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanik, Barbara; Chady, Tomasz; Frankowski, Paweł

    2017-02-01

    In this article the reinforced concrete non-destructive evaluation using active thermography is discussed. There are several aspects of possible non-destructive testing of mentioned structures. One of them is the detection and assessment of the reinforcement itself. In case of active thermography, the external energy source has to be used to induce the thermal response of the inspected specimen. Here, authors propose two different techniques: microwave heating and induction heating. In this article authors will present several experimental results which will allow to compare mentioned two techniques of heating. suitability of each one to assess the reinforced concrete by using the active thermography will be discussed.

  12. [Infrared thermography and electroneuromyography in occupational polyneuropathy diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Loginova, N N; Voitenkov, V B

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated diagnostic value of the combination of infrared thermography and electromyography in professional polyneuropathy diagnosis. 20 patients with working-hand syndrome and 5 controls were enrolled. In 18 cases (90%) both methods were sensitive: on EMG CNV slowing and amplitudes drop were seen, as well as M-response shape changes, and thermography have detected focal hypothermia in hands in some cases and appearance of obscure hypothermia in others. Thus, both methods demonstrated good sensitivity. We recommend using thermography as a screening test and EMG as a following investigation.

  13. Active thermography in qualitative evaluation of protective materials.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Wiecek, Bogusław

    2009-01-01

    This is a study of the possibilities of a qualitative evaluation of protective materials with active thermography. It presents a simulation of a periodic excitation of a multilayer composite material. Tests were conducted with lock-in thermography on Kevlar composite consisting of 16 layers of Kevlar fabric reinforced with formaldehyde resin with implanted delamination defects. Lock-in thermography is a versatile tool for nondestructive evaluation. It is a fast, remote and nondestructive procedure. Hence, it was used to detect delaminations in the composite structure of materials used in the production of components designed for personal protection. This method directly contributes to an improvement in safety.

  14. Flash Infrared Thermography Contrast Data Analysis Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast versus time evolutions from the flash thermography inspection infrared video data. The analysis calculates thermal measurement features from the contrast evolution. In addition, simulation of the contrast evolution is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat-bottom holes in the subject material. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography data in order to characterize delamination-like anomalies. The thermal measurement features relate to the anomaly characteristics. The contrast evolution simulation is matched to the measured contrast evolution over an anomaly to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width which correspond to the depth and diameter of the equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) similar to that used as input to the simulation. A similar analysis, in terms of diameter and depth of an equivalent uniform gap (EUG) providing a best match with the measured contrast evolution, is also provided. An edge detection technique called the half-max is used to measure width and length of the anomaly. Results of the half-max width and the EFBH/EUG diameter are compared to evaluate the anomaly. The information provided here is geared towards explaining the IR Contrast technique. Results from a limited amount of validation data on reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) hardware are included in this paper.

  15. The ACAT inhibitor VULM1457 significantly reduced production and secretion of adrenomedullin (AM) and down-regulated AM receptors on human hepatoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Drímal, J; Fáberová, V; Schmidtová, L; Bednáriková, M; Drímal, J; Drímal, D

    2005-12-01

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an important enzyme in the pathways of cholesterol esterification. It has been shown that new ACAT inhibitor 1-(2,6-diisopropyl-phenyl)-3-[4-(4'-nitrophenylthio)phenyl] urea (VULM1457) significantly reduced atherogenic activity in animal experimental atherosclerosis. Proliferative hormone adrenomedullin (AM) has been shown to be released in response to hypoxia, however, its role in cellular protection has remained elusive. The effect of increased local production of AM in cells and resultant down-regulation of AM receptors has not been investigated yet. We hypothesized that increased expression of AM in hypoxic cells was the result of excessive AM production with resultant AM receptor down-regulation, surface-membrane protein degradation and that the new specific ACAT inhibitor would reduce AM induction in hypoxia and thus proliferation of cells. In order to investigate specific cellular AM signaling and protection induced by VULM1457, we characterized specific surface-membrane [125I]AM receptors expressed on cells, evaluated AM secretion (RIA assays), AM mRNA expression in cultured cells (RT-PCR analysis) and proliferation (incorporation of [3H]thymidine) in control, hypoxic and metabolically stressed human hepatoblastoma cell lines exposed to gradually increasing concentrations of VULM1457. The new ACAT inhibitor VULM1457 in concentration 0.03 and 0.1 micromol/l significantly down-regulated specific AM receptors on HepG2 cells, reduced AM secretion of HepG2 cells exposed to hypoxia. These results suggest that VULM1457, as new member of ACAT family of inhibitors could negatively regulate cell proliferation induced by AM, which may correlate with down-regulation of membrane-bound AM receptors on HepG2 cells, and moreover, with the induction and expression of AM in hypoxia.

  16. Hypolipidemic and antioxidant activity of the novel acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor KY-455 in rabbits and hamsters.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shohei; Kamiya, Shoji; Shirahase, Hiroaki; Kanda, Mamoru; Yoshimi, Akihisa; Tarumi, Tadatsugu; Kurahashi, Kazuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    The hypolipidemic and antioxidant effects of N-(4,6-dimethyl-1-pentylindolin-7-yl)-2,2-dimethylpropanamide (CAS 178469-71-1, KY-455), a novel acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, were examined in hyperlipidemic rabbits and normolipidemic hamsters. KY-455 inhibited rabbit intestinal, hepatic, macrophage and adrenal ACAT with IC50 values of 0.4, 0.9, 2.9 and 4.1 micromol/l, respectively. KY-455 also inhibited rabbit plasma and LDL-peroxidation (IC50: 0.4 and 1.7 micromol/l, respectively). In rabbits fed a high-cholesterol diet, treatment with KY-455 (30 mg/kg/day) for 8 days markedly lowered serum esterified, free, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and hepatic esterified cholesterol levels. KY-455 tended to inhibit ex vivo hepatic ACAT activity 5 h after the final administration. KY-455 also inhibited ex vivo peroxidation of plasma lipids 1 and 5 h after the final administration in rabbits. In normolipidemic hamsters fed a regular diet, treatment with KY-455 (30 mg/kg, twice a day) for 4 days significantly reduced serum esterified, free and LDL-cholesterol, and hepatic esterified and free cholesterol levels. A single administration of KY-455 (30 mg/kg) significantly inhibited ex vivo hepatic ACAT activity in hamsters. In conclusion, KY-455 showed in vitro inhibitory effects on LDL-peroxidation and macrophage ACAT activity at similar concentrations, and in vivo hypolipidemic and ex vivo antioxidative effects at the same dose. Long-term administration of KY-455 is expected to prevent the progress of atherosclerosis by lowering plasma lipid levels, inhibiting both LDL-oxidation and accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages.

  17. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  18. Real Time Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Three-Stringer Panel Using Passive Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Bly, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue testing of advanced composite structures is critical to validate both structural designs and damage prediction models. In-situ inspection methods are necessary to track damage onset and growth as a function of load cycles. Passive thermography is a large area, noncontact inspection technique that is used to detect composite damage onset and growth in real time as a function of fatigue cycles. The thermal images are acquired in synchronicity to the applied compressive load using a dual infrared camera acquisition system for full (front and back) coverage. Image processing algorithms are investigated to increase defect contrast areas. The thermal results are compared to non-immersion ultrasound inspections and acoustic emission data.

  19. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  20. Infrared thermography for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G

    2014-07-10

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed.

  1. Airborne thermography of temperature patterns in sugar beet piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. G.; Bichsel, S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of thermography for locating spoilage areas (chimneys) within storage piles and to subsequently use the information for the scheduling of their processing. Thermal-infrared quantitative scanner data were acquired initially on January 16, 1975, over the storage piles at Moorhead, Minnesota, both during the day and predawn. Photographic data were acquired during the day mission to evaluate the effect of uneven snow cover on the thermal emittance, and the predawn thermography was used to locate potential chimneys. The piles were examined the day prior for indications of spoilage areas, and the ground crew indicated that no spoilage areas were located using their existing methods. Nine spoilage areas were interpreted from the thermography. The piles were rechecked by ground methods three days following the flights. Six of the nine areas delineated by thermography were actual spoilage areas.

  2. Thermography in mass screening investigations of industrial workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehter, A. I.; Ginsburg, L. I.; Traktinsky, A. G.

    1993-11-01

    The role of thermography in screening, directed to diagnose breast diseases, chronic tonsillitis, neurocirculatory dystonia, gall bladder dyskinesia, sinusitis, and to detect the character of influence of harmful factors on workers organisms is studied. The investigations demonstrate a possibility of a successful utilization of thermography in mass prophylactive examinations in order to diagnose these diseases, but the problem of breast tumors diagnostics demands the following investigations.

  3. Optically and non-optically excited thermography for composites: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze

    2016-03-01

    Composites, such as glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), and adhesive bonding are being increasingly used in fields of aerospace, renewable energy, civil and architecture, and other industries. Flaws and damages are inevitable during either fabrication or lifetime of composites structures or components. Thus, nondestructive testing (NDT) are extremely required to prevent failures and to increase reliability of composite structures or components in both manufacture and in-service inspection. Infrared thermography techniques including pulsed thermography, pulsed phase thermography, and lock-in thermography have shown the great potential and advantages. Besides conventional optical thermography, other sources such as laser, eddy current, microwave, and ultrasound excited thermography are drawing increasingly attentions for composites. In this work, a fully, in-depth and comprehensive review of thermography NDT techniques for composites inspection was conducted based on an orderly and concise literature survey and detailed analysis. Firstly, basic concepts for thermography NDT were defined and introduced, such as volume heating thermography. Next, the developments of conventional optic, laser, eddy current, microwave, and ultrasound thermography for composite inspection were reviewed. Then, some case studies for scanning thermography were also reviewed. After that, the strengths and limitations of thermography techniques were concluded through comparison studies. At last, some research trends were predicted. This work containing critical overview, detailed comparison and extensive list of references will disseminates knowledge between users, manufacturers, designers and researchers involved in composite structures or components inspection by means of thermography NDT techniques.

  4. Bonding quality evaluation of wind turbine blades by pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui-gang; Kong, De-juan; Zeng, Zhi; Tao, Ning; Zhang, Cun-lin; Feng, Li-chun

    2011-08-01

    The glue defects of the wind turbine blades which are composed of the glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite plates make its strength greatly reduced, so security issues could be caused. To improve the safety of wind turbine blades, nondestructive testing technique using pulsed thermography is being investigated in this study. The results of ultrasonic C scan test were compared with the results of thermography. The current results indicated that both methods can successfully detect two gluing situations. However, the inspect specimens need to be putted in the water in the detection process by ultrasonic C scan, and the detection time lasts much longer than pulsed thermography. And in situ applications, the measured wind turbine blades are normally in the size of several tens meter, and also only one side is available for the inspection especially at the tip of blades. Thus, ultrasonic C scan of current experimental setup is not suitable for the applications in the field. Pulsed thermography is not necessary to contact with inspected specimens. The infrared results by pulsed thermography indicate that the shape and size of deficiency glue defects in the specimens show good agreement with the real situation, so it is more suitable for the inspection in the field. The preliminary results in this study indicate that pulse thermography can be used to detect glue faults of GFRP which are not too thick.

  5. Convective heat transfer and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M; Astarita, Tommaso; Cardone, Gennaro

    2002-10-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography, because of its two-dimensional and non-intrusive nature, can be exploited in industrial applications as well as in research. This paper deals with measurement of convective heat transfer coefficients (h) in three complex fluid flow configurations that concern the main aspects of both internal and external cooling of turbine engine components: (1) flow in ribbed, or smooth, channels connected by a 180 degrees sharp turn, (2) a jet in cross-flow, and (3) a jet impinging on a wall. The aim of this study was to acquire detailed measurements of h distribution in complex flow configurations related to both internal and external cooling of turbine components. The heated thin foil technique, which involves the detection of surface temperature by means of an IR scanning radiometer, was exploited to measure h. Particle image velocimetry was also used in one of the configurations to precisely determine the velocity field.

  6. Angular effects on thermochromic liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzwa, Paul M.; Eaton, John K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper directly discusses the effects of lighting and viewing angles on liquid crystal thermography. This is because although thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) are a widely-used and accepted tool in heat transfer research, little effort has been directed to analytically describing these effects. Such insight is invaluable for the development of effective mitigation strategies. Using analytical relationships that describe the perceived color shift, a systematic manner of improving the performance of a TLC system is presented. This is particularly relevant for applications where significant variations in lighting and/or viewing angles are expected (such as a highly curved surface). This discussion includes an examination of the importance of the definition of the hue angle used to calibrate the color of a TLC-painted surface. The theoretical basis of the validated high-accuracy calibration approach reported by Kodzwa et al. (Exp Fluids s00348-007-0310-6, 2007) is presented.

  7. Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili

    2012-01-01

    An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

  8. INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY OF CUTANEOUS MELANOMA METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Shada, Amber L.; Dengel, Lynn T.; Petroni, Gina R.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Acton, Scott; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Differentiating melanoma metastasis from benign cutaneous lesions currently requires biopsy or costly imaging, such as positron emission tomography scans. Melanoma metastases have been observed to be subjectively warmer than similarly appearing benign lesions. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) thermography would be sensitive and specific in differentiating palpable melanoma metastases from benign lesions. Materials and methods Seventy-four patients (36 females and 38 males) had 251 palpable lesions imaged for this pilot study. Diagnosis was determined using pathologic confirmation or clinical diagnosis. Lesions were divided into size strata for analysis: 0–5, >5–15, >15–30, and >30 mm. Images were scored on a scale from −1 (colder than the surrounding tissue) to +3 (significantly hotter than the surrounding tissue). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each stratum. Logistical challenges were scored. Results IR imaging was able to determine the malignancy of small (0–5 mm) lesions with a sensitivity of 39% and specificity of 100%. For lesions >5–15 mm, sensitivity was 58% and specificity 98%. For lesions >15–30 mm, sensitivity was 95% and specificity 100%, and for lesions >30 mm, sensitivity was 78% and specificity 89%. The positive predictive value was 88%–100% across all strata, and the negative predictive value was 95% for >15–30 mm lesions and 80% for >30 mm lesions. Conclusions Malignant lesions >15 mm were differentiated from benign lesions with excellent sensitivity and specificity. IR imaging was well tolerated and feasible in a clinic setting. This pilot study shows promise in the use of thermography for the diagnosis of malignant melanoma with further potential as a noninvasive tool to follow tumor responses to systemic therapies. PMID:23043862

  9. Seismic risk evaluation aided by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, E.; Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.; Petracca, A.

    2009-05-01

    Conservation of buildings in areas at seismic risk must take prevention into account. The safeguard architectonic heritage is an ambitious objective, but a priority for planning programmes at varying levels of decision making. Preservation and restoration activities must be optimized to cover a vast and widespread historical and architectonic heritage present in many countries. Masonry buildings requires an adequate level of knowledge based on the importance of structural geometry, which may include the damage, details of construction and properties of materials. For identification and classification of masonry is necessary to find shape, type and size of the elements, texture, size of mortar joints, assemblage. The recognition can be done through a visual inspection of the surface of walls, which can be examined, where is not visible, removing a layer of plaster. Thermography is an excellent tool for a fast survey and collection of vital information for this purpose, but it is extremely important define a precise procedure in the development of more efficient monitoring tools. Thermography is a non-destructive method that allows recognizing the structural damage below plaster, detecting the presence of discontinuity in masonry, for added storeys, cavity, filled openings, and repairs. Furthermore, the fast identification of subsurface state allows to select areas where other methods either more penetrating or partially destructive have to be applied. The paper reports experimental results achieved in the mainframe of the European project RECES Modiquus. The main aim of the project is to improve methods, techniques and instruments for facing antiseismic options. Both passive and active thermographic techniques have been applied in different weather conditions and time schemes. A dedicated algorithm has been developed to enhance the visibility of wall bonding.

  10. Aerial thermography in archaeological prospection: Applications & processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Autumn Chrysantha

    Aerial thermography is one of the least utilized archaeological prospection methods, yet it has great potential for detecting anthropogenic anomalies. Thermal infrared radiation is absorbed and reemitted at varying rates by all objects on and within the ground depending upon their density, composition, and moisture content. If an area containing archaeological features is recorded at the moment when their thermal signatures most strongly contrast with that of the surrounding matrix, they can be visually identified in thermal images. Research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s established a few basic rules for conducting thermal survey, but the expense associated with the method deterred most archaeologists from using this technology. Subsequent research was infrequent and almost exclusively appeared in the form of case studies. However, as the current proliferation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and compact thermal cameras draws renewed attention to aerial thermography as an attractive and exciting form of survey, it is appropriate and necessary to reevaluate our approach. In this thesis I have taken a two-pronged approach. First, I built upon the groundwork of earlier researchers and created an experiment to explore the impact that different environmental and climatic conditions have on the success or failure of thermal imaging. I constructed a test site designed to mimic a range of archaeological features and imaged it under a variety of conditions to compare and contrast the results. Second, I explored a new method for processing thermal data that I hope will lead to a means of reducing noise and increasing the clarity of thermal images. This step was done as part of a case study so that the effectiveness of the processing method could be evaluated by comparison with the results of other geophysical surveys.

  11. Detecting defects in marine structures by using eddy current infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, W

    2016-12-01

    Eddy current infrared (IR) thermography is a new nondestructive testing (NDT) technique used for the detection of cracks in electroconductive materials. By combining the well-established inspection methods of eddy current NDT and IR thermography, this technique uses induced eddy currents to heat test samples. In this way, IR thermography allows the visualization of eddy current distribution that is distorted in defect sites. This paper discusses the results of numerical modeling of eddy current IR thermography procedures in application to marine structures.

  12. Department of National Defence's use of thermography for facilities maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittson, John E.

    1990-03-01

    Since the late seventies DND through the Director General Works has been actively encouraging the use of thermography as an efficient and effective technique for supporting preventive maintenance quality assurance and energy conservation programs at Canadian Forces Bases (CFBs). This paper will provide an overview of DND''s experiences in the utilization of thermography for facilities maintenance applications. 1. HISTORICAL MILESTONES The following are milestones of DND''s use of thermography: a. Purchase of Infrared Equipment In 1976/77 DND purchased five AGA 750 Infrared Thermovision Systems which were distributed to commands. In 1980/81/82 six AGA liOs five AGA TPT8Os two AGA 782s and one AGA 720 were acquired. Finally DND also purchased seven AGEMA 870 systems during 1987/88. b. First and Second Interdepartaental Building Thermography Courses In 1978 and 1980 DND hosted two building thermography courses that were conducted by Public Works Canada. c. CE Thermographer Specialist Training Courses DND developed a training standard in 1983 for Construction Engineering (CE) Thermographer qualification which included all CE applications of thermography. The first annual inhouse training course was conducted at CFB Borden Ontario in 1984. These are now being conducted at the CFB Chilliwack Detachment in Vernon British Columbia. 2 . MARKETING FACILITIES MAINTENANCE IR Of paramount importance for successfully developing DND appreciation for thermography was providing familiarization training to CE staff at commands and bases. These threeday presentations emphasized motivational factors conducting thermographic surveys and utilizing infrared data of roofs electrical/mechanical systems heating plants steam distribution and building enclosures. These factors consisted mainly of the following objectives: a. preventive maintenance by locating deficiencies to be repaired b. quality assurance by verification of workmanship materials and design c. energy conservation by locating

  13. Effects of an anti-oxidative ACAT inhibitor on apoptosis/necrosis and cholesterol accumulation under oxidative stress in THP-1 cell-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Miike, Tomohiro; Shirahase, Hiroaki; Jino, Hiroshi; Kunishiro, Kazuyoshi; Kanda, Mamoru; Kurahashi, Kazuyoshi

    2008-01-02

    THP-1 cell-derived foam cells were exposed to oxidative stress through combined treatment with acetylated LDL (acLDL) and copper ions (Cu2+). The foam cells showed caspase-dependent apoptotic changes on exposure to oxidative stress for 6 h, and necrotic changes with the leakage of LDH after 24 h. KY-455, an anti-oxidative ACAT inhibitor, and ascorbic acid (VC) but not YM-750, an ACAT inhibitor, prevented apoptotic and necrotic changes. These preventive effects of KY-455 and VC were accompanied by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation in culture medium containing acLDL and Cu2+, suggesting the involvement of oxidized acLDL in apoptosis and necrosis. Foam cells accumulated esterified cholesterol (EC) for 24 h in the presence of acLDL without Cu2+, which was suppressed by KY-455 and YM-750. Foam cells showed necrotic changes and died in the presence of acLDL and Cu2+. KY-455 but not YM-750 prevented cell death and reduced the amount of EC accumulated. The foam cells treated with VC further accumulated EC without necrotic changes for 24 h even in the presence of acLDL and Cu2+. YM-750 as well as KY-455 inhibited lipid accumulation when co-incubated with VC in foam cells exposed to oxidative stress. It is concluded that an anti-oxidative ACAT inhibitor or the combination of an antioxidant and an ACAT inhibitor protects foam cells from oxidative stress and effectively reduces cholesterol levels, which would be a promising approach in anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  14. Breast cancer detection in rotational thermography images using texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Sheeja V.; Sasikala, M.; Bhavani Bharathi, G.; Jaipurkar, Sandeep D.

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality in young women in the developing countries. Early diagnosis is the key to improve survival rate in cancer patients. Breast thermography is a diagnostic procedure that non-invasively images the infrared emissions from breast surface to aid in the early detection of breast cancer. Due to limitations in imaging protocol, abnormality detection by conventional breast thermography, is often a challenging task. Rotational thermography is a novel technique developed in order to overcome the limitations of conventional breast thermography. This paper evaluates this technique's potential for automatic detection of breast abnormality, from the perspective of cold challenge. Texture features are extracted in the spatial domain, from rotational thermogram series, prior to and post the application of cold challenge. These features are fed to a support vector machine for automatic classification of normal and malignant breasts, resulting in a classification accuracy of 83.3%. Feature reduction has been performed by principal component analysis. As a novel attempt, the ability of this technique to locate the abnormality has been studied. The results of the study indicate that rotational thermography holds great potential as a screening tool for breast cancer detection.

  15. Thermography--a feasible method for screening breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Kolarić, Darko; Herceg, Zeljko; Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Ramljak, Vesna; Kulis, Tomislav; Holjevac, Jadranka Katancić; Deutsch, Judith A; Antonini, Svetlana

    2013-06-01

    Potential use of thermography for more effective detection of breast carcinoma was evaluated on 26 patients scheduled for breast carcinoma surgery. Ultrasonographic scan, mammography and thermography were performed at the University Hospital for Tumors. Thermographic imaging was performed using a new generation of digital thermal cameras with high sensitivity and resolution (ThermoTracer TH7102WL, NEC). Five images for each patient were recorded: front, right semi-oblique, right oblique, left- semi oblique and left oblique. While mammography detected 31 changes in 26 patients, thermography was more sensitive and detected 6 more changes in the same patients. All 37 changes were subjected to the cytological analysis and it was found that 16 of samples were malignant, 8 were suspected malignant and 11 were benign with atypia or proliferation while only 2 samples had benign findings. The pathohistological method (PHD) recorded 75.75% malignant changes within the total number of samples. Statistical analysis of the data has shown a probability of a correct mammographic finding in 85% of the cases (sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 84%) and a probability of a correct thermographic finding in 92% of the cases (sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 79%). As breast cancer remains the most prevalent cancer in women and thermography exhibited superior sensitivity, we believe that thermography should immediately find its place in the screening programs for early detection of breast carcinoma, in order to reduce the sufferings from this devastating disease.

  16. Thermography is not a feasible method for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Brkljacić, Boris; Miletić, Damir; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy causing high mortality in women especially in developed countries. Due to the contribution of mammographic screening and improvements in therapy, the mortality rate from breast cancer has decreased considerably. An imaging-based early detection of breast cancer improves the treatment outcome. Mammography is generally established not only as diagnostic but also as screening tool, while breast ultrasound plays a major role in the diagnostic setting in distinguishing solid lesions from cysts and in guiding tissue sampling. Several indications are established for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Thermography was not validated as a screening tool and the only study performed long ago for evaluating this technology in the screening setting demonstrated very poor results. The conclusion that thermography might be feasible for screening cannot be derived from studies with small sample size, unclear selection of patients, and in which mammography and thermography were not blindly compared as screening modalities. Thermography can not be used to aspirate, biopsy or localize lesions preoperatively since no method so far was described to accurately transpose the thermographic location of the lesion to the mammogram or ultrasound and to surgical specimen. Thermography cannot be proclaimed as a screening method, without any evidence whatsoever.

  17. Possibilities of acoustic thermometry for controlling targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Nemchenko, O. Yu.; Less, Yu. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Model acoustic thermometry experiments were conducted during heating of an aqueous liposome suspension. Heating was done to achieve the liposome phase transition temperature. At the moment of the phase transition, the thermal acoustic signal achieved a maximum and decreased, despite continued heating. During subsequent cooling of the suspension, when lipids again passed through the phase transition point, the thermal acoustic signal again increased, despite a reduction in temperature. This effect is related to an increase in ultrasound absorption by the liposome suspension at the moment of the lipid phase transition. The result shows that acoustic thermography can be used to control targeted delivery of drugs mixed in thermally sensitive liposomes, the integrity of which is violated during heating to the phase transition temperature.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  19. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-02-07

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF).

  20. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-01-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF). PMID:28169361

  1. Medical applications of infrared thermography: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2012-07-01

    Abnormal body temperature is a natural indicator of illness. Infrared thermography (IRT) is a fast, passive, non-contact and non-invasive alternative to conventional clinical thermometers for monitoring body temperature. Besides, IRT can also map body surface temperature remotely. Last five decades witnessed a steady increase in the utility of thermal imaging cameras to obtain correlations between the thermal physiology and skin temperature. IRT has been successfully used in diagnosis of breast cancer, diabetes neuropathy and peripheral vascular disorders. It has also been used to detect problems associated with gynecology, kidney transplantation, dermatology, heart, neonatal physiology, fever screening and brain imaging. With the advent of modern infrared cameras, data acquisition and processing techniques, it is now possible to have real time high resolution thermographic images, which is likely to surge further research in this field. The present efforts are focused on automatic analysis of temperature distribution of regions of interest and their statistical analysis for detection of abnormalities. This critical review focuses on advances in the area of medical IRT. The basics of IRT, essential theoretical background, the procedures adopted for various measurements and applications of IRT in various medical fields are discussed in this review. Besides background information is provided for beginners for better understanding of the subject.

  2. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-02-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF).

  3. Thermography applied acupuncture and qi-gong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuwen; Ji, Hong-Wei; Chen, Jin-Long; Li, Hong-Qi

    1997-04-01

    Thermographic technique can be used to measure temperature distribution of body surface in real-time, non-contact and full-field, which has been successfully used in medical diagnosis, remote sensing, and NDT, etc. The authors have developed a thermographic experiment that can be applied to inspect the effect of action of acupuncture and qi-gong (a system of deep breathing exercises) by measuring the temperature of hand and arm. The observation is performed respectively by thermography for the dynamic changes of temperature of the arm and hand after acupuncture therapy and qi-gong therapy. Thermographic results show that the temperature on the collateral channels increases markedly. In the meantime, it can be seen that the above therapies of Chinese medicine can stimulate the channel collateral system. This also contributes a new basis to the effect of action of the therapies of Chinese medicine. The work shows that thermographic technique is a powerful tool for research in Chinese medicine. In this paper, some thermal images are obtained from the persons treated with acupuncture and qi- gong.

  4. Infrared thermography and overloaded neutral conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, John; Niebla, Hector E.

    1999-03-01

    Present findings of two recent case studies. One involves transformer failures on three computer-stores within eight hours of their grand opening. The second discusses the findings during an infrared thermography-training course for electric utility engineers of a transformer vault serving an industrial customer. Both of these deal with overloaded neutral conductors. Historically, the average neutral conductor carried only the imbalance of the current between the phases of a three-phase system. This current was typically small in relation to the load being served. In fact, for economic reasons many neutrals were installed smaller than their associated phase conductors. Today however, certain types of loads (non-linear loads such as computers) and certain transformer connections (4 bushing single phase with a collector bus) cause the neutral to have up to three times as much amperage as the phase conductors. This paper will discuss the conditions under which such loading occurs and further investigate steps that can be taken/recommended should an infrared test indicate an overloaded neutral conductor.

  5. Infrared Thermography in High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    GLEATON, DAVIDT.

    2004-08-24

    The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy, government-owned, company-operated industrial complex built in the 1950s to produce materials used in nuclear weapons. Five reactors were built to support the production of nuclear weapons material. Irradiated materials were moved from the reactors to one of the two chemical separation plants. In these facilities, known as ''canyons,'' the irradiated fuel and target assemblies were chemically processed to separate useful products from waste. Unfortunately, the by-product waste of nuclear material production was a highly radioactive liquid that had to be stored and maintained. In 1993 a strategy was developed to implement predictive maintenance technologies in the Liquid Waste Disposition Project Division responsible for processing the liquid waste. Responsibilities include the processing and treatment of 51 underground tanks designed to hold 750,000 to1,300,000 gallons of liquid waste and operation of a facility that vitrifies highly radioactive liquid waste into glass logs. Electrical and mechanical equipment monitored at these facilities is very similar to that found in non-nuclear industrial plants. Annual inspections are performed on electrical components, roof systems, and mechanical equipment. Troubleshooting and post installation and post-maintenance infrared inspections are performed as needed. In conclusion, regardless of the industry, the use of infrared thermography has proven to be an efficient and effective method of inspection to help improve plant safety and reliability through early detection of equipment problems.

  6. Membrane fouling characterization by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndukaife, Kennethrex O.; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Agwu Nnanna, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    An infrared thermography (IRT) technique for characterization of fouling on flat sheet membrane surface has been developed. In this work, an IR camera was used to measure surface temperature and emissivity of foulant on a membrane surface. Different fouling experiments were performed using different feed concentrations of aluminum oxide nanoparticle mixed with deionized water so as to investigate the effect of feed concentration on the degree of fouling and on the emissivity values measured on the membrane surfaces. Our findings revealed that the emissivity of the fouled membrane surface is contingent on the surface roughness as well as the material composition of the foulant. The technique was utilized to distinguish between foulants made of metallic materials from those that are non-metallic. This approach, which is simple to use and nondestructive represents an important addition to the toolset of fouling analysis techniques and would benefit a wide range of applications from observation of foulant structure to qualitative assessment of composition of foulant material.

  7. Bridge concrete deteriorating diagnosis by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hiroki; Fukuyama, Nobuhiro; Sakuma, Joji; Mochizuki, Jun; Kimura, Yukinori

    2006-04-01

    Bridge is indispensable as social overhead capital. In the past, concrete construction was believed to be semi-permanent. Actually, however, concrete is deteriorated by various factors including seawater damage, annual temperature change, etc. Therefore, it is now obvious that maintenance and management are essential to keep performance of the bridge. In Japan, we had many reports of using infrared thermography for diagnosis of building, mainly for delamination of tile and mortar used for surface of the building for more than 10 years. In recent years, infrared thermogrephy is more actively used for delamination of surface of the bridge. Passive method is usually used for open-air concrete structure diagnosis, which utilizes intraday environmental temperature change and/or radiation energy emitted from the sun which create delta-T of delamination portion of the concrete structure. It is very important to take thermal image at right conditions. Otherwise, you may easily fall onto false diagnosis. In our presentation, many case examples and study of thermal data will be shown, which are taken at the right condition.

  8. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography using Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared (IR) thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and IR imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with IR-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (− 0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (− 0.69 ± 0.18 °C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the IR measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45 – 50 °C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies where thermocouples or water-bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results show that high resolution IR thermography provides a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. PMID:26547634

  9. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  10. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  11. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  12. Infrared thermography on ocular surface temperature: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jen-Hong; Ng, E. Y. K.; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Chee, C.

    2009-07-01

    Body temperature is a good indicator of human health. Thermal imaging system (thermography) is a non-invasive imaging procedure used to record the thermal patterns using Infrared (IR) camera. It provides visual and qualitative documentation of temperature changes in the vascular tissues, and is beginning to play an important role in the field of ophthalmology. This paper deals with the working principle, use and advantages of IR thermography in the field of ophthalmology. Different algorithms to acquire the ocular surface temperature (OST), that can be used for the diagnosis of ocular diseases are discussed.

  13. Heat flux sensors for infrared thermography in convective heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-11-07

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described.

  14. Subsurface Defect Detection in FRP Composites Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, U. B.; Vasudevan, A.; GangaRao, H. V. S.; Klinkhachorn, P.; Lonkar, G.

    2005-04-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of digital infrared thermography to detect subsurface defects such as debonds and delaminations in Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bridge decks. Simulated sub-surface debonds and delaminations were inserted between the wearing surface and the underlying FRP deck specimens. The infrared thermography technique was used to detect these embedded subsurface defects. The use of various cooling and heating methods, including solar radiation, was explored. Surface temperature-time curves were established for different types and sizes of subsurface defects.

  15. Using thermography for an obstruction of the lower lacrimal system.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marco Antonio de Campos; Silva, João Amaro Ferrari; Brioschi, Marcos Leal; Allemann, Norma

    2016-02-01

    Obstructions in the lacrimal pathways quite often require accurate and reliable image scanning for confirmation and documentation. Infrared thermal imaging, known as thermography, is a resource that complements diagnosis; it does not require touching the patient or applying contrast materials and has been used in various medical procedures for decades. However, there have been few studies in the literature about its use in ophthalmology. In this paper, the authors have presented a case of dacryocystitis where the obstruction of the lacrimal punctum was so acute that conventional dacryocystography could not be used. The authors have successfully reported the use of thermography as a complementary propaedeutic and will discuss the method they used.

  16. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  17. IR Thermography of International Space Station Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, WIlliam; Morton, Richard; Howell, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Several non-flight qualification test radiators were inspected using flash thermography. Flash thermography data analysis used raw and second derivative images to detect anomalies (Echotherm and Mosaic). Simple contrast evolutions were plotted for the detected anomalies to help in anomaly characterization. Many out-of-family indications were noted. Some out-of-family indications were classified as cold spot indications and are due to additional adhesive or adhesive layer behind the facesheet. Some out-of-family indications were classified as hot spot indications and are due to void, unbond or lack of adhesive behind the facesheet. The IR inspection helped in assessing expected manufacturing quality of the radiators.

  18. Nondestructive evaluation technique using infrared thermography and terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Shiozawa, Daiki; Tamaki, Yoshitaka; Iwama, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques using pulse heating infrared thermography and terahertz (THz) imaging were developed for detecting deterioration of oil tank floor, such as blister and delamination of corrosion protection coating, or corrosion of the bottom steel plate under coating. Experimental studies were conducted to demonstrate the practicability of developed techniques. It was found that the pulse heating infrared thermography was utilized for effective screening inspection and THz-TDS imaging technique performed well for the detailed inspection of coating deterioration and steel corrosion.

  19. Computer Assisted Thermography And Its Application In Ovulation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. H.; Shah, A. V.

    1984-08-01

    Hardware and software of a computer-assisted image analyzing system used for infrared images in medical applications are discussed. The application of computer-assisted thermography (CAT) as a complementary diagnostic tool in centralized diagnostic management is proposed. The authors adopted 'Computer Assisted Thermography' to study physiological changes in the breasts related to the hormones characterizing the menstrual cycle of a woman. Based on clinical experi-ments followed by thermal image analysis, they suggest that 'differential skin temperature (DST)1 be measured to detect the fertility interval in the menstrual cycle of a woman.

  20. Integration of ground-penetrating radar, ultrasonic tests and infrared thermography for the analysis of a precious medieval rose window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, L.; Calia, A.; Liberatore, D.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.

    2010-04-01

    The integration of high-resolution, non-invasive geophysical techniques (such as ground-penetrating radar or GPR) with emerging sensing techniques (acoustics, thermography) can complement limited destructive tests to provide a suitable methodology for a multi-scale assessment of the state of preservation, material and construction components of monuments. This paper presents the results of the application of GPR, infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonic tests to the 13th century rose window of Troia Cathedral (Apulia, Italy), affected by widespread decay and instability problems caused by the 1731 earthquake and reactivated by recent seismic activity. This integrated approach provided a wide amount of complementary information at different scales, ranging from the sub-centimetre size of the metallic joints between the various architectural elements, narrow fractures and thin mortar fillings, up to the sub-metre scale of the internal masonry structure of the circular ashlar curb linking the rose window to the façade, which was essential to understand the original building technique and to design an effective restoration strategy.

  1. Inspecting thermal barrier coatings by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, Paolo G.; Marinetti, Sergio; Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Vavilov, Vladimir P.; Cernuschi, Federico; Robba, Daniele

    2003-04-01

    As far as power generation is concerned, coating technologies find the main and more advanced applications. Nowadays, superalloys available for manufacturing hot path components in gas turbine like combustion liners, blades and vanes can not sustain temperatures up to 1100°C. In order to guarantee a significative temperature drop ceramic thermal barrier coatings are deposited onto the metallic core. The thickness of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) ranges from a few hundreds microns up to 1 millimetre or more, depending on component and deposition technique (mainly Air Plasma Spray or Electron Beam Physical Vapour Deposition). The structural integrity of both the substrate and the coating and their mutual adhesion is a key point because any loss of the protective layer exposes the bulk material to an extremely aggressive environment in terms of oxidation and temperature. Therefore, TBC must be tested for detecting of defects during both quality control and periodic in-service inspections. Because of the key role played by thickness and low thermal diffusivity of TBC in the decreasing of the substrate material temperature, both delaminations and thickness variation must be detected and classified. Pulsed Thermography has been successfully applied to this application field. Nevertheless, the procedure gives ambiguous results when thickness or thermal properties change in a continuous way within the thermal barrier. In this paper, a specific study on the detection performances of NDE techniques is presented, even when a non-uniform TBC thickness is superimposed to the disbonding defect. Tests performed at workshop on real and specifically manufactured components are reported. Dedicated processing algorithms improving the test reliability and effectiveness are presented as well. Tests on real components on the field are also reported.

  2. Using infrared thermography to study freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that determine when and to what extent a plant will freeze are complex. While thermocouples have served as the main method of monitoring the freezing process in plants, infrared thermography offers distinct advantages, and the use of this latter technology has provided new insights on the p...

  3. Infrared thermography to evaluate lameness in pregnant sows

    PubMed Central

    Amezcua, Rocio; Walsh, Shannon; Luimes, Paul H.; Friendship, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of lameness in sows is important to reduce losses and improve animal welfare. Mild-to-moderate lameness is difficult to diagnose in sows. Infrared thermography (IRT) was evaluated as a method of detecting signs of inflammation in the lower limbs as an aid in lameness detection. PMID:24587511

  4. NASA MUST Paper: Infrared Thermography of Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comeaux, Kayla; Koshti, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this project is to use Infrared Thermography, a non-destructive test, to detect detrimental cracks and voids beneath the surface of materials used in the space program. This project will consist of developing a simulation model of the Infrared Thermography inspection of the Graphite/Epoxy specimen. The simulation entails finding the correct physical properties for this specimen as well as programming the model for thick voids or flat bottom holes. After the simulation is completed, an Infrared Thermography inspection of the actual specimen will be made. Upon acquiring the experimental test data, an analysis of the data for the actual experiment will occur, which includes analyzing images, graphical analysis, and analyzing numerical data received from the infrared camera. The simulation will then be corrected for any discrepancies between it and the actual experiment. The optimized simulation material property inputs can then be used for new simulation for thin voids. The comparison of the two simulations, the simulation for the thick void and the simulation for the thin void, provides a correlation between the peak contrast ratio and peak time ratio. This correlation is used in the evaluation of flash thermography data during the evaluation of delaminations.

  5. Feasibility of determining flat roof heat losses using aerial thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The utility of aerial thermography for determining rooftop heat losses was investigated experimentally using several completely instrumented test roofs with known thermal resistances. Actual rooftop heat losses were obtained both from in-situ instrumentation and aerial thermography obtained from overflights at an altitude of 305 m. In general, the remotely determined roof surface temperatures agreed very well with those obtained from ground measurements. The roof heat losses calculated using the remotely determined roof temperature agreed to within 17% of those calculated from 1/R delta T using ground measurements. However, this agreement may be fortuitous since the convective component of the heat loss is sensitive to small changes in roof temperature and to the average heat transfer coefficient used, whereas the radiative component is less sensitive. This, at this time, it is felt that an acceptable quantitative determination of roof heat losses using aerial thermography is only feasible when the convective term is accurately known or minimized. The sensitivity of the heat loss determination to environmental conditions was also evaluated. The analysis showed that the most reliable quantitative heat loss determinations can probably be obtained from aerial thermography taken under conditions of total cloud cover with low wind speeds and at low ambient temperatures.

  6. Use of aerial thermography in Canadian energy conservation programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Brown, R. J.; Lawrence, G.; Barry, J. N.; James, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of aerial thermography in energy conservation programs within Canada were summarized. Following a brief review of studies conducted during the last three years, methodologies of data acquisition, processing, analysis and interpretation was discussed. Examples of results from an industrial oriented project were presented and recommendations for future basic work were outlined.

  7. Normalized Temperature Contrast Processing in Flash Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents further development in normalized contrast processing of flash infrared thermography method by the author given in US 8,577,120 B1. The method of computing normalized image or pixel intensity contrast, and normalized temperature contrast are provided, including converting one from the other. Methods of assessing emissivity of the object, afterglow heat flux, reflection temperature change and temperature video imaging during flash thermography are provided. Temperature imaging and normalized temperature contrast imaging provide certain advantages over pixel intensity normalized contrast processing by reducing effect of reflected energy in images and measurements, providing better quantitative data. The subject matter for this paper mostly comes from US 9,066,028 B1 by the author. Examples of normalized image processing video images and normalized temperature processing video images are provided. Examples of surface temperature video images, surface temperature rise video images and simple contrast video images area also provided. Temperature video imaging in flash infrared thermography allows better comparison with flash thermography simulation using commercial software which provides temperature video as the output. Temperature imaging also allows easy comparison of surface temperature change to camera temperature sensitivity or noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) to assess probability of detecting (POD) anomalies.

  8. Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meola, C.; Carlomagno, G. M.; di Foggia, M.; Natale, O.

    2008-06-01

    A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in fact, the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and may cause difficulties in successive manufacturing. Therefore, it is important to have a non-destructive technique that must be capable of detecting tiny ceramic fragments in a fast and easy way. In this perspective, the suitability of infrared thermography was investigated within cooperation between the University of Naples and the Europea Microfusioni Aerospaziali S.p.A. (EMA). Several blades of three different types were inspected revealing that in many cases infrared thermography can discover small ceramic fragments which were missed by X-ray inspection. In addition, infrared thermography allows gaining of information about other types of anomalies (e.g., surface defects) during the same testing step (by eventually changing the test parameters) and then saving time and money. The obtained results look promising in view of introducing infrared thermography among industrial instrumentation as an alternative to, or integrated with, the most currently utilized non-destructive techniques.

  9. Investigation on choosing technical parameters for pulse thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan

    2015-04-01

    Composite material connected by glue has gained popularity as a replacement for conventional materials and structures to reduce weight and improve strength in the aerospace industry, with the development of material science and structural mechanics. However, the adhesive bonding process is more susceptible to quality variations during manufacturing than traditional joining methods. The integrality, strength and rigidity of product would be broken by disbonding. Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials. Pulsed infrared thermography has been widely used in aerospace and mechanical manufacture industry because it can offer noncontact, quickly and visual examinations of disbonding defects. However the parameter choosing method is difficult to decide. Investigate the choosing technical parameters for pulse thermograpghy is more important to ensure the product quality and testing efficiency. In this paper, two kinds of defects which are of various size, shape and location below the test surface are planted in the honeycomb structure, they are all tested by pulsed thermography. This paper presents a study of single factor experimental research on damage sample in simulation was carried out. The impact of the power of light source, detection distance, and the wave band of thermography camera on detecting effect is studied. The select principle of technique is made, the principle supplied basis for selection of detecting parameters in real part testing.

  10. Concept And Development Of Instruments For ITER Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Reichle, R.; Balorin, C.; Carpentier, S.; Corre, Y.; Davi, M.; Delchambre, E.; Desgrange, C.; Escourbiac, F.; Fougerolle, S.; Gardarein, J. L.; Gauthier, E.; Guilhem, D.; Jouve, M.; Loarer, Th.; Martins, J. P.; Patterlini, J. C.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Salasca, S.; Travere, J. M.

    2008-03-12

    We give here a short overview of the status of the development for ITER thermography as performed by the CEA-Cadarache and some of its collaboration partners. The topics that have been included in this synthesis are the status of the optical design, the role of multi-wavelength mesurements, multicolour pyroreflectometry, photothermal methods, and reflection simulations and measurements.

  11. Infrared thermography to evaluate lameness in pregnant sows.

    PubMed

    Amezcua, Rocio; Walsh, Shannon; Luimes, Paul H; Friendship, Robert M

    2014-03-01

    Early detection of lameness in sows is important to reduce losses and improve animal welfare. Mild-to-moderate lameness is difficult to diagnose in sows. Infrared thermography (IRT) was evaluated as a method of detecting signs of inflammation in the lower limbs as an aid in lameness detection.

  12. Infrared thermography for CFRP inspection: computational model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Henrique C.; Zhang, Hai; Morioka, Karen; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; López, Fernando; Maldague, Xavier P. V.; Tarpani, José R.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) is a well-known Non-destructive Testing (NDT) technique. In the last decades, it has been widely applied in several fields including inspection of composite materials (CM), specially the fiber-reinforced polymer matrix ones. Consequently, it is important to develop and improve efficient NDT techniques to inspect and assess the quality of CM parts in order to warranty airworthiness and, at the same time, reduce costs of airline companies. In this paper, active IRT is used to inspect carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) at laminate with artificial inserts (built-in sample) placed on different layers prior to the manufacture. Two optical active IRT are used. The first is pulsed thermography (PT) which is the most widely utilized IRT technique. The second is a line-scan thermography (LST) technique: a dynamic technique, which can be employed for the inspection of materials by heating a component, line-by-line, while acquiring a series of thermograms with an infrared camera. It is especially suitable for inspection of large parts as well as complex shaped parts. A computational model developed using COMSOL Multiphysics® was used in order to simulate the inspections. Sequences obtained from PT and LST were processed using principal component thermography (PCT) for comparison. Results showed that it is possible to detect insertions of different sizes at different depths using both PT and LST IRT techniques.

  13. Defect Detection in Composite Coatings by Computational Simulation Aided Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, R. M.; Souza, M. P. V.; Rebello, J. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thermography is based on the measurement of superficial temperature distribution of an object inspected subjected to tension, normally thermal heat. This measurement is performed with a thermographic camera that detects the infrared radiation emitted by every object. In this work thermograph was simulated by COMSOL software for optimize experimental parameters in composite material coatings inspection.

  14. Shuttle Entry Imaging Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas; Berry, Scott; Alter, Stephen; Blanchard, Robert; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Tack, Steve

    2007-01-01

    imaging platforms used within DoD along with agency assets developed and optimized for use during Shuttle ascent to demonstrate capability (i.e., tracking, acquisition of multispectral data, spatial resolution) and identify system limitations (i.e., radiance modeling, saturation) using state-of-the-art imaging instrumentation and communication systems. Global infrared intensity data have been transformed to temperature by comparison to Shuttle flight thermocouple data. Reasonable agreement is found between the flight thermography images and numerical prediction. A discussion of lessons learned and potential application to a potential Shuttle boundary layer transition flight test is presented.

  15. The ACAT inhibitor avasimibe increases the fractional clearance rate of postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John R; Telford, Dawn E; Barrett, P Hugh R; Huff, Murray W

    2005-12-30

    Previously, we have shown, in vivo, that the acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor avasimibe decreases hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) B secretion into plasma. To test the hypothesis that avasimibe modulates postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) metabolism in vivo, an oral fat load (2 g fat/kg) containing retinol was given to 9 control miniature pigs and to 9 animals after 28 days treatment with avasimibe (10 mg/kg/day, n=5; 25 mg/kg/day, n=4). The kinetic parameters for plasma retinyl palmitate (RP) metabolism were determined by multi-compartmental modeling using SAAM II. Avasimibe decreased the 2-h TRL (d<1.006 g/mL; S(f)>20) triglyceride concentrations by 34%. The TRL triglyceride 0-12 h area under the curve (AUC) was decreased by 21%. In contrast, avasimibe had no effect on peak TRL RP concentrations, time to peak, or its rate of appearance into plasma, however, the TRL RP 0-12 h AUC was decreased by 17%. Analysis of the RP kinetic parameters revealed that the TRL fractional clearance rate (FCR) was increased 1.4-fold with avasimibe. The TRL RP FCR was negatively correlated with very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) apoB production rate measured in the fasting state (r=-0.504). No significant changes in total intestinal lipid concentrations were observed. Thus, although avasimibe had no effect on intestinal TRL secretion, plasma TRL clearance was significantly increased; an effect that may relate to a decreased competition with hepatic VLDL for removal processes.

  16. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  17. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy of upper extremity: a new diagnostic approach using Flexi-Therm liquid crystal thermography

    PubMed Central

    Kobrossi, T.; Steiman, I.

    1986-01-01

    A case of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDA), diagnosed by liquid crystal contact thermography (LCT) is presented. The pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the syndrome are reviewed having regard to liquid crystal thermography. ImagesFigure 1

  18. International standards pertaining to thermography practices, training and certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West Åkerblom, Lisa

    2008-03-01

    American, European and International societies establish standards for individuals and companies within the field of infrared thermography. Historically addressing non-destructive testing (NDT) applications and personnel, standards exist and are being developed within the fields of condition monitoring (CM) and building diagnostics. Incorrect reference to or application of standards and guidelines create widespread market confusion. What type of claim can be made against which standards? Does the standard apply to a company or an individual? To what or whom is the standard intended? Does reference to a standard guarantee compliance or imply quality? How does one become educated or involved in standards? An overview of international standards within the field of thermography (with brief reference to recognizable guidelines and standards such as ASNT SNT-TC-1A and CEN 473), their status and application will be presented.

  19. Investigation on a new inducer of pulsed eddy current thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; Zhang, Laibin; Zheng, Wenpei; Feng, Yijing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a new inducer of pulsed eddy current thermography (PECT) is presented. The use of the inducer can help avoid the problem of blocking the infrared (IR) camera's view in eddy current thermography technique. The inducer can also provide even heating of the test specimen. This paper is concerned with the temperature distribution law around the crack on a specimen when utilizing the new inducer. Firstly, relative mathematical models are provided. In the following section, eddy current distribution and temperature distribution around the crack are studied using the numerical simulation method. The best separation distance between the inducer and the specimen is also determined. Then, results of temperature distribution around the crack stimulated by the inducer are gained by experiments. Effect of current value on temperature rise is studied as well in the experiments. Based on temperature data, temperature features of the crack are discussed.

  20. Detection of foreign substances in food using thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinlschmidt, Peter; Maergner, Volker

    2002-03-01

    This paper gives a short introduction into the possibility of detecting foreign bodies in food by using IR thermography. The first results shown for combinations of cherries and chocolate and berries contaminated with leaves, stalks, pedicel and thorns could be easily evaluated manually. Therefore the differing emissivity coefficients or the different heat conductivities and/or capacities are used for differentiation. Applying pulse thermography, first heat conductivity measurements of different food materials are performed. Calculating the contrast of possible food / contaminant combinations shows the difficulty of differentiating certain materials. A possible automatic evaluation for raisins contaminated with wooden sticks and almonds blended with stones could be shown. The power of special adapted algorithms using statistical or morphological analysis is shown to distinguish the foreign bodies from the foodstuff.

  1. Thermography Applied to Interfacial Phenomena, Potentials and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, M.; Sefiane, K.

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a non-intrusive method for temperature measurement. Its ability to produce two-dimensional temperature images makes it a powerful tool for investigating systems exhibiting spatial variation of temperature. IR temperature measurements are almost always surface measurements; the technique has therefore found use in obtaining interfacial temperatures, primarily in heat and mass transfer investigations. The reasons for the technique's limited uptake likely stems from the requirement of accurate material emissivity data and the large number of potential sources of error. This chapter provides an overview of the underlying theory of radiative heat transfer. Key considerations and problems in the application of IR thermography are discussed with reference to some examples of recent successful applications.

  2. Liquid ingress recognition in honeycomb structure by pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zeng, Zhi; Tao, Ning; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Zheng

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed thermography has been proven to be a fast and effective method to detect fluid ingress in aircraft honeycomb structure; however, water and hydraulic oil may have similar appearance in the thermal image sequence. It is meaningful to identify what kind of liquid ingress it is for aircraft maintenance. In this study, honeycomb specimens with glass fiber and aluminum skin are injected different kinds of liquids: water and oil. Pulsed thermography is adopted; a recognition method is proposed to first get the reference curve by linear fitting the beginning of the logarithmic curve, and then an algorithm based on the thermal contrast between liquid and reference is used to recognize what kind of fluid it is by calculating their thermal properties. It is verified with the results of theory and the finite element simulation.

  3. Roles For Thermography In Utility Company Residential Energy Audits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Bismarck, North Dakota, provides wholesale electricity to more than 100 rural electric cooperatives of the Missouri Pasin Region. The Cooperative, in cooperation with Aadland*Hoffmann*Pieri Energy Associates, Inc., Minneapolis, MN has developed a three-fold program which involves the analytical approach, the instructional approach and the motivational approach (A'IsM) to an energy audit. This three-fold program utilizes infrared thermography to pinpoint where heat loss is occurring in the home. The auditor can motivate the homeowner to initiate energy conserving improvements and practices by showing where money can be saved. Infrared thermography is a most valuable tool in helping the rural electrics conserve energy and the nation's natural resources. Over 180 energy auditors have been trained through this program in this area and 5,000 trained in the nation.

  4. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Payne, J.; Wurden, G. A.

    2010-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6° toroidal sector has been given a 2° toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings.

  5. Multiplexing thermography for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor divertor targets

    SciTech Connect

    Itami, K.; Sugie, T.; Vayakis, G.; Walker, C.

    2004-10-01

    The concept of multiplexing thermography is applied to the design of the divertor thermography system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The combination of the front mirror with multiellipticity and a Czerney-Turner spectrometer with a 0.2 mm pitched multichannel detector enables a spatial resolution of 3 mm and a time resolution of 20 {mu}s above a target temperature of 300 deg. C to be achieved. This should be sufficient to measure ELM heat fluxes to the targets in ITER. To satisfy the measurement requirement, it is very important to keep an accurate alignment around the optical axis against movement of the vessel during the plasma discharges. Several key engineering problems, such as the survivability of components against mirror coating by redeposited divertor material, remain to be solved. Potential solutions have been identified.

  6. Developing written inspection procedures for thermal/infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, J.

    1996-12-31

    Written inspection procedures are essential to acquiring valid data on a repeatable basis. They are also vital to the safety of the thermographer, and may, for that reason alone, be required by a company. Many thermographers are working with no written procedures. To date only a few of the necessary procedures have been developed by recognized standards organizations. The lack of procedures is limiting the use of thermography. Where thermography is being used without them, results are often less than optimum. This paper will (1) survey existing procedures and standards; (2) discuss current efforts by standards organizations to develop standards and procedures; and (3) present a general methodology from which written inspection procedures can be developed for many thermographic inspections.

  7. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J. L.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Payne, J.; Wurden, G. A.

    2010-10-15

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6 deg. toroidal sector has been given a 2 deg. toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings.

  8. The Effectiveness of Infrared Thermography in Patients with Whiplash Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Seo; Farhadi, Hooman F.; Lee, Won Hee; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Kun Su

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to visualize the subjective symptoms before and after the treatment of whiplash injury using infrared (IR) thermography. Methods IR thermography was performed for 42 patients who were diagnosed with whiplash injury. There were 19 male and 23 female patients. The mean age was 43.12 years. Thermal differences (ΔT) in the neck and shoulder and changes in the thermal differences (ΔdT) before and after treatment were analyzed. Pain after injury was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after treatment (ΔVAS). The correlations between ΔdT and ΔVAS results before and after the treatment were examined. We used Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging equipment of Dorex company for IR thermography. Results The skin temperature of the neck and shoulder immediately after injury showed 1-2℃ hyperthermia than normal. After two weeks, the skin temperature was normal range. ΔT after immediately injuy was higher than normal value, but it was gradually near the normal value after two weeks. ΔdT before and after treatment were statistically significant (p<0.05). VAS of the neck and shoulder significantly reduced after 2 week (p=0.001). Also, there was significant correlation between ΔdT and reduced ΔVAS (the neck; r=0.412, p<0.007) (the shoulder; r=0.648, p<0.000). Conclusion The skin temperature of sites with whiplash injury is immediately hyperthermia and gradually decreased after two weeks, finally it got close to normal temperature. These were highly correlated with reduced VAS. IR thermography can be a reliable tool to visualize the symptoms of whiplash injury and the effectiveness of treatment in clinical settings. PMID:25932296

  9. Efficiency of thermography in the study of hydrological connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantreul, Vincent; Burgeon, Victor; Triquet, Johan; Tuerlinck, Manon; Vaelen, Guillaume; Leemans, Vincent; Degré, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    Hydrologic connectivity is an emerging concept which permits deeper understanding of catchments behavior. However, the measurements of functional connectivity is complex and still needs new developments in order to approach the « dynamic » part of the story. This study aims at assessing the efficiency of thermography to analyze hydrologic connectivity in an agricultural catchment in Belgium (loamy soils). Tests have been performed on experimental tubs at first and on field at second. Under controlled conditions, hot milk was spread on an experimental tub with bare soil and grass. The hot milk permits to compare color tracer with thermic one. The results are quite good. The binarization of pictures from usual camera and from thermic one gives similar percentage of runoff coverage at same locations. The mean difference is about 8% for bare soils and 10% for planted grass. There is a slight overestimation with thermic camera because of time delay of soil cooling after milk passing. In the same time in the planted grass, there are some runoff pixels which are hidden by vegetation. On field, blue colored water was used to simulate a rainfall on a field covered with mustard and on the same field without any coverage. Where runoff flows, the soil appears warmer because of heat extracted by water in the soil. The results comparing visual and thermic pictures are more nuanced. The mean difference reaches 30% on bare soil. Indeed, (i) the rainfall drops seem to hide the runoff during the rain; (ii) the vegetation density (mustard) is quite a problem for runoff detection. However, the difference between successive time pictures permits to distinguish flow paths easily. In conclusion, thermography stands as a good alternative for connectivity study. It's obviously a preliminary study which gives some indications of the possible use of thermography. At present, we are testing real rainfalls (different types) with different camera's positions and different land use (different

  10. Inspection of composite structures using line scanning thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Obdulia; Butera, Manny; Godinez, Valery

    2012-06-01

    This work deals with the non destructive analysis of different composite parts and structures using Line Scanning Thermography (LST), a non-contact inspection method based in dynamic thermography. The LST technique provides a quick and efficient methodology to scan wide areas rapidly; the technique has been used on the inspection of composite propellers, sandwich panels, motor case tubes and wind turbine blades, among others. In LST a line heat source is used to thermally excite the surface under study while an infrared detector records the transient surface temperature variation of the heated region. Line Scanning Thermography (LST), has successfully been applied to determine the thickness of metallic plates and to assess boiler tube thinning. In this paper the LST protocols developed for the detection of sub-surface defects in different composite materials commonly used in aerospace applications, plates will be presented. In most cases the thermal images acquired using LST will be compared with ultrasonic c-scans. The fundamentals of LST will be discussed, as well as the limitations of this technique for NDT inspection.

  11. Infrared thermography: A non-invasive window into thermal physiology.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Glenn J

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a non-invasive technique that measures mid to long-wave infrared radiation emanating from all objects and converts this to temperature. As an imaging technique, the value of modern infrared thermography is its ability to produce a digitized image or high speed video rendering a thermal map of the scene in false colour. Since temperature is an important environmental parameter influencing animal physiology and metabolic heat production an energetically expensive process, measuring temperature and energy exchange in animals is critical to understanding physiology, especially under field conditions. As a non-contact approach, infrared thermography provides a non-invasive complement to physiological data gathering. One caveat, however, is that only surface temperatures are measured, which guides much research to those thermal events occurring at the skin and insulating regions of the body. As an imaging technique, infrared thermal imaging is also subject to certain uncertainties that require physical modelling, which is typically done via built-in software approaches. Infrared thermal imaging has enabled different insights into the comparative physiology of phenomena ranging from thermogenesis, peripheral blood flow adjustments, evaporative cooling, and to respiratory physiology. In this review, I provide background and guidelines for the use of thermal imaging, primarily aimed at field physiologists and biologists interested in thermal biology. I also discuss some of the better known approaches and discoveries revealed from using thermal imaging with the objective of encouraging more quantitative assessment.

  12. Applications of the thermography in the animal production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro, Carlos; Vizcaino, Elena; Morales, Joaquín.; Manso, Alberto; Díaz, Immaculada; Montalvo, Gema

    2015-04-01

    Infrared thermography is a working technology for over decades, which have been applied mainly in the buildings. We want to move this use to the animal production in order to help us to detect problems of energy efficiency in the facilities preventing, for example, the animal's welfare. In animal production it is necessary to provide a suitable microclimate according to age and production stage of the animals. This microclimate is achieved in the facilities through the environment modification artificially, providing an appropriate comfort for the animals. Many of the problems detected in farms are related to a poor environmental management and control. This is where infrared thermography becomes an essential diagnostic tool to detect failures in the facilities that will be related with health and performance of the animals. The use of this technology in energy audits for buildings, facilities, etc. is becoming more frequent, enabling the technician to easily detect and assess the temperature and energy losses, and it can be used as a support to draft reports and to transmit the situation to the owner in a visual format. In this way, both will be able to decide what improvements are required. Until now, there was not an appropriate technology with affordable prices and easy to manage enough in order to allow the use of the thermography like a routine tool for the diagnostic of these problems, but currently there are some solutions which are starting to appear on the market to meet the requirements needed by the industry.

  13. Infrared Contrast Analysis Technique for Flash Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the infrared flash thermography inspection to detect and analyze delamination-like anomalies in nonmetallic materials. It provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast verses time evolutions from the flash thermography infrared video data. The paper provides the analytical model used in the simulation of infrared image contrast. The contrast evolution simulation is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat bottom holes in the subject material. The paper also provides formulas to calculate values of the thermal measurement features from the measured contrast evolution curve. Many thermal measurement features of the contrast evolution that relate to the anomaly characteristics are calculated. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography inspection data in order to characterize the delamination-like anomalies. In addition, the contrast evolution prediction is matched to the measured anomaly contrast evolution to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width in terms of depth and diameter of the corresponding equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) or equivalent uniform gap (EUG). The paper provides anomaly edge detection technique called the half-max technique which is also used to estimate width of an indication. The EFBH/EUG and half-max width estimations are used to assess anomaly size. The paper also provides some information on the "IR Contrast" software application, half-max technique and IR Contrast feature imaging application, which are based on models provided in this paper.

  14. ANALYSIS OF IMPACT DAMAGE USING LINE SCANNING THERMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, O.; Valatka, T.; Godinez, V.; Chung, S.; Schutte, J.; Dunne, K.; Caiazzo, A.; Bandos, B.

    2010-02-22

    Impact damage in a composite shaft was studied using Line Scanning Thermography (LST), a novel dynamic thermography technique capable of inspecting large areas in short times. It is expected that projectile impact in a laminate composite will generate a discontinuity that affects heat propagation. Therefore, as heat is deposited over the impacted region, a hot spot will be observed. In this study several impact points were evaluated using UT and LST. Experiments show that assessing impact damage using LST is a dynamic process, which should be accounted for when using dynamic thermography to quantify impact damage extension and severity. The LST images provided information about the region affected by impact damage, which was consistent with the damage region determined using UT. It is seen that the damage areas obtained at early observation time after heat application show small areas with severe damage; and for further times after heat application, the temperature of the hot spots drops and the size of the region affected increases with time following a linear relationship with the observation time.

  15. Laser active thermography for non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; Grisolia, C.; Fomichev, S. V.; Thro, P.-Y.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography methods have found their applications in different fields of human activity. The non-destructive feature of these methods along with the additional advantage by automated remote control and tests of nuclear installations without personnel attendance in the contaminated zone are of particular interest. Laser active pyrometry and laser lock-in thermography for in situ non-destructive characterization of micrometric layers on graphite substrates from European tokamaks were under extensive experimental and theoretical studies in CEA (France). The studies were aimed to obtain layer characterization with cross-checking the layer thermal contact coefficients determined by active laser pyrometry and lock-in thermography. The experimental installation comprised a Nd-YAG pulsed repetition rate laser (1 Hz - 10 kHz repetition rate frequency, homogeneous spot) and a home-made pyrometer system based on two pyrometers for the temperature measurements in 500 - 2600 K range. For both methods, the layer characterization was provided by the best fit of the experimental results and simulations. The layer thermal contact coefficients determined by both methods were quite comparable. Though there was no gain in the measurements accuracy, lock-in measurements have proved their advantage as being much more rapid. The obtained experimental and theoretical results are presented. Some practical applications and possible improvements of the methods are discussed.

  16. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  17. Investigations of single and multilayer structures using lock-in thermography--possible applications.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Owczarek, Grzegorz; Wiecek, Bogusław

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the possibilities of evaluating thermal parameters of single and multilayer structures using dynamic thermography. It also discusses potential uses of lock-in thermography. It presents a simulation of a periodic excitation of a multilayer composite material. In practice, the described methods can be employed in various applications, for example, in multilayer nonwoven microelectronic components manufactured from hemp fibers, chemical fibers, with an addition of electrically conducting fibers, and in medicine and biology. This paper describes tests conducted with lock-in thermography on carbon fibre reinforced composites with implanted delamination defects. Lock-in thermography is a versatile tool for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Lock-in thermography is a fast, remote and non-destructive procedure. Hence, it has been used to detect delaminations in the composite structure of aircraft. This method directly contributes to an improvement in safety.

  18. Clinical application of infrared thermography in diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of vascular ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, J C; Chan, K H; Lui, P W; Lee, T Y

    1990-12-01

    Temperature is a very important and useful manifestation of various disease entities. The importance of body temperature as an indicator of disease has been known for centuries but in recent years attention has also been paid to how to conveniently and effectively make use of skin temperature as a diagnostic tool. Skin temperature can be measured with thermocouples, electronic thermistor-thermometers, electronic integrators, liquid crystal thermography, and infrared thermography. The temperature of extremities is largely dependent on the blood flow through peripheral vessels, and in the study of vascular diseases thermography has been, therefore, found to be useful. Blood flow can be assessed by many methods including washout techniques or laser Doppler flowmetry. Of these, infrared thermography has the advantages of being noninvasive, remote from the patient when in use, and capable of producing multiple recordings at short time intervals. Here we present a case of vascular ischemic pain which was diagnosed and therapeutically assessed by thermography.

  19. 3D thermography in non-destructive testing of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellstein, Piotr; Szwedo, Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    The combination of 3D scanners and infrared cameras has lead to the introduction of 3D thermography. Such analysis produces results in the form of three-dimensional thermograms, where the temperatures are mapped on a 3D model reconstruction of the inspected object. All work in the field of 3D thermography focused on its utility in passive thermography inspections. The authors propose a new real-time 3D temperature mapping method, which for the first time can be applied to active thermography analyses. All steps required to utilise 3D thermography are discussed, starting from acquisition of three-dimensional and infrared data, going through image processing and scene reconstruction, finishing with thermal projection and ray-tracing visualisation techniques. The application of the developed method was tested during diagnosis of several industrial composite structures—boats, planes and wind turbine blades.

  20. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  1. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  2. Thermography as a quantitative imaging method for assessing postoperative inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, J; Matzen, LH; Vaeth, M; Schou, S; Wenzel, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in skin temperature between the operated and control side of the face after mandibular third molar surgery using thermography. Methods 127 patients had 1 mandibular third molar removed. Before the surgery, standardized thermograms were taken of both sides of the patient's face using a Flir ThermaCam™ E320 (Precisions Teknik AB, Halmstad, Sweden). The imaging procedure was repeated 2 days and 7 days after surgery. A region of interest including the third molar region was marked on each image. The mean temperature within each region of interest was calculated. The difference between sides and over time were assessed using paired t-tests. Results No significant difference was found between the operated side and the control side either before or 7 days after surgery (p > 0.3). The temperature of the operated side (mean: 32.39 °C, range: 28.9–35.3 °C) was higher than that of the control side (mean: 32.06 °C, range: 28.5–35.0 °C) 2 days after surgery [0.33 °C, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22–0.44 °C, p < 0.001]. No significant difference was found between the pre-operative and the 7-day post-operative temperature (p > 0.1). After 2 days, the operated side was not significantly different from the temperature pre-operatively (p = 0.12), whereas the control side had a lower temperature (0.57 °C, 95% CI: 0.29–0.86 °C, p < 0.001). Conclusions Thermography seems useful for quantitative assessment of inflammation between the intervention side and the control side after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. However, thermography cannot be used to assess absolute temperature changes due to normal variations in skin temperature over time. PMID:22752326

  3. In-Flight Flow Visualization Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, C. P.; Shiu, H. J.; Banks D. W.

    1997-01-01

    The feasibility of remote infrared thermography of aircraft surfaces during flight to visualize the extent of laminar flow on a target aircraft has been examined. In general, it was determined that such thermograms can be taken successfully using an existing airplane/thermography system (NASA Dryden's F-18 with infrared imaging pod) and that the transition pattern and, thus, the extent of laminar flow can be extracted from these thermograms. Depending on the in-flight distance between the F-18 and the target aircraft, the thermograms can have a spatial resolution of as little as 0.1 inches. The field of view provided by the present remote system is superior to that of prior stationary infrared thermography systems mounted in the fuselage or vertical tail of a subject aircraft. An additional advantage of the present experimental technique is that the target aircraft requires no or minimal modifications. An image processing procedure was developed which improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the thermograms. Problems encountered during the analog recording of the thermograms (banding of video images) made it impossible to evaluate the adequacy of the present imaging system and image processing procedure to detect transition on untreated metal surfaces. The high reflectance, high thermal difussivity, and low emittance of metal surfaces tend to degrade the images to an extent that it is very difficult to extract transition information from them. The application of a thin (0.005 inches) self-adhesive insulating film to the surface is shown to solve this problem satisfactorily. In addition to the problem of infrared based transition detection on untreated metal surfaces, future flight tests will also concentrate on the visualization of other flow phenomena such as flow separation and reattachment.

  4. Crack detection using pulsed eddy current stimulated thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Kostson, E.; Weekes, B.; Almond, D. P.; Wilson, J.; Tian, G. Y.

    2011-06-23

    This contribution presents results from studies investigating factors that influence the detection of surface breaking cracks using pulsed eddy current thermography. The influences of the current strength and crack orientation in both ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic metals have been investigated. It has been found that crack detection is far more sensitive to crack orientation in non-ferromagnetic metals than in ferromagnetic metals. The effects of crack size on detectability are presented for a large number of steel, nickel alloy and titanium samples. Results of studies comparing crack images obtained prior and after coating a nickel alloy sample with a thermal barrier coating are presented.

  5. Mammography, thermography, and ultrasound in breast cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Basset, L.W.; Gold, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The book begins with a brief discussion of the history of mammography and a good review and discussion of the mammorgraphy controversy. The section on diagnosis is excellent with very good anatomic-pathologic correlation of the mammography signs. The preoperative localization is well described. Section 3 on performing the examination is an excellent discussion of the various modes of mammography and their techniques. Magnification mammography, computed tomographic mammography, thermography, sonomammography, and ductography are very well covered. In Section 4, the benefits and risk of mammography are well discussed enabling the reader to understand the controversy surrounding breast cancer detection techniques.

  6. Use of thermography to screen for subclinical bumblefoot in poultry.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C S; Patterson, J; Cheng, H W

    2009-06-01

    Thermographic imaging is a noninvasive diagnostic tool used to document the inflammatory process in many species and may be useful in the detection of subclinical bumblefoot and other inflammatory diseases. Bumblefoot is a chronic inflammation of the plantar metatarsal or digital pads of the foot (pododermatitis), or both. It is one of the major health problems in birds including chickens and is responsible for significant economic losses in commercial poultry operations. Early diagnosis of bumblefoot is essential for the prevention of economical loss and the improvement of animal well-being. The object of this study was to determine the suitability of thermography for the identification of subclinical bumblefoot in chickens. Experiment 1 was designed to validate thermography as a tool for screening avian populations for bumblefoot. The plantar surface of the feet of 150 randomly selected hens was imaged using a thermal camera. The thermal images were identified as suspect, positive, or negative for bumblefoot based on thermal patterns of the plantar surface. Visual inspection of the feet identified as suspect followed 14 d later. A visual score of clinical, mildly clinical, or negative for bumblefoot was assigned, based on gross pathological changes in the plantar surface. A correlation between initial thermal images identified as suspect for bumblefoot and a visual score of positive 14 d later was 83% (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, hens whose feet were free of lesions were inoculated in the metatarsal foot pad with Staphylococcus aureus. Thermal images and visual clinical scores were taken, prechallenge and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 d postchallenge. The correlation between thermal images classified as clinical and a visual score of clinical for bumblefoot was 86.7% (P < 0.001). However, the correlation between the thermal images classified as mild (subclinical) and a visual score of mild was only 26.7%, suggesting that thermography is a more sensitive indicator of

  7. Defect depth measurement of carbon fiber reinforced polymers by thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chen, Jian-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers has been widely used in all kind of the industries. However the internal defects can result in the change of material or mechanical properties, and cause safety problem. In this study, step-heating thermography is employed to measure the time series temperature distribution of composite plate. The principle of heat conduction in a flat plate with defect inside is introduced. A temperature separation criterion to determine the depth of defect inside the specimen is obtained experimentally. Applying this criterion to CFRP specimens with embedded defects, the depth of embedded defect in CFRP can be determined quite well from the time series thermograms obtained experimentally.

  8. Visualization of In-Flight Flow Phenomena Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; vanDam, C. P.; Shiu, H. J.; Miller, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared thermography was used to obtain data on the state of the boundary layer of a natural laminar flow airfoil in supersonic flight. In addition to the laminar-to-turbulent transition boundary, the infrared camera was able to detect shock waves and present a time dependent view of the flow field. A time dependent heat transfer code was developed to predict temperature distributions on the test subject and any necessary surface treatment. A commercially available infrared camera was adapted for airborne use in this application. Readily available infrared technology has the capability to provide detailed visualization of various flow phenomena in subsonic to hypersonic flight regimes.

  9. Finite Element Modeling of Transient Thermography Inspection of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1998-01-01

    Several finite element models of defects such as debond and void have been developed for composite panels subjected to transient thermography inspection. Since the exact nature of the heat generated from the flash lamps is unknown, direct comparison between FEA and experimental results is not possible. However, some similarity of the results has been observed. The shape of the time curve that simulates the heat flux from the flash lamps has minimal effect on the temperature profiles. Double the number of flash lamps could increase the contrast of thermal image and define the shape of defect better.

  10. [Use of distant thermography in uveitis in children].

    PubMed

    Khvatova, A V; Katargina, L A; Lokhmanov, V P; Zibarov, I N

    1991-01-01

    Forty-four children aged 6 months to 14 years, suffering from endogenous uveitis of various sites were examined at different phases of the diseases by a scanning type apparatus, AGA-780M-thermographer (Sweden). The results permit a conclusion that long-distance thermography may be effectively used to assess the ocular status even in small restless children. Uveitis active phase was found associated with a hyperthermal reaction in all the examined sites. Hyperthermia was found related to uveitis localization. The authors suggest that thermoasymmetry parameters and the corneolimbic gradient be used as additional objective criteria for the assessment of uveitis activity and dissemination in children.

  11. Efficient reconstruction of corrosion profiles by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuzzi, F.; Marinetti, S.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm to solve the hidden corrosion estimation problem from experimental data produced by infrared thermography. This is therefore a thermal inverse problem. The algorithm is put in a predictor-corrector form and uses an Adaptive Finite Element model as the reference model. The adaptation is done in the (linear) predictor step, while the parameter estimation is done in the (nonlinear) corrector step. An ad-hoc regularization strategy has been developed. Experiments with real data have confirmed the effectiveness of the method. Considerable computational savings have been achieved compared to a standard algorithm formulation.

  12. The effect of inhibition of acyl coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) on exercise performance in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, William R; Klepack, Ellen; Nehler, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G; Blue, John; Imus, James; Criqui, Michael H

    2004-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that avasimibe, an inhibitor of acyl coenzyme A-cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), would improve treadmill exercise performance in patients with claudication secondary to peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Four hundred and forty-two patients with PAD (ankle-brachial index in the index leg of < or =0.90 with a > or =20% reduction post-exercise) were enrolled from 39 centers in the USA. Patients were randomized to receive oral avasimibe 50 mg, 250 mg, 750 mg or placebo for a treatment period of 12 months. Changes from baseline in peak walking time (PWT) using a graded treadmill protocol were compared among groups after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Individual group comparisons were considered statistically significant if p < 0.0245 for the 50 mg and 250 mg groups and p < 0.001 for the 750 mg group. Patients randomized to the 50 mg group experienced a 0.76 min net increase over placebo in PWT, but this did not reach the pre-specified level of statistical significance (Hochberg procedure p = 0.027) using ANCOVA after 12 months of treatment after adjusting for multiple comparisons. This trend in PWT was supported by the changes in treadmill initial claudication time (ICT) (p = 0.026) and Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) walking distance score (p = 0.058). The 250 mg and 750 mg avasimibe dose groups failed to demonstrate an improvement in PWT over placebo after 6 months of treatment. In conclusion, while the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe did not show clear evidence of benefit on treadmill exercise performance in patients with PAD, the results add to our knowledge of the impact of treatments directed at atherosclerosis on functional endpoints.

  13. ACAT inhibitor pactimibe sulfate (CS-505) reduces and stabilizes atherosclerotic lesions by cholesterol-lowering and direct effects in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Naoki; Miyazaki, Atsuhiro; Kasanuki, Naomi; Ito, Kayoko; Ubukata, Naoko; Koieyama, Tadashi; Kitayama, Ken; Tanimoto, Tatsuo; Maeda, Naoyuki; Inaba, Toshimori

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether a novel acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, pactimibe sulfate (CS-505), could reduce atherosclerotic lesions beyond and independent of the reduction achieved by cholesterol lowering alone from two different types of lesions. (1) Early lesion model. Twelve-week-old apolipoprotein E (apoE)(-/-) mice were treated with 0.03 or 0.1% (w/w) CS-505, 0.1 or 0.3% avasimibe (CI-1011), or 3% cholestyramine for 12 weeks. Each treatment significantly reduced plasma cholesterol by a similar degree (43-48%). The antiatherosclerotic activity of 0.1% CS-505, however, was more efficacious than the effects of the other treatments (90% versus 40-50%). (2) Advanced lesion model. Twenty-four-week-old apoE(-/-) mice were treated with 0.03 or 0.1% CS-505 or 0.1% CI-1011 for 12 weeks. CS-505 at 0.1% revealed enhanced lesion reduction compared with 0.1% CI-1011 (77% versus 54%), whereas the plasma cholesterol-lowering effect of 0.1% CS-505 was almost the same as that of 0.1% CI-1011. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that CS-505 significantly reduced the number of macrophages and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and MMP-13. These data indicate that CS-505 can reduce and stabilize atherosclerotic lesions. This antiatherosclerotic activity is exerted via both cholesterol lowering and direct ACAT inhibition in plaque macrophages.

  14. Exon 10 skipping in ACAT1 caused by a novel c.949G>A mutation located at an exonic splice enhancer site.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroki; Sasai, Hideo; Nakama, Mina; Aoyama, Yuka; Abdelkreem, Elsayed; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, also known as mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) deficiency, is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the acetyl‑CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) gene. A German T2‑deficient patient that developed a severe ketoacidotic episode at the age of 11 months, was revealed to be a compound heterozygote of a previously reported null mutation, c.472A>G (p.N158D) and a novel mutation, c.949G>A (p.D317N), in ACAT1. The c.949G>A mutation was suspected to cause aberrant splicing as it is located within an exonic splicing enhancer sequence (c. 947CTGACGC) that is a potential binding site for serine/arginine‑rich splicing factor 1. A mutation in this sequence, c.951C>T, results in exon 10 skipping. A minigene construct was synthesized that included exon 9‑truncated intron 9‑exon 10‑truncated intron 10‑exon 11, and the splicing of this minigene revealed that the c.949G>A mutant construct caused exon 10 skipping in a proportion of the transcripts. Furthermore, additional substitution of G for C at the first nucleotide of exon 10 (c.941G>C) abolished the effect of the c.949G>A mutation. Transient expression analysis of the c.949G>A mutant cDNA revealed no residual T2 activity in the mutated D317N enzyme. Therefore, c.949G>A (D317N) is a pathogenic missense mutation, and diminishes the effect of an exonic splicing enhancer and causes exon 10 skipping. The present study demonstrates that a missense mutation, or even a synonymous substitution, may disrupt enzyme function by interference with splicing.

  15. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  16. Computed Tomography and Thermography Increases CMC Material and Process Development Efficiency and Testing Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael; Beshears, Ron; Hufnagle, David; Walker, James; Russell, Sam; Stowell, Bob; Myers, David

    2002-01-01

    Nondestructive characterization techniques have been used to steer development and testing of CMCs. Computed tomography is used to determine the volumetric integrity of the CMC plates and components. Thermography is used to determine the near surface integrity of the CMC plates and components. For process and material development, information such as density uniformity, part delamination, and dimensional tolerance conformity is generated. The information from the thermography and computed tomography is correlated and then specimen cutting maps are superimposed on the thermography images. This enables for tighter data and potential explanation of off nominal test data. Examples of nondestructive characterization utilization to make decisions in process and material development and testing are presented.

  17. Medical applications of model-based dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Antoni; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Ruminski, Jacek; Hryciuk, Marcin; Renkielska, Alicja; Grudzinski, Jacek; Siebert, Janusz; Jagielak, Dariusz; Rogowski, Jan; Roszak, Krzysztof; Stojek, Wojciech

    2001-03-01

    The proposal to use active thermography in medical diagnostics is promising in some applications concerning investigation of directly accessible parts of the human body. The combination of dynamic thermograms with thermal models of investigated structures gives attractive possibility to make internal structure reconstruction basing on different thermal properties of biological tissues. Measurements of temperature distribution synchronized with external light excitation allow registration of dynamic changes of local temperature dependent on heat exchange conditions. Preliminary results of active thermography applications in medicine are discussed. For skin and under- skin tissues an equivalent thermal model may be determined. For the assumed model its effective parameters may be reconstructed basing on the results of transient thermal processes. For known thermal diffusivity and conductivity of specific tissues the local thickness of a two or three layer structure may be calculated. Results of some medical cases as well as reference data of in vivo study on animals are presented. The method was also applied to evaluate the state of the human heart during the open chest cardio-surgical interventions. Reference studies of evoked heart infarct in pigs are referred, too. We see the proposed new in medical applications technique as a promising diagnostic tool. It is a fully non-invasive, clean, handy, fast and affordable method giving not only qualitative view of investigated surfaces but also an objective quantitative measurement result, accurate enough for many applications including fast screening of affected tissues.

  18. Finite Element Modeling for Infrared Thermography of Gfrp Bridge Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, Cheng L.; Halabe, Udaya B.

    2008-02-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) composite bridge decks are increasingly being used as replacements for old concrete decks and for new construction. The service performance of the GFRP bridge decks can be adversely affected by the formation of debonds between the wearing surface and the underlying bridge deck. Past experimental studies by the authors have shown the usefulness of the infrared thermography technique in detecting the subsurface debonds prior to maintenance and rehabilitation work. This paper investigates the use of finite element (FE) heat transfer modeling to predict infrared thermography images from GFRP bridge decks with subsurface debonds. The paper includes measurement of thermal properties of the GFRP bridge deck and the wearing surface, and heat transfer FE modeling of decks with debonds of different thicknesses. The results show that FE modeling can be a useful tool for predicting surface temperature profile under different heating conditions and debond sizes. Such predictions can help determine the required heat intensity and detectable debond sizes prior to experimental data acquisition in the field using an infrared camera.

  19. Nde of Frp Wrapped Columns Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Dutta, Shasanka Shekhar; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    2008-02-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using Infrared Thermography (IRT) for detecting debonds in Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) wrapped columns. Laboratory tests were conducted on FRP wrapped concrete cylinders of size 6″×12″ (152.4 mm×304.8 mm) in which air-filled and water-filled debonds of various sizes were placed underneath the FRP wraps. Air-filled debonds were made by cutting plastic sheets into the desired sizes whereas water-filled debonds were made by filling water in custom made polyethylene pouches. Both carbon and glass fiber reinforced wraps were considered in this study. Infrared tests were conducted using a fully radiometric digital infrared camera which was successful in detecting air-filled as well as water-filled subsurface debonds. In addition to the laboratory testing, two field trips were made to Moorefield, West Virginia for detecting subsurface debonds in FRP wrapped timber piles of a railroad bridge using infrared testing. The results revealed that infrared thermography can be used as an effective nondestructive evaluation tool for detecting subsurface debonds in structural components wrapped with carbon or glass reinforced composite fabrics.

  20. A relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merski, N. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    The NASA LaRC has developed a relative-intensity two-color phosphor thermography system. This system has become a standard technique for acquiring aerothermodynamic data in LaRC Hypersonic Facilities Complex (HFC). The relative intensity theory and its application to the LaRC phosphor thermography system is discussed along with the investment casting technique which is critical to the utilization of the phosphor method for aerothermodynamic studies. Various approaches to obtaining quantitative heat transfer data using thermographic phosphors are addressed and comparisons between thin-film data and thermographic phosphor data on an orbiter-like configuration are presented. In general, data from these two techniques are in good agreement. A discussion is given on the application of phosphors to integration heat transfer data reduction techniques (the thin film method) and preliminary heat transfer data obtained on a calibration sphere using thin-film equations are presented. Finally, plans for a new phosphor system which uses target recognition software are discussed.

  1. Automatic Detection of Subsurface Defects Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonkar, G. M.; Klinkhachorn, P.; Halabe, Udaya B.; GangaRao, H. V. S.

    2005-04-01

    The popularity of FRP bridge decks has increased in recent times because of their high strength to weight ratio, fatigue resistance etc. Defects due to degradation of the bridge deck malign their properties and adversely affect the structural integrity. These defects need to be detected and continuously monitored using field techniques such as infrared thermography. The process of manually analyzing the infrared images is tedious and ambiguous. Instead, using software algorithms on the infrared images of FRP decks can increase the defect detection speed and accuracy. This paper proposes a software automated defect detection technique to detect subsurface anomalies in fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bridge decks. Thermal images of the FRP decks were captured using a radiometric infrared camera. Software algorithms using morphological image processing and fuzzy clustering techniques were developed to analyze the images for detecting the defects automatically. They were tested on infrared images of FRP bridge decks prepared in the laboratory. In the tests conducted, simulated subsurface defects of varying size, thickness and wearing surfaces were fabricated in the laboratory. The tests include a performance analysis of detecting delaminations and debonds, and the effect of distance on the detecting ability of the algorithm. The algorithms were also tested with FRP deck specimens under solar radiation, to test the response under a passive heat source. The study showed that Infrared Thermography can be effectively used to detect subsurface defects and the process can be automated with substantial accuracy.

  2. Distance makes the difference in thermography for ecological studies.

    PubMed

    Faye, E; Dangles, O; Pincebourde, S

    2016-02-01

    Surface temperature drives many ecological processes and infrared thermography is widely used by ecologists to measure the thermal heterogeneity of different species' habitats. However, the potential bias in temperature readings caused by distance between the surface to be measured and the camera is still poorly acknowledged. We examined the effect of distance from 0.3 to 80m on a variety of thermal metrics (mean temperature, standard deviation, patch richness and aggregation) under various weather conditions and for different structural complexity of the studied surface types (various surfaces with vegetation). We found that distance is a key modifier of the temperature measured by a thermal infrared camera. A non-linear relationship between distance and mean temperature, standard deviation and patch richness led to a rapid under-estimation of the thermal metrics within the first 20m and then only a slight decrease between 20 and 80m from the object. Solar radiation also enhanced the bias with increasing distance. Therefore, surface temperatures were under-estimated as distance increased and thermal mosaics were homogenized at long distances with a much stronger bias in the warmer than the colder parts of the distributions. The under-estimation of thermal metrics due to distance was explained by atmospheric composition and the pixel size effect. The structural complexity of the surface had little effect on the surface temperature bias. Finally, we provide general guidelines for ecologists to minimize inaccuracies caused by distance from the studied surface in thermography.

  3. Investigation of Various Essential Factors for Optimum Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    OKADA, Keiji; TAKEMURA, Kei; SATO, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used. PMID:23759714

  4. Noninvasive diagnosis of seed viability using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Kranner, Ilse; Kastberger, Gerald; Hartbauer, Manfred; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the noninvasive analyses of plant metabolism include stress imaging techniques, mainly developed for vegetative tissues. We explored if infrared thermography can be used to predict whether a quiescent seed will germinate or die upon water uptake. Thermal profiles of viable, aged, and dead Pisum sativum seeds were recorded, and image analysis of 22,000 images per individual seed showed that infrared thermography can detect imbibition- and germination-associated biophysical and biochemical changes. These “thermal fingerprints” vary with viability in this species and in Triticum aestivum and Brassica napus seeds. Thermogenesis of the small individual B. napus seeds was at the limit of the technology. We developed a computer model of “virtual pea seeds,” that uses Monte Carlo simulation, based on the heat production of major seed storage compounds to unravel physico-chemical processes of thermogenesis. The simulation suggests that the cooling that dominates the early thermal profiles results from the dissolution of low molecular-weight carbohydrates. Moreover, the kinetics of the production of such “cooling” compounds over the following 100 h is dependent on seed viability. We also developed a deterministic tool that predicts in the first 3 hours of water uptake, when seeds can be redried and stored again, whether or not a pea seed will germinate. We believe that the early separation of individual, ungerminated seeds (live, aged, or dead) before destructive germination assessment creates unique opportunities for integrative studies on cell death, differentiation, and development. PMID:20133712

  5. Gapped smoothing algorithm applied to defect identification using pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Ye, Lin; Li, Eric; Shou, Dahua; Li, Zheng; Chang, Li

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of pulsed thermography, this article presents the development of a quantitative detection method for sub-surface defects. A two dimensional gapped smoothing algorithm (GSA) applied in this method to process the surface thermal distribution and no reference information is needed. A new thermal contrast is defined and a damage index based on the thermal contrast is proposed to estimate the probability of location of a defect, and differential curves of thermal contrast are applied for further quantification of defect size. One aluminium plate and one glass fibre reinforced composite laminate containing different depths of flat-bottom holes, delaminations and impurities are introduced to assess the performance of proposed method. Numerical and experimental results indicate that the influence of non-uniform heating is clearly suppressed. Compared with the differentiated absolute contrast approach, distinct enhancement of thermal contrast is achieved, and the location and size of sub-surface instances of damage can be quantitatively determined using the proposed method. The relation of damage index and flaw depth is investigated and a general expression is presented for the evaluation of flaw depth. The influence of the distribution density of the gapped grid on detection accuracy is further discussed. The proposed method, which is less dependent on the capture time, can be used for automatic detection and characterisation of defects. The reliability and applicability of the GSA applied to pulsed thermography are verified.

  6. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  7. Robust remote monitoring of breathing function by using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carina B; Yu, Xinchi; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An abnormal breathing rate (BR) is one of the strongest markers of physiological distress. Moreover, it plays an important role in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome, as well as in the diagnosis of respiratory disorders. However, the current measuring modalities can cause discomfort to the patient, since attachment to the patient's body is required. This paper proposes a new approach based on infrared thermography to remotely monitor BR. This method allows to (1) detect automatically the nose, (2) track the associate region of interest (ROI), and (3) extract BR. To evaluate the performance of this method, thermal recording of 5 healthy subjects were acquired. Results were compared with BR obtained by capnography. The introduced approach demonstrated an excellent performance. ROIs were precisely segmented and tracked. Furthermore, a Bland-Altman diagram showed a good agreement between estimated BR and gold standard. The mean correlation and mean absolute BR error are 0.92 ± 0.07 and 0.53 bpm, respectively. In summary, infrared thermography seems to be a great, clinically relevant alternative to attached sensors, due to its outstanding characteristics and performance.

  8. Digital thermography of the fingers and toes in Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mie Jin; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Joo, Kowoon; Park, Shin-Goo; Park, Won

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether skin temperature measurement by digital thermography on hands and feet is useful for diagnosis of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP). Fifty-seven patients with RP (primary RP, n = 33; secondary RP, n = 24) and 146 healthy volunteers were recruited. After acclimation to room temperature for 30 min, thermal imaging of palmar aspect of hands and dorsal aspect of feet were taken. Temperature differences between palm (center) and the coolest finger and temperature differences between foot dorsum (center) and first toe significantly differed between patients and controls. The area under curve analysis showed that temperature difference of the coolest finger (cutoff value: 2.2℃) differentiated RP patients from controls (sensitivity/specificity: 67/60%, respectively). Temperature differences of first toe (cutoff value: 3.11℃) also discriminated RP patients (sensitivity/specificity: about 73/66%, respectively). A combination of thermographic assessment of the coolest finger and first toe was highly effective in men (sensitivity/specificity : about 88/60%, respectively) while thermographic assessment of first toe was solely sufficient for women (sensitivity/specificity: about 74/68%, respectively). Thermographic assessment of the coolest finger and first toe is useful for diagnosing RP. In women, thermography of first toe is highly recommended.

  9. Investigation of various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Okada, Keiji; Takemura, Kei; Sato, Shigeru

    2013-10-01

    We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used.

  10. Karst Groundwater Hydrologic Analyses Based on Aerial Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren; Keith, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    On February 23, 1999, thermal imagery of Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama was collected using an airborne thermal camera. Ground resolution was I in. Approximately 40 km 2 of thermal imagery in and around Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was analyzed to determine the location of springs for groundwater monitoring. Subsequently, forty-five springs were located ranging in flow from a few ml/sec to approximately 280 liter/sec. Groundwater temperatures are usually near the mean annual surface air temperature. On thermography collected during the winter, springs show up as very warm spots. Many of the new springs were submerged in lakes, streams, or swamps; consequently, flow measurements were difficult. Without estimates of discharge, the impacts of contaminated discharge on surface streams would be difficult to evaluate. An approach to obtaining an estimate was developed using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System (CORMIX). The thermography was queried to obtain a temperature profile down the center of the surface plume. The spring discharge was modeled with CORMIX, and the flow adjusted until the surface temperature profile was matched. The presence of volatile compounds in some of the new springs also allowed MSFC to unravel the natural system of solution cavities of the karst aquifer. Sampling results also showed that two springs on either side of a large creek had the same water source so that groundwater was able to pass beneath the creek.

  11. Subsurface defect detection in first layer of pavement structure and reinforced civil engineering structure by FRP bonding using active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Ibos, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    In many countries road network ages while road traffic and maintenance costs increase. Nowadays, thousand and thousand kilometers of roads are each year submitted to surface distress survey. They generally lean on pavement surface imaging measurement techniques, mainly in the visible spectrum, coupled with visual inspection or image processing detection of emergent distresses. Nevertheless, optimisation of maintenance works and costs requires an early detection of defects within the pavement structure when they still are hidden from surface. Accordingly, alternative measurement techniques for pavement monitoring are currently under investigation (seismic methods, step frequency radar). On the other hand, strengthening or retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures by externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) systems is now a commonly accepted and widespread technique. However, the use of bonding techniques always implies following rigorous installing procedures. To ensure the durability and long-term performance of the FRP reinforcements, conformance checking through an in situ auscultation of the bonded FRP systems is then highly suitable. The quality-control program should involve a set of adequate inspections and tests. Visual inspection and acoustic sounding (hammer tap) are commonly used to detect delaminations (disbonds) but are unable to provide sufficient information about the depth (in case of multilayered composite) and width of debonded areas. Consequently, rapid and efficient inspection methods are also required. Among the non destructive methods under study, active infrared thermography was investigated both for pavement and civil engineering structures through experiments in laboratory and numerical simulations, because of its ability to be also used on field. Pulse Thermography (PT), Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) and Principal Component Thermography (PCT) approaches have been tested onto pavement samples and CFRP bonding on concrete

  12. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  13. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  14. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  15. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  16. Carbon fiber composites inspection and defect characterization using active infrared thermography: numerical simulations and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Henrique; Zhang, Hai; Figueiredo, Alisson; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Guimarares, Gilmar; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Composite materials are widely used in the aeronautic industry. One of the reasons is because they have strength and stiffness comparable to metals, with the added advantage of significant weight reduction. Infrared thermography (IT) is a safe nondestructive testing technique that has a fast inspection rate. In active IT, an external heat source is used to stimulate the material being inspected in order to generate a thermal contrast between the feature of interest and the background. In this paper, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers are inspected using IT. More specifically, carbon/PEEK (polyether ether ketone) laminates with square Kapton inserts of different sizes and at different depths are tested with three different IT techniques: pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and line scan thermography. The finite element method is used to simulate the pulsed thermography experiment. Numerical results displayed a very good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Integration of active thermography into the assessment of cultural heritage buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Röllig, Mathias; Krankenhagen, Rainer

    2010-10-01

    Applications of infrared thermography in civil engineering are not limited to the identification of heat losses in building envelopes. Active infrared thermography methods enable structural investigations of building elements with one-sided access up to a depth of about 10 cm. Masonry and especially historical masonry has a very heterogeneous structure containing several different materials (brick, stone, mortar, plaster, wood, metal, etc.) with various thermal properties. As many classes of damage originate from defects that are close to the surface, active thermography is in general very well suited to assessing different test problems in cultural heritage buildings. In this paper, the physical background, equipment, environmental influences and material properties are discussed. Several application results are presented. It is shown how active thermography can be integrated into a holistic approach for the assessment of historical structures.

  18. Clinical use of thermography in the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kobrossi, Toffy

    1984-01-01

    Thermography is a non-invasive method of recording and interpreting the distribution of surface temperature. First used clinically in the diagnosis of breast disease, thermography has been spreading steadily in a variety of diagnostic applications. Various investigators claim that thermography: 1) can document soft tissue injury, infection and inflammation, 2) has a place in pre-employment screening for back disorders and high risk backs, 3) is more sensitive than electromyography in the diagnosis of disc disease and radiculopathy, 4) is exceedingly more accurate than myelography in judging a patient’s disc problem, and 5) may be a useful supplement to present clinical methods for objectively documenting soft tissue trauma in the patient with low back pain. This review attempts to evaluate the state of thermography today and assess its value in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal pain. ImagesFigure 1

  19. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  1. Inhibition of Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), overexpression of cholesterol transporter gene, and protection of amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers-induced neuronal cell death by tricyclic pyrone molecules.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Laxman; Maezawa, Izumi; Nguyen, Thi D T; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Jin, Lee-Way; Hua, Duy H

    2012-10-25

    A major effort in Alzheimer's disease therapeutic development has targeted Aβ and downstream events. We have synthesized a small library of tricyclic pyrone compounds. Their protective action in MC65 cells and inhibition of ACAT along with the upregulation of cholesterol transporter gene were investigated. Five active compounds exhibited potencies in the nanomolar ranges. The multiple effects of the compounds on Aβ and cellular cholesterol pathways could be potential mechanisms underlying the protective effects in vivo.

  2. Evaluation of low-speed impact damage in CFRP with pulsed and lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichun, Feng; Wei, He; Ning, Tao

    2008-08-01

    Low speed impact subjected to carbon-fiber reinforced plastics could lead to delamination, matrix crack and other damages which would degrade the performance of composite structure. Fast and reliable evaluation methods are important for in-service inspections. In the paper, six CFRP plates with different impact energy was inspected with pulsed and lock-in thermography, respectively. The results showed thermography method was suitable for fast and large scale inspection of low-speed impact damage.

  3. Endoscopic Shearography and Thermography Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation of Lined Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Bullock, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this research effort was the development of methods for shearography and thermography inspection of coatings, bonds, or laminates inside rocket fuel or oxidizer tanks, fuel lines, and other closed structures. The endoscopic methods allow imaging and inspection inside cavities which are traditionally inaccessible with shearography or thermography cameras. The techniques are demonstrated and suggestions for practical application are made in this report. Drawings of the experimental setups, detailed procedures, and experimental data are included.

  4. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  5. Effect of VULM 1457, an ACAT inhibitor, on serum lipid levels and on real time red blood cell flow in diabetic and non-diabetic hamsters fed high cholesterol-lipid diet.

    PubMed

    Vojtassáková, E; Syneková, M; Tazká, D; Mátyás, S; Hózová, R; Sadlonová, I; Svec, P

    2007-12-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes the formation of cholesterol/fatty acyl-coenzyme A esters. Accumulation of cholesterol esters leads to pathological changes connected with atherosclerosis. We have evaluated effects of a newly synthesized ACAT inhibitor, 1-(2,6-diisopropyl-phenyl)-3-[4-(4'-nitrophenylthio)phenyl] urea (VULM 1457), on serum lipid (cholesterol and triglycerides) levels and velocity of red blood cells (RBC) in non-diabetic and diabetic hamsters fed on high cholesterol-lipid (HCHL) diet during 3 months. The VULM 1457 effects on the paw microcirculation were assessed using capillary microscopy by measuring (RBC) velocity in vivo. Hamsters fed on HCHL diet became hypercholesterolemic with a dramatic increase in serum lipids accompanied with significantly decreased RBC velocity. Diabetic hamsters fed on HCHL diet had further increased serum lipids with reduction of RBC velocity. The VULM 1457 inhibitor lowered cholesterol levels in both non-diabetic and diabetic hamsters fed on HCHL diet. The greater VULM 1457 effect was shown in diabetic hamsters fed on HCHL diet where VULM 1457 expressed hypotriglycerides effects, too. An improved RBC velocity-pronounced effect was observed in diabetic hamsters fed on HCHL diet treated with VULM 1457. These results suggest that the ACAT inhibitor, VULM 1457, is a prospective hypolipidemic and anti-atherogenic drug which treats diabetes.

  6. Noninvasive Assessment of Tissue Heating During Cardiac Radiofrequency Ablation Using MRI Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Castro, Valeria; Lardo, Albert C.; Berger, Ronald D.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Failure to achieve properly localized, permanent tissue destruction is a common cause of arrhythmia recurrence after cardiac ablation. Current methods of assessing lesion size and location during cardiac radiofrequency ablation are unreliable or not suited for repeated assessment during the procedure. MRI thermography could be used to delineate permanent ablation lesions because tissue heating above 50°C is the cause of permanent tissue destruction during radiofrequency ablation. However, image artifacts caused by cardiac motion, the ablation electrode, and radiofrequency ablation currently pose a challenge to MRI thermography in the heart. In the current study, we sought to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI thermography during cardiac ablation. Methods and Results An MRI-compatible electrophysiology catheter and filtered radiofrequency ablation system was used to perform ablation in the left ventricle of 6 mongrel dogs in a 1.5-T MRI system. Fast gradient-echo imaging was performed before and during radiofrequency ablation, and thermography images were derived from the preheating and postheating images. Lesion extent by thermography was within 20% of the gross pathology lesion. Conclusions MR thermography appears to be a promising technique for monitoring lesion formation and may allow for more accurate placement and titration of ablation, possibly reducing arrhythmia recurrences. PMID:20657028

  7. Potentialities of steady-state and transient thermography in breast tumour depth detection: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Amri, Amina; Pulko, Susan Helen; Wilkinson, Anthony James

    2016-01-01

    Breast thermography still has inherent limitations that prevent it from being fully accepted as a breast screening modality in medicine. The main challenges of breast thermography are to reduce false positive results and to increase the sensitivity of a thermogram. Further, it is still difficult to obtain information about tumour parameters such as metabolic heat, tumour depth and diameter from a thermogram. However, infrared technology and image processing have advanced significantly and recent clinical studies have shown increased sensitivity of thermography in cancer diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to study numerically the possibilities of extracting information about the tumour depth from steady state thermography and transient thermography after cold stress with no need to use any specific inversion technique. Both methods are based on the numerical solution of Pennes bioheat equation for a simple three-dimensional breast model. The effectiveness of two approaches used for depth detection from steady state thermography is assessed. The effect of breast density on the steady state thermal contrast has also been studied. The use of a cold stress test and the recording of transient contrasts during rewarming were found to be potentially suitable for tumour depth detection during the rewarming process. Sensitivity to parameters such as cold stress temperature and cooling time is investigated using the numerical model and simulation results reveal two prominent depth-related characteristic times which do not strongly depend on the temperature of the cold stress or on the cooling period.

  8. Infrared ocular thermography in dogs with and without keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Flávia; Dornbusch, Peterson T; Sampaio, Manuella; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Infrared thermography was used to measure temperature differences of the corneal surface between nasal and temporal limbus regions and central cornea of normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), in order to establish temperature values in normal canine eyes and in patients with decreased Schirmer tear tests (STT) values. Dogs investigated were all either patients seen at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Federal University of Paraná or normal dogs that belonged to the same institution. STT were performed in all eyes. A total of 40 control eyes (STT ≥15 mm/min) and 20 eyes with low STT values (STT ≤14 mm/min) were examined. The mean STT value for eyes with normal STT values was 22.9 ± 3.9 mm/min (mean ± standard deviation), and the mean STT value for eyes with low STT value was 7.2 ± 4.8 mm/min. The mean corneal temperature was significantly lower in eyes with low STT values than in control eyes (P < 0.0001). The following significant correlations were found: (i) Schirmer and breakup time (BUT) (P = 0.0001, r = 0.5); (ii) STT values and corneal surface temperature (P = 0.001, r = 0.256); (iii) STT values and age (P = 0.0001, r = -0.448); (iv) age and corneal surface temperature (P = 0.0001, r = -0.281); and (v) BUT and corneal surface temperature (P = 0.0001, r = 0.36). Thermography is a method that can differentiate between eyes with normal and abnormal STT values. In the future, thermography might be incorporated as part of the ophthalmic examination and perhaps become a popular ancillary test for the diagnoses of ocular surface disorders.

  9. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  10. Technical design note: differential infrared thermography of methane jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golzke, Hendrik; Leick, Philippe; Dreizler, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    In this note a novel approach for temperature measurements of methane jets is presented. Differential infrared thermography (DIT) is a contactless, tracer-free temperature determination method for semi-transparent objects, based on an infrared camera. DIT does not rely on a specific a priori value for the emissivity, but typically assumes constant emissivity within the relevant wavelength band. This is reasonable for complex hydrocarbons (i.e. as in liquid fuel sprays) but no longer justified for the discrete absorption spectrum of simple molecules such as methane. An alternative approximation is suggested and discussed, and the feasibility of DIT for the study of supercritical methane jets in a pressure chamber at conditions relevant for internal combustion engines is demonstrated. As DIT also determines the gas emissivity, a combined two-dimensional temperature and projected density visualisation becomes possible and is shown to highlight supersonic structurues such as Mach disks.

  11. IR thermography for dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bernhard; Filius, Adrian; Tropea, Cameron; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the potential of infrared (IR) thermography for the dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition. The experiments are conducted on a flat plate at velocities of 8-14 m/s, and the transition of the laminar boundary layer to turbulence is forced by a disturbance source which is turned on and off with frequencies up to 10 Hz. Three different heating techniques are used to apply the required difference between fluid and structure temperature: a heated aluminum structure is used as an internal structure heating technique, a conductive paint acts as a surface bounded heater, while an IR heater serves as an example for an external heating technique. For comparison of all heating techniques, a normalization is introduced and the frequency response of the measured IR camera signal is analyzed. Finally, the different heating techniques are compared and consequences for the design of experiments on laminar-turbulent transition are discussed.

  12. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  13. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieglin, B.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today's fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  14. Modeling of the Multiparameter Inverse Task of Transient Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Y. A.

    1998-01-01

    Transient thermography employs preheated surface temperature variations caused by delaminations, cracks, voids, corroded regions, etc. Often, it is enough to detect these changes to declare a defect in a workpiece. It is also desirable to obtain additional information about the defect from the thermal response. The planar size, depth, and thermal resistance of the detected defects are the parameters of interest. In this paper a digital image processing technique is applied to simulated thermal responses in order to obtain the geometry of the inclusion-type defects in a flat panel. A three-dimensional finite difference model in Cartesian coordinates is used for the numerical simulations. Typical physical properties of polymer graphite composites are assumed. Using different informative parameters of the thermal response for depth estimation is discussed.

  15. Porosity Measurement in Laminated Composites by Thermography and FEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the correlation between the through-thickness thermal diffusivity and the porosity of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to determine the transient thermal response of composites that were subjected to laser heating. A series of finite element models were built and thermal responses for isotropic and orthographic materials with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models and to estimate the unknown parameters such as the amount of heat flux. The analysis and experimental results show good correlation between thermal diffusivity and porosity in the composite materials. They also show that both laser and flash heating can be used effectively to obtain thermal diffusivity. The current infrared thermography system is developed for use with flash heating. The laser heating models and the FEA results can provide useful tools to develop practical thermal diffusivity measurement scheme using laser heat.

  16. IR thermography as a tool for the pest management professional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Jon L.

    2005-03-01

    For years the pest Management Professional has relied on visual and manual inspections to locate insect pest infestations. As building materials have improved, the ability to locate pest problems has become more difficult since building materials are often able to mask the existence of pest infestation. Additionally, these improved building materials have contributed to the pest problem by providing a convenient food and nesting source. Within the past five years, the Pest Management Industry has become aware that IR thermography can aid in the detection of pest infestation by detecting evidence of latent moisture within structures. This paper discusses the use of thermal imaging to detect thermal patterns associated with insect infestation, verification of data and special challenges associated with the inspection process.

  17. Advanced Image Processing for Defect Visualization in Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a defect visualization process based on pulse infrared thermography are presented. Algorithms have been developed to reduce the amount of operator participation required in the process of interpreting thermographic images. The algorithms determine the defect's depth and size from the temporal and spatial thermal distributions that exist on the surface of the investigated object following thermal excitation. A comparison of the results from thermal contrast, time derivative, and phase analysis methods for defect visualization are presented. These comparisons are based on three dimensional simulations of a test case representing a plate with multiple delaminations. Comparisons are also based on experimental data obtained from a specimen with flat bottom holes and a composite panel with delaminations.

  18. High speed heterodyne infrared thermography applied to thermal diffusivity identification.

    PubMed

    Pradere, C; Clerjaud, L; Batsale, J C; Dilhaire, S

    2011-05-01

    We have combined InfraRed thermography and thermal wave techniques to perform microscale, ultrafast (microsecond) temperature field measurements. The method is based on an IR camera coupled to a microscope and synchronized to the heat source by means of phase locked function generators. The principle is based on electronic stroboscopic sampling where the low IR camera acquisition frequency f(acq) (25 Hz) undersamples a high frequency thermal wave. This technique permits the measurement of the emissive thermal response at a (microsecond) short time scale (microsecond) with the full frame mode of the IR camera with a spatial thermal resolution of 7 μm. Then it becomes possible to study 3D transient heat transfer in heterogeneous and high thermal conductive thin layers. Thus it is possible for the first time in our knowledge to achieve temperature field measurements in heterogeneous media within a wide range of time domains. The IR camera is now a suitable instrument for multiscale thermal analysis.

  19. Characterization of Periodic Cylindrical Subsurface Defects by Pulsed Flash Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikić, Goran; Tomić, Ljubiša; Damnjanović, Vesna; Milanović, Bojan

    2015-03-01

    A characterization of cylindrical periodic subsurface defects of different sizes by means of pulsed thermography is presented in the paper. To ensure a uniform thermal flux distribution, the test samples were heated in lab conditions using two photographic flashes. Surface temperature was intentionally recorded at an angle to the normal of the sample surface. Recorded temperatures were compared with simulated temperatures and the differences in temperature peak values and temperature peak positions were noted. The thermal image was transformed based on known positions of four noncollinear points, in order to cancel out errors resulting from image recording at an angle. The uniformity of surface heating and the effect of the positions of the defects on the results were tested by means of a simulation model. The positions did not affect defect characterization. It was also found that in spite of nonuniform heating, if the reference points were selected properly, the difference in temperature contrast was negligible.

  20. The Study of Hypersonic Heat Transfer by Liquid Crystals Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovrizhina, V. N.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Petrov, A. P.; Schpack, S. I.; Zharkova, G. M.; Zvegintsev, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    The results of experimental application of the Liquid Crystal Thermography in short-duration facility AT-303 of ITAM Novosibirsk (Russia) are presented. Experiments were carried out at free stream Mach number M∞ ≍ 10.9, unit Reynolds number Re1≍2.9*106M-1, run duration 350 MC and temperature factor Tw/To ≍ 0.2 on a semi-spherically blunted cone. Polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC), developed at ITAM, have been used as thermosensitive coating. Transient technique and color pattern video acquisition was realized at different framing rates. It was obtained that high temperature sensitivity of PDLC allows visualize the fine features of the temperature field on the model surface. The heat flux in comparison with semi- empirical estimation are presented and discussed too.

  1. Aerial thermography studies of power plant heated lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2000-01-26

    Remote sensing temperature measurements of water bodies is complicated by the temperature differences between the true surface or skin water and the bulk water below. Weather conditions control the reduction of the skin temperature relative to the bulk water temperature. Typical skin temperature depressions range from a few tenths of a degree Celsius to more than one degree. In this research project, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) used aerial thermography and surface-based meteorological and water temperature measurements to study a power plant cooling lake in South Carolina. Skin and bulk water temperatures were measured simultaneously for imagery calibration and to produce a database for modeling of skin temperature depressions as a function of weather and bulk water temperatures. This paper will present imagery that illustrates how the skin temperature depression was affected by different conditions in several locations on the lake and will present skin temperature modeling results.

  2. The mental and subjective skin: Emotion, empathy, feelings and thermography.

    PubMed

    Salazar-López, E; Domínguez, E; Juárez Ramos, V; de la Fuente, J; Meins, A; Iborra, O; Gálvez, G; Rodríguez-Artacho, M A; Gómez-Milán, E

    2015-07-01

    We applied thermography to investigate the cognitive neuropsychology of emotions, using it as a somatic marker of subjective experience during emotional tasks. We obtained results that showed significant correlations between changes in facial temperature and mental set. The main result was the change in the temperature of the nose, which tended to decrease with negative valence stimuli but to increase with positive emotions and arousal patterns. However, temperature change was identified not only in the nose, but also in the forehead, the oro-facial area, the cheeks and in the face taken as a whole. Nevertheless, thermic facial changes, mostly nasal temperature changes, correlated positively with participants' empathy scores and their performance. We found that temperature changes in the face may reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions and feelings like love.

  3. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sieglin, B. Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today’s fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  4. HeatWave: the next generation of thermography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman; Vidas, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Energy sustainability is a major challenge of the 21st century. To reduce environmental impact, changes are required not only on the supply side of the energy chain by introducing renewable energy sources, but also on the demand side by reducing energy usage and improving energy efficiency. Currently, 2D thermal imaging is used for energy auditing, which measures the thermal radiation from the surfaces of objects and represents it as a set of color-mapped images that can be analysed for the purpose of energy efficiency monitoring. A limitation of such a method for energy auditing is that it lacks information on the geometry and location of objects with reference to each other, particularly across separate images. Such a limitation prevents any quantitative analysis to be done, for example, detecting any energy performance changes before and after retrofitting. To address these limitations, we have developed a next generation thermography device called Heat Wave. Heat Wave is a hand-held 3D thermography device that consists of a thermal camera, a range sensor and color camera, and can be used to generate precise 3D model of objects with augmented temperature and visible information. As an operator holding the device smoothly waves it around the objects of interest, Heat Wave can continuously track its own pose in space and integrate new information from the range and thermal and color cameras into a single, and precise 3D multi-modal model. Information from multiple viewpoints can be incorporated together to improve the accuracy, reliability and robustness of the global model. The approach also makes it possible to reduce any systematic errors associated with the estimation of surface temperature from the thermal images.

  5. Dual-band infrared thermography for quantitative nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-04-01

    The authors have developed dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermography that is being applied to quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aging aircraft. The DBIR technique resolves 0.2 degrees C surface temperature differences for inspecting interior flaws in heated aircraft structures. It locates cracks, corrosion sites, disbonds or delaminations in metallic laps and composite patches. By removing clutter from surface roughness effects, the authors clarify interpretation of subsurface flaws. To accomplish this, the authors ratio images recorded at two infrared bands, centered near 5 microns and 10 microns. These image ratios are used to decouple temperature patterns associated with interior flaw sites from spatially varying surface emissivity noise. They also discuss three-dimensional (3D) dynamic thermal imaging of structural flaws using dual-band infrared (DBIR) computed tomography. Conventional thermography provides single-band infrared images which are difficult to interpret. Standard procedures yield imprecise (or qualitative) information about subsurface flaw sites which are typically masked by surface clutter. They use a DBIR imaging technique pioneered at LLNL to capture the time history of surface temperature difference patterns for flash-heated targets. They relate these patterns to the location, size, shape and depth of subsurface flaws. They have demonstrated temperature accuracies of 0.2{degree}C, timing synchronization of 3 ms (after onset of heat flash) and intervals of 42 ms, between images, during an 8 s cooling (and heating) interval characterizing the front (and back) surface temperature-time history of an epoxy-glue disbond site in a flash-heated aluminum lap joint.

  6. Thermography and machine learning techniques for tomato freshness prediction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen; Wang, Hong-Jin; Tan, Zuojun

    2016-12-01

    The United States and China are the world's leading tomato producers. Tomatoes account for over $2 billion annually in farm sales in the U.S. Tomatoes also rank as the world's 8th most valuable agricultural product, valued at $58 billion dollars annually, and quality is highly prized. Nondestructive technologies, such as optical inspection and near-infrared spectrum analysis, have been developed to estimate tomato freshness (also known as grades in USDA parlance). However, determining the freshness of tomatoes is still an open problem. This research (1) illustrates the principle of theory on why thermography might be able to reveal the internal state of the tomatoes and (2) investigates the application of machine learning techniques-artificial neural networks (ANNs) and support vector machines (SVMs)-in combination with transient step heating, and thermography for freshness prediction, which refers to how soon the tomatoes will decay. Infrared images were captured at a sampling frequency of 1 Hz during 40 s of heating followed by 160 s of cooling. The temperatures of the acquired images were plotted. Regions with higher temperature differences between fresh and less fresh (rotten within three days) tomatoes of approximately uniform size and shape were used as the input nodes for ANN and SVM models. The ANN model built using heating and cooling data was relatively optimal. The overall regression coefficient was 0.99. These results suggest that a combination of infrared thermal imaging and ANN modeling methods can be used to predict tomato freshness with higher accuracy than SVM models.

  7. Infrared micro-thermography of an actively heated preconcentrator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We report infrared micro-thermography measurements and analysis of static and transient temperature maps of an actively heated micro-fabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a dual serpentine platinum heater trace deposited on a perforated polyimide membrane and suspended over a silicon frame. The sorbent coated perforated membrane is used to collect vapors and gases that flow through the preconcentrator. After heating, a concentrated pulse of analyte is released into the detector. Due to its small thermal mass, precise thermal management of the preconcentrator is critical to its performance. The sizes of features, the semi-transparent membrane, the need to flow air through the device, and changes in surface emissivity on a micron scale present many challenges for traditional infrared micro-thermography. We report an improved experimental test-bed. The hardware incorporates a custom-designed miniature calibration oven which, in conjunction with spatial filtering and a simple calibration algorithm, allows accurate temperature maps to be obtained. The test-bed incorporates a micro-bolometer array as the infrared imager. Instrumentation design, calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometers arrays can be used in certain radiometric applications. Heating profiles were examined with both uniform and non-uniform air flow through the device. The conclusions from this study provide critical information for optimal integration of the preconcentrator within a detection system, and in the design of the heater trace layout to achieve a more even temperature distribution across the device.

  8. Application of infrared thermography in computer aided diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Oliver; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Hong, Tan Jen; Yu, Wenwei

    2014-09-01

    The invention of thermography, in the 1950s, posed a formidable problem to the research community: What is the relationship between disease and heat radiation captured with Infrared (IR) cameras? The research community responded with a continuous effort to find this crucial relationship. This effort was aided by advances in processing techniques, improved sensitivity and spatial resolution of thermal sensors. However, despite this progress fundamental issues with this imaging modality still remain. The main problem is that the link between disease and heat radiation is complex and in many cases even non-linear. Furthermore, the change in heat radiation as well as the change in radiation pattern, which indicate disease, is minute. On a technical level, this poses high requirements on image capturing and processing. On a more abstract level, these problems lead to inter-observer variability and on an even more abstract level they lead to a lack of trust in this imaging modality. In this review, we adopt the position that these problems can only be solved through a strict application of scientific principles and objective performance assessment. Computing machinery is inherently objective; this helps us to apply scientific principles in a transparent way and to assess the performance results. As a consequence, we aim to promote thermography based Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems. Another benefit of CAD systems comes from the fact that the diagnostic accuracy is linked to the capability of the computing machinery and, in general, computers become ever more potent. We predict that a pervasive application of computers and networking technology in medicine will help us to overcome the shortcomings of any single imaging modality and this will pave the way for integrated health care systems which maximize the quality of patient care.

  9. Acoustics and temperature based NDT for damage assessment of concrete masonry system subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Fuad; Bartoli, Ivan; Rajaram, Satish; Vanniamparambil, Prashanth A.; Kontsos, Antonios; Bolhassani, Mohammad; Hamid, Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    This paper represents a hybrid non-destructive testing (HNDT) approach based on infrared thermography (IRT), acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic (UT) techniques for effective damage quantification of partially grouted concrete masonry walls (CMW). This integrated approach has the potential to be implemented for the health monitoring of concrete masonry systems. The implementation of this hybrid approach assists the cross validation of in situ recorded information for structural damage assessment. In this context, NDT was performed on a set of partially grouted CMW subjected to cyclic loading. Acoustic emission (AE) signals and Infrared thermography (IRT) images were recorded during each cycle of loading while the ultrasonic (UT) tests were performed in between each loading cycle. Four accelerometers, bonded at the toe of the wall, were used for recording waveforms for both passive (AE) and active (UT) acoustics. For the active approach, high frequency stress waves were generated by an instrumented hammer and the corresponding waveforms were recorded by the accelerometers. The obtained AE, IRT, and UT results were correlated to visually confirm accumulated progressive damage throughout the loading history. Detailed post-processing of these results was performed to characterize the defects at the region of interest. The obtained experimental results demonstrated the potential of the methods to detect flaws on monitored specimens; further experimental investigations are planned towards the quantitative use of these NDT methods.

  10. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  11. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  12. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  13. Comparisons of Three Indicators for Frey's Syndrome: Subjective Symptoms, Minor's Starch Iodine Test, and Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo Geun; Kwon, Sae Young; Won, Jung Youn; Yoo, Seung Woo; Lee, Min Gu; Kim, Si Whan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To correlate Frey's syndrome with subjective symptoms, Minor's starch iodine test results, and infrared thermography measurements, and to discuss the utility of thermography as a quantitative diagnostic method. Methods This study included 59 patients who underwent unilateral parotidectomy. A subjective clinical questionnaire and an objective Minor's starch iodine test were performed to evaluate the incidence of Frey's syndrome. Infrared thermography was performed, and the subjects were divided into seven groups according to the temperature differences between operated and unoperated sites. The thermal differences were correlated with the results from Minor's starch iodine test and the subjective symptoms questionnaire. Results Of the 59 patients, 20 patients (33.9%) reported subjective symptoms after eating; 30 patients (50.8%) tested positive for Minor's starch iodine test, 19 patients (63.3%) of which reported subjective symptoms. Of the 29 patients who were negative for the iodine test, 2 patients (6.9%) reported subjective symptoms. Thus, subjective symptoms were well correlated with Minor's starch iodine test (r=0.589, P<0.001). As the thermal differences with infrared thermography increased, the number of patients with subjective symptoms increased (χ2=22.5, P<0.001). Using infrared thermography, the mean temperature difference in the positive group for the iodine test was 0.82℃±0.26℃, and that in the negative group was 0.10℃±0.47℃. With increased thermal differences, more patients showed positivity in the iodine test (χ2=29.9, P<0.001). Conclusion Subjective symptoms, Minor's starch iodine test, and infrared thermography are well correlated with one another. Quantitative thermography provides clues for the wide variation in the incidence of Frey's syndrome, and could be a useful method for diagnosing and studying Frey's syndrome. PMID:24353866

  14. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in E-box motifs ACAT|GTG and ACAC|GTG increases DNA-binding of the B-HLH transcription factor TCF4.

    PubMed

    Khund-Sayeed, Syed; He, Ximiao; Holzberg, Timothy; Wang, Jun; Rajagopal, Divya; Upadhyay, Shriyash; Durell, Stewart R; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Weirauch, Matthew T; Rose, Robert; Vinson, Charles

    2016-09-12

    We evaluated DNA binding of the B-HLH family members TCF4 and USF1 using protein binding microarrays (PBMs) containing double-stranded DNA probes with cytosine on both strands or 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) on one DNA strand and cytosine on the second strand. TCF4 preferentially bound the E-box motif (CAN|NTG) with strongest binding to the 8-mer CAG|GTGGT. 5mC uniformly decreases DNA binding of both TCF4 and USF1. The bulkier 5hmC also inhibited USF1 binding to DNA. In contrast, 5hmC dramatically enhanced TCF4 binding to E-box motifs ACAT|GTG and ACAC|GTG, being better bound than any 8-mer containing cytosine. Examination of X-ray structures of the closely related TCF3 and USF1 bound to DNA suggests TCF3 can undergo a conformational shift to preferentially bind to 5hmC while the USF1 basic region is bulkier and rigid precluding a conformation shift to bind 5hmC. These results greatly expand the regulatory DNA sequence landscape bound by TCF4.

  15. Calculation of deuterium retention, re-emission and reflection from a tungsten material under D + ions irradiation with ACAT-DIFFUSE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Muramoto, T.; Kawamura, T.

    2009-06-01

    We calculated, with a dynamic Monte Carlo code ACAT-DIFFUSE, fluxes of thermal D 2 re-emission, reflection and segregated self-sputtering of D from a D + implanted wrought tungsten material during a time sequence of l00 eV D + implantation, post-implanted isothermal out-gassing and thermal desorption spectroscopy. The obtained result was in good agreement with an existing experiment if two different trap sites with de-trapping energy of 0.85 eV and 2.2 eV and density fraction of 0.05 D/W and 0.01 D/W were assumed to exist. The re-emission, reflection and self-sputtering fluxes in the implantation period were shown to be almost comparable. The integrated deuterium flux released in the same period was estimated. The amount of deuterium retained at 300 K was nearly six times higher than that at 473 K, which reflects the result that mobile atoms and atoms trapped in 0.85 eV trap existed abundantly at 300 K but scarcely at 473 K.

  16. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  17. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  18. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  19. Effect of perspiration on skin temperature measurements by infrared thermography and contact thermometry during aerobic cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Martínez Guillamón, Natividad; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M.a.; Psikuta, Agnes; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René Michel; Corberán Salvador, José Miguel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Salvador Palmer, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors for measuring skin temperature during cycling in a moderate environment. Fourteen cyclists performed a 45-min cycling test at 50% of peak power output. Skin temperatures were simultaneously recorded by infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors before and immediately after cycling activity as well as after 10 min cooling-down, representing different skin wetness and blood perfusion states. Additionally, surface temperature during well controlled dry and wet heat exchange (avoiding thermoregulatory responses) using a hot plate system was assessed by infrared thermography and thermal contact sensors. In human trials, the inter-method correlation coefficient was high when measured before cycling (r = 0.92) whereas it was reduced immediately after the cycling (r = 0.82) and after the cooling-down phase (r = 0.59). Immediately after cycling, infrared thermography provided lower temperature values than thermal contact sensors whereas it presented higher temperatures after the cooling-down phase. Comparable results as in human trials were observed for hot plate tests in dry and wet states. Results support the application of infrared thermography for measuring skin temperature in exercise scenarios where perspiration does not form a water film.

  20. Non-destructive Testing of Forged Metallic Materials by Active Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, S.; Cadith, J.; Bouteille, P.; Legros, G.; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Nowadays, infrared thermography is considered as the reference method in many applications such as safety, the inspection of electric installations, or the inspection of buildings' heat insulation. In recent years, the evolution of both material and data-processing tools also allows the development of thermography as a real non-destructive testing method. Thus, by subjecting the element to be inspected to an external excitation and by analyzing the propagation of heat in the examined zone, it is possible to highlight surface or subsurface defects such as cracks, delaminations, or corrosion. One speaks then about active infrared thermography. In this study, some results obtained during the collective studies carried out by CETIM and the University of Reims for the forging industry are presented. Various experimental possibilities offered by active thermography are presented and the interest in this method in comparison with the traditional non-destructive testing methods (penetrant testing and magnetic particle inspection) is discussed. For example, comparative results on a forged cracked hub, a steering joint, and a threaded rod are presented. They highlight the interest of infrared thermography stimulated by induction for forged parts.

  1. Tracking composite material damage evolution using Bayesian filtering and flash thermography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Elizabeth D.; Holland, Steve D.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a method for tracking the condition of a composite part using Bayesian filtering of ash thermography data over the lifetime of the part. In this demonstration, composite panels were fabricated; impacted to induce subsurface delaminations; and loaded in compression over multiple time steps, causing the delaminations to grow in size. Flash thermography data was collected between each damage event to serve as a time history of the part. The ash thermography indicated some areas of damage but provided little additional information as to the exact nature or depth of the damage. Computed tomography (CT) data was also collected after each damage event and provided a high resolution volume model of damage that acted as truth. After each cycle, the condition estimate, from the ash thermography data and the Bayesian filter, was compared to 'ground truth'. The Bayesian process builds on the lifetime history of ash thermography scans and can give better estimates of material condition as compared to the most recent scan alone, which is common practice in the aerospace industry. Bayesian inference provides probabilistic estimates of damage condition that are updated as each new set of data becomes available. The method was tested on simulated data and then on an experimental data set.

  2. Use of infra-red thermography for automotive climate control analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, S.D.; Hassani, V.; Penney, T.R.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, several automotive climate control applications for IR thermography are described. Some of these applications can be performed using conventional IR techniques. Others, such as visualizing the air temperature distribution within the cabin, at duct exits, and at heater and evaporator faces, require new experimental methods. In order to capture the temperature distribution within an airstream, a 0.25-mm-thick (0.01 inch) fiberglass screen is used. This screen can be positioned perpendicular or parallel to the flow to obtain three-dimensional spatial measurements. In many cases, the air flow pattern can be inferred from the resulting temperature distribution, allowing improved air distribution designs. In all cases, significant improvement in the speed, ease, and quantity of temperature distribution information can be realized with thermography as compared to conventional thermocouple array techniques. Comparisons are presented between IR thermography images and both thermocouple measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions.

  3. The early stage wheel fatigue crack detection using eddy current pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianping; Zhang, Kang; Yang, Kai; He, Zhu; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Chaoyong; Gao, Xiaorong

    2017-02-01

    The in-service wheel-set quality is one of critical challenges for railway safety, especially for the high-speed train. The defect in wheel tread, initiated by rolling contact fatigue (RCF) damage, is one of the most significant phenomena and has serious influence on rail industry. Eddy current pulsed thermography is studied to compensate the UT method for detection these early stage of fatigue cracks in wheel tread surface. This paper proposes approximately uniform magnetic field, excited by Helmholtz coils, based pulsed eddy current thermography to achieve open-view image and meet the irregular surface in wheel tread through numerical way. Some features are extracted and studied also to quantify the fatigue crack in term of eddy current pulsed thermography. The proposed method enhances the capability for cracks detection and quantitative evaluation compared with previous NDT method in railway.

  4. Non-destructive testing of composite materials used in military applications by eddy current thermography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderski, Waldemar

    2016-10-01

    Eddy current thermography is a new NDT-technique for the detection of cracks in electro conductive materials. It combines the well-established inspection techniques of eddy current testing and thermography. The technique uses induced eddy currents to heat the sample being tested and defect detection is based on the changes of induced eddy currents flows revealed by thermal visualization captured by an infrared camera. The advantage of this method is to use the high performance of eddy current testing that eliminates the known problem of the edge effect. Especially for components of complex geometry this is an important factor which may overcome the increased expense for inspection set-up. The paper presents the possibility of applying eddy current thermography method for detecting defects in ballistic covers made of carbon fiber reinforced composites used in the construction of military vehicles.

  5. Damage Detection in Rotorcraft Composite Structures Using Thermography and Laser-Based Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    New rotorcraft structural composite designs incorporate lower structural weight, reduced manufacturing complexity, and improved threat protection. These new structural concepts require nondestructive evaluation inspection technologies that can potentially be field-portable and able to inspect complex geometries for damage or structural defects. Two candidate technologies were considered: Thermography and Laser-Based Ultrasound (Laser UT). Thermography and Laser UT have the advantage of being non-contact inspection methods, with Thermography being a full-field imaging method and Laser UT a point scanning technique. These techniques were used to inspect composite samples that contained both embedded flaws and impact damage of various size and shape. Results showed that the inspection techniques were able to detect both embedded and impact damage with varying degrees of success.

  6. Thermophysical analysis of II-VI semiconductors by PPE calorimetry and lock-in thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Streza, M.; Dadarlat, D.; Strzałkowski, K.

    2013-11-13

    An accurate determination of thermophysical properties such as thermal diffusivity, thermal effusivity and thermal conductivity is extremely important for characterization and quality assurance of semiconductors. Thermal diffusivity and effusivity of some binary semiconductors have been investigated. Two experimental techniques were used: a contact technique (PPE calorimetry) and a non contact technique (lock-in thermography). When working with PPE, in the back (BPPE) configuration and in the thermally thick regim of the pyroelectric sensor, we can get the thermal diffusivity of the sample by performing a scanning of the excitation frequency of radiation. Thermal effusivity is obtained in front configuration (sensor directly irradiated and sample in back position) by performing a thickness scan of a coupling fluid. By using the lock-in thermography technique, the thermal diffusivity of the sample is obtained from the phase image. The results obtained by the two techniques are in good agreement. Nevertheless, for the determination of thermal diffusivity, lock-in thermography is preferred.

  7. Low-velocity impact damage characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Jin-yu; Tao, Sheng-jie

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) after low-velocity impact is detected using infrared thermography, and different damages in the impacted composites are analyzed in the thermal maps. The thermal conductivity under pulse stimulation, frictional heating and thermal conductivity under ultrasonic stimulation of CFRP containing low-velocity impact damage are simulated using numerical simulation method. Then, the specimens successively exposed to the low-velocity impact are respectively detected using the pulse infrared thermography and ultrasonic infrared thermography. Through the numerical simulation and experimental investigation, the results obtained show that the combination of the above two detection methods can greatly improve the capability for detecting and evaluating the impact damage in CFRP. Different damages correspond to different infrared thermal images. The delamination damage, matrix cracking and fiber breakage are characterized as the block-shape hot spot, line-shape hot spot, and

  8. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized.

  9. Infrared thermography based studies on mobile phone induced heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Soumya, C.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2015-07-01

    Here, we report the skin temperature rise due to the absorption of radio frequency (RF) energy from three handheld mobile phones using infrared thermography technique. Experiments are performed under two different conditions, viz. when the mobile phones are placed in soft touch with the skin surface and away from the skin surface. Additionally, the temperature rise of mobile phones during charging, operation and simultaneous charging and talking are monitored under different exposure conditions. It is observed that the temperature of the cheek and ear regions monotonically increased with time during the usage of mobile phones and the magnitude of the temperature rise is higher for the mobile phone with higher specific absorption rate. The increase in skin temperature is higher when the mobile phones are in contact with the skin surface due to the combined effect of absorption of RF electromagnetic power and conductive heat transfer. The increase in the skin temperature in non-contact mode is found to be within the safety limit of 1 °C. The measured temperature rise is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The empirical equation obtained from the temperature rise on the cheek region of the subjects correlates well with the specific absorption rate of the mobile phones. Our study suggests that the use of mobile phones in non-contact mode can significantly lower the skin temperature rise during its use and hence, is safer compared to the contact mode.

  10. Assessment of Lower Limb Prosthesis through Wearable Sensors and Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Perego, Paolo; Fusca, Marcello C.; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Andreoni, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the application of infrared thermography in combination with ambulatory wearable monitoring of temperature and relative humidity, to assess the residual limb-to-liner interface in lower-limb prosthesis users. Five male traumatic transtibial amputees were involved, who reported no problems or discomfort while wearing the prosthesis. A thermal imaging camera was used to measure superficial thermal distribution maps of the stump. A wearable system for recording the temperature and relative humidity in up to four anatomical points was developed, tested in vitro and integrated with the measurement set. The parallel application of an infrared camera and wearable sensors provided complementary information. Four main Regions of Interest were identified on the stump (inferior patella, lateral/medial epicondyles, tibial tuberosity), with good inter-subject repeatability. An average increase of 20% in hot areas (P < 0.05) is shown after walking compared to resting conditions. The sensors inside the cuff did not provoke any discomfort during recordings and provide an inside of the thermal exchanges while walking and recording the temperature increase (a regime value is ∼+1.1 ± 0.7 °C) and a more significant one (∼+4.1 ± 2.3%) in humidity because of the sweat produced. This study has also begun the development of a reference data set for optimal socket/liner-stump construction. PMID:24618782

  11. Study Methods to Characterize and Implement Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The limits and conditions under which an infrared thermographic nondestructive evaluation can be utilized to assess the quality of aerospace hardware is demonstrated in this research effort. The primary focus of this work is on applying thermography to the inspection of advanced composite structures such as would be found in the International Space Station Instrumentation Racks, Space Shuttle Cargo Bay Doors, Bantam RP-1 tank or RSRM Nose Cone. Here, the detection of delamination, disbond, inclusion and porosity type defects are of primary interest. In addition to composites, an extensive research effort has been initiated to determine how well a thermographic evaluation can detect leaks and disbonds in pressurized metallic systems "i.e. the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzles". In either case, research into developing practical inspection procedures was conducted and thermographic inspections were performed on a myriad of test samples, subscale demonstration articles and "simulated" flight hardware. All test samples were fabricated as close to their respective structural counterparts as possible except with intentional defects for NDE qualification. As an added benefit of this effort to create simulated defects, methods were devised for defect fabrication that may be useful in future NDE qualification ventures.

  12. Pulse Phase Thermography for Defect Detection and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinetti, Sergio; Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.; Braggiotti, Alberto

    1999-01-01

    Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) has been reported as a novel powerful technique of the thermal NDE. It employs application of the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) to thermal images obtained following flash heating of the front surface of a specimen. The computed phasegrams are excellent for defect visualization in a wide range of materials. This is in part due to their low sensitivity to uneven heating. This work is an attempt to analyze advantages and limitations of PPT. Results of application of the DFT to simulated temperature decays are presented. The temperature evolution on a surface has been simulated based on an analytical solution of the one-dimensional heat diffusion problem. A more sophisticated study has been done for different sizes of defects using numerical solution of the three-dimensional mathematical model. Capabilities of PPT for in-depth scanning and for monitoring of the material loss are discussed. The recommendations for the practical application of the PPT are presented. Experimental results obtained following these recommendations are reported.

  13. Measuring and Estimating Normalized Contrast in Infrared Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared flash thermography (IRFT) is used to detect void-like flaws in a test object. The IRFT technique involves heating up the part surface using a flash of flash lamps. The post-flash evolution of the part surface temperature is sensed by an IR camera in terms of pixel intensity of image pixels. The IR technique involves recording of the IR video image data and analysis of the data using the normalized pixel intensity and temperature contrast analysis method for characterization of void-like flaws for depth and width. This work introduces a new definition of the normalized IR pixel intensity contrast and normalized surface temperature contrast. A procedure is provided to compute the pixel intensity contrast from the camera pixel intensity evolution data. The pixel intensity contrast and the corresponding surface temperature contrast differ but are related. This work provides a method to estimate the temperature evolution and the normalized temperature contrast from the measured pixel intensity evolution data and some additional measurements during data acquisition.

  14. Remote monitoring of breathing dynamics using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An atypical or irregular respiratory frequency is considered to be one of the earliest markers of physiological distress. In addition, monitoring of this vital parameter plays a major role in diagnosis of respiratory disorders, as well as in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome. Nevertheless, the current measurement modalities require attachment of sensors to the patient’s body, leading to discomfort and stress. The current paper presents a new robust algorithm to remotely monitor breathing rate (BR) by using thermal imaging. This approach permits to detect and to track the region of interest (nose) as well as to estimate BR. In order to study the performance of the algorithm, and its robustness against motion and breathing disorders, three different thermal recordings of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired (sequence 1: normal breathing; sequence 2: normal breathing plus arbitrary head movements; and sequence 3: sequence of specific breathing patterns). Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) served as “gold standard” for validation of our results. An excellent agreement between estimated BR and ground truth was achieved. Whereas the mean correlation for sequence 1–3 were 0.968, 0.940 and 0.974, the mean absolute BR errors reached 0.33, 0.55 and 0.96 bpm (breaths per minute), respectively. In brief, this work demonstrates that infrared thermography is a promising, clinically relevant alternative for the currently available measuring modalities due to its performance and diverse remarkable advantages. PMID:26601003

  15. Layerwise Monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting Process by Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Harald; Zeugner, Thomas; Zaeh, Michael F.

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build parts directly from CAD data. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector, the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. This enables the identification of hot spots in an early stage during the solidification process and helps to avoid process interrupts. Potential quality indicators are derived from spatially resolved measurement data and are correlated to the resulting part properties. A model of heat dissipation is presented based on the measurement of the material response for varying heat input. Current results show the feasibility of process surveillance by thermography for a limited section of the building platform in a commercial system.

  16. Monitoring Sintering Burn-Through Point Using Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Molleda, Julio; Garcia, Daniel F.; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2013-01-01

    Sintering is a complex industrial process that applies heat to fine particles of iron ore and other materials to produce sinter, a solidified porous material used in blast furnaces. The sintering process needs to be carefully adjusted, so that the combustion zone reaches the bottom of the material just before the discharge end. This is known as the burn-through point. Many different parameters need to be finely tuned, including the speed and the quantities of the materials mixed. However, in order to achieve good results, sintering control requires precise feedback to adjust these parameters. This work presents a sensor to monitor the sintering burn-through point based on infrared thermography. The proposed procedure is based on the acquisition of infrared images at the end of the sintering process. At this position, infrared images contain the cross-section temperatures of the mixture. The objective of this work is to process this information to extract relevant features about the sintering process. The proposed procedure is based on four steps: key frame detection, region of interest detection, segmentation and feature extraction. The results indicate that the proposed procedure is very robust and reliable, providing features that can be used effectively to control the sintering process. PMID:23939585

  17. Infrared thermography of solid surfaces in a fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, J.; Foronda, A.; Aranda, J. M.; López, F.; López del Cerro, F. J.

    2010-10-01

    Fire resistance tests are commonplace in industry. The aerospace sector is particularly active in this area, since the behaviour of advanced materials, such as composites, when in a fire is not fully understood yet. Two of the main obstacles are the inherent difficulty of direct surface measurements in such a harsh environment (especially on the exposed side of the specimens) and the lack of spatial resolution of the usual measuring devices, namely thermocouples (TCs). This paper presents a way to overcome these problems by using an infrared (IR) camera to study the exposed side of composite plates exposed to fire. A method for minimizing the effect of the flame (thus making it as 'transparent' as possible) was developed, resulting in 2D temperature maps of the plate surface. The assumptions that the method relies on were verified by data analysis and ad hoc emission-transmission experiments. The errors associated with two slightly different versions of the method were studied, and comparisons with TC measurements were performed. It was found that the IR method provides better results than TCs, not only due to its spatial resolution capability but also because of the non-intrusive nature of IR thermography, as opposed to the local effects caused by TCs, which became evident during the experiments.

  18. Detection of localized fatigue damage in steel by thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medgenberg, Justus; Ummenhofer, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Fatigue damage of unalloyed steels in the high cycle regime is governed by localized cyclic plastic deformations and subsequent crack initiation. The extent of early microplastic deformations depends on the applied stress level, stress concentration at macroscopic notches, surface treatment, residual stresses etc. The onset of a nonlinear material response can be regarded as an early indicator of fatigue damage. During fatigue loading thermoelastic coupling and thermoplastic dissipation cause characteristic temperature variations in tested specimens which have been assessed by a highly sensitive infrared camera. A specialized data processing method in the time domain has been developed which allows to separate the different contributions to the measured temperature signal. In contrast to other methods - as e.g. measuring the rise of mean temperature during fatigue loading - the proposed methodology is based on measurements during the stabilized temperature regimen and offers very high spatial resolution of localized phenomena. Investigations have been made on mildly notched cylindrical and also on welded specimens. The results confirm the close relation between the local temperature signal and typical fatigue phenomena. The new methodology allows for a much better localization and quantification of effects as cyclic plasticity, crack initiation, crack growth etc. The following paper presents considerations and experimental results of an application of thermography to the local assessment of fatigue damage.

  19. Use of modern infrared thermography for wildlife population surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Dale L.; Underwood, H. Brian; Porter, William F.

    1995-03-01

    A commercially available thermal-infrared scanning system was used to survey populations of several wildlife species. The system's ability to detect species of different sizes in varying habitats relative to conventional survey methods, to differentiate between species in the same habitat, and the influence of environtmental factors on operational aspects of employing this technology in the field were evaluated. Total costs for the surveys were approximately 0.36/ha. There were marked discrepancies in the counts of untrained observers and those from trained analysis. Computer-assisted analysis of infrared imagery recorded 52% fewer deer than were estimated from drive counts, and densities of moose were five times those estimated from conventional aerial methods. By flying concentric circles and using telephoto, detailed counts of turkeys and deer were possible. With the aid of computer-assisted analysis, infrared thermography may become a useful wildlife population survey tool. More research is needed to verify the actual efficiency of detection by combining aerial scans with ground truthing for a variely of species and habitals.

  20. International standards for pandemic screening using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. D.; Ring, E. F.; Mercer, J. B.; Snell, J.; Osborn, D.; Hedley-Whyte, J.

    2010-03-01

    The threat of a virulent strain of influenza, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), tuberculosis, H1N1/A virus (swine flu) and possible mutations are a constant threat to global health. Implementation of pandemic infrared thermographic screening is based on the detection of febrile temperatures (inner canthus of the eyes) that are correlated with an infectious disease. Previous attempts at pandemic thermal screening have experienced problems (e.g. SARS outbreak, Singapore 2003) associated with the deployment plan, implementation and operation of the screening thermograph. Since this outbreak, the International Electrotechnical Commission has developed international standards that set minimum requirements for thermographic system fever screening and procedures that insure reliable and reproducible measurements. These requirements are published in IEC 80601-2-59:2008, Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-59: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of screening thermographs for human febrile temperature screening. The International Organization for Standardization has developed ISO/TR 13154:2009, Medical Electrical Equipment - which provides deployment, implementation and operational guidelines for identifying febrile humans using a screening thermograph. These new standards includes recommendations for camera calibrations, use of black body radiators, view field, focus, pixels within measurement site, image positioning, and deployment locations. Many current uses of thermographic screening at airports do not take into account critical issues addressed in the new standard, and are operating below the necessary effectiveness and efficiency. These documents, related thermal research, implications for epidemiology screening, and the future impact on medical thermography are discussed.

  1. Monitoring sintering burn-through point using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Molleda, Julio; Garcia, Daniel F; Bulnes, Francisco G

    2013-08-09

    Sintering is a complex industrial process that applies heat to fine particles of iron ore and other materials to produce sinter, a solidified porous material used in blast furnaces. The sintering process needs to be carefully adjusted, so that the combustion zone reaches the bottom of the material just before the discharge end. This is known as the burn-through point. Many different parameters need to be finely tuned, including the speed and the quantities of the materials mixed. However, in order to achieve good results, sintering control requires precise feedback to adjust these parameters. This work presents a sensor to monitor the sintering burn-through point based on infrared thermography. The proposed procedure is based on the acquisition of infrared images at the end of the sintering process. At this position, infrared images contain the cross-section temperatures of the mixture. The objective of this work is to process this information to extract relevant features about the sintering process. The proposed procedure is based on four steps: key frame detection, region of interest detection, segmentation and feature extraction. The results indicate that the proposed procedure is very robust and reliable, providing features that can be used effectively to control the sintering process.

  2. Glued structures inspection based on lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Laetitia; Autrique, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Active thermography is a widely employed technique for parametric identification and non-destructive inspection. This attractive method is based on the observation of thermal waves propagation induced by a periodic heating. For nondestructive testing usual approaches are based on a global heating (a large surface of the inspected material is submitted to thermal excitation). In the following a local approach is investigated: the heated area is small (order of magnitude is one square centimeter) and lateral propagation is studied in order to reveal the defect in the sample. In fact, both modulus (heat wave amplitude) and phase lag (delay) of the measured periodic signal are modified by the defect neighborhood and the search for the most effective area leads to the defect localization. Several results are highlighted in this communication in order to investigate an automated procedure. Temperatures are measured by an infrared camera and analyses of modulus cartography are performed in order to estimate the defect location. In such an aim, the downhill simplex method is implemented in order to converge toward defect location. Illustrations are dedicated to glued structures (two plates separated by a thin glue interface) for which unknown defect is a lack of glue which can be considered as a bubble (air trapped between the lower and the upper plane surface). Automated method attractiveness is established in several configurations.

  3. Infrared thermography of the tear film in dry eye.

    PubMed

    Morgan, P B; Tullo, A B; Efron, N

    1995-01-01

    Infrared ocular thermograms were recorded for a group of 36 dry eye patients and for 27 age- and sex-matched controls. Mean ocular surface temperature was greater in the dry eye group (32.38 +/- 0.69 degrees C) compared with the control group (31.94 +/- 0.54 degrees C; p < 0.01). In addition, there was a greater variation of temperatures across the ocular surface in the dry eye group, illustrated by the difference in temperature between the limbus and the centre of the cornea (0.64 +/- 0.20 degrees C in dry eye patients compared with 0.41 +/- 0.20 degrees C in the control group; p < 0.001). This parameter was also shown to be greater in dry eye patients who displayed either a fast tear break-up time or a poor Schirmer's test result. Infrared thermography is a non-invasive and objective technique that may prove a useful research tool for study of the tear film, its deficiencies and its various treatment modalities.

  4. Automated diagnosis of dry eye using infrared thermography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, U. Rajendra; Tan, Jen Hong; Koh, Joel E. W.; Sudarshan, Vidya K.; Yeo, Sharon; Too, Cheah Loon; Chua, Chua Kuang; Ng, E. Y. K.; Tong, Louis

    2015-07-01

    Dry Eye (DE) is a condition of either decreased tear production or increased tear film evaporation. Prolonged DE damages the cornea causing the corneal scarring, thinning and perforation. There is no single uniform diagnosis test available to date; combinations of diagnostic tests are to be performed to diagnose DE. The current diagnostic methods available are subjective, uncomfortable and invasive. Hence in this paper, we have developed an efficient, fast and non-invasive technique for the automated identification of normal and DE classes using infrared thermography images. The features are extracted from nonlinear method called Higher Order Spectra (HOS). Features are ranked using t-test ranking strategy. These ranked features are fed to various classifiers namely, K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Nave Bayesian Classifier (NBC), Decision Tree (DT), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to select the best classifier using minimum number of features. Our proposed system is able to identify the DE and normal classes automatically with classification accuracy of 99.8%, sensitivity of 99.8%, and specificity if 99.8% for left eye using PNN and KNN classifiers. And we have reported classification accuracy of 99.8%, sensitivity of 99.9%, and specificity if 99.4% for right eye using SVM classifier with polynomial order 2 kernel.

  5. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography Using Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-02-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and infrared imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with infrared-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (-0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (-0.69 ± 0.18°C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the infrared-measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45°C-50°C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies in which thermocouples or water bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results indicate that high-resolution infrared thermography is a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods.

  6. Thermography and colour duplex ultrasound assessments of arterio-venous fistula function in renal patients.

    PubMed

    Allen, John; Oates, Crispian P; Chishti, Ahmed D; Ahmed, Ihab A M; Talbot, David; Murray, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and clinical assessments of arterio-venous fistula (AVF) function and access are important in patients undergoing or preparing to undergo renal dialysis. Objective assessment techniques include colour duplex ultrasound and more recently medical infrared thermography. Ideally, these should help assess problems relating to fistula failure or to vascular steal from the hand which can result from excessive fistula blood flow. The clinical value of thermography, as yet, has not been assessed for this patient group. The aims of this study were therefore to investigate the relationships between thermography skin temperature measurement and (a) quantitative ultrasound measurement of AVF blood flow, and (b) qualitative clinical assessment of vascular steal from the hands. Fifteen adult patients underwent thermal imaging of the upper limbs, colour duplex ultrasound to derive AVF blood flow from brachial artery blood flow measurements, and a clinical evaluation for vascular steal. Temperature measurements were extracted from the thermograms, including bilateral arm and hand (Fistula -- Non-Fistula) differences, for comparison with derived AVF blood flow and steal grading. Derived AVF blood flow ranged from 30 to 1,950 ml min(-1), with a mean rate close to one litre per minute. Thermography detected the warmer superficial veins in proximity to the patent fistulas, with bilateral differences in fistula region skin temperature correlated with derived AVF blood flow (using maximum temperature measurements the correlation was +0.71 [p < 0.01]; and using mean temperature measurements the correlation was +0.56 [p < 0.05]). When thermography measurements were compared with the clinical assessment of steal the mean hand temperature differences separated steal from non-steal patients with an accuracy of greater than 90%. In summary, we have now demonstrated the potential clinical value of medical infrared thermography for assessing AVF function in renal patients.

  7. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  8. Nondestructive testing of plastered mosaics with the use of active thermography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheilakou, Eleni; Avdelidis, Nico P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Koui, Maria; Bendada, Abdel Hakim; Maldague, Xavier P.

    2010-05-01

    In this work, different mosaics covered with various plasters (of thickness and compositions) were evaluated in lab by means of active long wave and mid wave thermography approaches, with the intention of detecting the tesserae beneath the plastered surface. Thermal images as well as thermal contrast curves between plastered surfaces and plastered mosaics were recorded. Special considerations concerning the applicability and accuracy of the used approaches for this specific application are presented. Results from the assessment are presented and discussed, indicating that images seeing through the mortar-plaster on plastered mosaic surfaces can be obtained using active thermography approaches.

  9. Building material characterization by using IR thermography for efficient heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, Paolo; Grinzato, Ermanno

    2008-03-01

    Thermography is excellent for a fast characterisation of building materials, both at laboratory or in situ. A great advantage is the possibility to analyse many samples at the same conditions and time. A technique has been applied for new materials, oriented to radiating floor systems, evaluating different approaches. Samples are submitted to a stepwise, uniform heating. Surface excess temperature is recorded by thermography evaluating thermal inertia. At first, thermal diffusivity has been measured using a modified version of the Flash Method, then applied on a single face, for in situ application. Heat capacity and thermal conductivity have been inferred for each samples by definitions and the independent measure of the volumic mass.

  10. Interference filters as an enhancement tool for infrared thermography in humidity studies of building elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayo, E.; de Frutos, J.

    1997-06-01

    In the present work, the utility of infrared thermography applied to the study of moisture in builiding materials or in buildings (including those cases in which the water content is very high) is shown. Moreover, an increase in the information content of the thermal image by the use of suitable interference filters is demonstrated. The use of such filters allows us to determine the kind of hydric process. In the present work, different examples are given illustrating the use of infrared thermography (with and without interference filters) when moisture movement is studied.

  11. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  12. Emissivity-corrected power loss calibration for lock-in thermography measurements on silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemann, Martin; Walter, Benjamin; Meinhardt, Christoph; Ebser, Jan; Kwapil, Wolfram; Warta, Wilhelm

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes power loss calibration procedures with implemented emissivity correction. The determination of our emissivity correction matrix does neither rely on blackbody reference measurements nor on the knowledge of any sample temperatures. To describe the emissivity-corrected power calibration procedures in detail, we review the theory behind lock-in thermography and show experimentally that the lock-in signal is proportional to the power dissipation in the solar cell. Experiments show the successful application of our emissivity correction procedure, which significantly improves the informative value of lock-in thermography images and the reliability of the conclusions drawn from these images.

  13. Role of medical thermography in treatment of Frey's syndrome with botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Green, Richard James; Endersby, Simon; Allen, John; Adams, James

    2014-01-01

    Frey syndrome classically causes gustatory sweating and facial flushing. We describe 2 cases in which medical thermography was used to investigate the symptoms. Images were taken after patients chewed a sialagogue and 2 weeks later they were given injections of botulinum toxin A. Images taken 4 weeks after treatment showed a considerable reduction in sweating and facial flushing, which was supported by the results of quality of life questionnaires completed before and after treatment. Medical thermography is much cleaner than the Minor's starch iodine test. It identifies areas of gustatory sweating, changes in temperature, and vascular changes, which potentially enable treatment to be targeted accurately.

  14. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  15. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  16. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  17. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  18. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  19. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  20. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  1. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  2. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-093015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 30-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to develop

  3. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the...nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation, scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in the

  4. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  5. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  6. Noninvasive thermography of laser-induced hyperthermia using magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher M.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Dodd, Stephen J.; Gao, Jia Hong

    2004-07-01

    The possibility to induce selective hyperthermia in a target tissue or organ is of great interest for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. An emerging application of thermotherapy is for choroidal neovascularization, a complication of age-related macular degeneration. The therapy is currently limited because the temperature required for optimal tissue response is unknown. We report here an investigation of near infrared laser-induced heating in an ocular phantom. Magnetic resonance thermography (MRT) was used as a non-invasive method to determine the temperature distribution inside the phantom during exposure to a continuous wave diode laser at 806 nm wavelength with 1 watt maximum output. The laser beam had a quasi-gaussian profile, with a radius of 0.8-2.4 mm at target. High quality temperature images were obtained from temperature-dependent phase shifts in the proton resonance frequency with a resolution of 1deg C or better, using a 2T magnet. A phantom with a layer of bovine RPE melanin of 1.5 mm thickness was used to determine the spatial resolution of the MRT measurements. Three dimensional temperature maps were also constructed showing a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in all direction. The heat distribution depended on the laser parameters, as well as the orientation of the melanin layer with respect to the incident laser beam. The temperature profiles determined by MRT closely followed predictions of a heat diffusion model, based on the optical properties of infrared light in melanin. These results support the use of MRT to optimize laser-induced hyperthermia in a small organ such as the eye.

  7. Evaluation of Microbolometer-Based Thermography for Gossamer Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jonathan J.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jenkins, Christopher H.; Pappa, Richard S.; Banik, Jeremy; Brown, Hunter; McEvoy, Kiley

    2005-01-01

    In August 2003, NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program contracted with our team to develop a prototype on-board Optical Diagnostics System (ODS) for solar sail flight tests. The ODS is intended to monitor sail deployment as well as structural and thermal behavior, and to validate computational models for use in designing future solar sail missions. This paper focuses on the thermography aspects of the ODS. A thermal model was developed to predict local sail temperature variations as a function of sail tilt to the sun, billow depth, and spectral optical properties of front and back sail surfaces. Temperature variations as small as 0.5 C can induce significant thermal strains that compare in magnitude to mechanical strains. These thermally induced strains may result in changes in shape and dynamics. The model also gave insight into the range and sensitivity required for in-flight thermal measurements and supported the development of an ABAQUS-coupled thermo-structural model. The paper also discusses three kinds of tests conducted to 1) determine the optical properties of candidate materials; 2) evaluate uncooled microbolometer-type infrared imagers; and 3) operate a prototype imager with the ODS baseline configuration. (Uncooled bolometers are less sensitive than cooled ones, but may be necessary because of restrictive ODS mass and power limits.) The team measured the spectral properties of several coated polymer samples at various angles of incidence. Two commercially available uncooled microbolometer imagers were compared, and it was found that reliable temperature measurements are feasible for both coated and uncoated sides of typical sail membrane materials.

  8. Mapping the body surface temperature of cattle by infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Salles, Marcia Saladini Vieira; da Silva, Suelen Corrêa; Salles, Fernando André; Roma, Luiz Carlos; El Faro, Lenira; Bustos Mac Lean, Priscilla Ayleen; Lins de Oliveira, Celso Eduardo; Martello, Luciane Silva

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) is an alternative non-invasive method that has been studied as a tool for identifying many physiological and pathological processes related to changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the body surface temperature of Jersey dairy cattle in a thermoneutral environment in order to contribute to the determination of a body surface temperature pattern for animals of this breed in a situation of thermal comfort. Twenty-four Jersey heifers were used over a period of 35 days at APTA Brazil. Measurements were performed on all animals, starting with the physiological parameters. Body surface temperature was measured by IRT collecting images in different body regions: left and right eye area, right and left eye, caudal left foreleg, cranial left foreleg, right and left flank, and forehead. High correlations were observed between temperature and humidity index (THI) and right flank, left flank and forehead temperatures (0.85, 0.81, and 0.81, respectively). The IRT variables that exhibited the five highest correlation coefficients in principal component 1 were, in decreasing order: forehead (0.90), right flank (0.87), left flank (0.84), marker 1 caudal left foreleg (0.83), marker 2 caudal left foreleg (0.74). The THI showed a high correlation coefficient (0.88) and moderate to low correlations were observed for the physiological variables rectal temperature (0.43), and respiratory frequency (0.42). The thermal profile obtained indicates a surface temperature pattern for each region studied in a situation of thermal comfort and may contribute to studies investigating body surface temperature. Among the body regions studied, IRT forehead temperature showed the highest association with rectal temperature, and forehead and right and left flank temperatures are strongly associated with THI and may be adopted in future studies on thermoregulation and body heat production.

  9. Evaluation of mean skin temperature formulas by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. K.; Miki, K.; Sagawa, S.; Shiraki, K.

    To study the reliabiliity of formulas for calculating mean skin temperature (Tsk), values were computed by 18 different techniques and were compared with the mean of 10,841 skin temperatures measured by infrared thermography. One hundred whole-body infrared thermograms were scanned in ten resting males while changing the air temperature from 40° C to 4° C. Local, regional average and mean skin temperatures were obtained using an image processing system. The agreement frequency, defined as the percentage of the calculated Tsk values which agreed with the corresponding infrared thermographic Tsk within +/-0.2° C, ranged for with the various formulas from 7% to 80%. In many sites, the local skin temperature did not coincide with the regional average skin temperature. When the local skin temperatures which showed the highest percentage similarity to the regional average skin temperature within +/-0.4° C were applied to the formula, the agreement frequency was markedly improved for all formulas. However, the agreement frequency was not affected by changing the weighting factors from specific constants to individually measured values of regional surface area. By applying the physiologically reliable accuracy range of +/-0.2° C in the moderate and +/-0.4° C in the cool condition, agreement frequencies of at least 95% were observed in formulas involving seven or more skin temperature measurement sites, including the hand and foot. We conclude that calculation of a reliable mean skin temperature must involve more than seven skin temperature measurement sites regardless of ambient temperature. Optimal sites for skin temperature measurement are proposed for various formulas.

  10. Using aerial infrared thermography to detect utility theft of service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Gregory R.; Lucas, R. Gillem

    2012-06-01

    Natural gas and electric utility companies, public utility commissions, consumer advocacy groups, city governments, state governments and the federal government United States continue to turn a blind eye towards utility energy theft of service which we conservatively estimate is in excess of 10 billion a year. Why? Many in the United States have exhausted their unemployment benefits. The amounts for federal funding for low income heating assistance programs (LIHEAP) funds were cut by nearly 40% for 2012 to 3.02 billion. "At peak funding ($5.1 billion in 2009), the program was national in scale but still only had enough resources to support roughly 1/4 of the eligible households.i" Contributions to charities are down and the number of families below the poverty line who are unable to pay to heat their houses continues to rise. Many of the less fortunate in our society now consider theft and fraud to be an attractive option for their supply of natural gas and/or electricity. A record high mild winter in 2011-2012 coupled with 10-year low natural gas prices temporarily obscured the need for low income heating assistance programs (LIHEAPs) from the news and federal budgets, but cold winters will return. The proliferation of smart meters and automated meter infrastructures across our nation can do little to detect energy theft because the thieves can simply by-pass the meters, jumper around the meters and/or steal meters from abandoned houses and use them. Many utility systems were never set-up to stop these types of theft. Even with low-cost per identified thief method using aerial infrared thermography, utilities continue to ignore theft detection.

  11. Thermography Improves Clinical Assessment in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Treated with Ozone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Treatment of scleroderma is challenging and limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of thermography in assessment of the clinical condition (joints movability and skin thickness) in clinically advanced patients with systemic sclerosis before and after ozone therapy. Method. The study included 42 patients aged 32 to 73 years with advanced systemic sclerosis hospitalized in the university clinic between 2003 and 2006. Thermography and clinical examinations were conducted at baseline and after two series of bath in water with ozone. Results. The comparison of results showed significant increase in skin temperature by 2.5°C, significant increase in interphalangeal joints movability by 18 degrees, and significant decrease in skin score by 14.7 points. The skin temperature was correlated with skin score (r = −0.59) and joints movability (r = +0.8). Conclusions. Ozone therapy shows positive effect on clinical parameters and skin temperature as measured with thermography. The study indicated possibility of introducing ozonotherapy as an independent therapy in cases with low level of progression or during remission periods and as additional treatment in patients with advanced disease requiring immunosuppressive treatment. Thermography is useful in assessment of skin condition showing strong correlation between skin temperature and clinical parameters. PMID:28349063

  12. Fabrication of 0.0075-Scale Orbiter Phosphor Thermography Test Models for Shuttle RTF Aeroheating Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Powers, Michael A.; Griffith, Mark S.; Hopins, John W.; Veneris, Pete H.; Kuykendoll, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    This report details the techniques and fidelity associated with aeroheating models constructed in support of the return-to-flight boundary layer transition (BLT) activity for STS-114. This report provides technical descriptions of the methods, materials, and equipment used, as well as the surface quality results obtained with the cast ceramic phosphor thermography models.

  13. A new measurement method of coatings thickness based on lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Yu; Meng, Xiang-bin; Ma, Yong-chao

    2016-05-01

    Coatings have been widely used in modern industry and it plays an important role. Coatings thickness is directly related to the performance of the functional coatings, therefore, rapid and accurate coatings thickness inspection has great significance. Existing coatings thickness measurement method is difficult to achieve fast and accurate on-site non-destructive coatings inspection due to cost, accuracy, destruction during inspection and other reasons. This paper starts from the introduction of the principle of lock-in thermography, and then performs an in-depth study on the application of lock-in thermography in coatings inspection through numerical modeling and analysis. The numerical analysis helps explore the relationship between coatings thickness and phase, and the relationship lays the foundation for accurate calculation of coatings thickness. The author sets up a lock-in thermography inspection system and uses thermal barrier coatings specimens to conduct an experiment. The specimen coatings thickness is measured and calibrated to verify the quantitative inspection. Experiment results show that the lock-in thermography method can perform fast coatings inspection and the inspection accuracy is about 95%. Therefore, the method can meet the field testing requirements for engineering projects.

  14. Using radiation thermography and thermometry to evaluate crop water stress in soybean and cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of digital infrared thermography and thermometry to investigate unapparent but important field conditions (poor drainage, non-uniform irrigation, soil variability, or biotic infestations) offers a producer improved management tools to avoid yield declines or to deal with variability in crop ...

  15. Thermography Improves Clinical Assessment in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Treated with Ozone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Treatment of scleroderma is challenging and limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of thermography in assessment of the clinical condition (joints movability and skin thickness) in clinically advanced patients with systemic sclerosis before and after ozone therapy. Method. The study included 42 patients aged 32 to 73 years with advanced systemic sclerosis hospitalized in the university clinic between 2003 and 2006. Thermography and clinical examinations were conducted at baseline and after two series of bath in water with ozone. Results. The comparison of results showed significant increase in skin temperature by 2.5°C, significant increase in interphalangeal joints movability by 18 degrees, and significant decrease in skin score by 14.7 points. The skin temperature was correlated with skin score (r = -0.59) and joints movability (r = +0.8). Conclusions. Ozone therapy shows positive effect on clinical parameters and skin temperature as measured with thermography. The study indicated possibility of introducing ozonotherapy as an independent therapy in cases with low level of progression or during remission periods and as additional treatment in patients with advanced disease requiring immunosuppressive treatment. Thermography is useful in assessment of skin condition showing strong correlation between skin temperature and clinical parameters.

  16. Micro-thermography in millimeter-scale animals by using orally-dosed fluorescent nanoparticle thermosensors.

    PubMed

    Arai, Satoshi; Ferdinandus; Takeoka, Shinji; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2015-11-21

    We propose an instant micro-thermography method using a fluorescent-nanoparticle thermosensor capable of reporting temperature as the fluorescence intensity ratio of the temperature-sensitive dye to the reference. We demonstrate "temperature mapping" inside a fruit fly larva that was orally dosed with nanoparticle thermosensors.

  17. Scrotal infrared digital thermography in assessment of varicocele--pilot study to assess diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Kulis, T; Kolaric, D; Karlovic, K; Knezevic, M; Antonini, S; Kastelan, Z

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess scrotal thermography in diagnostics of varicocele and suggest potential diagnostic criteria. Twelve patients with clinically diagnosed varicocele were examined with scrotal infrared digital thermography, physical examination and ultrasound/doppler. The main outcome measure was evaluation of thermography diagnostic criteria for varicocele. Mean temperature at left pampiniform plexus was ≥ 34 °C in 83%, and at right pampiniform plexus in all cases was ≤ 34 °C. In 92% of patients, temperature at the left testicle was ≥ 32 °C, whereas at the right testicle it was >32 °C in 50% patients. Temperatures between left and right pampiniform plexus and between left and right testicle were significantly different with P < 0.0001 and P < 0.006 respectively. In all patients, temperature difference between pampiniform plexuses was ≥ 0.6 °C. In 92% of patients, temperature at left pampiniform plexus was equal or higher to thigh temperature with the mean temperature difference of 1.1 ± 1.1 °C. Temperature at right pampiniform plexus was colder than the thigh in 92% of patients. This study suggests diagnostic criteria of five thermographic signs to easily diagnose varicocele. Scrotal thermography presents feasible, short and low cost diagnostic method for varicocele. Further study on a larger number of patients and healthy participants is needed to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of this method.

  18. Risks of online advertisement of direct-to-consumer thermography for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Kimberly M; Liang, Bryan A

    2011-12-01

    Direct-to-consumer online advertising for thermography as a sole agent with which to diagnose breast cancer is misleading and exploits women who are seeking preventive health care for breast cancer. Regulatory action should be taken against companies who continue to mislead the public to ensure patient safety and evidence-based public health information.

  19. The Effect of Penetration Depth on Thermal Contrast of NDT by Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; DiGregorio, Anthony; Russell, Samuel S.

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation by Thermography (TNDE) is generally classified into two categories, the passive approach and the active approach. The passive approach is usually performed by measuring the natural temperature difference between the ambient and the material or structure to be tested. The active approach, on the other hand, requires the application of an external energy source to stimulate the material for inspection. A laser, a heater, a hot air blower, a high power thermal pulse, mechanical, or electromagnetic energy may provide the energy sources. For the external heating method to inspect materials for defects and imperfection at ambient temperature, a very short burst of heat can be introduced to one of the surfaces or slow heating of the side opposite to the side being observed. Due to the interruption of the heat flow through the defects, the thermal images will reveal the defective area by contrasting against the surrounding good materials. This technique is called transient Thermography, pulse video Thermography, or thermal wave imaging. As an empirical rule, the radius of the smallest defect should be at least one to two times larger than its depth under the surface. Thermography is being used to inspect void, debond, impact damage, and porosity in composite materials. It has been shown that most of the defects and imperfection can be detected. However, the current method of inspection using thermographic technique is more of an art than a practical scientific and engineering approach. The success rate of determining the defect location and defect type is largely depend on the experience of the person who operates thermography system and performs the inspection. The operator has to try different type of heat source, different duration of its application time, as well as experimenting with the thermal image acquisition time and interval during the inspection process. Further-more, the complexity of the lay-up and structure of composites makes it

  20. Assessment of the effect of housing on feather damage in laying hens using IR thermography.

    PubMed

    Pichová, K; Bilčík, B; Košt'ál, L'

    2017-04-01

    Plumage damage represents one of the animal-based measures of laying hens welfare. Damage occurs predominantly due to age, environment and damaging pecking. IR thermography, due to its non-invasiveness, objectivity and repeatability is a promising alternative to feather damage scoring systems such as the system included in the Welfare Quality ® assessment protocol for poultry. The aim of this study was to apply IR thermography for the assessment of feather damage in laying hens kept in two housing systems and to compare the results with feather scoring. At the start of the experiment, 16-week-old laying hens (n=30) were divided into two treatments such as deep litter pen and enriched cage. During 4 months, feather damage was assessed regularly in 2-week intervals. One more single assessment was done nine and a half months after the start of the experiment. The feather damage on four body regions was assessed by scoring and IR thermography: head and neck, back and rump, belly, and underneck and breast. Two variables obtained by IR thermography were used: the difference between the body surface temperature and ambient temperature (ΔTB) and the proportion of featherless areas, which were defined as areas with a temperature >33.5°C. Data were analyzed using a GLM model. The effects of housing, time, region and their interactions on feather damage, measured by the feather scoring and by both IR thermography measures, were all significant (P<0.001). The ΔTB in all assessed regions correlated positively with the feather score. Feather scoring revealed higher damage in enriched cages compared with deep litter pens starting from week 6 of the experiment on the belly and back and rump regions, whereas ΔTB from week 6 in the belly and from week 8 on the back and rump region. The proportion of featherless areas in the belly region differed significantly between the housings from week 8 of the experiment and on the back and rump region from week 12. The IR thermography

  1. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  2. The use of thermography to design tissue flaps – experimental studies on animals

    PubMed Central

    Łokaj, Marek; Falkowski, Aleksander; Prowans, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Methods allowing one to locate the position of a cutaneous perforator do not allow one to determine the boundaries of the vascularized skin. In clinical practice this causes complications in the form of marginal necrosis of the flap. Aim To examine the usefulness of thermography to assess the extent of vascularization of the skin and subcutaneous tissue by a single perforator. Material and methods Thirty-one male rats were used. Using dynamic thermography the perforators on the abdominal skin were located. Afterwards the flap was prepared on a randomly chosen perforator. After 24 h the extent of vascularization of the skin by a single perforator was examined. Results In 22.5% of cases the number of perforators marked in the thermography was equal to the number of perforators marked intraoperatively, in 64.5% it was lower and in 13% higher. The use of thermography has shown that basing the flap vascularization on the perforator with low efficiency resulted in statistically more frequent occurrence of ischemia and partial necrosis of the flap (p = 0.024). Partial necrosis of the flap occurred in 12 of 31 cases, always in the area in which during the preoperative thermography no perforators were found. The areas of necrosis occurred irrespectively of the distance from the supplying vessel. Conclusions When designing the shape of the flap, the distribution of all perforators must be considered. The perforators need to be included in the area of prepared tissues because their location indicates the area with a more efficient network of vessels. PMID:25337153

  3. Assessment of the Sensitivity, Specificity, and Accuracy of Thermography in Identifying Patients with TMD

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Krzysztof; Szyszka-Sommerfeld, Liliana; Trybek, Grzegorz; Piątkowska, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of thermography in identifying patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Material/Methods The study sample consisted of 50 patients (27 women and 23 men) ages 19.2 to 24.5 years (mean age 22.43±1.04) with subjective symptoms of TMD (Ai II–III) and 50 patients (25 women and 25 men) ages 19.3 to 25.1 years (mean age 22.21±1.18) with no subjective symptoms of TMD (Ai I). The anamnestic interviews were conducted according to the three-point anamnestic index of temporomandibular dysfunction (Ai). The thermography was performed using a ThermaCAM TMSC500 (FLIR Systems AB, Sweden) independent thermal vision system. Thermography was closely combined with a 10-min chewing test. Results The results of our study indicated that the absolute difference in temperature between the right and left side (ΔT) has the highest diagnostic value. The diagnostic effectiveness of this parameter increased after the chewing test. The cut-off points for values of temperature differences between the right and left side and identifying 95.5% of subjects with no functional disorders according to the temporomandibular dysfunction index Di (specificity 95.5%) were 0.26°C (AUC=0.7422, sensitivity 44.3%, accuracy 52.4%) before the chewing test and 0.52°C (AUC=0.7920, sensitivity 46.4%, accuracy 56.3%) after it. Conclusions The evaluation of thermography demonstrated its diagnostic usefulness in identifying patients with TMD with limited effectiveness. The chewing test helped in increasing the diagnostic efficiency of thermography in identifying patients with TMD. PMID:26002613

  4. Skin vasomotor hemiparesis followed by overactivity: characteristic thermography findings in a patient with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We present a 21-year-old female with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction. In this patient, infrared thermography revealed a hemibody skin temperature increase followed by excessive focal decreases, indicating skin vasomotor hemiparesis and overactivity.

  5. Thermography in the follow up of the diabetic foot: best to weigh the enemy more mighty than he seems.

    PubMed

    Pafili, Kalliopi; Papanas, Nikolaos

    2015-03-01

    Thermography is being increasingly appreciated as a further modality contributing to the early detection of incipient tissue damage predisposing to diabetic foot ulceration in selected high-risk patients. Among currently available modalities, liquid crystal thermography and infrared thermography have been most widely used. The former is effective, but its main limitation is low sensitivity. The latter permits non-contact measurements at different angles of the foot, independent of the quality of the camera used. It has been suggested that 5-year use of such techniques for daily self-examination among high-risk patients may contribute to the significant reduction of diabetic foot complications. Clearly, further experience with thermography in the real-life setting is now very welcome.

  6. Spatially resolved determination of the short-circuit current density of silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Fabian Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan

    2014-05-19

    We present a spatially resolved method to determine the short-circuit current density of crystalline silicon solar cells by means of lock-in thermography. The method utilizes the property of crystalline silicon solar cells that the short-circuit current does not differ significantly from the illuminated current under moderate reverse bias. Since lock-in thermography images locally dissipated power density, this information is exploited to extract values of spatially resolved current density under short-circuit conditions. In order to obtain an accurate result, one or two illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image need to be recorded. The method can be simplified in a way that only one image is required to generate a meaningful short-circuit current density map. The proposed method is theoretically motivated, and experimentally validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  7. Finite element modeling of haptic thermography: A novel approach for brain tumor detection during minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Goughari, Moslem; Mojra, Afsaneh

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a novel neuroimaging method that can potentially locate tissue abnormalities and hence improves surgeon's diagnostic ability. In the present study, thermography technique coupled with artificial tactile sensing method called "haptic thermography" is utilized to investigate the presence of an abnormal object as a tumor with an elevated temperature relative to the normal tissue in the brain. The brain tissue is characterized as a hyper-viscoelastic material to be descriptive of mechanical behavior of the brain tissue during tactile palpation. Based on a finite element approach, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a patient diagnosed to have a brain tumor is utilized to simulate and analyze the capability of haptic thermography in detection and localization of brain tumor. Steady-state thermal results prove that temperature distribution is an appropriate outcome of haptic thermography for the superficial tumors while heat flux distribution can be used as an extra thermal result for deeply located tumors.

  8. CURVATURE EFFECT QUANTIFICATION FOR IN-VIVO IR THERMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Deng, Daxiang; Herman, Cila

    2013-01-01

    Medical Infrared (IR) Imaging has become an important diagnostic tool over recent years. However, one underlying problem in medical diagnostics is associated with accurate quantification of body surface temperatures. This problem is caused by the artifacts induced by the curvature of objects, which leads to inaccurate temperature mapping and biased diagnostic results. Therefore, in our study, an experiment-based analysis is conducted to address the curvature effects toward the 3D temperature reconstruction of the IR thermography image. For quantification purposes, an isothermal copper plate with flat surface, and a cylindrical metal container filled with water are imaged. For the flat surface, the tilting angle measured from camera axis was varied incrementally from 0° to 60 °, such that the effects of surface viewing angle and travel distance on the measured temperature can be explored. On the cylindrical curved surface, the points viewed from 0° to 90° with respect to the camera axis are simultaneously imaged at different temperature levels. The experimental data obtained for the flat surface indicate that both viewing angle and distance effects become noticeable for angles over 40 °. The travel distance contributes a minor change when compared with viewing angle. The experimental results from the curved surface indicate that the curvature effect becomes pronounced when the viewing angle is larger than 60 °. The measurement error on the curved surface is compared with the simulation using the non-dielectric model, and the normalized temperature difference relative to 0° viewing angle was analyzed at six temperature levels. These results indicate that the linear formula associated with directional emissivity is a reasonable approximation for the measurement error, and the normalized error curves change consistently with viewing angle at various temperatures. Therefore, the analysis in this study implies that the directional emissivity based on the non

  9. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  10. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  11. The Role of Infrared Thermography as a Non-Invasive Tool for the Detection of Lameness in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Alsaaod, Maher; Schaefer, Allan L.; Büscher, Wolfgang; Steiner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The use of infrared thermography for the identification of lameness in cattle has increased in recent years largely because of its non-invasive properties, ease of automation and continued cost reductions. Thermography can be used to identify and determine thermal abnormalities in animals by characterizing an increase or decrease in the surface temperature of their skin. The variation in superficial thermal patterns resulting from changes in blood flow in particular can be used to detect inflammation or injury associated with conditions such as foot lesions. Thermography has been used not only as a diagnostic tool, but also to evaluate routine farm management. Since 2000, 14 peer reviewed papers which discuss the assessment of thermography to identify and manage lameness in cattle have been published. There was a large difference in thermography performance in these reported studies. However, thermography was demonstrated to have utility for the detection of contralateral temperature difference and maximum foot temperature on areas of interest. Also apparent in these publications was that a controlled environment is an important issue that should be considered before image scanning. PMID:26094632

  12. The Role of Infrared Thermography as a Non-Invasive Tool for the Detection of Lameness in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Alsaaod, Maher; Schaefer, Allan L; Büscher, Wolfgang; Steiner, Adrian

    2015-06-18

    The use of infrared thermography for the identification of lameness in cattle has increased in recent years largely because of its non-invasive properties, ease of automation and continued cost reductions. Thermography can be used to identify and determine thermal abnormalities in animals by characterizing an increase or decrease in the surface temperature of their skin. The variation in superficial thermal patterns resulting from changes in blood flow in particular can be used to detect inflammation or injury associated with conditions such as foot lesions. Thermography has been used not only as a diagnostic tool, but also to evaluate routine farm management. Since 2000, 14 peer reviewed papers which discuss the assessment of thermography to identify and manage lameness in cattle have been published. There was a large difference in thermography performance in these reported studies. However, thermography was demonstrated to have utility for the detection of contralateral temperature difference and maximum foot temperature on areas of interest. Also apparent in these publications was that a controlled environment is an important issue that should be considered before image scanning.

  13. Integration of reflectances and thermography imagery for transport infrastructures diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatti, S.; Palombo, A.; Pascucci, S.; Santini, F.

    2012-04-01

    The integrated use of reflectances and thermography to study and diagnostic of transport infrastructures has been applied on the Musumeci Bridge (Potenza, Italy) test site as a fast and non-destructive tool in the framework of the Integrated System for Transport Infrastructures surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing (ISTIMES) project, funded by the European Commission in the frame of a joint Call "ICT and Security" of the Seventh Framework Programme, in order to extract appropriate information and make useful decisions [1]. The applied hyperspectral imagery is primarily suited for the detection and characterization of alterations and defects in the structures' surface, whereas by means of thermography it is possible to attain near real-time information about the internal structure such as a bridge. Hyperspectral data is able to discriminate materials on the basis of their different patterns of wavelength-specific absorption; in fact, they are successfully used for identifying minerals and rocks, as well as detecting surface materials properties [2]. For this study we used the HySpex VNIR-1600 and the SWIR-320 hyperspectral scanners (see details in Table 1) located beneath the Musmeci Bridge thus being able to acquire the structure. The hyperspectral data processing has allowed to derive indication/parameters related to the status of the structure surface, i.e. by means of the detection of the surface weathering status of the iron (i.e. iron oxides such as limonite/goethite) used to reinforce the cement structure and the occurring detachments of the cement covering the iron. This assessment can be used to foresee more severe damages of the armed concrete. Concerning the rationale for using a high sensitivity Infrared camera in the MWIR range (3.5-5 micron; see Table 1) for the Musumeci test site is based on the fact that the high radiometric resolution of the thermal images time series allows analyzing the structure homogeneity and the cohesion of

  14. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  15. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic, altimetry, and other data types with ocean...of acoustic coherence at long ranges in the ocean. Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic...index.html Award Number N00014-13-1-0053 LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate limitations to the performance of long-range sonar are due to ocean sound speed

  16. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine

  17. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  18. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  19. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  20. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  1. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  2. Depth-Penetrating Luminescence Thermography of Thermal- Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    A thermographic method has been developed for measuring temperatures at predetermined depths within dielectric material layers . especially thermal-barrier coatings. This method will help satisfy a need for noncontact measurement of through-the-thickness temperature gradients for evaluating the effectiveness of thermal- barrier coatings designed to prevent overheating of turbine blades, combustor liners, and other engine parts. Heretofore, thermography has been limited to measurement of surface and near-surface temperatures. In the thermographic method that is the immediate predecessor of the present method, a thermographic phosphor is applied to the outer surface of a thermal barrier coating, luminescence in the phosphor is excited by illuminating the phosphor at a suitable wavelength, and either the time dependence of the intensity of luminescence or the intensities of luminescence spectral lines is measured. Then an emissivity-independent surface-temperature value is computed by use of either the known temperature dependence of the luminescence decay time or the known temperature dependence of ratios between intensities of selected luminescence spectral lines. Until now, depth-penetrating measurements have not been possible because light of the wavelengths needed to excite phosphors could not penetrate thermal-barrier coating materials to useful depths. In the present method as in the method described above, one exploits the temperature dependence of luminescence decay time. In this case, the phosphor is incorporated into the thermal-barrier coat at the depth at which temperature is to be measured. To be suitable for use in this method, a phosphor must (1) exhibit a temperature dependence of luminescence decay time in the desired range, (2) be thermochemically compatible with the thermal-barrier coating, and (3) exhibit at least a minor excitation spectral peak and an emission spectral peak, both peaks being at wavelengths at which the thermal-barrier coating is

  3. Infrared thermography and ultrasonics to evaluate composite materials for aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Boffa, N. D.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Maio, L.; Meola, C.; Ricci, F.

    2015-11-01

    The attention of this paper is focused on the suitability of two techniques: infrared thermography and ultrasonics to evaluate impact damaged carbon/epoxy specimens. The obtained results are compared by highlighting advantages and disadvantages of each technique, as well their limits in view of an integrated use. In this context, a crucial task may be to assess the extension of delamination caused by an impact event, which may ask one to guess between sound and damaged materials at the edge of the instrument background noise. To help fixing this problem, results obtained with either lock-in thermography, or an ultrasonic phased array system, are analysed with the aid of thermographic data collected during impact tests.

  4. Electromagnetic Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation: Physics-based Modeling and Pattern Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Tian, Gui Yun

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic mechanism of Joule heating and thermal conduction on conductive material characterization broadens their scope for implementation in real thermography based Nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) systems by imparting sensitivity, conformability and allowing fast and imaging detection, which is necessary for efficiency. The issue of automatic material evaluation has not been fully addressed by researchers and it marks a crucial first step to analyzing the structural health of the material, which in turn sheds light on understanding the production of the defects mechanisms. In this study, we bridge the gap between the physics world and mathematical modeling world. We generate physics-mathematical modeling and mining route in the spatial-, time-, frequency-, and sparse-pattern domains. This is a significant step towards realizing the deeper insight in electromagnetic thermography (EMT) and automatic defect identification. This renders the EMT a promising candidate for the highly efficient and yet flexible NDT&E.

  5. Modeling of the ITER-like wide-angle infrared thermography view of JET

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeunier, M.-H.; Firdaouss, M.; Travere, J.-M.; Loarer, T.; Gauthier, E.; Martin, V.; Chabaud, D.; Humbert, E.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography systems are mandatory to ensure safe plasma operation in fusion devices. However, IR measurements are made much more complicated in metallic environment because of the spurious contributions of the reflected fluxes. This paper presents a full predictive photonic simulation able to assess accurately the surface temperature measurement with classical IR thermography from a given plasma scenario and by taking into account the optical properties of PFCs materials. This simulation has been carried out the ITER-like wide angle infrared camera view of JET in comparing with experimental data. The consequences and the effects of the low emissivity and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function used in the model for the metallic PFCs on the contribution of the reflected flux in the analysis are discussed.

  6. Active thermography inspection of protective glass contamination on laser scanning heads.

    PubMed

    Skala, J; Svantner, M; Tesar, J; Franc, A

    2016-12-01

    Industrial lasers are an expanding technology of welding and other materials processing. Lasers with optical scanning heads are often used, as these provide more versatility, accuracy, and speed. The output part of the scanning head is covered by a protective glass, which might get contaminated by various particles from the laser processing. This decreases the transmissivity of the glass, and it can affect the production quality. The contamination needs to be checked regularly, but a visual inspection might not always be effective. This paper proposes two alternative methods of inspecting the protective glass: flash-pulse active thermography, and laser active thermography. They are based on the thermal excitation of the glass and measuring the response with an infrared camera. The experimental setup and practical results are described and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The presented methods are proven to be effective in detecting the contamination of the glass.

  7. Reconstruction of a nonlinear heat transfer law from uncomplete boundary data by means of infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarelli, Fabrizio; Inglese, Gabriele

    2016-11-01

    Heat exchange between a conducting plate and the environment is described here by means of an unknown nonlinear function F of the temperature u. In this paper we construct a method for recovering F by means of polynomial expansion, perturbation theory and the toolbox of thermal inverse problems. We test our method on two examples: In the first one, we heat the plate (initially at 20 ^\\circ {{C}}) from one side, read the temperature on the same side and identify the heat exchange law on the opposite side (active thermography); in the second example we measure the temperature of one side of the plate (initially at 1500 ^\\circ {{C}}) and study the heat exchange while cooling (passive thermography).

  8. Intra-Examiner and Inter-Examiner Reproducibility of Paraspinal Thermography

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Matthew; Campbell, Ismay; Stone, Pamela; Fedorchuk, Curtis; Wijayawardana, Sameera; Easley, Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the intra-examiner and inter-examiner reproducibility of paraspinal thermography using an infrared scanner. Materials and Methods The thermal functions of a commercially available infrared scanner (Insight Subluxation Station®) were evaluated for clinical reliability. Two practicing clinicians conducted the measures on 100 subjects. Intra class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were calculated from the collected data. Results Mean bilateral paraspinal skin temperature was 89.78° F and ranged from 88.77° F to 91.43° F. Intra class correlation coefficients (ICCs) for agreement and consistency ranged from 0.959 to 0.976. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) ranged from 0.783 to 0.859 with tight confidence intervals indicating robust estimates of these quantities. Conclusion This study revealed excellent intra-examiner and inter-examiner reproducibility of paraspinal thermography using a commercially available unit. PMID:21347290

  9. Thickness determination of polymeric multilayer surface protection systems for concrete by means of pulse thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenburg, S. J.; Krankenhagen, R.; Bavendiek, F.

    2017-02-01

    For thickness determination of polymer based surface protection systems for concrete surfaces, so far only destructive measurement techniques are available. Pulse thermography appears to be well suited for non-destructive thickness evaluation in these systems. Here, we present first results of the development of a respective measurement and analysis procedure. Since surface protection systems consist of a number of layers, a model for the calculation of the surface temperature of a multi-layer structure on a semi-infinite (concrete) substrate in pulse thermography setup was developed. It considers semitransparency of the upmost layer and thermal losses at the surface. It also supports the use of an arbitrary temporal shape of the heating pulse to properly describe the measurement conditions for different heat sources. Simulations for one and three layers on the substrate are presented and first results from fitting the model to experimental data for thickness determination and verification of the model are presented.

  10. Electromagnetic Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation: Physics-based Modeling and Pattern Mining

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Tian, Gui Yun

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic mechanism of Joule heating and thermal conduction on conductive material characterization broadens their scope for implementation in real thermography based Nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) systems by imparting sensitivity, conformability and allowing fast and imaging detection, which is necessary for efficiency. The issue of automatic material evaluation has not been fully addressed by researchers and it marks a crucial first step to analyzing the structural health of the material, which in turn sheds light on understanding the production of the defects mechanisms. In this study, we bridge the gap between the physics world and mathematical modeling world. We generate physics-mathematical modeling and mining route in the spatial-, time-, frequency-, and sparse-pattern domains. This is a significant step towards realizing the deeper insight in electromagnetic thermography (EMT) and automatic defect identification. This renders the EMT a promising candidate for the highly efficient and yet flexible NDT&E. PMID:27158061

  11. A Novel Method for Extracting Respiration Rate and Relative Tidal Volume from Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gregory F.; Gatto, Rodolfo G.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In psychophysiological research, measurement of respiration has been dependent on transducers having direct contact with the participant. The current study provides empirical data demonstrating that a noncontact technology, infrared video thermography, can accurately estimate breathing rate and relative tidal volume across a range of breathing patterns. Video tracking algorithms were applied to frame-by-frame thermal images of the face to extract time series of nostril temperature and to generate breath-by-breath measures of respiration rate and relative tidal volume. The thermal indices of respiration were contrasted with criterion measures collected with inductance plethysmography. The strong correlations observed between the technologies demonstrate the potential use of facial video thermography as a noncontact technology to monitor respiration. PMID:21214587

  12. Evaluation of the Diagnostic Power of Thermography in Breast Cancer Using Bayesian Network Classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Nicandro, Cruz-Ramírez; Efrén, Mezura-Montes; María Yaneli, Ameca-Alducin; Enrique, Martín-Del-Campo-Mena; Héctor Gabriel, Acosta-Mesa; Nancy, Pérez-Castro; Alejandro, Guerra-Hernández; Guillermo de Jesús, Hoyos-Rivera; Rocío Erandi, Barrientos-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. There are a number of techniques used for diagnosing this disease: mammography, ultrasound, and biopsy, among others. Each of these has well-known advantages and disadvantages. A relatively new method, based on the temperature a tumor may produce, has recently been explored: thermography. In this paper, we will evaluate the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers. We will show how the information provided by the thermal image can be used in order to characterize patients suspected of having cancer. Our main contribution is the proposal of a score, based on the aforementioned information, that could help distinguish sick patients from healthy ones. Our main results suggest the potential of this technique in such a goal but also show its main limitations that have to be overcome to consider it as an effective diagnosis complementary tool. PMID:23762182

  13. Electromagnetic Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation: Physics-based Modeling and Pattern Mining.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Tian, Gui Yun

    2016-05-09

    Electromagnetic mechanism of Joule heating and thermal conduction on conductive material characterization broadens their scope for implementation in real thermography based Nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) systems by imparting sensitivity, conformability and allowing fast and imaging detection, which is necessary for efficiency. The issue of automatic material evaluation has not been fully addressed by researchers and it marks a crucial first step to analyzing the structural health of the material, which in turn sheds light on understanding the production of the defects mechanisms. In this study, we bridge the gap between the physics world and mathematical modeling world. We generate physics-mathematical modeling and mining route in the spatial-, time-, frequency-, and sparse-pattern domains. This is a significant step towards realizing the deeper insight in electromagnetic thermography (EMT) and automatic defect identification. This renders the EMT a promising candidate for the highly efficient and yet flexible NDT&E.

  14. Quantitative detection of defects based on Markov-PCA-BP algorithm using pulsed infrared thermography technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingju; Dai, Jingmin; Liu, Junyan; Liu, Chunsheng; Liu, Yuanlin; Ren, Chunping

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative detection of debonding defects' diameter and depth in TBCs has been carried out using pulsed infrared thermography technology. By combining principal component analysis with neural network theory, the Markov-PCA-BP algorithm was proposed. The principle and realization process of the proposed algorithm was described. In the prediction model, the principal components which can reflect most characteristics of the thermal wave signal were set as the input, and the defect depth and diameter was set as the output. The experimental data from pulsed infrared thermography tests of TBCs with flat bottom hole defects was selected as the training and testing sample. Markov-PCA-BP predictive system was arrived, based on which both the defect depth and diameter were identified accurately, which proved the effectiveness of the proposed method for quantitative detection of debonding defects in TBCs.

  15. Quantitative analysis of pulse thermography data for degradation assessment of historical buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Mancini, Cecilia; Chiapparino, Antonella

    2015-06-01

    In the last decades, infrared thermography has been successfully applied to various materials and structures for the assessment of their state of conservation and planning suitable restoration works. To this aim, mathematical models are required to characterize thermal anomaly sources, such as detachments, water infiltration and material decomposition processes. In this paper, an algorithm based on the conservative finite difference method is used to analyse pulse thermography data acquired on an ancient building in the Pompeii archaeological site (Naples, Italy). The numerical study is applied to both broad and narrow elongated thermal anomalies. In particular, from the comparison between simulated and experimental thermal decays, the plaster thickness was characterized in terms of thermal properties and areas of possible future detachments, and moisture infiltration depths were identified.

  16. Intraoperative imaging of cortical cerebral perfusion by time-resolved thermography and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Gerald; Sobottka, Stephan B; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to cortical perfusion imaging is demonstrated using high-sensitivity thermography in conjunction with multivariate statistical data analysis. Local temperature changes caused by a cold bolus are imaged and transferred to a false color image. A cold bolus of 10 ml saline at ice temperature is injected systemically via a central venous access. During the injection, a sequence of 735 thermographic images are recorded within 2 min. The recorded data cube is subjected to a principal component analysis (PCA) to select slight changes of the cortical temperature caused by the cold bolus. PCA reveals that 11 s after injection the temperature of blood vessels is shortly decreased followed by an increase to the temperature before the cold bolus is injected. We demonstrate the potential of intraoperative thermography in combination with multivariate data analysis to image cortical cerebral perfusion without any markers. We provide the first in vivo application of multivariate thermographic imaging.

  17. Visualizing and measuring the temperature field produced by medical diagnostic ultrasound using thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachutka, J.; Grec, P.; Mornstein, V.; Caruana, C. J.

    2008-11-01

    The heating of tissues by diagnostic ultrasound can pose a significant hazard particularly in the imaging of the unborn child. The demonstration of the temperature field in tissue is therefore an important objective in the teaching of biomedical physics to healthcare professionals. The temperature field in a soft tissue model was made visible and measured using thermography. Temperature data from the images were used to investigate the dependence of temperature increase within the model on ultrasound exposure time and distance from the transducer. The experiment will be used within a multi-professional biomedical physics teaching laboratory for enhancing learning regarding the principles of thermography and the thermal effects of ultrasound to medical and healthcare students and also for demonstrating the quantitative use of thermographic imaging to students of biophysics, medical physics and medical technology.

  18. Thermography-Applications To The Manufacture And Nondestructive Characterization Of Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneke, E. G.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Shuford, R. J.; Hinton, Y. L.; Markert, B. R.

    1983-03-01

    The increasing use of composite materials in military and commercial aircraft requires the development of improved quality control and nondestructive inspection techniques to assure their structural integrity and reliability. Infrared thermography is particularly useful for rapid scanning and detection of manufacturing inhomogeneities and inservice damage states in composites. The relationship between the surface thermal patterns and the interior damage is governed by the type of damage, thermal conductivity of the material and the distance between the surface and the damaged region. Applications of real-time thermography as a quality control technique for processing fiber reinforced composites, and as a nondestructive technique for monitoring growth and development of defects in composite laminates and rotor blades during low-frequency, high amplitude fatigue tests will be discussed. Applications of high frequency vibrothermography for characterizing composite structures will also be presented. This latter technique involves the use of high-frequency, low amplitude ultrasonic excitation of a sample.

  19. Assessment of techniques of massage and pumping in the treatment of breast engorgement by thermography

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Anita Batista dos Santos; de Moura, Marcos Antônio Muniz; de Souza, Mauren Abreu; Nohama, Percy

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate techniques of massage and pumping in the treatment of postpartum breast engorgement through thermography. Method the study was conducted in the Human Milk Bank of a hospital in Curitiba, Brazil. We randomly selected 16 lactating women with engorgement with the classification lobar, ampullary and glandular, moderate and intense. We compared the differential patterns of temperature, before and after the treatment by means of massage and pumping. Results we found a negative gradient of 0.3°C of temperature between the pre- and post-treatment in the experimental group. Breasts with intense engorgement were 0.7°C warmer when compared with moderate engorgement. Conclusion massage and electromechanical pumping were superior to manual methods when evaluated by thermography. REBEC: U1111-1136-9027. PMID:26107836

  20. Evaluation of the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers.

    PubMed

    Nicandro, Cruz-Ramírez; Efrén, Mezura-Montes; María Yaneli, Ameca-Alducin; Enrique, Martín-Del-Campo-Mena; Héctor Gabriel, Acosta-Mesa; Nancy, Pérez-Castro; Alejandro, Guerra-Hernández; Guillermo de Jesús, Hoyos-Rivera; Rocío Erandi, Barrientos-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. There are a number of techniques used for diagnosing this disease: mammography, ultrasound, and biopsy, among others. Each of these has well-known advantages and disadvantages. A relatively new method, based on the temperature a tumor may produce, has recently been explored: thermography. In this paper, we will evaluate the diagnostic power of thermography in breast cancer using Bayesian network classifiers. We will show how the information provided by the thermal image can be used in order to characterize patients suspected of having cancer. Our main contribution is the proposal of a score, based on the aforementioned information, that could help distinguish sick patients from healthy ones. Our main results suggest the potential of this technique in such a goal but also show its main limitations that have to be overcome to consider it as an effective diagnosis complementary tool.

  1. Is it possible to revive the flagging interest in thermography for neurology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stulin, Igor D.

    1993-11-01

    The paper describes the results of twenty-years of experience in applying thermography (thermal imaging) in routine and urgent neurology, based on the study of more than ten thousand patients. Stress is laid on the fact that thermography is of great significance for diagnosing dextrocerebral hemorrhagic insult with a manifestation of pronounced hemihypothermia in the paralyzed limbs, identifying paraorbital hyperthermia on the side of rhinogenous cerebral abscess, for instrumental registration of transitory heat-up of the nasolabial region in the case of patients suffering from hypertensive nasal bleeding. Much attention is given to diagnosis of intra- and extracerebral phlebopathy in urgent neurology -- early diagnosis of iatrogenic catheterization phlebitis, interference with the venous return in the paralyzed lower limb. The novelty here is the employment of telethermography for complex diagnosis of cerebral death.

  2. Usefulness of high-resolution thermography in fault diagnosis of fluid power components and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietola, Matti; Varrio, Jukka P.

    1996-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been used routinely in industrial applications for quite a long time. For example, the condition of electric power lines, district heating networks, electric circuits and components, heat exchangers, pipes and its insulations, cooling towers, and various machines and motors is monitored using infrared imaging techniques. Also the usage of this technology in predictive maintenance has proved successful, mainly because of effective computers and tailored softwares available. However, the usage of thermal sensing technique in fluid power systems and components (or other automation systems in fact) is not as common. One apparent reason is that a fluid power circuit is not (and nor is a hydraulic component) an easy object of making thermal image analyses. Especially the high flow speed, fast pressure changes and fast movements make the diagnosis complex and difficult. Also the number of people whose knowledge is good both in thermography and fluid power systems is not significant. In this paper a preliminary study of how thermography could be used in the condition monitoring, fault diagnosis and predictive maintenance of fluid power components and systems is presented. The shortages and limitations of thermal imaging in the condition monitoring of fluid power are also discussed. Among many other cases the following is discussed: (1) pressure valves (leakage, wrong settings), (2) check valves (leakage); (3) cylinders (leakage and other damages); (4) directional valves and valve assemblies; (5) pumps and motors (leakage in piston or control plate, bearings). The biggest advantage of using thermography in the predictive maintenance and fault diagnosis of fluid power components and systems could be achieved in the process industry and perhaps in the commissioning of fluid power systems in the industry. In the industry the predictive maintenance of fluid power with the aid of an infrared camera could be done as part of a condition monitoring of

  3. Monitoring of microvascular free flaps following oropharyngeal reconstruction using infrared thermography: first clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Just, Maren; Chalopin, Claire; Unger, Michael; Halama, Dirk; Neumuth, Thomas; Dietz, Andreas; Fischer, Miloš

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate static and dynamic infrared (IR) thermography for intra- and postoperative free-flap monitoring following oropharyngeal reconstruction. Sixteen patients with oropharyngeal reconstruction by free radial forearm flap were included in this prospective, clinical study (05/2013-08/2014). Prior ("intraop_pre") and following ("intraop_post") completion of the microvascular anastomoses, IR thermography was performed for intraoperative flap monitoring. Further IR images were acquired one day ("postop_1") and 10 days ("postop_10") after surgery for postoperative flap monitoring. Of the 16, 15 transferred free radial forearm flaps did not show any perfusion failure. A significant decreasing mean temperature difference (∆T: temperature difference between the flap surface and the surrounding tissue in Kelvin) was measured at all investigation points in comparison with the temperature difference at "intraop_pre" (mean values on all patients: ∆T intraop_pre = -2.64 K; ∆T intraop_post = -1.22 K, p < 0.0015; ∆T postop_1 = -0.54 K, p < 0.0001; ∆T postop_10 = -0.58 K, p < 0.0001). Intraoperative dynamic IR thermography showed typical pattern of non-pathological rewarming due to re-established flap perfusion after completion of the microvascular anastomoses. Static and dynamic IR thermography is a promising, objective method for intraoperative and postoperative monitoring of free-flap reconstructions in head and neck surgery and to detect perfusion failure, before macroscopic changes in the tissue surface are obvious. A lack of significant decrease of the temperature difference compared to surrounding tissue following completion of microvascular anastomoses and an atypical rewarming following a thermal challenge are suggestive of flap perfusion failure.

  4. Neonatal infrared thermography imaging: Analysis of heat flux during different clinical scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas K.; Heimann, Konrad; Blazek, Vladimir; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-11-01

    IntroductionAn accurate skin temperature measurement of Neonatal Infrared Thermography (NIRT) imaging requires an appropriate calibration process for compensation of external effects (e.g. variation of environmental temperature, variable air velocity or humidity). Although modern infrared cameras can perform such calibration, an additional compensation is required for highly accurate thermography. This compensation which corrects any temperature drift should occur during the NIRT imaging process. We introduce a compensation technique which is based on modeling the physical interactions within the measurement scene and derived the detected temperature signal of the object. Materials and methodsIn this work such compensation was performed for different NIRT imaging application in neonatology (e.g. convective incubators, kangaroo mother care (KMC), and an open radiant warmer). The spatially distributed temperatures of 12 preterm infants (average gestation age 31 weeks) were measured under these different infant care arrangements (i.e. closed care system like a convective incubator, and open care system like kangaroo mother care, and open radiant warmer). ResultsAs errors in measurement of temperature were anticipated, a novel compensation method derived from infrared thermography of the neonate's skin was developed. Moreover, the differences in temperature recording for the 12 preterm infants varied from subject to subject. This variation could be arising from individual experimental setting applied to the same region of interest over the neonate's body. The experimental results for the model-based corrections is verified over the selected patient group. ConclusionThe proposed technique relies on applying model-based correction to the measured temperature and reducing extraneous errors during NIRT. This application specific method is based on different heat flux compartments present in neonatal thermography scene. Furthermore, these results are considered to be

  5. Coupling IR Thermography and BIA to analyse body reaction after one acupuncture session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquemal, M.

    2013-04-01

    Coupling both thermography and bio-Impedance, some biophysical acupuncture mechanisms are statically studied on a small population of 18 subjects. Results show that a possible way of understanding acupuncture, in an electrical way, should be to consider ionic flux redistribution between vascular and extra cell compartments. This is a two steps mechanism. The first one is starting with needles insertion and the second one is lasting with more intensity after removing them from skin.

  6. Advances in the Use of Thermography to Inspect Composite Tanks for Liquid Fuel Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Jones, Clyde S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of advances in the use of thermography to inspect composite tanks for liquid fuel propulsion systems. Details are given on the thermographic inspection system, thermographic analysis method (includes scan and defect map, method of inspection, and inclusions, ply wrinkle, and delamination defects), graphite composite cryogenic feedline (including method, image map, and deep/shallow inclusions and resin rich area defects), and material degradation nondestructive evaluation.

  7. Detection and Characterization of Boundary-Layer Transition in Flight at Supersonic Conditions Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a powerful tool for investigating fluid mechanics on flight vehicles. (Can be used to visualize and characterize transition, shock impingement, separation etc.). Updated onboard F-15 based system was used to visualize supersonic boundary layer transition test article. (Tollmien-Schlichting and cross-flow dominant flow fields). Digital Recording improves image quality and analysis capability. (Allows accurate quantitative (temperature) measurements, Greater enhancement through image processing allows analysis of smaller scale phenomena).

  8. Infrared dermal thermography on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Klein, Marvin E.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to lower extremity amputation, which imposes a major burden to society and great loss in health-related quality of life for patients. Early identification and subsequent preventive treatment have proven useful to limit the incidence of foot ulcers and lower extremity amputation. Thus, the development of new diagnosis tools has become an attractive option. The ultimate objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for frequent examination on patients' feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. Inflammation in diabetic feet can be an early and predictive warning sign for ulceration, and temperature has been proven to be a vicarious marker for inflammation. Studies have indicated that infrared dermal thermography of foot soles can be one of the important parameters for assessing the risk of diabetic foot ulceration. This paper covers the feasibility study of using an infrared camera, FLIR SC305, in our setup, to acquire the spatial thermal distribution on the feet soles. With the obtained thermal images, automated detection through image analysis was performed to identify the abnormal increased/decreased temperature and assess the risk for ulceration. The thermography for feet soles of patients with diagnosed diabetic foot complications were acquired before the ordinary foot examinations. Assessment from clinicians and thermography were compared and follow-up measurements were performed to investigate the prediction. A preliminary case study will be presented, indicating that dermal thermography in our proposed setup can be a screening modality to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration.

  9. Endoscopic Shearography and Thermography Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation of Lined Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Lansing, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this research effort was the development of methods for shearographic and thermographic inspection of coatings, bonds, or laminates inside rocket fuel or oxidizer tanks, fuel lines, and other closed structures. The endoscopic methods allow imaging and inspection inside cavities that are traditionally inaccessible with shearography or thermography cameras. The techniques are demonstrated and suggestions for practical application are made in this report. Drawings of the experimental setups, detailed procedures, and experimental data are included.

  10. Early events in plant hypersensitive response leaves revealed by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccara, Martine; Boue, Christine; De Paepe, Rosine; Boccara, Albert C.

    2001-10-01

    Infrared thermography is used to reveal the establishment of Erwinia amylovora harpin-induced hypersensitive response (HR) in Nicotiana sylvestris leaves. We observed a decrease in temperature (1-2 degree(s)C) in the harpin infiltrated zone, correlated with an increase in stomatal opening, strongly suggesting that the temperature decrease is due to higher transpiration rate. IRT experiments were conducted in a laboratory environment and could be widely applied for genotype screening and monitoring drug effects.

  11. A combined approach for using thermography for the detection of diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Bob

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents work done to develop an early diagnosis and monitoring method-encompassing thermography for the detection of Diabetes Mellitus. The early detection method involves fusion of images from infrared cameras, ultrasound devices, a 3D camera and a dermatascope. The project is to develop a novel system that could be easily used by physicians to allow for early intervention, and the paper highlights the approach taken by the Skindetector project.

  12. Evaluation of the limit of acceptable damage for leather products using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Phong M.

    1999-02-01

    The paper aims to illustrate three advantages of IR thermography as a nondestructive, noncontact and real time technique, (a) to observe the progressive damage processes and mechanisms of leather failure, and (b) to detect the occurrence of intrinsic dissipation localization. The parameter, investigated in this paper, is the heat generation due to intrinsic dissipation caused by inelasticity and/or inelasticity of leather. It readily describes the damage location and the failure evolution of leather for sport foot-wear.

  13. [Application possibilities of modern thermography--first experience with the new Tomey TG 1000].

    PubMed

    Klamann, M K J; Klein, J P; Maier, A-K B; Gonnermann, J; Pleyer, U

    2011-06-01

    Temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of tissue metabolism and is certainly of major interest to investigate ocular physiology. Current instrumentation offers the potential to measure the ocular surface temperature (OST) with high accuracy and resolution. Potential applications of OST measurement may include any condition of the ocular surface. The present study gives a survey of the possible applications of thermography and describes our first experience with the new Tomey TG 1000.

  14. Application of Pyrometry and IR-Thermography to High Surface Temperature Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Division in Cologne Porz-Wahnheide, Linder H6he D-51147 Cologne, Germany Summary d distance E energy In this document the non- intrusive temperature...interaction with the supersonic Some main parameters of the thermal radiation are flow, non- intrusive temperature measurement tech- defined below [1...ing a time duration dt into a hemisphere: well. S= dW / dt [W /m2]. (1) IR-thermography and pyrometry are two well de- veloped non- intrusive techniques

  15. Biomechanical stress maps of an artificial femur obtained using a new infrared thermography technique validated by strain gages.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suraj; Bougherara, Habiba; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad

    2012-12-01

    Femurs are the heaviest, longest, and strongest long bones in the human body and are routinely subjected to cyclic forces. Strain gages are commonly employed to experimentally validate finite element models of the femur in order to generate 3D stresses, yet there is little information on a relatively new infrared (IR) thermography technique now available for biomechanics applications. In this study, IR thermography validated with strain gages was used to measure the principal stresses in the artificial femur model from Sawbones (Vashon, WA, USA) increasingly being used for biomechanical research. The femur was instrumented with rosette strain gages and mechanically tested using average axial cyclic forces of 1500 N, 1800 N, and 2100 N, representing 3 times body weight for a 50 kg, 60 kg, and 70 kg person. The femur was oriented at 7° of adduction to simulate the single-legged stance phase of walking. Stress maps were also obtained using an IR thermography camera. Results showed good agreement of IR thermography vs. strain gage data with a correlation of R(2)=0.99 and a slope=1.08 for the straight line of best fit. IR thermography detected the highest principal stresses on the superior-posterior side of the neck, which yielded compressive values of -91.2 MPa (at 1500 N), -96.0 MPa (at 1800 N), and -103.5 MPa (at 2100 N). There was excellent correlation between IR thermography principal stress vs. axial cyclic force at 6 locations on the femur on the lateral (R(2)=0.89-0.99), anterior (R(2)=0.87-0.99), and posterior (R(2)=0.81-0.99) sides. This study shows IR thermography's potential for future biomechanical applications.

  16. Analyzing changes in the beef cattle ranching communities of acatic and tepatitlan de morelos, jalisco, Mexico related to land cover and climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevino-Pena, Melva B.

    The impacts of climate change on the environment at the global scale can be determined through the use of large-scale circulation models; however, the results from these models are difficult to interpret at the regional or local levels. Regional vulnerability analyses consider the knowledge of locals, which may provide insight into the effects of climate variability on the environment at smaller scales, and most importantly, the effects that these developments are having on society. The objective of this research was to analyze the vulnerability to climate variability of the beef cattle ranching communities of the municipalities of Acatic and of Tepatitlan de Morelos, Jalisco, Mexico. These municipalities are found in a region of the state referred to as "Los Altos". The economy of Los Altos largely relies on agricultural and farming practices; these sectors provide the largest source of employment in the area. In the two municipalities that comprise the study area, the beef cattle industry is one of the strongest economic activities. Climate variability poses great threat on these communities because the main economic activities of the region are highly dependent on natural resources. To have a better understanding of the human-environment interactions in this region, remote sensing methods were applied. Three Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images (years: 1985, 1993 and 2000) were employed to generate land use and land cover classification maps of the study area; these maps were then subjected to a change detections analysis. Some of the land use and land cover categories experienced more change than others; among those was the category of water, shrub land and crop land. The area covered by water nearly doubled from 1985 to 1993 and then nearly decreased by half by the year 2000. From 1985 to 1993, here was a decrease in the shrub land of about 1200 ha and concurrently an increase in the crop land of about 1400 ha. From 1993 to 2000 there was an increase in the

  17. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  18. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  19. Infrared Thermography to Evaluate Heat Tolerance in Different Genetic Groups of Lambs

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Concepta; Bianchini, Eliandra; Paim, Tiago do Prado; de Lima, Flavia Gontijo; Braccini Neto, José; Castanheira, Marlos; Esteves, Geisa Isilda Ferreira; Cardoso, Caio Cesar; Dalcin, Vanessa Calderaro

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress is considered a limiting factor for sheep production. We used information from physiological characteristics linked to heat tolerance to determine whether infrared thermography temperatures were able to separate groups of animals and determine the most important variables in this differentiation. Forty-eight four-month-old male lambs from eight genetic groups were used. Physiological (rectal temperature–RT, heart rate–HR, respiratory rate–RR) and blood traits, infrared thermography temperatures, heat tolerance indices, body measurements, weight and carcass traits were measured. Statistical analyses included variance, correlations, factor, discrimination and regression. Observing the correlations between physiological characteristics (RT, RR and HR) with temperatures measured by infrared thermography, regions for further studies should include the mean temperature of flank, nose and rump. Results show that there are strong relationships between thermograph measurements and RR, RT and HR in lambs, which are suggested to be directly correlated with heat tolerance capacity of the different genetic groups evaluated in this study. The assessment of body surface temperature measured by the thermograph could be used as a noninvasive tool to assess heat tolerance of the animals. PMID:26193274

  20. Development of nondestructive crack inspection technique for conveyance roll using vibro-thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Daisuke; Nishina, Yoshiaki; Yoshinaga, Youichi

    2012-06-01

    In recent study, active thermography has reached a high status as an easy and speedy defects inspection method in a NDT field. This paper newly proposes a non-disassembly and non-contact NDT method using the Vibro-Thermography for detecting and evaluating of fatigue cracks at neck parts of the conveyance roll in the steel making plant. In this method, fatigue cracks are detected as localized high temperature areas caused by friction and impact at crack surfaces with an infrared thermography, applying a high-amplitude ultrasonic vibration. In the case of the roll surface is covered with lubricating grease or dust, the crack detectability is shown. Self reference lock-in data processing technique is applied for improvement of signal noise ratio in the crack detection process. This technique makes it possible to perform correlating process without an external reference signal. Time and cost saving inspection method in the neck part of conveyance roll is carried out using this NDT technique.

  1. Infrared thermography based on artificial intelligence for carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jesensek Papez, B; Palfy, M; Turk, Z

    2008-01-01

    Thermography for the measurement of surface temperatures is well known in industry, although is not established in medicine despite its safety, lack of pain and invasiveness, easy reproducibility, and low running costs. Promising results have been achieved in nerve entrapment syndromes, although thermography has never represented a real alternative to electromyography. Here an attempt is described to improve the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome with thermography using a computer-based system employing artificial neural networks to analyse the images. Method reliability was tested on 112 images (depicting the dorsal and palmar sides of 26 healthy and 30 pathological hands), with the hand divided into 12 segments and compared relative to a reference. Palmar segments appeared to have no beneficial influence on classification outcome, whereas dorsal segments gave improved outcome with classification success rates near to or over 80%, and finger segments influenced by the median nerve appeared to be of greatest importance. These are preliminary results from a limited number of images and further research will be undertaken as our image database grows.

  2. Infrared Thermography to Evaluate Heat Tolerance in Different Genetic Groups of Lambs.

    PubMed

    McManus, Concepta; Bianchini, Eliandra; Paim, Tiago do Prado; de Lima, Flavia Gontijo; Neto, José Braccini; Castanheira, Marlos; Esteves, Geisa Isilda Ferreira; Cardoso, Caio Cesar; Dalcin, Vanessa Calderaro

    2015-07-16

    Heat stress is considered a limiting factor for sheep production. We used information from physiological characteristics linked to heat tolerance to determine whether infrared thermography temperatures were able to separate groups of animals and determine the most important variables in this differentiation. Forty-eight four-month-old male lambs from eight genetic groups were used. Physiological (rectal temperature-RT, heart rate-HR, respiratory rate-RR) and blood traits, infrared thermography temperatures, heat tolerance indices, body measurements, weight and carcass traits were measured. Statistical analyses included variance, correlations, factor, discrimination and regression. Observing the correlations between physiological characteristics (RT, RR and HR) with temperatures measured by infrared thermography, regions for further studies should include the mean temperature of flank, nose and rump. Results show that there are strong relationships between thermograph measurements and RR, RT and HR in lambs, which are suggested to be directly correlated with heat tolerance capacity of the different genetic groups evaluated in this study. The assessment of body surface temperature measured by the thermograph could be used as a noninvasive tool to assess heat tolerance of the animals.

  3. Scanning induction thermography (SIT) for imaging damages in carbon-fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. Renil; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Scanning Induction Thermography (SIT) combines both Eddy Current Technique (ECT) and Thermographic Non-Destructive Techniques (TNDT) [1],[2]. This NDT technique has been earlier demonstrated for metallic components for the detection of cracks, corrosion, etc.[3]-[9] Even though Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) has a relatively less electrical conductivity compared to metals, it was observed that sufficient heat could be generated using induction heating that can be used for nondestructive evaluation using the Induction Thermography technique. Also, measurable temperatures could be achieved using relatively less currents, when compared to metals. In Scanning Induction Thermography (SIT) technique, the induction coil moves over the sample at optimal speeds and the temperature developed in the sample due to Joule heating effects is captured as a function of time and distance using an IR camera in the form of video images. A new algorithm is also presented for the analysis of the video images for improved analysis of the data obtained. Several CFRP components were evaluated for detection of impact damage and delaminations using the SIT technique.

  4. Modelling and predicting hidden solder joint shape using active thermography and parametric numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giron Palomares, Jose Benjamin; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen

    2014-05-01

    A methodology based on active infrared thermography to study and characterize hidden solder joint shapes on a multi cover PCB assembly was investigated. A numerical model was developed to simulate the active thermography methodology and was proven to determine the grand average cooling rates with maximum errors of 8.85% (one cover) and 13.36% (two covers). A parametric analysis was performed by varying the number of covers, heat flux provided, and the amount of heating time. Grand average cooling rate distances among contiguous solder joint shapes, as well as solder joints discriminability, were determined to be directly proportional to heat flux, and inversely proportional to the number of covers and heating time. Finally, a mathematical model was developed to determine the appropriate total amount of energy needed to discriminate among hidden solder joints with a "good" discriminability for one and two covers, and a "regular" discriminability for up to five covers. The mathematical model was proven to predict the total amount of energy to achieve a "good" discriminability for one cover within a 10% of error with respect to the experimental active thermography model.

  5. Detection of tightness of mechanical joints using lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweschper, Thomas; Wu, Datong; Busse, Gerhard

    1999-09-01

    Lockin thermography is currently being used for the rapid and remote identification of subsurface structures and defects such as impact damages, delaminations, and hidden corrosion. The purpose of this paper is to show that lockin thermography is also a reliable tool to inspect in a remote way the tightness of mechanical joints in safety relevant structures (e.g. aerospace equipment and vehicles). For example, the rapid identification of loose rivets is a major concern for airlines and manufacturers in order to monitor the structural integrity of their aircraft. Our measurements aimed at the early detection of loose rivets. We analyzed the phase image signature obtained on two metal plates pressed together by screws fastened at various torque levels. A clear relationship was established between phase angle and torque level at which the screws had been fastened. Based on these results our investigations were extended to riveted samples where two aluminum plates were pressed together by an array of ten blind rivets. Also in this case the level of tightness of rivet joints can be detected. In addition to these feasibility studies on model samples, we performed investigations on airplane components which confirmed the applicability of lockin thermography for remote maintenance inspection within a few minutes.

  6. Implementing Recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board: Development of On-Orbit IR Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Brian P.; Parker, Bradford; Stephan, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    One of NASA's Space Shuttle Return-to-Flight (RTF) efforts has been to develop thermography for the on-orbit inspection of the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) portion of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE). This paper addresses the capability of thermography to detect cracks in RCC by using in-plane thermal gradients that naturally occur on-orbit. Crack damage, which can result from launch debris impact, is a detection challenge for other on-orbit sensors under consideration for RTF, such as the Intensified Television Camera and Laser Dynamic Range Imager. We studied various cracks in RCC, both natural and simulated, along with material characteristics, such as emissivity uniformity, in steady-state thermography. Severity of crack, such as those likely and unlikely to cause burn through were tested, both in-air and in-vacuum, and the goal of this procedure was to assure crew and vehicle safety during reentry by identification and quantification of a damage condition while on-orbit. Expected thermal conditions are presented in typical shuttle orbits, and the expected damage signatures for each scenario are presented. Finally, through statistical signal detection, our results show that even at very low in-plane thermal gradients, we are able to detect damage at or below the threshold for fatality in the most critical sections of the WLE, with a confidence exceeding 1 in 10,000 probability of false negative.

  7. Assessing the reliability of thermography to infer internal body temperatures of lizards.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Frederico M; Carretero, Miguel A; Silva, Francisco; Sannolo, Marco

    2016-12-01

    For many years lizard thermal ecology studies have relied on the use of contact thermometry to obtain internal body temperature (Tb) of the animals. However, with progressing technology, an interest grew in using new, less invasive methods, such as InfraRed (IR) pyrometry and thermography, to infer Tb of reptiles. Nonetheless few studies have tested the reliability of these new tools. The present study tested the use of IR cameras as a non-invasive tool to infer Tb of lizards, using three differently body-sized lacertid species (Podarcis virescens, Lacerta schreiberi and Timon lepidus). Given the occurrence of regional heterothermy, we pairwise compared thermography readings of six body parts (snout, eye, head, dorsal, hind limb, tail base) to cloacal temperature (measured by a thermometer-associated thermocouple probe) commonly employed to measure Tb in field and lab studies. The results showed moderate to strong correlations (R(2)=0.84-0.99) between all body parts and cloacal temperature. However, despite the readings on the tail base showed the strongest correlation in all three species, it was the eye where the absolute values and pattern of temperature change most consistently followed the cloacal measurements. Hence, we concluded that the eye would be the body location whose IR camera readings more closely approximate that of the animal's internal environment. Alternatively, other body parts can be used, provided that a careful calibration is carried out. We provide guidelines for future research using thermography to infer Tb of lizards.

  8. A novel and simple method for identifying the lung intersegmental plane using thermography.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kei; Kanzaki, Masato; Mitsuboshi, Shota; Maeda, Hideyuki; Kikkawa, Takuma; Isaka, Tamami; Murasugi, Masahide; Onuki, Takamasa

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the intersegmental plane is very important for successful lung segmentectomy. Although several methods are available, they require specialized skills and pose a potential risk of losing sight of the correct intersegmental planes. Therefore, easier and more reliable methods are required. In this study, we hypothesized that surface temperatures of resecting segments or lobes decrease because of blood flow suppression after the ligation of target arteries and veins, and intersegmental planes can be visualized using a thermography. To test this hypothesis, we performed six lung resections (two lobectomies and four segmentectomies) on three pigs and, using a handheld thermography, we monitored the lung surface temperatures to identify intersegmental planes. We demonstrated that thermal imaging sharply demarcated intersegmental planes soon after the ligation of vessels in all procedures. Compared with other methods, thermography requires no special technical skills, drug injection and lung inflation. Therefore, we believe that the thermographic method described in this study will be a powerful option to identify intersegmental planes during anatomical lung segmentectomy.

  9. Implementing Recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board - Development of on-Orbit RCC Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Brian; Parker, Brad; Stephen, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    One of NASA s Space Shuttle Return-to-Flight (RTF) efforts has been to develop thermography for the on-orbit inspection of the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) portion of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE). This paper addresses the capability of thermography to detect cracks in RCC by using in-plane thermal gradients that naturally occur on-orbit. Crack damage, which can result from launch debris impact, is a detection challenge for other on-orbit sensors under consideration for RTF, such as the Intensified Television Camera and Laser Dynamic Range Imager. We studied various cracks in RCC, both natural and simulated, along with material characteristics, such as emissivity uniformity, in steady-state thermography. Severity of crack, such as those likely and unlikely to cause burn through were tested, both in-air and in-vacuum, and the goal of this procedure was to assure crew and vehicle safety during re-entry by identification and quantification of a damage condition while on-orbit. Expected thermal conditions are presented in typical shuttle orbits, and the expected damage signatures for each scenario are presented. Finally, through statistical signal detection, our results show that even at very low in-plane thermal gradients, we are able to detect damage at or below the threshold for fatality in the most critical sections of the WLE, with a confidence exceeding 1 in 10,000 probability of false negative.

  10. Detection and assessment of electrocution in endangered raptors by infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most European birds of prey find themselves in a poor state of conservation, with electrocution as one of the most frequent causes of unnatural death. Since early detection of electrocution is difficult, treatment is usually implemented late, which reduces its effectiveness. By considering that electrocution reduces tissue temperature, it may be detectable by thermography, which would allow a more rapid identification. Three individuals from three endangered raptor species [Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti), Lammergeier (Gypaetus barbatus) and Osprey (Pandion haliaetus)] were studied thermographically from the time they were admitted to a rehabilitation centre to the time their clinical cases were resolved. Cases presentation The three raptors presented lesions lacking thermal bilateral symmetry and were consistent with electrocution of feet, wings and eyes, visible by thermography before than clinically; lesions were well-defined and showed a lower temperature than the surrounding tissue. Some lesions evolved thermally and clinically until the appearance of normal tissue recovered, while others evolved and became necrotic. A histopathological analysis of a damaged finger amputated off a Lammergeier, and the necropsy and histopathology examination of an osprey, confirmed the electrocution diagnosis. Conclusions These results suggest that thermography is effective and useful for the objective and early detection and monitoring of electrocuted birds, and that it may prove especially useful for examining live animals that require no amputation or cannot be subjected to invasive histopathology. PMID:23880357

  11. Detection of seal contamination in heat-sealed food packaging based on active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'huys, Karlien; Saeys, Wouter; De Ketelaere, Bart

    2015-05-01

    In the food industry packaging is often applied to protect the product from the environment, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the material used and the closure (seal). The material is selected based on the specific needs of the food product to be wrapped. However, proper closure of the package is often harder to achieve. One problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of food particles between the seal. Seal contamination can cause a decreased seal strength and thus an increased packaging failure risk. It can also trigger the formation of microchannels through which air and microorganisms can enter and spoil the enclosed food. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal-contaminated packages from the production chain is essential. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heat of the sealing bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. The cooling profile of contaminated seals was recorded. The detection performance of four processing methods (based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profile, pulsed phase thermography and a matched filter) was compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify contamination. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter of 0.63 mm) and the lowest processing time (0.42 s per sample) were obtained for the method based on a single frame. Presumably, practical limitations in the recording stage prevented the added value of active thermography to be fully reflected in this application.

  12. Infra-red thermography in the assessment of sacro-iliac inflammation.

    PubMed

    Grennan, D M; Caygill, L

    1982-05-01

    In a cross-sectional study designed to investigate the sensitivity of infra-red thermography in the detection of sacro-iliac regions were examined by thermography in a group of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and compared with normal volunteers and patients with other causes of low back pain. Thermograms were recorded both quantitatively via profile measurements across the sacro-iliac regions and sacrum and qualitatively via the pattern recorded by photography. Sacro-iliac disease activity was recorded clinically on the same day and was low overall in the patients examined. Thirteen of the 30 ankylosing spondylitis patients were abnormal thermographically either by profile or pattern measurements. None of the 13 patients with other causes of low back pain had increased sacro-iliac activity on thermography. None of four patients without X-ray evidence of sacro-iliitis was abnormal thermographically but there was a trend for increasing thermographic activity to be associated with increasing clinical activity. It was concluded that the thermographic technique examined was of little help in the diagnosis of early sacro-iliitis but might be more helpful in the objective serial assessment of sacro-iliitis in individual patients with active disease.

  13. Application of Infrared Thermography as a Diagnostic Tool of Knee Osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, Ahlem; Bouzid, Mohamed Amine; Pron, Hervé; Taiar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    This paper aimed to study the feasibility of application of infrared thermography to detect osteoarthritis of the knee and to compare the distribution of skin temperature between participants with osteoarthritis and those without pathology. All tests were conducted at LACM (Laboratory of Mechanical Stresses Analysis) and the gymnasium of the University of Reims Champagne Ardennes. IR thermography was performed using an IR camera. Ten participants with knee osteoarthritis and 12 reference healthy participants without OA participated in this study. Questionnaires were also used. The participants with osteoarthritis of the knee were selected on clinical examination and a series of radiographs. The level of pain was recorded by using a simple verbal scale (0-4). Infrared thermography reveals relevant disease by highlighting asymmetrical behavior in thermal color maps of both knees. Moreover, a linear evolution of skin temperature in the knee area versus time has been found whatever the participant group is in the first stage following a given effort. Results clearly show that the temperature can be regarded as a key parameter for evaluating pain. Thermal images of the knee were taken with an infrared camera. The study shows that with the advantage of being noninvasive and easily repeatable, IRT appears to be a useful tool to detect quantifiable patterns of surface temperatures and predict the singular thermal behavior of this pathology. It also seems that this non-intrusive technique enables to detect the early clinical manifestations of knee OA.

  14. Automated transient thermography for the inspection of CFRP structures: experimental results and developed procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakeas, P.; Avdelidis, N. P.; Hrissagis, K.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Koui, M.; Maldague, X.

    2011-05-01

    In thermography surveys, the inspector uses the camera to acquire images from the examined part. Common problems are the lack of repeatability when trying to repeat the scanning process, the need to carry the equipment during scanning, and long setting-up time. The aim of this paper is to present transient thermography results on CFRP plates for assessing different types of fabricated defects (impact damage, inclusions for delaminations, etc), as well as and to discuss and present a prototype robotic scanner to apply non destructive testing (thermographic scanning) on materials and structures. Currently, the scanning process is not automatic. The equipment to be developed, will be able to perform thermal NDT scanning on structures, create the appropriate scanning conditions (material thermal excitation), and ensure precision and tracking of scanning process. A thermographic camera that will be used for the image acquisition of the non destructive inspection, will be installed on a x, y, z, linear manipulator's end effector and would be surrounded by excitation sources (optical lamps), required for the application of transient thermography. In this work various CFRP samples of different shape, thickness and geometry were investigated using two different thermographic systems in order to compare and evaluate their effectiveness concerning the internal defect detectability under different testing conditions.

  15. Infrared digital thermography of scrotum in early selection of progressive varicocele.

    PubMed

    Kulis, T; Knezevic, M; Karlovic, K; Kolaric, D; Antonini, S; Kastelan, Z

    2013-10-01

    Varicocele is frequent but correctable cause of male infertility. Varicocelectomy is the most commonly performed operative procedure for varicocele. Majority of varicocele patients do not have fertility problem, therefore surgical correction is not recommended in all prevalent cases. On the other hand, varicocele is a progressive condition in some cases and individual with varicocele is at risk for developing impairment which can ultimately lead to semen deterioration and consequent infertility. Selection of patients with varicocele that will progress and cause infertility is beyond our current diagnostic capabilities. Diagnostic assessment of varicocele depends on physical examination and scrotal ultrasound/doppler. Infrared digital thermography of scrotum is a non-invasive and objective diagnostic method for early varicocele detection by means of temperature measurement on the scrotal skin surface. The criteria for diagnostic use of scrotal thermography were recently presented. We hypothesize that the infrared digital thermography of scrotum could be the cornerstone in detection of varicoceles that tend to progress with impairment of semen quality and will require surgical correction, among all prevalent varicocele cases.

  16. Line scanning thermography for rapid nondestructive inspection of large scale composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; Ley, O.; Godinez, V.; Bandos, B.

    2011-06-23

    As next generation structures are utilizing larger amounts of composite materials, a rigorous and reliable method is needed to inspect these structures in order to prevent catastrophic failure and extend service life. Current inspection methods, such as ultrasonic, generally require extended down time and man hours as they are typically carried out via point-by-point measurements. A novel Line Scanning Thermography (LST) System has been developed for the non-contact, large-scale field inspection of composite structures with faster scanning times than conventional thermography systems. LST is a patented dynamic thermography technique where the heat source and thermal camera move in tandem, which allows the continuous scan of long surfaces without the loss of resolution. The current system can inspect an area of 10 in{sup 2} per 1 second, and has a resolution of 0.05x0.03 in{sup 2}. Advanced data gathering protocols have been implemented for near-real time damage visualization and post-analysis algorithms for damage interpretation. The system has been used to successfully detect defects (delamination, dry areas) in fiber-reinforced composite sandwich panels for Navy applications, as well as impact damage in composite missile cases and armor ceramic panels.

  17. Comparative evaluation of aerospace composites using thermography and ultrasonic NDT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakeas, P.; Avdelidis, N. P.; Hatziioannidis, I.; Cheilakou, E.; Marini, R.; Koui, M.

    2015-05-01

    In the present research work a study was carried out evaluating the applicability of two NDT techniques, this of Transient Thermography (TT) and Ultrasonic Testing (UT) for the inspection of different types of composite materials (i.e. laminated CFRPs, laminated hybrid FRPs and sandwiched panels). The composite structures were consisted of a variety of artificial defects, while inspection was performed through different testing configurations. In particular, transient thermography was implemented through the monitoring of the surface transient cooling after flash heating the samples and ultrasonic testing was applied using both a conventional single element probe (immersion technique) and a linear phased array transducer consisted of 128 elements. The main objective of this work was to compare the applicability and effectiveness of the two techniques in aerospace composites inspection as well as to evaluate the accuracy produced regarding the quantitative characterisation of the detected features. The obtained results showed that all the defects were revealed by either transient thermography or ultrasonic testing, whilst thermographic inspection can display the acquired results in a more rapid manner. On the other hand UT testing can provide efficient results for deeper probing requiring however longer inspection times. In other words, the acquired data and the respective analyses highlighted the different capability of each testing configuration, to detect defects and to gain knowledge for the interior of the structures.

  18. Application of infrared lock-in thermography for the quantitative evaluation of bruises on pears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ghiseok; Kim, Geon-Hee; Park, Jongmin; Kim, Dae-Yong; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2014-03-01

    An infrared lock-in thermography technique was adjusted for the detection of early bruises on pears. This mechanical damage is usually difficult to detect in the early stage after harvested using conventional visual sorting or CCD sensor-based imaging processing methods. We measured the thermal emission signals from pears using a highly sensitive mid-infrared thermal camera. These images were post-processed using a lock-in method that utilized the periodic thermal energy input to the pear. By applying the lock-in method to infrared thermography, the detection sensitivity and signal to noise ratio were enhanced because of the phase-sensitive narrow-band filtering effect. It was also found that the phase information of thermal emission from pears provides good metrics with which to identify quantitative information about both damage size and damage depth for pears. Additionally, a photothermal model was implemented to investigate the behavior of thermal waves on pears under convective conditions. Theoretical results were compared to experimental results. These results suggested that the proposed lock-in thermography technique and resultant phase information can be used to detect mechanical damage to fruit, especially in the early stage of bruising.

  19. Line Scanning Thermography for Rapid Nondestructive Inspection of Large Scale Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S.; Ley, O.; Godinez, V.; Bandos, B.

    2011-06-01

    As next generation structures are utilizing larger amounts of composite materials, a rigorous and reliable method is needed to inspect these structures in order to prevent catastrophic failure and extend service life. Current inspection methods, such as ultrasonic, generally require extended down time and man hours as they are typically carried out via point-by-point measurements. A novel Line Scanning Thermography (LST) System has been developed for the non-contact, large-scale field inspection of composite structures with faster scanning times than conventional thermography systems. LST is a patented dynamic thermography technique where the heat source and thermal camera move in tandem, which allows the continuous scan of long surfaces without the loss of resolution. The current system can inspect an area of 10 in2 per 1 second, and has a resolution of 0.05×0.03 in2. Advanced data gathering protocols have been implemented for near-real time damage visualization and post-analysis algorithms for damage interpretation. The system has been used to successfully detect defects (delamination, dry areas) in fiber-reinforced composite sandwich panels for Navy applications, as well as impact damage in composite missile cases and armor ceramic panels.

  20. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  1. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  2. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  3. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  4. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  5. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  6. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  7. Real-Time Debonding Monitoring of Composite Repaired Materials via Electrical, Acoustic, and Thermographic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatikos, S. A.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of composite materials have been thoroughly investigated recently for the detection and monitoring of damage in carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs) under mechanical loading. Carbon nanotubes are incorporated in the polymer matrix of CFRPs for the enhancement of their electrical properties. The electrical properties have shown to be sensitive to the damage state of the material and hence their monitoring provides the profile of their structural deterioration. The aim of the paper is the cross-validation and benchmarking of an electrical potential change monitoring (EPCM) technique against acoustic emission (AE) and lock-in thermography (LT). All techniques successfully identified damage and its propagation. Thermography was more efficient in quantifying damage and describing dynamically the debond topology, as it provided full 2D imaging of the debond in real time. EPCM was successful in providing quantitative information on debond propagation and its directionality. AE provided consistent information on damage propagation. All techniques identified three stages in the fatigue life of the interrogated coupons. The representation of the fatigue behavior as a function of life fraction, the correlation of AE data with EPCM and LT data, and most importantly the consistent behavior of all tested coupons allowed for both the direct and indirect cross-correlation of all employed methodologies, which consistently identified all aforementioned fatigue life stages.

  8. Research on lock-in thermography for aerospace materials of nondestructive test based on image sequence processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyan; Dai, Jingmin; Wang, Yang

    2008-11-01

    IR Lock in thermography is an active thermography technology based on thermal wave signal processing, especially, it has many advantages for nondestructive test of composite materials and compound structure application and has been applied on aerospace, automotive, mechanics and electric fields. In lock in thermography, given sufficient time for periodic heating, the surface temperature will evolve periodically in a sinusoidal pattern form the transient state to the steady state. In this paper, the principle of lock in thermography is introduced and the heat transferring process is analyzed by the sinusoidal variation heating flow transferred in materials by means of FEM method. In experiment, the modulating optical stimulation is applied to sample, and image sequences are collected by Jade MWIR 550 FPA IR camera. The digital filter algorithm which is Savitzky-Golay digital smoothness filters is used to remove the effects of high frequency noise. A phase image at the frequency of periodic heating can be calculated using a Fourier transform of the periodic heating frequency in transient state for defect detection. The IR lock in thermography processing software is developed by using of visual C++ programmed based image sequence collected. The experimental results show that the developed system reached up to high level of conventional steady state Lock in method.

  9. Short-circuit current density imaging of crystalline silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography: Robustness and simplifications

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Fabian Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan

    2014-11-14

    Spatially resolved determination of solar cell parameters is beneficial for loss analysis and optimization of conversion efficiency. One key parameter that has been challenging to access by an imaging technique on solar cell level is short-circuit current density. This work discusses the robustness of a recently suggested approach to determine short-circuit current density spatially resolved based on a series of lock-in thermography images and options for a simplified image acquisition procedure. For an accurate result, one or two emissivity-corrected illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image have to be recorded. The dark lock-in thermography image can be omitted if local shunts are negligible. Furthermore, it is shown that omitting the correction of lock-in thermography images for local emissivity variations only leads to minor distortions for standard silicon solar cells. Hence, adequate acquisition of one image only is sufficient to generate a meaningful map of short-circuit current density. Beyond that, this work illustrates the underlying physics of the recently proposed method and demonstrates its robustness concerning varying excitation conditions and locally increased series resistance. Experimentally gained short-circuit current density images are validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  10. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  11. Active and passive infrared thermography applied to the detection and characterization of hidden defects in structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Infrared thermography for Non Destructive Testing (NDT) has encountered a wide spreading this last 2 decades, in particular thanks to emergence on the market of low cost uncooled infrared camera. So, infrared thermography is not anymore a measurement technique limited to laboratory application. It has been more and more involved in civil engineering and cultural heritage applications, but also in many other domains, as indicated by numerous papers in the literature. Nevertheless, laboratory, measurements are done as much as possible in quite ideal conditions (good atmosphere conditions, known properties of materials, etc.), while measurement on real site requires to consider the influence of not controlled environmental parameters and additional unknown thermal properties. So, dedicated protocol and additional sensors are required for measurement data correction. Furthermore, thermal excitation is required to enhance the signature of defects in materials. Post-processing of data requires to take into account the protocol used for the thermal excitation and sometimes its nature to avoid false detection. This analysis step is based on signal and image processing tool and allows to carry out the detection. Characterization of anomalies detected at the previous step can be done by additional signal processing in particular for manufactured objects. The use of thermal modelling and inverse method allows to determine properties of the defective area. The present paper will first address a review of some protocols currently in use for field measurement with passive and/or active infrared measurements. Illustrations in various experiments carried out on civil engineering structure will be shown and discussed. In a second part, different post-processing approaches will be presented and discussed. In particular, a review of the most standard processing methods like Fast Fourier Analysis, Principal Components Analysis, Polynomial Decomposition, defect characterization using

  12. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  13. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  14. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  15. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  16. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  17. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  18. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  19. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  20. Study on the heat flux reconstruction with the infrared thermography for the divertor target plates in the KSTAR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, C. S.; Lee, H. H.; Oh, S.; Lee, S. G.; Wi, H. M.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, H. S.

    2016-08-01

    An infrared (IR) thermography is the preferred diagnostic that can quantify heat flux by measuring the surface temperature distributions of the divertor plates. The IR thermography is successfully instrumented on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). In this study, finite volume method is considered to solve the heat conduction equations. 1D-, 2D-, and 3D models are developed and compared with various calculation algorithms, such as Duhamel's theorem and THEODOR. These comparisons show good agreement. In order to acquire more efficient and reliable calculation results, we consider two numerical analysis schemes, influence of temperature on thermal properties and image stabilization. Recently, this reconstruction code is successfully applied to the KSTAR IR thermography.

  1. Study on the heat flux reconstruction with the infrared thermography for the divertor target plates in the KSTAR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Kang, C S; Lee, H H; Oh, S; Lee, S G; Wi, H M; Kim, Y S; Kim, H S

    2016-08-01

    An infrared (IR) thermography is the preferred diagnostic that can quantify heat flux by measuring the surface temperature distributions of the divertor plates. The IR thermography is successfully instrumented on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). In this study, finite volume method is considered to solve the heat conduction equations. 1D-, 2D-, and 3D models are developed and compared with various calculation algorithms, such as Duhamel's theorem and THEODOR. These comparisons show good agreement. In order to acquire more efficient and reliable calculation results, we consider two numerical analysis schemes, influence of temperature on thermal properties and image stabilization. Recently, this reconstruction code is successfully applied to the KSTAR IR thermography.

  2. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  3. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  4. Acoustic borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Manzi, S.J.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes an acoustic borehole logging method. It comprises traversing a borehole with a borehole logging tool containing a transmitter of acoustic energy having a free-field frequency spectrum with at least one characteristic resonant frequency of vibration and spaced-apart receiver, repeatedly exciting the transmitter with a swept frequency tone burst of a duration sufficiently greater than the travel time of acoustic energy between the transmitter and the receiver to allow borehole cavity resonances to be established within the borehole cavity formed between the borehole logging tool and the borehole wall, detecting acoustic energy amplitude modulated by the borehole cavity resonances with the spaced-apart receiver, and recording an amplitude verses frequency output of the receiver in correlation with depth as a log of the borehole frequency spectrum representative of the subsurface formation comprising the borehole wall.

  5. Acoustic imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  6. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  7. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  8. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  9. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  10. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan D.

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually acoustics applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  11. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  12. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  13. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  14. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  15. Ocean Acoustic Observatory Federation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    J., C. G. Fox, and F. K. Duennebier, Hydroacoustic detection of submarine landslides on Kilauea volcano , Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 28, 1811-1814...acoustic tomography experiments in the vicinity of coastal North America, • Monitor, in real time, marine mammals, earthquakes and volcanoes in the...distances, coastal tomography and thermometry, and earthquakes and volcanoes in the northern Pacific. APPROACH The members of the Ocean Acoustic

  16. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  17. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  18. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  19. Low Frequency Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    with NOAA , ONR is providing technical services that will help establish a baseline for assessment of long- term VLF acoustic trends in selected...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 sponsored by NOAA , was added to the...with NOAA (NMFS) and other parties has dealt with ocean acoustics related to issues stimulated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. A focal point has

  20. A preliminary biomechanical assessment of a polymer composite hip implant using an infrared thermography technique validated by strain gage measurements.

    PubMed

    Bougherara, Habiba; Rahim, Ehsan; Shah, Suraj; Dubov, Anton; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad

    2011-07-01

    With the resurgence of composite materials in orthopaedic applications, a rigorous assessment of stress is needed to predict any failure of bone-implant systems. For current biomechanics research, strain gage measurements are employed to experimentally validate finite element models, which then characterize stress in the bone and implant. Our preliminary study experimentally validates a relatively new nondestructive testing technique for orthopaedic implants. Lock-in infrared (IR) thermography validated with strain gage measurements was used to investigate the stress and strain patterns in a novel composite hip implant made of carbon fiber reinforced polyamide 12 (CF/PA12). The hip implant was instrumented with strain gages and mechanically tested using average axial cyclic forces of 840 N, 1500 N, and 2100 N with the implant at an adduction angle of 15 deg to simulate the single-legged stance phase of walking gait. Three-dimensional surface stress maps were also obtained using an IR thermography camera. Results showed almost perfect agreement of IR thermography versus strain gage data with a Pearson correlation of R(2) = 0.96 and a slope = 1.01 for the line of best fit. IR thermography detected hip implant peak stresses on the inferior-medial side just distal to the neck region of 31.14 MPa (at 840 N), 72.16 MPa (at 1500 N), and 119.86 MPa (at 2100 N). There was strong correlation between IR thermography-measured stresses and force application level at key locations on the implant along the medial (R(2) = 0.99) and lateral (R(2) = 0.83 to 0.99) surface, as well as at the peak stress point (R(2) = 0.81 to 0.97). This is the first study to experimentally validate and demonstrate the use of lock-in IR thermography to obtain three-dimensional stress fields of an orthopaedic device manufactured from a composite material.

  1. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  2. The detection and thermal characterization of the inner structure of the ‘Musmeci’ bridge deck by infrared thermography monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Crinière, Antoine; Averty, Rodolphe

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the thermal monitoring of a bridge deck is carried out over several days thanks to an adapted infrared measurement system. This system does not just operate a single uncooled infrared camera but also other sensors (i.e., a weather station and a global positioning system (GPS). The detection of the inner structure of the deck is achieved by pulse phase thermography and principal component thermography approaches. A first characterization of the inner structure of the deck is proposed thanks to an original thermal modelling approach. The results obtained are discussed and analysed.

  3. Prospects of pulse phase thermography for finding disbonds in CFRP-sandwich parts with aluminum honeycomb cores compared to ultrasonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, J.; Stotter, B.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2013-01-01

    This work shows the prospects of pulse phase thermography (PPT) compared to ultrasonic testing when applied to carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sandwich parts with aluminum honeycomb cores. Measurements were carried out on full-scale components with flaws like disbonds, septum disbonds, staggers and displaced cores, where the last two are not literally flaws, but nevertheless regions of interest. The effect of the measurement time and the feasibility of extrapolating temperature decays were evaluated. Phase images, gathered with PPT, are compared with ultrasonic Cscan images to show the capability of PPT for quality assurance purposes. Finally, the saving on inspection time when using pulse phase thermography instead of ultrasonic testing is considered.

  4. Nondestructive testing of rocket engine injector panel using ultrasonic burst phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Cunlin; Wu, Naiming; Zeng, Zhi; Xing, Chunfei; Li, Yue; Zhao, Shibin; Ning, Tao

    2010-10-01

    As the key parts of the liquid rocket oxyhydrogen engine, the injector panel is a kind of transpiration material, which is braided and Sintered with stainless steel wire. If some hidden delaminition defects that are difficult to detect appear in the process of Sintering and rolling, a significant safety problem would occur. In this paper, we use the Ultrasonic Burst Phase Thermography (UBP) to detect the delamination defects in the injector panel, UBP is a rapid and reliable nondestructive technique derived from Ultrasonic Lock-in Thermography(ULT). It uses a controllable, adjustable ultrasonic burst as the heat source to stimulate the sample, the defects within the material are revealed through their heat generation caused by friction, clapping and thermoelastic effect, as the resulting surface temperature distribution is observed by an infrared camera. The original thermal images sequence is processed by Fast Fourier Transformation to obtain the phase information of the defects. In the experiments of the delamination sample, the UBP realized the selective heating of delamination defects in the injector panel, and the signal to noise of phase image is higher than the original thermal image because the phase information can not be disturbed by the initial conditions (such as the reflective surface of sample). However, the result of the detection of flat bottom hole transpiration panel sample reflects that UBP is not appropriate for the detection of this kind of defects, because it is difficult to induce frictional heating of flat bottom holes. As contrast, Flash Pulse Thermography is used to detect the flat bottom holes, all of the holes of different depth and sizes can be seen distinctly. The results show that PT is more appropriate for the detection of flat bottom holes defects than UBP, therefore, it is important to select the appropriate excitation method according to different defects.

  5. An active thermography approach for thermal and electrical characterization of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streza, M.; Longuemart, S.; Guilmeau, E.; Strzalkowski, K.; Touati, K.; Depriester, M.; Maignan, A.; Sahraoui, A. Hadj

    2016-07-01

    The enhancement of figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectrics is becoming extremely important for an efficient conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy. In this respect, reliable measurements of thermal and electrical parameters are of paramount importance in order to characterize thermoelectric materials in terms of their efficiency. In this work, a combined theoretical-experimental active thermography approach is presented. The method consists of selecting the right sequential interdependence between the excitation frequency and the sampling rate of the infrared camera, by computing a temporal Fourier analysis of each pixel of the recorded IR image. The method is validated by using a reference sample which is then applied to a recent synthesized titanium trisulphide thermoelectric material (TiS3). By combining AC and steady-state experiments, one can obtain information on both thermal and electrical parameters of TE materials (namely thermal diffusivity, Seebeck coefficient). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of TiS3 are also measured using photothermal radiometry technique (PTR) and the resulting values of these parameters are α  =  9.7*10-7 m2 s-1 and k  =  2.2 W m-1 K, respectively. The results obtained with the two techniques are in good agreement. In the case of TE materials, the main benefit of the proposed method is related to its non-contact nature and the possibility of obtaining the electric potential and temperature at the same probes. The Seebeck coefficient obtained by active IR thermography (S  =  -554 μV K-1) is consistent with the one obtained using an ULVAC-ZEM3 system (S  =  -570 μV K-1). For a large number of users of thermographic cameras, which are not equipped with a lock-in thermography module, the present approach provides an affordable and cheaper solution.

  6. A protocol for analysing thermal stress in insects using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Belén; Verdú, José R; Carrascal, Luis M; Lobo, Jorge M

    2016-02-01

    The study of insect responses to thermal stress has involved a variety of protocols and methodologies that hamper the ability to compare results between studies. For that reason, the development of a protocol to standardize thermal assays is necessary. In this sense, infrared thermography solves some of the problems allowing us to take continuous temperature measurements without handling the individuals, an important fact in cold-blooded organisms like insects. Here, we present a working protocol based on infrared thermography to estimate both cold and heat thermal stress in insects. We analyse both the change in the body temperature of individuals and their behavioural response. In addition, we used partial least squares regression for the statistical analysis of our data, a technique that solves the problem of having a large number of variables and few individuals, allowing us to work with rare or endemic species. To test our protocol, we chose two species of congeneric, narrowly distributed dung beetles that are endemic to the southeastern part of the Iberian Peninsula. With our protocol we have obtained five variables in the response to cold and twelve in the response to heat. With this methodology we discriminate between the two flightless species of Jekelius through their thermal response. In response to cold, Jekelius hernandezi showed a higher rate of cooling and reached higher temperatures of stupor and haemolymph freezing than Jekelius punctatolineatus. Both species displayed similar thermoregulation ranges before reaching lethal body temperature with heat stress. Overall, we have demonstrated that infrared thermography is a suitable method to assess insect thermal responses with a high degree of sensitivity, allowing for the discrimination between closely related species.

  7. The quantitative inspection of iron aluminide green sheet using transient thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Michael L.; Hinders, Mark K.; Scorey, Clive; Winfree, William

    1999-12-01

    The recent development of manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of thin iron aluminide, FeAl, sheet requires advanced quantitative methods for on-line inspection. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for flaws and the development of appropriate flaw detection methods are key elements in an effective quality management system. The first step in the fabrication of thin FeAl alloy sheet is the formation of a green sheet, either by cold rolling or tape casting FeAl powder mixed with organic binding agents. The finished sheet is obtained using a series of process steps involving binder elimination, densification, sintering, and annealing. Non-uniformities within the green sheet are the major contributor to material failure in subsequent sheet processing and the production of non-conforming finished sheet. Previous work has demonstrated the advantages of using active thermography to detect the flaws and heterogeneity within green powder composites (1)(2)(3). The production environment and physical characteristics of these composites provide for unique challenges in developing a rapid nondestructive inspection capability. Thermography is non-contact and minimizes the potential damage to the fragile green sheet. Limited access to the material also demands a one-sided inspection technique. In this paper, we will describe the application of thermography for 100% on-line inspection within an industrial process. This approach is cost competitive with alternative technologies, such as x-ray imaging systems, and provides the required sensitivity to the variations in material composition. The formation of green sheet flaws and their transformation into defects within intermediate and finished sheet products will be described. A green sheet conformance criterion will be presented which would significantly reduce the probability of processing poor quality green sheet which contributes to higher waste and inferior bulk alloy sheet.

  8. An assessment of skin temperature gradients in a tropical primate using infrared thermography and subcutaneous implants.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cynthia L; Scheidel, Caleb; Glander, Kenneth E; Williams, Susan H; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Infrared thermography has become a useful tool to assess surface temperatures of animals for thermoregulatory research. However, surface temperatures are an endpoint along the body's core-shell temperature gradient. Skin and fur are the peripheral tissues most exposed to ambient thermal conditions and are known to serve as thermosensors that initiate thermoregulatory responses. Yet relatively little is known about how surface temperatures of wild mammals measured by infrared thermography relate to subcutaneous temperatures. Moreover, this relationship may differ with the degree that fur covers the body. To assess the relationship between temperatures and temperature gradients in peripheral tissues between furred and bare areas, we collected data from wild mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) in Costa Rica. We used infrared thermography to measure surface temperatures of the furred dorsum and bare facial areas of the body, recorded concurrent subcutaneous temperatures in the dorsum, and measured ambient thermal conditions via a weather station. Temperature gradients through cutaneous tissues (subcutaneous-surface temperature) and surface temperature gradients (surface-ambient temperature) were calculated. Our results indicate that there are differences in temperatures and temperature gradients in furred versus bare areas of mantled howlers. Under natural thermal conditions experienced by wild animals, the bare facial areas were warmer than temperatures in the furred dorsum, and cutaneous temperature gradients in the face were more variable than the dorsum, consistent with these bare areas acting as thermal windows. Cutaneous temperature gradients in the dorsum were more closely linked to subcutaneous temperatures, while facial temperature gradients were more heavily influenced by ambient conditions. These findings indicate that despite the insulative properties of fur, for mantled howling monkeys surface temperatures of furred areas still demonstrate a

  9. The quantitative inspection of iron aluminide green sheet using transient thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Michael L.; Hinders, Mark K.; Scorey, Clive; Winfree, William

    1999-12-02

    The recent development of manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of thin iron aluminide, FeAl, sheet requires advanced quantitative methods for on-line inspection. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for flaws and the development of appropriate flaw detection methods are key elements in an effective quality management system. The first step in the fabrication of thin FeAl alloy sheet is the formation of a green sheet, either by cold rolling or tape casting FeAl powder mixed with organic binding agents. The finished sheet is obtained using a series of process steps involving binder elimination, densification, sintering, and annealing. Non-uniformities within the green sheet are the major contributor to material failure in subsequent sheet processing and the production of non-conforming finished sheet. Previous work has demonstrated the advantages of using active thermography to detect the flaws and heterogeneity within green powder composites (1)(2)(3). The production environment and physical characteristics of these composites provide for unique challenges in developing a rapid nondestructive inspection capability. Thermography is non-contact and minimizes the potential damage to the fragile green sheet. Limited access to the material also demands a one-sided inspection technique. In this paper, we will describe the application of thermography for 100% on-line inspection within an industrial process. This approach is cost competitive with alternative technologies, such as x-ray imaging systems, and provides the required sensitivity to the variations in material composition. The formation of green sheet flaws and their transformation into defects within intermediate and finished sheet products will be described. A green sheet conformance criterion will be presented which would significantly reduce the probability of processing poor quality green sheet which contributes to higher waste and inferior bulk alloy sheet.

  10. In-Field-of-View Thermal Image Calibration System for Medical Thermography Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R. C.; McEvoy, H. C.; Machin, G.; Howell, K.; Naeem, M.; Plassmann, P.; Ring, F.; Campbell, P.; Song, C.; Tavener, J.; Ridley, I.

    2008-06-01

    Medical thermography has become ever more accessible to hospitals, medical research, and clinical centers with the new generation of thermal cameras, which are easier to use and lower in cost. Some diagnostic techniques using thermal cameras are now regarded as standardized, such as the cold challenge test for Raynaud’s phenomenon. The future for medical thermography appears to be improved accuracy, standardization, and establishment as a mainstream medical imaging methodology. Medical thermography standardization, quantitative measurements, image comparison, and multi-center research trials all require thermal cameras to provide a demonstrably traceable, accurate, and reliable temperature output. To this end, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has developed a multi-fixed-point source that serves as an in-image calibration system, thereby providing a reliable means for radiometric image validation. An in-field-of-view fixed-point validation system for thermal imaging has successfully been developed, tested, and validated at NPL and has undergone field trials at three clinical centers in the UK. The sources use the phase change plateaux of gallium zinc eutectic, gallium, and ethylene carbonate. The fixed-point sources have an estimated cavity emissivity of greater than 0.998, a plateau longevity of nominally 3 h at ambient conditions, a stability of 0.1°C, or better, over that period, a repeatability of 0.1°C or better, and an estimated temperature uncertainty of ±0.4°C ( k = 2). In this article, the source specifications and design as well as testing, validation, and field trial results are described in detail.

  11. Time-resolved pulsed stimulated infrared thermography applied to carbon-epoxy non destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapez, J.-C.; Boscher, D.; Delpech, Ph.; Deom, A.; Gardette, G.; Balageas, D.

    Since several years, time-resolved pulsed stimulated infrared thermography (SIRT) has been developed at ONERA with the aim of combining fast screening and quantitative characterization. The analysis of pixel by pixel thermograms leads to depth-location and thermal resistance images of delaminations. In this paper we present recent enhancements of the portable SIRT system and refinement of the data reduction procedure which demonstrate the possibility of detecting and evaluating delaminations in C-epoxy at depths higher than 3 mm. A 2-D inversion procedure is proposed to better characterize defects of reduced lateral extend as compared to the former 1-D method.

  12. Characterization of pores in high pressure die cast aluminum using active thermography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Myrach, Philipp; Röllig, Mathias; Jonietz, Florian; Illerhaus, Bernhard; Meinel, Dietmar; Richter, Uwe; Miksche, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Larger high pressure die castings (HPDC) and decreasing wall thicknesses are raising the issue of casting defects like pores in aluminum structures. Properties of components are often strongly influenced by inner porosity. As these products are being established more and more in lightweight construction (e.g. automotive and other transport areas), non-destructive testing methods, which can be applied fast and on-site, are required for quality assurance. In this contribution, the application of active thermography for the direct detection of larger pores is demonstrated. The analysis of limits and accuracy of the method are completed by numerical simulation and the method is validated using computed tomography.

  13. Parameterisation of non-homogeneities in buried object detection by means of thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanić, Josip; Malinovec, Marina; Švaić, Srećko; Krstelj, Vjera

    2004-05-01

    Landmines and their natural environment form a system of complex dynamics with variable characteristics. A manifestation of that complexity within the context of thermography-based landmines detection is excessive noise in thermograms. That has severely suppressed application of thermography in landmines detection for the purposes of humanitarian demining. (To be differentiated from military demining and demining for military operations other than war [Land Mine Detection DOD's Research Program Needs a Comprehensive Evaluation Strategy, US GAO Report, GAO-01 239, 2001; International Mine Action Standards, Chapter 4.--Glossary. Available at: < http://www.mineactionstandards.org/IMAS_archive/Final/04.10.pdf>].) The discrepancy between the existing role and the actual potential of thermography in humanitarian demining motivated systematic approach to sources of noise in thermograms of buried objects. These sources are variations in mine orientation relative to soil normal, which modify the shape of mine signature on thermograms, as well as non-homogeneities in soil and vegetation layer above the mine, which modify the overall quality of thermograms. This paper analyses the influence of variable mines, and more generally the influence of axially symmetric buried object orientation on the quality of its signature on thermograms. The following two angles have been extracted to serve as parameters describing variation in orientation: (i) θ--angle between the local vertical axis and mine symmetry axis and (ii) ψ--angle between local vertical axis and soil surface normal. Their influence is compared to the influence of (iii) d--the object depth change, which serves as control parameter. The influences are quantified and ranked within a statistically planned experiment. The analysis has proved that among the parameters listed, the most influential one is statistical interaction dψ, followed with the statistical interaction dθ. According to statistical tests, these two

  14. New applications of liquid-crystal thermography in rotating turbomachinery heat transfer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, M. F.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    Two new liquid-crystal thermography techniques developed for use in rotating heat transfer experiments are described. In one experiment steady-state heat transfer data were obtained on the exterior surface of rotating turbine airfoil models. In the second study a transient technique was employed to obtain interior-surface heat transfer data in a rotating turbine blade coolant passage model. Sample data are presented in the form of photographs of the liquid-crystal temperature patterns and as contour maps and distributions of heat transfer on the rotor and coolant passage surfaces.

  15. Nondestructive testing and evaluation of historical monuments using thermography and electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinlschmidt, Peter; Bothe, Thorsten; Hinsch, Klaus D.; Mehlhorn, Lutz

    1998-03-01

    Two remote and nondestructive testing techniques for the study of the decay mechanism of stone and plaster surfaces are presented. While electronic speckle pattern interferometer (ESPI) measures the 3-D-microdeformations of the surface, transient thermography shows at the same time invisible defects and structural faults as a reaction to the impact of short heat pulses. The combination of these two different techniques demonstrates its feasibility to detect restorative work and shows the compatibility of classical and modern substitutes and restoration techniques to historical materials.

  16. Research on Defects Inspection of Solder Balls Based on Eddy Current Pulsed Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiuyun; Zhou, Jinlong; Tian, Guiyun; Wang, Yizhe

    2015-01-01

    In order to solve tiny defect detection for solder balls in high-density flip-chip, this paper proposed feasibility study on the effect of detectability as well as classification based on eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT). Specifically, numerical analysis of 3D finite element inductive heat model is generated to investigate disturbance on the temperature field for different kind of defects such as cracks, voids, etc. The temperature variation between defective and non-defective solder balls is monitored for defects identification and classification. Finally, experimental study is carried on the diameter 1mm tiny solder balls by using ECPT and verify the efficacy of the technique. PMID:26473871

  17. Mapping Soil Surface Macropores Using Infrared Thermography: An Exploratory Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, João L. M. P.; Abrantes, João R. C. B.; Silva, Valdemir P.; de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Montenegro, Abelardo A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Macropores and water flow in soils and substrates are complex and are related to topics like preferential flow, nonequilibrium flow, and dual-continuum. Hence, the quantification of the number of macropores and the determination of their geometry are expected to provide a better understanding on the effects of pores on the soil's physical and hydraulic properties. This exploratory study aimed at evaluating the potential of using infrared thermography for mapping macroporosity at the soil surface and estimating the number and size of such macropores. The presented technique was applied to a small scale study (laboratory soil flume). PMID:25371915

  18. An Overview of Recent Application of Medical Infrared Thermography in Sports Medicine in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Carolin; Raschner, Christian; Ammer, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Medical infrared thermography (MIT) is used for analyzing physiological functions related to skin temperature. Technological advances have made MIT a reliable medical measurement tool. This paper provides an overview of MIT’s technical requirements and usefulness in sports medicine, with a special focus on overuse and traumatic knee injuries. Case studies are used to illustrate the clinical applicability and limitations of MIT. It is concluded that MIT is a non-invasive, non-radiating, low cost detection tool which should be applied for pre-scanning athletes in sports medicine. PMID:22399901

  19. Thermography Inspection for Early Detection of Composite Damage in Structures During Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Parker, F. Raymond; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Wright, Christopher W.; Bly, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composite structures are commonly tested under controlled loading. Understanding the initiation and progression of composite damage under load is critical for validating design concepts and structural analysis tools. Thermal nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is used to detect and characterize damage in composite structures during fatigue loading. A difference image processing algorithm is demonstrated to enhance damage detection and characterization by removing thermal variations not associated with defects. In addition, a one-dimensional multilayered thermal model is used to characterize damage. Lastly, the thermography results are compared to other inspections such as non-immersion ultrasonic inspections and computed tomography X-ray.

  20. Infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool to indicate sick-house-syndrome: a case-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1996-03-01

    Every third child and many adults in Sweden have allergic reactions caused by indoor environmental problems. A lot of buildings constructed during the building-boom period of 1950 - 1990 expose the sick-house-syndrome, due to built-in moisture problems and poor ventilation performance of the building. Leaky building construction, transport of humid air condensing on thermal bridges within the construction gives rise to a humid environment, and forms a base for a microbial deterioration process of organic materials, with emissions hazardous for human health. So far there are no universal and cost efficient techniques or methods developed which could be used to reveal the sick-house-syndrome. In this paper we present the results of a case-study of the sick-house-syndrome, and an investigation concept with a combination of different techniques and methods to detect and to map underlying factors that form the base for microbial activities. The concept includes mobile and indoor thermography, functional control of ventilation systems, tracer gas techniques for measurement of air flow exchange rate in different rooms, microbial investigation of emissions, field inspections within the building construction and the building envelope, and medical investigation of the health status of the people working in the building. Mobile thermography of the exterior facades has been performed with a longwave AGEMA THV 900, respectively THV 1000 infrared system, during the period December 1994 - June 1995, at different and similar weather and radiation conditions, and with the building pressurized at one accession. Indoor thermography has been performed with a shortwave AGEMA THV 470 system, for a selection of objects/surfaces with thermal deviations, indicated in thermograms from the different mobile thermographic surveys. Functional control was performed for the ventilation systems, and air flow rates were measured using tracer gas technique for a selection of rooms with different