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Sample records for acoustic tiltedti media

  1. Finite Difference Modeling of Wave Progpagation in Acoustic TiltedTI Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Linbin; Rector III, James W.; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2005-03-21

    Based on an acoustic assumption (shear wave velocity is zero) and a dispersion relation, we derive an acoustic wave equation for P-waves in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media (transversely isotropic media with a tilted symmetry axis). This equation has fewer parameters than an elastic wave equation in TTI media and yields an accurate description of P-wave traveltimes and spreading-related attenuation. Our TTI acoustic wave equation is a fourth-order equation in time and space. We demonstrate that the acoustic approximation allows the presence of shear waves in the solution. The substantial differences in traveltime and amplitude between data created using VTI and TTI assumptions is illustrated in examples.

  2. Shear waves in acoustic anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Grechka, Vladimir; Zhang, Linbin; Rector, James W.

    2003-01-02

    Acoustic transversely isotropic (TI) media are defined by artificially setting the shear-wave velocity in the direction of symmetry axis, VS0, to zero. Contrary to conventional wisdom that equating VS0 = 0 eliminates shear waves, we demonstrate their presence and examine their properties. Specifically, we show that SV-waves generally have finite nonzero phase and group velocities in acoustic TI media. In fact, these waves have been observed in full waveform modeling, but apparently they were not understood and labeled as numerical artifacts. Acoustic TI media are characterized by extreme, in some sense infinite strength of anisotropy. It makes the following unusual wave phenomena possible: (1) there are propagation directions, where the SV-ray is orthogonal to the corresponding wavefront normal, (2) the SV-wave whose ray propagates along the symmetry axis is polarized parallel to the P-wave propagating in the same direction, (3) P-wave singularities, that is, directions where P- and SV -wave phase velocities coincide might exist in acoustic TI media. We also briefly discuss some aspects of wave propagation in low-symmetry acoustic anisotropic models. Extreme anisotropy in those media creates bizarre phase- and group-velocity surfaces that might bring intellectual delight to an anisotropic guru.

  3. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  4. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  5. Acoustic field in unsteady moving media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1995-01-01

    In the interaction of an acoustic field with a moving airframe the authors encounter a canonical initial value problem for an acoustic field induced by an unsteady source distribution, q(t,x) with q equivalent to 0 for t less than or equal to 0, in a medium moving with a uniform unsteady velocity U(t)i in the coordinate system x fixed on the airframe. Signals issued from a source point S in the domain of dependence D of an observation point P at time t will arrive at point P more than once corresponding to different retarded times, Tau in the interval (0, t). The number of arrivals is called the multiplicity of the point S. The multiplicity equals 1 if the velocity U remains subsonic and can be greater when U becomes supersonic. For an unsteady uniform flow U(t)i, rules are formulated for defining the smallest number of I subdomains V(sub i) of D with the union of V(sub i) equal to D. Each subdomain has multiplicity 1 and a formula for the corresponding retarded time. The number of subdomains V(sub i) with nonempty intersection is the multiplicity m of the intersection. The multiplicity is at most I. Examples demonstrating these rules are presented for media at accelerating and/or decelerating supersonic speed.

  6. Acoustic Energy Estimates in Inhomogeneous Moving Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Farris, Mark

    1999-01-01

    In ducted fan engine noise research, there is a need for defining a simple and easy to use acoustic energy conservation law to help in quantification of noise control techniques. There is a well known conservation law relating acoustic energy and acoustic energy flux in the case of an isentropic irrotational flow. Several different approaches have been taken to generalize this conservation law. For example, Morfey finds an identity by separating out the irrotational part of the perturbed flow. Myers is able to find a series of indentities by observing an algebraic relationship between the basic conservation of energy equation for a background flow and the underlying equations of motion. In an approximate sense, this algebraic relationship is preserved under perturbation. A third approach which seems to have not been pursued in the literature is a result known as Noether's theorem. There is a Lagrangian formulation for the Euler equation of fluid mechanics. Noether's theorem says that any group action that leaves the Lagrangian action invariant leads to a conserved quantity. This presentation will include a survey of current results regarding acoustic energy and preliminary results on the symmetries of the Lagrangian.

  7. The Numerical Solution of Acoustic Propagation through Dispersive Moving Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    domain version [3] of the Kramer- Kronig relationships (K-K), [6] he arrived at a general form for the operator. Szabo’s operator was originally...for longitudinal and shear wave propagation in viscoelastic media,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 2437-2446, 2000. [6] R. D. L. Kronig , “On the theory...domain representation of the Kramers- Kronig dispersion relations,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2114-2119, 2000. [8] G. V. Norton and J. C. Novarini

  8. How reproducible is the acoustical characterization of porous media?

    PubMed

    Pompoli, Francesco; Bonfiglio, Paolo; Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Jaouen, Luc; Bécot, François-Xavier; Sgard, Franck; Asdrubali, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Francesco; Hübelt, Jörn; Atalla, Noureddine; Amédin, Celse K; Lauriks, Walter; Boeckx, Laurens

    2017-02-01

    There is a considerable number of research publications on the characterization of porous media that is carried out in accordance with ISO 10534-2 (International Standards Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2001) and/or ISO 9053 (International Standards Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 1991). According to the Web of Science(TM) (last accessed 22 September 2016) there were 339 publications in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America alone which deal with the acoustics of porous media. However, the reproducibility of these characterization procedures is not well understood. This paper deals with the reproducibility of some standard characterization procedures for acoustic porous materials. The paper is an extension of the work published by Horoshenkov, Khan, Bécot, Jaouen, Sgard, Renault, Amirouche, Pompoli, Prodi, Bonfiglio, Pispola, Asdrubali, Hübelt, Atalla, Amédin, Lauriks, and Boeckx [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122(1), 345-353 (2007)]. In this paper, independent laboratory measurements were performed on the same material specimens so that the naturally occurring inhomogeneity in materials was controlled. It also presented the reproducibility data for the characteristic impedance, complex wavenumber, and for some related pore structure properties. This work can be helpful to better understand the tolerances of these material characterization procedures so improvements can be developed to reduce experimental errors and improve the reproducibility between laboratories.

  9. Acoustic-elastodynamic interaction in isotropic fractal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joumaa, H.; Ostoja-Starzewski, M.

    2013-09-01

    This research explores the acoustic-elastodynamic interaction in isotropic fractal media. The analysis discusses the direct coupling of two constitutive models under dynamic loading: a continuous solid and an isotropic fractal medium. We consider two situations where in the first, the fractal medium is enclosed within a thin spherical shell (interior problem), while in the second, the fractal medium extends infinitely outside the shell (exterior problem). The two problems are simulated analytically, and the exact solution for the shell displacement is expressed in closed form in the Laplace domain. The formulation of the radiation condition for infinite fractal media is essential to derive the exterior problem's solution. This study represents a meaningful idealization of real-application problems involving the interaction of multi-constitutive media, e.g. the human brain, whereby fractal features affect the response of this body under various excitations.

  10. Investigation of embedded structures in media with unknown acoustic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümmritz, S.; Wolf, M.; Kühnicke, E.

    2017-02-01

    This contribution presents new methods for the localization and characterization of discontinuities in media with unknown acoustic properties using annular arrays. The usage of annular arrays allows the focus position to be varied. By evaluating the signal amplitude as a function of the focus position and the measured time of flight, sound velocity and layer thickness can be determined simultaneously. For classifying the discontinuities, the directional patterns of the reflected sound fields are evaluated. The sound pressure distribution of the reflected sound field at the probe surface mainly depends on shape and size of the reflector. Evaluating the amplitude difference between the probe elements provides the ability to classify reflector shape and to determine its thickness.

  11. Acoustical properties of dry and saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinouskaya, I.; Mourzenko, V. V.; Bogdanov, B. B.; Thovert, J.; Adler, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    Our objective is to determine the macroscopic acoustical properties of porous media (either dry or saturated by an interstitial fluid) and to relate them to the mechanical and hydromechanical characteristics of the medium and its components. Wave propagation in a dry elastic material is governed by the elastodynamic equation. For a dry medium, the stress is zero on the pore surface. The medium is supposed to be spatially periodic and composed of identical cells. When the wave length λ is very large when compared to the scale l of the heterogeneities, the medium behaves in a first approximation as an equivalent homogeneous material. All the fields can expanded as series of the small parameter η= l/2πλ, in terms of two space variables x and y associated to the scales λ et l, respectively. This expansion is introduced into the elastodynamic equation with appropriate boundary conditions. A series of non homogeneous partial differential equations are found for the successive orders in η. The predominant order corresponds to the equivalent homogeneous material. The first order equation provides the polarization correction, the second one the celerity dispersion and the third one the attenuation. These equations are discretized by a finite volume formulation in a tetrahedral mesh which is either structured or not. The resulting linear system is solved by a conjugate gradient method. Each elementary volume may have specific properties. Wave propagation in a saturated medium is more complex since it is influenced by the solid and liquid phases. When a periodic oscillation is imposed, the solid displacements are governed by the elastodynamic and the Stokes equations coupled by boundary conditions at the interface. The solutions to these equations yield the macroscopic characteristics of the medium. The first equation yields two independent problems in the solid, one identical to dry media and one corresponding to a medium submitted to an interstitial macroscopic

  12. Acoustical properties of dry and saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Malinouskaya, I.; Mourzenko, V. V.; Thovert, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    Our objective is to determine the macroscopic acoustical properties of porous media (either dry or saturated by an interstitial fluid) and to relate them to the mechanical and hydromechanical characteristics of the medium and its components. Wave propagation in a dry elastic material is governed by the elastodynamic equation. For a dry medium, the stress is zero on the pore surface. The medium is supposed to be spatially periodic and composed of identical cells. When the wave length lambda is very large when compared to the scale l of the heterogeneities, the medium behaves in a first approximation as an equivalent homogeneous material. All the fields can expanded as series of the small parameter eta= l/2 pi lambda, in terms of two space variables associated to the scales lambda et l, respectively. This expansion is introduced into the elastodynamic equation with appropriate boundary conditions. A series of non homogeneous partial differential equations are found for the successive orders in eta. The predominant order corresponds to the equivalent homogeneous material. The first order equation provides the polarization correction, the second one the celerity dispersion and the third one the attenuation. These equations are discretized by a finite volume formulation in a tetrahedral mesh which is either structured or not. The resulting linear system is solved by a conjugate gradient method. Each elementary volume may have specific properties. Wave propagation in a saturated medium is more complex since it is influenced by the solid and liquid phases. When a periodic oscillation is imposed, the solid displacements are governed by the elastodynamic and the Stokes equations coupled by boundary conditions at the interface. The solutions to these equations yield the macroscopic characteristics of the medium. The first equation yields two independent problems in the solid, one identical to dry media and one corresponding to a medium submitted to an interstitial

  13. Acoustic field and array response uncertainties in stratified ocean media.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J; Dhakal, Sagar

    2012-07-01

    The change-of-variables theorem of probability theory is applied to compute acoustic field and array beam power probability density functions (pdfs) in uncertain ocean environments represented by stratified, attenuating ocean waveguide models. Computational studies for one and two-layer waveguides investigate the functional properties of the acoustic field and array beam power pdfs. For the studies, the acoustic parameter uncertainties are represented by parametric pdfs. The field and beam response pdfs are computed directly from the parameter pdfs using the normal-mode representation and the change-of-variables theorem. For two-dimensional acoustic parameter uncertainties of sound speed and attenuation, the field and beam power pdfs exhibit irregular functional behavior and singularities associated with stationary points of the mapping, defined by acoustic propagation, from the parameter space to the field or beam power space. Implications for the assessment of orthogonal polynomial expansion and other methods for computing acoustic field pdfs are discussed.

  14. Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter for Biological Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Wesley Nelson

    In vitro measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are presented for several biological media. With these measurements it is possible to predict the distortion of a finite amplitude wave in biological tissues of current diagnostic and research interest. The measurement method is based on the finite amplitude distortion of a sine wave that is emmitted by a piston source. The growth of the second harmonic component of this wave is measured by a piston receiver which is coaxial with and has the same size as the source. The experimental measurements and theory are compared in order to determine the nonlinearity parameter. The density, sound speed, and attenuation for the medium are determined in order to make this comparison. The theory developed for this study accounts for the influence of both diffraction and attenuation on the experimental measurements. The effects of dispersion, tissue inhomogeneity and gas bubbles within the excised tissues are studied. To test the measurement method, experimental results are compared with established values for the nonlinearity parameter of distilled water, ethylene glycol and glycerol. The agreement between these values suggests that the measurement uncertainty is (+OR-) 5% for liquids and (+OR-) 10% for solid tissues. Measurements are presented for dog blood and bovine serum albumen as a function of concentration. The nonlinearity parameters for liver, kidney and spleen are reported for both human and canine tissues. The values for the fresh tissues displayed little variation (6.8 to 7.8). Measurements for fixed, normal and cirrhotic tissues indicated that the nonlinearity parameter does not depend strongly on pathology. However, the values for fixed tissues were somewhat higher than those of the fresh tissues.

  15. Acoustic Scattering by Near-Surface Inhomogeneities in Porous Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-21

    then applying the in- verse Hankel transform gives equations that have been obtained by Rudnick [66], and Briquet et al [67], and alternative forms have...The propagation of an acoustic wave along a boundary. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 19:348-356, 1947. 131 1I t [67] M. Briquet and P

  16. Laser-speckle-visibility acoustic spectroscopy in soft turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintzenrieth, Frédéric; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Le Merrer, Marie; Höhler, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    We image the evolution in space and time of an acoustic wave propagating along the surface of turbid soft matter by shining coherent light on the sample. The wave locally modulates the speckle interference pattern of the backscattered light, which is recorded using a camera. We show both experimentally and theoretically how the temporal and spatial correlations in this pattern can be analyzed to obtain the acoustic wavelength and attenuation length. The technique is validated using shear waves propagating in aqueous foam. It may be applied to other kinds of acoustic waves in different forms of turbid soft matter such as biological tissues, pastes, or concentrated emulsions.

  17. Acoustic technique to monitor the kinetics of porous development phenomena in viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, G.; Skaf, A.; Saad, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the potential of a low frequency acoustic technique for the study and characterisation of viscoelastic porous media is investigated. This work was based on the limits of ultrasonic applications in highly absorbent porous media. In this context, fermenting dough was used as a model propagation medium. This type of product has a very complex matrix in terms of texture, openings and moisture. The basic theory of sound in such matter is recalled, especially the effects of the scattering of sound energy in matrices like that of the product under investigation. Depending on the properties of the openings, acoustic velocity and intensity of sound were chosen to represent the state of evolution of the matter. A tap-test acoustic technique was employed and allowed a quality indicator to be obtained. The results of the validation step using various technological parameters indicate that a high degree of sensitivity can be reached with non-destructive acoustic techniques.

  18. Image reconstruction in photoacoustic tomography involving layered acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Schoonover, Robert W.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), also known as thermoacoustic or optoacoustic tomography, is a rapidly emerging biomedical imaging technique that combines optical image contrast with ultrasound detection principles. Most existing reconstruction algorithms for PAT assume the object of interest possesses homogeneous acoustic properties. The images produced by such algorithms can contain significant distortions and artifacts when the object’s acoustic properties are spatially variant. In this work, we establish an image reconstruction formula for PAT applications in which a planar detection surface is employed and the to-be-imaged optical absorber is embedded in a known planar layered acoustic medium. The reconstruction formula is exact in a mathematical sense and accounts for multiple acoustic reflections between the layers of the medium. Computer-simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate and investigate the proposed method. PMID:21643397

  19. Studies of elasticity, sound propagation and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media: final report

    SciTech Connect

    Makse, Hernan A.; Johnson, David L.

    2014-09-03

    This is the final report describing the results of DOE Grant # DE-FG02-03ER15458 with original termination date of April 31, 2013, which has been extended to April 31, 2014. The goal of this project is to develop a theoretical and experimental understanding of sound propagation, elasticity and dissipation in granular materials. The topic is relevant for the efficient production of hydrocarbon and for identifying and characterizing the underground formation for storage of either CO2 or nuclear waste material. Furthermore, understanding the basic properties of acoustic propagation in granular media is of importance not only to the energy industry, but also to the pharmaceutical, chemical and agricultural industries. We employ a set of experimental, theoretical and computational tools to develop a study of acoustics and dissipation in granular media. These include the concept effective mass of granular media, normal modes analysis, statistical mechanics frameworks and numerical simulations based on Discrete Element Methods. Effective mass measurements allow us to study the mechanisms of the elastic response and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media. We perform experiments and simulations under varying conditions, including humidity and vacuum, and different interparticle force-laws to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of damping and acoustic propagation in granular media. A theoretical statistical approach studies the necessary phase space of configurations in pressure, volume fraction to classify granular materials.

  20. Laser speckle visibility acoustic spectroscopy in soft turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintzenrieth, Frédéric; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Le Merrer, Marie; Höhler, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    We image the evolution in space and time of an acoustic wave propagating along the surface of turbid soft matter by shining coherent light on the sample. The wave locally modulates the speckle interference pattern of the backscattered light and the speckle visibility[2] is recorded using a camera. We show both experimentally and theoretically how the temporal and spatial correlations in this pattern can be analyzed to obtain the acoustic wavelength and attenuation length. The technique is validated using shear waves propagating in aqueous foam.[3] It may be applied to other kinds of acoustic wave in different forms of turbid soft matter, such as biological tissues, pastes or concentrated emulsions. Now at Université Lyon 1 (ILM).

  1. Experimental study on the location of an acoustic emission source considering refraction in different media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Long; Zhou, Jing; Dong, Long-Jun; Cai, Xin; Rui, Yi-Chao; Ke, Chang-Tao

    2017-08-07

    The existing acoustic emission (AE) source location methods assume that acoustic waves propagate along straight lines, and the source location is determined by average wave velocity. Because of the heterogeneity of materials, location results often fail to meet the accuracy requirement. For this reason, an AE source location method considering refraction in different media was proposed in this paper. According to sensor coordinates, the arrival time of acoustic waves, the velocities of acoustic waves in two kinds of media, the space-time relation equations of the AE source point and the measuring point were established by the precise coordinates of the AE source based on Snell's law. The feasibility of the algorithm was verified by experiments, and the factors influencing location accuracy were also analysed. The results show that the algorithm proposed in this paper is applicable for both the same medium and different media, and the accuracy of localization is not affected by the ratio of wave velocities in two media or the distance from the AE source to the refraction surface.

  2. Computation of acoustic absorption in media composed of packed microtubes exhibiting surface irregularity.

    PubMed

    Kulpe, Jason A; Lee, Chang-Yong; Leamy, Michael J

    2011-08-01

    A multi-scale homogenization technique and a finite element-based solution procedure are employed to compute acoustic absorption in smooth and rough packed microtubes. The absorption considered arises from thermo-viscous interactions between the fluid media and the microtube walls. The homogenization technique requires geometric periodicity, which for smooth tubes is invoked using the periodicity of the finite element mesh; for rough microtubes, the periodicity invoked is that associated with the roughness. Analysis of the packed configurations, for the specific microtube radii considered, demonstrates that surface roughness does not appreciably increase the overall absorption, but instead shifts the peaks and values of the absorption curve. Additionally, the effect of the fluid media temperature on acoustic absorption is also explored. The results of the investigation are used to make conclusions about tailored design of acoustically absorbing microtube-based materials.

  3. Reproducibility experiments on measuring acoustical properties of rigid-frame porous media (round-robin tests).

    PubMed

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Bécot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc; Sgard, Franck; Renault, Amélie; Amirouche, Nesrine; Pompoli, Francesco; Prodi, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Paolo; Pispola, Giulio; Asdrubali, Francesco; Hübelt, Jörn; Atalla, Noureddine; Amédin, Celse K; Lauriks, Walter; Boeckx, Laurens

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the results of reproducibility experiments on the interlaboratory characterization of the acoustical properties of three types of consolidated porous media: granulated porous rubber, reticulated foam, and fiberglass. The measurements are conducted in several independent laboratories in Europe and North America. The studied acoustical characteristics are the surface complex acoustic impedance at normal incidence and plane wave absorption coefficient which are determined using the standard impedance tube method. The paper provides detailed procedures related to sample preparation and installation and it discusses the dispersion in the acoustical material property observed between individual material samples and laboratories. The importance of the boundary conditions, homogeneity of the porous material structure, and stability of the adopted signal processing method are highlighted.

  4. Acoustic Wave Monitoring of Biofilm Development in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm development in porous media can result in significant changes to the hydrogeological properties of subsurface systems with implications for fluid flow and contaminant transport. As such, a number of numerical models and simulations have been developed in an attempt to qua...

  5. Acoustic Wave Monitoring of Biofilm Development in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm development in porous media can result in significant changes to the hydrogeological properties of subsurface systems with implications for fluid flow and contaminant transport. As such, a number of numerical models and simulations have been developed in an attempt to qua...

  6. Acoustic imaging of vapor bubbles through optically non-transparent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, W. F.; Turko, B. T.; Leskovar, B.

    1983-10-01

    A preliminary investigation of the feasibility of acoustic imaging of vapor bubbles through optically nontransparent media is described. Measurements are reported showing the echo signals produced by air filled glass spheres of various sizes positioned in an aqueous medium as well as signals produced by actual vapor bubbles within a water filled steel pipe. In addition, the influence of the metallic wall thickness and material on the amplitude of the echo signals is investigated. Finally several examples are given of the imaging of spherical bubbles within metallic pipes using a simulated array of acoustic transducers mounted circumferentially around the pipe. The measurement procedures and a description of the measuring system are also given.

  7. One-way acoustic mirror based on anisotropic zero-index media

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zhong-ming; Liang, Bin E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Yang, Jing; Cheng, Jian-chun E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zou, Xin-ye; Li, Yong; Yang, Jun

    2015-11-23

    We have designed a one-way acoustic mirror comprising anisotropic zero-index media. For acoustic beam incident at a particular angle, the designed structure behaves like a high-efficient mirror that redirects almost all the incident energy into another direction predicted by the Snell's law, while becoming virtually transparent to beams propagating reversely along this output path. Furthermore, the mirror can be tailored to work at arbitrary incident angle by simply adjusting its geometry. Our design, with undirectional reflection functionality and flexible working angle, may offer possibilities in space isolations and have deep implication in various scenarios like ultrasound imaging or noise control.

  8. One-way acoustic mirror based on anisotropic zero-index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhong-ming; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Yang, Jing; Li, Yong; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2015-11-01

    We have designed a one-way acoustic mirror comprising anisotropic zero-index media. For acoustic beam incident at a particular angle, the designed structure behaves like a high-efficient mirror that redirects almost all the incident energy into another direction predicted by the Snell's law, while becoming virtually transparent to beams propagating reversely along this output path. Furthermore, the mirror can be tailored to work at arbitrary incident angle by simply adjusting its geometry. Our design, with undirectional reflection functionality and flexible working angle, may offer possibilities in space isolations and have deep implication in various scenarios like ultrasound imaging or noise control.

  9. Ocean Acoustic Propagation Measurements and Wave Propagation in Random Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    medium focus follows closely the prediction of Spivack and Uscinski3 5 . Using numerical solutions to the 4th moment equation, the (I’, Z) dependence...32(1), 71-89 (1985). 13. B.J. Uscinski, C. Macaskill and M. Spivack , "Path integrals for wave intensity fluctuations in random media," J. Sound and...intensity in a turbulent atmosphere-- the distribution function," Soy. Phys. JETP 47(6), 1028-1030 (1978). 35. M. Spivack and BJ. Uscinski, "Accurate

  10. Acoustic emissions (AE) during failure of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The release of shallow landslides and other geological mass movements is the result of progressive failure accumulation. Mechanical failure in disordered geologic materials occurs in intermittent breakage episodes marking the disintegration or rearrangement of load-bearing elements. Abrupt strain energy release in such breakage episodes is associated with generation of elastic waves measurable as high-frequency (kHz range) acoustic emissions (AE). The close association of AE with progressive failure events hold a promise for using such noninvasive methods to assess the mechanical state of granular Earth materials or for the development early warning methods for shallow landslides. We present numerical simulations that incorporate damage accumulation and associated stress redistribution using a fiber-bundle model. The stress released from element failure (fibers) is redistributed to the surrounding elements and eventually triggers larger failure avalanches. AE signals generated from such events and eventually hitting a virtual sensor are modeled using visco-elastic wave propagation laws. The model captures the characteristic saw-tooth shape of the observed stress-strain curves obtained from strain-controlled experiments with glass beads, including large intermittent stress release events that stem from cascading failure avalanches. The model also reproduces characteristics of AE signatures and yield a good agreement between simulation results and experimental data. Linking mechanical and AE information in the proposed modeling framework offer a solid basis for interpretation of measured field data.

  11. A contrast source method for nonlinear acoustic wave fields in media with spatially inhomogeneous attenuation.

    PubMed

    Demi, L; van Dongen, K W A; Verweij, M D

    2011-03-01

    Experimental data reveals that attenuation is an important phenomenon in medical ultrasound. Attenuation is particularly important for medical applications based on nonlinear acoustics, since higher harmonics experience higher attenuation than the fundamental. Here, a method is presented to accurately solve the wave equation for nonlinear acoustic media with spatially inhomogeneous attenuation. Losses are modeled by a spatially dependent compliance relaxation function, which is included in the Westervelt equation. Introduction of absorption in the form of a causal relaxation function automatically results in the appearance of dispersion. The appearance of inhomogeneities implies the presence of a spatially inhomogeneous contrast source in the presented full-wave method leading to inclusion of forward and backward scattering. The contrast source problem is solved iteratively using a Neumann scheme, similar to the iterative nonlinear contrast source (INCS) method. The presented method is directionally independent and capable of dealing with weakly to moderately nonlinear, large scale, three-dimensional wave fields occurring in diagnostic ultrasound. Convergence of the method has been investigated and results for homogeneous, lossy, linear media show full agreement with the exact results. Moreover, the performance of the method is demonstrated through simulations involving steered and unsteered beams in nonlinear media with spatially homogeneous and inhomogeneous attenuation. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  12. Acoustical determination of the parameters governing thermal dissipation in porous media.

    PubMed

    Olny, Xavier; Panneton, Raymond

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, the question of the acoustical determination of macroscopic thermal parameters used to describe heat exchanges in rigid open-cell porous media subjected to acoustical excitations is addressed. The proposed method is based on the measurement of the dynamic bulk modulus of the material, and analytical inverse solutions derived from different semiphenomenological models governing the thermal dissipation of acoustic waves in the material. Three models are considered: (1) Champoux-Allard model [J. Appl. Phys. 20, 1975-1979 (1991)] requiring knowledge of the porosity and thermal characteristic length, (2) Lafarge et al. model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1995-2006 (1997)] using the same parameters and the thermal permeability, and (3) Wilson model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94, 1136-1145 (1993)] that requires two adjusted parameters. Except for the porosity that is obtained from direct measurement, all the other thermal parameters are derived from the analytical inversion of the models. The method is applied to three porous materials-a foam, a glass wool, and a rock wool-with very different thermal properties. It is shown that the method can be used to assess the validity of the descriptive models for a given material.

  13. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  14. Full-wave iterative image reconstruction in photoacoustic tomography with acoustically inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Wang, Kun; Nie, Liming; Wang, Lihong V; Anastasio, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Existing approaches to image reconstruction in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) with acoustically heterogeneous media are limited to weakly varying media, are computationally burdensome, and/or cannot effectively mitigate the effects of measurement data incompleteness and noise. In this work, we develop and investigate a discrete imaging model for PACT that is based on the exact photoacoustic (PA) wave equation and facilitates the circumvention of these limitations. A key contribution of the work is the establishment of a procedure to implement a matched forward and backprojection operator pair associated with the discrete imaging model, which permits application of a wide-range of modern image reconstruction algorithms that can mitigate the effects of data incompleteness and noise. The forward and backprojection operators are based on the k-space pseudospectral method for computing numerical solutions to the PA wave equation in the time domain. The developed reconstruction methodology is investigated by use of both computer-simulated and experimental PACT measurement data.

  15. Approximate nonlinear multi-parameter inversion with single and double scattering seismic wavefields in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Wuqun; Zhang, Pan

    2016-11-01

    An approach for approximate direct quadratic nonlinear inversion in two-parameter (density and bulk modulus) heterogeneous acoustic media is being presented and discussed in this paper. The approach consists of two parts: the first is a linear generalized Radon transform (GRT) migration procedure based on the weighted true-amplitude summation of pre-stack seismic scattered data that is adapted to a virtually arbitrary observing system, and the second is a non-iterative quadratic inversion operation, produced from the explicit expression of amplitude radiation pattern that is acting on the migrated data. This ensures the asymptotic inversion can continue to simultaneously locate the discontinuities and reconstruct the size of the discontinuities in the perturbation parameters describing the acoustic media. We identify that the amplitude radiation pattern is the binary quadratic combination of the parameters in the process of formulating nonlinear inverse scattering problems based on second-order Born approximation. The coefficients of the quadratic terms are computed by appropriately handling the double scattering effects. These added quadratic terms provide a better amplitude correction for the parameters inversion. Through numerical tests, we show that for strong perturbations, the errors of the linear inversion are significant and unacceptable. In contrast, the quadratic nonlinear inversion can give fairly accurate inversion results and keep almost the same computational complexity as conventional GRT liner inversion.

  16. Diagnostics of elastic properties of a planar interface between two rough media using surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokshaiskii, A. I.; Korobov, A. I.; Shirgina, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    The results of experimental studies on the nonlinear elastic properties of a planar interface between two media are presented—an optically polished glass substrate and flat samples with different degrees of roughness. The nonlinear elastic properties of the interfaces between two media were investigated by the spectral method using surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The effect of external pressure applied to the interface on the efficiency of the generation of the second SAW harmonic was studied. Using the measured amplitudes of the first and second harmonics of the SAW that passes along the interface, the second-order nonlinear acoustic parameter was calculated as a function of the external pressure applied to the sample at a fixed amplitude of a probing wave. It was revealed that the nonlinear parameter of the SAW is a nonmonotonic function of the pressure at the boundary. The results were analyzed on the basis of an elastic contact nonlinearity, and it is concluded that these results can be used in nondestructive testing for roughness and waviness of surfaces of flat solids.

  17. Approximate non-linear multiparameter inversion with single and double scattering seismic wavefields in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Wuqun; Zhang, Pan

    2017-02-01

    An approach for approximate direct quadratic non-linear inversion in two-parameter (density and bulk modulus) heterogeneous acoustic media is being presented and discussed in this paper. The approach consists of two parts: the first is a linear generalized Radon transform (GRT) migration procedure based on the weighted true-amplitude summation of pre-stack seismic scattered data that is adapted to a virtually arbitrary observing system, and the second is a non-iterative quadratic inversion operation, produced from the explicit expression of amplitude radiation pattern that is acting on the migrated data. This ensures the asymptotic inversion can continue to simultaneously locate the discontinuities and reconstruct the size of the discontinuities in the perturbation parameters describing the acoustic media. We identify that the amplitude radiation pattern is the binary quadratic combination of the parameters in the process of formulating non-linear inverse scattering problems based on second-order Born approximation. The coefficients of the quadratic terms are computed by appropriately handling the double scattering effects. These added quadratic terms provide a better amplitude correction for the parameters inversion. Through numerical tests, we show that for strong perturbations, the errors of the linear inversion are significant and unacceptable. In contrast, the quadratic non-linear inversion can give fairly accurate inversion results and keep almost the same computational complexity as conventional GRT liner inversion.

  18. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-10

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  19. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  20. Fluid displacement fronts in porous media: pore scale interfacial jumps, pressure bursts and acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps and pressure bursts that involve intense interfacial energy release in the form of acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and transport properties behind the front. We present experimental studies using acoustic emission technique (AE), rapid imaging, and liquid pressure measurements to characterize these processes during drainage and imbibition in simple porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (AE amplitudes obey a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion reflecting fluid redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Imaging revealed that the velocity of interfacial jumps often exceeds front velocity by more than 50 fold and is highly inertial component (Re>1000). Pore invasion volumes reduced deduced from pressure fluctuations waiting times (for constant withdrawal rates) show remarkable agreement with geometrically-deduced pore volumes. Discrepancies between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to constraints on evacuation opportunity times and simultaneous invasion events. A mechanistic model for interfacial motions in a pore-throat network was developed to investigate interfacial dynamics focusing on the role of inertia. Results suggest that while pore scale dynamics were sensitive to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerted only a minor effect on phase entrapment. The study on pore scale invasion events paints a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provides new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts that are essential for improved macroscopic description of multiphase flows in porous media.

  1. Sources and characteristics of acoustic emissions from mechanically stressed geologic granular media — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Cohen, Denis; Or, Dani

    2012-05-01

    The formation of cracks and emergence of shearing planes and other modes of rapid macroscopic failure in geologic granular media involve numerous grain scale mechanical interactions often generating high frequency (kHz) elastic waves, referred to as acoustic emissions (AE). These acoustic signals have been used primarily for monitoring and characterizing fatigue and progressive failure in engineered systems, with only a few applications concerning geologic granular media reported in the literature. Similar to the monitoring of seismic events preceding an earthquake, AE may offer a means for non-invasive, in-situ, assessment of mechanical precursors associated with imminent landslides or other types of rapid mass movements (debris flows, rock falls, snow avalanches, glacier stick-slip events). Despite diverse applications and potential usefulness, a systematic description of the AE method and its relevance to mechanical processes in Earth sciences is lacking. This review is aimed at providing a sound foundation for linking observed AE with various micro-mechanical failure events in geologic granular materials, not only for monitoring of triggering events preceding mass mobilization, but also as a non-invasive tool in its own right for probing the rich spectrum of mechanical processes at scales ranging from a single grain to a hillslope. We review first studies reporting use of AE for monitoring of failure in various geologic materials, and describe AE generating source mechanisms in mechanically stressed geologic media (e.g., frictional sliding, micro-crackling, particle collisions, rupture of water bridges, etc.) including AE statistical features, such as frequency content and occurrence probabilities. We summarize available AE sensors and measurement principles. The high sampling rates of advanced AE systems enable detection of numerous discrete failure events within a volume and thus provide access to statistical descriptions of progressive collapse of systems

  2. Direct opto-acoustic in vitro measurement of the spatial distribution of laser radiation in biological media

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Belov, Sergej A; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2006-12-31

    The problem of opto-acoustic (AO) diagnostics of light scattering and absorption in biological media is considered. The objects under study were milk, bovine and porcine liver, and bovine muscle tissue. The forward and backward schemes for recording acoustic signals were used in experiments. The spatial distribution of the light intensity was measured for each biological medium from the temporal profile of the excited OA pulse and the absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient were determined. Opto-acoustic signals were excited by a 1064-nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 779 nm. It is shown that the proposed method can be used for obtaining a priori information on a biological medium in problems of optical and AO tomography. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  3. Effects of acoustic waves on stick-slip in granular media and implications for earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, P.A.; Savage, H.; Knuth, M.; Gomberg, J.; Marone, C.

    2008-01-01

    It remains unknown how the small strains induced by seismic waves can trigger earthquakes at large distances, in some cases thousands of kilometres from the triggering earthquake, with failure often occurring long after the waves have passed. Earthquake nucleation is usually observed to take place at depths of 10-20 km, and so static overburden should be large enough to inhibit triggering by seismic-wave stress perturbations. To understand the physics of dynamic triggering better, as well as the influence of dynamic stressing on earthquake recurrence, we have conducted laboratory studies of stick-slip in granular media with and without applied acoustic vibration. Glass beads were used to simulate granular fault zone material, sheared under constant normal stress, and subject to transient or continuous perturbation by acoustic waves. Here we show that small-magnitude failure events, corresponding to triggered aftershocks, occur when applied sound-wave amplitudes exceed several microstrain. These events are frequently delayed or occur as part of a cascade of small events. Vibrations also cause large slip events to be disrupted in time relative to those without wave perturbation. The effects are observed for many large-event cycles after vibrations cease, indicating a strain memory in the granular material. Dynamic stressing of tectonic faults may play a similar role in determining the complexity of earthquake recurrence. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Effects of acoustic waves on stick-slip in granular media and implications for earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul A; Savage, Heather; Knuth, Matt; Gomberg, Joan; Marone, Chris

    2008-01-03

    It remains unknown how the small strains induced by seismic waves can trigger earthquakes at large distances, in some cases thousands of kilometres from the triggering earthquake, with failure often occurring long after the waves have passed. Earthquake nucleation is usually observed to take place at depths of 10-20 km, and so static overburden should be large enough to inhibit triggering by seismic-wave stress perturbations. To understand the physics of dynamic triggering better, as well as the influence of dynamic stressing on earthquake recurrence, we have conducted laboratory studies of stick-slip in granular media with and without applied acoustic vibration. Glass beads were used to simulate granular fault zone material, sheared under constant normal stress, and subject to transient or continuous perturbation by acoustic waves. Here we show that small-magnitude failure events, corresponding to triggered aftershocks, occur when applied sound-wave amplitudes exceed several microstrain. These events are frequently delayed or occur as part of a cascade of small events. Vibrations also cause large slip events to be disrupted in time relative to those without wave perturbation. The effects are observed for many large-event cycles after vibrations cease, indicating a strain memory in the granular material. Dynamic stressing of tectonic faults may play a similar role in determining the complexity of earthquake recurrence.

  5. Theoretical and experimental study on the acoustic wave energy after the nonlinear interaction of acoustic waves in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chao-feng; Li, Feng-chen; Chen, Huan; Lu, Di; Yang, De-sen; Zhang, Meng

    2015-06-01

    Based on the Burgers equation and Manley-Rowe equation, the derivation about nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves has been done in this paper. After nonlinear interaction among the low-frequency weak waves and the pump wave, the analytical solutions of acoustic waves' amplitude in the field are deduced. The relationship between normalized energy of high-frequency and the change of acoustic energy before and after the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves is analyzed. The experimental results about the changes of the acoustic energy are presented. The study shows that new frequencies are generated and the energies of the low-frequency are modulated in a long term by the pump waves, which leads the energies of the low-frequency acoustic waves to change in the pulse trend in the process of the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves. The increase and decrease of the energies of the low-frequency are observed under certain typical conditions, which lays a foundation for practical engineering applications.

  6. Full-Wave Iterative Image Reconstruction in Photoacoustic Tomography With Acoustically Inhomogeneous Media

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Wang, Kun; Nie, Liming; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Existing approaches to image reconstruction in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) with acoustically heterogeneous media are limited to weakly varying media, are computationally burdensome, and/or cannot effectively mitigate the effects of measurement data incompleteness and noise. In this work, we develop and investigate a discrete imaging model for PACT that is based on the exact photoacoustic (PA) wave equation and facilitates the circumvention of these limitations. A key contribution of the work is the establishment of a procedure to implement a matched forward and backprojection operator pair associated with the discrete imaging model, which permits application of a wide-range of modern image reconstruction algorithms that can mitigate the effects of data incompleteness and noise. The forward and backprojection operators are based on the k-space pseudospectral method for computing numerical solutions to the PA wave equation in the time domain. The developed reconstruction methodology is investigated by use of both computer-simulated and experimental PACT measurement data. PMID:23529196

  7. Stability analysis for acoustic wave propagation in tilted TI media by finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Peter M.; Duveneck, Eric

    2011-05-01

    Several papers in recent years have reported instabilities in P-wave modelling, based on an acoustic approximation, for inhomogeneous transversely isotropic media with tilted symmetry axis (TTI media). In particular, instabilities tend to occur if the axis of symmetry varies rapidly in combination with strong contrasts of medium parameters, which is typically the case at the foot of a steeply dipping salt flank. In a recent paper, we have proposed and demonstrated a P-wave modelling approach for TTI media, based on rotated stress and strain tensors, in which the wave equations reduce to a coupled set of two second-order partial differential equations for two scalar stress components: a normal component along the variable axis of symmetry and a lateral component of stress in the plane perpendicular to that axis. Spatially constant density is assumed in this approach. A numerical discretization scheme was proposed which uses discrete second-derivative operators for the non-mixed second-order derivatives in the wave equations, and combined first-derivative operators for the mixed second-order derivatives. This paper provides a complete and rigorous stability analysis, assuming a uniformly sampled grid. Although the spatial discretization operator for the TTI acoustic wave equation is not self-adjoint, this operator still defines a complete basis of eigenfunctions of the solution space, provided that the solution space is somewhat restricted at locations where the medium is elliptically anisotropic. First, a stability analysis is given for a discretization scheme, which is purely based on first-derivative operators. It is shown that the coefficients of the central difference operators should satisfy certain conditions. In view of numerical artefacts, such a discretization scheme is not attractive, and the non-mixed second-order derivatives of the wave equation are discretized directly by second-derivative operators. It is shown that this modification preserves

  8. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO MULTIPLE RADIATION SCATTERING IN RANDOM MEDIA: Direct opto-acoustic in vitro measurement of the spatial distribution of laser radiation in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Belov, Sergej A.; Solomatin, Vladimir S.; Khokhlova, Tanya D.; Karabutov, Aleksander A.

    2006-12-01

    The problem of opto-acoustic (AO) diagnostics of light scattering and absorption in biological media is considered. The objects under study were milk, bovine and porcine liver, and bovine muscle tissue. The forward and backward schemes for recording acoustic signals were used in experiments. The spatial distribution of the light intensity was measured for each biological medium from the temporal profile of the excited OA pulse and the absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient were determined. Opto-acoustic signals were excited by a 1064-nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 779 nm. It is shown that the proposed method can be used for obtaining a priori information on a biological medium in problems of optical and AO tomography.

  9. Frequency-Dependent Spherical-Wave Reflection in Acoustic Media: Analysis and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingnan; Wang, Shangxu; Wang, Jingbo; Dong, Chunhui; Yuan, Sanyi

    2017-02-01

    Spherical-wave reflectivity (SWR), which describes the seismic wave reflection in real subsurface media more accurately than plane-wave reflectivity (PWR), recently, again attracts geophysicists' attention. The recent studies mainly focus on the amplitude variation with offset/angle (AVO/AVA) attributes of SWR. For a full understanding of the reflection mechanism of spherical wave, this paper systematically investigates the frequency-dependent characteristics of SWR in a two-layer acoustic medium model with a planar interface. Two methods are used to obtain SWR. The first method is through the calculation of classical Sommerfeld integral. The other is by 3D wave equation numerical modeling. To enhance computation efficiency, we propose to perform wave equation simulation in cylindrical coordinates, wherein we for the first time implement unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer as the absorbing boundary. Both methods yield the same results, which demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the computation. From both the numerical tests and the theoretical demonstration, we find that the necessary condition when frequency dependence of SWR occurs is that the upper and lower media have different velocities. At the precritical small angle, the SWR exhibits complicated frequency-dependent characteristics for varying medium parameters. Especially when the impedance of upper medium equals that of lower one, the PWR is zero according to geometric seismics. Whereas the SWR is nonzero: the magnitude of SWR decreases with growing frequency, and approaches that of the corresponding PWR at high frequency; the phase of SWR increases with growing frequency, but approaches 90° or -90° at high frequency. At near- and post-critical angles, large difference exists between SWR and PWR, and the difference is particularly great at low frequencies. Finally, we propose a nonlinear inversion method to estimate physical parameters and interface depth of media by utilizing the frequency

  10. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams in lossy media.

    PubMed

    Prego-Borges, José L; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    2014-08-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have raised significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction -self-healing- property (after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's); while the FWs, a sub-class of LWs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the longitudinal field intensity pattern inside a prefixed interval, for instance 0⩽z⩽L, of the wave propagation axis. More specifically, the FWs are localized fields "at rest", that is, with a static envelope (within which only the carrier wave propagates), and can be endowed moreover with a high transverse localization. In this paper we investigate, by simulated experiments, various cases of generation of ultrasonic FW fields, with the frequency of f0=1 MHz in a water-like medium, taking account of the effects of attenuation. We present results of FWs for distances up to L=80 mm, in attenuating media with absorption coefficient α in the range 70⩽α⩽170 dB/m. Such simulated FW fields are constructed by using a procedure developed by us, via appropriate finite superpositions of monochromatic ultrasonic Bessel beams. We pay due attention to the selection of the FW parameters, constrained by the rather tight restrictions imposed by experimental Acoustics, as well as to some practical implications of the transducer design. The energy localization properties of the Frozen Waves can find application even in many medical apparatus, such as bistouries or acoustic tweezers, as well as for treatment of diseased tissues (in particular, for the destruction of tumor cells, without affecting the surrounding tissues; also for kidney stone shuttering, etc.).

  11. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  12. Shaping volumetric light distribution through turbid media using real-time three-dimensional opto-acoustic feedback.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, X Luís; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-02-15

    Focusing light through turbid media represents a highly fascinating challenge in modern biophotonics. The unique capability of opto-acoustics for high-resolution imaging of light absorption contrast in deep tissues can provide a natural and efficient feedback to control light delivery in a scattering medium. While the basic feasibility of using opto-acoustic readings as a feedback mechanism for wavefront shaping has been recently reported, the suggested approaches may require long acquisition times, making them challenging to be translated into realistic tissue environments. In an attempt to significantly accelerate dynamic wavefront shaping capabilities, we present here a feedback-based approach using real-time three-dimensional opto-acoustic imaging assisted with genetic-algorithm-based optimization. The new technique offers robust performance in the presence of noisy measurements and can simultaneously control the scattered wave field in an entire volumetric region.

  13. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  14. Acoustic wave propagation in heterogeneous two-dimensional fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzehpour, Hossein; Asgari, Mojgan; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses an important fundamental question: the differences between wave propagation in fractured porous media with a uniform matrix (constant bulk modulus) and those in which the matrix is heterogeneous with its bulk modulus distributed spatially. The analysis of extensive experimental data [Phys. Rev. E 71, 046301 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevE.71.046301] indicated that such distributions are self-affine and induce correlations at all the relevant length scales. The comparison is important from a practical view point because in many of the traditional models of fractured rock, particularly those that are used to study wave propagation or fit some data, the matrix is assumed to be uniform. Using extensive numerical simulation of propagation of acoustic waves, we present strong evidence indicating that the waves' amplitude in a fractured porous medium with a heterogeneous matrix decays exponentially with the distance from the source. This is in sharp contrast with a fractured porous medium with a uniform matrix in which not only the waves' amplitude decays with the distance as a stretched exponential function, but the exponent that characterizes the function is also dependent upon the fracture density. The localization length depends on the correlations in the spatial distribution of the bulk modulus, as well as the fracture density. The mean speed of the waves varies linearly with the fractures' mean orientation.

  15. Determination of B/A of Biological Media by Measuring and Modeling Nonlinear Distortion of Pulsed Acoustic Wave in Two-Layer System of Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, T.; Wójcik, J.; Nowicki, A.

    Knowledge of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, B/A, of biological fluids or soft tissues is necessary whenever high intensity pressure fields are induced. A numerical model recently developed in our lab is capable of fast predicting the nonlinear distortion of pulsed finite-amplitude acoustic waves generated from axisymmetric sources propagating through multilayer attenuating media. Quantitative analysis of the obtained results enabled developing the alternative method for determination of the B/A of biological media. First, the method involves measuring the nonlinear waveform distortion of the tone burst propagating through water. Then, it involves numerical modeling (in frequency domain) using the Time-Averaged Wave Envelope (TAWE) approach. The numerical simulation results are fitted to the experimental data by adjusting the source boundary conditions to determine accurately the source pressure, effective radius and apodization function being the input parameters to the numerical solver. Next, the method involves measuring the nonlinear distortion of idem tone burst passing through the two-layer system of parallel media. Then, we numerically model nonlinear distortion in two-layer system of media in frequency domain under experimental boundary conditions. The numerical simulation results are fitted to the experimental data by adjusting the B/A value of the tested material. Values of the B/A for 1.3-butanediol at both the ambient (25°C) and physiological (36.6°C) temperatures were determined. The obtained result (B/A = 10.5 ± 5% at 25°C) is in a good agreement with that available in literature. The B/A = 11.5 ± 5% at 36.6°C was determined.

  16. Microbial-Induced Heterogeneity in the Acoustic Properties of Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acoustic wave data were acquired over a two-dimensional region of a microbial-stimulated sand column and an unstimulated sand column to assess the spatiotemporal changes in a porous medium caused by microbial growth and biofilm formation. The acoustic signals from the unstimulate...

  17. Microbial-Induced Heterogeneity in the Acoustic Properties of Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acoustic wave data were acquired over a two-dimensional region of a microbial-stimulated sand column and an unstimulated sand column to assess the spatiotemporal changes in a porous medium caused by microbial growth and biofilm formation. The acoustic signals from the unstimulate...

  18. Solution of an inverse scattering problem for the acoustic wave equation in three-dimensional media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional inverse scattering problem for the acoustic wave equation is studied. The task is to determine the density and acoustic impedance of a medium. A necessary and sufficient condition for the unique solvability of this problem is established in the form of an energy conservation law. The interpretation of the solution to the inverse problem and the construction of medium images are discussed.

  19. Effects of signal attenuation in natural media on interpretation of acoustic emissions in the context early warning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Gravity driven instabilities in natural media such as rockfalls, landslides, snow avalanches or glacier break-offs represent a significant class of natural hazards. Reliable prediction of imminence of such events combined with timely evacuation remain a challenge because material failure is a non linear process involving inherent heterogeneities affecting the outcome. Nevertheless, such materials break gradually with the weakest parts breaking first, producing precursory "micro-cracks" and associated elastic waves traveling in the material. The monitoring of such acoustic/micro-seismic activity offers valuable information on the progression of damage and imminence of global failure. The main challenge is that acoustic waves are strongly attenuated during their travel through natural media thereby introducing ambiguity in the interpretation of the magnitude (severity) or leading to loss of detection for faraway events. For example, a micro-crack event would be measured as a large event if occurring close to the sensor, and as a small event if far from the sensor ( or may not be detected at all). A more complete picture of acoustic emissions or micro- seismic activity requires deployment of a dense network of sensors that enables localization of sources and thus the determination of initial energy released with each event. However, such networks are prohibitively costly difficult to analyze in real time over scales of interest. Is it possible to find a way to analyze directly in real time the measured micro-seismic activity to infer the slope mechanical status? Following a qualitative description of the observation problem and the processes leading to attenuation, a quantitative analysis is performed using a numerical model based on the classical Fiber Bundle Model. Introducing a basic attenuation law in such simple models enables to directly compare un-attenuated and attenuated acoustic activity (and also avalanche size-frequency distribution) at any location

  20. Ultrasonic Tracking of Acoustic Radiation Force-Induced Displacements in Homogeneous Media

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; McAleavey, Stephen A.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2007-01-01

    The use of ultrasonic methods to track the tissue deformation generated by acoustic radiation force is subject to jitter and displacement underestimation errors, with displacement underestimation being primarily caused by lateral and elevation shearing within the point spread function (PSF) of the ultrasonic beam. Models have been developed using finite element methods and Field II, a linear acoustic field simulation package, to study the impact of focal configuration, tracking frequency, and material properties on the accuracy of ultrasonically tracking the tissue deformation generated by acoustic radiation force excitations. These models demonstrate that lateral and elevation shearing underneath the PSF of the tracking beam leads to displacement underestimation in the focal zone. Displacement underestimation can be reduced by using tracking beams that are narrower than the spatial extent of the displacement fields. Displacement underestimation and jitter decrease with time after excitation as shear wave propagation away from the region of excitation reduces shearing in the lateral and elevation dimensions. The use of higher tracking frequencies in broadband transducers, along with 2D focusing in the elevation dimension, will reduce jitter and improve displacement tracking accuracy. Relative displacement underestimation remains constant as a function of applied force, while jitter increases with applied force. Underdeveloped speckle (SNR <1.91) leads to greater levels of jitter and peak displacement underestimation. Axial shearing is minimal over the tracking kernel lengths used in Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging and thus does not impact displacement tracking. PMID:16889337

  1. Doppler effects in heterogeneous media with applications to ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Peter B.

    2005-12-01

    Doppler shift corrections to ocean acoustic signals are complicated by the multi-spatial-scale structure of the ocean medium, resulting in a multi-time-scale structure of the acoustic Green function. Repeated reflections and refractions lead in general to an infinite number of acoustic paths or modes, with different times of flight, connecting source and receiver. The rate of change of these flight times with source or receiver motion gives rise to Doppler shift corrections, and each acoustic path or mode has a different correction. A clean Doppler correction (in the sense of an observable coherent motion-induced frequency shift for each path or mode) is shown to emerge only when the medium is homogeneous along the direction of source or receiver motion, even when it is highly inhomogeneous in directions orthogonal to the motion. A very general quantitative theory for this correction is developed, encompassing earlier results in the literature, and presented in a form amenable to efficient numerical implementation in data processing.

  2. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force source for non-contact measurement of soft media elasticity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Lukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David S.; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) is commonly used in ultrasound (US)-based elastography to generate shear waves deep within soft tissue. These waves can be detected with different methods, e.g. contact conventional ultrasound imaging probes or contact free magnetic resonance or optical coherence tomography (OCT). For many clinical applications, however, for instance the eye, a totally non-contact system for generation/detection of mechanical waves is needed. Here, we present a method for efficient non-contact excitation of broadband transverse mechanical waves in soft media. The approach is based on pushing the medium under study with a 1 MHz chirped US wave focused to its surface from air. The US beam reflected from the air/medium interface provides the ARF force to the medium surface launching a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The design and performance of the air-coupled transducer is discussed. The focal zone, peak pressure and acoustic intensity are measured for transducers with different numerical apertures. Time and frequency characteristics of the propagating mechanical waves, generated in soft tissue, are tracked with a phase-sensitive ultra-fast frame rate OCT imaging system. Application of the proposed method for non-contact, non-invasive, sub-mm resolution elasticity measurement in soft tissue is proposed.

  3. Investigation of 3D surface acoustic waves in granular media with 3-color digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Mathieu; Picart, Pascal; Penelet, Guillaume; Tournat, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the implementation of digital color holography to investigate elastic waves propagating along a layer of a granular medium. The holographic set-up provides simultaneous recording and measurement of the 3D dynamic displacement at the surface. Full-field measurements of the acoustic amplitude and phase at different excitation frequencies are obtained. It is shown that the experimental data can be used to obtain the dispersion curve of the modes propagating in this granular medium layer. The experimental dispersion curve and that obtained from a finite element modeling of the problem are found to be in good agreement. In addition, full-field images of the interaction of an acoustic wave guided in the granular layer with a buried object are also shown.

  4. Compensation of shear waves in photoacoustic tomography with layered acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Schoonover, Robert W.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    An image reconstruction formula is presented for photoacoustic computed tomography that accounts for conversion between longitudinal and shear waves in a planar-layered acoustic medium. We assume the optical absorber that produces the photoacoustic wave field is embedded in a single fluid layer and any elastic solid layers present are separated by one or more fluid layers. The measurement aperture is assumed to be planar. Computer simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate and investigate the proposed reconstruction formula. PMID:21979514

  5. Compensation of shear waves in photoacoustic tomography with layered acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Robert W; Anastasio, Mark A

    2011-10-01

    An image reconstruction formula is presented for photoacoustic computed tomography that accounts for conversion between longitudinal and shear waves in a planar-layered acoustic medium. We assume the optical absorber that produces the photoacoustic wave field is embedded in a single fluid layer and any elastic solid layers present are separated by one or more fluid layers. The measurement aperture is assumed to be planar. Computer simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate and investigate the proposed reconstruction formula.

  6. Non-blind acoustic invisibility by dual layers of homogeneous single-negative media

    PubMed Central

    Gao, He; Zhu, Yi-fan; Fan, Xu-dong; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Non-blind invisibility cloaks allowing the concealed object to sense the outside world have great application potentials such as in high-precision sensing or underwater camouflage. However the existing designs based on coordinate transformation techniques need complicated spatially-varying negative index or intricate multi-layered configurations, substantially increasing the difficulty in practical realization. Here we report on the non-blind acoustic invisibility for a circular object in free space with simple distribution of cloak parameters. The mechanism is that, instead of utilizing the transformation acoustics technique, we develop the analytical formulae for fast prediction of the scattering from the object and then use an evolutionary optimization to retrieve the desired cloak parameters for minimizing the scattered field. In this way, it is proven possible to break through the fundamental limit of complementary condition that must be satisfied by the effective parameters of the components in transformation acoustics-based cloaks. Numerical results show that the resulting cloak produces a non-bflind invisibility as perfect as in previous designs, but only needs two layers with homogenous single-negative parameters. With full simplification in parameter distribution and broken symmetry in complementary relationship, our scheme opens new route to free-space non-blind invisibility, taking a significant step towards real-world application of cloaking devices. PMID:28195227

  7. Non-blind acoustic invisibility by dual layers of homogeneous single-negative media.

    PubMed

    Gao, He; Zhu, Yi-Fan; Fan, Xu-Dong; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2017-02-14

    Non-blind invisibility cloaks allowing the concealed object to sense the outside world have great application potentials such as in high-precision sensing or underwater camouflage. However the existing designs based on coordinate transformation techniques need complicated spatially-varying negative index or intricate multi-layered configurations, substantially increasing the difficulty in practical realization. Here we report on the non-blind acoustic invisibility for a circular object in free space with simple distribution of cloak parameters. The mechanism is that, instead of utilizing the transformation acoustics technique, we develop the analytical formulae for fast prediction of the scattering from the object and then use an evolutionary optimization to retrieve the desired cloak parameters for minimizing the scattered field. In this way, it is proven possible to break through the fundamental limit of complementary condition that must be satisfied by the effective parameters of the components in transformation acoustics-based cloaks. Numerical results show that the resulting cloak produces a non-bflind invisibility as perfect as in previous designs, but only needs two layers with homogenous single-negative parameters. With full simplification in parameter distribution and broken symmetry in complementary relationship, our scheme opens new route to free-space non-blind invisibility, taking a significant step towards real-world application of cloaking devices.

  8. Non-blind acoustic invisibility by dual layers of homogeneous single-negative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Zhu, Yi-Fan; Fan, Xu-Dong; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2017-02-01

    Non-blind invisibility cloaks allowing the concealed object to sense the outside world have great application potentials such as in high-precision sensing or underwater camouflage. However the existing designs based on coordinate transformation techniques need complicated spatially-varying negative index or intricate multi-layered configurations, substantially increasing the difficulty in practical realization. Here we report on the non-blind acoustic invisibility for a circular object in free space with simple distribution of cloak parameters. The mechanism is that, instead of utilizing the transformation acoustics technique, we develop the analytical formulae for fast prediction of the scattering from the object and then use an evolutionary optimization to retrieve the desired cloak parameters for minimizing the scattered field. In this way, it is proven possible to break through the fundamental limit of complementary condition that must be satisfied by the effective parameters of the components in transformation acoustics-based cloaks. Numerical results show that the resulting cloak produces a non-bflind invisibility as perfect as in previous designs, but only needs two layers with homogenous single-negative parameters. With full simplification in parameter distribution and broken symmetry in complementary relationship, our scheme opens new route to free-space non-blind invisibility, taking a significant step towards real-world application of cloaking devices.

  9. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of acoustic wave phase conjugation in magnetostrictive elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinovich, Peter; Merlen, Alain

    2005-12-01

    The effect of parametric wave phase conjugation (WPC) in application to ultrasound or acoustic waves in magnetostrictive solids has been addressed numerically by Ben Khelil et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 75-83 (2001)] using 1-D unsteady formulation. Here the numerical method presented by Voinovich et al. [Shock waves 13(3), 221-230 (2003)] extends the analysis to the 2-D effects. The employed model describes universally elastic solids and liquids. A source term similar to Ben Khelil et al.'s accounts for the coupling between deformation and magnetostriction due to external periodic magnetic field. The compatibility between the isotropic constitutive law of the medium and the model of magnetostriction has been considered. Supplementary to the 1-D simulations, the present model involves longitudinal/transversal mode conversion at the sample boundaries and separate magnetic field coupling with dilatation and shear stress. The influence of those factors in a 2-D geometry on the potential output of a magneto-elastic wave phase conjugator is analyzed in this paper. The process under study includes propagation of a wave burst of a given frequency from a point source in a liquid into the active solid, amplification of the waves due to parametric resonance, and formation of time-reversed waves, their radiation into liquid, and focusing. The considered subject is particularly important for ultrasonic applications in acoustic imaging, nondestructive testing, or medical diagnostics and therapy.

  10. Probing porous media with first and second sound. II. Acoustic properties of water-saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David Linton; Plona, Thomas J.; Kojima, Haruo

    1994-07-01

    The ultrasonic properties (reflection/transmission and bulk attenuation/speed) of porous and permeable media saturated with a Newtonian fluid, namely water, are considered. The frequency dependence of the transmission amplitudes of pulses is measured through a slab of thickness d1, repeated for another slab of thickness d2 for a given material. With these two measurements on two different thicknesses, it is possible in principle to separate bulk losses from reflection/transmission losses for compressional waves in these materials. The bulk properties are calculated from the Biot theory for which all of the input parameters have been measured separately; the attenuations are particularly sensitive to the values of Λ, determined from second-sound attenuation measurements reported in the companion article. There is excellent quantitative agreement between the theoretical and experimental values in the cases considered; there are no adjustable parameters involved. The reflection and transmission coefficients are reported for some of the multiply reflected pulses and their amplitudes are compared with those calculated from the Deresiewicz-Skalak and Rosenbaum boundary conditions appropriate to either the open-pore or sealed-pore surfaces, as the case may be. Again, there is excellent quantitative agreement between theory and experiment. Compared with the open-pore boundary conditions, it is noted that there is a large reduction, both theoretically and experimentally, in the efficiency with which the slow compressional wave is generated when the sealed-pore boundary conditions apply, but this efficiency is not reduced to zero.

  11. A k-space Green's function solution for acoustic initial value problems in homogeneous media with power law absorption.

    PubMed

    Treeby, Bradley E; Cox, B T

    2011-06-01

    An efficient Green's function solution for acoustic initial value problems in homogeneous media with power law absorption is derived. The solution is based on the homogeneous wave equation for lossless media with two additional terms. These terms are dependent on the fractional Laplacian and separately account for power law absorption and dispersion. Given initial conditions for the pressure and its temporal derivative, the solution allows the pressure field for any time t>0 to be calculated in a single step using the Fourier transform and an exact k-space time propagator. For regularly spaced Cartesian grids, the former can be computed efficiently using the fast Fourier transform. Because no time stepping is required, the solution facilitates the efficient computation of the pressure field in one, two, or three dimensions without stability constraints. Several computational aspects of the solution are discussed, including the effect of using a truncated Fourier series to represent discrete initial conditions, the use of smoothing, and the properties of the encapsulated absorption and dispersion.

  12. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids—Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  13. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids--Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert A; Shaw, J M

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  14. Wave theory of turbulence in compressible media (acoustic theory of turbulence)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kentzer, C. P.

    1975-01-01

    The generation and the transmission of sound in turbulent flows are treated as one of the several aspects of wave propagation in turbulence. Fluid fluctuations are decomposed into orthogonal Fourier components, with five interacting modes of wave propagation: two vorticity modes, one entropy mode, and two acoustic modes. Wave interactions, governed by the inhomogeneous and nonlinear terms of the perturbed Navier-Stokes equations, are modeled by random functions which give the rates of change of wave amplitudes equal to the averaged interaction terms. The statistical framework adopted is a quantum-like formulation in terms of complex distribution functions. The spatial probability distributions are given by the squares of the absolute values of the complex characteristic functions. This formulation results in nonlinear diffusion-type transport equations for the probability densities of the five modes of wave propagation.

  15. The effect of fluid streams in porous media on acoustic compression wave propagation, transmission, and reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeo, A.; Djeran-Maigre, I.; Rosi, G.; Silvani, C.

    2013-03-01

    In geomechanics, a relevant role is played by coupling phenomena between compressible fluid seepage flow and deformation of the solid matrix. The behavior of complex porous materials can be greatly influenced by such coupling phenomena. A satisfactorily theoretical framework for their description is not yet completely attained. In this paper, we discuss how the model developed in dell'Isola et al. (Int J Solids Struct 46:3150-3164, 2009) can describe how underground flows or, more generally, confined streams of fluid in deformable porous matrices affect compression wave propagation and their reflection and transmission at a solid-material discontinuity surface. Further work will investigate the effect of stream flow in porous media on shear waves, generalizing what done in Djeran Maigre and Kuznetsov (Comptes Rendus Mécanique 336(1-2):102-107, 2008) for shear waves in one-constituent orthotropic two-layered plates. The presented treatment shows that the presence of fluid streams considerably affect reflection and transmission phenomena in porous media.

  16. Quantitative modeling of the transduction of electromagnetic acoustic transducers operating on ferromagnetic media.

    PubMed

    Ribichini, Remo; Cegla, Frederic; Nagy, Peter B; Cawley, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The noncontact nature of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) offers a series of advantages over traditional piezoelectric transducers, but these features are counter-balanced by their relatively low signal-to-noise ratio and their strong dependence on material properties such as electric conductivity, magnetic permeability, and magnetostriction. The implication is that full exploitation of EMATs needs detailed modeling of their operation. A finite element model, accounting for the main transduction mechanisms, has been developed to allow the optimization of the transducers. Magnetostriction is included and described through an analogy with piezoelectricity. The model is used to predict the performance of a simple EMAT: a single current-carrying wire, parallel to a bias magnetic field generating shear horizontal waves in a nickel plate close to it. The results are validated against experiments. The model is able to successfully predict the wave amplitude dependence on significant parameters: the static bias field, the driving current amplitude, and the excitation frequency. The comparison does not employ any arbitrary adjustable parameter; for the first time an absolute validation of a magnetostrictive EMAT model has been achieved. The results are satisfactory: the discrepancy between the numerical predictions and the measured values of wave amplitude per unit current is less than 20% over a 200 kHz frequency range. The study has also shown that magnetostrictive EMAT sensitivity is not only a function of the magnetostrictive properties, because the magnetic permeability also plays a significant role in the transduction mechanism, partly counterbalancing the magnetostrictive effects.

  17. Improving the estimation of detection probability and magnitude of completeness in strongly heterogeneous media, an application to acoustic emission (AE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Samira; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebastian; Kaiser, Diethelm; Becker, Dirk; Dahm, Torsten

    2013-06-01

    Reliable estimations of magnitude of completeness (Mc) are essential for a correct interpretation of seismic catalogues. The spatial distribution of Mc may be strongly variable and difficult to assess in mining environments, owing to the presence of galleries, cavities, fractured regions, porous media and different mineralogical bodies, as well as in consequence of inhomogeneous spatial distribution of the seismicity. We apply a 3-D modification of the probabilistic magnitude of completeness (PMC) method, which relies on the analysis of network detection capabilities. In our approach, the probability to detect an event depends on its magnitude, source-receiver Euclidian distance and source-receiver direction. The suggested method is proposed for study of the spatial distribution of the magnitude of completeness in a mining environment and here is applied to a 2-months acoustic emission (AE) data set recorded at the Morsleben salt mine, Germany. The dense seismic network and the large data set, which includes more than one million events, enable a detailed testing of the method. This method is proposed specifically for strongly heterogeneous media. Besides, it can also be used for specific network installations, with sensors with a sensitivity, dependent on the direction of the incoming wave (e.g. some piezoelectric sensors). In absence of strong heterogeneities, the standards PMC approach should be used. We show that the PMC estimations in mines strongly depend on the source-receiver direction, and cannot be correctly accounted using a standard PMC approach. However, results can be improved, when adopting the proposed 3-D modification of the PMC method. Our analysis of one central horizontal and vertical section yields a magnitude of completeness of about Mc ≈ 1 (AE magnitude) at the centre of the network, which increases up to Mc ≈ 4 at further distances outside the network; the best detection performance is estimated for a NNE-SSE elongated region, which

  18. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation.

    PubMed

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-11-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed c depending on position r. In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path ℓ^{*}, scattering phase function f, and anisotropy factor g. Discarding the operator term in the wave equation is shown to have a significant impact on f and g, yet limited to the low-frequency regime, i.e., when the correlation length of the disorder ℓ_{c} is smaller than or comparable to the wavelength λ. More surprisingly, discarding the operator part has a significant impact on the transport mean-free path ℓ^{*} whatever the frequency regime. When the scalar and operator terms have identical amplitudes, the discrepancy on the transport mean-free path is around 300% in the low-frequency regime, and still above 30% for ℓ_{c}/λ=10^{3} no matter how weak fluctuations of the disorder are. Analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the wave equation and Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-11-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed c depending on position r . In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path ℓ*, scattering phase function f , and anisotropy factor g . Discarding the operator term in the wave equation is shown to have a significant impact on f and g , yet limited to the low-frequency regime, i.e., when the correlation length of the disorder ℓc is smaller than or comparable to the wavelength λ . More surprisingly, discarding the operator part has a significant impact on the transport mean-free path ℓ* whatever the frequency regime. When the scalar and operator terms have identical amplitudes, the discrepancy on the transport mean-free path is around 300 % in the low-frequency regime, and still above 30 % for ℓc/λ =103 no matter how weak fluctuations of the disorder are. Analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the wave equation and Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. 3D Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Simulation of Acoustic Waves in Turbulent Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, N. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Marlin, D.; Wilson, D. K.; Sullivan, P.; Ostashev, V.

    2003-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in a three-dimensional heterogeneous moving atmosphere is accurately simulated with a numerical algorithm recently developed under the DOD Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). Sound waves within such a dynamic environment are mathematically described by a set of four, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing small-amplitude fluctuations in pressure and particle velocity. The system is rigorously derived from fundamental principles of continuum mechanics, ideal-fluid constitutive relations, and reasonable assumptions that the ambient atmospheric motion is adiabatic and divergence-free. An explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) numerical scheme is used to solve the system for both pressure and particle velocity wavefields. The atmosphere is characterized by 3D gridded models of sound speed, mass density, and the three components of the wind velocity vector. Dependent variables are stored on staggered spatial and temporal grids, and centered FD operators possess 2nd-order and 4th-order space/time accuracy. Accurate sound wave simulation is achieved provided grid intervals are chosen appropriately. The gridding must be fine enough to reduce numerical dispersion artifacts to an acceptable level and maintain stability. The algorithm is designed to execute on parallel computational platforms by utilizing a spatial domain-decomposition strategy. Currently, the algorithm has been validated on four different computational platforms, and parallel scalability of approximately 85% has been demonstrated. Comparisons with analytic solutions for uniform and vertically stratified wind models indicate that the FD algorithm generates accurate results with either a vanishing pressure or vanishing vertical-particle velocity boundary condition. Simulations are performed using a kinematic turbulence wind profile developed with the quasi-wavelet method. In addition, preliminary results are presented

  1. Acoustic Full waveform inversion strategy using structural constraint in VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an effective method for deriving high resolution earth models for seismic imaging from full waveforms of the seismic data. Since accounting for seismic anisotropy can improve reservoir delineation in oil and gas field, anisotropic FWI has received much attention during the last decade. However, the intrinsic non-linearity, ill-posedness, and possibility of being trapped in local minima must be addressed to consider multiparameter FWI in an anisotropic media. In multiparameter FWI, moreover, the sensitivity difference between the parameters should be considered. In this study, we applyed the cross-gradient approach usually used for joint interpretation of two different types of geophysical measurments which has structural similarity to overcome the intrinsic drawbacks of the anisotropic FWI. The cross-gradient technique as the structural constraints was shown to improve the structural conformity in joint inversion. It is well acknowledged that the vertical P-wave velocity (Vpz) is more sensitive than the horizontal one (Vpx), so Vpz which has higher sensitivity was firstly reconstructed, then Vpx was inverted using the stuctural information of reconstructed Vpz as the structural constraints. We also the plane-wave approach and a multifrequency simultaneous inversion method for efficient anisotropic inversion. By applying the cross-graient methodology, both the vertical and horizontal velocities were reconstructed properly for the various VTI models, and the root mean square (RMS) error curves converged steadily to lower values. The computational cost of FWI can be effectively reduced by using the proposed FWI algorithm.

  2. Simulation of acoustic wave propagation in a borehole surrounded by cracked media using a finite difference method based on Hudson’s approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Chongwang; Yue, Xiaopeng

    2017-06-01

    Cracked media are a common geophysical phenomena. It is important to study the propagation characteristics in boreholes for sonic logging theory, as this can provide the basis for the sonic log interpretation. This paper derives velocity-stress staggered finite difference equations of elastic wave propagation in cylindrical coordinates for cracked media. The sound field in the borehole is numerically simulated using the finite-difference technique with second order in time and tenth order in space. It gives the relationship curves between the P-wave, S-wave velocity, anisotropy factor and crack density, and aspect ratio. Furthermore, it gives snapshots of the borehole acoustic wave field in cracked media with different crack densities and aspect ratios. The calculated results show that in dry conditions the P-wave velocity in both the axial and radial directions decreases, and more rapidly in the axial direction while the crack density increases. The S-wave velocity decreases slowly with increasing crack density. The attenuation of the wave energy increases with the increase in crack density. In fluid-saturated cracked media, both the P-wave and S-wave velocity increases with the aspect ratio of the cracks. The anisotropy of the P-wave decreases with the aspect ratio of the cracks. The aspect ratio of the crack does not obviously affect the energy attenuation.

  3. A novel multi-segment path analysis based on a heterogeneous velocity model for the localization of acoustic emission sources in complex propagation media.

    PubMed

    Gollob, Stephan; Kocur, Georg Karl; Schumacher, Thomas; Mhamdi, Lassaad; Vogel, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    In acoustic emission analysis, common source location algorithms assume, independently of the nature of the propagation medium, a straight (shortest) wave path between the source and the sensors. For heterogeneous media such as concrete, the wave travels in complex paths due to the interaction with the dissimilar material contents and with the possible geometrical and material irregularities present in these media. For instance, cracks and large air voids present in concrete influence significantly the way the wave travels, by causing wave path deviations. Neglecting these deviations by assuming straight paths can introduce significant errors to the source location results. In this paper, a novel source localization method called FastWay is proposed. It accounts, contrary to most available shortest path-based methods, for the different effects of material discontinuities (cracks and voids). FastWay, based on a heterogeneous velocity model, uses the fastest rather than the shortest travel paths between the source and each sensor. The method was evaluated both numerically and experimentally and the results from both evaluation tests show that, in general, FastWay was able to locate sources of acoustic emissions more accurately and reliably than the traditional source localization methods.

  4. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for wave propagation simulation in complex geophysical media (elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic); an unifying framework to couple continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, Sebastien; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Guillot, Laurent; Mariotti, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  5. High-Order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) Method for Wave Propagation Simulation in Complex Geophysical Media - Elastic, Acoustic and Hydro-Acoustic - an Unifying Framework to Couple Continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sébastien, T.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.; Mariotti, C.

    2014-12-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  6. The Effects of Acoustic Waves on Stick Slip Behavior in Sheared Granular Media and Their Implications for Earthquake Recurrence and Dynamic Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Marone, C.; Gomberg, J.; Savage, H.; Knuth, M.; Behringer, B.; Carpenter, B.

    2008-12-01

    To better understand the physics of dynamic triggering and the influence of dynamic stressing on earthquake recurrence, we are conducting laboratory studies of stick slip in granular media with and without applied acoustic vibrations. In our 3-D experiments, glass beads are used to simulate granular fault zone wear material, sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient or continuous perturbations by acoustic waves. We observe both instantaneous and delayed triggering when vibration is applied. Vibrations also cause significant disruption in the recurrence rate. The effects of vibration are observed for many major-event cycles after vibrations cease, indicating a strain memory in the granular material. Vibration-induced disruption of periodic stick slip is linked to failure of granular force chains. In 2-D experiments we are applying photoelastic discs in stick slip measurements in order to visualize the evolution of the force chain network. Photoelastic measurements provide insight into failure, and in particular small adjustments in the force chains network that presage failure. Our results should lead to a new understanding of the importance of seismic energy on earthquake physics and more generally, we anticipate that it will have broad impact on unexpected material failure induced by moderate-amplitude elastic waves, including avalanches, landslide and failure of incipient damage in solids.

  7. Phase conjugation of the second harmonic of a focused ultrasound beam as a method for improving C-scan acoustical imaging in nonlinear inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyansky, Leonid M.; Brysev, Andrew P.; Klopotov, Roman V.; Pernod, Philippe J.; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir L.; Yan, Xiang; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustical imaging in complex media (e.g., biological tissue) can be affected by phase aberrations introduced in a wave during propagation. Wave phase conjugation (WPC) of ultrasound is known for its ability to compensate for phase distortions due to inhomogeneity of the propagation medium, and it can be used for improvement of acoustical imaging under these conditions. In a nonlinear medium harmonics are generated during propagation of an intense beam of ultrasound, and this principle is used in tissue harmonic imaging. The parametric method of WPC permits phase conjugation of a selected frequency component of the probe beam. In this way the peculiarities of WPC can be combined with advantages of harmonic imaging. Automated WPC-focusing of the conjugated second-harmonic component of a focused nonlinear probe beam is studied experimentally and theoretically for the case of a homogeneous medium, and experimentally for a medium with pseudo-random inhomogeneities. The generated conjugate wave can also be sufficiently intense to generate higher-order harmonics, which display enhanced focusing. Improvement of a C-scan harmonic imaging system operating in an inhomogeneous medium is provided as an example.

  8. Buried targets in layered media: A combined finite element/physical acoustics model and comparison to data on a half buried 2:1 cylinder.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin L

    2016-12-01

    Previously, a combined finite element/physical acoustics model for proud targets [K. L. Williams, S. G. Kargl, E. I. Thorsos, D. S. Burnett, J. L. Lopes, M. Zampolli, and P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 3356-3371 (2010)] was compared to both higher fidelity finite element models and to experimental data for a proud 2:1 aluminum cylinder. Here that expression is generalized to address the case of a target buried in a layered media. The result is compared to data acquired for the same 2:1 cylinder but half buried in a mud layer that covers the sand sediment (considered here as infinite in extent below the mud layer). The generalized expression reduces to both the previous proud result and to the result for a target buried in an infinite medium under the appropriate limiting conditions. The model/data comparisons shown include both the previous proud model and data results along with the ones for the half buried cylinder. The comparison quantifies the reduction in target strength as a function of frequency in the half buried case relative to the proud case.

  9. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  10. Effects of Acoustic Waves on Stick—Slip Behavior in Sheared Granular Media With Implications to Dynamic Earthquake Triggering and Slow Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Marone, C.; Knuth, M. W.; Kaproth, B. M.; Carpenter, B.; Behringer, B.; Guyer, R.; Le Bas, P.

    2009-12-01

    To better understand the physics of dynamic triggering and the influence of dynamic stressing on earthquake recurrence, we are conducting laboratory studies of stick—slip in granular media with and without applied acoustic waves. In our 3-D experiments, glass beads are used to simulate granular fault zone wear material, sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient or continuous perturbations by acoustic waves. We find that the horizontal stress applied plays a crucial role in the response of the glass beads to applied waves. Under smaller normal stress (2MPa), and subject to wave amplitudes of >10-6 strain, we observe induced slow (silent) slip and tremor. Under moderate normal stress (4 MPa) and subject to >10-6 strain amplitude we observe both instantaneous and delayed triggering. Waves also cause significant disruption in the recurrence rate. The effects of waves are observed for many major-event cycles after wave excitation ceases, indicating a strain memory of waves in the granular material. Under slightly larger horizontal stress (5MPa), if strain amplitudes exceed 10-6, we observe instantaneous triggering followed by slow dynamics—the shear modulus recovers linearly with the-logarithm-of-time back to equilibrium. Slow dynamics is a classical elastic nonlinear (anelastic) behavior observed in acoustical experiments with rock samples in the lab as well as in Earth. Wave-induced disruption of periodic stick—slip is linked to failure of granular force chains. In 2-D experiments we are applying photoelastic discs in stick—slip measurements in order to visualize the evolution of the force chain network. Photoelastic measurements provide insight into failure, and in particular small adjustments in the force chains network that presage failure. A phenomenological model similar to Knopoff-Burridge shows the same general behaviors. Our results should lead to a new understanding of the importance of seismic

  11. Effects of Acoustic Waves on Stick—Slip Behavior in Sheared Granular Media With Implications to Dynamic Earthquake Triggering and Slow Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Paul; Marone, Chris; Knuth, Matt; Kaproth, Bryan; Carpenter, Brett; Behringer, Bob; Guyer, Robert; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Griffa, Michele; Carmeliet, Jan

    2010-05-01

    To better understand the physics of dynamic triggering and the influence of dynamic stressing on earthquake recurrence, we are conducting laboratory studies of stick—slip in granular media with and without applied acoustic waves. In our 3-D experiments, glass beads are used to simulate granular fault zone wear material, sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient or continuous perturbations by acoustic waves. We find that the horizontal stress applied plays a crucial role in the response of the glass beads to applied waves. Under smaller normal stress (2MPa), and subject to wave amplitudes of >10-6 strain, we observe induced slow (silent) slip and tremor. Under moderate normal stress (4 MPa) and subject to >10-6 strain amplitude we observe both instantaneous and delayed triggering. Waves also cause significant disruption in the recurrence rate. The effects of waves are observed for many major-event cycles after wave excitation ceases, indicating a strain memory of waves in the granular material. Under slightly larger horizontal stress (5MPa), if strain amplitudes exceed 10-6, we observe instantaneous triggering followed by slow dynamics—the shear modulus recovers linearly with the-logarithm-of-time back to equilibrium. Slow dynamics is a classical elastic nonlinear (anelastic) behavior observed in acoustical experiments with rock samples in the lab as well as in Earth. Wave-induced disruption of periodic stick—slip is linked to failure of granular force chains. In 2-D experiments we are applying photoelastic discs in stick—slip measurements in order to visualize the evolution of the force chain network. Photoelastic measurements provide insight into failure, and in particular small adjustments in the force chains network that presage failure. A phenomenological model similar to Knopoff-Burridge shows the same general behaviors as well. In a companion paper, we show model results emplying a DEM approach

  12. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Cellular Automaton Simulations for Target Waves in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Sheng; Deng, Min-Yi; Kong, Ling-Jiang; Liu, Mu-Ren; Tang, Guo-Ning

    2010-01-01

    Using the Greenberg-Hasting cellular automata model, we study the properties of target waves in excitable media under the no-flux boundary conditions. For the system has only one excited state, the computer simulation and analysis lead to the conclusions that, the number of refractory states does not influence the wave-front speed; the wave-front speed decreases as the excitation threshold increases and increases as the neighbor radius increases; the period of target waves is equal to the number of cell states; the excitation condition for target waves is that the wave-front speed must be bigger than half of the neighbor radius.

  13. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force for non-contact generation of broadband mechanical waves in soft media

    SciTech Connect

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Gao, Liang; O'Donnell, Matthew; Li, David; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-07-25

    A non-contact method for efficient, non-invasive excitation of mechanical waves in soft media is proposed, in which we focus an ultrasound (US) signal through air onto the surface of a medium under study. The US wave reflected from the air/medium interface provides radiation force to the medium surface that launches a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The type of mechanical wave is determined by boundary conditions. To prove this concept, a home-made 1 MHz piezo-ceramic transducer with a matching layer to air sends a chirped US signal centered at 1 MHz to a 1.6 mm thick gelatin phantom mimicking soft biological tissue. A phase-sensitive (PhS)-optical coherence tomography system is used to track/image the mechanical wave. The reconstructed transient displacement of the mechanical wave in space and time demonstrates highly efficient generation, thus offering great promise for non-contact, non-invasive characterization of soft media, in general, and for elasticity measurements in delicate soft tissues and organs in bio-medicine, in particular.

  14. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force for non-contact generation of broadband mechanical waves in soft media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    A non-contact method for efficient, non-invasive excitation of mechanical waves in soft media is proposed, in which we focus an ultrasound (US) signal through air onto the surface of a medium under study. The US wave reflected from the air/medium interface provides radiation force to the medium surface that launches a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The type of mechanical wave is determined by boundary conditions. To prove this concept, a home-made 1 MHz piezo-ceramic transducer with a matching layer to air sends a chirped US signal centered at 1 MHz to a 1.6 mm thick gelatin phantom mimicking soft biological tissue. A phase-sensitive (PhS)-optical coherence tomography system is used to track/image the mechanical wave. The reconstructed transient displacement of the mechanical wave in space and time demonstrates highly efficient generation, thus offering great promise for non-contact, non-invasive characterization of soft media, in general, and for elasticity measurements in delicate soft tissues and organs in bio-medicine, in particular.

  15. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force for non-contact generation of broadband mechanical waves in soft media.

    PubMed

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T; Wang, Ruikang K; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-07-25

    A non-contact method for efficient, non-invasive excitation of mechanical waves in soft media is proposed, in which we focus an ultrasound (US) signal through air onto the surface of a medium under study. The US wave reflected from the air/medium interface provides radiation force to the medium surface that launches a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The type of mechanical wave is determined by boundary conditions. To prove this concept, a home-made 1 MHz piezo-ceramic transducer with a matching layer to air sends a chirped US signal centered at 1 MHz to a 1.6 mm thick gelatin phantom mimicking soft biological tissue. A phase-sensitive (PhS)-optical coherence tomography system is used to track/image the mechanical wave. The reconstructed transient displacement of the mechanical wave in space and time demonstrates highly efficient generation, thus offering great promise for non-contact, non-invasive characterization of soft media, in general, and for elasticity measurements in delicate soft tissues and organs in bio-medicine, in particular.

  16. Seismic inversion with generalized Radon transform based on local second-order approximation of scattered field in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Xuelei; Li, Wuqun

    2014-08-01

    Sound velocity inversion problem based on scattering theory is formulated in terms of a nonlinear integral equation associated with scattered field. Because of its nonlinearity, in practice, linearization algorisms (Born/single scattering approximation) are widely used to obtain an approximate inversion solution. However, the linearized strategy is not congruent with seismic wave propagation mechanics in strong perturbation (heterogeneous) medium. In order to partially dispense with the weak perturbation assumption of the Born approximation, we present a new approach from the following two steps: firstly, to handle the forward scattering by taking into account the second-order Born approximation, which is related to generalized Radon transform (GRT) about quadratic scattering potential; then to derive a nonlinear quadratic inversion formula by resorting to inverse GRT. In our formulation, there is a significant quadratic term regarding scattering potential, and it can provide an amplitude correction for inversion results beyond standard linear inversion. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the linear single scattering inversion is only good in amplitude for relative velocity perturbation () of background media up to 10 %, and its inversion errors are unacceptable for the perturbation beyond 10 %. In contrast, the quadratic inversion can give more accurate amplitude-preserved recovery for the perturbation up to 40 %. Our inversion scheme is able to manage double scattering effects by estimating a transmission factor from an integral over a small area, and therefore, only a small portion of computational time is added to the original linear migration/inversion process.

  17. Acoustic broadband metacouplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-05-01

    We present the concept of acoustic metacoupler for broadband impedance match between two media with different impedances and cross sections. An implementation is demonstrated that produces spatial gradient of effective acoustic impedance by utilizing helical-like structure with continuously varying pitch instead of changing the cross-section or employing multiple layers. Numerical results verify the effectiveness of our design in achieving near-unity coupling efficiency in a broad band. We anticipate the proposed metacoupler with capability and flexibility to open route to broadband impedance matching and to have a wide realm of potential applications such as transducer design, acoustic imaging and energy harvesting.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  19. Virtual Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  20. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  1. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  2. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  3. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  4. One path to acoustic cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Schurig, David

    2007-03-01

    A complete analysis of coordinate transformations in elastic media by Milton et al has shown that, in general, the equations of motion are not form invariant and thus do not admit transformation-type solutions of the type discovered by Pendry et al for electromagnetics. However, in a two-dimensional (2D) geometry, the acoustic equations in a fluid are identical in form to the single polarization Maxwell equations via a variable exchange that also preserves boundary conditions. We confirm the existence of transformation-type solutions for the 2D acoustic equations with anisotropic mass via time harmonic simulations of acoustic cloaking. We discuss the possibilities of experimentally demonstrating acoustic cloaking and analyse why this special equivalence of acoustics and electromagnetics occurs only in 2D.

  5. 50 years of nonlinear acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naugolnykh, K.

    2008-06-01

    Episodes of nonlinear acoustics history related to several topics are discussed. Nonlinear evolution of finite amplitude wave, its distortion and weak shock wave formation, nonlinear absorption of the high intensity wave. Nonlinear wave propagation in a randomly inhomogeneous media, interaction of noises and regular signals. Nonlinear sound wave interactions. Parametric transmitting and receiving array theoretical models, experimental test and applications in ocean and atmospheric sounding. Parametric acoustic array in oceanic waveguids. High-intensity focused ultrasound propagation in a inhomogeneous fluid and tissue, nonlinear mechanism of heating by high-intensity focused ultrasound, which is important for ultrasound thermal therapy. Intense acoustic pulses generation, cavitation, laser generated nonlinear pulses.

  6. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  7. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-06-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies.

  8. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  9. Acoustical oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Acoustical Society of America has formed a Technical Specialty Group on Acoustical Oceanography. At ASA meetings the new group will have special sessions where they will give invited and contributed papers and have panel discussions about ocean parameters that are measured effectively by acoustical techniques.The first special sessions will be May 22-23, 1990, at the ASA meeting at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. The focus on May 22 will be acoustical techniques for detection and measurement of internal waves and turbulence; conveners are Robert Pinkel of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif., and Herman Medwin of the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Acoustical studies of the physical and biological characteristics of ocean mass boundaries are the discussion topic on May 23. The convener is C. S. Clay, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  10. Acoustic transducer for nuclear reactor monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Ahlgren, Frederic F.; Scott, Paul F.

    1977-01-01

    A transducer to monitor a parameter and produce an acoustic signal from which the monitored parameter can be recovered. The transducer comprises a modified Galton whistle which emits a narrow band acoustic signal having a frequency dependent upon the parameter being monitored, such as the temperature of the cooling media of a nuclear reactor. Multiple locations within a reactor are monitored simultaneously by a remote acoustic receiver by providing a plurality of transducers each designed so that the acoustic signal it emits has a frequency distinct from the frequencies of signals emitted by the other transducers, whereby each signal can be unambiguously related to a particular transducer.

  11. Influence of acoustics in separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, H. V.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of introducing high energy acoustics into various filtering and drying systems were studied. With very slow velocity filtration systems, it was found that the introduction of acoustics could substantially increase the flow rate and also aided in the coagulation of the particulates before reaching the filter media. In the drying of temperature sensitive powders, the rate was increased by the introduction of acoustics. The acoustic frequency used was 20 kHz with power levels up to 3 watts per square centimeter.

  12. Comment on "Relative variance of the mean squared pressure in multimode media: rehabilitating former approaches" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136, 2621-2629 (2014)].

    PubMed

    Davy, John L; Weaver, Richard L

    2015-03-01

    Models for the statistics of responses in finite reverberant structures, and in particular, for the variance of the mean square pressure in reverberation rooms, have been studied for decades. It is therefore surprising that a recent communication has claimed that the literature has gotten the simplest of such calculations very wrong. Monsef, Cozza, Rodrigues, Cellard, and Durocher [(2014). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136, 2621-2629] have derived a modal-based expression for the relative variance that differs significantly from expressions that have been accepted since 1969. This Comment points out that the Monsef formula is clearly incorrect, and then for the interested reader, points out the subtle place where they made their mistake.

  13. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  14. An efficient high-order Nyström scheme for acoustic scattering by inhomogeneous penetrable media with discontinuous material interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Akash; Pandey, Ambuj; Rathish Kumar, B. V.; Paul, Jagabandhu

    2016-04-01

    This text proposes a fast, rapidly convergent Nyström method for the solution of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation that mathematically models the scattering of time-harmonic acoustic waves by inhomogeneous obstacles, while allowing the material properties to jump across the interface. The method works with overlapping coordinate charts as a description of the given scatterer. In particular, it employs "partitions of unity" to simplify the implementation of high-order quadratures along with suitable changes of parametric variables to analytically resolve the singularities present in the integral operator to achieve desired accuracies in approximations. To deal with the discontinuous material interface in a high-order manner, a specialized quadrature is used in the boundary region. The approach further utilizes an FFT based strategy that uses equivalent source approximations to accelerate the evaluation of large number of interactions that arise in the approximation of the volumetric integral operator and thus achieves a reduced computational complexity of O (Nlog ⁡ N) for an N-point discretization. A detailed discussion on the solution methodology along with a variety of numerical experiments to exemplify its performance are presented in this paper.

  15. Opto-acoustic measurement of the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media: 1. Monte-Carlo simulation of laser fluence distribution at the beam axis beneath the surface of a turbid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Barskaya, M I; Podymova, N B; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2009-09-30

    A new method for measuring the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media, for example, biological tissues, is proposed. The method is based on the fact that the amplitude of the excited opto-acoustic (OA) signal is proportional to the absorbed laser power density (the product of the light absorption coefficient and the laser fluence) at the medium interface. In the first part of the paper, the influence of the laser beam diameter, the light absorption and reduced scattering coefficients on the maximal amplitude of the laser fluence at the laser beam axis in the near-surface layer of the turbid medium is studied by using the Monte-Carlo simulation. The conditions are predicted under which the amplitude of the OA signal detected in a transparent medium in contact with the scattering medium should remain proportional to the light absorption coefficient of the medium under study, when the scattering coefficient in it changes more than twice. The results of the numerical simulation are used for the theoretical substantiation of the OA method being proposed. (measurement of parametrs of laser radiation)

  16. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  17. Acoustic tomography. Laboratory technique Implementation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvis, Jorge; Carvajal, Jenny

    2010-05-01

    From geomechanical tests carried out on rocks it is possible to determine its physico-mechanical properties, which relate the strain and applied stress; even so, conventional tests do not allow to identify how stress is distributed and how it has affected porous media. Today, techniques like acoustic tomography widely used in medicine, geophysics and others sciences, generates images by sections of the interior of a body. Acoustic tomography allows inferring the stress state within porous media; since wave velocities are closely related to media density, if a stress is applied to a rock, it will generate grains compaction and this will be showed by an increase of wave velocity. Implementation was conducted on rock plugs under diverse stress fields, simultaneously recording P-wave velocities (Compressional) on perpendicular planes to sample vertical axis. Transmission and reception of acoustic waves through porous media were done by piezoelectric crystals (PZT) used as sensors. A transmitting crystal excited by a voltage pulse causes a mechanical vibration, which travels across media; this is known as inverse piezoelectric effect. This vibration is recorded by a receiving crystal in which the direct piezoelectric effect appears; which dictates that if a piezoelectric is disturbed mechanically, an electrical signal between its terminals will appear. This electrical signal is used to obtain the wave velocity. Nevertheless, acoustic tomography corresponds to one of those called inverse Problems that arise when from observed data the model parameters must be obtained; in this way, tomography involves iterative reconstruction techniques (ART or SIRT) which are projections of observed data and its later inversion. Obtained results are cross-sectional images of velocity within the rock. In these images it is possible to identify where stress has a greater concentration observing the color map generated; thus, a greater velocity density area corresponding to a greater

  18. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  19. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  20. Acoustic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Pump uses acoustic-radiation forces. Momentum transferred from sound waves to sound-propagating material in way resulting in net pumping action on material. Acoustic pump is solid-state pump. Requires no moving parts, entirely miniaturized, and does not invade pumped environment. Silent, with no conventional vibration. Used as pump for liquid, suspension, gas, or any other medium interacting with radiation pressure. Also used where solid-state pump needed for reliability and controllability. In microgravity environment, device offers unusual control for low flow rates. For medical or other applications in which contamination cannot be allowed, offers noninvasive pumping force.

  1. Conceptual architectural/acoustical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A. Harold

    2004-05-01

    The thinking which characterizes acoustics as a branch of physics and engineering has difficulty with the architectural design process-the process that generates a room concept in the imagination and experience of the architect. The architect has learned to ``sense'' the visual properties of a room as the design develops in the interaction between mind and media. Phrases such as ``wanting to be'' express the architectural intention but too often such intentions are dismissed as arbitrary; acoustics may then be about fixing the design with acoustical add-ons. Occasionally there is a true meeting of minds-a creative and receptive architect and an acoustician able to communicate at the level of the architectural intention. There is evidently an auditory dimension of wanting to be which is one with the visual. This paper explores the idea in several examples and concludes with suggestions for the training of acousticians.

  2. High transmission acoustic focusing by impedance-matched acoustic meta-surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Jahdali, Rasha; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Impedance is an important issue in the design of acoustic lenses because mismatched impedance is detrimental to real focusing applications. Here, we report two designs of acoustic lenses that focus acoustic waves in water and air, respectively. They are tailored by acoustic meta-surfaces, which are rigid thin plates decorated with periodically distributed sub-wavelength slits. Their respective building blocks are constructed from the coiling-up spaces in water and the layered structures in air. Analytic analysis based on coupled-mode theory and transfer matrix reveals that the impedances of the lenses are matched to those of the background media. With these impedance-matched acoustic lenses, we demonstrate the acoustic focusing effect by finite-element simulations.

  3. Classifying Particles By Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Stoneburner, James D.

    1983-01-01

    Separation technique well suited to material processing. Apparatus with rectangular-cross-section chamber used to measure equilibrium positions of low-density spheres in gravitational field. Vertical acoustic forces generated by two opposing compression drivers exciting fundamental plane-wave mode at 1.2 kHz. Additional horizontal drivers centered samples along vertical axis. Applications in fusion-target separation, biological separation, and manufacturing processes in liquid or gas media.

  4. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  5. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  6. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  8. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  9. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  10. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  11. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  12. Nonlinear Acoustic Wave Interactions in Layered Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-06

    give rise to leaky wave modes which are more thoroughly discussed 17 18 by Kapany and Burke, and by Marcuse . Leaky modes are C.C. Ghizoni, J.M...1977), 843-848. 1 7N.S. Kapany and J.J. Burke, Optical Waveeeuides, (New York: Academic Press, 1972), pp. 24-34. D. Marcuse , Theory of Dielectric Optical...Linear Differential Operators. London: D. Van Nostrand Co., Ltd., 1961. Marcuse , D. Theory of Dielectric Optical Waveguides. New York: Academic Press

  13. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  14. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  15. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  16. Envelope Solitons in Acoustically Dispersive Vitreous Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation-induced static strains, displacements, and stresses are manifested as rectified or dc waveforms linked to the energy density of an acoustic wave or vibrational mode via the mode nonlinearity parameter of the material. An analytical model is developed for acoustically dispersive media that predicts the evolution of the energy density of an initial waveform into a series of energy solitons that generates a corresponding series of radiation-induced static strains (envelope solitons). The evolutionary characteristics of the envelope solitons are confirmed experimentally in Suprasil W1 vitreous silica. The value (-11.9 plus or minus 1.43) for the nonlinearity parameter, determined from displacement measurements of the envelope solitons via a capacitive transducer, is in good agreement with the value (-11.6 plus or minus 1.16) obtained independently from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The agreement provides strong, quantitative evidence for the validity of the model.

  17. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Mehrem, Ahmed; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M.; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g., cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be canceled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime.

  18. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1989-09-26

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K. 3 figs.

  19. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes an acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effect to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15--60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  20. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  1. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  2. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  3. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  4. Dynamics of levitated objects in acoustic vortex fields.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z Y; Yin, J F; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wang, W L; Zhang, J; Drinkwater, Bruce W

    2017-08-02

    Acoustic levitation in gaseous media provides a tool to process solid and liquid materials without the presence of surfaces such as container walls and hence has been used widely in chemical analysis, high-temperature processing, drop dynamics and bioreactors. To date high-density objects can only be acoustically levitated in simple standing-wave fields. Here we demonstrate the ability of a small number of peripherally placed sources to generate acoustic vortex fields and stably levitate a wide range of liquid and solid objects. The forces exerted by these acoustic vortex fields on a levitated water droplet are observed to cause a controllable deformation of the droplet and/or oscillation along the vortex axis. Orbital angular momentum transfer is also shown to rotate a levitated object rapidly and the rate of rotation can be controlled by the source amplitude. We expect this research can increase the diversity of acoustic levitation and expand the application of acoustic vortices.

  5. Acoustic Microfluidics for Bioanalytical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Gabriel

    2013-03-01

    This talk will present new methods the use of ultrasonic standing waves in microfluidic systems to manipulate microparticles for the purpose of bioassays and bioseparations. We have recently developed multi-node acoustic focusing flow cells that can position particles into many parallel flow streams and have demonstrated the potential of such flow cells in the development of high throughput, parallel flow cytometers. These experiments show the potential for the creation of high throughput flow cytometers in applications requiring high flow rates and rapid detection of rare cells. This talk will also present the development of elastomeric capture microparticles and their use in acoustophoretic separations. We have developed simple methods to form elastomeric particles that are surface functionalized with biomolecular recognition reagents. These compressible particles exhibit negative acoustic contrast in ultrasound when suspended in aqueous media, blood serum or diluted blood. These particles can be continuously separated from cells by flowing them through a microfluidic device that uses an ultrasonic standing wave to align the blood cells, which exhibit positive acoustic contrast, at a node in the acoustic pressure distribution while aligning the negative acoustic contrast elastomeric particles at the antinodes. Laminar flow of the separated particles to downstream collection ports allows for collection of the separated negative contrast particles and cells. Separated elastomeric particles were analyzed via flow cytometry to demonstrate nanomolar detection for prostate specific antigen in aqueous buffer and picomolar detection for IgG in plasma and diluted blood samples. This approach has potential applications in the development of rapid assays that detect the presence of low concentrations of biomarkers (including biomolecules and cells) in a number of biological sample types. We acknowledge support through the NSF Research Triangle MRSEC.

  6. Acoustic Propagation Modeling Using MATLAB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    M1 Oatoq~wv.$~e 204.*’liqi.VA22202-43. andto %be 0##cejf~d q94o’.et~e *Ad6.aet. Vawe’-ok Aedwg1enPr.o,KtO04i4IS8I. .,a,..qto. DC 2010 ) 1. AGENCY USE...media," in Acoustical Imaging, Volume 14, (A, Berkhout , J. Ridder, and L. van der Wal, eds.), pp. 521-531, New York: Plenum Press, 1985. (16] MATLAB

  7. Media Clips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vennebush, G. Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Media Clips aims to offer readers contemporary, authentic applications of quantitative reasoning based on print or electronic media. Clips may be in text or graphic format, and clip sources may be either print or electronic media.

  8. Improving the performance of acoustic invisibility with multilayer structure based on scattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chen; Yuan, Yin; Kan, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jing; Zou, Xin-Ye

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, acoustic scattering from the system comprised of a cloaked object and the multilayer cloak with only one single pair of isotropic media is analyzed with a recursive numerical method. The designed acoustic parameters of the isotropic cloak media are assumed to be single-negative, and the resulting cloak can reduce acoustic scattering from an acoustic sensor while allowing it to receive external information. Several factors that may influence the performance of the cloak, including the number of layers and the acoustic dissipation of the medium are fully analyzed. Furthermore, the possibility of achieving acoustic invisibility with positive acoustic parameters is proposed by searching the optimum value in the parameter space and minimizing the scattering cross-section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274168, 11374157, 11174138, 11174139, 11222442, and 81127901) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2010CB327803 and 2012CB921504).

  9. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  10. Acoustic Logging Modeling by Refined Biot's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    An explicit uniform completely conservative finite difference scheme for the refined Biot's equations is proposed. This system is modified according to the modern theory of dynamic permeability and tortuosity in a fluid-saturated elastic porous media. The approximate local boundary transparency conditions are constructed. The acoustic logging device is simulated by the choice of appropriate boundary conditions on its external surface. This scheme and these conditions are satisfactory for exploring borehole acoustic problems in permeable formations in a real axial-symmetrical situation. The developed approach can be adapted for a nonsymmetric case also.

  11. Problems in Nonlinear Acoustics: Pulsed Finite Amplitude Sound Beams, Nonlinear Propagation of Sound in Layered Media, Time Domain Solutions for Focused Sound Beams, Focusing of Sound with an Ellipsoidal Mirror, and Modeling Finite Amplitude Propagation in Waveguides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    Introduction of an article by Hamilton and TenCate . 5 In a real ocean environment, however, not only does sound penetrate the ocean bottom, but the...F. Hamilton and J. A. TenCate , "Finite amplitude sound near cutoff in higher-order modes of a rectangular duct," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 327-334

  12. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  13. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  14. Acoustic Goos-Hänchen effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Lin; Xue, Ling; Fa, YuXiao; Han, YongLan; Zhang, YanDong; Cheng, HongShen; Ding, PengFei; Li, GuoHui; Tang, ShaoJie; Bai, ChunLing; Xi, BingJie; Zhang, XiaoLin; Zhao, MeiShan

    2017-10-01

    We report two models of the lateral displacement of acoustic-wave scattering on a fluid-solid interface that reveal an acoustic analog of the Goos-Hänchen effect in optics. This acoustic analog is called the acoustic Goos-Hänchen effect. Using newly proposed models, we made numerical calculations for the system of a water-Perspex interface. Specifically, in the post-critical-angle region, we observed a lateral displacement (and transition time) of the reflected P-wave with respect to the incident P-wave. The first arrival of the acoustic signal from the interface is found to be a reflected P-wave rather than the sliding-refraction P-wave usually described in traditional acoustic-logging sliding P-wave theory. For both proposed models, the effective propagation speed of the reflected P-wave along the interface depends on not only the physical properties of the interfacial media but also the incident angle. These observations are intriguing and warrant further investigation.

  15. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with "sound visualization," acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-reverberation methods, both essentialfor visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, "Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?"

  16. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with sound visualization, acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-re verberation methods, both essential for visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?

  17. A theoretical study of the feasibility of acoustical tweezer: Ray acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, Kirk

    2005-04-01

    Optical tweezer has been found to have many biomedical applications in trapping macromolecules and cells. For the trapping mechanism, there has to be a sharp spatial change in axial optical intensity and the particle size must be much greater than the wavelength. Similar phenomenon may exist in acoustics. This work was undertaken to demonstrate theoretically that it is possible to acoustically trap particles near the focal point if certain conditions are met. Acoustic force exerted on fat tissue in ultrasonic fields is analyzed in ray acoustics regime where the wavelength of acoustic beam is much smaller than the size of the particle. In this paper, the analysis is therefore based on the field pattern produced by a strongly focused 100 MHz ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian intensity distribution. The magnitude of force and Fresnel coefficients at various positions are calculated. According to the simulation results, acoustical tweezer works particularly when the beam width at focus is one wavelength and the tolerance of acoustic impedance mismatch between two media lies within 6.7%. [Work supported by NIH Grant P41-EB2182.

  18. Media Competency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ron

    The need to teach media competency in the schools in a systematic way has been largely unrecognized. The Media Now course of study provides an example of the type of instruction needed to teach the knowledge and skills necessary for informed media consumption and skilled media production. The course, which has been thoroughly tested and validated…

  19. Acoustic Purification of Extracellular Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungheon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are an increasingly important source for biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics. The small size of MVs and their presence in complex biological environment, however, pose practical technical challenges, particularly when sample volumes are small. We herein present an acoustic nano-filter system that size-specifically separates MVs in a continuous and contact-free manner. The separation is based on ultrasound standing waves that exert differential acoustic force on MVs according to their size and density. By optimizing the design of the ultrasound transducers and underlying electronics, we were able to achieve a high separation yield and resolution. The “filter size-cutoff” can be controlled electronically in situ and enables versatile MV-size selection. We applied the acoustic nano-filter to isolate nanoscale (<200 nm) vesicles from cell culture media as well as MVs in stored red blood cell products. With the capacity for rapid and contact-free MV isolation, the developed system could become a versatile preparatory tool for MV analyses. PMID:25672598

  20. Acoustic purification of extracellular microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungheon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-03-24

    Microvesicles (MVs) are an increasingly important source for biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics. The small size of MVs and their presence in complex biological environment, however, pose technical challenges in sample preparation, particularly when sample volumes are small. We herein present an acoustic nanofilter system that size-specifically separates MVs in a continuous and contact-free manner. The separation uses ultrasound standing waves to exert differential acoustic force on MVs according to their size and density. By optimizing the design of the ultrasound transducers and underlying electronics, we were able to achieve a high separation yield and resolution. The "filter size-cutoff" can be controlled electronically in situ, which enables versatile MV-size selection. We applied the acoustic nanofilter to isolate nanoscale (<200 nm) vesicles from cell culture media as well as MVs in stored red blood cell products. With the capacity for rapid and contact-free MV isolation, the developed system could become a versatile preparatory tool for MV analyses.

  1. Quasi-phase-matched backward second-harmonic generation by complementary media in nonlinear metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2012-10-01

    High efficiency of the second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation can be obtained in optical superlattice by using the conventional quasi-phase-matched (QPM) method. Although this trick can be played on the acoustic wave, the media with negative nonlinear parameters are not common in acoustics. Furthermore, the QPM method used in acoustic metamaterials has been less studied. In this work, a protocol is provided to realize the QPM method by using nonlinear complementary media in acoustic metamaterials in order to obtain large backward second-harmonic generation. Compared with the conventional method, the method gains a broader bandwidth and can be used in both acoustic and electromagnetic waves.

  2. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  3. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  6. Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma. There are several different commercially-available machines that are used to treat acoustic neuromas with ... how the radiation is precisely delivered. Gamma Knife® machines derive their radiation from a fixed-array of ...

  7. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  8. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-07

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-093016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...Award No.: N00014-14-C-0172 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-093016 Prepared for: Office of Naval Research For the period: July 1, 2016...to September 30, 2016 Submitted by: Principal Investigator/Author: Kevin Heaney Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems, Inc. 5

  9. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-03

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-063016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...Award No.: N00014-14-C-0172 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-063016 Prepared for: Office of Naval Research For the period: April 1...2016 to June 30, 2016 Submitted by: Principal Investigator/Author: Kevin Heaney Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems, Inc. 5

  10. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...Award No.: N00014-14-C-0172 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-093015 Prepared for: Office of Naval Research For the period: January 1...2016 to March 31, 2015 Submitted by: Principal Investigator/Author: Kevin Heaney Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems, Inc. 5

  11. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    this year towards publishing one of the last SW06 papers, on acoustic scattering from crossing nonlinear internal wave trains. This is submitted for...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the

  12. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  13. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  14. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  15. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  16. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  17. Acoustic Casing Treatment Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-14

    Acoustic Casing Treatment Testing Completed in the W-8 Single Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn. Four different over-the-rotor acoustic casing treatment concepts were tested along with two baseline configurations. Testing included steady-aerodynamic measurements of fan performance, hotfilm turbulence measurements, and inlet acoustic measurements with an in-duct array.

  18. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  19. Contactless Acoustic Manipulation and Sorting of Particles by Dynamic Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco Aurelio; Skotis, George D; Ritchie, Scott; Cumming, David R S; Riehle, Mathis O; Bernassau, Anne L

    2016-09-12

    This paper presents a contactless, acoustic technique to manipulate and sort particles of varying size in both liquid and air media. An acoustic standing wave is generated by the superposition of counter-propagating waves emitted by two opposing emitters. The acoustic radiation force traps the smallest particles at the pressure nodes of the acoustic standing wave. The position of the particles can be manipulated by dynamically changing the phase difference between the two emitters. By applying a dynamic acoustic field (DAF), it is demonstrated that particles can be manipulated spatially and sorted according to size. The discrimination (sorting dynamic range) capability is initially demonstrated in liquid media by separating three different sets of polystyrene particles, ranging in size from 5 to 45 μm in diameter. The separation between particles was performed up to a ratio of 5/6 in diameter (20 % diameter difference). Finally, the scalability of the DAF method is demonstrated by sorting expanded polystyrene particles of 2 and 5 mm diameter in air.

  20. Laser-induced acoustic imaging of underground objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; DiMarzio, Charles A.; McKnight, Stephen W.; Sauermann, Gerhard O.; Miller, Eric L.

    1999-02-01

    This paper introduces a new demining technique based on the photo-acoustic interaction, together with results from photo- acoustic experiments. We have buried different types of targets (metal, rubber and plastic) in different media (sand, soil and water) and imaged them by measuring reflection of acoustic waves generated by irradiation with a CO2 laser. Research has been focused on the signal acquisition and signal processing. A deconvolution method using Wiener filters is utilized in data processing. Using a uniform spatial distribution of laser pulses at the ground's surface, we obtained 3D images of buried objects. The images give us a clear representation of the shapes of the underground objects. The quality of the images depends on the mismatch of acoustic impedance of the buried objects, the bandwidth and center frequency of the acoustic sensors and the selection of filter functions.

  1. Soft 3D acoustic metamaterial with negative index.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Thomas; Merlin, Aurore; Mascaro, Benoit; Zimny, Kevin; Leng, Jacques; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Mondain-Monval, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to the design and achievement of negative-refractive-index metamaterials since the 2000s. One of the challenges at present is to extend that field beyond electromagnetism by realizing three-dimensional (3D) media with negative acoustic indices. We report a new class of locally resonant ultrasonic metafluids consisting of a concentrated suspension of macroporous microbeads engineered using soft-matter techniques. The propagation of Gaussian pulses within these random distributions of 'ultra-slow' Mie resonators is investigated through in situ ultrasonic experiments. The real part of the acoustic index is shown to be negative (up to almost - 1) over broad frequency bandwidths, depending on the volume fraction of the microbeads as predicted by multiple-scattering calculations. These soft 3D acoustic metamaterials open the way for key applications such as sub-wavelength imaging and transformation acoustics, which require the production of acoustic devices with negative or zero-valued indices.

  2. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS

    PubMed Central

    Stremmel, Neil B.; Struck, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel. Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News. This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the national catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:28599517

  3. Media, Gadgets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes papers presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference on Chemical Education describing new media and gadgets, particularly models, computers, and other media. A bibliography of 15 presented papers on these topics is attached. (CS)

  4. Liquid lens using acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Isago, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2011-03-01

    A liquid lens is proposed that uses acoustic radiation force with no mechanical moving parts. It consists of a cylindrical acrylic cell filled with two immiscible liquids (degassed water and silicone oil) and a concave ultrasound transducer. The focal point of the transducer is located on the oil-water interface, which functions as a lens. The acoustic radiation force is generated when there is a difference in the acoustic energy densities of different media. An acoustic standing wave was generated in the axial direction of the lens and the variation of the shape of the oil-water interface was observed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). The lens profile can be rapidly changed by varying the acoustic radiation force from the transducer. The kinematic viscosity of silicone oil was optimized to minimize the response times of the lens. Response times of 40 and 80 ms when switching ultrasonic radiation on and off were obtained with a kinematic viscosity of 200 cSt. The path of a laser beam transmitted through the lens was calculated by ray-tracing simulations based on the experimental results obtained by OCT. The transmitted laser beam could be focused by applying an input voltage. The liquid lens could be operated as a variable-focus lens by varying the input voltage.

  5. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1999-01-01

    For decades, media violence has been viewed as largely a Western problem. New studies indicate that Indian children have increasing access to the media and that media violence will subject them to the same problems as Western children: imitation, desensitization, fear, and inappropriate attitudes about violence and aggression. Solutions exist but will have to be implemented within the next decade to protect Indian children and adolescents from the harmful effects of media violence.

  6. Media Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordlund, Jan-Erik

    1978-01-01

    Defines and operationalizes the concept of media interaction, which implies that the audience member experiences "interaction" with, and in many cases identifies with, persons in the media content. Presents a model of media interaction and the results of surveys conducted to explore hypotheses derived form the model. (JMF)

  7. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study:…

  8. Media Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish Media Panel is a research program about children and young persons and their use of mass media. The aim of the ten-year (1975-1985) project is to explain how media habits originate, how they change as children grow older, what factors on the part of children themselves and in their surroundings may be connected with a certain use of…

  9. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  10. Reflection and Scattering of Acoustical Waves from a Discontinuity in Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Leeman, S.; Nolan, E.; Lee, D.

    The reflection and transmission of a plane acoustical wave from a planar boundary at the interface between two homogeneous media of different acoustical properties is a classical problem in acoustics that has served as a basis for many developments in acoustics for over 100 years. This problem, detailed in virtually every textbook on acoustics, provides us with the acoustical analogue to Snell's Law in optics and gives us correspondingly simple results. Classical acoustics predicts that a reflection from a boundary occurs only if the characteristic acoustical impedances of the two media are different. Here we show that a reflection also occurs if the media have the same impedances but different absorption coefficients. Our analysis yields some surprising results. For example, a reflection will occur at a discontinuity in absorption even if the impedance is uniform and continuous across the interface. In addition, a discontinuity in impedance at an interface between two media that have constant and equal, but non-zero absorption, results in a reflection coefficient that is dependent on absorption as well as impedance. In general, reflection coefficients now become frequency dependent. To experimentally test our results, we measured the reflection at the interface between water and castor oil, two liquids with similar impedances but very different absorption coefficients. Measurement of the reflection coefficient between 1 and 50 MHz demonstrated a frequency dependence that was in good agreement with our analysis.

  11. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  12. Underwater Acoustic Carbon Nanotube Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300042 1 of 10 UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC CARBON NANOTUBE THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube underwater acoustic source which acts as a thermophone...development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An

  13. Acoustic metamaterial design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu

    The explosion of interest in metamaterials is due to the dramatically increased manipulation ability over light as well as sound waves. This material research was stimulated by the opportunity to develop an artificial media with negative refractive index and the application in superlens which allows super-resolution imaging. High-resolution acoustic imaging techniques are the essential tools for nondestructive testing and medical screening. However, the spatial resolution of the conventional acoustic imaging methods is restricted by the incident wavelength of ultrasound. This is due to the quickly fading evanescent fields which carry the subwavelength features of objects. By focusing the propagating wave and recovering the evanescent field, a flat lens with negative-index can potentially overcome the diffraction limit. We present the first experimental demonstration of focusing ultrasound waves through a flat acoustic metamaterial lens composed of a planar network of subwavelength Helmholtz resonators. We observed a tight focus of half-wavelength in width at 60.5 KHz by imaging a point source. This result is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulation by transmission line model in which we derived the effective mass density and compressibility. This metamaterial lens also displays variable focal length at different frequencies. Our experiment shows the promise of designing compact and light-weight ultrasound imaging elements. Moreover, the concept of metamaterial extends far beyond negative refraction, rather giving enormous choice of material parameters for different applications. One of the most interesting examples these years is the invisible cloak. Such a device is proposed to render the hidden object undetectable under the flow of light or sound, by guiding and controlling the wave path through an engineered space surrounding the object. However, the cloak designed by transformation optics usually calls for a highly anisotropic metamaterial, which

  14. Generalized acoustic energy density.

    PubMed

    Xu, Buye; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Leishman, Timothy W

    2011-09-01

    The properties of acoustic kinetic energy density and total energy density of sound fields in lightly damped enclosures have been explored thoroughly in the literature. Their increased spatial uniformity makes them more favorable measurement quantities for various applications than acoustic potential energy density (or squared pressure), which is most often used. In this paper, a generalized acoustic energy density (GED), will be introduced. It is defined by introducing weighting factors into the formulation of total acoustic energy density. With an additional degree of freedom, the GED can conform to the traditional acoustic energy density quantities, or it can be optimized for different applications. The properties of the GED will be explored in this paper for individual room modes, a diffuse sound field, and a sound field below the Schroeder frequency. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  15. Dirac cones in two-dimensional acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongqing; Xia, Baizhan; Yu, Dejie

    2017-08-01

    Dirac cones show many extraordinary properties, including Klein tunneling, pseudo-diffusive behavior, phase reconstruction, and topological edge states, and are thus attracting increasing research attention. However, no studies of Dirac cones on a subwavelength scale have been reported to date. In this paper, subwavelength-scale Dirac cones are realized using acoustic metamaterials that consist of hexagonal arrays of hexagonal columns with Helmholtz resonators. We have calculated the band structures of the three types of unit cells that are yielded by space group symmetry operations of the triangular Helmholtz resonators. The results show that these acoustic metamaterials with Helmholtz resonators can be used successfully to reduce the Dirac cone frequencies. Subwavelength Dirac cones of acoustic metamaterials with p6 mm or p6 symmetries are robust to rotation, while subwavelength Dirac cones of acoustic metamaterials with p31m symmetry are sensitive to rotation. In addition, the Dirac cone frequency decreases gradually with increasing filling ratio, which indicates a possible way to control wave propagation on the subwavelength scale. Numerical simulation results show that acoustic metamaterials can behave like zero-refractive-index media and can be applied to acoustic tunneling. The acoustic metamaterials designed in this work offer a route towards the design of functional acoustic devices operating on subwavelength scales.

  16. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-22

    Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 7/1/15 to 12/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...NUMBER Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems, Inc. 5 Militia Drive, Ste. 104 Lexington, MA 02421-4706...FR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics- 123116 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Office of Naval

  17. Asymmetric acoustic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaojian; Peng, Shasha; Ye, Yangtao; Dai, Zhongwei; Qiu, Chunyin; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2011-02-01

    The unidirectional transmission of acoustic waves is realized by a simple geometrically asymmetric steel grating structure. This exotic phenomenon stems from the one-way diffraction effect induced by the different periods of the slits on the both surfaces of the sample. And the frequency range of unidirectional transmission is simply determined by the structure periods. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical simulation. This remarkable effect is expected potential applications in ultrasonic devices, such as acoustic rectifiers and acoustic diodes.

  18. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  19. Low Frequency Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    understanding of very low frequency (VLF) acoustics in the deep ocean as applicable to naval warfare and coexistence with marine mammals. OBJECTIVES The...characteristics in the deep ocean; (3) encourage a cooperative interagency working relationship to investigate acoustic impact on marine mammals; and...with NOAA(NMFS) and other parties has dealt with ocean acoustics related to issues stimulated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. A focal point has

  20. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  1. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  2. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  3. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  4. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  5. Origins of Willis coupling and acoustic bianisotropy in acoustic metamaterials through source-driven homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Caleb F.; Alù, Andrea; Haberman, Michael R.

    2017-09-01

    Willis fluids, or more generally Willis materials, are homogenized composites that exhibit coupling between momentum and strain. This coupling is intrinsic to inhomogeneous media and can play a significant role in the overall response in acoustic metamaterials. In this paper, we draw connections between bianisotropy in electromagnetism and Willis coupling in elastodynamics to provide a qualitative understanding. Building upon these analogies, we introduce a homogenization technique for acoustic metamaterials based on a source-driven, multiple scattering approach that highlights the physical origins of Willis coupling. Moreover, through numerical examples, we compare several macroscopic material descriptions of acoustic metamaterials with non-negligible Willis coupling. The descriptions neglecting Willis coupling may not satisfy restrictions stemming from reciprocity, passivity, and causality, which suggests that including Willis coupling in macroscopic descriptions is necessary to realize physically meaningful macroscopic parameters.

  6. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO MULTIPLE RADIATION SCATTERING IN RANDOM MEDIA: Opto-acoustic diagnostics of the thermal action of high-intensity focused ultrasound on biological tissues: the possibility of its applications and model experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Tanya D.; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Solomatin, Vladimir S.; Karabutov, Aleksander A.

    2006-12-01

    The possibility of using the opto-acoustic (OA) method for monitoring high-intensity ultrasonic therapy is studied. The optical properties of raw and boiled liver samples used as the undamaged model tissue and tissue destroyed by ultrasound, respectively, are measured. Experiments are performed with samples consisting of several alternating layers of raw and boiled liver of different thickness. The position and transverse size of the thermal lesion were determined from the temporal shape of the OA signals. The results of measurements are compared with the real size and position of the thermal lesion determined from the subsequent cuts of the sample. It is shown that the OA method permits the diagnostics of variations in biological tissues upon ultrasonic therapy.

  7. Basic nonlinear acoustics: an introduction for radiological physicists.

    PubMed

    Harpen, Michael D

    2006-09-01

    Presented is a brief introduction to nonlinear acoustics, a topic of increasing importance in modern diagnostic ultrasound. Specifically treated is shock wave and harmonic production in lossless media. We also present a description of linear attenuation mechanisms in soft tissue and finally nonlinear propagation in soft tissue.

  8. Broadband metamaterial for nonresonant matching of acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    D'Aguanno, G; Le, K Q; Trimm, R; Alù, A; Mattiucci, N; Mathias, A D; Aközbek, N; Bloemer, M J

    2012-01-01

    Unity transmittance at an interface between bulk media is quite common for polarized electromagnetic waves incident at the Brewster angle, but it is rarely observed for sound waves at any angle of incidence. In the following, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic metamaterial possessing a Brewster-like angle that is completely transparent to sound waves over an ultra-broadband frequency range with >100% bandwidth. The metamaterial, consisting of a hard metal with subwavelength apertures, provides a surface impedance matching mechanism that can be arbitrarily tailored to specific media. The nonresonant nature of the impedance matching effectively decouples the front and back surfaces of the metamaterial allowing one to independently tailor the acoustic impedance at each interface. On the contrary, traditional methods for acoustic impedance matching, for example in medical imaging, rely on resonant tunneling through a thin antireflection layer, which is inherently narrowband and angle specific.

  9. Acoustic diffusers III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidondo, Alejandro

    2002-11-01

    This acoustic diffusion research presents a pragmatic view, based more on effects than causes and 15 very useful in the project advance control process, where the sound field's diffusion coefficient, sound field diffusivity (SFD), for its evaluation. Further research suggestions are presented to obtain an octave frequency resolution of the SFD for precise design or acoustical corrections.

  10. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  11. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  12. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  13. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  14. Highly directional acoustic receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Evora, Victor M.; Nuttall, Albert H.

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources.

  15. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  16. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  17. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  18. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  19. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  20. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  1. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  2. Mass sensitivity of layered shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave devices for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Trinchi, Adrian; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Holland, Anthony; Galatsis, Kosmas

    2001-11-01

    Layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices that allow the propagation of Love mode acoustic waves will be studied in this paper. In these devices, the substrate allows the propagation of Surface Skimming Bulks Waves (SSBWs). By depositing layers, that the speed of Shear Horizontal (SH) acoustic wave propagation is less than that of the substrate, the propagation mode transforms to Love mode. Love mode devices which will be studied in this paper, have SiO2 and ZnO acoustic guiding layers. As Love mode of propagation has no movement of particles component normal to the active sensor surface, they can be employed for the sensing applications in the liquid media.

  3. Theoretical study of different attenuation measurement by acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, F.; Bouhedja, S.; Amrani, H.

    2013-10-01

    Many works are devoted to study the attenuation of surface waves in media, particularly, leaky surface acoustic waves (LSAW). In this work, a big part of the study is based on the intensity of the output signal, i.e., acoustic signature, V(z). The latter is obtained by the use of quantitative mode of acoustic microscopy in order to measure the velocity and the attenuation of those excited waves at the limit between the specimen and the coupling liquid. Our aim is to compare the attenuation values of the LSAW propagation in porous silicon obtained with three different methods. The first is obtained by resolving Viktorov equation. The second method is the spectral analysis acoustical signature V(z) curves. The third method uses the dark field. The obtained results are in a good agreement with those experiments.

  4. Refraction of acoustic duct waveguide modes by exhaust jets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, R.

    1973-01-01

    The refraction of acoustic duct waveguide modes emitted from the open end of a semiinfinite rectangular duct by a jet-like exhaust flow is studied theoretically. The problem is formulated as a Wiener-Hopf problem and is ultimately solved by an approximate method due to Carrier and Koiter. Continuity of transverse acoustic particle displacement and of acoustic pressure is assumed at the jet/still-air interface. The solution exhibits several features of the acoustics of moving media such as a source convection effect, zones of relative silence, and simple refraction. Plots of far-field directivity patterns are presented for several cases and show refraction effects to be important even at modest exhaust Mach numbers of order 0.3. Only subsonic exhaust Mach numbers are considered.

  5. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through…

  6. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  7. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through…

  8. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  9. Theoretical model of lossy acoustic bipolar cylindrical cloak with negative index metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Y.; Ahn, Doyeol

    2017-09-01

    While, it was shown that for the lossless acoustic cloak the illumination direction independent cloaking can be achieved by employing the structure with compressed geometry and complementary media, the effect of the material loss have not been fully explored yet. Here, we show that realistic cloaking materials with moderate loss still works when complementary media is introduced but with the attenuated back scattering waves.

  10. Translational illusion of acoustic sources by transformation acoustics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Li, Shichao; He, Sailing

    2017-09-01

    An acoustic illusion of creating a translated acoustic source is designed by utilizing transformation acoustics. An acoustic source shifter (ASS) composed of layered acoustic metamaterials is designed to achieve such an illusion. A practical example where the ASS is made with naturally available materials is also given. Numerical simulations verify the performance of the proposed device. The designed ASS may have some applications in, e.g., anti-sonar detection.

  11. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  12. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  13. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  14. Some Problems of modern acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan, A.

    1974-01-01

    The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary character of acoustics is considered and its scientific, technological, economical and social implications, as well as the role of acoustics in creating new machines and equipment and improving the quality of products are outlined. Research beyond audible frequencies, as well as to extremely high acoustic intensities, which requires the development of a nonlinear acoustics is elaborated.

  15. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  16. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  17. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  18. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  19. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  20. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  1. Media Publics and Media Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie; McGrath, Kristin

    To gain a perspective on the kinds of people who find newspapers and television to be high or low in credibility, a two-phase study combined demographic and other characteristics, media behavior, and attitudes toward the media. The first phase involved a series of focused group discussions, while the second was a national, representative sampling…

  2. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Cantor, J

    2000-08-01

    Research on the effects of media violence is not well understood by the general public. Despite this fact, there is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific literature about the unhealthy effects of media violence. Meta-analyses show that media-violence viewing consistently is associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, ranging from the trivial (imitative violence directed against toys) to the serious (criminal violence), with many consequential outcomes in between (acceptance of violence as a solution to problems, increased feelings of hostility, and the apparent delivery of painful stimulation to another person). Desensitization is another well-documented effect of viewing violence, which is observable in reduced arousal and emotional disturbance while witnessing violence, the reduced tendency to intervene in a fight, and less sympathy for the victims of violence. Although there is evidence that youth who are already violent are more likely to seek out violent entertainment, there is strong evidence that the relationship between violence viewing and antisocial behavior is bidirectional. There is growing evidence that media violence also engenders intense fear in children which often lasts days, months, and even years. The media's potential role in solutions to these problems is only beginning to be explored, in investigations examining the uses and effects of movie ratings, television ratings, and the V-chip, and the effects of media literacy programs and public education efforts. Future research should explore important individual differences in responses to media violence and effective ways to intervene in the negative effects.

  3. Acoustic Ridge Waveguide Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    P. E. Lagasse, I. M. Mason, and E. A. Ash, "Acoustic Surface Waveguides - Analysis and Assessment," IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory and Techniques MTT-2i»t i», 225-236 (April 1973). yt^^^^ HMMMM . . .

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  5. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  6. Diagnosing Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  7. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  8. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  9. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  10. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  11. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  12. Miniature Biomimetic Acoustic Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    micro-sensors 5. Microscale bio-sound detectors. Stereocilia as actuators: 1. Similar to crustacean /insect stridulatory pegs 2. Micro-Sonar/Sodar emitting arrays, Handheld Sonars, Air-Coupled Acoustic Sensors.

  13. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  14. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  15. Numerical methods in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, S. M.

    This paper presents a survey of some computational techniques applicable to acoustic wave problems. Recent advances in wave extrapolation methods, spectral methods and boundary integral methods are discussed and illustrated by specific calculations.

  16. Acoustic imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  17. Acoustic borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Manzi, S.J.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes an acoustic borehole logging method. It comprises traversing a borehole with a borehole logging tool containing a transmitter of acoustic energy having a free-field frequency spectrum with at least one characteristic resonant frequency of vibration and spaced-apart receiver, repeatedly exciting the transmitter with a swept frequency tone burst of a duration sufficiently greater than the travel time of acoustic energy between the transmitter and the receiver to allow borehole cavity resonances to be established within the borehole cavity formed between the borehole logging tool and the borehole wall, detecting acoustic energy amplitude modulated by the borehole cavity resonances with the spaced-apart receiver, and recording an amplitude verses frequency output of the receiver in correlation with depth as a log of the borehole frequency spectrum representative of the subsurface formation comprising the borehole wall.

  18. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  19. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  20. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  1. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    all levels of operations1." By making rapid ("near-real time") communications with and control of all forces the key element of national strategy ...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced ...of the ACOMMS ATD was to develop a fleet-compatible advanced acoustic communication capability that can easily be transitioned into planned Fleet

  2. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    receiver block the propagation - how much 3D diffraction occurs to fill in the shadow zone behind the islands? - What is the long-range arrival time...and structure of the signal? - Can we identify the late arriving energy, echoing off of distant seamounts ? - Can we use 3D acoustics to improve the...the CTBTO hydroacoustic stations of seismic events that are in the acoustic shadow due to island (or continent) blockage. The 3D Peregrine model

  3. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  4. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  5. Ocean Acoustic Observatory Federation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    J., C. G. Fox, and F. K. Duennebier, Hydroacoustic detection of submarine landslides on Kilauea volcano , Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 28, 1811-1814...acoustic tomography experiments in the vicinity of coastal North America, • Monitor, in real time, marine mammals, earthquakes and volcanoes in the...distances, coastal tomography and thermometry, and earthquakes and volcanoes in the northern Pacific. APPROACH The members of the Ocean Acoustic

  6. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  7. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  8. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Willis, E; Strasburger, V C

    1998-04-01

    American media are the most violent in the world, and American society is now paying a high price in terms of real life violence. Research has confirmed that mass media violence contributes to aggressive behavior, fear, and desensitization of violence. Television, movies, music videos, computer/video games are pervasive media and represent important influences on children and adolescents. Portraying rewards and punishments and showing the consequences of violence are probably the two most essential contextual factors for viewers as they interpret the meaning of what they are viewing on television. Public health efforts have emphasized public education, media literacy campaign for children and parents, and an increased use of technology to prevent access to certain harmful medial materials.

  9. Cloaking of the momentum in acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Sklan, Sophia

    2010-01-01

    Through an appropriate change in variables, we find that the three-dimensional acoustic wave equation is subject to the transformation media interpretation. In particular, we determine that this interpretation can be extended beyond the pressure difference to also account for the momentum transported by the wave. The suitability of momentum transport is especially interesting as it is an example where the field of interest is not governed by a wave equation. We examine how both fields behave in the case of cloaking. Explicit consideration of the boundary conditions shows that perfect cloaking is preserved, even when the incoming momentum is nonzero at the surface of the cloak.

  10. Acoustic flowmeters: Their applications in hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzsche, Ulf

    Flowmeter installations for viscous and high hydrostatic pressure media are developed. Their usability is considered for characteristic measuring tasks in the field of oil hydraulics. The properties of flow sensors are evaluated by system analysis. Acoustic measuring systems are preferred. Two ultrasonic flowmeters are realized. Simulation models, installation with piezoceramic material parameters, and sound visualization support these developments. A computer aided hydraulic test stand is developed in order to detect the measuring characteristics of this system. Flowmeter applications are shown using the identification of the static and dynamic parameters of an electrohydraulic pilot valve.

  11. Application of nonlinear acoustics in the atmosphere and biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    David Blackstock has made important contributions to understanding nonlinear processes in underwater acoustics, atmospheric acoustics, and biomedical acoustics. In this talk, two of these areas that David has been involved with are addressed by contrasting the evolution of sonic booms in an inhomogeneous atmosphere with the evolution of shock waves in lithotripsy (breaking of kidney stones by shock waves). The distortion of N waves generated by supersonic aircraft is affected by geometrical spreading and changes in the acoustic properties of the medium with altitude. In shock wave lithotripsy, the distortion of triangle waves is affected by geometrical spreading and changes in the acoustic properties due to layering of tissue types. In addition, the turbulent boundary layer near the ground and the inhomogeneous nature of tissue, means that both sonic booms and lithotripter shock waves pass through a random media. Calculations are presented using weak shock to compare the distortion that occurs in the two scenarios. Measurements of saturationlike effects are shown for a clinical shock wave therapy device. Numerical simulations for propagation through random media demonstrate the localized focusing and defocusing that can occur for both sonic booms and lithotripter shock waves. [Work supported in part by NIH and NASA.

  12. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  13. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  14. Acoustic calibration apparatus for calibrating plethysmographic acoustic pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Davis, David C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating an acoustic sensor is described. The apparatus includes a transmission material having an acoustic impedance approximately matching the acoustic impedance of the actual acoustic medium existing when the acoustic sensor is applied in actual in-service conditions. An elastic container holds the transmission material. A first sensor is coupled to the container at a first location on the container and a second sensor coupled to the container at a second location on the container, the second location being different from the first location. A sound producing device is coupled to the container and transmits acoustic signals inside the container.

  15. Acoustic calibration apparatus for calibrating plethysmographic acoustic pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Davis, David C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating an acoustic sensor is described. The apparatus includes a transmission material having an acoustic impedance approximately matching the acoustic impedance of the actual acoustic medium existing when the acoustic sensor is applied in actual in-service conditions. An elastic container holds the transmission material. A first sensor is coupled to the container at a first location on the container and a second sensor coupled to the container at a second location on the container, the second location being different from the first location. A sound producing device is coupled to the container and transmits acoustic signals inside the container.

  16. Practical Acoustic Thermometry with Acoustic Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Podesta, M.; Sutton, G.; Underwood, R.; Legg, S.; Steinitz, A.

    2010-09-01

    Acoustic thermometry is capable of phenomenal accuracy, but is a difficult technique to apply in many practical situations. Here, we describe a modification of the technique, which permits robust temperature measurements to be made, potentially with millikelvin resolution, over a temperature range extending from cryogenic temperatures to over 1000 °C. The technique uses measurements of the time of flight of acoustic pulses in tubes, usually filled with an inert gas such as argon. The tubes—typically made of stainless steel with an outer diameter of 6mm—act as acoustic waveguides and can be several meters long and bent into complex shapes. The time of flight is determined by the average temperature along the entire length of the tube. Local temperature information can be inferred in several ways. Typically a second shorter tube is used and the difference in time of flight reflects the temperature in the region at the end of the first tube. If the measurement length is sufficiently long—typically 1m of tube—then a measurement resolution of less than 1mK is achievable. The technique is well suited to measurements in harsh environments in which conventional sensors degrade. Results from early tests are shown, which highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the technique.

  17. The effect of continuous pore stratification on the acoustic absorption in open cell foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahasaranon, Sararat; Horoshenkov, Kirill V.; Khan, Amir; Benkreira, Hadj

    2012-04-01

    This work reports new data on the acoustical properties of open cell foam with pore stratification. The pore size distribution as a function of the sample depth is determined in the laboratory using methods of optical image analysis. It is shown that the pore size distribution in this class of materials changes gradually with the depth. It is also shown that the observed pore size distribution gradient is responsible for the air flow resistivity stratification, which is measured acoustically and non-acoustically. The acoustical absorption coefficient of the developed porous sample is measured using a standard laboratory method. A suitable theoretical model for the acoustical properties of porous media with pore size distribution is adopted. The measured data for open porosity, tortuosity, and standard deviation data are used together with this model to predict the observed acoustic absorption behavior of the developed material sample. The transfer matrix approach is used in the modeling process to account for the pore size stratification. This work suggests that it is possible to design and manufacture porous media with continuous pore size stratification, which can provide an improvement to conventional porous media with uniform pore size distribution in terms of the attained acoustic absorption coefficient.

  18. Program in acoustics. [aeroacoustics, aircraft noise, and noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Relevant research projects conducted by faculty and graduate students in the general area of aeroacoustics to further the understanding of noise generation by aircraft and to aid in the development of practical methods for noise suppression are listed. Special activities summarized relate to the nonlinear acoustic wave theory and its application to several cases including that of the acoustic source located at the throat of a near-sonic duct, a computer program developed to compute the nonlinear wave theory, and a parabolic approximation for propagation of sounding in moving stratified media.

  19. Acoustic Propagation in Continental Shelf Break and Slope Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    REFERENCES 1. J. D. Sagers , Integral Equation Coupled Mode Code (Version 2.0) [MATLAB program]. ARL:UT internal software (Accessed August 2012). 2. D...167 (2001). 4. R. A. Koch, “Coupled mode formalism in three dimensions,” ARL-TL-EV-10-01 (2010). 5. Jason D. Sagers , “Predicting Acoustic Intensity...and J. D. Sagers , “A nonlocal effective operator for coupling forward and backward propagating modes in inhomogeneous media,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130

  20. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  1. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  2. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography with intense acoustic bursts.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Roger J; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-04-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) detects ultrasonically modulated light to spatially localize multiply scattered photons in turbid media with the ultimate goal of imaging the optical properties in living subjects. A principal challenge of the technique is weak modulated signal strength. We discuss ways to push the limits of signal enhancement with intense acoustic bursts while conforming to optical and ultrasonic safety standards. A CCD-based speckle-contrast detection scheme is used to detect acoustically modulated light by measuring changes in speckle statistics between ultrasound-on and ultrasound-off states. The CCD image capture is synchronized with the ultrasound burst pulse sequence. Transient acoustic radiation force, a consequence of bursts, is seen to produce slight signal enhancement over pure ultrasonic-modulation mechanisms for bursts and CCD exposure times of the order of milliseconds. However, acoustic radiation-force-induced shear waves are launched away from the acoustic sample volume, which degrade UOT spatial resolution. By time gating the CCD camera to capture modulated light before radiation force has an opportunity to accumulate significant tissue displacement, we reduce the effects of shear-wave image degradation, while enabling very high signal-to-noise ratios. Additionally, we maintain high-resolution images representative of optical and not mechanical contrast. Signal-to-noise levels are sufficiently high so as to enable acquisition of 2D images of phantoms with one acoustic burst per pixel.

  3. Modifying the acoustic impedance of polyurea-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantasetphong, Wiroj; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Jia, Zhanzhan; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2013-04-01

    Acoustic impedance is a material property that depends on mass density and acoustic wave speed. An impedance mismatch between two media leads to the partial reflection of an acoustic wave sent from one medium to another. Active sonar is one example of a useful application of this phenomenon, where reflected and scattered acoustic waves enable the detection of objects. If the impedance of an object is matched to that of the surrounding medium, however, the object may be hidden from observation (at least directly) by sonar. In this study, polyurea composites are developed to facilitate such impedance matching. Polyurea is used due to its excellent blast-mitigating properties, easy casting, corrosion protection, abrasion resistance, and various uses in current military technology. Since pure polyurea has impedance higher than that of water (the current medium of interest), low mass density phenolic microballoon particles are added to create composite materials with reduced effective impedances. The volume fraction of particles is varied to study the effect of filler quantity on the acoustic impedance of the resulting composite. The composites are experimentally characterized via ultrasonic measurements. Computational models based on the method of dilute-randomly-distributed inclusions are developed and compared with the experimental results. These experiments and models will facilitate the design of new elastomeric composites with desirable acoustic impedances.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  5. Acoustic propagation effects in therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, T. Douglas; Faidi, Waseem; Makin, Inder Raj S.

    2006-05-01

    Accurate understanding of ultrasound-tissue interaction is important for realization of clinically useful therapeutic ultrasound methods and devices. Linear acoustic propagation in homogeneous media, including diffraction and absorption effects, provides a useful first approximation but fails to accurately model many problems of interest. Depending on the therapy regime, other important effects can include cavitation and other gas activity, inhomogeneous tissue structure, finite-amplitude propagation, temperature-dependent tissue properties, and irreversible tissue modification. For ablation of soft tissue using ultrasound, prediction of therapeutic effects requires accurate knowledge of space- and time-dependent heat deposition from acoustic absorption. In addition to perfusion losses, acoustically inhomogeneous tissue structure, even in nominally homogeneous organs such as the liver, can modify heating patterns enough to change treatment outcomes. Gas activity due to boiling and tissue property changes due to local ablation, both of which markedly affect treatment, can be approximated by appropriate modification of the initial heat deposition pattern. These issues are illustrated by simulations of ultrasound therapy and comparison with in vivo and in vitro ultrasound ablation experiments.

  6. Acoustic field modeling in therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, T. Douglas; Faidi, Waseem; Makin, Inder Raj S.

    2006-05-01

    Understanding of ultrasound-tissue interaction is important for realization of clinically useful therapeutic ultrasound methods and devices. Linear acoustic propagation in homogeneous media, including diffraction and absorption effects, provides a useful first approximation but fails to accurately model many problems of interest. Depending on the therapy regime, other important effects can include finite-amplitude propagation, cavitation and other gas activity, inhomogeneous tissue structure, temperature-dependent tissue properties, and irreversible tissue modification. For bulk ablation of soft tissue using ultrasound, prediction of therapeutic effects requires accurate knowledge of space- and time-dependent heat deposition from acoustic absorption. A primary factor affecting heat deposition is local heat loss due to blood flow, both from bulk perfusion and large vessels. Gas activity due to boiling and tissue property changes due to local ablation, both of which markedly affect treatment, can be approximated by appropriate modification of the initial heat deposition pattern. Acoustically inhomogeneous tissue structure, even in nominally homogeneous organs such as the liver, can modify heating patterns enough to change treatment outcomes. These issues are illustrated by simulations of ultrasound therapy and comparison with in vivo and in vitro ultrasound ablation experiments.

  7. Acoustic properties of low growing plants.

    PubMed

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Benkreira, Hadj

    2013-05-01

    The plane wave normal incidence acoustic absorption coefficient of five types of low growing plants is measured in the presence and absence of soil. These plants are generally used in green living walls and flower beds. Two types of soil are considered in this work: a light-density, man-made soil and a heavy-density natural clay base soil. The absorption coefficient data are obtained in the frequency range of 50-1600 Hz using a standard impedance tube of diameter 100 mm. The equivalent fluid model for sound propagation in rigid frame porous media proposed by Miki [J. Acoust. Soc. Jpn. (E) 11, 25-28 (1990)] is used to predict the experimentally observed behavior of the absorption coefficient spectra of soils, plants, and their combinations. Optimization analysis is employed to deduce the effective flow resistivity and tortuosity of plants which are assumed to behave acoustically as an equivalent fluid in a rigid frame porous medium. It is shown that the leaf area density and dominant angle of leaf orientation are two key morphological characteristics which can be used to predict accurately the effective flow resistivity and tortuosity of plants.

  8. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  9. Media Training

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  10. Media Training

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  11. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-20

    300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described...0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube transducer that can operate in a passive acoustic mode for data...acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An underwater acoustic

  12. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  13. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  14. Acoustic Levitation Containerless Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.; Rey, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    This research program consists of the development of acoustic containerless processing systems with applications in the areas of research in material sciences, as well as the production of new materials, solid forms with novel and unusual microstructures, fusion target spheres, and improved optical fibers. Efforts have been focused on the containerless processing at high temperatures for producing new kinds of glasses. Also, some development has occurred in the areas of containerlessly supporting liquids at room temperature, with applications in studies of fluid dynamics, potential undercooling of liquids, etc. The high temperature area holds the greatest promise for producing new kinds of glasses and ceramics, new alloys, and possibly unusual structural shapes, such as very uniform hollow glass shells for fusion target applications. High temperature acoustic levitation required for containerless processing has been demonstrated in low-g environments as well as in ground-based experiments. Future activities include continued development of the signals axis acoustic levitator.

  15. Architectural-acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Anthony K.

    2004-05-01

    Consulting involves both the science of acoustics and the art of communication, requiring an array of inherent and created skills. Perhaps because consulting on architectural acoustics is a relatively new field, there is a remarkable variety of career paths, all influenced by education, interest, and experience. Many consultants juggle dozens of chargeable projects at a time, not to mention proposals, seminars, teaching, articles, business concerns, and professional-society activities. This paper will discuss various aspects of career paths, projects, and clients as they relate to architectural-acoustics consulting. The intended emphasis will be considerations for those who may be interested in such a career, noting that consultants generally seem to thrive on the numerous challenges.

  16. High temperature acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically levitating an object within a portion of a chamber that is heated to a high temperature, while a driver at the opposite end of the chamber is maintained at a relatively low temperature. The cold end of the chamber is constructed so it can be telescoped to vary the length (L sub 1) of the cold end portion and therefore of the entire chamber, so that the chamber remains resonant to a normal mode frequency, and so that the pressure at the hot end of the chamber is maximized. The precise length of the chamber at any given time, is maintained at an optimum resonant length by a feedback loop. The feedback loop includes an acoustic pressure sensor at the hot end of the chamber, which delivers its output to a control circuit which controls a motor that varies the length (L) of the chamber to a level where the sensed acoustic pressure is a maximum.

  17. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  18. Toward an adjustable nonlinear low frequency acoustic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, R.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.; Herzog, P.; Mattei, P. O.

    2011-10-01

    A study of the targeted energy transfer (TET) phenomenon between an acoustic resonator and a thin viscoelastic membrane has recently been presented in the paper [R. Bellet et al., Experimental study of targeted energy transfer from an acoustic system to a nonlinear membrane absorber, Journal of Sound and Vibration 329 (2010) 2768-2791], providing a new path to passive sound control in the low frequency domain where no efficient dissipative device exists. This paper presents experimental results showing that a loudspeaker used as a suspended piston working outside its range of linearity can also be used as a nonlinear acoustic absorber. The main advantage of this technology of absorber is the perspective to adjust independently the device parameters (mass, nonlinear stiffness and damping) according to the operational conditions. To achieve this purpose, quasi-static and dynamic tests have been performed on three types of commercial devices (one with structural modifications), in order to define the constructive characteristics that it should present. An experimental setup has been developed using a one-dimensional acoustic linear system coupled through a box (acting as a weak spring) to a loudspeaker used as a suspended piston acting as an essentially nonlinear oscillator. The tests carried out on the whole vibro-acoustic system have showed the occurrence of the acoustic TET from the acoustic media to the suspended piston and demonstrated the efficiency of this new kind of absorber at low frequencies over a wide frequency range. Moreover, the experimental analyses conducted with different NES masses have confirmed that it is possible to optimize the noise absorption with respect to the excitation level of the acoustic resonator.

  19. Acoustic Liners for Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G (Inventor); Grady, Joseph E (Inventor); Kiser, James D. (Inventor); Miller, Christopher (Inventor); Heidmann, James D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An improved acoustic liner for turbine engines is disclosed. The acoustic liner may include a straight cell section including a plurality of cells with straight chambers. The acoustic liner may also include a bent cell section including one or more cells that are bent to extend chamber length without increasing the overall height of the acoustic liner by the entire chamber length. In some cases, holes are placed between cell chambers in addition to bending the cells, or instead of bending the cells.

  20. Good acoustics central to recovery.

    PubMed

    Budd, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Good acoustic conditions in hospitals and other healthcare facilities are known not only to benefit patients by creating an environment that facilitates rest, sleeping, consultation and treatment, but also clinical and nursing staff. At the recent Healthcare Estates conference, Richard Budd of acoustic engineering and noise and vibration consultants Sound Research Laboratories, discussed the revised guidance on good acoustic design in a recently published Health Technical Memorandum, HTM 08-01-Acoustics.

  1. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  2. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  3. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  4. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  5. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  6. Broadband Acoustic Hyperbolic Metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-12-18

    In this Letter, we report on the design and experimental characterization of a broadband acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial. The proposed metamaterial consists of multiple arrays of clamped thin plates facing the y direction and is shown to yield opposite signs of effective density in the x and y directions below a certain cutoff frequency, therefore, yielding a hyperbolic dispersion. Partial focusing and subwavelength imaging are experimentally demonstrated at frequencies between 1.0 and 2.5 kHz. The proposed metamaterial could open up new possibilities for acoustic wave manipulation and may find usage in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  7. Undersea Acoustic Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    field test of ocean tomography in 1981. S.; Bibliography W. Munk, B. Zetler, J. Clark, S. Gill, D. Porter, J. Spiesberger , and R. Spindel, "Tidal effects...on long-range sound transmission," JGR (Green) 86, 6399-6410, 1981. J. Spiesberger , R. Spindel and K. Metzger, "Stability and identification of ocean...Acoustics, T =+viv, Israel, 1981. R.C. Spindel and J. Spiesberger , "Multipath variability du, the Gulf Stream," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69, 982-988, 1981. R.C

  8. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  9. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  10. Mars Acoustic Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D.; Gierasch, P. J.; Toigo, A.; Dissly, R.; Dagle, W. R.; Schindel, D.; Hutchins, D.; Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    2004-05-01

    We are developing an acoustic anemometer for use in the low pressure atmosphere of Mars. Acoustic anemometers have high sensitivity, high temporal resolution, high accuracy, and are insensitive to radiative heating and demand little power. In these ways they are superior to the anemometers previously flown to Mars. Accurate, well-calibrated anemometers are crucial for understanding the near-surface atmospheric environment (e.g., slope winds, convective cells, dust devils, and aeolian processes in general). Furthermore, the high time-resolution, sensitivity, 3-D capabilities and well-defined, open sampling volume available from an acoustic anemometer allow it to resolve individual turbulent eddies, a first for Mars. This feature allows it to directly measure eddy fluxes, for example water vapor vertical fluxes between the surface and atmosphere when coupled with a fast hygrometer (e.g. a TDL). This novel ability to measure water vapor fluxes is viewed as a high priority science goal of Mars landers. We expect that the instrument designed in this program will be a prime candidate to fly on either the Mars Science Laboratory Lander (2009 launch), or any of the future planned Mars Scout landers or Mars Surveyor Landers. With adaptation, the instrument could also find application on Titan, or at high altitude on Earth. Acoustic anemometers are well developed for Earth, but need modifications to function in the vastly different martian pressure environment. The two main hurdles are sound attenuation in Mars air, and transducer coupling inefficiency from density and sound speed mismatches with Mars air. The sound attenuation on Mars is significant, especially at ultrasonic frequencies. We have a simple model of the relevant phenomena to guide our choices to the optimal frequencies for Mars. The coupling between a transducer and the atmosphere is characterized by the match of their densities and sound speeds, or acoustic impedances, similar to index of refraction in optics

  11. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  12. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  13. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  14. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  15. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  16. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  17. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  18. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  19. Acoustical Environment of School Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzroy, Dariel; Reid, John L.

    A field study was made of the acoustical environment of schools designed for increased flexibility to meet the spatial requirements of new teaching methods. The object of the study was to define all the criteria for the acoustical design of this type of classroom including the determination of--(1) minimum acoustical separation required for…

  20. ACOUSTICAL ENVIRONMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FITZROY, DARIEL; REID, JOHN L.

    A FIELD STUDY WAS MADE OF THE ACOUSTICAL ENVIRONMENT OF SCHOOLS DESIGNED FOR INCREASED FLEXIBILITY TO MEET THE SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS OF NEW TEACHING METHODS. THE OBJECT OF THE STUDY WAS TO DEFINE ALL THE CRITERIA FOR THE ACOUSTICAL DESIGN OF THIS TYPE OF CLASSROOM INCLUDING THE DETERMINATION OF--(1) MINIMUM ACOUSTICAL SEPARATION REQUIRED FOR…

  1. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  2. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, C. B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi et al. [J. Plasma Phys. 41, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode.

  3. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  4. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  5. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  6. Acoustic band gaps in composites of solids and viscous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprik, Rudolf; Wegdam, Gerard H.

    1998-04-01

    The propagation of sound in three dimensional periodic lattices of solid-solid and solid-liquid composites is determined by calculating the acoustic band structure. Inclusion of viscous damping in the liquid is essential in understanding the acoustical properties of the solid-liquid composite when the characteristic length scale of the system matches the viscous penetration depth in the liquid. By using complex sound velocities to model the visco-elastic properties of the liquid we show that the solid-viscous liquid composite displays acoustic band gaps. These results are consistent with the hydrodynamic analysis of viscoelastic modes in porous media, binary mixtures and with a stratified layer model. As a characteristic example the ultrasonic band structure of silica spheres in ice and of colloidal crystals of silica in glycerol/water mixture are presented. Both systems display gaps under experimentally obtainable conditions.

  7. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission through an acoustic prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ailing; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xi, Yanhui

    2017-08-01

    Narrow bandwidth and complex structure are the main shortcomings of the existing asymmetric acoustic transmission devices. In this letter, a simple broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission device is proposed by using an acoustic prism filled with xenon gas. The sound pressure field distributions, the transmission spectra, and the prism angle effect are numerically investigated by using finite element method. The proposed device can always realize asymmetric acoustic transmission for the wave frequency larger than 480 Hz because the wave paths are not influenced by the wave frequencies. The asymmetric acoustic transmission is attributed to normal refraction and total reflection occur at different interfaces. Besides, relatively high transmission efficiency is realized due to the similar impedance between the acoustic prism and background. And the transmitted wave direction can be controlled freely by changing the prism angle. Our design provides a simple method to obtain broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission device and has potentials in many applications, such as noise control and medical ultrasound.

  8. Angular spectrum approach for the computation of group and phase velocity surfaces of acoustic waves in anisotropic materials

    PubMed

    Pluta; Schubert; Jahny; Grill

    2000-03-01

    The decomposition of an acoustic wave into its angular spectrum representation creates an effective base for the calculation of wave propagation effects in anisotropic media. In this method, the distribution of acoustic fields is calculated in arbitrary planes from the superposition of the planar components with proper phase shifts. These phase shifts depend on the ratio of the distance between the planes to the normal component of the phase slowness vector. In anisotropic media, the phase shifts depend additionally on the changes of the slowness with respect to the direction of the propagation vector and the polarization. Those relations are obtained from the Christoffel equation. The method employing the fast Fourier transformation algorithm is especially suited for volume imaging in anisotropic media, based on holographic detection in transmission of acoustic waves generated by a point source. This technique is compared with measurements on crystals performed by phase-sensitive scanning acoustic microscopy.

  9. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  10. [Chronic otitis mediaChronic Otitis Media].

    PubMed

    Kohles, N; Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2015-11-01

    There are 2 different kinds of chronic otitis media: Otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and otitis media chronica epitympanalis (cholesteatoma). The incidence of chronic otitis media as reported in literature differs in a wide range. The incidence rates vary between 0.45 and 46%. Both, otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and cholesteatoma, lead to eardrum perforation due to lengthy and recurring inflammations. Furthermore, chronic otitis media is characterized by frequently recurring otorrhea and conductive hearing loss.

  11. Acoustics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    This paper explores the issues associated with poor acoustics within schools. Additionally, it suggests remedies for existing buildings and those under renovation, as well as concerns for new construction. The paper discusses the effects of unwanted noise on students in terms of physiological, motivational, and cognitive influences. Issues are…

  12. Detecting Contaminant Particles Acoustically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus "listens" for particles in interior of complex turbomachinery. Contact microphones are attached at several points on pump housing. Acoustic transducer also attached to housing to excite entire pump with sound. Frequency of sound is slowly raised until pump resonates. Microphones detect noise of loose particles scraping against pump parts. Such as machining chips in turbopumps or other machinery without disassembly.

  13. Improved acoustic levitation apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berge, L. H.; Johnson, J. L.; Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Concave driver and reflector enhance and shape levitation forces in acoustic resonance system. Single-mode standing-wave pattern is focused by ring element situated between driver and reflector. Concave surfaces increase levitating forces up to factor of 6 as opposed to conventional flat surfaces, making it possible to suspend heavier objects.

  14. Concert hall acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2004-05-01

    I will review some work at Bell Laboratories on artificial reverberation and concert hall acoustics including Philharmonic Hall (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York). I will also touch on sound diffusion by number-theoretic surfaces and the measurement of reverberation time using the music as played in the hall as a ``test'' signal.

  15. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  16. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  17. Indigenous Acoustic Detection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-26

    considerable distances, and they act as good sensors of human presence. Though singing insects are ubiquitous in warm areas, even in the desert ( Nevo and...methodology. DTIC. CD-58-PL. Lloyd, J. E. 1981. Personnel communication. Nevo , E. and S. A. Blondheim. 1972. Acoustic isolation in the speciation of

  18. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, the sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.

  19. Acoustic visualizations using surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Robinson, Philip W; Saarelma, Jukka; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Savioja, Lauri; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-06-01

    Sound visualizations have been an integral part of room acoustics studies for more than a century. As acoustic measurement techniques and knowledge of hearing evolve, acousticians need more intuitive ways to represent increasingly complex data. Microphone array processing now allows accurate measurement of spatio-temporal acoustic properties. However, the multidimensional data can be a challenge to display coherently. This letter details a method of mapping visual representations of acoustic reflections from a receiver position to the surfaces from which the reflections originated. The resulting animations are presented as a spatial acoustic analysis tool.

  20. Otitis media with effusion

    MedlinePlus

    OME; Secretory otitis media; Serous otitis media; Silent otitis media; Silent ear infection; Glue ear ... Kerschner JE, Preciado D. Otitis media. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ... Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  1. On Media Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This monograph analyzes the theory and practice of media education and media literacy. The book also includes the list of Russian media education literature and addresses of websites of the associations for media education.

  2. Hydraulic and acoustic investigation of sintered glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueven, Ibrahim; Luding, Stefan; Steeb, Holger

    2013-06-01

    In the present contribution, we are focussing on the hydraulical and acoustical charcterization of sintered glass beads. For the experiments sintered mono-and weakly polydisperse glass bead samples were applied. Depending on the particle size, degree of particle dispersion and sample treatment during the sintering process, the produced cylindircal samples exhibit different hydraulic and acoustic properties. The more general focus of our research lies on the physical behaviour of oil-water emulsions in porous media by means of combined electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation. For this purpose, a hydraulic multi-task measuring cell was developed. This cell allows carrying out simple hydraulic permeability and challenging ultrasound experiments in porous materials saturated with Pickering emulsions. In the first phase of our experiments, hydraulical and acoustical measurements of cylindrical sintered glass bead samples were performed in order to determine their intrinsic permeabilities and effective ultrasound velocities. The intrinsic permeability ks, a coupling parameter between the solid matrix and the pore fluid, has a huge influence on wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. For the assessment of permeabilities, particle size distributions and porosities of the investigated glass beads were determined.

  3. Metamaterial buffer for broadband non-resonant impedance matching of obliquely incident acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Romain; Alù, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Broadband impedance matching and zero reflection of acoustic waves at a planar interface between two natural materials is a rare phenomenon, unlike its optical counterpart, frequently observed for polarized light incident at the Brewster angle. In this article, it is shown that, by inserting a metamaterial layer between two acoustic materials with different impedance, it is possible to artificially realize an extremely broadband Brewster-like acoustic intromission angle window, in which energy is totally transmitted from one natural medium to the other. The metamaterial buffer, composed of acoustically hard materials with subwavelength tapered apertures, provides an interesting way to match the impedances of two media in a broadband fashion, different from traditional methods like quarter-wave matching or Fabry-Pérot resonances, inherently narrowband due to their resonant nature. This phenomenon may be interesting for a variety of applications including energy harvesting, acoustic imaging, ultrasonic transducer technology, and noise control.

  4. Modal Theory of Transverse Acoustic Coherence in Shallow Oceans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-28

    shallow water. While the mechanism for the generation of nonlinear internal waves by tidal flow across the continental shelf break is well established...Contributions from ocean acoustics,” Proc. IEEE 71(11), 1267–1294 (1983). 11. R. Dashen, “Path integrals for waves in random media,” J. Math . Phys. 20(5...Jinhae, Korea, Sept. 2009 (Agency for Defense Development). 62. K. G. Lamb, “Numerical experiments of internal wave generation by strong tidal flow

  5. Raman spectroscopy of acoustic phonons in periodic and Fibonacci superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharma-wardana, M. W. C.; MacDonald, A. H.; Aers, G. C.; Lockwood, D. J.; Moore, W. T.; Devine, R. L. S.

    Results of Raman scattering experiments on (a) periodic superlattices made up of GaAs/In xGa 1-xAs layers with high indium concentrations, (b) GaAs/Ga 1-xAl xAs Fibonacci superlattices, are presented. We discuss the observed peak positions and intensities using the continuum theory of acoustic wave propagation in layered media and the photo-elastic coupling model.

  6. Dynamics and Stability of Acoustic Wavefronts in the Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    642 (2002) O. A. Godin, Systematic distortions of signal propagation times in random inhomogeneous media, Doklady Physics, 48, 389–394 (2003) O...predictability of acoustic wavefronts and timefronts. 2. To quantify horizontal refraction of sound by random meso-scale inhomogeneities at O(1)Mm...propagation ranges. 3. To find the variance and bias of random ray travel times in the regime, where the ray displacement may be comparable to the

  7. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  8. Chelyabinsk Meteoroid Acoustic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogor, L. F.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: The parameters (period, time delay, celerity, duration, and the rate of attenuation) of the acoustic signal which was generated during the Chelyabinsk meteoroid passage and explosion on February 15, 2013 are investigated along with atmospheric parameters. Design/methodology/approach: With the temporal variations in the level of the acoustic signals acquired at an array of acoustic stations, the principal signal parameters are determined and their comparison made with the model results. Findings: The time delay of the infrasound signal has been shown to increase approximately linearly with the distance between the acoustic source and an observation station. The mean celerity of the infrasound wave is approximately 270 m/s. The signal spectrum exhibits components with periods of 10÷100 s, and the harmonic with an approximately 30-s period prevails. The duration of the infrasound signal is established by its source length (50÷90 km) and the infrasound signal spreading due to dispersion in the atmosphere that depends on the distance the wave has traveled. The overall duration of the signal is equal to 6÷30 min for the range of 540÷ 5780 km. The regression relations between the time delays and the acoustic signal spreading have been determined as a function of path length. The characteristic scale length of infrasound attenuation depends on a specific path and varies within 1000÷3000 km. The effect of the moving shock created by the explosion is shown to be much greater than the effect of the ballistic wave almost at all altitudes. Conclusions: The estimates substantially agree with the observations.

  9. Holograms for acoustics.

    PubMed

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-22

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  10. Passive acoustic measurements of wind velocity and sound speed in air.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A; Irisov, Vladimir G; Charnotskii, Mikhail I

    2014-02-01

    Random acoustic fields generated by uncorrelated sources in moving media contain information about the propagation environment, including sound speed and flow velocity. This information can be recovered by noise interferometry. Here interferometric techniques are applied to road traffic noise. Acoustic travel times and their nonreciprocity are retrieved from two-point cross-correlation functions of noise. The feasibility of passive acoustic measurements of wind velocity using diffuse noise is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The accuracy of the interferometric measurements of sound speed and wind velocity is confirmed by comparison with in situ measurements of wind, air temperature, and humidity.

  11. The anomalous manipulation of acoustic waves based on planar metasurface with split hollow sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Changlin; Chen, Huaijun; Zhai, Shilong; Liu, Song; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an acoustic metasurface (AMS) model consisting of split hollow sphere (SHS) resonator arrays with the property of negative modulus. It shows that the AMS can imprint phase discontinuities on an acoustic reflected wave as it traverses the interface between two media. By designing suitable phase gradients, the AMS enables the perpendicularly incident acoustic wave to be converted to a surface wave or reflected in any angle. Four kinds of AMSs, which can anomalously manipulate the reflected wave’s direction, are simulated to fulfill the generalized Snell’s law. The results provide an available and simple path to experimentally achieving the AMS.

  12. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  13. Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Bain, John

    1992-01-01

    Otitis media remains one of the least understood conditions seen by a family physician. More attention to follow up instead of widespread use of antibiotics and decongestant mixtures could improve family practice care of children with middle ear disorders. Greater selection in resorting to surgical management would be helpful. Unnecessary interference is unlikely to be of long-term benefit to either children or their families. ImagesFigures 1-3Figures 4-5 PMID:21221314

  14. Frequency band structure and absorption predictions for multi-periodic acoustic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Yong; Leamy, Michael J.; Nadler, Jason H.

    2010-05-01

    This article introduces a computational framework for studying frequency band structure and absorption behavior in multi-periodic acoustic composite structures. Herein, multi-periodic acoustic composite structures are defined as periodically-layered acoustic media wherein each layer is composed of periodically-repeated fluid unit cells, especially those arising from the study of porous materials. Hence, at least two periodic scales (microscopic and mesoscopic, respectively) comprise the macroscopic acoustic composite media. Exploitation of the multi-periodicity allows for efficient generation of dispersion and absorption curves via the conventional multi-scale asymptotic method (for homogenizing the mesoscale) coupled to the acoustic transfer matrix methods (for the macroscale). The combined computational framework results in a single analysis procedure for evaluating complex dispersion relationships and acoustic absorption. The dispersion curves can be used to reveal frequency stop bands wherein the wave vector is highly imaginary—i.e., plane waves experience rapid attenuation. They can also be used to reinterpret classical absorption curves. The framework is applied to four multi-periodic acoustic composite structures in order to demonstrate the framework's utility and to reveal novel properties, particularly those which can be influenced by design of the mesoscopic unit cell.

  15. Underwater asymmetric acoustic transmission structure using the medium with gradient change of impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Hu; Jie, Shi; Sheng-Guo, Shi; Yu, Sun; Zhong-Rui, Zhu

    2016-02-01

    We propose an underwater asymmetric acoustic transmission structure comprised of two media each with a gradient change of acoustic impedance. By gradually increasing the acoustic impedances of the media, the propagating direction of the acoustic wave can be continuously bent, resulting in allowing the acoustic wave to pass through along the positive direction and blocking acoustic waves from the negative one. The main advantages of this structure are that the asymmetric transmission effect of this structure can be realized and enhanced more easily in water. We investigate both numerically and experimentally the asymmetric transmission effect. The experimental results show that a highly efficient asymmetric acoustic transmission can be yielded within a remarkable broadband frequency range, which agrees well with the numerical prediction. It is of potential practical significance for various underwater applications such as reducing vibration and noise. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204049 and 11204050), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. IRT1228), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20122304120023 and 20122304120011).

  16. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  17. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  18. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  19. Media matters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L M

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the mass media on woman's status was addressed at two 1995 conferences: the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing, China, and the Congress of the World Association for Christian Communication, held in Puebla, Mexico. The globalization process facilitated by the mass media has served to increase the power of patriarchy, with no advantages to the cause of women's rights. Coverage of popular movements has been suppressed out of deference to male-controlled governments. Coverage of the Beijing Conference highlighted celebrities and personal stories, to the exclusion of the economic and political issues under debate. Television has commodified women, reinforcing their oppression. On the other hand, the alternative media, which tend to be decentralized, democratic, low-cost, and low in technology, are presenting women as subjects rather than objects and deconstructing gender stereotypes. Of concern, however, is the tendency of computer technology to widen the gap between social classes and developed and developing countries. Women must use information networks to disseminate information on women's rights and strengthen the links between women throughout the world.

  20. Porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bullien, F.A.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The unique property of a porous medium, the one that distinguishes it from other solid bodies on the one hand and from simple conduits on the other, is its complicated pore structure. Fluid flow, diffusion, and electrical conduction in porous media take place within extremely complicated microscopic boundaries that in the past made a rigorous solution of the equations of change in the capillary network practically impossible. The past state of affairs is one of the reasons why some of the brilliant and successful practitioners in the field of flow through porous media have tried, as much as possible, to stick with the continuum approach in which no attention is paid to pores or pore structure. Another reason is that the continuum approach is often adequate for the phenomenological description of macroscopic transport processes in porous media. This book has been written with the primary purpose of presenting in an organized manner the most pertinent information available on the role of pore structure and then putting it to use in the interpretation of experimental data and the results of model calculations.

  1. A hierarchical generalization of the acoustic reciprocity theorem involving higher-order derivatives and interaction quantities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ju; Li, Jie; Li, Xiaolei; Wang, Ning

    2016-10-01

    An acoustic reciprocity theorem is generalized, for a smoothly varying perturbed medium, to a hierarchy of reciprocity theorems including higher-order derivatives of acoustic fields. The standard reciprocity theorem is the first member of the hierarchy. It is shown that the conservation of higher-order interaction quantities is related closely to higher-order derivative distributions of perturbed media. Then integral reciprocity theorems are obtained by applying Gauss's divergence theorem, which give explicit integral representations connecting higher-order interactions and higher-order derivative distributions of perturbed media. Some possible applications to an inverse problem are also discussed.

  2. Correction for acoustic attenuation effects in optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-07-01

    The feasibility of correcting for the effects of acoustic attenuation in optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained with model-based inversion is shown in this work. Acoustic attenuation is a physical phenomenon that takes place inevitably in actual acoustic media and becomes significant at high ultrasonic frequencies. The frequency dependence of acoustic attenuation and the associated dispersion lead to reduction of amplitude and broadening of the optoacoustic signals, which in turn cause, respectively, quantification errors and loss of resolution in the reconstructed images. In this work we imaged an agar phantom with embedded microparticles in three different scenarios, namely with the signals acquired with no attenuation, with the signals collected by placing an attenuating sample in between the phantom and the ultrasonic transducer and with the signals corrected for the effects of acoustic attenuation. The results obtained show that the quantification inaccuracies and the loss of resolution of the images can be partially corrected at the expense of introducing noise at high spatial frequencies due to the amplification of the high frequency components of the noise in the signals.

  3. Acoustic user interfaces for ambient-assisted living technologies.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Stefan; Moritz, Niko; Appell, Jens-E; Meis, Markus; Bartsch, Christian; Bitzer, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    This contribution discusses technologies for acoustic user interaction in ambient-assisted living (AAL) scenarios. Acoustic user interfaces allow for a natural and convenient way to interact with technical systems e.g. via sound or speech presentation or via speech input by means of automatic speech recognition (ASR) as well as by detection and classification of acoustic events. Older persons targeted by AAL technologies especially need more easy-to-use methods to interact with inherently complex supporting technology. As an example we designed and evaluated an application for acoustic user interaction with a multi-media reminder and calendar system. For this purpose, mainly older participants were involved in user studies to continuously evaluate and support the development strictly following a user-centred design process. The results suggest a wide acceptance of acoustic user interfaces by older users either for controlling inherently complex AAL systems by using robust ASR technologies or as a natural and ambient way of presenting information to the user. However, further research is needed to increase the robustness of ASR systems when using hands-free equipment, i.e. to provide a real ambient way of interaction, and to introduce personalised speech and sound presentation schemes accounting for the individual hearing capabilities and sound preferences.

  4. Experimental Studies of Acoustics in a Spherical Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowen, Savannah; Adams, Matthew; Stone, Douglas; Lathrop, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The Earth, like many other astrophysical bodies, contains turbulent flows of conducting fluid which are able to sustain magnetic field. To investigate the hydromagnetic flow in the Earth's outer core, we have created an experiment which generates flows in liquid sodium. However, measuring these flows remains a challenge because liquid sodium is opaque. One possible solution is the use of acoustic waves. Our group has previously used acoustic wave measurements in air to infer azimuthal velocity profiles, but measurements attempted in liquid sodium remain challenging. In the current experiments we measure acoustic modes and their mode splittings in both air and water in a spherical Couette device. The device is comprised of a hollow 30-cm outer sphere which contains a smaller 10-cm rotating inner sphere to drive flow in the fluid in between. We use water because it has material properties that are similar to those of sodium, but is more convenient and less hazardous. Modes are excited and measured using a speaker and microphones. Measured acoustic modes and their mode splittings correspond well with the predicted frequencies in air. However, water modes are more challenging. Further investigation is needed to understand acoustic measurements in the higher density media.

  5. Instructional Media Center. Educational Facility Series. A Guide to Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Nicholas A., Ed.

    General recommendations are set forth regarding aesthetics, acoustics, lighting, temperature control, location, and layout of the instructional media center. Consideration is given to spatial relationships, equipment and furnishings, and suggestions are included regarding basic and advance facilities for primary, middle and secondary schools. (FS)

  6. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  7. Acoustic levitation of an object larger than the acoustic wavelength.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco A B; Okina, Fábio T A; Bernassau, Anne L; Adamowski, Julio C

    2017-06-01

    Levitation and manipulation of objects by sound waves have a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, material sciences, and engineering. However, the current acoustic levitation techniques are mainly restricted to particles that are much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this work, it is shown that acoustic standing waves can be employed to stably levitate an object much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The levitation of a large slightly curved object weighting 2.3 g is demonstrated by using a device formed by two 25 kHz ultrasonic Langevin transducers connected to an aluminum plate. The sound wave emitted by the device provides a vertical acoustic radiation force to counteract gravity and a lateral restoring force that ensure horizontal stability to the levitated object. In order to understand the levitation stability, a numerical model based on the finite element method is used to determine the acoustic radiation force that acts on the object.

  8. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  9. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  10. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory and Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory and Deep Water...coherence of the received signal, while the ambient noise field is in direct competition with the received signal. Research conducted in the North Pacific ...The scientific objectives of the North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory and Deep Water Acoustics research are: 1. To study the spatial and temporal

  11. Acoustic Environment Simulation Study; Acoustic Intrusion Sensor Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    RD-R149 245 ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT SIMULATION STUDY; ACOUSTIC is INTRUSION SENSOR PERFORMANCE(U) TIME SERIES ASSOCIATES PALO ALTO CA L ENOCHSON ET AL...ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT SIMULATION STUDY PREPARED BY: LOREN ENOCHSON TIME SERIES ASSOCIATES 920 WEST 33RD AVENUE SPOKANE, WA 99203 PREPARED FOR: NAVAL... TIME COVERED 5A0pA OF 1 jeamonth, Day) S, 54 ( 4UNT ,inal; .. na, F ROM TO o . !L,,Nv; REJa- ,GE U -. ,16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION COSATI CODES 18

  12. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  13. Books on acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil A.

    2004-05-01

    The legacy of a man is not limited to just his projects. His writings in many cases are a more lasting, and a definitely more accessible, monument. For 60 years, Leo L. Beranek has produced books on acoustics, acoustic measurements, sound control, music and architecture, noise and vibration control, concert halls, and opera houses in addition to teaching and consulting. His books are standard references and still cited in other books and in technical and professional articles. Many of his books were among, if not, the first comprehensive modern treatment of the subject and many are still foremost. A review of Dr. Beranek's many books as well as some anecdotes about the circumstances and consequences of same will be presented.

  14. Undersea acoustic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindel, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    This is the final report of Contract N00014-77-C-0196 between the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Office of Naval Research for the contract period 1 January 1977 to 28 February 1983. This contract supported a broad program of research and development in underwater acoustics related to present and future Navy systems and requirements. The bulk of this contract research was conducted from 1977 to 1981, during which time the categories outlined below were all areas of active research. (Between 1981 and 1983 the contract remained in effect, although only in the area of bottom acoustics and at a reduced level.) The primary contract products are the published technical reports and papers listed below. These reports give detailed descriptions of the research work and the specialized techniques, methods, and instrumentation developed to support this research program. The final report contains a brief review of the program highlights and a bibliography of associated reports.

  15. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions.

  16. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  17. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-02

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  18. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  19. Liquid Propellant Manipulated Acoustically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Chato, David J.; Mann, Adin, III

    2003-01-01

    Fluids are difficult to manage in the space environment. Without gravity, the liquid and gas do not always remain separated as they do in the 1g environment of Earth. Instead the liquid and gas volumes mix and migrate under the influence of surface tension, thermodynamic forces, and external disturbances. As a result, liquid propellants may not be in a useable location or may even form a chaotic mix of liquid and gas bubbles. In the past, mechanical pumps, baffles, and a variety of specialized passive devices have been used to control the liquid and gas volumes. These methods need to be carefully tuned to a specific configuration to be effective. With increasing emphasis on long-term human activity in space there is a trend toward liquid systems that are more flexible and provide greater control. We are exploring new methods of manipulating liquids by using the nonlinear acoustic effects achieved by using beams of highly directed high-intensity acoustic waves.

  20. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  1. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  2. Electromagnetic acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jane F; Chang, David B; McNaughton, Stuart; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K K; Cerwin, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic imaging (EMAI) is a new imaging technique that uses long-wavelength RF electromagnetic (EM) waves to induce ultrasound emission. Signal intensity and image contrast have been found to depend on spatially varying electrical conductivity of the medium in addition to conventional acoustic properties. The resultant conductivity- weighted ultrasound data may enhance the diagnostic performance of medical ultrasound in cancer and cardiovascular applications because of the known changes in conductivity of malignancy and blood-filled spaces. EMAI has a potential advantage over other related imaging techniques because it combines the high resolution associated with ultrasound detection with the generation of the ultrasound signals directly related to physiologically important electrical properties of the tissues. Here, we report the theoretical development of EMAI, implementation of a dual-mode EMAI/ultrasound apparatus, and successful demonstrations of EMAI in various phantoms designed to establish feasibility of the approach for eventual medical applications.

  3. Suppression through acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kevin D.; Short, Kenneth R.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper reviews research conducted by our laboratory exploring the possible use of acoustical stimuli as a tool for influencing behavior. Over the course of several programs, different types of acoustic stimuli have been evaluated for their effectiveness in disrupting targeting, balance, and high-order cognitive processes in both humans and animals. Escape responses are of particular use in this regard. An escape response serves not only as an objective measure of aversion, but as a potential substitute for ongoing behavior. We have also assessed whether the level of performance changes if the individual does not perform an escape response. In general these studies have both suggested certain types of sounds are more aversive or distracting than others. Although the laboratory development of additional stimuli needs to continue, we are taking the next step by testing some of the more effective stimuli in more applied experimental scenarios including those involving group dynamics.

  4. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  5. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  6. Ocean acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Worcester, Peter F.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2008-10-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was proposed in 1979 by Walter Munk and Carl Wunsch as an analogue to x-ray computed axial tomography for the oceans. The oceans are opaque to most electromagnetic radiation, but there is a strong acoustic waveguide, and sound can propagate for 10 Mm and more with distinct multiply-refracted ray paths. Transmitting broadband pulses in the ocean leads to a set of impulsive arrivals at the receiver which characterize the impulse response of the sound channel. The peaks observed at the receiver are assumed to represent the arrival of energy traveling along geometric ray paths. These paths can be distinguished by arrival time, and by arrival angle when a vertical array of receivers is available. Changes in ray arrival time can be used to infer changes in ocean structure. Ray travel time measurements have been a mainstay of long-range acoustic measurements, but the strong sensitivity of ray paths to range-dependent sound speed perturbations makes the ray sampling functions uncertain in real cases. In the ray approximation travel times are sensitive to medium changes only along the corresponding eigenrays. Ray theory is an infinite-frequency approximation, and its eikonal equation has nonlinearities not found in the acoustic wave equation. We build on recent seismology results (kernels for body wave arrivals in the earth) to characterize the kernel for converting sound speed change in the ocean to travel time changes using more complete propagation physics. Wave-theoretic finite frequency kernels may show less sensitivity to small-scale sound speed structure.

  7. FY 89 Acoustics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-11

    1989. 5. M. Ahmad, A. Ghani, L.A. Crum, R.A. Roy, C.C. Church, "Cavitational activity in ultrasonic instrumentation," J. Endodontics , 16 (4), 1989. 6...Previous editions are obsolete. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE 8.propagation physics, solid state acoustics, short-range ultrasonic sensing...have a noticeable effect on the third order elastic constants. (g) Short-Range Ultrasonic Sensing. This project relates to the use of short-range

  8. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    the nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation , scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in...field data The work on internal wave scattering of sound continues, and we have looked at mode coupling, ducting by curved waves, and high...understanding of the propagation of sound through complicated coastal oceanography, 2) an eventual capability to model these effects for use in sonar

  9. Acoustics Local Area Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    contract was to provide a shared computing i : resource - the acou tics local area network (ALAN) - to support ocean acoustic and related oceanographic...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT: THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified I I ONRCtI COMPUTER V 10 11/94 STANDARD FORM 233 (REV 241) oo 0 90 " VLNV1LV HNO Og6OuLtOI, CT:tT 96/OT/0

  10. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  11. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  12. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    shallow water 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to...claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water environments. A step-by-step detailed...that of the overlying water column and hence there is no critical angle. Thus, the reflection, scattering, propagation and reverberation are

  13. Advanced Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-31

    7, 18]). Key result: despite some claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water ...propagation, and clutter in both theory and measurements. This is important because in some shallow water areas (especially those with significant riverine...Abraham, data from Clutter󈧋 Experiment) to examine dependence of clutter statistics on multipath (Ref [8]). Key result: in the shallow water

  14. Acoustic Characterization of Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    modified SAR imaging algorithm. Page 26 Final Report In the acoustic subsurface imaging scenario, the "object" to be imaged (i.e., cultural artifacts... subsurface imaging scenario. To combat this potential difficulty we can utilize a new SAR imaging algorithm (Lee et al., 1996) derived from a geophysics...essentially a transmit plane wave. This is a cost-effective means to evaluate the feasibility of subsurface imaging . A more complete (and costly

  15. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    intensity profile (see figure 4)—which is to be expected due to the infinite-frequency assumption inherent in a ray model. The high - intensity values at...perturbations and the characteristics of the ambient acoustic noise field . Scattering and diffraction resulting from internal waves and other ocean...processes limit the temporal and spatial coherence of the received signal, while the ambient noise field is in direct competition with the received

  16. Acoustic Daylight Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and...information to improve image quality. Many different types of targets have also been deployed from ORB at ranges up to 80 m, although most data were...correlation with the acoustic data . Data are recorded continually onto a large hard drive and later transcribed to CD ROM for permanent storage. WORK

  17. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  18. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas T.; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  19. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-09

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  20. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  1. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  2. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  3. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  4. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  5. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  6. Modern Acoustics, Based on Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Woon S.

    We discover parity invariance in acoustic field equation. Acoustic metamaterials are a special type of metamaterials with negative mass density and negative bulk modulus and the Poynting vector in opposite direction to wave propagation. This is also known as lefthanded material because the Poynting vector with mass density and bulk modulus form a lefthanded set. For lefthanded material the parity is -1. Double negativity and Poynting vector in opposite direction to wave propagation give rise to new phenomena in refraction diffraction and scattering of acoustic waves. These three are the basic mechanisms of sound propagation in medium. For each new mechanism, there are several new acoustic devices to be developed. Hence we call this the new acoustics. The PHONONICS 2011 to be held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA on May 29 - June 2, 2011 supports our idea of New Acoustics.

  7. Acoustic Reflex Screening of Conductive Hearing Loss for Third Window Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hong, Robert S; Metz, Christopher M; Bojrab, Dennis I; Babu, Seilesh C; Zappia, John; Sargent, Eric W; Chan, Eleanor Y; Naumann, Ilka C; LaRouere, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of acoustic reflexes in screening for third window disorders (eg, superior semicircular canal dehiscence) prior to middle ear exploration for conductive hearing loss. Case series with chart review. Outpatient tertiary otology center. A review was performed of 212 ears with acoustic reflexes, performed as part of the evaluation of conductive hearing loss in patients without evidence of chronic otitis media. The etiology of hearing loss was determined from intraoperative findings and computed tomography imaging. The relationship between acoustic reflexes and conductive hearing loss etiology was assessed. Eighty-eight percent of ears (166 of 189) demonstrating absence of all acoustic reflexes had an ossicular etiology of conductive hearing loss. Fifty-two percent of ears (12 of 23) with at least 1 detectable acoustic reflex had a nonossicular etiology. The positive and negative predictive values for an ossicular etiology were 89% and 57% when acoustic reflexes were used alone for screening, 89% and 39% when third window symptoms were used alone, and 94% and 71% when reflexes and symptoms were used together, respectively. Acoustic reflex testing is an effective means of screening for third window disorders in patients with a conductive hearing loss. Questioning for third window symptoms should complement screening. The detection of even 1 acoustic reflex or third window symptom (regardless of reflex status) should prompt further workup prior to middle ear exploration. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  8. Negative refraction induced acoustic concentrator and the effects of scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2012-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional acoustic concentrator capable of significantly enhancing the sound intensity in the compressive region with scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage effects. The concentrator shell is built by isotropic gradient negative-index materials, which together with an exterior host medium slab constructs a pair of complementary media. The enhancement factor, which can approach infinity by tuning the geometric parameters, is always much higher than that of a traditional concentrator made by positive-index materials with the same size. The acoustic scattering theory is applied to derive the pressure field distribution of the concentrator, which is consistent with the numerical full-wave simulations. The inherent acoustic impedance match at the interfaces of the shell as well as the inverse processes of “negative refraction—progressive curvature—negative refraction” for arbitrary sound rays can exactly cancel the scattering of the concentrator. In addition, the concentrator shell can also function as an acoustic spherical magnifying superlens, which produces a perfect image with the same shape, with bigger geometric and acoustic parameters located at a shifted position. Then some acoustic mirages are observed whereby the waves radiated from (scattered by) an object located in the center region may seem to be radiated from (scattered by) its image. Based on the mirage effect, we further propose an intriguing acoustic transformer which can transform the sound scattering pattern of one object into another object at will with arbitrary geometric, acoustic, and location parameters.

  9. An Acoustic Wave Equation for Tilted Transversely Isotropic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Linbin; Rector III, James W.; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2005-03-15

    A finite-difference method for computing the first arrival traveltimes by solving the Eikonal equation in the celerity domain has been developed. This algorithm incorporates the head and diffraction wave. We also adapt a fast sweeping method, which is extremely simple to implement in any number of dimensions, to obtain accurate first arrival times in complex velocity models. The method, which is stable and computationally efficient, can handle instabilities due to caustics and provide head waves traveltimes. Numerical examples demonstrate that the celerity-domain Eikonal solver provides accurate first arrival traveltimes. This new method is three times accurate more than the 2nd-order fast marching method in a linear velocity model with the same spacing.

  10. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  11. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  12. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  13. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  14. Special Award in Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-21

    project to acoustically detect, simultaneously with the Cerenkov light detection, very high-energy cosmic ray neutrinos at the deep underwater laboratory in...to Professor Uscinski and the Cambridge Ocean Acoustics Group in devising the Acoustic Shadowgraph Method . Initial trials of the method were reported...to test the high and low tails of these intensity pdfs. The second research area is to work with Bradley Bell to complete the MDMF for complex

  15. Underwater Acoustic Beacon Location System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-23

    300087 1 of 31 UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC BEACON LOCATION SYSTEM [0001] The present application claims the benefit of United States Provisional...Application Serial Number 62/297,179 filed on February 19, 2016 by the inventor, Steven E. Crocker and entitled “Underwater Acoustic Beacon...None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0004] An acoustic detection system is provided in which the detection system can

  16. Wavelet Preprocessing of Acoustic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase I database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The

  17. Magnetomechanical Acoustic Emission - A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Nickel Alloys Ferromagnetic Materials LA Acoustic Emission Barkhausen noise O-A Residual Stress ’~20 ABSTWA 7- ontinue reverse ad. Ii nedceeory and...also called magneto-acoustic emission [13], or acoustic Barkhausen effect [1]. When a ferromagnetic sample is placed in an alternating magnetic field...transducer, which should be insensitive to a magnetic field, was attached to a sample. A flux sensing coil and a Barkhausen noise (BN) probe are also

  18. Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Murat; Ozcelik, Adem; Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E; Crespi, Vincent H; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-31

    Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers is experimentally demonstrated. Microswimmers are fabricated in situ in a microchannel. Upon acoustic excitation, the flagellum of the microswimmer oscillates, which in turn generates linear or rotary movement depending on the swimmer design. The speed of these bioinspired microswimmers is tuned by adjusting the voltage amplitude applied to the acoustic transducer. Simple microfabrication and remote actuation are promising for biomedical applications.

  19. A Brief History of Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas

    Although there are certainly some good historical treatments of acoustics in the literature, it still seems appropriate to begin a handbook of acoustics with a brief history of the subject. We begin by mentioning some important experiments that took place before the 19th century. Acoustics in the 19th century is characterized by describing the work of seven outstanding acousticians: Tyndall, von Helmholtz, Rayleigh, Stokes, Bell, Edison, and Koenig. Of course this sampling omits the mention of many other outstanding investigators.

  20. Acoustic Imaging of Combustion Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N.; Seshan, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Elliposidal acoustic mirror used to measure sound emitted at discrete points in burning turbulent jets. Mirror deemphasizes sources close to target source and excludes sources far from target. At acoustic frequency of 20 kHz, mirror resolves sound from region 1.25 cm wide. Currently used by NASA for research on jet flames. Produces clearly identifiable and measurable variation of acoustic spectral intensities along length of flame. Utilized in variety of monitoring or control systems involving flames or other reacting flows.

  1. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  2. Causality Bubbles to the Surface: Investigating Acoustic Causality in Highly Dispersive Bubbly Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    media . This correction has resulted in a causal self-consistent theory verified by both higher fre- quency data taken in the Salt Water Tank Facility and...contemporary theories of acoustic propagation in bubbly media that has brought these theories into compliance with the physical law of causality. In...the experimental data below 10 kHz. FIGURE 2 Precision bubbler. This bubbler consists of 3000 luer-lock square cut hypodermic needles glued into a

  3. Comment on 'Acoustic plasma modes'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1984-01-01

    In a recent treatment of the T = 0 acoustic plasma modes of a two-component Fermi liquid with Coulomb forces, Appel and Overhauser conclude that there exist three generally damped longitudinal acoustic branches. It is observed that this conclusion results from an inapplicable analytic continuation in their solution of the transport equations. There is only one longitudinal acoustic branch, and, in fact, when applied to the standard one-component Fermi-liquid model, the method of Appel and Overhauser also leads to the incorrect conclusion that there exist two longitudinal acoustic branches.

  4. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  5. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  6. Double-negative acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Li, Jensen; Chan, C T

    2004-11-01

    We show here the existence of acoustic metamaterial, in which both the effective density and bulk modulus are simultaneously negative, in the true and strict sense of an effective medium. Our double-negative acoustic system is an acoustic analogue of Veselago's medium in electromagnetism, and shares many unique consequences, such as negative refractive index. The double negativity in acoustics is derived from low-frequency resonances, as in the case of electromagnetism, but the negative density and modulus are derived from a single resonance structure as distinct from electromagnetism in which the negative permeability and negative permittivity originates from different resonance mechanisms.

  7. Acoustic confinement in superlattice cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Daniel; Déleglise, Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Atkinson, Paola; Lagoin, Camille; Perrin, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    The large coupling rate between the acoustic and optical fields confined in GaAs/AlAs superlattice cavities makes them appealing systems for cavity optomechanics. We have developed a mathematical model based on the scattering matrix that allows the acoustic guided modes to be predicted in nano and micropillar superlattice cavities. We demonstrate here that the reflection at the surface boundary considerably modifies the acoustic quality factor and leads to significant confinement at the micropillar center. Our mathematical model also predicts unprecedented acoustic Fano resonances on nanopillars featuring small mode volumes and very high mechanical quality factors, making them attractive systems for optomechanical applications.

  8. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  9. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    theory and experimental results in this report demonstrate that the presence of fractures in anisotropic material can be unambiguously interpreted if experimental measurements are made as a function of stress, which eliminates many fracture-generated discrete modes (e.g., interface waves, and leaky guided-modes). Orthogonal fracture networks that are often encountered in field exploration bring in additional challenges for seismic/acoustic data interpretation. An innovative wavefront imaging system with a bi-axial load frame was designed and implemented on orthogonally-fractured samples to determine the effect of fracture networks on elastic wave propagation. The effects of central wave guiding and extra time delays along a fracture intersection were observed in experiments and was analyzed. Interpreting data from media with intersecting fracture sets must account for fracture intersections and the non-uniformity of fracture properties caused by local tectonic conditions or other physical process such as non-uniform fluid distributions within a network and/or chemical alterations.

  10. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  11. Acoustical Measurement Of Mine-Shaft Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustical system proposed to measure depth of a "blind" shaft. Acoustic wave guided by shaft and provides estimate of shaft length, from which volume estimated. Acoustic-generator system determines resonant-frequency difference to measure shaft length.

  12. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  13. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  14. Adolescents and media literacy.

    PubMed

    McCannon, Robert

    2005-06-01

    In the face of media industry consolidation, fewer people control media content which makes it harder for parents and citizens to know the research about media-related issues, such as video game violence, nutrition, and sexual risk-taking. Media literacy offers a popular and potentially successful way to counter the misinformation that is spread by Big Media public relations.

  15. Geographic Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  16. Geographic Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  17. The Mass Media Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  18. The Mass Media Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  19. Acoustic Cymbal Transducers - Design, Hydrostatic Pressure Compensation, and Acoustic Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    applications is the composite metal-ceramic flextensional type transducer . The configuration of such a transducer can be quite diverse and many of these... transducers , so named for their geometric similarity to the percussion instruments, are miniature “class V” flextensional transducers that consist of a...Calibration, Underwater Acoustics, Underwater Sound, Transducer , Flextensional , Acoustic Cymbal, Broadband, USRD, APTF, Piezoelectric, Piezoceramic, Array

  20. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, C.B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi {ital et al.} [J. Plasma Phys. {bold 41}, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. High-spatial-resolution sub-surface imaging using a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Cole, Garrett D; Huber, Robert; Chinn, Diane; Murray, Todd W; Spicer, James B

    2011-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy techniques operating at frequencies in the gigahertz range are suitable for the elastic characterization and interior imaging of solid media with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Acoustic wave propagation at these frequencies is strongly limited by energy losses, particularly from attenuation in the coupling media used to transmit ultrasound to a specimen, leading to a decrease in the depth in a specimen that can be interrogated. In this work, a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique is presented that uses a pulsed laser source for the generation of broadband acoustic waves and an optical interferometer for detection. The use of a 900-ps microchip pulsed laser facilitates the generation of acoustic waves with frequencies extending up to 1 GHz which allows for the resolution of micrometer-scale features in a specimen. Furthermore, the combination of optical generation and detection approaches eliminates the use of an ultrasonic coupling medium, and allows for elastic characterization and interior imaging at penetration depths on the order of several hundred micrometers. Experimental results illustrating the use of the laser-based acoustic microscopy technique for imaging micrometer-scale subsurface geometrical features in a 70-μm-thick single-crystal silicon wafer with a (100) orientation are presented.

  2. Acoustic Detection of Neutrinos: Review and Future Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of cosmogenic neutrinos at energies exceeding 100 PeV. The technique is based on the thermo-acoustic model, which implies that the energy deposition by a particle cascade-resulting from a neutrino interaction in a medium with suitable thermal and acoustic properties-leads to a local heating and a subsequent characteristic pressure pulse that propagates in the surrounding medium. The main advantage of using sound for the detection of neutrino interactions, as opposed to Cherenkov light, lies in the much longer attenuation length of the former type of radiation: several kilometres for sound compared to several ten metres for light in the respective frequency ranges of interest in sea water. As detection media for future detectors, water, ice, salt domes and permafrost have been discussed, but it is the first two which have been investigated most thoroughly by using existing arrays of acoustic receivers-mainly military arrays in various bodies of water-or by implementing dedicated acoustic arrays in Cherenkov neutrino telescopes. Such arrays have been installed in IceCube at the South Pole, in the Lake Baikal experiment in Siberia and in ANTARES and the former NEMO experiment in the Mediterranean Sea. The future KM3NeT neutrino telescope to be installed in the Mediterranean Sea will be equipped with acoustic sensors for position calibration that are suited to also serve acoustic detection purposes. Ongoing experiments in water and ice have established the feasibility of the acoustic neutrino detection technique and allowed for the investigation of prevailing background conditions. Methods to improve the signal detection efficiency and to reduce the rate of misidentified neutrinos have been devised and potential future large-scale detector designs are investigated using detailed simulations in combination with the wealth

  3. Acoustic mechanical feedthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-04-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  4. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  5. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  6. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  7. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  8. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  9. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  10. The acoustics of snoring.

    PubMed

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (<500 Hz) and corresponds to a fundamental frequency with associated harmonics. The pitch of snoring is determined by vibration of the soft palate, while nonpalatal snoring is more 'noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as

  11. Acoustic Model Testing Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Scale models have been used for decades to replicate liftoff environments and in particular acoustics for launch vehicles. It is assumed, and analyses supports, that the key characteristics of noise generation, propagation, and measurement can be scaled. Over time significant insight was gained not just towards understanding the effects of thruster details, pad geometry, and sound mitigation but also to the physical processes involved. An overview of a selected set of scale model tests are compiled here to illustrate the variety of configurations that have been tested and the fundamental knowledge gained. The selected scale model tests are presented chronologically.

  12. Acoustic Properties of Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Lombardi, Ilaria

    2017-08-01

    Cellulose is the oldest material for thermal insulation in construction field. Thomas Jefferson was the first architect that used the cellulose in his project of the Monticello house (1800). But only after 1945 that the cellulose from newsprint was used across America and northern Europe. In the 70s with the energy crisis it Austria, Czech Republic, Switzerland and Germany began the production of cellulose derived from paper newspapers. It used for both winter and summer thermal insulation, while respecting the environment. In this paper are reported acoustic measurements carried out with the tube of Kundt, with the cellulose melted and with glue with different thicknesses.

  13. Acoustic studies of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Granato, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic technique have proven to be very useful in getting basic information on the configuration and dynamics of defects. Although the technique is indirect, the sensitivity is such that it often competes very favorably with more direct techniques such as neutron, x-ray, or phonon scattering. The symmetry information that comes directly from polarization control often also proves decisive in determining configurations. Many of the concepts that have been developed in explaining the various effects that have been seen in dislocation and point defect studies have proven also to be very useful when taken over almost directly into other areas of physics. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, P. B.

    2006-02-01

    Two classes of natural solid media, glacial ice and salt domes, are under consideration as media in which to deploy instruments for detection of neutrinos with energy ≥1018 eV. Though insensitive to 1011 to 1016 eV neutrinos for which observatories (e.g., AMANDA and IceCube) that utilize optical Cherenkov radiation detectors are designed, radio and acoustic methods are suited for searches for the very low fluxes of neutrinos with energies >1017 eV. This is because owing to the very long attenuation lengths of radio and acoustic waves produced by interactions of such neutrinos in ice and salt, detection modules can be spaced at horizontal distances ˜1 km, in contrast to the 0.12 km distances between strings of IceCube modules. In this paper, I calculate the absorption and scattering coefficients as a function of frequency and grain size for acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes and show that experimental measurements on laboratory samples and in glacial ice and salt domes are consistent with theory. For South Pole ice with grain size ˜0.2 cm at depths ≤600 m, scattering lengths are calculated to be 2000 and 25 km at frequencies 10 and 30 kHz, respectively; for grain size ˜0.4 cm at 1500 m (the maximum depth to be instrumented acoustically), scattering lengths are calculated to be 250 and 3 km. These are within the range of frequencies where most of the energy of the acoustic wave is concentrated. The absorption length is calculated to be 9 ± 3 km at all frequencies above ˜100 Hz. For NaCl (rock salt) with grain size 0.75 cm, scattering lengths are calculated to be 120 and 1.4 km at 10 and 30 kHz, and absorption lengths are calculated to be 3 × 104 and 3300 km at 10 and 30 kHz. Existing measurements are consistent with theory. For ice, absorption is the limiting factor; for salt, scattering is the limiting factor. Both media would be suitable for detection of acoustic waves from ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions.

  15. High frequency acoustic reflections from an air-snow interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courville, Z.; Albert, D. G.; Lieb-Lappen, R.; Fegyveresi, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    High frequency wave propagation methods can be used to determine in situ near surface micro-pore geometry parameters in real Earth materials including snow. To this end, we have been developing a portable ultrasonic transducer rig to make measurements of acoustic reflections from a variety of natural porous media. Fresh natural snow, in particular, is a difficult material to characterize, as any mechanical interaction is likely to damage the fragile pores and grain bonds. Because acoustic waves are sensitive to the porous material properties, they potentially can be used to measure snow properties in a non-destructive manner. Such methods have already been demonstrated on cohesive porous materials including manufactured foams, porous metals, and sintered glass beads. We conducted high frequency, oblique-angle and near vertical reflection measurements on snow samples in a cold room. We then compare the acoustically derived snow physical parameters, including porosity, with values determined from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and with standard (but destructive) laboratory measurements. Preliminary results using a manufactured open cell foam following previous work by Fellah et al., (2003) shows very good agreement between values of porosity determined from the acoustic measurements and the values determined from μCT image analysis and gravimetric determination. Similarly, preliminary results comparing acoustic measurements of natural, dry snow samples prepared in the laboratory show good agreement between acoustically-derived porosity values and porosity values derived through independent means. Fellah, Z.E.A., S. Berger, W. Lauriks, C. Depollier, C. Aristegui, and J.Y. Chapelon, (2003b), Measuring the porosity and tortuosity of porous materials via reflected waves at oblique incidence, J. Acous. Soc. Am., 113, 2424-2433.

  16. Nonlinear Acoustics in a Dispersive Continuum: Random Waves, Radiation Pressure, and Quantum Noise.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Karpman , Nonlinear Waves in Dispersive Media, Pergamon Press, New York, 1975, p. 76. 26. R. Beyers, Nonlinear Acoustics, U.S. Government Printing...20301 U. S. Army Research nffice 2 copies Box 12211 Research Triangle Park tlorth Carolina 27709 Defense Technical Information Center 12 copies Cameron

  17. Numerical analysis of the lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of linear acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuri, Dattaraj B.; Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Perlekar, Prasad; Robertsson, Johan O. A.

    2017-04-01

    We analyze a linear lattice Boltzmann (LB) formulation for simulation of linear acoustic wave propagation in heterogeneous media. We employ the single-relaxation-time Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook as well as the general multirelaxation-time collision operators. By calculating the dispersion relation for various 2D lattices, we show that the D2Q5 lattice is the most suitable model for the linear acoustic problem. We also implement a grid-refinement algorithm for the LB scheme to simulate waves propagating in a heterogeneous medium with velocity contrasts. Our results show that the LB scheme performance is comparable to the classical second-order finite-difference schemes. Given its efficiency for parallel computation, the LB method can be a cost effective tool for the simulation of linear acoustic waves in complex geometries and multiphase media.

  18. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    been spread over adjacent depths in the same manner as in the plots of the measured data in Figures 2 and 3. Histograms of intensity normalized...Mercer, J. A., Colosi, J. A., and Howe, B. M., “Deep seafloor arrivals in long range ocean acoustic propagation,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., in press

  19. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  20. Electronic dummy for acoustical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, B. B.; Di Mattia, A. L.; Rosencheck, A. J.; Stern, M.; Torick, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Dummy /ED/ used for acoustical testing represents the average male torso from the Xiphoid process upward and includes an acoustic replica of the human head. This head simulates natural flesh, and has an artificial voice and artificial ears that measure sound pressures at the eardrum or the entrance to the ear canal.

  1. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  2. Acoustic Levitation With One Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.

    1987-01-01

    Higher resonator modes enables simplification of equipment. Experimental acoustic levitator for high-temperature containerless processing has round cylindrical levitation chamber and only one acoustic transducer. Stable levitation of solid particle or liquid drop achieved by exciting sound in chamber to higher-order resonant mode that makes potential well for levitated particle or drop at some point within chamber.

  3. Acoustic Levitation With One Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Rudnick, I.; Elleman, D. D.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Report discusses acoustic levitation in rectangular chamber using one driver mounted at corner. Placement of driver at corner enables it to couple effectively to acoustic modes along all three axes. Use of single driver reduces cost, complexity and weight of levitation system below those of three driver system.

  4. Bilateral internal acoustic canal mass.

    PubMed

    Nazim, Korkut; Mehmet, Yilmaz; Tuna, Edizer Deniz; Marlen, Mamanov Asanbekovich

    2013-01-01

    We reported a case of bilateral internal acoustic canal mass. A 42-year-old man patient was previously treated for colon cancer. After surgery during chemotherapy signs as severe vertigo and bilateral sudden hearing loss occurred. Temporal bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had bilateral internal acoustic canal masses.

  5. Automated Acoustic Identification of Bats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    discrimination for such acoustically similar and cryptic species. Quantitative methods depend upon automatically extracting call descriptive parameters...constructing a dichotomous key, we iterated the highest performing classification choices at each step in a hierarchical classification scheme to...prevents unambiguous discrimination (Figure 31). For such acoustically cryptic species, identification remains in the realm of calculating a statistical

  6. Giving acoustics a fairer hearing.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Ken

    2012-05-01

    Ken Marriott, an independent acoustics consultant with Industrial Commercial & Technical Consultants (ICTC), outlines some of the key acoustics considerations for those planning new hospital build or refurbishment schemes, cautioning that, all too often, this important area is not properly considered at a sufficiently early project stage.

  7. Sound Advice on Classroom Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of acoustic standards in classroom design, presenting an interview with the Acoustical Society of America's (ASA's) standards manager which focuses on reasons for the new ASA standards, the standards document (which was written for K-12 classroom but applies to college classrooms), the need to avoid echo and be able to…

  8. Sound Advice on Classroom Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of acoustic standards in classroom design, presenting an interview with the Acoustical Society of America's (ASA's) standards manager which focuses on reasons for the new ASA standards, the standards document (which was written for K-12 classroom but applies to college classrooms), the need to avoid echo and be able to…

  9. Improving Acoustics in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article to a clinical forum describes the following seven articles that discuss the problem of noisy classrooms and resulting reduction in learning, basic principles of noise and reverberation measurements in classrooms, solutions to the problem of poor classroom acoustics, and the development of a classroom acoustics standard.…

  10. Nonlinear surface waves in soft, weakly compressible elastic media.

    PubMed

    Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A; Ilinskii, Yurii A; Hamilton, Mark F

    2007-04-01

    Nonlinear surface waves in soft, weakly compressible elastic media are investigated theoretically, with a focus on propagation in tissue-like media. The model is obtained as a limiting case of the theory developed by Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 2569-2575 (1992)] for nonlinear surface waves in arbitrary isotropic elastic media, and it is consistent with the results obtained by Fu and Devenish [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 49, 65-80 (1996)] for incompressible isotropic elastic media. In particular, the quadratic nonlinearity is found to be independent of the third-order elastic constants of the medium, and it is inversely proportional to the shear modulus. The Gol'dberg number characterizing the degree of waveform distortion due to quadratic nonlinearity is proportional to the square root of the shear modulus and inversely proportional to the shear viscosity. Simulations are presented for propagation in tissue-like media.

  11. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  12. Nonlinear acoustics in diagnostic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis A

    2002-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic waves is nonlinear. Phenomena associated with the propagation of diagnostic ultrasound pulses cannot be predicted using linear assumptions alone. These include a progressive distortion in waveform, the generation of frequency harmonics and acoustic shocks, excess deposition of energy and acoustic saturation. These effects occur most strongly when ultrasound propagates within liquids with comparatively low acoustic attenuation, such as water, amniotic fluid or urine. Within soft tissues, similar effects occur, although they are limited by absorption and scattering. Nonlinear effects are of considerable importance during acoustic measurements, especially when these are used to predict in situ exposure. Harmonic generation may be used to create images. These offer improvements over conventional B-mode images in spatial resolution and, more significantly, in the suppression of acoustic clutter and side-lobe artifacts. B/A has promise as a parameter for tissue characterisation, but methods for imaging B/A have shown limited success.

  13. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  14. Wastewater treatment with acoustic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambayashi, Takuya; Saeki, Tomonori; Buchanan, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic separation is a filter-free wastewater treatment method based on the forces generated in ultrasonic standing waves. In this report, a batch-system separator based on acoustic separation was demonstrated using a small-scale prototype acoustic separator to remove suspended solids from oil sand process-affected water (OSPW). By applying an acoustic separator to the batch use OSPW treatment, the required settling time, which was the time that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased to the environmental criterion (<200 mg/L), could be shortened from 10 to 1 min. Moreover, for a 10 min settling time, the acoustic separator could reduce the FeCl3 dose as coagulant in OSPW treatment from 500 to 160 mg/L.

  15. Broadband active acoustic absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roure, A.; Martin, V.

    1980-11-01

    A noise suppression system that is both broadband and stable in a guide in the presence of a flow is described. Behavior of an acoustic field in a rectilinear channel is explored analytically and a system of 2nd order linear differential equations is obtained. A general solution of these equations yields a physical interpretation of an infinite number of plane waves propagating downstream and driven by a piston, either above or below a reference frequency. Parasitic noise is considered cancellable by electroacoustic transducers operating under the constraint of not altering the channel flow. Difficulties of realization are noted as time lag between microphone and transducer, signal attenuation in supersonic flow (ameliorated by the presence of not less than 2 sources), and, most importantly, control of the propagation speed of the acoustic damping signals, whose recommended solution is an electrodynamic speaker emitting VHF signals centered around the resonance frequency and including 2 or 3 octaves around it. Designs for the corrector circuit are given.

  16. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Fitch, Pat

    2000-01-01

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  17. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  18. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Celliers, P.; Silva, L. Da; Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Maitland, D.; Matthews, D.; Fitch, P.

    2000-02-08

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  19. Acoustic shock injury (ASI).

    PubMed

    Westcott, Myriam

    2006-12-01

    The potential severity and persistence of ASI symptoms has significant clinical and medico-legal implications. With the rapid growth of call centres around the world, professionals providing tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy are increasingly likely to encounter some or all of the cluster of ASI symptoms in their clients. Acoustic shock injury (ASI), occurring as a result of exposure to a sudden unexpected loud sound, has been observed to cause a specific and consistent pattern of neurophysiological and psychological symptoms. These include aural pain, tinnitus, hyperacusis/phonophobia, vertigo and other unusual symptoms such as numbness or burning sensations around the ear. A range of emotional reactions including trauma, anxiety and depression can develop. Call centre staff using a telephone headset or handset are vulnerable to ASI because of the increased likelihood of exposure, close to their ear(s), of sudden unexpected loud sounds randomly transmitted via the telephone line. This paper presents an overview of a study of 103 people exposed to 123 acoustic incidents, and of the proposed neurophysiological mechanism of ASI, in particular tonic tensor tympani syndrome (TTTS). An understanding of TTTS has the potential to provide insight into the neurophysiological and psychological development of tinnitus and hyperacusis and the association with high levels of emotional trauma and anxiety. ASI rehabilitation is discussed.

  20. [Acoustical parameters of toys].

    PubMed

    Harazin, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Toys play an important role in the development of the sight and hearing concentration in children. They also support the development of manipulation, gently influence a child and excite its emotional activities. A lot of toys emit various sounds. The aim of the study was to assess sound levels produced by sound-emitting toys used by young children. Acoustical parameters of noise were evaluated for 16 sound-emitting plastic toys in laboratory conditions. The noise level was recorded at four different distances, 10, 20, 25 and 30 cm, from the toy. Measurements of A-weighted sound pressure levels and noise levels in octave band in the frequency range from 31.5 Hz to 16 kHz were performed at each distance. Taking into consideration the highest equivalent A-weighted sound levels produced by tested toys, they can be divided into four groups: below 70 dB (6 toys), from 70 to 74 dB (4 toys), from 75 to 84 dB (3 toys) and from 85 to 94 dB (3 toys). The majority of toys (81%) emitted dominant sound levels in octave band at the frequency range from 2 kHz to 4 kHz. Sound-emitting toys produce the highest acoustic energy at the frequency range of the highest susceptibility of the auditory system. Noise levels produced by some toys can be dangerous to children's hearing.

  1. Time-Reversal Acoustic Focusing with Liquid Resonator for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor D.; Sutin, Alexandre Y.; Sarvazyan, Armen P.

    2007-05-01

    Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) focusing system based on the use of liquid filled resonators with single or few transducers is demonstrated to effectively converge acoustic energy in space and time. Because the wavelength in liquid is typically smaller than in solids, liquid based TRA focusing resonators can have smaller dimensions than solid resonators. The efficiency of liquid-based TRA focusing resonators to transmit acoustic power to soft tissues is improved by impedance matching of the acoustic transducer assembly to the surrounding liquid. Experiments were conducted to understand the properties of TRA focusing with the liquid-filled resonators and possible application of the TRA systems for biomedical applications. The factors defining the efficiency of liquid based TRA focusing resonators were explored. In media with high attenuation, the binary mode of ultrasound delivery yielded noticeably narrower focusing of ultrasound than conventional analog focusing.

  2. Engineering challenges of the acoustics of a political convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randorff, Jack E.

    2002-05-01

    The acoustical challenges encountered during the 2000 Republican Convention are discussed. The convention has held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's First Union Center. This venue is a dual-purpose facility catering to professional basketball and professional ice hockey. The acoustical needs of the delegates and the broadcast audience are discussed. The technical performance requirements of convention sound reinforcement and media network broadcast feed are outlined. The necessary technical and performance trade-offs are enumerated with respect to the physical constraints, schedule requirements, budget limitations, and technical planning committee expectations. The conversion of a major sporting arena to a large-scale meeting room with reverberation times and general room conditions conducive to good listening was a significant undertaking. The site had been chosen for a preliminary screening visit approximately 2 years before. This presentation is a followup to ``Acoustics of Political Conventions-A Review,'' delivered at the Acoustical Society of America 139th Meeting in Atlanta in June 2000, 2 months before the convention in Philadelphia.

  3. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect.

  4. A low-cost acoustic permeameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Selker, John S.; Higgins, Chad W.

    2017-04-01

    Intrinsic permeability is an important parameter that regulates air exchange through porous media such as snow. Standard methods of measuring snow permeability are inconvenient to perform outdoors, are fraught with sampling errors, and require specialized equipment, while bringing intact samples back to the laboratory is also challenging. To address these issues, we designed, built, and tested a low-cost acoustic permeameter that allows computation of volume-averaged intrinsic permeability for a homogenous medium. In this paper, we validate acoustically derived permeability of homogenous, reticulated foam samples by comparison with results derived using a standard flow-through permeameter. Acoustic permeameter elements were designed for use in snow, but the measurement methods are not snow-specific. The electronic components - consisting of a signal generator, amplifier, speaker, microphone, and oscilloscope - are inexpensive and easily obtainable. The system is suitable for outdoor use when it is not precipitating, but the electrical components require protection from the elements in inclement weather. The permeameter can be operated with a microphone either internally mounted or buried a known depth in the medium. The calibration method depends on choice of microphone positioning. For an externally located microphone, calibration was based on a low-frequency approximation applied at 500 Hz that provided an estimate of both intrinsic permeability and tortuosity. The low-frequency approximation that we used is valid up to 2 kHz, but we chose 500 Hz because data reproducibility was maximized at this frequency. For an internally mounted microphone, calibration was based on attenuation at 50 Hz and returned only intrinsic permeability. We found that 50 Hz corresponded to a wavelength that minimized resonance frequencies in the acoustic tube and was also within the response limitations of the microphone. We used reticulated foam of known permeability (ranging from 2

  5. Gallium nitride electro-acoustic devices and acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2016-05-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) being one of a few piezoelectric semiconductors with low acoustic loss is a perfect material for electro-acoustic applications. Interactions of electrons and phonons are facilitated by the piezoelectric effect in addition to the deformation coupling in GaN, a property that can be used to implement a variety of very interesting devices and metamaterials, such as resonant transistors, acoustic amplifiers, circulators, and couplers. This talk covers theoretical basis of such devices and overviews recent advances in this technology.

  6. Acoustic diagnosis for nondestructive evaluation of ceramic coatings on steel substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Aizawa, Tatsuhiko; Kihara, Junji; Ito, Manabu

    1995-11-01

    New methodology is proposed and developed to make quantitative nondestructive evaluation of TiN coated SKH steel substrates. Since the measured acoustic structure is in precise correspondence with the multi-layered elastic media, change of elastic properties by degradation and damage can be easily distinguished by the acoustic spectro microscopy. In particular, rather complex acoustic structure can be measured by the present method for ceramic coated steel substrate system, but it is completely described by the two-layer model in two dimensional elasticity. Typical example is the cut-off phenomenon where the dispersion curve for the leaky surface wave velocity is forced to be terminated by alternative activation of shear wave instead of it. The quantitative nondestructive diagnosis was developed on the basis of this predictable acoustic structure. Furthermore, the effect of coating conditions on the acoustic structure is also discussed to make residual stress distribution analysis in coating by the acoustic spectro microscopy with reference to the X-ray stress analysis. Some comments are made on further advancement of the present acoustic spectro microscopy adaptive to precise characterization of ceramic coatings and practical sensing system working in practice.

  7. Development of an analytical solution of modified Biot's equations for the optimization of lightweight acoustic protection.

    PubMed

    Kanfoud, Jamil; Ali Hamdi, Mohamed; Becot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc

    2009-02-01

    During lift-off, space launchers are submitted to high-level of acoustic loads, which may damage sensitive equipments. A special acoustic absorber has been previously integrated inside the fairing of space launchers to protect the payload. A new research project has been launched to develop a low cost fairing acoustic protection system using optimized layers of porous materials covered by a thin layer of fabric. An analytical model is used for the analysis of acoustic wave propagation within the multilayer porous media. Results have been validated by impedance tube measurements. A parametric study has been conducted to determine optimal mechanical and acoustical properties of the acoustic protection under dimensional thickness constraints. The effect of the mounting conditions has been studied. Results reveal the importance of the lateral constraints on the absorption coefficient particularly in the low frequency range. A transmission study has been carried out, where the fairing structure has been simulated by a limp mass layer. The transmission loss and noise reduction factors have been computed using Biot's theory and the local acoustic impedance approximation to represent the porous layer effect. Comparisons between the two models show the frequency domains for which the local impedance model is valid.

  8. Architectural acoustics to non acousticians: Prediction auralization in design and consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciao, Quinsan

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic theories and principals are not necessarily familiar to most of the parties closely related to architectural acoustic issues. For example, architects involved in building designs, occupant communicates involved in space improvements are often the clients of architectural acoustic consultants. On one hand they are responsible to make knowledgeable decisions, on the other hand they do not have time or interest to be systematically trained in acoustics principals and theories. Properly educating such clients is one of the challenges constantly faced by architectural acoustic consultants. Traditionally, consultants are tormented between two different approaches. One is to deeply educate clients in architectural acoustics. The other is to convince the clients to trust and leave the matter to experts. Neither has been satisfactory. The former is insufficient and inefficient to establish appreciation of practical results, while the lattter is resisted for lack of transparency. Thanks to the latest development of computing technologies, a new approach is available, which is to demonstrate the acoustic effects in audible media through auralization and prediction in conjunction with explanation of simple principles. This paper discusses this approach of client education in practices with case study examples.

  9. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2005-06-07

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  10. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2003-11-25

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  11. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  12. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  13. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  14. Acoustic metamaterial with negative parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Yan, Fei; Gu, Hao; Li, Ying

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present theoretical results on an acoustic metamaterial beam and a bar that exhibit negative effective mass and negative effective stiffness. A one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with an array of spring-mass subsystems was fabricated. The frequency of the acoustic one dimensional metamaterial structure has the same form as that of the permittivity in metals due to the plasma oscillation. We also provide a theory to explain the simulation results. And we use the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers to reveal the actual working mechanism of the acoustic metamaterials. We explain the two vibrate modes which are optical mode and acoustic mode in detail. When the incoming elastic wave in the acoustic metamaterials to resonate the integrated spring-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the beam and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, we explain the negative parameter in acoustic metamaterials.

  15. System for Multiplexing Acoustic Emission (AE) Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor); Gorman, Michael R. (Inventor); Scales, Edgar F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic monitoring device has at least two acoustic sensors with a triggering mechanism and a multiplexing circuit. After the occurrence of a triggering event at a sensor, the multiplexing circuit allows a recording component to record acoustic emissions at adjacent sensors. The acoustic monitoring device is attached to a solid medium to detect the occurrence of damage.

  16. Novel Acoustic Scattering Processes for Target Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    acoustic signal using algorithms originally developed for high-frequency acoustical holography [11]. Data is only acquired by scanning a hydrophone ...by the application of a back-propagation algorithm based on the methods of acoustic holography . Selected results relevant to the interpretation of...Novel Acoustic Scattering Processes for Target Discrimination Philip L. Marston Physics and Astronomy Dept., Washington State University, Pullman

  17. Crack detection in lap-joints using acoustic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, I.; Ziola, S.; Rutherford, P.

    1995-08-01

    Experiments have been performed to assess the feasibility of crack growth detection in an aircraft lap-joint using acoustic emission (AE). Fatigue tests were conducted in both simple geometry specimens and lap-joint specimens. A high fidelity, wide band transient recording system was used to capture the acoustic emission due to defect growth. The simple specimens were used to determine crack growth signal characteristics, while the complex lap-joint provided a more realistic specimen. Representative waveforms from these two specimens are presented, along with a discussion of wave propagnation for the particular media. A self-organizing map was investigated as a means of automatically identify crack signals. Results and suggestions for future work are presented.

  18. Integrated Structural/Acoustic Modeling of Heterogeneous Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven, M.; Pennline, James, A.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the dynamic response of heterogeneous media is presented. A given medium is discretized into a number of subvolumes, each of which may contain an elastic anisotropic material, void, or fluid, and time-dependent boundary conditions are applied to simulate impact or incident pressure waves. The full time-dependent displacement and stress response throughout the medium is then determined via an explicit solution procedure. The model is applied to simulate the coupled structural/acoustic response of foam core sandwich panels as well as aluminum panels with foam inserts. Emphasis is placed on the acoustic absorption performance of the panels versus weight and the effects of the arrangement of the materials and incident wave frequency.

  19. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  20. Media Violence and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)