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Sample records for acoustic time scale

  1. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the Syracuse Athena Temple: Scale Invariance in the Timing of Ruptures

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolini, G.; Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Manuello, A.

    2011-03-11

    We perform a comparative statistical analysis between the acoustic-emission time series from the ancient Greek Athena temple in Syracuse and the sequence of nearby earthquakes. We find an apparent association between acoustic-emission bursts and the earthquake occurrence. The waiting-time distributions for acoustic-emission and earthquake time series are described by a unique scaling law indicating self-similarity over a wide range of magnitude scales. This evidence suggests a correlation between the aging process of the temple and the local seismic activity.

  2. The Short Time Scale Events of Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph L.

    2012-11-01

    The conversion of a liquid microdroplets to gas bubbles initiated by an acoustic pulse, known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), has been proposed as a method to selectively generate gas emboli for therapeutic purposes (gas embolotherapy), specifically for vascularized tumors. In this study we focused on the first 10 microseconds of the ADV process, namely the gas nucleation site formation and bubble evolution. BSA encapsulated dodecafluoropentane (CAS: 678-26-2) microdroplets were isolated at the bottom of a degassed water bath held at 37°C. Microdroplets, diameters ranging from 5-65 microns, were vaporized using a single pulse (4-16 cycles) from a 7.5 MHz focused single element transducer ranging from 2-5 MPa peak negative pressure and images of the vaporization process were recorded using an ultra-high speed camera (SIM802, Specialised Imaging Ltd). It was observed that typically two gas nuclei were formed in series with one another on axis with ultrasound pulse. However, relative positioning of the nucleation sites within the droplet depended on droplet diameter. Additionally, depending on acoustic parameters the bubble could deform into a toroidal shape. Such dynamics could suggest acoustic parameters that may result in tissue damage. This work is supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  4. A mixed time integration method for large scale acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.; Wineman, S.J.; Goudreau, G.L.; Foch, J.D.

    1994-07-18

    The transient, coupled, interaction of sound with structures is a process in which an acoustic fluid surrounding an elastic body contributes to the effective inertia and elasticity of the body. Conversely, the presence of an elastic body in an acoustic medium influences the behavior of propagating disturbances. This paper details the application of a mixed explicit-implicit time integration algorithm to the fully coupled acoustic fluidstructure interaction problem. Based upon a dispersion analysis of the semi-discrete wave equation a second-order, explicit scheme for solving the wave equation is developed. The combination of a highly vectorized, explicit, acoustic fluid solver with an implicit structural code for linear elastodynamics has resulted in a simulation tool, PING, for acoustic fluid-structure interaction. PING`s execution rates range from 1{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for rigid scattering to 10{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for fully coupled problems. Several examples of PING`s application to 3-D problems serve in part to validate the code, and also to demonstrate the capability to treat complex geometry, acoustic fluid-structure problems which require high resolution meshes.

  5. Semantic and acoustic analysis of speech by functional networks with distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Deng, Siyi; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2010-07-30

    Speech perception requires the successful interpretation of both phonetic and syllabic information in the auditory signal. It has been suggested by Poeppel (2003) that phonetic processing requires an optimal time scale of 25 ms while the time scale of syllabic processing is much slower (150-250 ms). To better understand the operation of brain networks at these characteristic time scales during speech perception, we studied the spatial and dynamic properties of EEG responses to five different stimuli: (1) amplitude modulated (AM) speech, (2) AM speech with added broadband noise, (3) AM reversed speech, (4) AM broadband noise, and (5) AM pure tone. Amplitude modulation at gamma band frequencies (40 Hz) elicited steady-state auditory evoked responses (SSAERs) bilaterally over primary auditory cortices. Reduced SSAERs were observed over the left auditory cortex only for stimuli containing speech. In addition, we found over the left hemisphere, anterior to primary auditory cortex, a network whose instantaneous frequencies in the theta to alpha band (4-16 Hz) are correlated with the amplitude envelope of the speech signal. This correlation was not observed for reversed speech. The presence of speech in the sound input activates a 4-16 Hz envelope tracking network and suppresses the 40-Hz gamma band network which generates the steady-state responses over the left auditory cortex. We believe these findings to be consistent with the idea that processing of the speech signals involves preferentially processing at syllabic time scales rather than phonetic time scales. PMID:20580635

  6. Semantic and acoustic analysis of speech by functional networks with distinct time scales

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Siyi; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Speech perception requires the successful interpretation of both phonetic and syllabic information in the auditory signal. It has been suggested by Poeppel (2003) that phonetic processing requires an optimal time scale of 25 ms while the time scale of syllabic processing is much slower (150–250ms). To better understand the operation of brain networks at these characteristic time scales during speech perception, we studied the spatial and dynamic properties of EEG responses to five different stimuli: (1) amplitude modulated (AM) speech, (2) AM speech with added broadband noise, (3) AM reversed speech, (4) AM broadband noise, and (5) AM pure tone. Amplitude modulation at gamma band frequencies (40 Hz) elicited steady-state auditory evoked responses (SSAERs) bilaterally over primary auditory cortices. Reduced SSAERs were observed over the left auditory cortex only for stimuli containing speech. In addition, we found over the left hemisphere, anterior to primary auditory cortex, a network whose instantaneous frequencies in the theta to alpha band (4–16 Hz) are correlated with the amplitude envelope of the speech signal. This correlation was not observed for reversed speech. The presence of speech in the sound input activates a 4–16 Hz envelope tracking network and suppresses the 40-Hz gamma band network which generates the steady-state responses over the left auditory cortex. We believe these findings to be consistent with the idea that processing of the speech signals involves preferentially processing at syllabic time scales rather than phonetic time scales. PMID:20580635

  7. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  8. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  9. Acoustical scale modeling of roadway traffic noise

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.S.

    1980-03-01

    During the planning and design of any federally assisted highway project, noise levels must be predicted for the highway in its operational mode. The use of an acoustical scale modeling technique to predict roadway traffic noise is described. Literature pertaining to acoustical scale modeling of outdoor noise propagation, particularly roadway noise, is reviewed. Field and laboratory measurements validated the predictions of the acoustical scale modeling technique. (1 photo)

  10. Acoustic characteristics of 1/20-scale model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenoy, Rajarama K.; Kohlhepp, Fred W.; Leighton, Kenneth P.

    1986-01-01

    A wind tunnel test to study the effects of geometric scale on acoustics and to investigate the applicability of very small scale models for the study of acoustic characteristics of helicopter rotors was conducted in the United Technologies Research Center Acoustic Research Tunnel. The results show that the Reynolds number effects significantly alter the Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) Noise characteristics by enhancing the lower frequency content and suppressing the higher frequency content. In the time domain this is observed as an inverted thickness noise impulse rather than the typical positive-negative impulse of BVI noise. At higher advance ratio conditions, in the absence of BVI, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends with Mach number follow those of larger scale models. However, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends appear to indicate stall at higher thrust and advance ratio conditions.

  11. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore » readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  12. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  13. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. (Technical Monitor); Parrott, T. (Technical Monitor); Jones, M. (Technical Monitor); Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Beer, B.; Seybert, A. F.; Tathavadekar, P.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to design, build and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of full scale engines provides not only cost-savings, but also an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing multiple tests. To use scale model treatment as a design tool, the impedance of the sub-scale liner must be known with confidence. This study was aimed at developing impedance measurement methods for high frequencies. A normal incidence impedance tube method that extends the upper frequency range to 25,000 Hz. without grazing flow effects was evaluated. The free field method was investigated as a potential high frequency technique. The potential of the two-microphone in-situ impedance measurement method was evaluated in the presence of grazing flow. Difficulties in achieving the high frequency goals were encountered in all methods. Results of developing a time-domain finite difference resonator impedance model indicated that a re-interpretation of the empirical fluid mechanical models used in the frequency domain model for nonlinear resistance and mass reactance may be required. A scale model treatment design that could be tested on the Universal Propulsion Simulator vehicle was proposed.

  14. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  15. Acoustic Studies of the Large Scale Ocean Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menemenlis, Dimitris

    1999-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of ocean circulation and its transport properties is prerequisite to an understanding of the earth's climate and of important biological and chemical cycles. Results from two recent experiments, THETIS-2 in the Western Mediterranean and ATOC in the North Pacific, illustrate the use of ocean acoustic tomography for studies of the large scale circulation. The attraction of acoustic tomography is its ability to sample and average the large-scale oceanic thermal structure, synoptically, along several sections, and at regular intervals. In both studies, the acoustic data are compared to, and then combined with, general circulation models, meteorological analyses, satellite altimetry, and direct measurements from ships. Both studies provide complete regional descriptions of the time-evolving, three-dimensional, large scale circulation, albeit with large uncertainties. The studies raise serious issues about existing ocean observing capability and provide guidelines for future efforts.

  16. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  17. Acoustic tweezers via sub-time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  18. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas; Houston, Janice

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I liftoff acoustic environments and to determine the acoustic reduction gained by using an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and Mobile Launcher with tower. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by over 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to Ares I-X flight data.

  19. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  20. SLS Scale Model Acoustic Test Liftoff Results and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, Douglas; Giacomoni, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible design phase test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments.

  1. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  2. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  3. Time and timing in the acoustic recognition system of crickets

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, R. Matthias; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Clemens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The songs of many insects exhibit precise timing as the result of repetitive and stereotyped subunits on several time scales. As these signals encode the identity of a species, time and timing are important for the recognition system that analyzes these signals. Crickets are a prominent example as their songs are built from sound pulses that are broadcast in a long trill or as a chirped song. This pattern appears to be analyzed on two timescales, short and long. Recent evidence suggests that song recognition in crickets relies on two computations with respect to time; a short linear-nonlinear (LN) model that operates as a filter for pulse rate and a longer integration time window for monitoring song energy over time. Therefore, there is a twofold role for timing. A filter for pulse rate shows differentiating properties for which the specific timing of excitation and inhibition is important. For an integrator, however, the duration of the time window is more important than the precise timing of events. Here, we first review evidence for the role of LN-models and integration time windows for song recognition in crickets. We then parameterize the filter part by Gabor functions and explore the effects of duration, frequency, phase, and offset as these will correspond to differently timed patterns of excitation and inhibition. These filter properties were compared with known preference functions of crickets and katydids. In a comparative approach, the power for song discrimination by LN-models was tested with the songs of over 100 cricket species. It is demonstrated how the acoustic signals of crickets occupy a simple 2-dimensional space for song recognition that arises from timing, described by a Gabor function, and time, the integration window. Finally, we discuss the evolution of recognition systems in insects based on simple sensory computations. PMID:25161622

  4. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  5. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 4; Numerical Simulation of the Nonlinear Acoustic Impedance of a Perforated Plate Single-Degree-of-Freedom Resonator Using a Time-Domain Finite Difference Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Single-degree-of-freedom resonators consisting of honeycomb cells covered by perforated facesheets are widely used as acoustic noise suppression liners in aircraft engine ducts. The acoustic resistance and mass reactance of such liners are known to vary with the intensity of the sound incident upon the panel. Since the pressure drop across a perforated liner facesheet increases quadratically with the flow velocity through the facesheet, this is known as the nonlinear resistance effect. In the past, two different empirical frequency domain models have been used to predict the Sound Pressure Level effect of the incident wave on the perforated liner impedance, one that uses the incident particle velocity in isolated narrowbands, and one that models the particle velocity as the overall velocity. In the absence of grazing flow, neither frequency domain model is entirely accurate in predicting the nonlinear effect that is measured for typical perforated sheets. The time domain model is developed in an attempt to understand and improve the model for the effect of spectral shape and amplitude of multi-frequency incident sound pressure on the liner impedance. A computer code for the time-domain finite difference model is developed and predictions using the models are compared to current frequency-domain models.

  6. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  7. Ocean acoustic tomography - Travel time biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiesberger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The travel times of acoustic rays traced through a climatological sound-speed profile are compared with travel times computed through the same profile containing an eddy field. The accuracy of linearizing the relations between the travel time difference and the sound-speed deviation at long ranges is assessed using calculations made for two different eddy fields measured in the eastern Atlantic. Significant nonlinearities are found in some cases, and the relationships of the values of these nonlinearities to the range between source and receiver, to the anomaly size associated with the eddies, and to the positions of the eddies are studied. An analytical model of the nonlinearities is discussed.

  8. Time reversal acoustic communication for multiband transmission.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijun; Badiey, Mohsen

    2012-04-01

    In this letter, multiband acoustic communication is proposed to access a relatively wide frequency band. The entire frequency band is divided into multiple separated sub-bands, each of which is several kilohertz in width. Time reversal decision feedback equalizers are used to compensate for inter-symbol interference at each sub-band. The communication scheme was demonstrated in a shallow water acoustic experiment conducted in Kauai, Hawaii during the summer of 2011. Using quadrature phase-shift keying signaling at four sub-bands over the frequency band of 10-32 kHz, a data rate of 32 k bits/s was achieved over a 3 km communication range. PMID:22502482

  9. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.

  10. Dispersive behavior and acoustic scaling in granular rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Santos; Vanessa, Urdaneta; Ernesto, Medina; Xavier, García

    2013-06-01

    Handling and making decisions based on data taken at different scales is a critical issue in the design of exploration and production tasks in the oil industry. Acoustic data is the classical example of the integration of dissimilar scales (i.e. seismic, well logs, lab data) where there is a scale dependent velocity. An understanding of the acoustic dispersion phenomenon in granular samples is needed. A detailed numerical work was conducted in order to establish the relationship between frequency and propagation speed for an acoustical pulse induced in simulated granular materials. The granular samples were generated with different grain size distributions while porosity and pressure were targeted and kept invariant using the grain radii expansion method. A sinusoidal burst with frequencies from 10Hz to 1MHz was applied and the corresponding acoustical speeds were estimated for each frequency. A coherent sigmoid dispersion relationship was obtained for each granular sample. The asymptotic boundaries for the dispersion function reflect the limiting cases for the wavelength/heterogeneity ratio in the granular pack. The lower speed asymptote was explained as the mean field value while upper speed asymptote can be understood based on a ray theory approximation scaled by a parameter we defined as the "acoustic tortuosity factor". This factor reflects the intricate acoustical path due to the texture of the stress network developed in the granular samples and can be used together with the sigmoid dispersive relationship to describe and clarify the scale discrepancy between different source acoustic data in granular materials.

  11. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  12. Perception of acoustic scale and size in musical instrument sounds

    PubMed Central

    van Dinther, Ralph; Patterson, Roy D.

    2010-01-01

    There is size information in natural sounds. For example, as humans grow in height, their vocal tracts increase in length, producing a predictable decrease in the formant frequencies of speech sounds. Recent studies have shown that listeners can make fine discriminations about which of two speakers has the longer vocal tract, supporting the view that the auditory system discriminates changes on the acoustic-scale dimension. Listeners can also recognize vowels scaled well beyond the range of vocal tracts normally experienced, indicating that perception is robust to changes in acoustic scale. This paper reports two perceptual experiments designed to extend research on acoustic scale and size perception to the domain of musical sounds: The first study shows that listeners can discriminate the scale of musical instrument sounds reliably, although not quite as well as for voices. The second experiment shows that listeners can recognize the family of an instrument sound which has been modified in pitch and scale beyond the range of normal experience. We conclude that processing of acoustic scale in music perception is very similar to processing of acoustic scale in speech perception. PMID:17069313

  13. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  14. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  15. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan A.; McEwen, Joseph E.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ˜5 ) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  16. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation. PMID:27058069

  17. Overview of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    Launch environments, such as lift-off acoustic (LOA) and ignition overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. LOA environments are used directly in the development of vehicle vibro-acoustic environments and IOP is used in the loads assessment. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe for component survivability, reduction of the environment itself is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the Ares I LOA and IOP environments for the vehicle and ground systems including the Mobile Launcher (ML) and tower. An additional objective was to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. ASMAT was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116 (TS 116). The ASMAT program is described in this presentation.

  18. Acoustic resonance in MEMS scale cylindrical tubes with side branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, John F.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Marcus, Logan S.

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) design. One of the central issues related to sensor miniaturization is optimization of the photoacoustic cell geometry, especially in relationship to high acoustical amplification and reduced system noise. Previous work relied on a multiphysics approach to analyze the resonance structures of the MEMS scale photo acoustic cell. This technique was unable to provide an accurate model of the acoustic structure. In this paper we describe a method that relies on techniques developed from musical instrument theory and electronic transmission line matrix methods to describe cylindrical acoustic resonant cells with side branches of various configurations. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the ease and accuracy of this method. All experimental results were within 2% of those predicted by this theory.

  19. Features of underwater acoustics from Aristotle to our time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørnø, Leif

    2003-01-01

    Underwater acoustics has been one of the fastest growing fields of research in acoustics. In particular, the 20th Century has taken our understanding of underwater acoustics phenomena a great step forward. The two World Wars contributed to the recognition of the importance of research in underwater acoustics, and the momentum in research and development gained during World War II did not reduce in the years after the war. The so-called cold war and the development in computer technology both contributed substantially to the development in underwater acoustics over the second half of the 20th Century. However, the very widespread field of underwater acoustic activities started nearly 2300 years ago with human curiosity about the fundamental nature of sound in the sea. From primitive philosophical and experimental studies of the velocity of sound in the sea and through centuries of successes and failures, the knowledge about underwater acoustics has developed into its high-technological status of today. In particular the development through the period from Aristotle (384 322 BC) to 1960 formed the basis for the tremendous research and development efforts we have witnessed in our time. In this paper most emphasis will be put on the development in underwater acoustics through this period of nearly 2300 years duration, and only the main trends in later research will be mentioned.

  20. Absence of localized acoustic waves in a scale-free correlated random system.

    PubMed

    Costa, A E B; de Moura, F A B F

    2011-02-16

    We numerically study the propagation of acoustic waves in a one-dimensional medium with a scale-free long-range correlated elasticity distribution. The random elasticity distribution is assumed to have a power spectrum S(k) ∼ 1/k(α). By using a transfer-matrix method we solve the discrete version of the scalar wave equation and compute the localization length. In addition, we apply a second-order finite-difference method for both the time and spatial variables and study the nature of the waves that propagate in the chain. Our numerical data indicate the presence of extended acoustic waves for a high degree of correlations. In contrast with local correlations, we numerically demonstrate that scale-free correlations promote a stable phase of free acoustic waves in the thermodynamic limit. PMID:21406919

  1. Constraints on large-scale dark acoustic oscillations from cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Putter, Roland; Raccanelli, Alvise; Sigurdson, Kris

    2014-03-01

    If all or a fraction of the dark matter (DM) were coupled to a bath of dark radiation (DR) in the early Universe, we expect the combined DM-DR system to give rise to acoustic oscillations of the dark matter until it decouples from the DR. Much like the standard baryon acoustic oscillations, these dark acoustic oscillations (DAO) imprint a characteristic scale, the sound horizon of dark matter, on the matter power spectrum. We compute in detail how the microphysics of the DM-DR interaction affects the clustering of matter in the Universe and show that the DAO physics also gives rise to unique signatures in the temperature and polarization spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We use cosmological data from the CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations, and large-scale structure to constrain the possible fraction of interacting DM as well as the strength of its interaction with DR. Like nearly all knowledge we have gleaned about DM since inferring its existence this constraint rests on the betrayal by gravity of the location of otherwise invisible DM. Although our results can be straightforwardly applied to a broad class of models that couple dark matter particles to various light relativistic species, in order to make quantitative predictions, we model the interacting component as dark atoms coupled to a bath of dark photons. We find that linear cosmological data and CMB lensing put strong constraints on the existence of DAO features in the CMB and the large-scale structure of the Universe. Interestingly, we find that at most ˜5% of all DM can be very strongly interacting with DR. We show that our results are surprisingly constraining for the recently proposed double-disk DM model, a novel example of how large-scale precision cosmological data can be used to constrain galactic physics and subgalactic structure.

  2. Phase Time and Envelope Time in Time-Distance Analysis and Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Jimenez, Antonio; Rabello-Soares, Maria Cristina; Ai, Guoxiang; Wang, Gwo-Ping; Goode Philip; Marquette, William; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Landenkov, Oleg

    1999-01-01

    Time-distance analysis and acoustic imaging are two related techniques to probe the local properties of solar interior. In this study, we discuss the relation of phase time and envelope time between the two techniques. The location of the envelope peak of the cross correlation function in time-distance analysis is identified as the travel time of the wave packet formed by modes with the same w/l. The phase time of the cross correlation function provides information of the phase change accumulated along the wave path, including the phase change at the boundaries of the mode cavity. The acoustic signals constructed with the technique of acoustic imaging contain both phase and intensity information. The phase of constructed signals can be studied by computing the cross correlation function between time series constructed with ingoing and outgoing waves. In this study, we use the data taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) instrument and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument. The analysis is carried out for the quiet Sun. We use the relation of envelope time versus distance measured in time-distance analyses to construct the acoustic signals in acoustic imaging analyses. The phase time of the cross correlation function of constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is twice the difference between the phase time and envelope time in time-distance analyses as predicted. The envelope peak of the cross correlation function between constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is located at zero time as predicted for results of one-bounce at 3 mHz for all four data sets and two-bounce at 3 mHz for two TON data sets. But it is different from zero for other cases. The cause of the deviation of the envelope peak from zero is not known.

  3. Information and data real time transmission acoustic underwater system: TRIDENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubuil, Joel; Labat, Joel; Lapierre, Gerard

    2001-05-01

    The objective of the Groupe d'Etudes Sous-Marines de l'Atlantique (GESMA) is to develop a robust high data rate acoustic link. A real-time receiver recently developed at ENST Bretagne has just been designed to cope with all perturbations induced by such harsh channels. In order to cope with channel features, a spatio-temporal equalizer introduced by J. Labat et al. [Brevet FT no. 9914844, ``Perfectionnements aux dispositifs d'galisation adaptative pour recepteurs de systemes de communications numriques,'' Nov. 1999] was recently implemented and evaluated. This equalizer is the core of the receiver platform [Trubuil et al., ``Real-time high data rate acoustic link based on spatio temporal blind equalization: the TRIDENT acoustic system,'' OCEANS 2002]. This paper provides an overview of this project. The context of the study and the design of high data rate acoustic link are presented. Last Brest harbor experiments (2002, 2003) are described. The real time horizontal acoustic link performances are evaluated. Two carriers frequencies are available (20, 35 kHz). Acoustic communications for bit rate ranging from 10 to 20 kbps and for channel length (shallow water) ranging from 500 to 4000 m have been conducted successfully over several hours.

  4. A prediction of helicopter rotor discrete frequency noise for three scale models using a new acoustics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1987-01-01

    A new computer program which uses Farassat's most advanced subsonic time domain formulation has been written to predict helicopter rotor discrete frequency noise. A brief description of the program, WOPWOP, is followed by a comparison of predicted and experimentally measured acoustic pressure and spectra for a 1/4 scale UH-1 model rotor blade and a 1/7 scale OLS (AH-1G) model rotor blade. The C81 computer program was used to predict the spanwise loading on the rotor for aerodynamic input into the acoustic prediction. Comparisons are made for different flight conditions and microphone locations with good results. In general the acoustic pressure is underpredicted. The acoustic predictions for a tapered rotor blade and predictions for microphones well below the tip path plane show less underprediction. Finally, in-plane motion of the rotor blade is shown to significantly affect the peak-to-peak amplitude of the acoustic pressure for high advancing tip Mach numbers.

  5. Nanolitre-scale crystallization using acoustic liquid-transfer technology

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Armando G.; Wong, April; Shao, Ada; Garg, Ankur; Donohue, Timothy J.; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Harris, Seth F.

    2012-01-01

    Focused acoustic energy allows accurate and precise liquid transfer on scales from picolitre to microlitre volumes. This technology was applied in protein crystallization, successfully transferring a diverse set of proteins as well as hundreds of precipitant solutions from custom and commercial crystallization screens and achieving crystallization in drop volumes as small as 20 nl. Only higher concentrations (>50%) of 2-­methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) appeared to be systematically problematic in delivery. The acoustic technology was implemented in a workflow, successfully reproducing active crystallization systems and leading to the discovery of crystallization conditions for previously uncharacterized proteins. The technology offers compelling advantages in low-nanolitre crystallization trials by providing significant reagent savings and presenting seamless scalability for those crystals that require larger volume optimization experiments using the same vapor-diffusion format. PMID:22868754

  6. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Alvord, D. A.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the overpressure environment from the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) and the implications to the full-scale Ares I are presented in this Technical Memorandum. These include the scaled environment that would be used for assessing the full-scale Ares I configuration, observations, and team recommendations. The ignition transient is first characterized and described, the overpressure suppression system configuration is then examined, and the final environment characteristics are detailed. The recommendation for Ares I is to keep the space shuttle heritage ignition overpressure (IOP) suppression system (below-deck IOP water in the launch mount and mobile launcher and also the crest water on the main flame deflector) and the water bags.

  7. Experimental studies of applications of time-reversal acoustics to noncoherent underwater communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, M.; Larraza, A.; Smith, K. B.

    2003-06-01

    The most difficult problem in shallow underwater acoustic communications is considered to be the time-varying multipath propagation because it impacts negatively on data rates. At high data rates the intersymbol interference requires adaptive algorithms on the receiver side that lead to computationally intensive and complex signal processing. A novel technique called time-reversal acoustics (TRA) can environmentally adapt the acoustic propagation effects of a complex medium in order to focus energy at a particular target range and depth. Using TRA, the multipath structure is reduced because all the propagation paths add coherently at the intended target location. This property of time-reversal acoustics suggests a potential application in the field of noncoherent acoustic communications. This work presents results of a tank scale experiment using an algorithm for rapid transmission of binary data in a complex underwater environment with the TRA approach. A simple 15-symbol code provides an example of the simplicity and feasibility of the approach. Covert coding due to the inherent scrambling induced by the environment at points other than the intended receiver is also investigated. The experiments described suggest a high potential in data rate for the time-reversal approach in underwater acoustic communications while keeping the computational complexity low.

  8. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  9. Time Scales: Terrestrial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, G.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Terrestrial time is at present derived from atomic clocks. The SI second, the unit of time of the international system of units, has been defined since 1967 in terms of a hyperfine transition of the cesium atom and the best primary frequency standards now realize it with a relative uncertainty of a few parts in 1015, which makes it the most accurately measurable physical quantity. INTERNATIONAL A...

  10. Accuracy of cosmological parameters using the baryon acoustic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thepsuriya, Kiattisak; Lewis, Antony E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    2015-01-01

    Percent-level measurements of the comoving baryon acoustic scale standard ruler can be used to break degeneracies in parameter constraints from the CMB alone. The sound horizon at the epoch of baryon drag is often used as a proxy for the scale of the peak in the matter density correlation function, and can conveniently be calculated quickly for different cosmological models. However, the measurements are not directly constraining this scale, but rather a measurement of the full correlation function, which depends on the detailed evolution through decoupling. We assess the level of reliability of parameter constraints based on a simple approximation of the acoustic scale compared to a more direct determination from the full numerical two-point correlation function. Using a five-parameter fitting technique similar to recent BAO data analyses, we find that for standard ΛCDM models and extensions with massive neutrinos and additional relativistic degrees of freedom, the approximation is at better than 0.15% for most parameter combinations varying over reasonable ranges.

  11. Geologic time scale bookmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    This bookmark, designed for use with U.S. Geological Survey activities at the 2nd USA Science and Engineering Festival (April 26–29, 2012), is adapted from the more detailed Fact Sheet 2010–3059 "Divisions of Geologic Time." The information that it presents is widely sought by educators and students.

  12. Micro/meso scale fatigue damage accumulation monitoring using nonlinear acoustic vibro-modulation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrai, Andrei; Donskoy, Dimitri; Chudnovsky, Alexander; Golovin, Edward; Agarwala, Vinod S.

    2006-03-01

    Monitoring the incipient damage at the earliest possible stage is essential for predicting structural performance and remaining life of structural components. Existing prognostic methodologies incorporate conventional SHM and NDE techniques responsive to cracks and delaminations resulted from the irreversible material fracture and disintegration at the macro-scale. There is an increasing need for technologies that could allow for monitoring material degradation at the micro/meso scale before the onset of the macro-scale fracture. In this contribution, we report results of the real-time monitoring of the material micro/meso scale degradation using the nonlinear acoustic vibro-modulation technique. The technique explores nonlinear acoustic interaction of high frequency ultrasound and low frequency structural vibration at the site of the incipient damage. The indicator of the damage severity, nonlinear acoustic damage index (DI), was measured in real time during the strain-controlled three-point bending fatigue test of aluminum and steel specimens. Nondestructively, degradation of the specimen was revealed through the increase in the DI, which correlated well with the respective decrease in the specimen's stiffness. Destructive SEM examination confirmed sensitivity of the DI to the incipient micro/meso scale damage and advocated for utilizing the vibro-modulation approach for assessment of material degradation before fracture.

  13. Real Time Monitoring of Containerless Microreactions in Acoustically Levitated Droplets via Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Esen, Cemal; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-09-01

    Direct in-droplet (in stillo) microreaction monitoring using acoustically levitated micro droplets has been achieved by combining acoustic (ultrasonic) levitation for the first time with real time ambient tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acoustic levitation and inherent mixing of microliter volumes of reactants (3 μL droplets), yielding total reaction volumes of 6 μL, supported monitoring the acid-catalyzed degradation reaction of erythromycin A. This reaction was chosen to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of directly monitoring in stillo microreactions via hyphenated acoustic levitation and ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The microreactions took place completely in stillo over 30, 60, and 120 s within the containerless stable central pressure node of an acoustic levitator, thus readily promoting reaction miniaturization. For the evaluation of the miniaturized in stillo reactions, the degradation reactions were also carried out in vials (in vitro) with a total reaction volume of 400 μL. The reacted in vitro mixtures (6 μL total) were similarly introduced into the acoustic levitator prior to ambient ionization MS/MS analysis. The in stillo miniaturized reactions provided immediate real-time snap-shots of the degradation process for more accurate reaction monitoring and used a fraction of the reactants, while the larger scale in vitro reactions only yielded general reaction information. PMID:27505037

  14. Acoustical and Flowfield Characterization of a Scaled Tabletop Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Margasahayam, Ravi; Norton, Michael; Caimi, Raoul; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor); Venegas, Augusto (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of the acoustical and flowfield environment for the scaled 1-pound-force (lbf) thrust tabletop motor was performed. This tabletop motor from NASA Stennis Space Center Is composed of Plexiglas burning In gaseous oxygen with a graphite insert for the nozzle portion. The nozzle has a throat diameter of 0.2 inch and an exit diameter of 0.38 Inch. With a chamber pressure at 55 pounds per square Inch absolute (psia), a normal shock is formed immediately downstream of the nozzle exit plane as the combustion products exhaust into the ambient at atmospheric pressure. The jet characterization Is based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in conjunction with Kirchhoff surface integral formulation and compared with correlations developed for measured rocket noise and a pressure fluctuation scaling (PFS) method. Predictions and comparisons are made for the overall sound pressure levels (OASPL's) and spectral dependence of sound pressure level (SPL). The overall objective of this effort is to develop methods for scaling the acoustic and flowfield environment of rockets with a wide range of thrust (1 lbf to 1 million lbf).

  15. Flow structure, performance and scaling of acoustic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Michael Oliver

    Acoustic jets are studied, with an emphasis on their flow structure, performance, and scaling. The ultimate goal is the development of a micromachined acoustic jet for propulsion of a micromachined airborne platform, as well as integrated cooling and pumping applications. Scaling suggests an increase in performance with decreasing size, motivating the use of micro-technology. Experimental studies are conducted at three different orders of magnitude in size, each closely following analytic expectations. The jet creates a periodic vortical structure, the details of which are a function of amplitude. At small actuation amplitude, but still well above the linear acoustic regime, the flow structure consists of individual vortex rings, propagating away from the nozzle, formed during the outstroke of the acoustic cavity. At large amplitude, a trail of vorticity forms between the periodic vortex rings. Approximately corresponding to these two flow regions are two performance regimes. At low amplitude, the jet thrust increases with the fourth power of the amplitude; and at large amplitude, the thrust equals the momentum flux ejected during the output stroke, and increases as the square of the amplitude. Resonance of the cavity, at Reynolds numbers greater than approximately 10, enhances the jet performance beyond the incompressible behavior. Gains of an order of magnitude in the jet velocity occur at Reynolds numbers of approximately 100, and the data suggest further gains with increasing Reynolds number. The smallest geometries tested are micromachined acoustic jets, manufactured using MEMS technology. The throat dimensions are 50 by 200 mum, and the overall device size is approximately 1 mm 2, with eight throats per device. Several jets are manufactured in an array, to suit any given application. The performance is very dependent on frequency, with a sharp peak at the system resonance, occurring at approximately 70 kHz (inaudible). The mean jet velocity of these devices

  16. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts. PMID:26764815

  17. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q , the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v1≪cs for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v1≪cs/Q . Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  18. Integrated measurements of acoustical and optical thin layers II: Horizontal length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, Mark A.; Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Robbins, Ian C.; Schroth-Miller, Maddie; Waluk, Chad M.; Zelenke, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The degree of layered organization of planktonic organisms in coastal systems impacts trophic interactions, the vertical availability of nutrients, and many biological rate processes. While there is reasonable characterization of the vertical structure of these phenomena, the extent and horizontal length scale of variation has rarely been addressed. Here we extend the examination of the vertical scale in the first paper of the series to the horizontal scale with combined shipboard acoustic measurements and bio-optic measurements taken on an autonomous underwater vehicle. Measurements were made in Monterey Bay, CA from 2002 to 2008 for the bio-optical parameters and during 2006 for acoustic scattering measurements. The combined data set was used to evaluate the horizontal decorrelation length scales of the bio-optical and acoustic scattering layers themselves. Because biological layers are often decoupled from the physical structure of the water column, assessment of the variance within identified layers was appropriate. This differs from other studies in that physical parameters were not used as a basis for the layer definition. There was a significant diel pattern to the decorrelation length scale for acoustic layers with the more abundant nighttime layers showing less horizontal variability despite their smaller horizontal extent. A significant decrease in the decorrelation length scale was found in bio-optical parameters over six years of study, coinciding with a documented shift in the plankton community. Results highlight the importance of considering plankton behavior and time of day with respect to scale when studying layers, and the challenges of sampling these phenomena.

  19. Frequency and Time Domain Modeling of Acoustic Liner Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program directed at the acoustics of advanced subsonic propulsion systems undertaken at NASA Langley, Duke University was funded to develop a boundary condition model for bulk-reacting nacelle liners. The overall objective of the Langley program was to understand and predict noise from advanced subsonic transport engines and to develop related noise control technology. The overall technical areas included: fan and propeller source noise, acoustics of ducts and duct liners, interior noise, subjective acoustics, and systems noise prediction. The Duke effort was directed toward duct liner acoustics for the development of analytical methods to characterize liner behavior in both frequency domain and time domain. A review of duct acoustics and liner technology can be found in Reference [1]. At that time, NASA Langley was investigating the propulsion concept of an advanced ducted fan, with a large diameter housed inside a relatively short duct. Fan diameters in excess of ten feet were proposed. The lengths of both the inlet and exhaust portions of the duct were to be short, probably less than half the fan diameter. The nacelle itself would be relatively thin-walled for reasons of aerodynamic efficiency. The blade-passage frequency was expected to be less than I kHz, and very likely in the 200 to 300 Hz range. Because of the design constraints of a short duct, a thin nacelle, and long acoustic wavelengths, the application of effective liner technology would be especially challenging. One of the needs of the NASA Langley program was the capability to accurately and efficiently predict the behavior of the acoustic liner. The traditional point impedance method was not an adequate model for proposed liner designs. The method was too restrictive to represent bulk reacting liners and to allow for the characterization of many possible innovative liner concepts. In the research effort at Duke, an alternative method, initially developed to handle bulk

  20. Acoustic telemetry reveals large-scale migration patterns of walleye in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayden, Todd A.; Holbrook, Christopher; Fielder, David G.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Fish migration in large freshwater lacustrine systems such as the Laurentian Great Lakes is not well understood. The walleye (Sander vitreus) is an economically and ecologically important native fish species throughout the Great Lakes. In Lake Huron walleye has recently undergone a population expansion as a result of recovery of the primary stock, stemming from changing food web dynamics. During 2011 and 2012, we used acoustic telemetry to document the timing and spatial scale of walleye migration in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. Spawning walleye (n = 199) collected from a tributary of Saginaw Bay were implanted with acoustic tags and their migrations were documented using acoustic receivers (n = 140) deployed throughout U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. Three migration pathways were described using multistate mark-recapture models. Models were evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion. Fish sex did not influence migratory behavior but did affect migration rate and walleye were detected on all acoustic receiver lines. Most (95%) tagged fish migrated downstream from the riverine tagging and release location to Saginaw Bay, and 37% of these fish emigrated from Saginaw Bay into Lake Huron. Remarkably, 8% of walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay were detected at the acoustic receiver line located farthest from the release location more than 350 km away. Most (64%) walleye returned to the Saginaw River in 2012, presumably for spawning. Our findings reveal that fish from this stock use virtually the entirety of U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron.

  1. An invisible acoustic sensor based on parity-time symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Romain; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alù, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Sensing an incoming signal is typically associated with absorbing a portion of its energy, inherently perturbing the measurement and creating reflections and shadows. Here, in contrast, we demonstrate a non-invasive, shadow-free, invisible sensor for airborne sound waves at audible frequencies, which fully absorbs the impinging signal, without at the same time perturbing its own measurement or creating a shadow. This unique sensing device is based on the unusual scattering properties of a parity-time (PT) symmetric metamaterial device formed by a pair of electro-acoustic resonators loaded with suitably tailored non-Foster electrical circuits, constituting the acoustic equivalent of a coherent perfect absorber coupled to a coherent laser. Beyond the specific application to non-invasive sensing, our work broadly demonstrates the unique relevance of PT-symmetric metamaterials for acoustics, loss compensation and extraordinary wave manipulation. PMID:25562746

  2. Acoustically trapped colloidal crystals that are reconfigurable in real time

    PubMed Central

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic and phononic crystals are metamaterials with repeating unit cells that result in internal resonances leading to a range of wave guiding and filtering properties and are opening up new applications such as hyperlenses and superabsorbers. Here we show the first, to our knowledge, 3D colloidal phononic crystal that is reconfigurable in real time and demonstrate its ability to rapidly alter its frequency filtering characteristics. Our reconfigurable material is assembled from microspheres in aqueous solution, trapped with acoustic radiation forces. The acoustic radiation force is governed by an energy landscape, determined by an applied high-amplitude acoustic standing wave field, in which particles move swiftly to energy minima. This creates a colloidal crystal of several milliliters in volume with spheres arranged in an orthorhombic lattice in which the acoustic wavelength is used to control the lattice spacing. Transmission acoustic spectroscopy shows that the new colloidal crystal behaves as a phononic metamaterial and exhibits clear band-pass and band-stop frequencies which are adjusted in real time. PMID:24706925

  3. Nonlinear effects of dark energy clustering beyond the acoustic scales

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Stefano; Sefusatti, Emiliano E-mail: dlopez_n@ictp.it

    2014-07-01

    We extend the resummation method of Anselmi and Pietroni (2012) to compute the total density power spectrum in models of quintessence characterized by a vanishing speed of sound. For standard ΛCDM cosmologies, this resummation scheme allows predictions with an accuracy at the few percent level beyond the range of scales where acoustic oscillations are present, therefore comparable to other, common numerical tools. In addition, our theoretical approach indicates an approximate but valuable and simple relation between the power spectra for standard quintessence models and models where scalar field perturbations appear at all scales. This, in turn, provides an educated guess for the prediction of nonlinear growth in models with generic speed of sound, particularly valuable since no numerical results are yet available.

  4. Time-Reversal Acoustics and Maximum-Entropy Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2001-08-22

    Target location is a common problem in acoustical imaging using either passive or active data inversion. Time-reversal methods in acoustics have the important characteristic that they provide a means of determining the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the scattering operator for either of these problems. Each eigenfunction may often be approximately associated with an individual scatterer. The resulting decoupling of the scattered field from a collection of targets is a very useful aid to localizing the targets, and suggests a number of imaging and localization algorithms. Two of these are linear subspace methods and maximum-entropy imaging.

  5. Acoustic measurements of a full-scale coaxial helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, M.; Peterson, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic data were obtained during a full-scale test of the XH-59A Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) Technology Demonstrator in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The XH-59A is a research helicopter with two coaxial rotors and hingeless blades. Performance, vibration, noise at various forward speeds, rotor lift coefficients, and rotor shaft angles of attack were investigated. In general, the noise level is shown to increase with rotor lift coefficient except under certain operating conditions where it is increased by significant impulsive blade/vortex interactions. The impulsivity appears to depend upon how the lift is distributed between the two rotors. The noise levels measured are shown to be slightly higher than on a modern conventional rotor tested in the same facility.

  6. Multi-carrier Communications over Time-varying Acoustic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aval, Yashar M.

    Acoustic communication is an enabling technology for many autonomous undersea systems, such as those used for ocean monitoring, offshore oil and gas industry, aquaculture, or port security. There are three main challenges in achieving reliable high-rate underwater communication: the bandwidth of acoustic channels is extremely limited, the propagation delays are long, and the Doppler distortions are more pronounced than those found in wireless radio channels. In this dissertation we focus on assessing the fundamental limitations of acoustic communication, and designing efficient signal processing methods that cam overcome these limitations. We address the fundamental question of acoustic channel capacity (achievable rate) for single-input-multi-output (SIMO) acoustic channels using a per-path Rician fading model, and focusing on two scenarios: narrowband channels where the channel statistics can be approximated as frequency- independent, and wideband channels where the nominal path loss is frequency-dependent. In each scenario, we compare several candidate power allocation techniques, and show that assigning uniform power across all frequencies for the first scenario, and assigning uniform power across a selected frequency-band for the second scenario, are the best practical choices in most cases, because the long propagation delay renders the feedback information outdated for power allocation based on the estimated channel response. We quantify our results using the channel information extracted form the 2010 Mobile Acoustic Communications Experiment (MACE'10). Next, we focus on achieving reliable high-rate communication over underwater acoustic channels. Specifically, we investigate orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) as the state-of-the-art technique for dealing with frequency-selective multipath channels, and propose a class of methods that compensate for the time-variation of the underwater acoustic channel. These methods are based on multiple

  7. Acoustic resonance in tube bundles -- Comparison of full scale and laboratory test results

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.

    1995-12-01

    Full scale operational data from steam generator tube bundles exposed to hot gases in crossflow are compared with small scale laboratory test results with cold air. Vibration thresholds based on input energy, acoustic particle velocity and effective damping are evaluated and compared. It is shown that these parameters play an important role in the development, or suppression of acoustic resonance.

  8. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  9. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  10. Method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.

    2004-06-29

    A method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics. Time-reversal acoustics uses an iterative process to determine the optimum signal for locating a strongly reflecting target in a cluttered environment. An acoustic array sends a signal into a medium, and then receives the returned/reflected signal. This returned/reflected signal is then time-reversed and sent back into the medium again, and again, until the signal being sent and received is no longer changing. At that point, the array has isolated the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination and has effectively determined the location of a single target in the medium (the one that is most strongly reflecting). After the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination has been determined, to determine the location of other targets, instead of sending back the same signals, the method sends back these time reversed signals, but half of them will also be reversed in sign. There are various possibilities for choosing which half to do sign reversal. The most obvious choice is to reverse every other one in a linear array, or as in a checkerboard pattern in 2D. Then, a new send/receive, send-time reversed/receive iteration can proceed. Often, the first iteration in this sequence will be close to the desired signal from a second target. In some cases, orthogonalization procedures must be implemented to assure the returned signals are in fact orthogonal to the first eigenvector found.

  11. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  12. Time Reversal Acoustic Communication Using Filtered Multitone Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lin; Chen, Baowei; Li, Haisen; Zhou, Tian; Li, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    The multipath spread in underwater acoustic channels is severe and, therefore, when the symbol rate of the time reversal (TR) acoustic communication using single-carrier (SC) modulation is high, the large intersymbol interference (ISI) span caused by multipath reduces the performance of the TR process and needs to be removed using the long adaptive equalizer as the post-processor. In this paper, a TR acoustic communication method using filtered multitone (FMT) modulation is proposed in order to reduce the residual ISI in the processed signal using TR. In the proposed method, FMT modulation is exploited to modulate information symbols onto separate subcarriers with high spectral containment and TR technique, as well as adaptive equalization is adopted at the receiver to suppress ISI and noise. The performance of the proposed method is assessed through simulation and real data from a trial in an experimental pool. The proposed method was compared with the TR acoustic communication using SC modulation with the same spectral efficiency. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of the TR process and reduce the computational complexity of adaptive equalization for post-process. PMID:26393586

  13. Cylindrical acoustical holography applied to full-scale jet noise.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Krueger, David W; James, Michael M

    2014-09-01

    Near-field acoustical holography methods are used to predict sound radiation from an engine installed on a high-performance military fighter aircraft. Cylindrical holography techniques are an efficient approach to measure the large and complex sound fields produced by full-scale jets. It is shown that a ground-based, one-dimensional array of microphones can be used in conjunction with a cylindrical wave function field representation to provide a holographic reconstruction of the radiated sound field at low frequencies. In the current work, partial field decomposition methods and numerical extrapolation of data beyond the boundaries of the hologram aperture are required prior to holographic projection. Predicted jet noise source distributions and directionality are shown for four frequencies between 63 and 250 Hz. It is shown that the source distribution narrows and moves upstream, and that radiation directionality shifts toward the forward direction, with increasing frequency. A double-lobe feature of full-scale jet radiation is also demonstrated. PMID:25190387

  14. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  15. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging.

  16. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  17. Time-instant sampling based encoding of time-varying acoustic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neeraj Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The inner ear has been shown to characterize an acoustic stimuli by transducing fluid motion in the inner ear to mechanical bending of stereocilia on the inner hair cells (IHCs). The excitation motion/energy transferred to an IHC is dependent on the frequency spectrum of the acoustic stimuli, and the spatial location of the IHC along the length of the basilar membrane (BM). Subsequently, the afferent auditory nerve fiber (ANF) bundle samples the encoded waveform in the IHCs by synapsing with them. In this work we focus on sampling of information by afferent ANFs from the IHCs, and show computationally that sampling at specific time instants is sufficient for decoding of time-varying acoustic spectrum embedded in the acoustic stimuli. The approach is based on sampling the signal at its zero-crossings and higher-order derivative zero-crossings. We show results of the approach on time-varying acoustic spectrum estimation from cricket call signal recording. The framework gives a time-domain and non-spatial processing perspective to auditory signal processing. The approach works on the full band signal, and is devoid of modeling any bandpass filtering mimicking the BM action. Instead, we motivate the approach from the perspective of event-triggered sampling by afferent ANFs on the stimuli encoded in the IHCs. Though the approach gives acoustic spectrum estimation but it is shallow on its complete understanding for plausible bio-mechanical replication with current mammalian auditory mechanics insights.

  18. Time-sliced perturbation theory II: baryon acoustic oscillations and infrared resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    We use time-sliced perturbation theory (TSPT) to give an accurate description of the infrared non-linear effects affecting the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) present in the distribution of matter at very large scales. In TSPT this can be done via a systematic resummation that has a simple diagrammatic representation and does not involve uncontrollable approximations. We discuss the power counting rules and derive explicit expressions for the resummed matter power spectrum up to next-to leading order and the bispectrum at the leading order. The two-point correlation function agrees well with N-body data at BAO scales. The systematic approach also allows to reliably assess the shift of the baryon acoustic peak due to non-linear effects.

  19. Application of time reversal acoustics focusing for nonlinear imaging ms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2001-05-01

    Time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing of ultrasound appears to be an effective tool for nonlinear imaging in industrial and medical applications because of its ability to efficiently concentrate ultrasonic energy (close to diffraction limit) in heterogeneous media. In this study, we used two TRA systems to focus ultrasonic beams with different frequencies in coinciding focal points, thus causing the generation of ultrasonic waves with combination frequencies. Measurements of the intensity of these combination frequency waves provide information on the nonlinear parameter of medium in the focal region. Synchronized stirring of two TRA focused beams enables obtaining 3-D acoustic nonlinearity images of the object. Each of the TRA systems employed an aluminum resonator with piezotransducers glued to its facet. One of the free facets of each resonator was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array capable of ultrasound focusing and beam steering. To mimic a medium with spatially varying acoustical nonlinearity a simplest model such as a microbubble column in water was used. Microbubbles were generated by electrolysis of water using a needle electrode. An order of magnitude increase of the sum frequency component was observed when the ultrasound beams were focused in the area with bubbles.

  20. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  1. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine. Previously announced in STAR as N83-21896

  2. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  3. Effects of Horizontal Magnetic Fields on Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rekha

    2007-02-01

    Local helioseismology techniques seek to probe the subsurface magnetic fields and flows by observing waves that emerge at the solar surface after passing through these inhomogeneities. Active regions on the surface of the Sun are distinguished by their strong magnetic fields, and techniques such as time-distance helioseismology can provide a useful diagnostic for probing these structures. Above the active regions, the fields fan out to create a horizontal magnetic canopy. We investigate the effect of a uniform horizontal magnetic field on the travel time of acoustic waves by considering vertical velocity in a simple plane-parallel adiabatically stratified polytrope. It is shown that such fields can lower the upper turning point of p-modes and hence influence their travel time. It is found that acoustic waves reflected from magnetically active regions have travel times up to a minute less than for waves similarly reflected in quiet regions. It is also found that sound speeds are increased below the active regions. These findings are consistent with time-distance measurements.

  4. On the effects of small-scale variability on acoustic propagation in Fram Strait: The tomography forward problem.

    PubMed

    Dushaw, Brian D; Sagen, Hanne; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic tomography systems have been deployed in Fram Strait over the past decade to complement existing observing systems there. The observed acoustic arrival patterns are unusual, however, consisting of a single, broad arrival pulse, with no discernible repeating patterns or individual ray arrivals. The nature of these arrivals is caused by vigorous acoustic scattering from the small-scale processes that dominate ocean variability in Fram Strait. Simple models for internal wave and mesoscale variability were constructed and tailored to match the variability observed by moored thermisters in Fram Strait. The internal wave contribution to variability is weak. Acoustic propagation through a simulated ocean consisting of a climatological sound speed plus mesoscale and internal wave scintillations obtains arrival patterns that match the characteristics of those observed, i.e., pulse width and travel time variation. The scintillations cause a proliferation of acoustic ray paths, however, reminiscent of "ray chaos." This understanding of the acoustic forward problem is prerequisite to designing an inverse scheme for estimating temperature from the observed travel times. PMID:27586755

  5. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  6. Time scales in cognitive neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Papo, David

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience boils down to describing the ways in which cognitive function results from brain activity. In turn, brain activity shows complex fluctuations, with structure at many spatio-temporal scales. Exactly how cognitive function inherits the physical dimensions of neural activity, though, is highly non-trivial, and so are generally the corresponding dimensions of cognitive phenomena. As for any physical phenomenon, when studying cognitive function, the first conceptual step should be that of establishing its dimensions. Here, we provide a systematic presentation of the temporal aspects of task-related brain activity, from the smallest scale of the brain imaging technique's resolution, to the observation time of a given experiment, through the characteristic time scales of the process under study. We first review some standard assumptions on the temporal scales of cognitive function. In spite of their general use, these assumptions hold true to a high degree of approximation for many cognitive (viz. fast perceptual) processes, but have their limitations for other ones (e.g., thinking or reasoning). We define in a rigorous way the temporal quantifiers of cognition at all scales, and illustrate how they qualitatively vary as a function of the properties of the cognitive process under study. We propose that each phenomenon should be approached with its own set of theoretical, methodological and analytical tools. In particular, we show that when treating cognitive processes such as thinking or reasoning, complex properties of ongoing brain activity, which can be drastically simplified when considering fast (e.g., perceptual) processes, start playing a major role, and not only characterize the temporal properties of task-related brain activity, but also determine the conditions for proper observation of the phenomena. Finally, some implications on the design of experiments, data analyses, and the choice of recording parameters are discussed. PMID:23626578

  7. Development of an Acoustic Signal Analysis Tool “Auto-F” Based on the Temperament Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modegi, Toshio

    The MIDI interface is originally designed for electronic musical instruments but we consider this music-note based coding concept can be extended for general acoustic signal description. We proposed applying the MIDI technology to coding of bio-medical auscultation sound signals such as heart sounds for retrieving medical records and performing telemedicine. Then we have tried to extend our encoding targets including vocal sounds, natural sounds and electronic bio-signals such as ECG, using Generalized Harmonic Analysis method. Currently, we are trying to separate vocal sounds included in popular songs and encode both vocal sounds and background instrumental sounds into separate MIDI channels. And also, we are trying to extract articulation parameters such as MIDI pitch-bend parameters in order to reproduce natural acoustic sounds using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator. In this paper, we present an overall algorithm of our developed acoustic signal analysis tool, based on those research works, which can analyze given time-based signals on the musical temperament scale. The prominent feature of this tool is producing high-precision MIDI codes, which reproduce the similar signals as the given source signal using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator, and also providing analyzed texts in the XML format.

  8. Multidimensional scaling between acoustic and electric stimuli in cochlear implant users with contralateral hearing

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Katrien; Landsberger, David M.; Schleich, Peter; Van de Heyning, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptual relationship between acoustic and electric stimuli presented to CI users with functional contralateral hearing. Fourteen subjects with unilateral profound deafness implanted with a MED-EL CI scaled the perceptual differences between pure tones presented to the acoustic hearing ear and electric biphasic pulse trains presented to the implanted ear. The differences were analyzed with a multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis. Additionally, speech performance in noise was tested using sentence material presented in different spatial configurations while patients listened with both their acoustic hearing and implanted ears. Results of alternating least squares scaling (ALSCAL) analysis consistently demonstrate that a change in place of stimulation is in the same perceptual dimension as a change in acoustic frequency. However, the relative perceptual differences between the acoustic and the electric stimuli varied greatly across subjects. A degree of perceptual separation between acoustic and electric stimulation (quantified by relative dimensional weightings from an INDSCAL analysis) was hypothesized that would indicate a change in perceptual quality, but also be predictive of performance with combined acoustic and electric hearing. Perceptual separation between acoustic and electric stimuli was observed for some subjects. However, no relationship between the degree of perceptual separation and performance was found. PMID:24055624

  9. Multidimensional scaling between acoustic and electric stimuli in cochlear implant users with contralateral hearing.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Katrien; Landsberger, David M; Schleich, Peter; Van de Heyning, Paul H

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the perceptual relationship between acoustic and electric stimuli presented to CI users with functional contralateral hearing. Fourteen subjects with unilateral profound deafness implanted with a MED-EL CI scaled the perceptual differences between pure tones presented to the acoustic hearing ear and electric biphasic pulse trains presented to the implanted ear. The differences were analyzed with a multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis. Additionally, speech performance in noise was tested using sentence material presented in different spatial configurations while patients listened with both their acoustic hearing and implanted ears. Results of alternating least squares scaling (ALSCAL) analysis consistently demonstrate that a change in place of stimulation is in the same perceptual dimension as a change in acoustic frequency. However, the relative perceptual differences between the acoustic and the electric stimuli varied greatly across subjects. A degree of perceptual separation between acoustic and electric stimulation (quantified by relative dimensional weightings from an INDSCAL analysis) was hypothesized that would indicate a change in perceptual quality, but also be predictive of performance with combined acoustic and electric hearing. Perceptual separation between acoustic and electric stimuli was observed for some subjects. However, no relationship between the degree of perceptual separation and performance was found. PMID:24055624

  10. Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2010-01-01

    Testing of air breathing propulsion systems in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center depends on compressed air turbines for power. The drive rig turbines exhaust directly to the wind tunnel test section, and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the model being tested. In order to mitigate this acoustic contamination, a muffler can be attached downstream of the drive rig turbine. The modern engine designs currently being tested produce much less noise than traditional engines, and consequently a lower noise floor is required of the facility. An acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate this extraneous noise is presented, and a noise reduction of 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz was documented, significantly improving the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  11. Shelf-Scale Mapping of Fish Distribution Using Active and Passive Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Carrie C.

    Fish sound production has been associated with courtship and spawning behavior. Acoustic recordings of fish sounds can be used to identify distribution and behavior. Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) can record large amounts of acoustic data in a specific area for days to years. These data can be collected in remote locations under potentially unsafe seas throughout a 24-hour period providing datasets unattainable using observer-based methods. However, the instruments must withstand the caustic ocean environment and be retrieved to obtain the recorded data. This can prove difficult due to the risk of PAMs being lost, stolen or damaged, especially in highly active areas. In addition, point-source sound recordings are only one aspect of fish biogeography. Passive acoustic platforms that produce low self-generated noise, have high retrieval rates, and are equipped with a suite of environmental sensors are needed to relate patterns in fish sound production to concurrently collected oceanographic conditions on large, synoptic scales. The association of sound with reproduction further invokes the need for such non-invasive, near-real time datasets that can be used to enhance current management methods limited by survey bias, inaccurate fisher reports, and extensive delays between fisheries data collection and population assessment. Red grouper (Epinephelus morio) exhibit the distinctive behavior of digging holes and producing a unique sound during courtship. These behaviors can be used to identify red grouper distribution and potential spawning habitat over large spatial scales. The goal of this research was to provide a greater understanding of the temporal and spatial distribution of red grouper sound production and holes on the central West Florida Shelf (WFS) using active sonar and passive acoustic recorders. The technology demonstrated here establishes the necessary methods to map shelf-scale fish sound production. The results of this work could aid resource

  12. Acoustic thermometric reconstruction of a time-varying temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Sharakshane, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The time-varying temperature profiles were reconstructed in an experiment using a thermal acoustic radiation receiving array containing 14 sensors. The temperature was recovered by performing similar experiments using plasticine, as well as in vivo with a human hand. Plasticine preliminarily heated up to 36.5°C and a human hand were placed into water for 50 s at a temperature of 20°C. The core temperature of the plasticine was independently measured using thermocouples. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction in the lateral direction was determined by the distance between neighboring sensors and was equal to10 mm; the averaging time was 10 s. The error in reconstructing the core temperature determined in the experiment with plasticine was 0.5 K. The core temperature of the hand changed with time (in 50 s it decreased from 35 to 34°C) and space (the mean square deviation was 1.5 K). The experiment with the hand revealed that multichannel detection of thermal acoustic radiation using a compact 45 × 36 mm array to reconstruct the temperature profile could be performed during medical procedures.

  13. Object detection and imaging with acoustic time reversal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias

    1993-11-01

    Focusing an acoustic wave on an object of unknown shape through an inhomogeneous medium of any geometrical shape is a challenge in underground detection. Optimal detection and imaging of objects needs the development of such focusing techniques. The use of a time reversal mirror (TRM) represents an original solution to this problem. It realizes in real time a focusing process matched to the object shape, to the geometries of the acoustic interfaces and to the geometries of the mirror. It is a self adaptative technique which compensates for any geometrical distortions of the mirror structure as well as for diffraction and refraction effects through the interfaces. Two real time 64 and 128 channel prototypes have been built in our laboratory and TRM experiments demonstrating the TRM performance through inhomogeneous solid and liquid media are presented. Applications to medical therapy (kidney stone detection and destruction) and to nondestructive testing of metallurgical samples of different geometries are described. Extension of this study to underground detection and imaging will be discussed.

  14. Automatic time alignment of phonemes using acoustic- phonetic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosom, John-Paul

    2000-10-01

    One requirement for researching and building spoken language systems is the availability of speech data that have been labeled and time-aligned at the phonetic level. Although manual phonetic alignment is considered more accurate than automatic methods, it is too time consuming to be commonly used for aligning large corpora. One reason for the greater accuracy of human labeling is that humans are better able to locate distinct events in the speech signal that correspond to specific phonetic characteristics. The development of the proposed method was motivated by the belief that if an automatic alignment method were to use such acoustic-phonetic information, its accuracy would become closer to that of human performance. Our hypothesis is that the integration of acoustic-phonetic information into a state-of-the-art automatic phonetic alignment system will significantly improve its accuracy and robustness. In developing an alignment system that uses acoustic- phonetic information, we use a measure of intensity discrimination in detecting voicing, glottalization, and burst-related impulses. We propose and implement a method of voicing determination that has average accuracy of 97.25% (which is an average 58% reduction in error over a baseline system), a fundamental-frequency extraction method with average absolute error of 3.12 Hz (representing a 45% reduction in error), and a method for detecting burst-related impulses with accuracy of 86.8% on the TIMIT corpus (which is a 45% reduction in error compared to reported results). In addition to these features, we propose a means of using acoustics-dependent transition information in the HMM framework. One aspect of successful implementation of this method is the use of distinctive phonetic features. To evaluate the proposed and baseline phonetic alignment systems, we measure agreement with manual alignments and robustness. On the TIMIT corpus, the proposed method has 92.57% agreement within 20 msec. The average agreement

  15. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  16. Uncertainty estimation in seismo-acoustic reflection travel time inversion.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W

    2007-07-01

    This paper develops a nonlinear Bayesian inversion for high-resolution seabed reflection travel time data including rigorous uncertainty estimation and examination of statistical assumptions. Travel time data are picked on seismo-acoustic traces and inverted for a layered sediment sound-velocity model. Particular attention is paid to picking errors which are often biased, correlated, and nonstationary. Non-Toeplitz data covariance matrices are estimated and included in the inversion along with unknown travel time offset (bias) parameters to account for these errors. Simulated experiments show that neglecting error covariances and biases can cause misleading inversion results with unrealistically high confidence. The inversion samples the posterior probability density and provides a solution in terms of one- and two-dimensional marginal probability densities, correlations, and credibility intervals. Statistical assumptions are examined through the data residuals with rigorous statistical tests. The method is applied to shallow-water data collected on the Malta Plateau during the SCARAB98 experiment. PMID:17614476

  17. Acoustic fluidization and the scale dependence of impact crater morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Gaffney, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological Bingham plastic model has previously been shown to provide an adequate description of the collapse of impact craters. This paper demonstrates that the Bingham parameters may be derived from a model in which acoustic energy generated during excavation fluidizes the rock debris surrounding the crater. Experimental support for the theoretical flow law is presented. Although the Bingham yield stress cannot be computed without detailed knowledge of the initial acoustic field, the Bingham viscosity is derived from a simple argument which shows that it increases as the 3/2 power of crater diameter, consistent with observation. Crater collapse may occur in material with internal dissipation Q as low as 100, comparable to laboratory observations of dissipation in granular materials. Crater collapse thus does not require that the acoustic field be regenerated during flow.

  18. Time-Accurate Simulations and Acoustic Analysis of Slat Free-Shear-Layer. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Singer, Bart A.; Lockard, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Unsteady computational simulations of a multi-element, high-lift configuration are performed. Emphasis is placed on accurate spatiotemporal resolution of the free shear layer in the slat-cove region. The excessive dissipative effects of the turbulence model, so prevalent in previous simulations, are circumvented by switching off the turbulence-production term in the slat cove region. The justifications and physical arguments for taking such a step are explained in detail. The removal of this excess damping allows the shear layer to amplify large-scale structures, to achieve a proper non-linear saturation state, and to permit vortex merging. The large-scale disturbances are self-excited, and unlike our prior fully turbulent simulations, no external forcing of the shear layer is required. To obtain the farfield acoustics, the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is evaluated numerically using the simulated time-accurate flow data. The present comparison between the computed and measured farfield acoustic spectra shows much better agreement for the amplitude and frequency content than past calculations. The effect of the angle-of-attack on the slat's flow features radiated acoustic field are also simulated presented.

  19. Validation and Simulation of ARES I Scale Model Acoustic Test -1- Pathfinder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Within this first of a series of papers, results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in a held down configuration and without water suppression have then been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Detailed evaluations of the mesh features, mesh length scales relative to acoustic signals, Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers, and spatial residual sources have been performed to support this assessment. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure. Finally, acoustic propagation patterns illustrated a previously unconsidered issue of tower placement inline with the high intensity overpressure propagation path.

  20. Acoustic Performance of Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David, B.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft engine component testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) includes acoustic testing of scale model fans and propellers in the 9- by15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). This testing utilizes air driven turbines to deliver power to the article being studied. These air turbines exhaust directly downstream of the model in the wind tunnel test section and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the engine model being tested. This report describes an acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate the extraneous turbine noise. The muffler was found to provide acoustic attenuation of at least 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz which significantly improves the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  1. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 3; Test Plans, Hardware, Results, and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Echternach, D. K.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale-model fan rigs representative of the full-scale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. To be able to use scale model treatment as a full-scale design tool, it is necessary that the designer be able to reliably translate the scale model design and performance to an equivalent full-scale design. The primary objective of the study presented in this volume of the final report was to conduct laboratory tests to evaluate liner acoustic properties and validate advanced treatment impedance models. These laboratory tests include DC flow resistance measurements, normal incidence impedance measurements, DC flow and impedance measurements in the presence of grazing flow, and in-duct liner attenuation as well as modal measurements. Test panels were fabricated at three different scale factors (i.e., full-scale, half-scale, and one-fifth scale) to support laboratory acoustic testing. The panel configurations include single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) perforated sandwich panels, SDOF linear (wire mesh) liners, and double-degree-of-freedom (DDOF) linear acoustic panels.

  2. Taming the Exceptional Points of Parity-Time Symmetric Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Marc; Shi, Chengzhi; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric concept and development lead to a wide range of applications including coherent perfect absorbers, single mode lasers, unidirectional cloaking and sensing, and optical isolators. These new applications and devices emerge from the existence of a phase transition in PT symmetric complex-valued potential obtained by balancing gain and loss materials. However, the systematic extension of such devices is adjourned by the key challenge in the management of the complex scattering process within the structure in order to engineer PT phase and exceptional points. Here, based on active acoustic elements, we experimentally demonstrate the simultaneous control of complex-valued potentials and multiple interference inside the structure at any given frequency. This method broadens the scope of applications for PT symmetric devices in many fields including optics, microwaves, electronics, which are crucial for sensing, imaging, cloaking, lasing, absorbing, etc.

  3. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests. PMID:26950889

  4. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  5. Acoustic Survey of a 3/8-Scale Automotive Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Romberg, Gary; Hansen, Larry; Lutz, Ron

    1996-01-01

    An acoustic survey that consists of insertion loss and flow noise measurements was conducted at key locations around the circuit of a 3/8-scale automotive acoustic wind tunnel. Descriptions of the test, the instrumentation, and the wind tunnel facility are included in the current report, along with data obtained in the test in the form of 1/3-octave-band insertion loss and narrowband flow noise spectral data.

  6. Ocean acoustic field simulations for monitoring large-scale ocean structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, E. C.; Wang, Y. Y.

    1991-04-01

    Substantial numerical simulations of low-frequency acoustic field under different ocean models have been carried out on the CYBER-205 at WPL/NOAA. The purpose of these numerical simulations is to investigate our potential ability to monitor large-scale ocean structures by using modal ocean acoustic tomography (MOAT). For example, the possibility of monitoring El Niño by using MOAT has been illustrated.

  7. A Study of Acoustic Reflections in Full-Scale Rotor Low Frequency Noise Measurements Acquired in Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbely, Natasha L.; Sim, Ben W.; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Goulding, Pat, II

    2010-01-01

    Difficulties in obtaining full-scale rotor low frequency noise measurements in wind tunnels are addressed via residual sound reflections due to non-ideal anechoic wall treatments. Examples illustrated with the Boeing-SMART rotor test in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel facility demonstrated that these reflections introduced distortions in the measured acoustic time histories that are not representative of free-field rotor noise radiation. A simplified reflection analysis, based on the method of images, is used to examine the sound measurement quality in such "less-than-anechoic" environment. Predictions of reflection-adjusted acoustic time histories are qualitatively shown to account for some of the spurious fluctuations observed in wind tunnel noise measurements

  8. The acoustics of a small-scale helicopter rotor in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitaplioglu, Cahit

    1989-01-01

    A 2.1 m diameter, 1/6-scale model helicopter main rotor was tested in hover in the test section of the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. Performance and noise data on a small-scale rotor at various thrust coefficients and tip Mach numbers were obtained for comparison with existing data on similar full-scale helicopter rotors. These data form part of a data base to permit the estimation of scaling effects on various rotor noise mechanisms. Another objective was to contribute to a data base that will permit the estimation of facility effects on acoustic testing. Acoustic 1/3-octave-band spectra are presented, together with variations of overall acoustic levels with rotor performance, microphone distance, and directivity angle.

  9. Dynamic acoustics for the STAR-100. [computer algorithms for time dependent sound waves in jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    An algorithm is described to compute time dependent acoustic waves in a jet. The method differs from previous methods in that no harmonic time dependence is assumed, thus permitting the study of nonharmonic acoustical behavior. Large grids are required to resolve the acoustic waves. Since the problem is nonstiff, explicit high order schemes can be used. These have been adapted to the STAR-100 with great efficiencies and permitted the efficient solution of problems which would not be feasible on a scalar machine.

  10. Statistical Modeling of Large-Scale Signal Path Loss in Underwater Acoustic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel Perez

    2013-01-01

    In an underwater acoustic channel, the propagation conditions are known to vary in time, causing the deviation of the received signal strength from the nominal value predicted by a deterministic propagation model. To facilitate a large-scale system design in such conditions (e.g., power allocation), we have developed a statistical propagation model in which the transmission loss is treated as a random variable. By applying repetitive computation to the acoustic field, using ray tracing for a set of varying environmental conditions (surface height, wave activity, small node displacements around nominal locations, etc.), an ensemble of transmission losses is compiled and later used to infer the statistical model parameters. A reasonable agreement is found with log-normal distribution, whose mean obeys a log-distance increases, and whose variance appears to be constant for a certain range of inter-node distances in a given deployment location. The statistical model is deemed useful for higher-level system planning, where simulation is needed to assess the performance of candidate network protocols under various resource allocation policies, i.e., to determine the transmit power and bandwidth allocation necessary to achieve a desired level of performance (connectivity, throughput, reliability, etc.). PMID:23396190

  11. Statistical modeling of large-scale signal path loss in underwater acoustic networks.

    PubMed

    Llor, Jesús; Malumbres, Manuel Perez

    2013-01-01

    In an underwater acoustic channel, the propagation conditions are known to vary in time, causing the deviation of the received signal strength from the nominal value predicted by a deterministic propagation model. To facilitate a large-scale system design in such conditions (e.g., power allocation), we have developed a statistical propagation model in which the transmission loss is treated as a random variable. By applying repetitive computation to the acoustic field, using ray tracing for a set of varying environmental conditions (surface height, wave activity, small node displacements around nominal locations, etc.), an ensemble of transmission losses is compiled and later used to infer the statistical model parameters. A reasonable agreement is found with log-normal distribution, whose mean obeys a log-distance increases, and whose variance appears to be constant for a certain range of inter-node distances in a given deployment location. The statistical model is deemed useful for higher-level system planning, where simulation is needed to assess the performance of candidate network protocols under various resource allocation policies, i.e., to determine the transmit power and bandwidth allocation necessary to achieve a desired level of performance (connectivity, throughput, reliability, etc.). PMID:23396190

  12. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oshkai; M. Geveci; D. Rockwell; M. Pollack

    2002-12-12

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of,these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  13. Application of acoustic feedback to target detection in a waveguide: experimental demonstration at the ultrasonic scale.

    PubMed

    Roux, Philippe; Marandet, Christian; La Rizza, Patrick; Kuperman, W A

    2011-07-01

    People are familiar with the acoustic feedback phenomenon, which results in a loud sound that is heard when a musician plays an electric instrument directly into a speaker. Acoustic feedback occurs when a source and a receiver are connected both acoustically through the propagation medium and electrically through an amplifier, such that the amplified received signal is continuously re-emitted by the source. The acoustic feedback can be initiated from a continuous sine wave. When the emitter and the receiver are in phase, resonance is obtained, which appears to be highly sensitive to any fluctuation of the propagation medium. Another procedure consists in initiating the acoustic feedback from a continuous loop of ambient noise. It then generates an unstable self-sustained feedback oscillator (SFO) that is tested here as a method for monitoring temperature fluctuations of a shallow-water oceanic environment. The goal of the present study is to reproduce and study the SFO at the laboratory scale in an ultrasonic waveguide. The experimental results demonstrate the potential applications of the SFO for the detection of a target in the framework of the acoustic-barrier problem in shallow-water acoustics. PMID:21786873

  14. Control of Thermo-Acoustics Instabilities: The Multi-Scale Extended Kalman Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Dzu K.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    "Multi-Scale Extended Kalman" (MSEK) is a novel model-based control approach recently found to be effective for suppressing combustion instabilities in gas turbines. A control law formulated in this approach for fuel modulation demonstrated steady suppression of a high-frequency combustion instability (less than 500Hz) in a liquid-fuel combustion test rig under engine-realistic conditions. To make-up for severe transport-delays on control effect, the MSEK controller combines a wavelet -like Multi-Scale analysis and an Extended Kalman Observer to predict the thermo-acoustic states of combustion pressure perturbations. The commanded fuel modulation is composed of a damper action based on the predicted states, and a tones suppression action based on the Multi-Scale estimation of thermal excitations and other transient disturbances. The controller performs automatic adjustments of the gain and phase of these actions to minimize the Time-Scale Averaged Variances of the pressures inside the combustion zone and upstream of the injector. The successful demonstration of Active Combustion Control with this MSEK controller completed an important NASA milestone for the current research in advanced combustion technologies.

  15. Comparison study of time reversal OFDM acoustic communication with vector and scalar sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongkang; Zhang, Hongtao; Xie, Zhe

    2012-11-01

    To compare the performance of time reversal orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) acoustic communication on vector and scalar sensors, the vector and scalar acoustic fields were modeled. Time reversal OFDM acoustic communication was then simulated for each sensor type. These results are compared with data from the CAPEx'09 experiment. The abilityof particle velocity channels to achieve reliable acoustic communication, as predicted by the model, is confirmed with the experiment data. Experimental results show that vector receivers can reduce the required array size, in comparisonto hydrophone arrays, whileproviding comparable communication performance.

  16. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  17. Hover and forward flight acoustics and performance of a small-scale helicopter rotor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitaplioglu, C.; Shinoda, P.

    1985-01-01

    A 2.1-m diam., 1/6-scale model helicopter main rotor was tested in hover in the test section of the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel. Subsequently, it was tested in forward flight in the Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain performance and noise data on a small-scale rotor at various thrust coefficients, tip Mach numbers, and, in the later case, various advance ratios, for comparisons with similar existing data on full-scale helicopter rotors. This comparison yielded a preliminary evaluation of the scaling of helicopter rotor performance and acoustic radiation in hover and in forward flight. Correlation between model-scale and full-scale performance and acoustics was quite good in hover. In forward flight, however, there were significant differences in both performance and acoustic characteristics. A secondary objective was to contribute to a data base that will permit the estimation of facility effects on acoustic testing.

  18. On the time-mean state of ocean models and the properties of long range acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushaw, B. D.; Worcester, P. F.; Dzieciuch, M. A.; Menemenlis, D.

    2013-09-01

    Receptions on three vertical hydrophone arrays from basin-scale acoustic transmissions in the North Pacific during 1996 and 1998 are used to test the time-mean sound-speed properties of the World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05), of an eddying unconstrained simulation of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), and of three data-constrained solutions provided by the estimating the circulation and climate of the ocean (ECCO) project: a solution based on an approximate Kalman filter from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (ECCO-JPL), a solution based on the adjoint method from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (ECCO-MIT), and an eddying solution based on a Green's function approach from ECCO, Phase II (ECCO2). Predictions for arrival patterns using annual average WOA05 fields match observations to within small travel time offsets (0.3-1.0 s). Predictions for arrival patterns from the models differ substantially from the measured arrival patterns, from the WOA05 climatology, and from each other, both in terms of travel time and in the structure of the arrival patterns. The acoustic arrival patterns are sensitive to the vertical gradients of sound speed that govern acoustic propagation. Basin-scale acoustic transmissions, therefore, provide stringent tests of the vertical temperature structure of ocean state estimates. This structure ultimately influences the mixing between the surface waters and the ocean interior. The relatively good agreement of the acoustic data with the more recent ECCO solutions indicates that numerical ocean models have reached a level of accuracy where the acoustic data can provide useful additional constraints for ocean state estimation.

  19. Stability of Rasch Scales over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Catherine S.; Lee, Yoonsun

    2010-01-01

    Item response theory (IRT) methods are generally used to create score scales for large-scale tests. Research has shown that IRT scales are stable across groups and over time. Most studies have focused on items that are dichotomously scored. Now Rasch and other IRT models are used to create scales for tests that include polytomously scored items.…

  20. Broadband time reversed acoustic focusing and steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen; Montaldo, Gabriel; Palacio, Delphine; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2001-05-01

    We present results of experimental testing and theoretical modeling of a time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing system based on a multifaceted aluminum resonator with 15 piezoceramic transducers glued to the resonator facets. One of the facets of the resonator, a pentagon with characteristic dimension of about 30 mm, was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array which provided ultrasound focusing and beam steering in a wide frequency band (0.7-3 MHz). Ultrasonic pulses with different carrier frequencies and various complex waveforms were focused; the focal length was varied in the range of 10-55 mm and the focused beam was steered in a range of angles of +/-60 deg. The amplitude of the signal in the focal region reached 40 MPa. A theoretical model was based on an assumption that the radiating part of the resonator works as a phase conjugation screen for a spherical wave radiated from the focal point. Theoretical dependencies of the field structure on the position of the focus point and ultrasound frequency are in a good agreement with experimental results. TRA based focusing of ultrasound has numerous applications in medical diagnostics, surgery and therapy. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  1. Coded acoustic wave sensors and system using time diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for distinguishing between sensors that are to be wirelessly detected is provided. An interrogator device uses different, distinct time delays in the sensing signals when interrogating the sensors. The sensors are provided with different distinct pedestal delays. Sensors that have the same pedestal delay as the delay selected by the interrogator are detected by the interrogator whereas other sensors with different pedestal delays are not sensed. Multiple sensors with a given pedestal delay are provided with different codes so as to be distinguished from one another by the interrogator. The interrogator uses a signal that is transmitted to the sensor and returned by the sensor for combination and integration with the reference signal that has been processed by a function. The sensor may be a surface acoustic wave device having a differential impulse response with a power spectral density consisting of lobes. The power spectral density of the differential response is used to determine the value of the sensed parameter or parameters.

  2. Representative environments for reduced estimation time of wide area acoustic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Josette Paquin

    Advances in ocean modeling (Barron et al., 2006) have improved such that ocean forecasts and even ensembles ( e.g., Coelho et al., 2009) representing ocean uncertainty are becoming more widely available. This facilitates nowcasts (current time ocean fields/analyses) and forecasts (predicted ocean fields) of acoustic propagation conditions in the ocean which can greatly improve the planning of acoustic experiments. Modeling of acoustic transmission loss (TL) provides information about how the environment impacts acoustic performance for various systems and system configurations of interest. It is, however, very time consuming to compute acoustic propagation to and from many potential source and receiver locations for multiple locations on an area-wide grid for multiple analysis/forecast times, ensembles and scenarios of interest. Currently, to make such wide area predictions, an area is gridded and acoustic predictions for multiple directions (or radials) at each grid point for a single time period or ensemble, are computed to estimate performance on the grid. This grid generally does not consider the environment and can neglect important environmental acoustic features or can over-compute in areas of environmental acoustic isotropy. This effort develops two methods to pre-examine the area and time frame in terms of the environmental acoustics in order to prescribe an environmentally optimized computational grid that takes advantage of environmental-acoustic similarities and differences to characterize an area, time frame and ensemble with fewer acoustic model predictions and thus less computation time. Such improvement allows for a more thorough characterization of the time frame and area of interest. The first method is based on critical factors in the environment that typically indicate acoustic response, and the second method is based on a more robust full waveguide mode-based description of the environment. Results are shown for the critical factors method and

  3. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  4. Introduction to the time scale problem

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    As motivation for the symposium on extended-scale atomistic methods, I briefly discuss the time scale problem that plagues molecular dynamics simulations, some promising recent developments for circumventing the problem, and some remaining challenges.

  5. Sources and Radiation Patterns of Volcano-Acoustic Signals Investigated with Field-Scale Chemical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the processes that give rise to complex acoustic signals during volcanic blasts by monitoring buried chemical explosions with infrasound and audio range microphones, strong motion sensors, and high speed imagery. Acoustic waveforms vary with scaled depth of burial (SDOB, units in meters per cube root of joules), ranging from high amplitude, impulsive, gas expansion dominated signals at low SDOB to low amplitude, longer duration, ground motion dominated signals at high SDOB. Typically, the sudden upward acceleration of the substrate above the blast produces the first acoustic arrival, followed by a second pulse due to the eruption of pressurized gas at the surface. Occasionally, a third overpressure occurs when displaced material decelerates upon impact with the ground. The transition between ground motion dominated and gas release dominated acoustics ranges between 0.0038-0.0018 SDOB, respectively. For example, one explosion registering an SDOB=0.0031 produced two overpressure pulses of approximately equal amplitude, one due to ground motion, the other to gas release. Recorded volcano infrasound has also identified distinct ground motion and gas release components during explosions at Sakurajima, Santiaguito, and Karymsky volcanoes. Our results indicate that infrasound records may provide a proxy for the depth and energy of these explosions. Furthermore, while magma fragmentation models indicate the possibility of several explosions during a single vulcanian eruption (Alidibirov, Bull Volc., 1994), our results suggest that a single explosion can also produce complex acoustic signals. Thus acoustic records alone cannot be used to distinguish between single explosions and multiple closely-spaced blasts at volcanoes. Results from a series of lateral blasts during the 2014 field experiment further indicates whether vent geometry can produce directional acoustic radiation patterns like those observed at Tungarahua volcano (Kim et al., GJI, 2012). Beside

  6. Comparison of experimental and analytical predictions of rotor blade-vortex interactions using model scale acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Elliott, J. W.; Hoad, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is studied using a model scale rotor acoustic data base and an analytical rotor wake prediction method. The variation of BVI acoustic levels with vehicle flight conditions (forward speed and disk attitude) is presented. Calculations of probable BVI locations on the rotor disk are made for a range of operating conditions using the measured acoustic signals and an acoustic ray tracing technique. Analytical predictions of possible BVI locations on the rotor disk are made using a generalized distorted wake analysis program. Comparisons of the interaction locations are made with the results of both the analytic approach and the acoustic ray tracing technique.

  7. Profiling of molecular interactions in real time using acoustic detection.

    PubMed

    Godber, Benjamin; Frogley, Mark; Rehak, Marian; Sleptsov, Alexander; Thompson, Kevin S J; Uludag, Yildiz; Cooper, Matthew A

    2007-04-15

    Acoustic sensors that exploit resonating quartz crystals to directly detect the binding of an analyte to a receptor are finding increasing utility in the quantification of clinically relevant analytes. We have developed a novel acoustic detection technology, which we term resonant acoustic profiling (RAP). This technology builds on the fundamental basics of the "quartz crystal microbalance" or "QCM" with several key additional features including two- or four-channel automated sample delivery, in-line referencing and microfluidic sensor 'cassettes' that are pre-coated with easy-to-use surface chemistries. Example applications are described for the quantification of myoglobin concentration and its interaction kinetics, and for the ranking of enzyme-cofactor specificities. PMID:17129723

  8. Thermal lens measurements in liquids on a submicrosecond time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Isak, S. J.; Komorowski, S. J.; Merrow, C. N.; Poston, P. E.; Eyring, E. M.

    1989-03-01

    The use of the thermal lens method is shown to be quite suitable for kinetic studies of quenching on a submicrosecond time scale. The lower limit of time resolution that can be achieved is determined by the acoustic transit time, /tau//sub /ital a//, in the medium. A thermal lens signal with a 100-ns time constant due to the quenched triplet state of benzophenone is readily measured. The thermal lens method is superior to the photoacoustic (PA) method in the breadth of the accessible time range, and in the significantly fewer measurements required to obtain accurate data, including no requirement for a reference sample; it is also less sensitive to geometrical and laser power requirements than is the PA method.

  9. An electromagnetic finite difference time domain analog treatment of small signal acoustic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, K.; Steich, D.; Lewis, K.; Landrum, C.; Barth, M.

    1994-03-01

    Hyperbolic partial differential equations encompass an extremely important set of physical phenomena including electromagnetics and acoustics. Small amplitude acoustic interactions behave much the same as electromagnetic interactions for longitudinal acoustic waves because of the similar nature of the governing hyperbolic equations. Differences appear when transverse acoustic waves are considered; nonetheless, the strong analogy between the acoustic and electromagnetic phenomena prompted the development of a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) acoustic analog to the existing electromagnetic FDTD technique. The advantages of an acoustic FDTD (AFDTD) code are as follows: (1) boundary condition-free treatment of the acoustic scatterer--only the intrinsic properties of the scatterer's material are needed, no shell treatment or other set of special equations describing the macroscopic behavior of a sheet of material or a junction, etc. are required; this allows completely general geometries and materials in the model. (2) Advanced outer radiation boundary condition analogs--in the electromagnetics arena, highly absorbing outer radiation boundary conditions were developed that can be applied with little modification to the acoustics arena with equal success. (3) A suite of preexisting capabilities related to electromagnetic modeling--this includes automated model generation and interaction visualization as its most important components and is best exemplified by the capabilities of the LLNL generated TSAR electromagnetic FDTD code.

  10. NEMO-SMO acoustic array: A deep-sea test of a novel acoustic positioning system for a km3-scale underwater neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, S.; Ardid, M.; Bertin, V.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Keller, P.; Lahmann, R.; Larosa, G.; Llorens, C. D.; NEMO Collaboration; SMO Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Within the activities of the NEMO project, the installation of a 8-floors tower (NEMO-Phase II) at a depth of 3500 m is foreseen in 2012. The tower will be installed about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero, in Sicily. On board the NEMO tower, an array of 18 acoustic sensors will be installed, permitting acoustic detection of biological sources, studies for acoustic neutrino detection and primarily acoustic positioning of the underwater structures. For the latter purpose, the sensors register acoustic signals emitted by five acoustic beacons anchored on the sea-floor. The data acquisition system of the acoustic sensors is fully integrated with the detector data transport system and is based on an “all data to shore” philosophy. Signals coming from hydrophones are continuously sampled underwater at 192 kHz/24 bit and transmitted to shore through an electro-optical cable for real-time analysis. A novel technology for underwater GPS time-stamping of data has been implemented and tested. The operation of the acoustic array will permit long-term test of sensors and electronics technologies that are proposed for the acoustic positioning system of KM3NeT.

  11. The derivation of scaling relationship between acoustic and electromagnetic scattering by spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yongpan; Ge, Junxiang; Wan, Fayu

    2013-11-15

    The rigorous theory of the conversion between the scattering of uniform plane electromagnetic wave by a perfectly conducting sphere and the scattering of uniform plane acoustic wave by a rigid sphere is studied in this paper. The conversion formula between these two different scattering based on two calibration curves is derived, which describes the quantitative relationship between acoustic and electromagnetic wave scattering at arbitrary frequencies by spheres of arbitrary sizes. In addition, the scaling relationship of the sizes of those two spheres and the corresponding frequencies are discussed in detail, and an indirect method of measurement of electromagnetic scattering by the spheres is proposed.

  12. Review of time scales. [Universal Time-Ephemeris Time-International Atomic Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinot, B.

    1974-01-01

    The basic time scales are presented: International Atomic Time, Universal Time, and Universal Time (Coordinated). These scales must be maintained in order to satisfy specific requirements. It is shown how they are obtained and made available at a very high level of precision.

  13. Dispersive Alfven waves and Ion-acoustic Turbulence: M-I coupling at the Smallest Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, J. L.; Zettergren, M. D.; Diaz, M.; Stromme, A.; Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Auroral displays exhibit coherence across multiple scales, beginning with the global auroral oval and extending down to packets of discrete arcs of <100-m width related to dispersive Alfven waves. The latter have been found to be magnetically conjugate to regions of non-thermal backscatter from the ionospheric F-region recorded by incoherent scatter radar (ISR). The phenomenological relationship between auroral morphology and ISR spectral distortions has been well established, at least in a static sense, but the theory connecting these disparate observational domains is incomplete. It is argued that considerable insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling is obtained by understanding auroral physics at these elemental scales. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide observational evidence that not all arc-related ISR distortions fit neatly into a single category (e.g., the “Naturally Enhanced Ion-Acoustic Line” or NEIAL), and (2) to provide a critical review of candidate theoretical models to simultaneously account for the time-dependent optical and radar measurements. Evidentiary support focuses on observations of a substorm onset on 23 March 2007 (11:20 UT) by a narrow-field video-rate camera and the electronically steerable Poker Flat ISR (PFISR). Examples of ISR spectra as a function of altitude. 1: thermal backscatter, 2 and 3: enhanced backscatter conjugate to discrete aurora.

  14. Acoustical Tests Of A Scale-Model Helicopter Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Kinney, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    Data obtained in simulated hovering flight in open environment. Report discusses measurements of sound generated in outdoor hoovering tests of 1/6-scale, four bladed helicopter rotor. Information of delineation between accoustic near field and far field and on effect of simple boundary-layer-tripping device. Also covers rotor accoustics at low thrust and at high thrust.

  15. The acoustic results of a United Techologies scale model helicopter rotor tested at DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Sandy R.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    An initial summary is presented of the acoustic measurements acquired for some of the different configurations of a 1/6 geometrically and aeroelastically scaled UTC model helicopter rotor which was tested in the open-jet anechoic test section of the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel in the Netherlands. Of particular interest are high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction. An analysis is provided of baseline swept tip rotor acoustic characteristics in the regimes of high-speed forward flight, where high-speed impulsive noise dominates, and low-speed descent, where severe blade vortex interaction noise occurs. Also discussed are more recent studies of data which involve the animation of the acoustic field upstream of the rotor to evaluate the detailed radiation patters caused by BVI and HSI noise sources. The trends of these primary noise sources are examined as the first step in validating the data for release and application.

  16. Kalman plus weights: a time scale algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    KPW is a time scale algorithm that combines Kalman filtering with the basic time scale equation (BTSE). A single Kalman filter that estimates all clocks simultaneously is used to generate the BTSE frequency estimates, while the BTSE weights are inversely proportional to the white FM variances of the clocks. Results from simulated clock ensembles are compared to previous simulation results from other algorithms.

  17. Multiple time scale methods in tokamak magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods are discussed for integrating the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in tokamak systems on other than the fastest time scale. The dynamical grid method for simulating ideal MHD instabilities utilizes a natural nonorthogonal time-dependent coordinate transformation based on the magnetic field lines. The coordinate transformation is chosen to be free of the fast time scale motion itself, and to yield a relatively simple scalar equation for the total pressure, P = p + B/sup 2//2..mu../sub 0/, which can be integrated implicitly to average over the fast time scale oscillations. Two methods are described for the resistive time scale. The zero-mass method uses a reduced set of two-fluid transport equations obtained by expanding in the inverse magnetic Reynolds number, and in the small ratio of perpendicular to parallel mobilities and thermal conductivities. The momentum equation becomes a constraint equation that forces the pressure and magnetic fields and currents to remain in force balance equilibrium as they evolve. The large mass method artificially scales up the ion mass and viscosity, thereby reducing the severe time scale disparity between wavelike and diffusionlike phenomena, but not changing the resistive time scale behavior. Other methods addressing the intermediate time scales are discussed.

  18. Time scale in quasifission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Paul, P.; Nestler, J.

    1995-08-01

    The quasifission process arises from the hindrance of the complete fusion process when heavy-ion beams are used. The strong dissipation in the system tends to prevent fusion and lead the system towards reseparation into two final products of similar mass reminiscent of a fission process. This dissipation slows down the mass transfer and shape transformation and allows for the emission of high energy {gamma}-rays during the process, albeit with a low probability. Giant Dipole {gamma} rays emitted during this time have a characteristic spectral shape and may thus be discerned in the presence of a background of {gamma} rays emitted from the final fission-like fragments. Since the rate of GDR {gamma} emission is very well established, the strength of this component may therefore be used to measure the timescale of the quasifission process. In this experiment we studied the reaction between 368-MeV {sup 58}Ni and a {sup 165}Ho target, where deep inelastic scattering and quasifission processes are dominant. Coincidences between fission fragments (detected in four position-sensitive avalanche detectors) and high energy {gamma} rays (measured in a 10{close_quotes} x 10{close_quotes} actively shielded NaI detector) were registered. Beams were provided by the Stony Brook Superconducting Linac. The {gamma}-ray spectrum associated with deep inelastic scattering events is well reproduced by statistical cooling of projectile and target-like fragments with close to equal initial excitation energy sharing. The y spectrum associated with quasifission events is well described by statistical emission from the fission fragments alone, with only weak evidence for GDR emission from the mono-nucleus. A 1{sigma} limit of t{sub ss} < 11 x 10{sup -21} s is obtained for the mono-nucleus lifetime, which is consistent with the lifetime obtained from quasifission fragment angular distributions. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  19. Acoustic Stimulation of Colloid Behavior at the Pore and Core Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    Acoustic waves can influence the attachment and/or detachment of colloids at solid/liquid interfaces. They can also induce colloid-colloid interactions leading to colloid trapping or clustering. Subsequent accumulation or release of colloids in a porous medium can alter its permeability. This can cause either good or bad effects on porous fluid-flow behavior in the Earth and geomaterials. Prior experiments using a microscopic, video image- processing system focused on a glass flow-visualization cell indicated that 0.5 to 5 MHz acoustic energy can induce attachment and detachment of sub-micron-size polystyrene microspheres at solid/liquid interfaces. New experiments were performed to investigate the effect of particle size, concentration (volume fraction), ionic strength, and acoustic energy on the deposition and removal kinetics of colloidal particles onto different solid surfaces. Additional experiments demonstrated that acoustically excited particles can attract other particles and cause them to orbit each other in directions that depend on the acoustic frequency. Other prior experiments on centimeter-size sandstone cores showed that 50 Hz mechanical stress oscillations can mobilize trapped in-situ colloids as well as injected 300-nm polystyrene microspheres. A unique core-holder apparatus that mechanically strains 2.54-cm-diameter porous rock samples during constant-rate fluid flow was used for those experiments. To investigate the effect of particle size on trapping and acoustic release of colloids, new experiments were performed by injecting 1-micron microspheres suspended in deionized water and 0.1M NaCl solution. The larger size microspheres were trapped at both high and low ionic strengths, unlike the smaller 300-nm microspheres which were only trapped at high ionic strength. Stress stimulation at less than 100 Hz caused enhanced release of the trapped microspheres at a rate much higher than the average background production rate during water flow alone

  20. The acoustic results of a United Technologies scale model helicopter rotor tested at DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Sandy R.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In a major cooperative program between U.S. Government agencies (represented by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers) and United Technologies Corp., a 1/6 geometrically and aeroelastically scaled UTC model helicopter rotor was tested in the open-jet anechoic test section of the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel in the Netherlands. As the fourth entry under the Aerodynamic and Acoustic Testing of Model Rotors Program, several comprehensive acoustic and aerodynamic databases were obtained relating the important aerodynamic phenomena to both the near- and far-field acoustic radiation. In particular, high speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction are of primary interest. This paper provides an initial summary of the acoustic measurements acquired for some of the different configurations tested. A review of the baseline swept tip rotor acoustic characteristics in the regimes of high speed forward flight, where high speed impulsive noise dominates, and low speed descent, where severe blade vortex interaction noise occurs, is presented. The trends of these primary noise sources are studied as the first step in validating the data for release and application.

  1. Reconstructed imaging of acoustic cloak using time-lapse reversal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Jian-yi; Li, Bo; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2014-08-01

    We proposed and investigated a solution to the inverse acoustic cloak problem, an anti-stealth technology to make cloaks visible, using the time-lapse reversal (TLR) method. The TLR method reconstructs the image of an unknown acoustic cloak by utilizing scattered acoustic waves. Compared to previous anti-stealth methods, the TLR method can determine not only the existence of a cloak but also its exact geometric information like definite shape, size, and position. Here, we present the process for TLR reconstruction based on time reversal invariance. This technology may have potential applications in detecting various types of cloaks with different geometric parameters.

  2. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 1; Overview, Results, and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    Scale model fan rigs that simulate new generation ultra-high-bypass engines at about 1/5-scale are achieving increased importance as development vehicles for the design of low-noise aircraft engines. Testing at small scale allows the tests to be performed in existing anechoic wind tunnels, which provides an accurate simulation of the important effects of aircraft forward motion on the noise generation. The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of the fullscale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. The primary objective of this study was to develop methods that will allow scale model fan rigs to be successfully used as acoustic treatment design tools. The study focuses on finding methods to extend the upper limit of the frequency range of impedance prediction models and acoustic impedance measurement methods for subscale treatment liner designs, and confirm the predictions by correlation with measured data. This phase of the program had as a goal doubling the upper limit of impedance measurement from 6 kHz to 12 kHz. The program utilizes combined analytical and experimental methods to achieve the objectives.

  3. The effect of time-variant acoustical properties on orchestral instrument timbres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajda, John Michael

    1999-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the timbre of orchestral instrument tones. Kendall (1986) showed that time-variant features are important to instrument categorization. But the relative salience of specific time-variant features to each other and to other acoustical parameters is not known. As part of a convergence strategy, a battery of experiments was conducted to assess the importance of global amplitude envelope, spectral frequencies, and spectral amplitudes. An omnibus identification experiment investigated the salience of global envelope partitions (attack, steady state, and decay). Valid partitioning models should identify important boundary conditions in the evolution of a signal; therefore, these models should be based on signal characteristics. With the use of such a model for sustained continuant tones, the steady-state segment was more salient than the attack. These findings contradicted previous research, which used questionable operational definitions for signal partitioning. For the next set of experiments, instrument tones were analyzed by phase vocoder, and stimuli were created by additive synthesis. Edits and combinations of edits controlled global amplitude envelope, spectral frequencies, and relative spectral amplitudes. Perceptual measurements were made with distance estimation, Verbal Attribute Magnitude Estimation, and similarity scaling. Results indicated that the primary acoustical attribute was the long-time-average spectral centroid. Spectral centroid is a measure of the center of energy distribution for spectral frequency components. Instruments with high values of spectral centroid (bowed strings) sound nasal while instruments with low spectral centroid (flute, clarinet) sound not nasal. The secondary acoustical attribute was spectral amplitude time variance. Predictably, time variance correlated highly with subject ratings of vibrato. The control of relative spectral amplitudes was more salient than the control of global

  4. Real-time observation of coherent acoustic phonons generated by an acoustically mismatched optoacoustic transducer using x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A. I. H.; Andreasson, B. P.; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2015-11-14

    The spectrum of laser-generated acoustic phonons in indium antimonide coated with a thin nickel film has been studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction. Strain pulses that can be considered to be built up from coherent phonons were generated in the nickel film by absorption of short laser pulses. Acoustic reflections at the Ni–InSb interface leads to interference that strongly modifies the resulting phonon spectrum. The study was performed with high momentum transfer resolution together with high time resolution. This was achieved by using a third-generation synchrotron radiation source that provided a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast x-ray streak camera to obtain a temporal resolution of 10 ps. We also carried out simulations, using commercial finite element software packages and on-line dynamic diffraction tools. Using these tools, it is possible to calculate the time-resolved x-ray reflectivity from these complicated strain shapes. The acoustic pulses have a peak strain amplitude close to 1%, and we investigated the possibility to use this device as an x-ray switch. At a bright source optimized for hard x-ray generation, the low reflectivity may be an acceptable trade-off to obtain a pulse duration that is more than an order of magnitude shorter.

  5. Time evolution of ion-acoustic double layers in an unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bharuthram, R.; Momoniat, E.; Mahomed, F.; Singh, S. V.; Islam, M. K.

    2008-08-15

    Ion-acoustic double layers are examined in an unmagnetized, three-component plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature electrons. Both of the electrons are considered to be Boltzmann distributed and the ions follow the usual fluid dynamical equations. Using the method of characteristics, a time-dependent solution for ion-acoustic double layers is obtained. Results of the findings may have important consequences for the real time satellite observations in the space environment.

  6. Time-dependent corona models - Scaling laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korevaar, P.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1989-01-01

    Scaling laws are derived for the one-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations that describe the evolution of a spherically symmetric stellar atmosphere. With these scaling laws the results of the time-dependent calculations by Korevaar (1989) obtained for one star are applicable over the whole Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and even to elliptic galaxies. The scaling is exact for stars with the same M/R-ratio and a good approximation for stars with a different M/R-ratio. The global relaxation oscillation found by Korevaar (1989) is scaled to main sequence stars, a solar coronal hole, cool giants and elliptic galaxies.

  7. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P Oshkai; M Geveci; D Rockwell; M Pollack

    2004-05-24

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe, which give rise to flow tones, are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  8. Influence of the outer scales of temperature and dynamic turbulence on the characteristics of transmitted acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Belov, V. V.; Burkatovskaya, Yu. B.; Krasnenko, N. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, the problem of propagation of monochromatic acoustic radiation in the lower 500-meter layer of the plain stratified moving turbulent atmosphere is solved by the Monte Carlo method. The influence of the parameters of models of the outer scales of temperature and dynamic turbulence on the intensity of transmitted acoustic radiation intensity is investigated.

  9. Feature extraction from time domain acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Christine; Goldman, Geoffrey H.

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Army is interested in developing algorithms to classify weapons systems fire based on their acoustic signatures. To support this effort, an algorithm was developed to extract features from acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire and applied to over 1300 signatures. The algorithm filtered the data using standard techniques then estimated the amplitude and time of the first five peaks and troughs and the location of the zero crossing in the waveform. The results were stored in Excel spreadsheets. The results are being used to develop and test acoustic classifier algorithms.

  10. Assessment at full scale of exhaust nozzle to wing size on STOL-OTW acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U.; Grosbeck, D.

    1979-01-01

    On the basis of static aero/acoustic data obtained at model scale, the effect of exhaust nozzle size on flyover noise is evaluated at full scale for different STOL-OTW nozzle configurations. Three types of nozzles are evaluated: a circular/deflector nozzle mounted above the wing; a slot/deflector nozzle mounted on the wing; and a slot nozzle mounted on the wing. The nozzle exhaust plane location, measured from the wing leading edge, was varied from 10 to 46 percent of the wing chord (flaps retracted). Flap angles of 20 deg (takeoff) and 60 deg (approach) are included in the study. Initially, perceived noise levels (PNL) are calculated as a function flyover distance at 152m altitude. From these plots, static EPNL values (defined as flyover relative noise levels), are obtained as functions of nozzle size for equal aerodynamic performance (lift and thrust). The acoustic benefits attributable to nozzle size relative to a given wing chord size are assessed.

  11. Time Scales in Turbulence and Sediment Concentration Over Mobile Sand Dunes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between turbulent fluid motions and sediment particles over mobile sand dunes may be better understood by examining the time scales over which the quantities fluctuate. In laboratory experiments performed at the USDA-ARS-National Sedimentation Laboratory, profiles of acoustic backs...

  12. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  13. Acoustics Reflections of Full-Scale Rotor Noise Measurements in NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbely, Natasha Lydia; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Sim, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of current research is to identify the extent of acoustic time history distortions due to wind tunnel wall reflections. Acoustic measurements from the recent full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor test (Fig. 2) will be used to illustrate the quality of noise measurement in the NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test section. Results will be compared to PSU-WOPWOP predictions obtained with and without adjustments due to sound reflections off wind tunnel walls. Present research assumes a rectangular enclosure as shown in Fig. 3a. The Method of Mirror Images7 is used to account for reflection sources and their acoustic paths by introducing mirror images of the rotor (i.e. acoustic source), at each and every wall surface, to enforce a no-flow boundary condition at the position of the physical walls (Fig. 3b). While conventional approach evaluates the "combined" noise from both the source and image rotor at a single microphone position, an alternative approach is used to simplify implementation of PSU-WOPWOP for this reflection analysis. Here, an "equivalent" microphone position is defined with respect to the source rotor for each mirror image that effectively renders the reflection analysis to be a one rotor, multiple microphones problem. This alternative approach has the advantage of allowing each individual "equivalent" microphone, representing the reflection pulse from the associated wall surface, to be adjusted by the panel absorption coefficient illustrated in Fig. 1a. Note that the presence of parallel wall surfaces requires an infinite number of mirror images (Fig. 3c) to satisfy the no-flow boundary conditions. In the present analysis, up to four mirror images (per wall surface) are accounted to achieve convergence in the predicted time histories

  14. Auralization of concert hall acoustics using finite difference time domain methods and wave field synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochgraf, Kelsey

    Auralization methods have been used for a long time to simulate the acoustics of a concert hall for different seat positions. The goal of this thesis was to apply the concept of auralization to a larger audience area that the listener could walk through to compare differences in acoustics for a wide range of seat positions. For this purpose, the acoustics of Rensselaer's Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) Concert Hall were simulated to create signals for a 136 channel wave field synthesis (WFS) system located at Rensselaer's Collaborative Research Augmented Immersive Virtual Environment (CRAIVE) Laboratory. By allowing multiple people to dynamically experience the concert hall's acoustics at the same time, this research gained perspective on what is important for achieving objective accuracy and subjective plausibility in an auralization. A finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation on a three-dimensional face-centered cubic grid, combined at a crossover frequency of 800 Hz with a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation, was found to have a reverberation time, direct to reverberant sound energy ratio, and early reflection pattern that more closely matched measured data from the hall compared to a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation and other hybrid simulations. In the CRAIVE lab, nine experienced listeners found all hybrid auralizations (with varying source location, grid resolution, crossover frequency, and number of loudspeakers) to be more perceptually plausible than the CATT-Acoustic(TM) auralization. The FDTD simulation required two days to compute, while the CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation required three separate TUCT(TM) computations, each taking four hours, to accommodate the large number of receivers. Given the perceptual advantages realized with WFS for auralization of a large, inhomogeneous sound field, it is recommended that hybrid simulations be used in the future to achieve more accurate and plausible auralizations. Predictions are made for a

  15. Finite-difference, time-domain analysis of a folded acoustic transmission line.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charles M

    2005-03-01

    Recently designed, modern versions of renais sance woodwind instruments such as the recorder and serpent use square cross sections and a folded acoustic transmission line. Conventional microwave techniques would expect that this bend would cause unwanted reflections and impedance discontinuities. This paper analyses the folded acoustic transmission line using finite-difference, time-domain techniques and shows that the discontinuity can be compensated with by the use of a manufacturable method. PMID:15857045

  16. Nonlinear response - A time domain approach. [with applications to acoustic fatigue, spacecraft and composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper reviews the basic concepts of nonlinear response of panels to surface flow and acoustic pressures, simulation of random processes, time domain solutions and the Monte Carlo Method. Applications of this procedure to the orbit-on-demand space vehicles, acoustic fatigue and composite materials are discussed. Numerical examples are included for a variety of nonlinear problems to illustrate the applicability of this method.

  17. Acoustic and Aero-Mixing Experimental Results for Fluid Shield Scale Model Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Mengle, V. G.; Shin, H. W.; Majjigi, R. K.

    2005-01-01

    The principle objectives of this investigation are to evaluate the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of fluid shield nozzle concept and to assess Far 36, Stage 3 potential for fluid shield nozzle with Flade Cycle. Acoustic data for nine scale model nozzle configurations are obtained. The effects of simulated flight and geometric and aerothermodynamic flow variables on the acoustic behavior of the fluid shield are determined. The acoustic tests are aimed at studying the effect of: (1) shield thickness, (2) wrap angle, (3) mass flow and velocity ratios between shield and core streams at constant cycle specific thrust (i.e., mixed velocity), (4) porous plug, and (5) subsonic shield. Shadowgraphs of six nozzle configurations are obtained to understand the plume flowfield features. Static pressure data on suppressor chutes in the core stream (shielded and unshielded) sides and on plug surface are acquired to determine the impact of fluid shield on base drag of the 36-chute suppressor nozzle and the thrust augmentation due to the plug, respectively.

  18. Detection of nonlinear picosecond acoustic pulses by time-resolved Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2014-08-14

    In time-resolved Brillouin scattering (also called picosecond ultrasonic interferometry), the time evolution of the spatial Fourier component of an optically excited acoustic strain distribution is monitored. The wave number is determined by the momentum conservation in photon-phonon interaction. For linear acoustic waves propagating in a homogeneous medium, the detected time-domain signal of the optical probe transient reflectivity shows a sinusoidal oscillation at a constant frequency known as the Brillouin frequency. This oscillation is a result of heterodyning the constant reflection from the sample surface with the Brillouin-scattered field. Here, we present an analytical theory for the nonlinear reshaping of a propagating, finite amplitude picosecond acoustic pulse, which results in a time-dependence of the observed frequency. In particular, we examine the conditions under which this information can be used to study the time-evolution of the weak-shock front speed. Depending on the initial strain pulse parameters and the time interval of its nonlinear transformation, our theory predicts the detected frequency to either be monotonically decreasing or oscillating in time. We support these theoretical predictions by comparison with available experimental data. In general, we find that picosecond ultrasonic interferometry of nonlinear acoustic pulses provides access to the nonlinear acoustic properties of a medium spanning most of the GHz frequency range.

  19. Observing Reality on Different Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyushin, Alexey

    2005-10-01

    In the first part of the paper, I examine cases of acceleration of perception and cognition and provide my explanation of the mechanism of the effect. The explanation rests on the conception of neuronal temporal frames, or windows of simultaneity. Frames have different standard durations and yield to stretching and compressing. I suggest it to be the cause of the effect, as well as the ground for differences in perceptive time scales of living beings. In the second part, I apply the conception of temporal frames to model observation in the extended time scales that reach far beyond the temporal perceptive niche of individual living beings. Duration of a frame is taken as the basic parameter setting a particular time scale. By substituting a different frame duration, we set a hypothetical time scale and emulate observing reality in a wider or a narrower angle of embracing events in time. I discuss the status of observer in its relation to objective reality, and examine how reality does change its appearance when observed in different time scales.

  20. Testing and verification of a scale-model acoustic propagation system.

    PubMed

    Sagers, Jason D; Ballard, Megan S

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a measurement apparatus used to conduct scale-model underwater acoustic propagation experiments, presents experimental results for an idealized waveguide, and compares the measured results to data generated by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of the apparatus for a simple waveguide that primarily exhibits 2D acoustic propagation. The apparatus contains a computer-controlled positioning system that accurately moves a receiving transducer in the water layer above a scale-model bathymetry while a stationary source transducer emits broadband pulsed waveforms. Experimental results are shown for a 2.133 m × 1.219 m bathymetric part possessing a flat-bottom bathymetry with a translationally invariant wedge of 10° slope along one edge. Beamformed results from a synthetic horizontal line array indicate the presence of strong in-plane arrivals along with weaker diffracted and horizontally refracted arrivals. A simulated annealing inversion method is applied to infer values for five waveguide parameters with the largest measurement uncertainty. The inferred values are then used in a 2D method of images model and a 3D adiabatic normal-mode model to simulate the measured acoustic data. PMID:26723314

  1. Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on Rene'n5+y: Moisture Effects and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2001-01-01

    The single crystal superalloy Rene'N5 (with or without Y-doping and hydrogen annealing) was cyclically oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 hours. After considerable scale growth (>= 500 hours), even the adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped samples exhibited delayed interfacial spallation during subsequent water immersion tests, performed up to one year after oxidation. Spallation was characterized by weight loss, the amount of spalled area, and acoustic emission response. Hydrogen annealing (prior to oxidation) reduced spallation both before and after immersion, but without measurably reducing the bulk sulfur content of the Y-doped alloys. The duration and frequency of sequential, co-located acoustic emission events implied an interfacial crack growth rate at least 10(exp -3) m/s, but possibly higher than 10(exp 2) m/s. This is much greater than classic moisture-assisted slow crack growth rates in bulk alumina (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) m/s), which may still have occurred undetected by acoustic emission. An alternative failure sequence is proposed: an incubation process for preferential moisture ingress leads to a local decrease in interfacial toughness, thus allowing fast fracture driven by stored strain energy.

  2. Time scales involved in emergent market coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapień, J.; Drożdż, S.; Speth, J.

    2004-06-01

    In addressing the question of the time scales characteristic for the market formation, we analyze high-frequency tick-by-tick data from the NYSE and from the German market. By using returns on various time scales ranging from seconds or minutes up to 2 days, we compare magnitude of the largest eigenvalue of the correlation matrix for the same set of securities but for different time scales. For various sets of stocks of different capitalization (and the average trading frequency), we observe a significant elevation of the largest eigenvalue with increasing time scale. Our results from the correlation matrix study can be considered as a manifestation of the so-called Epps effect. There is no unique explanation of this effect and it seems that many different factors play a role here. One of such factors is randomness in transaction moments for different stocks. Another interesting conclusion to be drawn from our results is that in the contemporary markets the emergence of significant correlations occurs on time scales much smaller than in the more distant history.

  3. An eighth-scale speech source for subjective assessments in acoustic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, R. J.

    1981-08-01

    The design of a source is described which is suitable for making speech recordings in eighth-scale acoustic models of auditoria. An attempt was made to match the directionality of the source with the directionality of the human voice using data reported in the literature. A narrow aperture was required for the design which was provided by mounting an inverted conical horn over the diaphragm of a high frequency loudspeaker. Resonance problems were encountered with the use of a horn and a description is given of the electronic techniques adopted to minimize the effect of these resonances. Subjective and objective assessments on the completed speech source have proved satisfactory. It has been used in a modelling exercise concerned with the acoustic design of a theatre with a thrust-type stage.

  4. Multi-scale morphology analysis of acoustic emission signal and quantitative diagnosis for bearing fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Cui, Ling-Li; Chen, Dao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of potential bearing faults in operation is of critical importance to safe operation of high speed trains. One of the major challenges is how to differentiate relevant signals to operational conditions of bearings from noises emitted from the surrounding environment. In this work, we report a procedure for analyzing acoustic emission signals collected from rolling bearings for diagnosis of bearing health conditions by examining their morphological pattern spectrum (MPS) through a multi-scale morphology analysis procedure. The results show that acoustic emission signals resulted from a given type of bearing faults share rather similar MPS curves. Further examinations in terms of sample entropy and Lempel-Ziv complexity of MPS curves suggest that these two parameters can be utilized to determine damage modes.

  5. Enhancement of time-domain acoustic imaging based on generalized cross-correlation and spatial weighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaegebeur, Nicolas; Padois, Thomas; Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Masson, Patrice

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an alternative formulation of the time-domain beamforming is proposed using the generalized cross-correlation of measured signals. This formulation uses spatial weighting functions adapted to microphone positions and imaging points. The proposed approach is demonstrated for acoustic source localization using a microphone array, both theoretically and experimentally. An increase in accuracy of acoustic imaging results is shown for both narrow and broadband sources, while a factor of reduction up to 20 in the computation time can be achieved, allowing real-time or volumetric source localization over very large grids.

  6. The Laplace transform on time scales revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, John M.; Gravagne, Ian A.; Jackson, Billy J.; Marks, Robert J., II; Ramos, Alice A.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we reexamine the time scale Laplace transform as defined by Bohner and Peterson [M. Bohner, A. Peterson, Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications, Birkhauser, Boston, 2001; M. Bohner, A. Peterson, Laplace transform and Z-transform: Unification and extension, Methods Appl. Anal. 9 (1) (2002) 155-162]. In particular, we give conditions on the class of functions which have a transform, develop an inversion formula for the transform, and further, we provide a convolution for the transform. The notion of convolution leads to considering its algebraic structure--in particular the existence of an identity element--motivating the development of the Dirac delta functional on time scales. Applications and examples of these concepts are given.

  7. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound. PMID:27587311

  8. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound. PMID:27587311

  9. Global scale precipitation from monthly to centennial scales: empirical space-time scaling analysis, anthropogenic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, Isabel; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of precipitation scaling regimes represents a key contribution to the improved understanding of space-time precipitation variability, which is the focus here. We conduct space-time scaling analyses of spectra and Haar fluctuations in precipitation, using three global scale precipitation products (one instrument based, one reanalysis based, one satellite and gauge based), from monthly to centennial scales and planetary down to several hundred kilometers in spatial scale. Results show the presence - similarly to other atmospheric fields - of an intermediate "macroweather" regime between the familiar weather and climate regimes: we characterize systematically the macroweather precipitation temporal and spatial, and joint space-time statistics and variability, and the outer scale limit of temporal scaling. These regimes qualitatively and quantitatively alternate in the way fluctuations vary with scale. In the macroweather regime, the fluctuations diminish with time scale (this is important for seasonal, annual, and decadal forecasts) while anthropogenic effects increase with time scale. Our approach determines the time scale at which the anthropogenic signal can be detected above the natural variability noise: the critical scale is about 20 - 40 yrs (depending on the product, on the spatial scale). This explains for example why studies that use data covering only a few decades do not easily give evidence of anthropogenic changes in precipitation, as a consequence of warming: the period is too short. Overall, while showing that precipitation can be modeled with space-time scaling processes, our results clarify the different precipitation scaling regimes and further allow us to quantify the agreement (and lack of agreement) of the precipitation products as a function of space and time scales. Moreover, this work contributes to clarify a basic problem in hydro-climatology, which is to measure precipitation trends at decadal and longer scales and to

  10. Changes in Wisconsin English over 110 Years: A Real-Time Acoustic Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delahanty, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The growing set of studies on American regional dialects have to date focused heavily on vowels while few examine consonant features and none provide acoustic analysis of both vowel and consonant features. This dissertation uses real-time data on both vowels and consonants to show how Wisconsin English has changed over time. Together, the…

  11. Analysis of the time scales in time periodic Darcy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Waluga, C.; Wohlmuth, B.; Manhart, M.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate unsteady flow in a porous medium under time - periodic (sinusoidal) pressure gradient. DNS were performed to benchmark the analytical solution of the unsteady Darcy equation with two different expressions of the time scale : one given by a consistent volume averaging of the Navier - Stokes equation [1] with a steady state closure for the flow resistance term, another given by volume averaging of the kinetic energy equation [2] with a closure for the dissipation rate . For small and medium frequencies, the analytical solutions with the time scale obtained by the energy approach compare well with the DNS results in terms of amplitude and phase lag. For large frequencies (f > 100 [Hz]) we observe a slightly smaller damping of the amplitude. This study supports the use of the unsteady form of Darcy's equation with constant coefficients to solve time - periodic Darcy flows at low and medium frequencies. Our DNS simulations, however, indicate that the time scale predicted by the VANS approach together with a steady - state closure for the flow resistance term is too small. The one obtained by the energy approach matches the DNS results well. At large frequencies, the amplitudes deviate slightly from the analytical solution of the unsteady Darcy equation. Note that at those high frequencies, the flow amplitudes remain below 1% of those of steady state flow. This result indicates that unsteady porous media flow can approximately be described by the unsteady Darcy equation with constant coefficients for a large range of frequencies, provided, the proper time scale has been found.

  12. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J. R.; Krenner, Hubert J.; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length). PMID:25294979

  13. Structure of Student Time Management Scale (STMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balamurugan, M.

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of constructing a Student Time Management Scale (STMS), the initial version was administered and data were collected from 523 standard eleventh students. (Mean age = 15.64). The data obtained were subjected to Reliability and Factor analysis using PASW Statistical software version 18. From 42 items 14 were dropped, resulting in the…

  14. Acoustic measurements of a full-scale coaxial hingeless rotor helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. L.; Mosher, M.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic data were obtained during a full-scale test of the XH-59A Advancing Blade Concept Technology Demonstrator in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The XH-59A is a research helicopter with two coaxial rotors and hingeless blades. Performance, vibration, and noise at various forward speeds, rotor lift coefficients and rotor shaft angles of attack were investigated. The noise data were acquired over an isolated rotor lift coefficient range of 0.024 to 0.162, an advance ratio range of 0.23 to 0.45 corresponding to tunnel wind speeds of 89 to 160 knots, and angles of attack from 0 deg to 10 deg. Acoustic data are presented for seven microphone locations for all run conditions where the model noise is above the background noise. Model test configuration and performance information are also listed. Acoustic waveforms, dBA, and 1/3-octave spectra as functions of operating condition for selected data points and microphones are presented. In general, the noise level is shown to increase with rotor lift coefficient except under certain operating conditions where significant impulsive blade/vortex interactions increase noise levels.

  15. Comparison of the acoustic characteristics of large-scale models of several propulsive-lift concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.; Koenig, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    Wind-tunnel acoustic investigations were performed to determine the acoustic characteristics and the effect of forward speed on the over-the-wing externally blown jet flap (OTW), the under-the-wing externally blown jet flap (UTW), the internally blown jet flap (IBF), and the augmentor wing (AW). The data presented represent the basic noise generated by the powered-lift system without acoustic treatment, assuming all other noise sources, such as the turbofan compressor noise, have been suppressed. Under these conditions, when scaled to a 100,000-lb aircraft, the OTW concept exhibited the lowest perceived noise levels, because of dominant low-frequency noise and wing shielding of the high-frequency noise. The AW was the loudest configuration, because of dominant high-frequency noise created by the high jet velocities and small nozzle dimensions. All four configurations emitted noise 10 to 15 PNdB higher than the noise goal of 95 PNdB at 500 ft.

  16. Isocurvature modes and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations II: gains from combining CMB and Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Mangilli, Anna; Verde, Licia E-mail: anna.mangilli@icc.ub.edu

    2011-09-01

    We consider cosmological parameters estimation in the presence of a non-zero isocurvature contribution in the primordial perturbations. A previous analysis showed that even a tiny amount of isocurvature perturbation, if not accounted for, could affect standard rulers calibration from Cosmic Microwave Background observations such as those provided by the Planck mission, affect Baryon Acoustic Oscillations interpretation, and introduce biases in the recovered dark energy properties that are larger than forecasted statistical errors from future surveys. Extending on this work, here we adopt a general fiducial cosmology which includes a varying dark energy equation of state parameter and curvature. Beside Baryon Acoustic Oscillations measurements, we include the information from the shape of the galaxy power spectrum and consider a joint analysis of a Planck-like Cosmic Microwave Background probe and a future, space-based, Large Scale Structure probe not too dissimilar from recently proposed surveys. We find that this allows one to break the degeneracies that affect the Cosmic Microwave Background and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations combination. As a result, most of the cosmological parameter systematic biases arising from an incorrect assumption on the isocurvature fraction parameter f{sub iso}, become negligible with respect to the statistical errors. We find that the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure combination gives a statistical error σ(f{sub iso}) ∼ 0.008, even when curvature and a varying dark energy equation of state are included, which is smaller that the error obtained from Cosmic Microwave Background alone when flatness and cosmological constant are assumed. These results confirm the synergy and complementarity between Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure, and the great potential of future and planned galaxy surveys.

  17. Mechanical properties of single cells by high-frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Eike C; Anastasiadis, Pavlos; Pilarczyk, Götz; Lemor, Robert M; Zinin, Pavel V

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a new, high-frequency, time-resolved scanning acoustic microscope developed for studying dynamical processes in biological cells. The new acoustic microscope operates in a time-resolved mode. The center frequency is 0.86 GHz, and the pulse duration is 5 ns. With such a short pulse, layers thicker than 3 microm can be resolved. For a cell thicker than 3 microm, the front echo and the echo from the substrate can be distinguished in the signal. Positions of the first and second pulses are used to determine the local impedance of the cell modeled as a thin liquid layer that has spatial variations in its elastic properties. The low signal-to-noise ratio in the acoustical images is increased for image generation by averaging the detected radio frequency signal over 10 measurements at each scanning point. In conducting quantitative measurements of the acoustic parameters of cells, the signal can be averaged over 2000 measurements. This approach enables us to measure acoustical properties of a single HeLa cell in vivo and to derive elastic parameters of subcellular structures. The value of the sound velocity inside the cell (1534.5 +/- 33.6 m/s) appears to be only slightly higher than that of the cell medium (1501 m/s). PMID:18051160

  18. The penetration of acoustic cavitation bubbles into micrometer-scale cavities.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Haresh Anant; Ertunç, Özgür; Lichtenegger, Thomas; Delgado, Antonio; Skupin, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The penetration of acoustically induced cavitation bubbles in micrometer-scale cavities is investigated experimentally by means of high-speed photography and acoustic measurements. Micrometer-scale cavities of different dimensions (width=40 μm, 80 μm, 10 mm and depth=50 μm) are designed to replicate the cross section of microvias in a PCB. The aim here is to present a method for enhancing mass transfer due to the penetration of bubbles in such narrow geometries under the action of ultrasound. The micrometer-scale cavities are placed in a test-cell filled with water and subjected to an ultrasound excitation at 75 kHz. A cavitation bubble cluster is generated at the mouth of the cavity which acts as a continuous source of bubbles that penetrate into the cavity. The radial oscillation characteristics and translation of these bubbles are investigated in detail here. It is observed that the bubbles arrange themselves into streamer-like structures inside the cavity. Parameters such as bubble population and size distribution and their correlation with the phase of the incident ultrasound radiation are investigated in detail here. This provides a valuable insight into the dynamics of bubbles in narrow confined spaces. Mass transfer investigations show that fresh liquid can be continuously introduced in the cavities under the action of ultrasound. Our findings may have important consequences in optimizing the filling processes for microvias with high aspect ratios. PMID:26763751

  19. Development of large-scale acoustic waveguides for liquid-level measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J.F.; Kuzniak, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Large-scale magnetostrictive ultrasonic waveguides are being developed and tested for liquid-level measurement. The use of inexpensive, commercially available, nickel tubing provides a homogeneous waveguide with nondispersive transmission properties and good independence of torsional and extensional wave modes. Because the entire waveguide is magnetostrictive, acoustic excitation and sensing is possible at any point along the length of the waveguide. The problems of establishing and maintaining circumferential fields for torsional wave generation have been solved by electromagnetic field generation. Prototype devices have been built and tested which exhibit a linear relationship between either torsional amplitude or phase velocity and depth of immersion.

  20. A case-study comparison of computer modeling and scale modeling in acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamia, Paul T.

    2002-05-01

    As an alternate or compliment to computer models, acoustics consultants often make use of scale models to evaluate the efficacy of architectural designs. The intention of this paper is to compare the two modeling approaches, using one or more case studies, to explore the pros and cons of each. Topics of comparison will include cost, geometric representations, effective bandwidths, propagation phenomena (e.g., diffraction), simulation of material properties, and auralization. Where possible, measured data from existing spaces will be presented to provide a reference for the modeled data.

  1. Tempo and scale of biogenic effects on high-frequency acoustic propagation near the marine sediment-water interface in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumars, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Organisms have natural scales, such as lifetimes, body sizes, frequencies of movement to new locations, and residence times of material in digestive systems, and each scale has potential implications for acoustic effects. The effects of groups of organisms, like organisms themselves, aggregate in space and time. This review, including an assortment of unpublished information, examines examples of such aggregations, many of them documented acoustically. Light synchronizes many activities. Macroscopic animals forage primarily under cover of darkness. This phasing applies both to animals that extend appendages above the sediment-water interface and to animals that leave the seabed at night. Whereas their bottom-modifying activities are concentrated in nocturnal or crepuscular fashion, the bottom-modifying activities of the visual feeders follow a different phasing and often dominate the rate of change in acoustic backscatter from the interface. Light also acts through its effects on primary production, often concentrated in a very thin surficial layer atop the seabed. The supersaturation of oxygen does, and microbubble nucleation may, result. Where tidal velocities are large, light-set patterns are often tidally modulated. Activities of animals living below the seabed, however, remain a mystery, whose primary hope for solution is acoustic. [Work supported by ONR and DEPSCoR.

  2. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  3. Time dependent inflow-outflow boundary conditions for 2D acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Myers, Michael K.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the number and form of the required inflow-outflow boundary conditions for the full two-dimensional time-dependent nonlinear acoustic system in subsonic mean flow is performed. The explicit predictor-corrector method of MacCormack (1969) is used. The methodology is tested on both uniform and sheared mean flows with plane and nonplanar sources. Results show that the acoustic system requires three physical boundary conditions on the inflow and one on the outflow boundary. The most natural choice for the inflow boundary conditions is judged to be a specification of the vorticity, the normal acoustic impedance, and a pressure gradient-density gradient relationship normal to the boundary. Specification of the acoustic pressure at the outflow boundary along with these inflow boundary conditions is found to give consistent reliable results. A set of boundary conditions developed earlier, which were intended to be nonreflecting is tested using the current method and is shown to yield unstable results for nonplanar acoustic waves.

  4. Soil Hydrology Across Space And Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, B.; Gaur, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture and hydrologic fluxes at the land surface are critical to climate feedback, hydrology, and biogeochemical cycling. Soil moisture temporal and spatial variability over catchment areas affects surface and subsurface runoff, modulates evaporation and transpiration, determines the extent of groundwater recharge and contaminant transport, and initiates or sustains feedback between the land surface and the atmosphere. At a particular point in time soil moisture content is influenced by: (1) the precipitation history, (2) the texture of the soil, which determines the water-holding capacity, (3) the slope of the land surface, which affects runoff and infiltration, and (4) the vegetation and land cover, which influences evapotranspiration and deep percolation. In other terms the partitioning of soil moisture to recharge to the groundwater, evapotranspiration to the atmosphere, and surface/subsurface runoff to the streams at different spatio-temporal scales and under different hydro-climatic conditions pose one of the greatest challenges to weather and climate prediction, water resources availability, sustainability, quality, and variability in agricultural, range and forested watersheds and hydro-climatic conditions. In this context we hypothesize that: 1) soil moisture variability is dominated by soil properties at the field scale, topographic features at the catchment/watershed scale, and vegetation characteristics and precipitation patterns at the regional scale and beyond; and 2) ensemble hydrologic fluxes (evapotranspiration, infiltration, and shallow ground water recharge) across the vadose zone at the corresponding scale can be effectively represented by one or more soil, topography, vegetation, or climate scale factors. Using ground-based and various active and passive microwave remote sensing measurements during the NASA field campaigns in the past decade we test these hypotheses. Various scaling techniques for soil moisture and soil hydrologic and

  5. Apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of Rayleigh-Benard convection.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Kerry; Polfer, Jonathan; Furno, Joanna; Finke, Nathan

    2007-11-01

    We have designed and built an apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of convective flow patterns in optically opaque fluids. This apparatus takes advantage of recent advances in two-dimensional ultrasound transducer array technology; it employs a modified version of a commercially available ultrasound camera, similar to those employed in nondestructive testing of solids. Images of convection patterns are generated by observing the lateral variation of the temperature dependent speed of sound via refraction of acoustic plane waves passing vertically through the fluid layer. The apparatus has been validated by observing convection rolls in both silicone oil and ferrofluid. PMID:18052477

  6. Acoustic sensor for real-time control for the inductive heating process

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, John Bruce; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-09-30

    Disclosed is a system and method for providing closed-loop control of the heating of a workpiece by an induction heating machine, including generating an acoustic wave in the workpiece with a pulsed laser; optically measuring displacements of the surface of the workpiece in response to the acoustic wave; calculating a sub-surface material property by analyzing the measured surface displacements; creating an error signal by comparing an attribute of the calculated sub-surface material properties with a desired attribute; and reducing the error signal below an acceptable limit by adjusting, in real-time, as often as necessary, the operation of the inductive heating machine.

  7. HIGH-PRECISION PREDICTIONS FOR THE ACOUSTIC SCALE IN THE NONLINEAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Hee-Jong; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Mehta, Kushal; Metchnik, Marc; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Pinto, Phillip; Takahashi, Ryuichi; White, Martin; Xu, Xiaoying

    2010-09-10

    We measure shifts of the acoustic scale due to nonlinear growth and redshift distortions to a high precision using a very large volume of high-force-resolution simulations. We compare results from various sets of simulations that differ in their force, volume, and mass resolution. We find a consistency within 1.5-sigma for shift values from different simulations and derive shift alpha(z) -1 = (0.300\\pm 0.015)% [D(z)/D(0)]^{2} using our fiducial set. We find a strong correlation with a non-unity slope between shifts in real space and in redshift space and a weak correlation between the initial redshift and low redshift. Density-field reconstruction not only removes the mean shifts and reduces errors on the mean, but also tightens the correlations: after reconstruction, we recover a slope of near unity for the correlation between the real and redshift space and restore a strong correlation between the low and the initial redshifts. We derive propagators and mode-coupling terms from our N-body simulations and compared with Zeldovich approximation and the shifts measured from the chi^2 fitting, respectively. We interpret the propagator and the mode-coupling term of a nonlinear density field in the context of an average and a dispersion of its complex Fourier coefficients relative to those of the linear density field; from these two terms, we derive a signal-to-noise ratio of the acoustic peak measurement. We attempt to improve our reconstruction method by implementing 2LPT and iterative operations: we obtain little improvement. The Fisher matrix estimates of uncertainty in the acoustic scale is tested using 5000 (Gpc/h)^3 of cosmological PM simulations from Takahashi et al. (2009). (abridged)

  8. Linking acoustic emission signatures with grain-scale mechanical interactions during granular shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, G.; Cohen, D.; Or, D.

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic Emissions (AE) are high frequency (kHz range) elastic body waves, generated in deforming granular material during particle collisions, frictional slip, or other types of abrupt grain-scale mechanical interactions. The direct link with particle micro-mechanics makes AE a useful tool for gaining insights into mechanical aspects of progressive shear failure in granular material and slow granular flows. The formation of shear plane in granular matter involves numerous internal restructuring and failure events with distinct dynamics resembling features of critical phase transition. Following establishment of a shear plane, subsequent deformation involves episodic slip events interrupted by arrested flow (stick-slip behavior). We developed a model for interpreting measured AE signatures in terms of micro-failures during progressive granular shear a considering AE generation mechanisms and propagation of acoustic signals within granular material. Results from shear frame experiments include information on strains, stresses and acoustic emissions during deformation controlled tests on glass beads and sand. The number of failure associated AE event rates peaks with maximum shear resistance of the granular material. Intermittent slip events during stick-slip deformation are found to be closely related to low frequency AE events (~1kHz). Statistics of AE events and their temporal development are reproduced using a simple fiber-bundle model. A conceptual AE generation and propagation model accounts for conversion of mechanical events into elastic waves. In addition to gaining insights concerning grain-scale mechanical interactions, the AE method offers a useful tool for monitoring hazardous geologic mass movements, such as landslides, rock avalanches or debris flows.

  9. Short time-scale variability of chromospheric Ca II in late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baliunas, S. L.; Vaughan, A. H.; Hartmann, L.; Liller, W.; Dupree, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The short time-scale variability of singly ionized calcium chromospheric emission has been investigated in a few late-type stars. Emission-line variations with time scales of a few minutes to hours are seen in Alpha Tau (K5 III), Lambda And (G8 III-IV), and Epsilon Eri (K2 V). The existence of substantial chromospheric flux changes (10 to the 30th to 10 to the 32nd ergs) over short periods of time suggests that the calcium emission arises from a few small, coherent regions. Frequencies present in the data are discussed in the context of acoustic wave predictions and estimated acoustic cutoff frequencies for giants and dwarfs.

  10. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  11. Brain Blood Flow Related to Acoustic Laryngeal Reaction Time in Adult Developmental Stutterers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ben C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study sought to identify patterns of impaired acoustic laryngeal reaction time as a function of response complexity parallel to metabolic measures of brain function. Findings indicated that the disruption in speech motor control for 16 adult male developmental stutterers was systematically related to metabolic asymmetry in left superior and…

  12. Reaction time to changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. P.; Warm, J. S.; Westendorf, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of human observers to detect accelerations and decelerations in the rate of presentation of pulsed stimuli, i.e., changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains. Response times to accelerations in tempo were faster than to decelerations. Overall speed of response was inversely related to the pulse repetition rate.

  13. Effect of Foreshortening on Center-to-Limb Variations of Measured Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junwei; Stejko, Andrey; Chen, Ruizhu

    2016-03-01

    We use data observed near the solar disk center by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) to mimic observations at high-latitude areas after applying geometric transform and projection. These data are then used to study how foreshortening affects the time-distance measurements of acoustic travel times. We find that foreshortening reduces the measured mean travel-times through altering the acoustic-power weighting in different harmonic degrees, but the level of reduction and the latitude dependence are not as strong as those measured from the observation data at the same latitude. Foreshortening is not found to be accountable for the systematic center-to-limb effect in the measured acoustic travel-time differences, which is an essential factor for a reliable inference of the Sun's meridional-circulation profile. The differences in the acoustic power spectrum between the mimicked data and the observation data in high-latitude areas suggest that the optical spectrum-line formation height or convection cells in these areas may be the primary cause of the center-to-limb effect in helioseismic analyses.

  14. Xylem cavitation resistance can be estimated based on time-dependent rate of acoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Nolf, Markus; Beikircher, Barbara; Rosner, Sabine; Nolf, Anton; Mayr, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) analysis allows nondestructive monitoring of embolism formation in plant xylem, but signal interpretation and agreement of acoustically measured hydraulic vulnerability with reference hydraulic techniques remain under debate. We compared the hydraulic vulnerability of 16 species and three crop tree cultivars using hydraulic flow measurements and acoustic emission monitoring, proposing the use of time-dependent AE rates as a novel parameter for AE analysis. There was a linear correlation between the water potential (Ψ) at 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50 ) and the Ψ at maximum AE activity (Pmaxrate ), where species with lower P50 also had lower Pmaxrate (P < 0.001, R(2)  = 0.76). Using AE rates instead of cumulative counts for AE analysis allows more efficient estimation of P50 , while excluding problematic AE at late stages of dehydration. PMID:26010417

  15. Underwater acoustic communication using orthogonal signal division multiplexing scheme with time diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Tadashi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an underwater acoustic (UWA) communication scheme for mobile platforms is proposed. The proposed scheme is based on the orthogonal signal division multiplexing (OSDM) scheme, which offers highly reliable UWA communication. However, OSDM is not suitable for mobile platforms as it is — it requires a receiver array and a large calculation cost for equalization. To establish a reliable link with small communication platforms, we design OSDM that can perform reliable communication without the need for an array and can reduce receiver complexity using the time-diversity technique (TD), and evaluate its performance in experiments. The experimental results suggest that OSDM-TD can simultaneously achieve power-efficient communications and receiver complexity reduction, and can realize small-scale communication platforms. In detail, OSDM-TD achieved almost the same communication quality as conventional OSDM, in exchange for an effective data rate. Moreover, the power efficiency of OSDM-TD was almost the same as that of conventional OSDM with two receiver array elements, although the calculation cost of OSDM-TD was far below that of conventional OSDM. As a result, it was found that OSDM-TD is suitable for UWA communication for mobile nodes whose capacity and computational resources are severely limited.

  16. An inverse acoustic waveguide problem in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monk, Peter; Selgas, Virginia

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of locating an obstacle in a waveguide from time domain measurements of causal waves. More precisely, we assume that we are given the scattered field due to point sources placed on a surface located inside the waveguide away from the obstacle, where the scattered field is measured on the same surface. From this multi-static scattering data we wish to determine the position and shape of an obstacle in the waveguide. To deal with this inverse problem, we adapt and analyze the time domain linear sampling method. This involves proving new time domain estimates for the forward problem, as well as analyzing several time domain operators arising in the inversion scheme. We also implement the inversion algorithm and provide numerical results in two-dimensions using synthetic data.

  17. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Substorm Recovery Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous statistical observations have shown that the recovery time scales of substorms occurring in the winter and near equinox (when the nighttime auroral zone was in darkness) are roughly twice as long as the recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the summer (when the nighttime auroral region was sunlit). This suggests that auroral substorms in the northern and southern hemispheres develop asymmetrically during solstice conditions with substorms lasting longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere than in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. Additionally, this implies that more energy is deposited by electron precipitation in the winter hemisphere than in the summer one during substorms. This result, coupled with previous observations that have shown that auroral activity is more common when the ionosphere is in darkness and is suppressed when the ionosphere is in daylight, strongly suggests that the ionospheric conductivity plays an important role governing how magnetospheric energy is transferred to the ionosphere during substorms. Therefore, the ionosphere itself may dictate how much energy it will accept from the magnetosphere during substorms rather than this being an externally imposed quantity. Here, we extend our earlier work by statistically analyzing the recovery time scales for a large number of substorms observed in the conjugate hemispheres simultaneously by two orbiting global auroral imagers: Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV. Our current results are consistent with previous observations. The recovery time scales are observed to be longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere while the auroral activity has a shorter duration in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. This leads to an asymmetric energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere with more energy being deposited in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere.

  18. Liquidity crises on different time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Francesco; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    We present an empirical analysis of the microstructure of financial markets and, in particular, of the static and dynamic properties of liquidity. We find that on relatively large time scales (15 min) large price fluctuations are connected to the failure of the subtle mechanism of compensation between the flows of market and limit orders: in other words, the missed revelation of the latent order book breaks the dynamical equilibrium between the flows, triggering the large price jumps. On smaller time scales (30 s), instead, the static depletion of the limit order book is an indicator of an intrinsic fragility of the system, which is related to a strongly nonlinear enhancement of the response. In order to quantify this phenomenon we introduce a measure of the liquidity imbalance present in the book and we show that it is correlated to both the sign and the magnitude of the next price movement. These findings provide a quantitative definition of the effective liquidity, which proves to be strongly dependent on the considered time scales.

  19. Time scales of the stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nachiketa; Parida, Nigam Chandra; Raha, Soumyendu

    2015-01-01

    The stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape is characterized by bifurcations that have been experimentally well studied. In this work, we investigate the time scale in which the the stick–slips happen leading to the bifurcations. This is fundamental to understanding the triboluminescence and acoustic emissions associated with the bifurcations. We establish a relationship between the time scale of the bifurcations and the inherent mathematical structure of the peeling dynamics by studying a characteristic time quantity associated with the dynamics. PMID:25663802

  20. Ray travel times at long ranges in acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Virovlyansky, A L

    2003-05-01

    The Hamiltonian formalism in terms of the action-angle variables is applied to study ray travel times in a waveguide with a smooth sound speed profile perturbed by a weak range-dependent inhomogeneity. A simple approximate formula relating the differences in ray travel times to range variations of action variables is derived. This relation is applied to study range variations of the timefront (representing ray arrivals in the time-depth plane). Widening and bias of timefront segments in the presence of perturbations are considered. Qualitative and quantitative explanations are given to surprising stability of early portions of timefronts observed in both numerical simulations and field experiments. This phenomenon is interpreted from the viewpoint of Fermat's principle. By ray tracing in a realistic deep water environment with an internal-wave-induced perturbation it has been demonstrated that our approach can be used at ranges up to, at least, 3000 km. PMID:12765372

  1. Comparison between psycho-acoustics and physio-acoustic measurement to determine optimum reverberation time of pentatonic angklung music concert hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarsono, Anugrah S.; Merthayasa, I. G. N.; Suprijanto

    2015-09-01

    This research tried to compare psycho-acoustics and Physio-acoustic measurement to find the optimum reverberation time of soundfield from angklung music. Psycho-acoustic measurement was conducted using a paired comparison method and Physio-acoustic measurement was conducted with EEG Measurement on T3, T4, FP1, and FP2 measurement points. EEG measurement was conducted with 5 persons. Pentatonic angklung music was used as a stimulus with reverberation time variation. The variation was between 0.8 s - 1.6 s with 0.2 s step. EEG signal was analysed using a Power Spectral Density method on Alpha Wave, High Alpha Wave, and Theta Wave. Psycho-acoustic measurement on 50 persons showed that reverberation time preference of pentatonic angklung music was 1.2 second. The result was similar to Theta Wave measurement on FP2 measurement point. High Alpha wave on T4 measurement gave different results, but had similar patterns with psycho-acoustic measurement

  2. Multidimensional scaling of musical time estimations.

    PubMed

    Cocenas-Silva, Raquel; Bueno, José Lino Oliveira; Molin, Paul; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the psycho-musical factors that govern time evaluation in Western music from baroque, classic, romantic, and modern repertoires. The excerpts were previously found to represent variability in musical properties and to induce four main categories of emotions. 48 participants (musicians and nonmusicians) freely listened to 16 musical excerpts (lasting 20 sec. each) and grouped those that seemed to have the same duration. Then, participants associated each group of excerpts to one of a set of sine wave tones varying in duration from 16 to 24 sec. Multidimensional scaling analysis generated a two-dimensional solution for these time judgments. Musical excerpts with high arousal produced an overestimation of time, and affective valence had little influence on time perception. The duration was also overestimated when tempo and loudness were higher, and to a lesser extent, timbre density. In contrast, musical tension had little influence. PMID:21853763

  3. Periodic Time-Domain Nonlocal Nonreflecting Boundary Conditions for Duct Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Zorumski, William E.

    1996-01-01

    Periodic time-domain boundary conditions are formulated for direct numerical simulation of acoustic waves in ducts without flow. Well-developed frequency-domain boundary conditions are transformed into the time domain. The formulation is presented here in one space dimension and time; however, this formulation has an advantage in that its extension to variable-area, higher dimensional, and acoustically treated ducts is rigorous and straightforward. The boundary condition simulates a nonreflecting wave field in an infinite uniform duct and is implemented by impulse-response operators that are applied at the boundary of the computational domain. These operators are generated by convolution integrals of the corresponding frequency-domain operators. The acoustic solution is obtained by advancing the Euler equations to a periodic state with the MacCormack scheme. The MacCormack scheme utilizes the boundary condition to limit the computational space and preserve the radiation boundary condition. The success of the boundary condition is attributed to the fact that it is nonreflecting to periodic acoustic waves. In addition, transient waves can pass rapidly out of the solution domain. The boundary condition is tested for a pure tone and a multitone source in a linear setting. The effects of various initial conditions are assessed. Computational solutions with the boundary condition are consistent with the known solutions for nonreflecting wave fields in an infinite uniform duct.

  4. Acoustic imaging with time reversal methods: From medicine to NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    This talk will present an overview of the research conducted on ultrasonic time-reversal methods applied to biomedical imaging and to non-destructive testing. We will first describe iterative time-reversal techniques that allow both focusing ultrasonic waves on reflectors in tissues (kidney stones, micro-calcifications, contrast agents) or on flaws in solid materials. We will also show that time-reversal focusing does not need the presence of bright reflectors but it can be achieved only from the speckle noise generated by random distributions of non-resolved scatterers. We will describe the applications of this concept to correct distortions and aberrations in ultrasonic imaging and in NDT. In the second part of the talk we will describe the concept of time-reversal processors to get ultrafast ultrasonic images with typical frame rates of order of 10.000 F/s. It is the field of ultrafast ultrasonic imaging that has plenty medical applications and can be of great interest in NDT. We will describe some applications in the biomedical domain: Quantitative Elasticity imaging of tissues by following shear wave propagation to improve cancer detection and Ultrafast Doppler imaging that allows ultrasonic functional imaging.

  5. Acoustic Emission Patterns and the Transition to Ductility in Sub-Micron Scale Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Xia, K.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    We report observation of a transition from the brittle to ductile regime in precursor events from different rock materials (Granite, Sandstone, Basalt, and Gypsum) and Polymers (PMMA, PTFE and CR-39). Acoustic emission patterns associated with sub-micron scale laboratory earthquakes are mapped into network parameter spaces (functional damage networks). The sub-classes hold nearly constant timescales, indicating dependency of the sub-phases on the mechanism governing the previous evolutionary phase, i.e., deformation and failure of asperities. Based on our findings, we propose that the signature of the non-linear elastic zone around a crack tip is mapped into the details of the evolutionary phases, supporting the formation of a strongly weak zone in the vicinity of crack tips. Moreover, we recognize sub-micron to micron ruptures with signatures of 'stiffening' in the deformation phase of acoustic-waveforms. We propose that the latter rupture fronts carry critical rupture extensions, including possible dislocations faster than the shear wave speed. Using 'template super-shear waveforms' and their network characteristics, we show that the acoustic emission signals are possible super-shear or intersonic events. Ref. [1] Ghaffari, H. O., and R. P. Young. "Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes." Nature Scientific reports 3 (2013). [2] Xia, Kaiwen, Ares J. Rosakis, and Hiroo Kanamori. "Laboratory earthquakes: The sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear rupture transition." Science 303.5665 (2004): 1859-1861. [3] Mello, M., et al. "Identifying the unique ground motion signatures of supershear earthquakes: Theory and experiments." Tectonophysics 493.3 (2010): 297-326. [4] Gumbsch, Peter, and Huajian Gao. "Dislocations faster than the speed of sound." Science 283.5404 (1999): 965-968. [5] Livne, Ariel, et al. "The near-tip fields of fast cracks." Science 327.5971 (2010): 1359-1363. [6] Rycroft, Chris H., and Eran Bouchbinder

  6. Wireless acoustic modules for real-time data fusion using asynchronous sniper localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; De Mezzo, S.; Duffner, P.; Naz, P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) has been conducting studies in the domain of acoustic localization of shots. Mobile antennas mounted on the soldier's helmet were initially used for real-time detection, classification and localization of sniper shots. It showed good performances in land scenarios, but also in urban scenarios if the array was in the shot corridor, meaning that the microphones first detect the direct wave and then the reflections of the Mach and muzzle waves (15% distance estimation error compared to the actual shooter array distance). Fusing data sent by multiple sensor nodes distributed on the field showed some of the limitations of the technologies that have been implemented in ISL's demonstrators. Among others, the determination of the arrays' orientation was not accurate enough, thereby degrading the performance of data fusion. Some new solutions have been developed in the past year in order to obtain better performance for data fusion. Asynchronous localization algorithms have been developed and post-processed on data measured in both free-field and urban environments with acoustic modules on the line of sight of the shooter. These results are presented in the first part of the paper. The impact of GPS position estimation error is also discussed in the article in order to evaluate the possible use of those algorithms for real-time processing using mobile acoustic nodes. In the frame of ISL's transverse project IMOTEP (IMprovement Of optical and acoustical TEchnologies for the Protection), some demonstrators are developed that will allow real-time asynchronous localization of sniper shots. An embedded detection and classification algorithm is implemented on wireless acoustic modules that send the relevant information to a central PC. Data fusion is then processed and the

  7. Fireballs: Detonation Initiation on the Microsecond Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassoy, D. R.; Wojciechowski, K.

    2003-11-01

    A mathematical model is developed for detonation initiation following a time and spatially resolved burst of thermal power from an external source into a spherical target of reactive gas. The objective is to produce a detonation in or near the target with the least possible energy input. Source heating occurs on a sub-microsecond time scale, short compared to the acoustic time of the millimeter-sized target. This leads to a period of near inertial confinement, where the pressure rises with temperature, the density change is very small and local Mach number is extremely subsonic. As a result the thermal enegy change is maximized while the induced kinetic energy is minimized. The large temperature increase within the localized high pressure spot initiates a high activation energy, exothermic reaction which spreads hypersonically from the maximum temperature point. The chemical front is co-located with a large localized pressure gradient, responsible for rapid gas acceleration. A detonation appears at the edge of target, in the form of a strong shock with a coupled reaction zone. The evolutionary process differs fundamentally from that in a DDT and that in a traditional model of direct initiation.

  8. Timing and classifying brief acoustic stimuli by songbirds and humans.

    PubMed

    Weisman, R; Brownlie, L; Olthof, A; Njegovan, M; Sturdy, C; Mewhort, D

    1999-04-01

    The durations of animals' brief vocalizations provide conspecifics with important recognition cues. In the present experiments, zebra finches and humans (trained musicians) were rewarded for responding after S+ (standard) auditory signals from 56 to 663 ms and not for responding after shorter or longer S- (comparison) durations from 10 to 3684 ms. With either a single standard (Experiment 1) or multiple standards (Experiment 2), both zebra finches and humans timed brief signals to about the same level of accuracy. The results were in qualitative agreement with predictions from scalar timing theory and its connectionist implementation in both experiments. The connectionist model provides a good quantitative account of temporal gradients with a single standard (Experiment 1) but not with multiple standards (Experiment 2). PMID:10331915

  9. Cell water dynamics on multiple time scales

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Erik; Halle, Bertil

    2008-01-01

    Water–biomolecule interactions have been extensively studied in dilute solutions, crystals, and rehydrated powders, but none of these model systems may capture the behavior of water in the highly organized intracellular milieu. Because of the experimental difficulty of selectively probing the structure and dynamics of water in intact cells, radically different views about the properties of cell water have proliferated. To resolve this long-standing controversy, we have measured the 2H spin relaxation rate in living bacteria cultured in D2O. The relaxation data, acquired in a wide magnetic field range (0.2 mT–12 T) and analyzed in a model-independent way, reveal water dynamics on a wide range of time scales. Contradicting the view that a substantial fraction of cell water is strongly perturbed, we find that ≈85% of cell water in Escherichia coli and in the extreme halophile Haloarcula marismortui has bulk-like dynamics. The remaining ≈15% of cell water interacts directly with biomolecular surfaces and is motionally retarded by a factor 15 ± 3 on average, corresponding to a rotational correlation time of 27 ps. This dynamic perturbation is three times larger than for small monomeric proteins in solution, a difference we attribute to secluded surface hydration sites in supramolecular assemblies. The relaxation data also show that a small fraction (≈0.1%) of cell water exchanges from buried hydration sites on the microsecond time scale, consistent with the current understanding of protein hydration in solutions and crystals. PMID:18436650

  10. A perspective on time: Loss frequencies, time scales, and lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Michael; Holmes, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    The need to describe the Earth system and its components with a quantity that has units of time is ubiquitous since the 1970s work of Bolin, Rodhe and Junge. These quantities are often used as metrics of the system to describe the duration or cumulative impact of an action, such as in global-warming and ozone-depletion potentials, as in the SPARC lifetime re-assessment. The quantity designated "lifetime" is often calculated inconsistently and/or misused when applied to the subsequent evaluations of impacts. A careful set of definitions and derivations is needed to ensure that we are reporting, publishing, and comparing the same quantities. There are many different ways to derive metrics of time, and they describe different properties of the system. Here we carefully define several of those metrics - denoted here as loss frequency, time scale, and lifetime - and demonstrate which properties of the system they describe. Three generalizable examples demonstrate (i) how the non-linear chemistry of tropospheric ozone makes simple approaches for tracking pollution in error; (ii) why the lifetime of a gas depends on the history of emissions, and (iii) when multiple reservoirs generate time scales quite separate from the traditionally defined lifetime. Proper use of the many "time" parameters in a system, however, gives a very powerful understanding of the response to anthropogenic perturbations.

  11. South Atlantic Spreading Velocities and Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. R.; Smethurst, M. A.; Bianchi, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Plate reconstructions based on hierarchical spherical rotations have been around for many years. For the breakup of Pangea and Gondwana, these reconstructions are based on two major sources: magnetic isochrons and geological evidence for the onset of rifting and the tightness of the fit between continents. These reconstructions imply spreading velocities and it is the changes in velocities that can be used to probe questions of the forces moving plates around. In order to calculate the velocities correctly though, the importance of the choice of geologic time scale is often ignored. In this talk, we focus on the South Atlantic and calculate the spreading velocity errors implied by the choice of time scale for three major epochs: the Cenozoic and Late Mesozoic, the Cretaceous Quiet Zone and the Late Cretaceous to the Early Jurassic. In addition, we report the spreading velocities implied through these phases by various available magnetic isochron-derived reconstructions and the geological fits for South America and Africa used by large scale global reconstruction as well as in recent papers. Finally, we will highlight the implications for the choice of the mantle reference frame on African plate velocities.

  12. Deciphering Time Scale Hierarchy in Reaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Yutaka; Maeda, Satoshi; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Horiyama, Takashi; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2016-03-01

    Markovian dynamics on complex reaction networks are one of the most intriguing subjects in a wide range of research fields including chemical reactions, biological physics, and ecology. To represent the global kinetics from one node (corresponding to a basin on an energy landscape) to another requires information on multiple pathways that directly or indirectly connect these two nodes through the entire network. In this paper we present a scheme to extract a hierarchical set of global transition states (TSs) over a discrete-time Markov chain derived from first-order rate equations. The TSs can naturally take into account the multiple pathways connecting any pair of nodes. We also propose a new type of disconnectivity graph (DG) to capture the hierarchical organization of different time scales of reactions that can capture changes in the network due to changes in the time scale of observation. The crux is the introduction of the minimum conductance cut (MCC) in graph clustering, corresponding to the dividing surface across the network having the "smallest" transition probability between two disjoint subnetworks (superbasins on the energy landscape) in the network. We present a new combinatorial search algorithm for finding this MCC. We apply our method to a reaction network of Claisen rearrangement of allyl vinyl ether that consists of 23 nodes and 66 links (saddles on the energy landscape) connecting them. We compare the kinetic properties of our DG to those of the transition matrix of the rate equations and show that our graph can properly reveal the hierarchical organization of time scales in a network. PMID:26641663

  13. Scaling laws from geomagnetic time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voros, Z.; Kovacs, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kormendi, A.; Green, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    The notion of extended self-similarity (ESS) is applied here for the X - component time series of geomagnetic field fluctuations. Plotting nth order structure functions against the fourth order structure function we show that low-frequency geomagnetic fluctuations up to the order n = 10 follow the same scaling laws as MHD fluctuations in solar wind, however, for higher frequencies (f > l/5[h]) a clear departure from the expected universality is observed for n > 6. ESS does not allow to make an unambiguous statement about the non triviality of scaling laws in "geomagnetic" turbulence. However, we suggest to use higher order moments as promising diagnostic tools for mapping the contributions of various remote magnetospheric sources to local observatory data. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. An Acoustical Comparison of Sub-Scale and Full-Scale Far-Field Measurements for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Jared; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, members of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Fluid Dynamics Branch and Wyle Labs measured far-field acoustic data during a series of three Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) horizontal static tests conducted in Promontory, Utah. The test motors included the Technical Evaluation Motor 13 (TEM-13), Flight Verification Motor 2 (FVM-2), and the Flight Simulation Motor 15 (FSM-15). Similar far-field data were collected during horizontal static tests of sub-scale solid rocket motors at MSFC. Far-field acoustical measurements were taken at multiple angles within a circular array centered about the nozzle exit plane, each positioned at a radial distance of 80 nozzle-exit-diameters from the nozzle. This type of measurement configuration is useful for calculating rocket noise characteristics such as those outlined in the NASA SP-8072 "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." Acoustical scaling comparisons are made between the test motors, with particular interest in the Overall Sound Power, Acoustic Efficiency, Non-dimensional Relative Sound Power Spectrum, and Directivity. Since most empirical data in the NASA SP-8072 methodology is derived from small rockets, this investigation provides an opportunity to check the data collapse between a sub-scale and full-scale rocket motor.

  15. Prediction of acoustic scattering in the time domain and its applications to rotorcraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seongkyu

    This work aims at the development of a numerical method for the analysis of acoustic scattering in the time domain and its applications to rotorcraft noise. This purpose is achieved by developing two independent methods: (1) an analytical formulation of the pressure gradient for an arbitrary moving source and (2) a time-domain moving equivalent source method. First, the analytical formulation for the pressure gradient is developed to fulfill the boundary condition on a scattering surface to account for arbitrary moving incident sources. A semi-analytical formulation was derived from the gradient of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation. This formulation needs to calculate the observer time differentiation outside the integrals numerically. A numerical algorithm is developed to implement this formulation in an aeroacoustic prediction code. A new analytical formulation is presented in the thesis. In this formulation, the time differentiation is taken inside the integrals analytically. This formulation avoids the numerical time differentiation with respect to the observer time, which is computationally more efficient. The acoustic pressure gradient predicted by these two formulations is validated through comparison with available exact solutions for a stationary and moving monopole sources. The agreement between the predictions and exact solutions is excellent. One of the advantages of this analytic formulation is that it efficiently provides the boundary condition for the acoustic scattering of sound generated from an arbitrary moving source, such as rotating blades, which undergoes rotation, flapping and lead-lag motions. The formulation is applied to the rotor noise problems for two model rotors (UH-1H and HART-I). For HART-I rotor, CFD/CSD coupling was used to provide unsteady aerodynamics and trim solutions of the blade motion. A purely numerical approach is compared with the analytical formulations. The agreement between the analytical formulations and

  16. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio, low tip speed fan (QEP fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A scale model (0.484 scale factor) of a single stage fan designed for a 1.5 pressure ratio and 1160 ft/sec tip speed was tested to determine its noise characteristics. The fan had 26 blades and 60 outlet guide vanes, with vanes spaced two rotor blade aerodynamic chords from the blades. The effects of speed, exhaust nozzle area and fan frame acoustic treatment on the scale model's noise characteristics were investigated.

  17. Time sequence and time scale of intermediate mass fragment emission

    SciTech Connect

    De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Cardella, G.; Lanzano, G.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Wilczynski, J.

    2005-04-01

    Semiperipheral collisions in the {sup 124}Sn+{sup 64}Ni reaction at 35 MeV/nucleon were studied using the forward part of the Charged Heavy Ion Mass and Energy Resolving Array. Nearly completely determined ternary events involving projectilelike fragments (PLF), targetlike fragments (TLF), and intermediate mass fragments (IMF) were selected. A new method of studying the reaction mechanism, focusing on the analysis of the correlations between relative velocities in the IMF+PLF and IMF+TLF subsystems, is proposed. The relative velocity correlations provide information on the time sequence and time scale of the neck fragmentation processes leading to production of IMFs. It is shown that the majority of light IMFs are produced within 40-80 fm/c after the system starts to reseparate. Heavy IMFs are formed at times of about 120 fm/c or later and can be viewed as resulting from two-step (sequential) neck rupture processes.

  18. Subjective scaling of spatial room acoustic parameters influenced by visual environmental cues

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Daniel L.; Braasch, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies investigating subjective spatial impression in rooms, only a few of those studies have addressed the influence of visual cues on the judgment of auditory measures. In the psychophysical study presented here, video footage of five solo music∕speech performers was shown for four different listening positions within a general-purpose space. The videos were presented in addition to the acoustic signals, which were auralized using binaural room impulse responses (BRIR) that were recorded in the same general-purpose space. The participants were asked to adjust the direct-to-reverberant energy ratio (D∕R ratio) of the BRIR according to their expectation considering the visual cues. They were also directed to rate the apparent source width (ASW) and listener envelopment (LEV) for each condition. Visual cues generated by changing the sound-source position in the multi-purpose space, as well as the makeup of the sound stimuli affected the judgment of spatial impression. Participants also scaled the direct-to-reverberant energy ratio with greater direct sound energy than was measured in the acoustical environment. PMID:20968367

  19. Acoustic characteristics of a large scale wind-tunnel model of a jet flap aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.

    1975-01-01

    The expanding-duct jet flap (EJF) concept is studied to determine STOL performance in turbofan-powered aircraft. The EJF is used to solve the problem of ducting the required volume of air into the wing by providing an expanding cavity between the upper and lower surfaces of the flap. The results are presented of an investigation of the acoustic characteristics of the EJF concept on a large-scale aircraft model powered by JT15D engines. The noise of the EJF is generated by acoustic dipoles as shown by the sixth power dependence of the noise on jet velocity. These sources result from the interaction of the flow turbulence with flap of internal and external surfaces and the trailing edges. Increasing the trailing edge jet from 70 percent span to 100 percent span increased the noise 2 db for the equivalent nozzle area. Blowing at the knee of the flap rather than the trailing edge reduced the noise 5 to 10 db by displacing the jet from the trailing edge and providing shielding from high-frequency noise. Deflecting the flap and varying the angle of attack modified the directivity of the underwing noise but did not affect the peak noise. A forward speed of 33.5 m/sec (110 ft/sec) reduced the dipole noise less than 1 db.

  20. Selective attention to temporal features on nested time scales.

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-02-01

    Meaningful auditory stimuli such as speech and music often vary simultaneously along multiple time scales. Thus, listeners must selectively attend to, and selectively ignore, separate but intertwined temporal features. The current study aimed to identify and characterize the neural network specifically involved in this feature-selective attention to time. We used a novel paradigm where listeners judged either the duration or modulation rate of auditory stimuli, and in which the stimulation, working memory demands, response requirements, and task difficulty were held constant. A first analysis identified all brain regions where individual brain activation patterns were correlated with individual behavioral performance patterns, which thus supported temporal judgments generically. A second analysis then isolated those brain regions that specifically regulated selective attention to temporal features: Neural responses in a bilateral fronto-parietal network including insular cortex and basal ganglia decreased with degree of change of the attended temporal feature. Critically, response patterns in these regions were inverted when the task required selectively ignoring this feature. The results demonstrate how the neural analysis of complex acoustic stimuli with multiple temporal features depends on a fronto-parietal network that simultaneously regulates the selective gain for attended and ignored temporal features. PMID:23978652

  1. Propagation of small-scale acoustic-gravity waves in the Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, G.; Walterscheid, R. L.

    1984-04-01

    The amplification and attenuation of small-scale acoustic-gravity waves in Venus's atmosphere is studied with a plane-wave model that realistically simulates height variations in structure and zonal circulation. Forcing for these waves could be convective activity at cloud heights or close to the surface, or turbulence arising from small-scale shear instability of the zonal flow; the model treats both surface forcing and cloud-level forcing by diabatic heating variations in the low-stability layer near the base of the clouds. Waves are attenuated in this cloud-level, low-static-stability layer. Slowly moving waves with small vertical length scales are attenuated by eddy diffusivity. Westward moving waves can undergo critical level absorption. A net enhancement in wave amplitude is also possible because waves can be trapped between the surface and the base of the low stability layer at about 50 km. Observations of small-scale wave activity at the cloud tops and above can be used to explore uncertain aspects of atmospheric structure and circulation such as the persistence or decay of the atmospheric superrotation with height above the clouds.

  2. Small scale aspects of warm dark matter: Power spectra and acoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, Daniel; Wu Jun

    2011-02-15

    We provide a semianalytic derivation of approximate evolution equations for density perturbations of warm dark matter candidates that decoupled while relativistic with arbitrary distribution functions, their solutions at small scales, and a simple numerical implementation that yields their transfer functions and power spectra. Density perturbations evolve through three stages: radiation domination when the particle is relativistic and nonrelativistic and matter domination. An early integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect during the first stage leads to an enhancement of density perturbations and a plateau in the transfer function for k < or approx. k{sub fs}, the free-streaming wave vector. An effective fluid description emerges at small scales which includes the effects of free streaming in initial conditions and inhomogeneities. The transfer function features warm dark matter acoustic oscillations at scales k > or approx. 2k{sub fs}. A simple analytic interpolation of the power spectra between large and small scales and a numerical implementation valid for arbitrary distribution functions is provided. As an application we study the power spectra for two models of sterile neutrinos with m{approx}keV produced nonresonantly and compare our results to those obtained from Boltzmann codes.

  3. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 2; Advanced Treatment Impedance Models for High Frequency Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop improved models for the acoustic impedance of treatment panels at high frequencies, for application to subscale treatment designs. Effects that cause significant deviation of the impedance from simple geometric scaling are examined in detail, an improved high-frequency impedance model is developed, and the improved model is correlated with high-frequency impedance measurements. Only single-degree-of-freedom honeycomb sandwich resonator panels with either perforated sheet or "linear" wiremesh faceplates are considered. The objective is to understand those effects that cause the simple single-degree-of- freedom resonator panels to deviate at the higher-scaled frequency from the impedance that would be obtained at the corresponding full-scale frequency. This will allow the subscale panel to be designed to achieve a specified impedance spectrum over at least a limited range of frequencies. An advanced impedance prediction model has been developed that accounts for some of the known effects at high frequency that have previously been ignored as a small source of error for full-scale frequency ranges.

  4. Acoustic Source Localization via Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob; Wardlaw, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. The complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on an optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. They investigate key concepts of threat-detection algorithms such as Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) estimation via sensor data correlation in the time domain with the purpose of implementation on the optical-core processor. they illustrate their results with the aid of numerical simulation and actual optical hardware runs. The major accomplishments of this research, in terms of computational speedup and numerical accurcy achieved via the deployment of optical processing technology, should be of substantial interest to the acoustic signal processing community.

  5. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiède, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [-35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study.

  6. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Cassiède, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-04-15

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [−35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study.

  7. A micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Y.; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2015-03-01

    To achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT), massive transducer arrays and data acquisition (DAQ) electronics are needed to receive the PA signals simultaneously, which results in complex and high-cost ultrasound receiver systems. To address this issue, we have developed a new PA data acquisition approach using acoustic time delay. Optical fibers were used as parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs) to create different time delays in multiple channels of PA signals. This makes the PA signals reach a single-element transducer at different times. As a result, they can be properly received by single-channel DAQ electronics. However, due to their small diameter and fragility, using optical fiber as acoustic delay lines poses a number of challenges in the design, construction and packaging of the PADLs, thereby limiting their performances and use in real imaging applications. In this paper, we report the development of new silicon PADLs, which are directly made from silicon wafers using advanced micromachining technologies. The silicon PADLs have very low acoustic attenuation and distortion. A linear array of 16 silicon PADLs were assembled into a handheld package with one common input port and one common output port. To demonstrate its real-time PAT capability, the silicon PADL array (with its output port interfaced with a single-element transducer) was used to receive 16 channels of PA signals simultaneously from a tissue-mimicking optical phantom sample. The reconstructed PA image matches well with the imaging target. Therefore, the silicon PADL array can provide a 16× reduction in the ultrasound DAQ channels for real-time PAT.

  8. Bound states in one-dimensional acoustic parity-time-symmetric lattices for perfect sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Degang; Shen, Yaxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Xuefeng; Yi, Lin

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we study the propagation of acoustic waves through a one-dimensional multilayer structure composed of a thin defect layer sandwiched by two phononic crystals. Two kinds of defect states will generate in band gaps and both of them cause unitary transmission. However, they have very unlike field distributions due to the different contrasted acoustic impedances between the defect layer and its neighboring layers. Spectral positions of transmission peaks can be exactly determined by the resonant phase condition. In a non-dissipative system, these resonant states correspond to single crossing point of two eigenvalues of scattering matrix. When gain and loss are introduced to judiciously construct an acoustic parity-time-symmetric lattice, the crossing point will split into a pair of exceptional points (EPs). Interestingly, the EPs correspond to unidirectional zero reflection that is very sensitive to the thickness of defect layer. Taking advantage of this virtue, a very sensitive acoustic sensor can be designed, which has potentially applications in ultrasonic inspection, noise detection, ultrasonic medicine, etc.

  9. Parametric instabilities in picosecond time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H.A.; Rozmus, W.; Labaune, C.; Mounaix, Ph.; Pesme, D.; Baton, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1993-03-01

    The coupling of intense laser light with plasmas is a rich field of plasma physics, with many applications. Among these are inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray lasers, particle acceleration, and x-ray sources. Parametric instabilities have been studied for many years because of their importance to ICF; with laser pulses with duration of approximately a nanosecond, and laser intensities in the range 10{sup 14}--10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2} these instabilities are of crucial concern because of a number of detrimental effects. Although the laser pulse duration of interest for these studies are relatively long, it has been evident in the past years that to reach an understanding of these instabilities requires their characterization and analysis in picosecond time scales. At the laser intensities of interest, the growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is of the order of picoseconds, and of an order of magnitude shorter for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In this paper the authors discuss SBS and SRS in the context of their evolution in picosecond time scales. They describe the fundamental concepts associated with their growth and saturation, and recent work on the nonlinear treatment required for the modeling of these instabilities at high laser intensities.

  10. Small scale model static acoustic investigation of hybrid high lift systems combining upper surface blowing with the internally blown flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Rathburn, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    A static acoustic and propulsion test of a small radius Jacobs-Hurkamp and a large radius Flex Flap combined with four upper surface blowing (USB) nozzles was performed. Nozzle force and flow data, flap trailing edge total pressure survey data, and acoustic data were obtained. Jacobs-Hurkamp flap surface pressure data, flow visualization photographs, and spoiler acoustic data from the limited mid-year tests are reported. A pressure ratio range of 1.2 to 1.5 was investigated for the USB nozzles and for the auxiliary blowing slots. The acoustic data were scaled to a four-engine STOL airplane of roughly 110,000 kilograms or 50,000 pounds gross weight, corresponding to a model scale of approximately 0.2 for the nozzles without deflector. The model nozzle scale is actually reduced to about .17 with deflector although all results in this report assume 0.2 scale factor. Trailing edge pressure surveys indicated that poor flow attachment was obtained even at large flow impingement angles unless a nozzle deflector plate was used. Good attachment was obtained with the aspect ratio four nozzle with deflector, confirming the small scale wind tunnel tests.

  11. Identification of Damaged Wheat Kernels and Cracked-Shell Hazelnuts with Impact Acoustics Time-Frequency Patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new adaptive time-frequency (t-f) analysis and classification procedure is applied to impact acoustic signals for detecting hazelnuts with cracked shells and three types of damaged wheat kernels. Kernels were dropped onto a steel plate, and the resulting impact acoustic signals were recorded with ...

  12. Near-Real-Time Acoustic Monitoring of Beaked Whales and Other Cetaceans Using a Seaglider™

    PubMed Central

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K.; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M.; Luby, James C.; Jump, William A.; Shilling, Geoffrey B.; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S.; Schorr, Gregory S.; Baird, Robin W.

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle – a glider – equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  13. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    PubMed

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M; Luby, James C; Jump, William A; Shilling, Geoffrey B; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S; Schorr, Gregory S; Baird, Robin W

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  14. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, L. V.; Zou, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT.

  15. The aero-acoustic Galbrun equation in the time domain with perfectly matched layer boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Ben Tahar, Mabrouk; Baccouche, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a solution for aero-acoustic problems using the Galbrun equation in the time domain with a non-uniform steady mean flow in a two-dimensional coordinate system and the perfectly matched layer technique as the boundary conditions corresponding to an unbounded domain. This approach is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian description corresponding to a wave equation written only in terms of the Lagrangian perturbation of the displacement. It is an alternative to the Linearized Euler Equations for solving aero-acoustic problems. The Galbrun equation is solved using a mixed pressure-displacement Finite Element Method. A complex Laplace transform scheme is used to study the time dependent variables. Several numerical examples are presented to validate and illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach. PMID:26827028

  16. Gust Acoustics Computation with a Space-Time CE/SE Parallel 3D Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Himansu, A.; Chang, S. C.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The benchmark Problem 2 in Category 3 of the Third Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA) Workshop is solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. This problem concerns the unsteady response of an isolated finite-span swept flat-plate airfoil bounded by two parallel walls to an incident gust. The acoustic field generated by the interaction of the gust with the flat-plate airfoil is computed by solving the 3D (three-dimensional) Euler equations in the time domain using a parallel version of a 3D CE/SE solver. The effect of the gust orientation on the far-field directivity is studied. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, showing a reasonable agreement.

  17. Reverse time migration for reconstructing extended obstacles in planar acoustic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, ZhiMing; Huang, GuangHui

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new reverse time migration method for reconstructing extended obstacles in the planar waveguide using acoustic waves at a fixed frequency. We prove the resolution of the reconstruction method in terms of the aperture and the thickness of the waveguide. The resolution analysis implies that the imaginary part of the cross-correlation imaging function is always positive and thus may have better stability properties. Numerical experiments are included to illustrate the powerful imaging quality and to confirm our resolution results.

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue on time scale algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakis, Demetrios; Tavella, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    This special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the tutorials presented on the first day. The symposium was attended by 76 persons, from every continent except Antarctica, by students as well as senior scientists, and hosted by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in San Fernando, Spain, whose staff further enhanced their nation's high reputation for hospitality. Although a timescale can be simply defined as a weighted average of clocks, whose purpose is to measure time better than any individual clock, timescale theory has long been and continues to be a vibrant field of research that has both followed and helped to create advances in the art of timekeeping. There is no perfect timescale algorithm, because every one embodies a compromise involving user needs. Some users wish to generate a constant frequency, perhaps not necessarily one that is well-defined with respect to the definition of a second. Other users might want a clock which is as close to UTC or a particular reference clock as possible, or perhaps wish to minimize the maximum variation from that standard. In contrast to the steered timescales that would be required by those users, other users may need free-running timescales, which are independent of external information. While no algorithm can meet all these needs, every algorithm can benefit from some form of tuning. The optimal tuning, and even the optimal algorithm, can depend on the noise characteristics of the frequency standards, or of their comparison systems, the most precise and accurate of which are currently Two Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT) and GPS carrier phase time transfer. The interest in time scale algorithms and its associated statistical methodology began around 40 years ago when the Allan variance appeared and when the metrological institutions started realizing ensemble atomic time using more than

  19. EDITORIAL: Special issue on time scale algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakis, Demetrios; Tavella, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    This special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the tutorials presented on the first day. The symposium was attended by 76 persons, from every continent except Antarctica, by students as well as senior scientists, and hosted by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in San Fernando, Spain, whose staff further enhanced their nation's high reputation for hospitality. Although a timescale can be simply defined as a weighted average of clocks, whose purpose is to measure time better than any individual clock, timescale theory has long been and continues to be a vibrant field of research that has both followed and helped to create advances in the art of timekeeping. There is no perfect timescale algorithm, because every one embodies a compromise involving user needs. Some users wish to generate a constant frequency, perhaps not necessarily one that is well-defined with respect to the definition of a second. Other users might want a clock which is as close to UTC or a particular reference clock as possible, or perhaps wish to minimize the maximum variation from that standard. In contrast to the steered timescales that would be required by those users, other users may need free-running timescales, which are independent of external information. While no algorithm can meet all these needs, every algorithm can benefit from some form of tuning. The optimal tuning, and even the optimal algorithm, can depend on the noise characteristics of the frequency standards, or of their comparison systems, the most precise and accurate of which are currently Two Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT) and GPS carrier phase time transfer. The interest in time scale algorithms and its associated statistical methodology began around 40 years ago when the Allan variance appeared and when the metrological institutions started realizing ensemble atomic time using more than

  20. Time Horizon and Social Scale in Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009 our center (CRED) published a first version of The Psychology of Climate Change Communication. In it, we attempted to summarize facts and concepts from psychological research that could help guide communication. While this work focused on climate change, most of the ideas are at least partly applicable for communication about a variety of natural hazards. Of the many examples in this guide, I mention three. Single-action bias is the human tendency to stop considering further actions that might be needed to deal with a given hazard, once a single action has been taken. Another example is the importance of group affiliation in motivating voluntary contributions to joint action. A third concerns the finding that group participation enhances understanding of probabilistic concepts and promotes action in the face of uncertainty. One current research direction, which goes beyond those included in the above publication, focuses on how time horizons arise in the thinking of individuals and groups, and how these time horizons might influence hazard preparedness. On the one hand, individuals sometimes appear impatient, organizations look for immediate results, and officials fail to look beyond the next election cycle. Yet under some laboratory conditions and in some subcultures, a longer time horizon is adopted. We are interested in how time horizon is influenced by group identity and by the very architecture of planning and decision making. Institutional changes, involving long-term contractual relationships among communities, developers, insurers, and governments, could greatly increase resilience in the face of natural hazards. Communication about hazards, in the context of such long-term contractual relationships might look very different from communication that is first initiated by immediate threat. Another new direction concerns the social scale of institutions and of communication about hazards. Traditionally, insurance contracts share risk among a large

  1. Tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The longwave phenomenological model is used to make simple and precise calculations of various physical quantities such as the vibrational energy density, the vibrational energy, the relative mechanical displacement, and the one-dimensional stress tensor of a porous silicon distributed Bragg reflector. From general principles such as invariance under time reversal, invariance under space reflection, and conservation of energy density flux, the equivalence of the tunneling times for both transmission and reflection is demonstrated. Here, we study the tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector in porous silicon multilayer structures, and we report the possibility that a phenomenon called Hartman effect appears in these structures. PMID:25237288

  2. Tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Lazcano, Zorayda; Valdés Negrín, Pedro Luis; Villegas, Diosdado; Arriaga, Jesus; Pérez-Álvarez, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The longwave phenomenological model is used to make simple and precise calculations of various physical quantities such as the vibrational energy density, the vibrational energy, the relative mechanical displacement, and the one-dimensional stress tensor of a porous silicon distributed Bragg reflector. From general principles such as invariance under time reversal, invariance under space reflection, and conservation of energy density flux, the equivalence of the tunneling times for both transmission and reflection is demonstrated. Here, we study the tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector in porous silicon multilayer structures, and we report the possibility that a phenomenon called Hartman effect appears in these structures. PMID:25237288

  3. Times Scales in Dense Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duan

    2005-07-01

    Forces in dense granular material are transmitted through particle contacts. The evolution of the contact stress is directly related to dynamical interaction forces between particles. Since particle contacts in a dense granular material are random, a statistical method is employed to describe and model their motions. It is found that the time scales of particle contacts determinate stress relaxation and the fluid- like or solid-like behavior of the material. Numerical simulations are performed to calculate statistical properties of particle interactions. Using results from the numerical simulations we examine the relationship between the averaged local deformation field and the macroscopic deformation field. We also examine the relationship between the averaged local interaction force and the averaged stress field in the material. Validities of the Voigt and the Reuss assumptions are examined; and extensions to these assumptions are studied. Numerical simulations show that tangential frictions between particles significantly increase the contact stress, while the direct contribution of the tangential force to the stress is small. This puzzling observation can be explained by dependency of the relaxation time on the tangential friction.

  4. Iterative Receiver in Time-Frequency Domain for Shallow Water Acoustic Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Ge, Jianhua

    2012-03-01

    Inter-symbol interference (ISI) caused by multi-path propagation, especially in shallow water channel, degrades the performance of underwater acoustic (UWA) communication systems. In this paper, we combine soft minimum mean squared error (MMSE) equalization and the serially concatenated trellis coded modulation (SCTCM) decoding to develop an iterative receiver in time-frequency domain (TFD) for underwater acoustic point to point communications. Based on sound speed profile (SSP) measured in the lake and finite-element ray (FER) tracing method (Bellhop), the shallow water channel is constructed to evaluate the performance of the proposed iterative receiver. The results suggest that the proposed iterative receiver can reduce the calculation complexity of the equalizer and obtain better performance using less receiving elements.

  5. Space-Time Correlation of Stable Boundary-Layer, Weak Wind Data from Ground Based Acoustic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, A. R.; Thomas, C. K.

    2011-12-01

    We present data collected using ground based acoustic sensing in order to connect near-surface motions including turbulence and sub-meso modes under stable, weak wind conditions to possible external forcing mechanisms from aloft. Under stable stratification and weak wind conditions the generation of the weak, intermittent turbulence is poorly understood, but critical to understanding and modeling the dispersion and diffusion of pollutants and other trace gases. Recent studies have suggested that the driving processes behind weak wind turbulence may include external forcing on the sub-meso scale. The forcing mechanisms may include gravity waves, 2 dimensional horizontal modes, solitons, or interactions between surface flow and low-level jets. Efforts to detect weak wind, sub-meso scale processes have failed so far due to a lack of sufficient spatial coverage necessary for capturing these events. This research has taken an unconventional observational approach by using a pair of SODAR (Sound Detection And Ranging) units. The SODARs have collected data on short time scales with a significant vertical (15 - 300 meters) and horizontal (200 - 1000 meters) coverage. The experiment took place on Oregon State University's Research Farms located roughly a mile to the east of OSU's campus. The site was chosen for its homogenous terrain which allowed the two SODAR's to be separated across the domain without their measurements being contaminated by influence from surface heterogeneity. The experiment has provided a data set comprised of more than 3 months of semi-continuous SODAR data. By making use of the Multi-resolution Decomposition method we will present results on the space-time correlations of the boundary-layer winds on multiple different time scales. The results will be a significant step towards improving the predictability of weak wind meanderings, identifying scaling parameters for sub-meso scale motions, and help to improve air quality and diffusion models.

  6. Time-averaged acoustic forces acting on a rigid sphere within a wide range of radii in an axisymmetric levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresti, Daniele; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic levitation is a physical phenomenon that arises when the acoustic radiation pressure is strong enough to overcome gravitational force. It is a nonlinear phenomenon which can be predicted only if higher order terms are included in the acoustic field calculation. The study of acoustic levitation is usually conducted by solving the linear acoustic equation and bridging the gap with an analytical solution. Only recently, the scientific community has shown interest in the full solution of the Navier-Stokes' equation with the aim of deeply investigating the acoustic radiation pressure. We present herein a numerical model based on Finite Volume Method (FVM) and Dynamic Mesh (DM) for the calculation of the acoustic radiation pressure acting on a rigid sphere inside an axisymmetric levitator which is the most widely used and investigated type of levitators. In this work, we focus on the third resonance mode. The use of DM is new in the field of acoustic levitation, allowing a more realistic simulation of the phenomenon, since no standing wave has to be necessarily imposed as boundary condition. The radiating plate is modeled as a rigid cylinder moving sinusoidally along the central axis. The time-averaged acoustic force exerting on the sphere is calculated for different radii Rs of the sphere (0.025 to 0.5 wavelengths). It is shown that the acoustic force increases proportional to Rs3 for small radii, then decreases when the standing wave condition is violated and finally rises again in the travelling wave radiation pressure configuration. The numerical model is validated for the inviscid case with a Finite Element Method model of the linear acoustic model based on King's approximation.

  7. First cosmological constraints on dark energy from the radial baryon acoustic scale.

    PubMed

    Gaztañaga, Enrique; Miquel, Ramon; Sánchez, Eusebio

    2009-08-28

    We present cosmological constraints arising from the first measurement of the radial (line-of-sight) baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) scale in the large scale structure traced by the galaxy distribution. Here we use these radial BAO measurements at z = 0.24 and z = 0.43 to derive new constraints on dark energy and its equation of state for a flat universe, without any other assumptions on the cosmological model: w = -1.14 + or - 0.39 (assumed constant), Omega(m) = 0.24(-0.05);(+0.06). If we drop the assumption of flatness and include previous cosmic microwave background and supernova data, we find w = -0.974 + or - 0.058, Omega(m) = 0.271 + or - 0.015, and Omega(k) = -0.002 + or - 0.006, in good agreement with a flat cold dark matter cosmology with a cosmological constant. To our knowledge, these are the most stringent constraints on these parameters to date under our stated assumptions. PMID:19792779

  8. Acoustic Surveys of a Scaled-Model CESTOL Transport Aircraft in Static and Forward Speed Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Nathan; Horne, Clifton

    2012-01-01

    An 11% scale-model of a Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) scalemodel test was recently completed. The test was conducted in the AEDC National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The model included two over-wing pod-mounted turbine propulsion simulators (TPS). The hybrid blended wing-body used a circulation control wing (CCW) with leadingand trailing-edge blowing. The bulk of the test matrix included three forward velocities (40 kts, 60 kts, and 100kts), angle-of-attack variation between -5 and 25 , and CCW mass flow variation. Seven strut-mounted microphones outboard of the left wing provided source directivity. A phased microphone array was mounted outboard of the right wing for source location. The goal of this paper is to provide a preliminary look at the acoustic data acquired during the Advanced Model for Extreme Lift and Improved Aeroacoustics (AMELIA) test for 0 angle-of-attack and 0 sideslip conditions. Data presented provides a good overview of the test conditions and the signal-to-noise quality of the data. TPS height variation showed a difference of 2 dB to 3 dB due to wing shielding. Variation of slot mass flow showed increases of 12 dB to 26 dB above the airframe noise and the TPS increased the overall levels an additional 5 dB to 10 dB.

  9. Very low frequency and ELF effects in the upper ionosphere caused by large-scale acoustic waves in the lower ionosphere observed from AUREOL-3 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galperin, Y. I.; Gladyshev, V. A.; Jorjio, N. V.; Kovrazhkin, R. A.; Lissakov, Y. V.; Maslov, V. D.; Nikolaenko, L. M.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Molchanov, O. A.; Mogilevsky, M. M.

    The active MASSA experiment studied the effects generated in the upper atmosphere and in the magnetosphere by a large-scale acoustic wave from a chemical explosion reaching ionospheric altitudes. The AUREOL-3 satellite crossed the corresponding magnetic force tubes by the time of the development of the electromagnetic processes expected in the lower ionosphere E-region above the explosion. Measurements reveal electromagnetic effects in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas. Effects include nearly electrostatic ELF and VLF noises in the magnetic force tube based on the E-layer ionosphere above the explosion. Their area expands with a velocity of 0.6 km/sec, i.e., as of an acoustic wave in the lower ionosphere. An intense MHD wave is detected at L = 1.31, equatorwards from the explosion L-shell (L = 1.5).

  10. Imaging Acoustic Phonon Dynamics on the Nanometer-Femtosecond Spatiotemporal Length-Scale with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plemmons, Dayne; Flannigan, David

    Coherent collective lattice oscillations known as phonons dictate a broad range of physical observables in condensed matter and act as primary energy carriers across a wide range of material systems. Despite this omnipresence, analysis of phonon dynamics on their ultrashort native spatiotemporal length scale - that is, the combined nanometer (nm), spatial and femtosecond (fs), temporal length-scales - has largely remained experimentally inaccessible. Here, we employ ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) to directly image discrete acoustic phonons in real-space with combined nm-fs resolution. By directly probing electron scattering in the image plane (as opposed to the diffraction plane), we retain phase information critical for following the evolution, propagation, scattering, and decay of phonons in relation to morphological features of the specimen (i.e. interfaces, grain boundaries, voids, ripples, etc.). We extract a variety of morphologically-specific quantitative information from the UEM videos including phonon frequencies, phase velocities, and decays times. We expect these direct manifestations of local elastic properties in the vicinity of material defects and interfaces will aide in the understanding and application of phonon-mediated phenomena in nanostructures. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.

  11. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images. PMID:26518525

  12. The vibration dipole: A time reversed acoustics scheme for the experimental localisation of surface breaking cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, Bart; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Bou Matar, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    A combination of time reversed acoustics and nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy techniques is introduced to localize surface breaking defects in a non-destructive manner. Reciprocal time reversal is applied at two neighbouring positions in order to create a vibration dipole with high amplitudes. At surface breaking cracks, nonlinear elastic effects are triggered by the shear forces due to induced friction of the crack interfaces. By mapping the nonlinearity generated by the vibration dipole over the sample surface, the position of a surface breaking crack can be visualized. The technique is tested on an industrial steel sample containing a closed crack.

  13. A comparison of time domain boundary conditions for acoustic waves in wave guides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Propst, G.; Silcox, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers consider several types of boundary conditions in the context of time domain models for acoustic waves. Experiments with four different duct terminations (hard wall, free radiation, foam, and wedge) were carried out in a wave duct from which reflection coefficients over a wide frequency range were measured. These reflection coefficients were used to estimate parameters in the time domain boundary conditions. A comparison of the relative merits of the models in describing the data is presented. Boundary conditions which yield a good fit of the model to the experimental data were found for all duct terminations except the wedge.

  14. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for Aircraft Acoustic Nacelle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  15. Time Scales, Bedforms and Bedload Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, B.

    2015-12-01

    Bedload transport rates in mountain streams may exhibit wide fluctuations even under constant flow conditions. A better understanding of bedload pulses is key to predict natural hazards induced by torrential activity and sediment issues in mountainous areas. Several processes such as bedforms migration, grain sorting and random particles' trajectories are evoked as the driving agents of pulse formation and development. Quantifying the effects of these processes is a difficult task. This work aims to investigate the interactions between bedload transport and bedform dynamics in steep gravel-bed rivers. Experiments are carried out in a 17-m long 60-cm wide flume inclined at an angle of 2.7%. The bed is initially flat and made of homogenous natural gravel with a mean diameter of 6 mm. We imposed 200 identical hydrographs (of 1 hr duration) at the flume inlet (the bed surface was not flattened out during these cycling floods). The input hydrograph and the input sediment discharge are nearly triangular. Bed topography is measured after each flood using ultrasound sensors while the bedload transport rate is steadily monitored at the outlet using accelerometers (accelerometers fixed on metallic plates record the impacts of the grains flowing out of the flume). For the sake of comparison, a similar experiment consisting of 19 floods of 10 hours is carried out under constant supply conditions. We show that accelerometers are a cost effective technique to obtain high-frequency bedload discharge data. Spectral analysis of the bedload timeseries is used to highlight the different time scales corresponding to different bedload transport processes. We show that long timeseries are necessary to capture the different processes that drive bedload transport, including the resilience time after a perturbation of the bed. The alternate bars that develop and migrate along the flume are found to significantly influence bedload transport rate fluctuations.

  16. Time-domain delay-and-sum beamforming for time-reversal detection of intermittent acoustic sources in flows.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, Ifanila; Fischer, Jeoffrey; Valeau, Vincent; Marx, David; Prax, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent-Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the identification of intermittent aeroacoustic sources in flows by using the time-domain beamforming technique. It is first shown that this technique can be seen as a time-reversal (TR) technique, working with approximate Green functions in the case of a shear flow. Some numerical experiments investigate the case of an array measurement of a generic acoustic pulse emitted in a wind-tunnel flow, with a realistic multi-arm spiral array. The results of the time-domain beamforming successfully match those given by a numerical TR technique over a wide range of flow speeds (reaching the transonic regime). It is shown how the results should be analyzed in a focusing plane parallel to the microphone array in order to estimate the location and emission time of the pulse source. An experimental application dealing with the aeroacoustic radiation of a bluff body in a wind-tunnel flow is also considered, and shows that some intermittent events can be clearly identified in the noise radiation. Time-domain beamforming is then an efficient tool for analyzing intermittent acoustic sources in flows, and is a computationally cheaper alternative to the numerical TR technique, which should be used for complex configurations where the Green function is not available. PMID:25373968

  17. An optimal modification of a Kalman filter for time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Kalman filter in question, which was implemented in the time scale algorithm TA(NIST), produces time scales with poor short-term stability. A simple modification of the error covariance matrix allows the filter to produce time scales with good stability at all averaging times, as verified by simulations of clock ensembles.

  18. Investigation of an acoustical holography system for real-time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecht, Barbara A.; Andre, Michael P.; Garlick, George F.; Shelby, Ronald L.; Shelby, Jerod O.; Lehman, Constance D.

    1998-07-01

    A new prototype imaging system based on ultrasound transmission through the object of interest -- acoustical holography -- was developed which incorporates significant improvements in acoustical and optical design. This system is being evaluated for potential clinical application in the musculoskeletal system, interventional radiology, pediatrics, monitoring of tumor ablation, vascular imaging and breast imaging. System limiting resolution was estimated using a line-pair target with decreasing line thickness and equal separation. For a swept frequency beam from 2.6 - 3.0 MHz, the minimum resolution was 0.5 lp/mm. Apatite crystals were suspended in castor oil to approximate breast microcalcifications. Crystals from 0.425 - 1.18 mm in diameter were well resolved in the acoustic zoom mode. Needle visibility was examined with both a 14-gauge biopsy needle and a 0.6 mm needle. The needle tip was clearly visible throughout the dynamic imaging sequence as it was slowly inserted into a RMI tissue-equivalent breast biopsy phantom. A selection of human images was acquired in several volunteers: a 25 year-old female volunteer with normal breast tissue, a lateral view of the elbow joint showing muscle fascia and tendon insertions, and the superficial vessels in the forearm. Real-time video images of these studies will be presented. In all of these studies, conventional sonography was used for comparison. These preliminary investigations with the new prototype acoustical holography system showed favorable results in comparison to state-of-the-art pulse-echo ultrasound and demonstrate it to be suitable for further clinical study. The new patient interfaces will facilitate orthopedic soft tissue evaluation, study of superficial vascular structures and potentially breast imaging.

  19. Where the ocean influences the impulse response and its effect on synchronous changes of acoustic travel time.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2011-12-01

    In 1983, sounds at 133 Hz, 0.06 s resolution were transmitted in the Pacific for five days at 2 min intervals over 3709 km between bottom-mounted instruments maintained with atomic clocks. In 1989, a technique was developed to measure changes in acoustic travel time with an accuracy of 135 microseconds at 2 min intervals for selected windows of travel time within the impulse response. The data have short-lived 1 to 10 ms oscillations of travel time with periods less than a few days. Excluding tidal effects, different windows exhibited significant synchronized changes in travel time for periods shorter than 10 h. In the 1980s, this phenomenon was not understood because internal waves have correlation lengths of a few kilometers which are smaller than the way sound was thought to sample the ocean along well-separated and distinct rays corresponding to different windows. The paradox's resolution comes from modern theories that replace the ray-picture with finite wavelength representations that predict sound can be influenced in the upper ocean over horizontal scales such as 20 km or more. Thus, different windows are influenced by the same short-scale fluctuations of sound speed. This conclusion is supported by the data and numerical simulations of the impulse response. PMID:22225021

  20. Teaching about time by understanding Geologic Time Scales: The Geological Society of America Geologic Time Scale and its history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.; Walker, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic time scales, of one form or another, are used in most undergraduate geosciences courses, even including introductory physical geology or equivalent. However, satisfactory discussions of how geologic time scales originated, and how they have evolved to modern versions, are far too often conveniently or inconveniently left out of classroom discussions. Yet it is these kinds of discussions that have the potential of solidifying student appreciation of deep time and rates of geologic processes. We use the history and development of the Geological Society of America Geologic Time Scale, which reflects major developments in the fields of stratigraphy, geochronology, magnetic polarity stratigraphy, astrochronology, and chemostratigraphy, as a focus of how specific details of time scales can be used to teach about time. Advances in all of these fields have allowed many parts of the time scale to be calibrated to precisions approaching less than 0.05 %. Notable time intervals for which collaborative, multifaceted efforts have led to dramatic improvements in our understanding of the character and temporal resolution of key evolutionary events, in both marine and terrestrial environments, include the Triassic-Jurassic, Permo-Triassic, and Neoproterozoic-Phanerozoic boundaries (or transitions). Many of the details, but certainly not all, can be incorporated in discussions of how we know about geologic time in the classroom. For example, we presently understand that both the end-Permian ecological crisis and the biostratigraphic Permian-Triassic boundary, as calibrated by conodonts, lie within a ca. 700 ka long normal polarity chron. The reverse to normal polarity transition at the beginning of this chron is ca. 100 ka earlier than the ecological crisis and thus slightly older than the current estimate, based on high precision U-Pb zircon age determinations, of ca. 252.4 Ma for the Permian-Triassic boundary. This polarity transition occurred during the early part of

  1. Detection of crossover time scales in multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Erjia; Leung, Yee

    2013-04-01

    Fractal is employed in this paper as a scale-based method for the identification of the scaling behavior of time series. Many spatial and temporal processes exhibiting complex multi(mono)-scaling behaviors are fractals. One of the important concepts in fractals is crossover time scale(s) that separates distinct regimes having different fractal scaling behaviors. A common method is multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). The detection of crossover time scale(s) is, however, relatively subjective since it has been made without rigorous statistical procedures and has generally been determined by eye balling or subjective observation. Crossover time scales such determined may be spurious and problematic. It may not reflect the genuine underlying scaling behavior of a time series. The purpose of this paper is to propose a statistical procedure to model complex fractal scaling behaviors and reliably identify the crossover time scales under MF-DFA. The scaling-identification regression model, grounded on a solid statistical foundation, is first proposed to describe multi-scaling behaviors of fractals. Through the regression analysis and statistical inference, we can (1) identify the crossover time scales that cannot be detected by eye-balling observation, (2) determine the number and locations of the genuine crossover time scales, (3) give confidence intervals for the crossover time scales, and (4) establish the statistically significant regression model depicting the underlying scaling behavior of a time series. To substantive our argument, the regression model is applied to analyze the multi-scaling behaviors of avian-influenza outbreaks, water consumption, daily mean temperature, and rainfall of Hong Kong. Through the proposed model, we can have a deeper understanding of fractals in general and a statistical approach to identify multi-scaling behavior under MF-DFA in particular.

  2. Real-time analysis system for gas turbine ground test acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robert T

    2003-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a data system upgrade to the Pratt and Whitney facility designed for making acoustic measurements on aircraft gas turbine engines. A data system upgrade was undertaken because the return-on-investment was determined to be extremely high. That is, the savings on the first test series recovered the cost of the hardware. The commercial system selected for this application utilizes 48 input channels, which allows either 1/3 octave and/or narrow-band analyses to be preformed real-time. A high-speed disk drive allows raw data from all 48 channels to be stored simultaneously while the analyses are being preformed. Results of tests to ensure compliance of the new system with regulations and with existing systems are presented. Test times were reduced from 5 h to 1 h of engine run time per engine configuration by the introduction of this new system. Conservative cost reduction estimates for future acoustic testing are 75% on items related to engine run time and 50% on items related to the overall length of the test. PMID:14582877

  3. Multi-stage pulse tube cryocooler with acoustic impedance constructed to reduce transient cool down time and thermal loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, David R. (Inventor); Wilson, Kyle B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The cool down time for a multi-stage, pulse tube cryocooler is reduced by configuring at least a portion of the acoustic impedance of a selected stage, higher than the first stage, so that it surrounds the cold head of the selected stage. The surrounding acoustic impedance of the selected stage is mounted in thermally conductive connection to the warm region of the selected stage for cooling the acoustic impedance and is fabricated of a high thermal diffusivity, low thermal radiation emissivity material, preferably aluminum.

  4. Wideband Multichannel Time-Reversal Processing for Acoustic Communications in a Tunnel-like Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Robbins, C L; Guidry, B L; Poggio, A J; Dowla, F; Hertzog, C A

    2006-01-12

    The development of multichannel time-reversal (T/R) processing techniques continues to progress rapidly especially when the need to communicate in a highly reverberative environment becomes critical. The underlying T/R concept is based on time-reversing the Green's function characterizing the uncertain communications channel investigating the deleterious dispersion and multipath effects. In this paper, attention is focused on two major objectives: (1) wideband communications leading to a time reference modulation technique; and (2) multichannel acoustic communications in a tunnel (or cave or pipe) with many obstructions, multipath returns, severe background noise, disturbances, long propagation paths ({approx}180) with disruptions (bends). For this extremely hostile environment, it is shown that multichannel T/R receivers can easily be extended to the wideband designs while demonstrating their performance in both the ''canonical'' stairwell of our previous work as well as a tunnel-like structure. Acoustic information signals are transmitted with an 8-element host or base station array to two client receivers with a significant loss in signal levels due to the propagation environment. In this paper, the results of the new wideband T/R processor and modulation scheme are discussed to demonstrate the overall performance for both high (24-bit) and low (1-bit) bit level analog-to-digital (A/D) converter designs. These results are validated by performing proof-of-principle acoustic communications experiments in air. It is shown that the resulting T/R receivers are capable of extracting the transmitted coded sequence from noisy microphone array measurements with zero-bit error.

  5. A Study of Mexican Free-Tailed Bat Chirp Syllables: Bayesian Functional Mixed Models for Nonstationary Acoustic Time Series

    PubMed Central

    MARTINEZ, Josue G.; BOHN, Kirsten M.; CARROLL, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new approach to analyze chirp syllables of free-tailed bats from two regions of Texas in which they are predominant: Austin and College Station. Our goal is to characterize any systematic regional differences in the mating chirps and assess whether individual bats have signature chirps. The data are analyzed by modeling spectrograms of the chirps as responses in a Bayesian functional mixed model. Given the variable chirp lengths, we compute the spectrograms on a relative time scale interpretable as the relative chirp position, using a variable window overlap based on chirp length. We use 2D wavelet transforms to capture correlation within the spectrogram in our modeling and obtain adaptive regularization of the estimates and inference for the regions-specific spectrograms. Our model includes random effect spectrograms at the bat level to account for correlation among chirps from the same bat, and to assess relative variability in chirp spectrograms within and between bats. The modeling of spectrograms using functional mixed models is a general approach for the analysis of replicated nonstationary time series, such as our acoustical signals, to relate aspects of the signals to various predictors, while accounting for between-signal structure. This can be done on raw spectrograms when all signals are of the same length, and can be done using spectrograms defined on a relative time scale for signals of variable length in settings where the idea of defining correspondence across signals based on relative position is sensible. PMID:23997376

  6. A Study of Mexican Free-Tailed Bat Chirp Syllables: Bayesian Functional Mixed Models for Nonstationary Acoustic Time Series.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Josue G; Bohn, Kirsten M; Carroll, Raymond J; Morris, Jeffrey S

    2013-06-01

    We describe a new approach to analyze chirp syllables of free-tailed bats from two regions of Texas in which they are predominant: Austin and College Station. Our goal is to characterize any systematic regional differences in the mating chirps and assess whether individual bats have signature chirps. The data are analyzed by modeling spectrograms of the chirps as responses in a Bayesian functional mixed model. Given the variable chirp lengths, we compute the spectrograms on a relative time scale interpretable as the relative chirp position, using a variable window overlap based on chirp length. We use 2D wavelet transforms to capture correlation within the spectrogram in our modeling and obtain adaptive regularization of the estimates and inference for the regions-specific spectrograms. Our model includes random effect spectrograms at the bat level to account for correlation among chirps from the same bat, and to assess relative variability in chirp spectrograms within and between bats. The modeling of spectrograms using functional mixed models is a general approach for the analysis of replicated nonstationary time series, such as our acoustical signals, to relate aspects of the signals to various predictors, while accounting for between-signal structure. This can be done on raw spectrograms when all signals are of the same length, and can be done using spectrograms defined on a relative time scale for signals of variable length in settings where the idea of defining correspondence across signals based on relative position is sensible. PMID:23997376

  7. Acoustic and aerodynamic testing of a scale model variable pitch fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.; Kazin, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    A fully reversible pitch scale model fan with variable pitch rotor blades was tested to determine its aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics. The single-stage fan has a design tip speed of 1160 ft/sec (353.568 m/sec) at a bypass pressure ratio of 1.5. Three operating lines were investigated. Test results show that the blade pitch for minimum noise also resulted in the highest efficiency for all three operating lines at all thrust levels. The minimum perceived noise on a 200-ft (60.96 m) sideline was obtained with the nominal nozzle. At 44% of takeoff thrust, the PNL reduction between blade pitch and minimum noise blade pitch is 1.8 PNdB for the nominal nozzle and decreases with increasing thrust. The small nozzle (6% undersized) has the highest efficiency at all part thrust conditions for the minimum noise blade pitch setting; although, the noise is about 1.0 PNdB higher for the small nozzle at the minimum noise blade pitch position.

  8. Scaling of plane-wave functions in statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustic Holography (SONAH) is a Patch Holography method, meaning that it can be applied in cases where the measurement area covers only part of the source surface. The method performs projections directly in the spatial domain, avoiding the use of spatial discrete Fourier transforms and the associated errors. First, an inverse problem is solved using regularization. For each calculation point a multiplication must then be performed with two transfer vectors--one to get the sound pressure and the other to get the particle velocity. Considering SONAH based on sound pressure measurements, existing derivations consider only pressure reconstruction when setting up the inverse problem, so the evanescent wave amplification associated with the calculation of particle velocity is not taken into account in the regularized solution of the inverse problem. The present paper introduces a scaling of the applied plane wave functions that takes the amplification into account, and it is shown that the previously published virtual source-plane retraction has almost the same effect. The effectiveness of the different solutions is verified through a set of simulated measurements. PMID:25373969

  9. Internal Acoustics Measurements of a Full Scale Advanced Ducted Propulsor Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa Maria, O. L.; Soderman, P. T.; Horne, W. C.; Jones, M. G.; Bock, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustics measurements of a Pratt & Whitney full-scale ADP (Advanced Ducted Propulsor), an ultrahigh by-pass ratio engine, were conducted in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. This paper presents data from measurements taken from sensors on a fan exit guide vane in the ADP. Data from two sensors, one at mid-span and the other at the tip of the fan exit guide vane, are presented. At the blade passage frequency (BPF), the levels observed at the various engine and wind speeds were higher at the mid-span sensor than the tip sensor. The coherence between these internal sensors and external microphones were calculated and plotted as a function of angle (angles ranged from 5 degrees to 160 degrees) relative to the ADP longitudinal axis. At the highest engine and wind speeds, the coherence between the tip sensor and the external microphones was observed to decrease at higher multiples of the BPF. These results suggest that the rotor-stator interaction tones are stronger in the mid-span region than at the tip.

  10. Time scales in Galveston Bay: An unsteady estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayson, Matthew D.; Gross, Edward S.; Hetland, Robert D.; Fringer, Oliver B.

    2016-04-01

    Estuarine time scales including the turnover, particle e-folding time, the age (calculated with a passive tracer), and residence time (calculated with Lagrangian particles) were computed using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Galveston Bay, a low-flow, partially stratified estuary. Time scales were computed during a time period when river flow varied by several orders of magnitude and all time scales therefore exhibited significant temporal variability because of the unsteadiness of the system. The spatial distributions of age and residence time were qualitatively similar and increased from 15 days in a shipping channel to >45 days in the upper estuary. Volume-averaged age and residence time decreased during high-flow conditions. Bulk time scales, including the freshwater and salinity turnover times, were far more variable due to the changing river discharge and salt flux through the estuary mouth. A criterion for calculating a suitable averaging time is discussed to satisfy a steady state assumption and to estimate a more representative bulk time scale. When scaled with a freshwater advective time, all time scales were approximately equal to the advective time scale during high-flow conditions and many times higher during low-flow conditions. The mean age, Lagrangian residence, and flushing times exhibited a relationship that was weakly dependent on the freshwater advective time scale demonstrating predictability even in an unsteady, realistic estuary.

  11. Performance assessment and calibration of a profiling lab-scale acoustic Doppler velocimeter for application over mixed sand-gravel beds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic Doppler velocimetry has made high-resolution turbulence measurements in sediment-laden flows possible. Recent developments have resulted in a commercially available lab-scale acoustic Doppler profiling device, a Nortek Vectrino II, that allows for three-dimensional velocity data to be colle...

  12. Acoustic travel time gauges for in-situ determination of pressure and temperature in multi-anvil apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Kung, Jennifer; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we developed a new method for in-situ pressure determination in multi-anvil, high-pressure apparatus using an acoustic travel time approach within the framework of acoustoelasticity. The ultrasonic travel times of polycrystalline Al2O3 were calibrated against NaCl pressure scale up to 15 GPa and 900 °C in a Kawai-type double-stage multi-anvil apparatus in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation, thereby providing a convenient and reliable gauge for pressure determination at ambient and high temperatures. The pressures derived from this new travel time method are in excellent agreement with those from the fixed-point methods. Application of this new pressure gauge in an offline experiment revealed a remarkable agreement of the densities of coesite with those from the previous single crystal compression studies under hydrostatic conditions, thus providing strong validation for the current travel time pressure scale. The travel time approach not only can be used for continuous in-situ pressure determination at room temperature, high temperatures, during compression and decompression, but also bears a unique capability that none of the previous scales can deliver, i.e., simultaneous pressure and temperature determination with a high accuracy (±0.16 GPa in pressure and ±17 °C in temperature). Therefore, the new in-situ Al2O3 pressure gauge is expected to enable new and expanded opportunities for offline laboratory studies of solid and liquid materials under high pressure and high temperature in multi-anvil apparatus.

  13. Acoustic travel time gauges for in-situ determination of pressure and temperature in multi-anvil apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng; Kung, Jennifer; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2015-08-14

    In this study, we developed a new method for in-situ pressure determination in multi-anvil, high-pressure apparatus using an acoustic travel time approach within the framework of acoustoelasticity. The ultrasonic travel times of polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were calibrated against NaCl pressure scale up to 15 GPa and 900 °C in a Kawai-type double-stage multi-anvil apparatus in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation, thereby providing a convenient and reliable gauge for pressure determination at ambient and high temperatures. The pressures derived from this new travel time method are in excellent agreement with those from the fixed-point methods. Application of this new pressure gauge in an offline experiment revealed a remarkable agreement of the densities of coesite with those from the previous single crystal compression studies under hydrostatic conditions, thus providing strong validation for the current travel time pressure scale. The travel time approach not only can be used for continuous in-situ pressure determination at room temperature, high temperatures, during compression and decompression, but also bears a unique capability that none of the previous scales can deliver, i.e., simultaneous pressure and temperature determination with a high accuracy (±0.16 GPa in pressure and ±17 °C in temperature). Therefore, the new in-situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} pressure gauge is expected to enable new and expanded opportunities for offline laboratory studies of solid and liquid materials under high pressure and high temperature in multi-anvil apparatus.

  14. Acoustic Performance of a Real-Time Three-Dimensional Sound-Reproduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, Kenneth J., II; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Aumann, Aric R.

    2013-01-01

    The Exterior Effects Room (EER) is a 39-seat auditorium at the NASA Langley Research Center and was built to support psychoacoustic studies of aircraft community noise. The EER has a real-time simulation environment which includes a three-dimensional sound-reproduction system. This system requires real-time application of equalization filters to compensate for spectral coloration of the sound reproduction due to installation and room effects. This paper describes the efforts taken to develop the equalization filters for use in the real-time sound-reproduction system and the subsequent analysis of the system s acoustic performance. The acoustic performance of the compensated and uncompensated sound-reproduction system is assessed for its crossover performance, its performance under stationary and dynamic conditions, the maximum spatialized sound pressure level it can produce from a single virtual source, and for the spatial uniformity of a generated sound field. Additionally, application examples are given to illustrate the compensated sound-reproduction system performance using recorded aircraft flyovers

  15. A Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of Earth's geomagnetic field create marker horizons that are readily detected in sedimentary and volcanic rocks worldwide. An accurate and precise chronology of these geomagnetic field instabilities is fundamental to understanding several aspects of Quaternary climate, dynamo processes, and surface processes. For example, stratigraphic correlation between marine sediment and polar ice records of climate change across the cryospheres benefits from a highly resolved record of reversals and excursions. The temporal patterns of dynamo behavior may reflect physical interactions between the molten outer core and the solid inner core or lowermost mantle. These interactions may control reversal frequency and shape the weak magnetic fields that arise during successive dynamo instabilities. Moreover, weakening of the axial dipole during reversals and excursions enhances the production of cosmogenic isotopes that are used in sediment and ice core stratigraphy and surface exposure dating. The Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS) is based on the direct dating of transitional polarity states recorded by lava flows using the 40Ar/39Ar method, in parallel with astrochronologic age models of marine sediments in which O isotope and magnetic records have been obtained. A review of data from Quaternary lava flows and sediments yields a GITS comprising 10 polarity reversals and 27 excursions during the past 2.6 million years. Nine of the ten reversals bounding chrons and subchrons are associated with 40Ar/39Ar ages of transitionally-magnetized lava flows. The tenth, the Guass-Matuyama chron boundary, is tightly bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar dated ash deposits. Of the 27 well-documented excursions, 14 occurred during the Matuyama chron and 13 during the Brunhes chron; 19 have been dated directly using the 40Ar/39Ar method on transitionally-magnetized volcanic rocks and form the backbone of the GITS. Excursions are clearly not the rare phenomena once thought

  16. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  17. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range. PMID:24491527

  18. Time domain computational modeling of viscothermal acoustic propagation in catalytic converter substrates with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, N. S.; Selamet, A.; Miazgowicz, K. D.; Tallio, K. V.; Parks, S. J.

    2005-08-01

    Models for viscothermal effects in catalytic converter substrates are developed for time domain computational methods. The models are suitable for use in one-dimensional approaches for the prediction of exhaust system performance (engine tuning characteristics) and radiated sound levels. Starting with the ``low reduced frequency'' equations for viscothermal acoustic propagation in capillary tubes, time domain submodels are developed for the frequency-dependent wall friction, frequency-dependent wall heat transfer, and porous wall effects exhibited by catalytic converter substrates. Results from a time domain computational approach employing these submodels are compared to available analytical solutions for the low reduced frequency equations. The computational results are shown to agree well with the analytical solutions for capillary geometries representative of automotive catalytic converter substrates.

  19. Transcranial ultrasonic therapy based on time reversal of acoustically induced cavitation bubble signature

    PubMed Central

    Gâteau, Jérôme; Marsac, Laurent; Pernot, Mathieu; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Tanter, Mickaël; Fink, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Brain treatment through the skull with High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be achieved with multichannel arrays and adaptive focusing techniques such as time-reversal. This method requires a reference signal to be either emitted by a real source embedded in brain tissues or computed from a virtual source, using the acoustic properties of the skull derived from CT images. This non-invasive computational method focuses with precision, but suffers from modeling and repositioning errors that reduce the accessible acoustic pressure at the focus in comparison with fully experimental time-reversal using an implanted hydrophone. In this paper, this simulation-based targeting has been used experimentally as a first step for focusing through an ex vivo human skull at a single location. It has enabled the creation of a cavitation bubble at focus that spontaneously emitted an ultrasonic wave received by the array. This active source signal has allowed 97%±1.1% of the reference pressure (hydrophone-based) to be restored at the geometrical focus. To target points around the focus with an optimal pressure level, conventional electronic steering from the initial focus has been combined with bubble generation. Thanks to step by step bubble generation, the electronic steering capabilities of the array through the skull were improved. PMID:19770084

  20. On time scales and time synchronization using LORAN-C as a time reference signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    The long term performance of the eight LORAN-C chains is presented in terms of the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) of the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO); and the use of the LORAN-C navigation system for maintaining the user's clock to a UTC scale is described. The atomic time scale and the UTC of several national laboratories and observatories relative to the international atomic time are reported. Typical performance of several NASA tracking station clocks, relative to the USNO master clock, is also presented.

  1. Angular measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients by the inversion of V(z, t) data with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    For inspection of mechanical properties and integrity of critical components such as integrated circuits or composite materials by acoustic methodology, it is imperative to evaluate their acoustic reflection coefficients, which are in close correlation with the elastic properties, thickness, density, and attenuation and interface adhesion of these layered structures. An experimental method based on angular spectrum to evaluate the acoustic coefficient as a function of the incident angle, θ, and frequency, ω, is presented with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy. In order to achieve a high spatial resolution for evaluation of thin plates with thicknesses about one or two wavelengths, a point focusing transducer with a nominal center frequency of 25 MHz is adopted. By measuring the V(z, t) data in pulse mode, the reflection coefficient, R(θ, ω), can be reconstructed from its two-dimensional spectrum. It brings simplicity to experimental setup and measurement procedure since only single translation of the transducer in the vertical direction is competent for incident angle and frequency acquisition. It overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional methods requiring the spectroscopy for frequency scanning and/or ultrasonic goniometer for angular scanning. Two substrates of aluminum and Plexiglas and four stainless plates with various thicknesses of 100 μm, 150 μm, 200 μm, and 250 μm were applied. The acoustic reflection coefficients are consistent with the corresponding theoretical calculations. It opened the way of non-destructive methodology to evaluate the elastic and geometrical properties of very thin multi-layers structures simultaneously.

  2. Improved tests for global warming trend extraction in ocean acoustic travel-time data. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bottone, S.; Gray, H.L.; Woodward, W.A.

    1996-04-01

    A possible indication of the existence of global climate warming is the presence of a trend in the travel time of an acoustic signal along several ocean paths over a period of many years. This report describes new, improved tests for testing for linear trend in time series data with correlated residuals. We introduce a bootstrap based procedure to test for trend in this setting which is better adapted to controlling the significance levels. The procedure is applied to acoustic travel time data generated by the MASIG ocean model. It is shown how to generalize the improved method to multivariate, or vector, time series, which, in the ocean acoustics setting, corresponds to travel time data on many ocean paths. An appendix describes the TRENDS software, which enables the user to perform these calculations using a graphical user interface (GUI).

  3. Tone and Broadband Noise Separation from Acoustic Data of a Scale-Model Contra-Rotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave; Stephens, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Renewed interest in contra-rotating open rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools for better design and improved acoustical performance. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open rotor acoustic spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and also for validating the open rotor noise simulation codes. The technique of phase averaging has been employed to separate the tone and broadband components from a single rotor, but this method does not work for the two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor. A new signal processing technique was recently developed to process the contra-rotating open rotor acoustic data. The technique was first tested using acoustic data taken of a hobby aircraft open rotor propeller, and reported previously. The intent of the present work is to verify and validate the applicability of the new technique to a realistic one-fifth scale open rotor model which has 12 forward and 10 aft contra-rotating blades operating at realistic forward flight Mach numbers and tip speeds. The results and discussions of that study are presented in this paper.

  4. Tone and Broadband Noise Separation from Acoustic Data of a Scale-Model Counter-Rotating Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, David; Stephens, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Renewed interest in contra-rotating open rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools for better design and improved acoustical performance. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open rotor acoustic spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and also for validating the open rotor noise simulation codes. The technique of phase averaging has been employed to separate the tone and broadband components from a single rotor, but this method does not work for the two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor. A new signal processing technique was recently developed to process the contra-rotating open rotor acoustic data. The technique was first tested using acoustic data taken of a hobby aircraft open rotor propeller, and reported previously. The intent of the present work is to verify and validate the applicability of the new technique to a realistic one-fifth scale open rotor model which has 12 forward and 10 aft contra-rotating blades operating at realistic forward flight Mach numbers and tip speeds. The results and discussions of that study are presented in this paper.

  5. Computational Analyses in Support of Sub-scale Diffuser Testing for the A-3 Facility. Part 3; Aero-Acoustic Analyses and Experimental Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Graham, Jason S.; McVay, Greg P.; Langford, Lester L.

    2008-01-01

    A unique assessment of acoustic similarity scaling laws and acoustic analogy methodologies in predicting the far-field acoustic signature from a sub-scale altitude rocket test facility at the NASA Stennis Space Center was performed. A directional, point-source similarity analysis was implemented for predicting the acoustic far-field. In this approach, experimental acoustic data obtained from "similar" rocket engine tests were appropriately scaled using key geometric and dynamic parameters. The accuracy of this engineering-level method is discussed by comparing the predictions with acoustic far-field measurements obtained. In addition, a CFD solver was coupled with a Lilley's acoustic analogy formulation to determine the improvement of using a physics-based methodology over an experimental correlation approach. In the current work, steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculations were used to model the internal flow of the rocket engine and altitude diffuser. These internal flow simulations provided the necessary realistic input conditions for external plume simulations. The CFD plume simulations were then used to provide the spatial turbulent noise source distributions in the acoustic analogy calculations. Preliminary findings of these studies will be discussed.

  6. Linking Response-Time Parameters onto a Common Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2010-01-01

    Although response times on test items are recorded on a natural scale, the scale for some of the parameters in the lognormal response-time model (van der Linden, 2006) is not fixed. As a result, when the model is used to periodically calibrate new items in a testing program, the parameter are not automatically mapped onto a common scale. Several…

  7. Terahertz acoustic wave on piezoelectric semiconductor film via large-scale molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikata, Ryo; Tsuruta, Kenji; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Fujimori, Kazuhiro

    2015-07-01

    By atomistic simulation, we investigate an acoustic wave at THz frequencies in nanoscale thin films of aluminum-nitride piezoelectric material. A mode analysis reveals that the thickness longitudinal mode along the [0001] direction exists stably at the atomic level. To control the acoustic wave, we introduce a phononic crystal (PC) structure in the films. We determine the band-gap frequency in the phonon dispersion of the PC structure and confirm via molecular dynamics simulation that the acoustic wave within the band-gap frequency can be confined by a waveguide structure with a PC. The possibility of designing and controlling a THz acoustic wave in a nanoscale thin film with a PC is thereby demonstrated.

  8. Clinical Studies of Real-Time Monitoring of Lithotripter Performance Using Passive Acoustic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, T. G.; Fedele, F.; Coleman, A. J.; McCarthy, C.; Ryves, S.; Hurrell, A. M.; De Stefano, A.; White, P. R.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the development and clinical testing of a passive device which monitors the passive acoustic emissions generated within the patient's body during Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL). Designed and clinically tested so that it can be operated by a nurse, the device analyses the echoes generated in the body in response to each ESWL shock, and so gives real time shock-by-shock feedback on whether the stone was at the focus of the lithotripter, and if so whether the previous shock contributed to stone fragmentation when that shock reached the focus. A shock is defined as being `effective' if these two conditions are satisfied. Not only can the device provide real-time feedback to the operator, but the trends in shock `effectiveness' can inform treatment. In particular, at any time during the treatment (once a statistically significant number of shocks have been delivered), the percentage of shocks which were `effective' provides a treatment score TS(t) which reflects the effectiveness of the treatment up to that point. The TS(t) figure is automatically delivered by the device without user intervention. Two clinical studies of the device were conducted, the ethics guidelines permitting only use of the value of TS(t) obtained at the end of treatment (this value is termed the treatment score TS0). The acoustically-derived treatment score was compared with the treatment score CTS2 given by the consultant urologist at the three-week patient's follow-up appointment. In the first clinical study (phase 1), records could be compared for 30 out of the 118 patients originally recruited, and the results of phase 1 were used to refine the parameter values (the `rules') with which the acoustic device provides its treatment score. These rules were tested in phase 2, for which records were compared for 49 of the 85 patients recruited. Considering just the phase 2 results (since the phase 1 data were used to draw up the `rules' under which phase 2 operated

  9. Time-domain analysis of resonant acoustic nonlinearity arising from cracks in multilayer ceramic capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ward L.; Kim, Sudook A.; White, Grady S.; Herzberger, Jaemi; Peterson, Kirsten L.; Heyliger, Paul R.

    2016-02-01

    Acoustic nonlinearity of cracked and uncracked multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) was characterized through time-domain analysis of resonant waveforms following tone-burst excitation. A phase-sensitive receiver was employed to measure the phase, relative to a reference sinusoid, of decaying oscillations of a resonant mode near 1 MHz that was excited through ferroelectric coupling within the barium-titanate-based ceramic of the MLCC. Amplitude dependence of the resonant frequency during decay of the oscillations was characterized through measurements of changes in the resonant phase versus time. Waveforms were analyzed by fitting the recorded RF amplitude versus time to a decaying exponential and inserting the parameters of this fit into a second function to fit the time-dependent phase, with amplitude dependence of the resonant frequency incorporated in the second function. The measurements and analyses were performed on unmounted type-1210 MLCCs before and after quenching in ice water from elevated temperatures. This thermal treatment generated surface-breaking cracks in a fraction of the specimens. Measurements of a nonlinear parameter B of the capacitors before quenching were used to set a range corresponding to plus and minus three standard deviations (±3σ) relative to the mean of a Gaussian fit to the distribution of this parameter. 93 % of the values of B determined for heat-treated MLCCs with cracks were outside of this ±3σ range of the as-received MLCCs, while only 10 % of the values of B for heat-treated MLCCs without visible cracks were outside this range. These results indicate that time-domain nonlinear measurements with tone-burst excitation are a promising approach for rapid nondestructive detection of cracks that have no significant initial effect on the electrical characteristics of an MLCC but can evolve into conductive pathways during service and lead to electrical-device failure. They also illustrate the potential of this approach for

  10. Investigation of acoustic cavitation energy in a large-scale sonoreactor.

    PubMed

    Son, Younggyu; Lim, Myunghee; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation energy distributions were investigated for various frequencies such as 35, 72, 110 and 170 kHz in a large-scale sonoreactor. The energy analyses were conducted in three-dimensions and the highest and most stable cavitation energy distribution was obtained not in 35 kHz but in 72 kHz. However, the half-cavitation-energy distance was larger in the case of 35 kHz ultrasound than in the case of 72 kHz, demonstrating that cavitation energy for one cycle was higher for a lower frequency. This discrepancy was due to the large surface area of the cavitation-energy-meter probe. In addition, 110 and 170 kHz ultrasound showed a very low and poor cavitation energy distribution. Therefore larger input power was required to optimize the use of higher frequency ultrasound in the sonoreactor with long-irradiation distance. The relationship between cavitation energy and sonochemical efficiency using potassium iodide (KI) dosimetry was best fitted quadratically. From 7.77 x 10(-10) to 4.42 x 10(-9)mol/J of sonochemical efficiency was evaluated for the cavitation energy from 31.76 to 103. 67 W. In addition, the cavitation energy attenuation was estimated under the assumption that cavitation energy measured in this study would be equivalent to sound intensity, resulting in 0.10, 0.18 and 2.44 m(-1) of the attenuation coefficient (alpha) for 35, 72 and 110 kHz, respectively. Furthermore, alpha/(frequency)(2) was not constant, as some previous studies have suggested. PMID:19144557

  11. The Space-Time Conservative Schemes for Large-Scale, Time-Accurate Flow Simulations with Tetrahedral Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Friedlander, David J.; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of development of unstructured mesh methods, high-fidelity time-accurate simulations are still predominantly carried out on structured, or unstructured hexahedral meshes by using high-order finite-difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO), or hybrid schemes formed by their combinations. In this work, the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method is used to simulate several flow problems including supersonic jet/shock interaction and its impact on launch vehicle acoustics, and direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows using tetrahedral meshes. This paper provides a status report for the continuing development of the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) numerical and software framework under the Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences (RCA) project. Solution accuracy and large-scale parallel performance of the numerical framework is assessed with the goal of providing a viable paradigm for future high-fidelity flow physics simulations.

  12. Automatic fault diagnosis of rotating machines by time-scale manifold ridge analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2013-10-01

    This paper explores the improved time-scale representation by considering the non-linear property for effectively identifying rotating machine faults in the time-scale domain. A new time-scale signature, called time-scale manifold (TSM), is proposed in this study through combining phase space reconstruction (PSR), continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and manifold learning. For the TSM generation, an optimal scale band is selected to eliminate the influence of unconcerned scale components, and the noise in the selected band is suppressed by manifold learning to highlight the inherent non-linear structure of faulty impacts. The TSM reserves the non-stationary information and reveals the non-linear structure of the fault pattern, with the merits of noise suppression and resolution improvement. The TSM ridge is further extracted by seeking the ridge with energy concentration lying on the TSM signature. It inherits the advantages of both the TSM and ridge analysis, and hence is beneficial to demodulation of the fault information. Through analyzing the instantaneous amplitude (IA) of the TSM ridge, in which the noise is nearly not contained, the fault characteristic frequency can be exactly identified. The whole process of the proposed fault diagnosis scheme is automatic, and its effectiveness has been verified by means of typical faulty vibration/acoustic signals from a gearbox and bearings. A reliable performance of the new method is validated in comparison with traditional enveloping methods for rotating machine fault diagnosis.

  13. Detecting separate time scales in genetic expression data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Biological processes occur on a vast range of time scales, and many of them occur concurrently. As a result, system-wide measurements of gene expression have the potential to capture many of these processes simultaneously. The challenge however, is to separate these processes and time scales in the data. In many cases the number of processes and their time scales is unknown. This issue is particularly relevant to developmental biologists, who are interested in processes such as growth, segmentation and differentiation, which can all take place simultaneously, but on different time scales. Results We introduce a flexible and statistically rigorous method for detecting different time scales in time-series gene expression data, by identifying expression patterns that are temporally shifted between replicate datasets. We apply our approach to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-cycle dataset and an Arabidopsis thaliana root developmental dataset. In both datasets our method successfully detects processes operating on several different time scales. Furthermore we show that many of these time scales can be associated with particular biological functions. Conclusions The spatiotemporal modules identified by our method suggest the presence of multiple biological processes, acting at distinct time scales in both the Arabidopsis root and yeast. Using similar large-scale expression datasets, the identification of biological processes acting at multiple time scales in many organisms is now possible. PMID:20565716

  14. Time-Efficient High-Rate Data Flooding in One-Dimensional Acoustic Underwater Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jae Kyun; Seo, Bo-Min; Yun, Kyungsu; Cho, Ho-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Because underwater communication environments have poor characteristics, such as severe attenuation, large propagation delays and narrow bandwidths, data is normally transmitted at low rates through acoustic waves. On the other hand, as high traffic has recently been required in diverse areas, high rate transmission has become necessary. In this paper, transmission/reception timing schemes that maximize the time axis use efficiency to improve the resource efficiency for high rate transmission are proposed. The excellence of the proposed scheme is identified by examining the power distributions by node, rate bounds, power levels depending on the rates and number of nodes, and network split gains through mathematical analysis and numerical results. In addition, the simulation results show that the proposed scheme outperforms the existing packet train method. PMID:26528983

  15. Acoustic Masking Disrupts Time-Dependent Mechanisms of Memory Encoding in Word-List Recall

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Katheryn A.Q.; Dar, Jonathan; Wingfield, Arthur; Miller, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Recall of recently heard words is affected by the clarity of presentation: even if all words are presented with sufficient clarity for successful recognition, those that are more difficult to hear are less likely to be recalled. Such a result demonstrates that memory processing depends on more than whether a word is simply “recognized” versus “not-recognized”. More surprising is that when a single item in a list of spoken words is acoustically masked, prior words that were heard with full clarity are also less likely to be recalled. To account for such a phenomenon, we developed the Linking by Active Maintenance Model (LAMM). This computational model of perception and encoding predicts that these effects are time dependent. Here we challenge our model by investigating whether and how the impact of acoustic masking on memory depends on presentation rate. We find that a slower presentation rate causes a more disruptive impact of stimulus degradation on prior, clearly heard words than does a fast rate. These results are unexpected according to prior theories of effortful listening, but we demonstrate that they can be accounted for by LAMM. PMID:24838269

  16. Signal Restoration of Non-stationary Acoustic Signals in the Time Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babkin, Alexander S.

    1988-01-01

    Signal restoration is a method of transforming a nonstationary signal acquired by a ground based microphone to an equivalent stationary signal. The benefit of the signal restoration is a simplification of the flight test requirements because it could dispense with the need to acquire acoustic data with another aircraft flying in concert with the rotorcraft. The data quality is also generally improved because the contamination of the signal by the propeller and wind noise is not present. The restoration methodology can also be combined with other data acquisition methods, such as a multiple linear microphone array for further improvement of the test results. The methodology and software are presented for performing the signal restoration in the time domain. The method has no restrictions on flight path geometry or flight regimes. Only requirement is that the aircraft spatial position be known relative to the microphone location and synchronized with the acoustic data. The restoration process assumes that the moving source radiates a stationary signal, which is then transformed into a nonstationary signal by various modulation processes. The restoration contains only the modulation due to the source motion.

  17. Time-dependent seafloor acoustic backscatter (10-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, Daniel D; de Moustier, Christian P

    2003-11-01

    A time-dependent model of the acoustic intensity backscattered by the seafloor is described and compared with data from a calibrated, vertically oriented, echo-sounder operating at 33 and 93 kHz. The model incorporates the characteristics of the echo-sounder and transmitted pulse, and the water column spreading and absorption losses. Scattering from the water-sediment interface is predicted using Helmholtz-Kirchhoff theory, parametrized by the mean grain size, the coherent reflection coefficient, and the strength and exponent of a power-law roughness spectrum. The composite roughness approach of Jackson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 1410-1422 (1986)], modified for the finite duration of the transmitted signal, is used to predict backscatter from subbottom inhomogeneities. It depends on the sediment's volume scattering and attenuation coefficients, as well as the interface characteristics governing sound transmission into the sediment. Estimation of model parameters (mean grain size, roughness spectrum strength and exponent, volume scattering coefficient) reveals ambiguous ranges for the two spectral components. Analyses of model outputs and of physical measurements reported in the literature yield practical constraints on roughness spectrum parameter settings appropriate for echo-envelope-based sediment classification procedures. PMID:14650007

  18. A methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission signals to identify fracture timing from human cadaver spine impact tests.

    PubMed

    Arun, Mike W J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    While studies have used acoustic sensors to determine fracture initiation time in biomechanical studies, a systematic procedure is not established to process acoustic signals. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission data using signal processing techniques to identify fracture initiation time. The methodology was developed from testing a human cadaver lumbar spine column. Acoustic sensors were glued to all vertebrae, high-rate impact loading was applied, load-time histories were recorded (load cell), and fracture was documented using CT. Compression fracture occurred to L1 while other vertebrae were intact. FFT of raw voltage-time traces were used to determine an optimum frequency range associated with high decibel levels. Signals were bandpass filtered in this range. Bursting pattern was found in the fractured vertebra while signals from other vertebrae were silent. Bursting time was associated with time of fracture initiation. Force at fracture was determined using this time and force-time data. The methodology is independent of selecting parameters a priori such as fixing a voltage level(s), bandpass frequency and/or using force-time signal, and allows determination of force based on time identified during signal processing. The methodology can be used for different body regions in cadaver experiments. PMID:25241279

  19. Time-domain damping models in structural acoustics using digital filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parret-Fréaud, Augustin; Cotté, Benjamin; Chaigne, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a new approach in order to formulate well-posed time-domain damping models able to represent various frequency domain profiles of damping properties. The novelty of this approach is to represent the behavior law of a given material directly in a discrete-time framework as a digital filter, which is synthesized for each material from a discrete set of frequency-domain data such as complex modulus through an optimization process. A key point is the addition of specific constraints to this process in order to guarantee stability, causality and verification of thermodynamics second law when transposing the resulting discrete-time behavior law into the time domain. Thus, this method offers a framework which is particularly suitable for time-domain simulations in structural dynamics and acoustics for a wide range of materials (polymers, wood, foam, etc.), allowing to control and even reduce the distortion effects induced by time-discretization schemes on the frequency response of continuous-time behavior laws.

  20. Timing signatures of large scale solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Hock-Mysliwiec, Rachel; Henry, Timothy; Kirk, Michael S.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the timing signatures of large solar eruptions resulting in flares, CMEs and Solar Energetic Particle events. We probe solar active regions from the chromosphere through the corona, using data from space and ground-based observations, including ISOON, SDO, GONG, and GOES. Our studies include a number of flares and CMEs of mostly the M- and X-strengths as categorized by GOES. We find that the chromospheric signatures of these large eruptions occur 5-30 minutes in advance of coronal high temperature signatures. These timing measurements are then used as inputs to models and reconstruct the eruptive nature of these systems, and explore their utility in forecasts.

  1. Picosecond acoustics in vegetal cells: non invasive in vitro measurements at a sub-cell scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audoin, Bertrand; Rossignol, Clément; Chigarev, Nikolay; Ducousso, Mathieu; Forget, Guillaume; Guillemot, Fabien; Durrieu, Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    A 100 fs laser pulse passes through a single transparent cell and is absorbed at the surface of a metallic substrate. Picosecond acoustic waves are generated and propagate through the cell in contact with the metal. Interaction of the high frequency acoustic pulse with a probe laser light gives rise to stimulated Brillouin oscillations. The measurements are thus made with lasers for both the opto-acoustic generation and the acousto-optic detection. The technique offers perspectives for single cell imaging. The in plane resolution is limited by the pump and probe spot sizes, i.e ˜1 μm, and the in depth resolution is provided by the acoustic frequencies, typically in the GHz range. The effect of the technique on cell safety is discussed. Experiments achieved in vegetal cells illustrate reproducibility and sensitivity of the measurements. The acoustic responses of cell organelles are significantly different. The results support the potentialities of the hypersonic non invasive technique in the fields of bio-engineering and medicine.

  2. Developments and field tests of low-frequency portable acoustic transducers for a mobile exploration and time lapse experiment of a sea-bottom reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruga, K.; Kasahara, J.; Hasada, Y.; Kondo, H.

    2013-12-01

    Depth, scale and resolutions of geophysical explorations for mineral resources are controlled by transmitted seismic energy and wavelength (frequency range). Most explorations in marine have been conducted by survey ship system with arrayed acoustic sources whose dominant frequency range is about 10 to 500 Hz. On the other hand, for shallow parts of sea bottom structure survey, some sub-bottom profilers with frequency range around 3.5kHz are used. To monitor a time lapse of a sea bottom reservoir such as an oil, gas, or methane hydrate reservoir as well as to exploit a mobile survey near a sea bottom by AUVs, it is necessary to use a broadband portable acoustic transducer with a dominant frequency range of 500 Hz to 5 kHz. We have been developing several types of portable acoustic transducers and a transmitting and recording system which is accurately controlled by a GPS clock (Tsuruga et al., 2012). In this pater, we report the new broadband acoustic portable transducers which have larger power than the original cylindrical acoustic transducers in a low frequency range (<5 kHz), partly funded by JOGMEC, and show the preliminary results of field tests at the shallow sea bottom around 32 m deep by means of the transducers and hydrophone receivers array. Each transducer repeatedly transmitted Chirp signals with a unit period of 500 msec in two frequency ranges of 0.5k-4.5kHz and 4k-16kHz . We stacked 500-ms data by 28 times to obtain a transfer function of each source-receiver pair in the time and frequency domains. The preliminary results suggest as the follows: (i) it is successful to broaden the frequency bandwidth (i.e., 2k-10kHz) by extending a geometrical resonance length of a cylindrical acoustic transducers, and (ii) the observation at the sea bottom with accurately controlled timing systems of transmitter and data-logger is very useful to identify the stable and/or unstable seismic phases, that is, waves propagating in a underground and/or in a sea water as

  3. A new aerodynamic integral equation based on an acoustic formula in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    1984-01-01

    An aerodynamic integral equation for bodies moving at transonic and supersonic speeds is presented. Based on a time-dependent acoustic formula for calculating the noise emanating from the outer portion of a propeller blade travelling at high speed (the Ffowcs Williams-Hawking formulation), the loading terms and a conventional thickness source terms are retained. Two surface and three line integrals are employed to solve an equation for the loading noise. The near-field term is regularized using the collapsing sphere approach to obtain semiconvergence on the blade surface. A singular integral equation is thereby derived for the unknown surface pressure, and is amenable to numerical solutions using Galerkin or collocation methods. The technique is useful for studying the nonuniform inflow to the propeller.

  4. PC-based real-time acoustic source locator and sound capture system for teleconferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morde, Ashutosh; Grove, Deborah; Utama, Robert

    2002-05-01

    A PC-based real time acoustic source locator and sound capture system has been developed. The system is implemented using Frontier Design A/D converters and the Intel Signal Processing Library directly on a 1 GHz Pentium III machine, without a DSP board. The source locator uses the cross-power spectral phase to locate a moving talker. The algorithm also uses an energy detector that minimizes incorrect location estimates by neglecting frames with high background noise. The source locator provides 8 location estimates per second. A 16-element 0.90 m linear delay-sum beamformer has also been implemented in the system as a method for selective sound capture. The ability of the source locator to detect talkers in a typical office environment is evaluated. In addition, the array response is measured. [Work supported by Intel.

  5. Wideband nonlinear time reversal seismo-acoustic method for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Sutin, Alexander; Libbey, Brad; Fillinger, Laurent; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic and seismic waves provide a method to localize compliant mines by vibrating the top plate and a thin soil layer above the mine. This vibration is mostly linear, but also includes a small nonlinear deviation. The main goal of this paper is to introduce a method of processing that uses phase-inversion to observe nonlinear effects in a wide frequency band. The method extracts a nonlinear part of surface velocity from two similar broadcast signals of opposite sign by summing and cancelling the linear components and leaving the nonlinear components. This phase-inversion method is combined with time reversal focusing to provide increased seismic vibration and enhance the nonlinear effect. The experiments used six loudspeakers in a wood box placed over sand in which inert landmines were buried. The nonlinear surface velocity of the sand with a mine compared to the sand without a mine was greater as compared to a linear technique. PMID:19354365

  6. Modeling orbital changes on tectonic time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    Geologic time series indicate significant 100 ka and 400 ka pre-Pleistocene climate fluctuations, prior to the time of such fluctuations in Pleistocene ice sheets. The origin of these fluctuations must therefore depend on phenomena other than the ice sheets. In a previous set of experiments, we tested the sensitivity of an energy balance model to orbital insolation forcing, specifically focusing on the filtering effect of the Earth's geography. We found that in equatorial areas, the twice-yearly passage of the sun across the equator interacts with the precession index to generate 100 ka and 400 ka power in our modeled time series. The effect is proportional to the magnitude of land in equatorial regions. We suggest that such changes may reflect monsoonal variations in the real climate system, and the subsequent wind and weathering changes may transfer some of this signal to the marine record. A comparison with observed fluctuations of Triassic lake levels is quite favorable. A number of problems remain to be studied or clarified: (1) the EBM experiments need to be followed up by a limited number of GCM experiments; (2) the sensitivity to secular changes in orbital forcing needs to be examined; (3) the possible modifying role of sedimentary processes on geologic time series warrants considerably more study; (4) the effect of tectonic changes on Earth's rotation rate needs to be studied; and (5) astronomers need to make explicit which of their predictions are robust and geologists and astronomers have to agree on which of the predictions are most testable in the geologic record.

  7. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  8. Helicopter blade-vortex interaction locations: Scale-model acoustics and free-wake analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, Danny R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a model rotor acoustic test in the Langley 4by 7-Meter Tunnel are used to evaluate a free-wake analytical technique. An acoustic triangulation technique is used to locate the position in the rotor disk where the blade-vortex interaction noise originates. These locations, along with results of the rotor free-wake analysis, are used to define the geometry of the blade-vortex interaction noise phenomena as well as to determine if the free-wake analysis is a capable diagnostic tool. Data from tests of two teetering rotor systems are used in these analyses.

  9. Time-frequency analysis of the bistatic acoustic scattering from a spherical elastic shell.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shaun D; Sabra, Karim G; Zakharia, Manell E; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The development of low-frequency sonar systems, using, for instance, a network of autonomous systems in unmanned vehicles, provides a practical means for bistatic measurements (i.e., when the source and receiver are widely separated) allowing for multiple viewpoints of the target of interest. Time-frequency analysis, in particular, Wigner-Ville analysis, takes advantage of the evolution time dependent aspect of the echo spectrum to differentiate a man-made target, such as an elastic spherical shell, from a natural object of the similar shape. A key energetic feature of fluid-loaded and thin spherical shell is the coincidence pattern, also referred to as the mid-frequency enhancement (MFE), that results from antisymmetric Lamb-waves propagating around the circumference of the shell. This article investigates numerically the bistatic variations of the MFE with respect to the monostatic configuration using the Wigner-Ville analysis. The observed time-frequency shifts of the MFE are modeled using a previously derived quantitative ray theory by Zhang et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 1862-1874 (1993)] for spherical shell's scattering. Additionally, the advantage of an optimal array beamformer, based on joint time delays and frequency shifts is illustrated for enhancing the detection of the MFE recorded across a bistatic receiver array when compared to a conventional time-delay beamformer. PMID:22280581

  10. A tool for real-time acoustic species identification of delphinid whistles.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Julie N; Rankin, Shannon; Barlow, Jay; Lammers, Marc O

    2007-07-01

    The ability to identify delphinid vocalizations to species in real-time would be an asset during shipboard surveys. An automated system, Real-time Odontocete Call Classification Algorithm (ROCCA), is being developed to allow real-time acoustic species identification in the field. This Matlab-based tool automatically extracts ten variables (beginning, end, minimum and maximum frequencies, duration, slope of the beginning and end sweep, number of inflection points, number of steps, and presence/absence of harmonics) from whistles selected from a real-time scrolling spectrograph (ISHMAEL). It uses classification and regression tree analysis (CART) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) to identify whistles to species. Schools are classified based on running tallies of individual whistle classifications. Overall, 46% of schools were correctly classified for seven species and one genus (Tursiops truncatus, Stenella attenuata, S. longirostris, S. coeruleoalba, Steno bredanensis, Delphinus species, Pseudorca crassidens, and Globicephala macrorhynchus), with correct classification as high as 80% for some species. If classification success can be increased, this tool will provide a method for identifying schools that are difficult to approach and observe, will allow species distribution data to be collected when visual efforts are compromised, and will reduce the time necessary for post-cruise data analysis. PMID:17614515

  11. Scaling of coupled dilatancy-diffusion processes in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, I. G.; Bell, A. F.; Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Heap, M.

    2012-04-01

    Coupled dilatancy-diffusion processes resulting from microscopically brittle damage due to precursory cracking have been observed in the laboratory and suggested as a mechanism for earthquake precursors. One reason precursors have proven elusive may be the scaling in space: recent geodetic and seismic data placing strong limits on the spatial extent of the nucleation zone for recent earthquakes. Another may be the scaling in time: recent laboratory results on axi-symmetric samples show both a systematic decrease in circumferential extensional strain at failure and a delayed and a sharper acceleration of acoustic emission event rate as strain rate is decreased. Here we examine the scaling of such processes in time from laboratory to field conditions using brittle creep (constant stress loading) to failure tests, in an attempt to bridge part of the strain rate gap to natural conditions, and discuss the implications for forecasting the failure time. Dilatancy rate is strongly correlated to strain rate, and decreases to zero in the steady-rate creep phase at strain rates around 10-9 s-1 for a basalt from Mount Etna. The data are well described by a creep model based on the linear superposition of transient (decelerating) and accelerating micro-crack growth due to stress corrosion. The model produces good fits to the failure time in retrospect using the accelerating acoustic emission event rate, but in prospective tests on synthetic data with the same properties we find failure-time forecasting is subject to systematic epistemic and aleatory uncertainties that degrade predictability. The next stage is to use the technology developed to attempt failure forecasting in real time, using live streamed data and a public web-based portal to quantify the prospective forecast quality under such controlled laboratory conditions.

  12. Use of acoustic wave travel-time measurements to probe the near-surface layers of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Osaki, Y.; Shibahashi, H.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The variation of solar p-mode travel times with cyclic frequency nu is shown to provide information on both the radial variation of the acoustic potential and the depth of the effective source of the oscillations. Observed travel-time data for waves with frequency lower than the acoustic cutoff frequency for the solar atmosphere (approximately equals 5.5 mHz) are inverted to yield the local acoustic cutoff frequency nu(sub c) as a function of depth in the outer convection zone and lower atmosphere of the Sun. The data for waves with nu greater than 5.5 mHz are used to show that the source of the p-mode oscillations lies approximately 100 km beneath the base of the photosphere. This depth is deeper than that determined using a standard mixing-length calculation.

  13. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Shogo; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu

    2014-01-15

    We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  14. Pennsylvanian time scales and cycle periods

    SciTech Connect

    deV. Klein, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Geochronological results from central Europe indicate that the duration of Pennsylvanian time is only 19 m.y., compared to the Harland et al. and Palmer estimates of 34 m.y. Prior calculations of Pennsylvanian cycle periods from the midcontinent of North America suggesting a fit with Milankovitch orbital parameters may well be in errors; as a consequence, other mechanisms for possible eustatic sea-level changes represented in those cycles are needed. Calculation of cycle periods of 100 ka or less lack precision in stratigraphic intervals representing ages characterized by error margins of millions of years. Thus, cycle periods may be less reliable as an indicator of global process than previously considered, particularly in rocks of Paleozoic and early and middle Mesozoic age.

  15. Multi-bearing defect detection with trackside acoustic signal based on a pseudo time-frequency analysis and Dopplerlet filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of train bearing defects based on the acoustic signal acquired by a trackside microphone plays a significant role in the transport system. However, the wayside acoustic signal suffers from the Doppler distortion due to the high moving speed and also contains the multi-source signals from different train bearings. This paper proposes a novel solution to overcome the two difficulties in trackside acoustic diagnosis. In the method a pseudo time-frequency analysis (PTFA) based on an improved Dopplerlet transform (IDT) is presented to acquire the time centers for different bearings. With the time centers, we design a series of Dopplerlet filters (DF) in time-frequency domain to work on the signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) gained by the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Then an inverse STFT (ISTFT) is utilized to get the separated signals for each sound source which means bearing here. Later the resampling method based on certain motion parameters eliminates the Doppler Effect and finally the diagnosis can be made effectively according to the envelope spectrum of each separated signal. With the effectiveness of the technique validated by both simulated and experimental cases, the proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme is expected to be available in wayside defective bearing detection.

  16. Generation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in Ionospheric HF Heating Experiments: Simulating Large-Scale Natural Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, Rezy

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence in the ionospheric layer. The main hypothesis is that, the thermal gradients associated with the heat wave fronts could act as a source of powerful AGW capable of triggering ionospheric plasma turbulence over extensive areas. In our investigations, first we are going to examine a case study of the summer 2006 North American heat wave event. Our examination of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) data over the North American sector reveals a quite noticeable increase in the level of daily plasma density fluctuations during the summer 2006 heat wave period. Comparison with the summer 2005 and summer 2007 data further confirms that the observed increase of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the summer 2006 heat wave period was not simply a regular seasonal phenomenon. Furthermore, a series of field experiments had been carried out at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in order to physically simulate the process of AGW/TID generation by large-scale thermal gradients in the ionosphere. In these ionospheric HF heating experiments, we create some time-varying artificial thermal gradients at an altitude of 200--300 km above the Earth's surface using vertically-transmitted amplitude-modulated 0-mode HF heater waves. For our experiments, a number of radio diagnostic instruments had been utilized to detect the characteristic signatures of heater-generated AGW/TID. So far, we have been able to obtain several affirmative indications that some artificial AGW/TID are indeed being radiated out from the heated plasma volume during the HAARP-AGW experiments. Based on the experimental evidence, we may conclude that it is certainly quite plausible for large-scale thermal gradients associated with severe heat wave

  17. Overcoming of the Diffraction Limit for the Discrete Case in Time Reversed Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez-Arcos, J. M.; Vargas, C. A.; Fernández-Chapou, L.; Granados-Samaniego, J.

    2008-04-01

    The time reversal phenomenon in sound waves for the discrete case is revisited. Our purpose is to improve a previous explanation of this problem in which there was a more limited scope. We develop a formulation which includes sink terms in the time reversed process, which allow going beyond the diffraction limit. By employing a reversed signal it is possible to reach a definition of a fourteenth of the wavelength. In the present work we discuss a matrix formulation for the discrete case in terms of the Fourier transforms of the input and output signals and the Green function. With this function it is possible to characterize the propagation of signals emitted by an array of devices. We are able to express the time reversed signal and precisely select the destination site, among other useful objectives. Finally we show an experimental arrangement using a Michelson interferometer in order to observe this phenomenon. Time Reversal originates from the second order time derivative in the wave equation. This is different from the case of nonlinear behavior in media known as acoustic or electromagnetic inverse scattering. Some of the fields which Time Reversal opens for investigation are the time reversal of a signal by a sound mirror (Time Reversal Mirror or TRM) or by a Time Reversal Cavity (TRC), and the possibility of sending a message to a precise physical location. Recently a new and powerful application has been reported in the literature, namely the abovementioned overcoming of the diffraction limit in wave physics. Although our experimental proposal is based on reports from others authors, the experimental arrangement used here, the specific way of operation and the image construction are original.

  18. Rapid evaluation of time scale using an optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Hachisu, H.; Nakagawa, F.; Hanado, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility of steering a time scale using an optical clock is investigated. Since the high stability of optical frequency standards enables rapid evaluation of the scale interval, the requirement for the continuous operation is mitigated. Numerical simulations with the input of real calibration data by a 87Sr lattice clock indicated that the calibrations once in two weeks maintain the time scale within 5 ns level using a currently available hydrogen maser at NICT. “Optical” steering of a time scale by the intermittent calibrations frees an optical frequency standard from being dedicated to the steering, enabling other applications using the same apparatus.

  19. On the Assessment of Acoustic Scattering and Shielding by Time Domain Boundary Integral Equation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Fang Q.; Pizzo, Michelle E.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the time domain boundary integral equation formulation of the linear convective wave equation, a computational tool dubbed Time Domain Fast Acoustic Scattering Toolkit (TD-FAST) has recently been under development. The time domain approach has a distinct advantage that the solutions at all frequencies are obtained in a single computation. In this paper, the formulation of the integral equation, as well as its stabilization by the Burton-Miller type reformulation, is extended to cases of a constant mean flow in an arbitrary direction. In addition, a "Source Surface" is also introduced in the formulation that can be employed to encapsulate regions of noise sources and to facilitate coupling with CFD simulations. This is particularly useful for applications where the noise sources are not easily described by analytical source terms. Numerical examples are presented to assess the accuracy of the formulation, including a computation of noise shielding by a thin barrier motivated by recent Historical Baseline F31A31 open rotor noise shielding experiments. Furthermore, spatial resolution requirements of the time domain boundary element method are also assessed using point per wavelength metrics. It is found that, using only constant basis functions and high-order quadrature for surface integration, relative errors of less than 2% may be obtained when the surface spatial resolution is 5 points-per-wavelength (PPW) or 25 points-per-wavelength squared (PPW2).

  20. Classification of Hazelnut Kernels by Using Impact Acoustic Time-Frequency Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Habil; Ince, Nuri Firat; Tewfik, Ahmed H.; Yardimci, Yasemin; Pearson, Tom

    2007-12-01

    Hazelnuts with damaged or cracked shells are more prone to infection with aflatoxin producing molds ( Aspergillus flavus). These molds can cause cancer. In this study, we introduce a new approach that separates damaged/cracked hazelnut kernels from good ones by using time-frequency features obtained from impact acoustic signals. The proposed technique requires no prior knowledge of the relevant time and frequency locations. In an offline step, the algorithm adaptively segments impact signals from a training data set in time using local cosine packet analysis and a Kullback-Leibler criterion to assess the discrimination power of different segmentations. In each resulting time segment, the signal is further decomposed into subbands using an undecimated wavelet transform. The most discriminative subbands are selected according to the Euclidean distance between the cumulative probability distributions of the corresponding subband coefficients. The most discriminative subbands are fed into a linear discriminant analysis classifier. In the online classification step, the algorithm simply computes the learned features from the observed signal and feeds them to the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. The algorithm achieved a throughput rate of 45 nuts/s and a classification accuracy of 96% with the 30 most discriminative features, a higher rate than those provided with prior methods.

  1. Do quasars evolve over cosmological time scales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler, E. J.; Ponz, D.

    Systematic biases that are redshift dependent can influence the optical discovery of quasars and the evolution laws derived from counts of quasars. New data and their interpretation for quasars brighter than MB = -24 in the Palomar Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) (Schmidt and Green, 1983) are consistent with no evolution. A comparison of BQS quasars with the brightest quasars from the CTIO Schmidt Telescope Survey (Osmer and Smith, 1980) shows that if q(0) is near zero, the comoving density of bright quasars in a Friedmann cosmology is about 15 times higher for the CTIO survey quasars (mean z of about 2.8) than for the BQS quasars (mean z of about 1.8). In this case spectral evolution is also required since the CTIO quasars have stronger CIV 1548 A lines than the BQS quasars of similar luminosity. Alternatively, if q(0) is taken to be near 1, the CTIO survey quasars would then have a lower luminosity than the BQS quasars and these data would be consistent with no evolution. Strong CIV 1548 A lines for the CTIO quasars would then fit the general correlation between absolute quasar luminosity and emission line strength (Wampler, Gaskell, Burke and Baldwin, 1984).

  2. Acoustic scaling: A review of progress to date, and of possible future development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathers, C. D.

    1981-09-01

    The techniques of acoustic modelling have developed to a degree which enables a realistic subjective assessment to be made of at least the major features of a music studio. The successes of the work are reviewed, its limitations are discussed, and the ways in which advancing technology might enable some of these limitations to be overcome in the future are considered.

  3. Critical time scale of coarse-graining entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jang-il

    2016-04-01

    We study coarse-grained entropy production in an asymmetric random walk system on a periodic one-dimensional lattice. In coarse-grained systems, the original dynamics are unavoidably destroyed, but the coarse-grained entropy production is not hidden below the critical time-scale separation. The hidden entropy production is rapidly increasing near the critical time-scale separation.

  4. Evolutionary time-scale of primate bocaviruses.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Igor V; Tyumentsev, Alexander I; Tikunov, Artem Yu; Kurilshikov, Alexander M; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Zhirakovskaya, Elena V; Netesov, Sergei V; Tikunova, Nina V

    2013-03-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is associated with acute gastroenteritis in humans, occurring mostly in young children and elderly people. Four bocavirus genotypes (HBoV1-HBoV4) have been found so far. Since there were no data on the contribution of HBoV to gastroenteritis in Russia, 1781 fecal samples collected from infants hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Novosibirsk, Russia during one year were tested for the presence of nucleic acids from HBoV and three major gastrointestinal viruses (rotavirus A, norovirus II, and astrovirus). HBoV was detected only in 1.9% of the samples: HBoV1 was detected in 0.6% and HBoV2, in 1.3%. Complete genome sequencing of three Novosibirsk isolates was performed. An evolutionary analysis of these sequences and the available sequences of human and great apes bocaviruses demonstrated that the current HBoV genotypes diverged comparatively recently, about 60-300years ago. The independent evolution of bocaviruses from chimpanzees and gorillas commenced at the same time period. This suggests that these isolates of great apes bocaviruses belong to separate genotypes within the species of human bocavirus, which is actually the primate bocavirus. The rate of mutation accumulation in the genome of primate bocaviruses has been estimated as approximately 9×10(-4)substitutions/site/year. It has been demonstrated that HBoV1 diverged from the ancestor common with chimpanzee bocavirus approximately 60-80years ago, while HBoV4 separated from great apes bocaviruses about 200-300years ago. The hypothesis postulating independent evolution of HBoV1 and HBoV4 genotypes from primate bocaviruses has been proposed. PMID:23313830

  5. Scale Model Acoustic Test Validation of IOP-SS Water Prediction using Loci-STREAM-VoF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). SMAT consists of a 5% scale representation of the ignition overpressure sound-suppression system (IOP-SS) that is being tested to quantify the water flow and induced air entrainment in and around the mobile launcher exhaust hole. This data will be compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the newly developed Loci-STREAM Volume of Fluid (VoF) methods. Compressible and incompressible VoF methods have been formulated, and are currently being used to simulate the water flow of SMAT IOP-SS. The test data will be used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and validate the VoF methods.

  6. Assessment at full scale of nozzle/wing geometry effects on OTW aero-acoustic characteristics. [short takeoff aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D.; Vonglahn, U.

    1979-01-01

    The effects on acoustic characteristics of nozzle type and location on a wing for STOL engine over-the-wing configurations are assessed at full scale on the basis of model-scale data. Three types of nozzle configurations are evaluated: a circular nozzle with external deflector mounted above the wing, a slot nozzle with external deflector mounted on the wing and a slot nozzle mounted on the wing. Nozzle exhaust plane locations with respect to the wing leading edge are varied from 10 to 46 percent chord (flaps retracted) with flap angles of 20 (takeoff altitude) and 60 (approach attitude). Perceived noise levels (PNL) are calculated as a function of flyover distance at 152 m altitude. From these plots, static EPNL values, defined as flyover relative noise levels, are calculated and plotted as a function of lift and thrust ratios. From such plots the acoustic benefits attributable to variations in nozzle/deflector/wing geometry at full scale are assessed for equal aerodynamic performance.

  7. Time reversal multiple-input/multiple-output acoustic communication enhanced by parallel interference cancellation.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijun; Badiey, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) techniques can lead to significant improvements of underwater acoustic communication capabilities. In this paper, receivers based on time reversal processing are developed for high frequency underwater MIMO channels. Time reversal followed by a single channel decision feedback equalizer, aided by frequent channel updates, is used to compensate for the time-varying inter-symbol interference. A parallel interference cancellation method is incorporated to suppress the co-channel interference in the MIMO system. The receiver performance is demonstrated by a 2008 shallow water experiment in Kauai, Hawaii. In the experiment, high frequency MIMO signals centered at 16 kHz were transmitted every hour during a 35 h period from an 8-element source array to a wide aperture 16-element vertical receiving array at 4 km range. The interference cancellation method is shown to generate significant performance enhancement, on average 2-4 dB in the output signal-to-noise ratio per data stream, throughout the 35 h MIMO transmissions. Further, communication performance and achieved data rates exhibit significant changes over the 35 h period as a result of stratification of the water column. PMID:22280591

  8. Electrochemical-acoustic time of flight: in operando correlation of physical dynamics with battery charge and health

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, AG; Bhadra, S; Hertzberg, BJ; Gjeltema, PJ; Goy, A; Fleischer, JW; Steingart, DA

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a simple acoustic time-of-flight experiment can measure the state of charge and state of health of almost any closed battery. An acoustic conservation law model describing the state of charge of a standard battery is proposed, and experimental acoustic results verify the simulated trends; furthermore, a framework relating changes in sound speed, via density and modulus changes, to state of charge and state of health within a battery is discussed. Regardless of the chemistry, the distribution of density within a battery must change as a function of state of charge and, along with density, the bulk moduli of the anode and cathode changes as well. The shifts in density and modulus also change the acoustic attenuation in a battery. Experimental results indicating both state-of-charge determination and irreversible physical changes are presented for two of the most ubiquitous batteries in the world, the lithium-ion 18650 and the alkaline LR6 (AA). Overall, a one-or two-point acoustic measurement can be related to the interaction of a pressure wave at multiple discrete interfaces within a battery, which in turn provides insights into state of charge, state of health, and mechanical evolution/degradation.

  9. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features. PMID:24181982

  10. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  11. Scaling analysis of multi-variate intermittent time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitt, Robert; Kalda, Jaan

    2005-08-01

    The scaling properties of the time series of asset prices and trading volumes of stock markets are analysed. It is shown that similar to the asset prices, the trading volume data obey multi-scaling length-distribution of low-variability periods. In the case of asset prices, such scaling behaviour can be used for risk forecasts: the probability of observing next day a large price movement is (super-universally) inversely proportional to the length of the ongoing low-variability period. Finally, a method is devised for a multi-factor scaling analysis. We apply the simplest, two-factor model to equity index and trading volume time series.

  12. Gust Acoustic Response of a Single Airfoil Using the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James (Technical Monitor); Wang, X. Y.; Chang, S. C.; Himansu, A.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.

    2003-01-01

    A 2D parallel Euler code based on the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is validated by solving the benchmark problem I in Category 3 of the Third CAA Workshop. This problem concerns the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a convected harmonic vortical gust with a single airfoil. Three gust frequencies, two gust configurations, and three airfoil geometries are considered. Numerical results at both near and far fields are presented and compared with the analytical solutions, a frequency-domain solver GUST3D solutions, and a time-domain high-order Discontinuous Spectral Element Method (DSEM) solutions. It is shown that the CE/SE solutions agree well with the GUST3D solution for the lowest frequency, while there are discrepancies between CE/SE and GUST3D solutions for higher frequencies. However, the CE/SE solution is in good agreement with the DSEM solution for these higher frequencies. It demonstrates that the CE/SE method can produce accurate results of CAA problems involving complex geometries by using unstructured meshes.

  13. Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

    2014-05-01

    In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as

  14. On time scale invariance of random walks in confined space.

    PubMed

    Bearup, Daniel; Petrovskii, Sergei

    2015-02-21

    Animal movement is often modelled on an individual level using simulated random walks. In such applications it is preferable that the properties of these random walks remain consistent when the choice of time is changed (time scale invariance). While this property is well understood in unbounded space, it has not been studied in detail for random walks in a confined domain. In this work we undertake an investigation of time scale invariance of the drift and diffusion rates of Brownian random walks subject to one of four simple boundary conditions. We find that time scale invariance is lost when the boundary condition is non-conservative, that is when movement (or individuals) is discarded due to boundary encounters. Where possible analytical results are used to describe the limits of the time scaling process, numerical results are then used to characterise the intermediate behaviour. PMID:25481837

  15. Some results of the testing of a full-scale Ogee tip helicopter rotor; acoustics, loads, and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, W. R.; Shidler, P. A.; Campbell, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Full-scale tests were utilized to investigate the effect of the Ogee tip on helicopter rotor acoustics, performance, and loads. Two facilities were used for this study: the Langley whirl tower and a UH-1H helicopter. The test matrix for hover on the whirl tower involved thrust values from 0 to 44,480 N (10,000 lbs) at several tip Mach numbers for both standard and Ogee rotors. The full-scale testing on the UH-1H encompassed the major portion of the flight envelope for that aircraft. Both near-field acoustic measurements as well as far-field flyover data were obtained for both the Ogee and standard rotors. Data analysis of the whirl-tower test shows that the Ogee tip does significantly diffuse the tip vortex while providing some improvement in hover performance. Flight testing of both rotors indicates that the strong impulsive noise signature of the standard rotor can be reduced with the Ogee rotor. Forward flight performance was significantly improved with the Ogee configuration for a large number of flight conditions. Further, rotor control loads and vibrations were reduced through use of this advanced tip rotor.

  16. Assessment at full scale of exhaust nozzle-to-wing size on STOL-OTW acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Glahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1979-01-01

    On the basis of static zero/acoustic data obtained at model scale, the effect of exhaust nozzle size on flyover noise is evaluated at full scale for different STOL-OTW nozzle configurations. Three types of nozzles are evaluated: a circular/deflector nozzle mounted above the wing, a slot/deflector nozzle mounted on the wing, and a slot nozzle mounted on the wing. The nozzle exhaust plane location, measured from the wing leading edge was varied from 10 to 46 percent of the wing chord (flaps retracted). Flap angles of 20 deg (takeoff) and 60 deg (approach) are included in the study. Initially, perceived noise levels (PNL) are calculated as a function of flyover distance at 152 m altitude. From these plots static EPNL values, defined as flyover relative noise levels, then are obtained as functions of nozzle size for equal aerodynamic performance (lift and thrust). On the basis of these calculations, the acoustic benefits attributable to nozzle size relative to a given wing chord size are assessed.

  17. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  18. Liquidity Spillover in International Stock Markets through Distinct Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale. PMID:24465918

  19. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale. PMID:24465918

  20. Space and Time Scale Variability and Interdependencies in Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddes, Reinder A.

    1995-09-01

    The atmospheric, hydrologic, and terrestrial components of the earth's systems operate on different time and space scales. Resolving these scaling incongruities as well as understanding and modeling the complex interaction of land surface processes at the different scales represents a major challenge for hydrologists, ecologists and meteorologists alike. This book presents the contributions of hydrologists, meteorologists, and ecologists to the first IHP/IAHS George Kovacs Colloqium on global hydrology and climate change. It deals with time and space scale variations with reference to several topics including soil water balance, ecosystems and interaction of flow systems, and macroscale hydrologic modeling. This book will be of great use to researchers, engineers and forecasters with an interest in space and time scale variability.

  1. Very short NMR relaxation times of anions in ionic liquids: New pulse sequence to eliminate the acoustic ringing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimavicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2014-11-01

    NMR relaxation processes of anions were studied in two neat imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide- and chloride. The spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxations of 81Br and 35Cl nuclei were found to be extremely fast due to very strong quadrupolar interactions. The determined relaxation rates are comparable with those observed in the solids or in some critical organic solute/water/salt systems. In order to eliminate the acoustic ringing of the probe-head during relaxation times measurements the novel pulse sequence has been devised. It is based on the conventional inversion recovery pulse sequence, however, instead of the last 90° pulse the subsequence of three 90° pulses applied along axes to fulfill the phase cycling condition is used. Using this pulse sequence it was possible to measure T1 for both studied nuclei. The viscosity measurements have been carried out and the rotational correlation times were calculated. The effective 35Cl quadrupolar coupling constant was found to be almost one order lower than that for 81Br, i.e. 1.8 MHz and 16.0 MHz, respectively. Taking into account the facts that the ratio of (Q(35Cl)/Q(81Br))2 ≈ 0.1 and EFG tensors on the anions are quite similar, analogous structural organizations are expected for both RTILs. The observed T1/T2 (1.27-1.44) ratios were found to be not sufficiently high to confirm the presence of long-living (on the time scale of ⩾10-8 s) mesoscopic structures or heterogeneities in the studied neat ionic liquids.

  2. [Physiological-occupational assessment of acoustic load with equal energy but different time and informational characteristics].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, G A; Shkarinov, L N; Kravchenko, O K; Kur'erov, N N

    1999-01-01

    The article deals with results of experimental study comparing effects of 4 types of acoustic load--noise (constant and impulse) and music (electronic symphonic one and rap)--on hearing sensitivity, processes in nervous system and subjective evaluation. All types of acoustic load were equal in energy (on evaluation according to equivalent level during the experiment). The study included 2 levels of load--90 and 95 dB. The differences revealed demonstrate importance of impulse parameters of noise and musical load for reactions of acoustic analyzer and central nervous system. The experiments show that evaluation of harm caused by temporary and impulse noises should be based not only on assessment of specific (hearing) function, but also on parameters of central nervous system state. The authors found that music of certain acoustic and informational parameters may harm hearing function. PMID:10420710

  3. NEA Scout Solar Sail: Half-scale Fold Time Lapse

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this time lapse, the Near-Earth Asteroid Scout (NEA Scout) CubeSat team rolls a half-scale prototype of the small satellite's solar sail in preparation for a deployment test. During its mission,...

  4. Kibble-Zurek mechanism and finite-time scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yingyi; Yin, Shuai; Feng, Baoquan; Zhong, Fan

    2014-10-01

    The Kibble-Zurek (KZ) mechanism has been applied to a variety of systems ranging from low-temperature Bose-Einstein condensations to grand unification scales in particle physics and cosmology and from classical phase transitions to quantum phase transitions. Here, we show that finite-time scaling (FTS) provides a detailed improved understanding of the mechanism. In particular, the finite time scale, which is introduced by the external driving (or quenching) and results in FTS, is the origin of the division of the adiabatic regimes from the impulse regime in the KZ mechanism. The origin of the KZ scaling for the defect density, generated during the driving through a critical point, is not that the correlation length ceases growing in the nonadiabatic impulse regime, but rather, is that it is taken over by the effective finite length scale corresponding to the finite time scale. We also show that FTS accounts well for and improves the scaling ansatz proposed recently by Liu, Polkovnikov, and Sandvik, [Phys. Rev. B 89, 054307 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.054307]. Further, we show that their universal power-law scaling form applies only to some observables in cooling but not to heating. Even in cooling, it is invalid either when an appropriate external field is present. However, this finite-time-finite-size scaling calls for caution in application of FTS. Detailed scaling behaviors of the FTS and finite-size scaling, along with their crossover, are explicitly demonstrated, with the dynamic critical exponent z being estimated for two- and three-dimensional Ising models under the usual Metropolis dynamics. These values of z are found to give rise to better data collapses than the extant values do in most cases but take on different values in heating and cooling in both two- and three-dimensional spaces.

  5. Non-invasive and real-time passive acoustic mapping of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.; Carlisle, Robert C.; Coviello, Christian; Seymour, Len; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2014-09-01

    New classes of biologically active materials, such as viruses, siRNA, antibodies and a wide range of engineered nanoparticles have emerged as potent agents for diagnosing and treating diseases, yet many of these agents fail because there is no effective route of delivery to their intended targets. Focused ultrasound and its ability to drive microbubble-seeded cavitation have been shown to facilitate drug delivery. However, cavitation is difficult to control temporally and spatially, making prediction of therapeutic outcomes deep in the body difficult. Here, we utilized passive acoustic mapping in vivo to understand how ultrasound parameters influence cavitation dynamics and to correlate spatial maps of cavitation to drug delivery. Focused ultrasound (center frequency: 0.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 1.2 MPa, pulse length: 25 cycles or 50,000 cycles, pulse repetition interval: 0.02, 0.2, 1 or 3 s, number of pulses: 80 pulses) was applied to murine xenograft-model tumors in vivo during systemic injection of microbubbles with and without cavitation-sensitive liposomes or type 5 adenoviruses. Analysis of in vivo cavitation dynamics through several pulses revealed that cavitation was more efficiently produced at a lower pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz than at 50 Hz. Within a pulse, inertial cavitation activity was shown to persist but reduced to 50% and 25% of its initial magnitude in 4.3 and 29.3 ms, respectively. Both through several pulses and within a pulse, the spatial distribution of cavitation was shown to change in time due to variations in microbubble distribution present in tumors. Finally, we demonstrated that the centroid of the mapped cavitation activity was within 1.33  ±  0.6 mm and 0.36 mm from the centroid location of drug release from liposomes and expression of the reporter gene encoded by the adenovirus, respectively. Thus passive acoustic mapping not only unraveled key mechanisms whereby a successful outcome is achieved

  6. Diffusion Time-Scale of Porous Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Teduka, Norikazu; Kameda, Masaharu; Asai, Keisuke

    2001-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is an optical pressure sensor that utilizes the oxygen quenching of luminescence. PSP measurements in unsteady aerodynamic flows require fast time response of the paint. There are two characteristic time-scales that are related to the time response of PSP. One is the luminescent lifetime representing an intrinsic physical limit for the achievable temporal resolution of PSP. Another is the time-scale of oxygen diffusion across the PSP layer. When the time-scale of oxygen diffusion is much larger than the luminescent lifetime, the time response of PSP is controlled by oxygen diffusion. In a thin homogenous polymer layer where diffusion is Fickian, the oxygen concentration 1021 can be described by the diffusion equation in one-dimension.

  7. Exchanged ridge demodulation of time-scale manifold for enhanced fault diagnosis of rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo

    2014-05-01

    The vibration or acoustic signal from rotating machinery with localized fault usually behaves as the form of amplitude modulation (AM) and/or frequency modulation (FM). The demodulation techniques are conventional ways to reveal the fault characteristics from the analyzed signals. One of these techniques is the time-scale manifold (TSM) ridge demodulation method with the merits of good time-frequency localization and in-band noise suppression properties. However, due to the essential attribute of wavelet ridge, the survived in-band noise on the achieved TSM will still disturb the envelope extraction of fault-induced impulses. This paper presents an improved TSM ridge demodulation method, called exchanged ridge demodulation of TSM, by combining the benefits of the first two TSMs: the noise suppression of the first TSM and the noise separation of the second TSM. Specifically, the ridge on the second TSM can capture the fault-induced impulses precisely while avoiding the in-band noise smartly. By putting this ridge on the first TSM, the corresponding instantaneous amplitude (IA) waveform can represent the real envelope of pure faulty impulses. Moreover, an adaptive selection method for Morlet wavelet parameters is also proposed based on the smoothness index (SI) in the time-scale domain for an optimal time-scale representation of analyzed signal. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by means of a simulation study and applications to diagnosis of bearing defects and gear fault.

  8. Time-reversal acoustic focusing system as a virtual random phased array.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Fillinger, Laurent; Gavrilov, Leonid

    2010-04-01

    This paper compares the performance of two different systems for dynamic focusing of ultrasonic waves: conventional 2-D phased arrays (PA) and a focusing system based on the principles of time-reversed acoustics (TRA). Focused ultrasound fields obtained in the experiments with the TRA focusing system (TRA FS), which employs a liquid-filled reverberator with 4 piezotransducers attached to its wall, are compared with the focused fields obtained by mathematical simulation of PAs comprised from several tens to several hundreds of elements distributed randomly on the array surface. The experimental and simulated focusing systems had the same aperture and operated at a frequency centered about 600 kHz. Experimental results demonstrated that the TRA FS with a small number of channels can produce complex focused patterns and can steer them with efficiency comparable to that of a PA with hundreds of elements. It is shown that the TRA FS can be realized using an extremely simple means, such as a reverberator made of a water-filled plastic bottle with just a few piezotransducers attached to its walls. PMID:20378444

  9. Time scale for point-defect equilibration in nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, Paul C.; Wolf, Dieter; Desai, Tapan; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2008-10-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of high-temperature annealing are performed on nanostructured materials enabling direct observation of vacancy emission from planar defects (i.e., grain boundaries and free surfaces) to populate the initially vacancy-free grain interiors on a subnanosecond time scale. We demonstrate a universal time-length scale correlation that governs these re-equilibration processes, suggesting that nanostructures are particularly stable against perturbations in their point-defect concentrations, caused for example by particle irradiation or temperature fluctuations.

  10. Non-conforming curved finite element schemes for time-dependent elastic-acoustic coupled problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rozas, Ángel; Diaz, Julien

    2016-01-01

    High-order numerical methods for solving time-dependent acoustic-elastic coupled problems are introduced. These methods, based on Finite Element techniques, allow for a flexible coupling between the fluid and the solid domain by using non-conforming meshes and curved elements. Since characteristic waves travel at different speeds through different media, specific levels of granularity for the mesh discretization are required on each domain, making impractical a possible conforming coupling in between. Advantageously, physical domains may be independently discretized in our framework due to the non-conforming feature. Consequently, an important increase in computational efficiency may be achieved compared to other implementations based on conforming techniques, namely by reducing the total number of degrees of freedom. Differently from other non-conforming approaches proposed so far, our technique is relatively simpler and requires only a geometrical adjustment at the coupling interface at a preprocessing stage, so that no extra computations are necessary during the time evolution of the simulation. On the other hand, as an advantage of using curvilinear elements, the geometry of the coupling interface between the two media of interest is faithfully represented up to the order of the scheme used. In other words, higher order schemes are in consonance with higher order approximations of the geometry. Concerning the time discretization, we analyze both explicit and implicit schemes. These schemes are energy conserving and, for the explicit case, the stability is guaranteed by a CFL condition. In order to illustrate the accuracy and convergence of these methods, a set of representative numerical tests are presented.

  11. Scale-dependent intrinsic entropies of complex time series.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jia-Rong; Peng, Chung-Kang; Huang, Norden E

    2016-04-13

    Multi-scale entropy (MSE) was developed as a measure of complexity for complex time series, and it has been applied widely in recent years. The MSE algorithm is based on the assumption that biological systems possess the ability to adapt and function in an ever-changing environment, and these systems need to operate across multiple temporal and spatial scales, such that their complexity is also multi-scale and hierarchical. Here, we present a systematic approach to apply the empirical mode decomposition algorithm, which can detrend time series on various time scales, prior to analysing a signal's complexity by measuring the irregularity of its dynamics on multiple time scales. Simulated time series of fractal Gaussian noise and human heartbeat time series were used to study the performance of this new approach. We show that our method can successfully quantify the fractal properties of the simulated time series and can accurately distinguish modulations in human heartbeat time series in health and disease. PMID:26953181

  12. Validation and Simulation of Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test - 2 - Simulations at 5 Foot Elevation for Evaluation of Launch Mount Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putman, Gabriel C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. Expanding from initial simulations of the ASMAT setup in a held down configuration, simulations have been performed using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software for ASMAT tests of the vehicle at 5 ft. elevation (100 ft. real vehicle elevation) with worst case drift in the direction of the launch tower. These tests have been performed without water suppression and have compared the acoustic emissions for launch structures with and without launch mounts. In addition, simulation results have also been compared to acoustic and imagery data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Simulations have shown a marked change in the pattern of emissions after removal of the launch mount with a reduction in the overall acoustic environment experienced by the vehicle and the formation of highly directed acoustic waves moving across the platform deck. Comparisons of simulation results to live-fire test data showed good amplitude and temporal correlation and imagery comparisons over the visible and infrared wavelengths showed qualitative capture of all plume and pressure wave evolution features.

  13. Russian national time scale long-term stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshina, A. P.; Gaigerov, B. A.; Koshelyaevsky, N. B.; Pushkin, S. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Institute of Metrology for Time and Space NPO 'VNIIFTRI' generates the National Time Scale (NTS) of Russia -- one of the most stable time scales in the world. Its striking feature is that it is based on a free ensemble of H-masers only. During last two years the estimations of NTS longterm stability based only on H-maser intercomparison data gives a flicker floor of about (2 to 3) x 10(exp -15) for averaging times from 1 day to 1 month. Perhaps the most significant feature for a time laboratory is an extremely low possible frequency drift -- it is too difficult to estimate it reliably. The other estimations, free from possible inside the ensemble correlation phenomena, are available based on the time comparison of NTS relative to the stable enough time scale of outer laboratories. The data on NTS comparison relative to the time scale of secondary time and frequency standards at Golitzino and Irkutsk in Russia and relative to NIST, PTB and USNO using GLONASS and GPS time transfer links gives stability estimations which are close to that based on H-maser intercomparisons.

  14. Trends in Surface Radiation Budgets at Climatic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, R. T.; Zhang, B.; Ma, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For assessment of variability and trends in the Earth Radiation Balance, information is needed at climatic time scales. Satellite observations have been instrumental for advancing the understanding of radiative balance at global scale, however, the length of available satellite records is limited due to the frequent changes in the observing systems. In this paper we report on an effort to synthesize satellite observations from independent sources to estimates shortwave and longwave surface radiative fluxes at climatic time scales and use them to learn about their variability and trends at global scale with a focus on the tropics. An attempt will be made to learn from the comparison about possible causes of observed trends. The radiative fluxes were derived in the framework of the MEaSURES and NEWS programs; they are evaluated against ground observations and compared to independent satellite and model estimates. Attention is given to updated knowledge on radiative balance as compared to what is known from shorter time records.

  15. Time scale construction from multiple sources of information (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinverno, A.

    2013-12-01

    Geological age estimates are provided by diverse chronometers, such as radiometric measurements, astrochronology, and the spacing of magnetic anomalies recorded on mid-ocean ridges by seafloor spreading. These age estimates are affected by errors that can be systematic (e.g., biased radiometric dates due to imperfect assumptions) or random (e.g., imprecise recording of astronomical cycles in sedimentary records). Whereas systematic errors can be reduced by improvements in technique and calibration, uncertainties due to random errors will always be present and need to be dealt with. A Bayesian framework can be used to construct an integrated time scale that is based on several uncertain sources of information. In this framework, each piece of data and the final time scale have an associated probability distribution that describes their uncertainty. The key calculation is to determine the uncertainty in the time scale from the uncertain data that constrain it. In practice, this calculation can be performed by Monte Carlo sampling. In Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, the time scale is iteratively perturbed and the perturbed time scale is accepted or rejected depending on how closely it fits the data. The final result is a large ensemble of possible time scales that are consistent with all the uncertain data; while the average of this ensemble defines a 'best' time scale, the ensemble variability quantifies the time scale uncertainty. An example of this approach is the M-sequence (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, ~160-120 Ma) MHTC12 geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS) of Malinverno et al. (2012, J. Geophys. Res., B06104, doi:10.1029/2012JB009260). Previous GPTSs were constructed by interpolating between dated marine magnetic anomalies while assuming constant or smoothly varying spreading rates. These GPTSs were typically based on magnetic lineations from one or a few selected spreading centers, and an undesirable result is that they imply larger spreading rate

  16. Evaluation of real-time acoustical holography for breast imaging and biopsy guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Constance D.; Andre, Michael P.; Fecht, Barbara A.; Johansen, Jennifer M.; Shelby, Ronald L.; Shelby, Jerod O.

    1999-05-01

    Ultrasound is an attractive modality for adjunctive characterization of certain breast lesions, but it is not considered specific for cancer and it is not recommended for screening. An imaging technique remarkably different from pulse-echo ultrasound, termed Optical SonographyTM (Advanced Diagnostics, Inc.), uses the through-transmission signal. The method was applied to breast examinations in 41 asymptomatic and symptomatic women ranging in age from 18 to 83 years to evaluate this imaging modality for detection and characterization of breast disease and normal tissue. This approach uses coherent sound and coherent light to produce real-time, large field-of-view images with pronounced edge definition in soft tissues of the body. The system patient interface was modified to improve coupling to the breast and bring the chest wall to within 3 cm of the sound beam. System resolution (full width half maximum of the line-spread function) was 0.5 mm for a swept-frequency beam centered at 2.7 MHz. Resolution degrades slightly in the periphery of the very large 15.2-cm field of view. Dynamic range of the reconstructed 'raw' images (no post processing) was 3000:1. Included in the study population were women with dense parenchyma, palpable ductal carcinoma in situ with negative mammography, superficial and deep fibroadenomas, and calcifications. Successful breast imaging was performed in 40 of 41 women. These images were then compared with images generated using conventional X-ray mammography and pulse-echo ultrasound. Margins of lesions and internal textures were particularly well defined and provided substantial contrast to fatty and dense parenchyma. In two malignant lesions, Optical SonographyTM appeared to approximate more closely tumor extent compared to mammography than pulse-echo sonography. These preliminary studies indicate the method has unique potential for detecting, differentiating, and guiding the biopsy of breast lesions using real-time acoustical holography.

  17. Subpilot-scale testing of acoustically enhanced cyclone collectors. Final report, September 1988--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Galica, M.A.; Campbell, A.H.; Rawlins, D.C.

    1994-08-01

    Gas turbines are used to recover energy from high temperature exhaust gases in coal-fired pressurized-fluidized bed, combined-cycle power generation systems. However, prior to entering the turbine hot-section, the majority of the fly ash must be removed in order to protect the turbine components from erosion, corrosion, and deposition of the ash. The U.S. Department of Energy under the direction of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) sponsored the development of an acoustically enhanced cyclone collector which offers the potential of achieving environmental control standards under Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustors (PFBC) conditions without the need for post-turbine particulate control. Pulse combustors developed by Manufacturing and Technology Conversation International, Inc. (MTCI) produced the acoustic power necessary to agglomerate ash particles into sizes large enough to be collected in a conventional cyclone system. A hot gas cleanup system that meets both turbine protection and emissions requirements without post-turbine particulate controls would also have improved overall system economics.

  18. Multiple-time scales analysis of physiological time series under neural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Hausdorff, J. M.; Havlin, S.; Mietus, J. E.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss multiple-time scale properties of neurophysiological control mechanisms, using heart rate and gait regulation as model systems. We find that scaling exponents can be used as prognostic indicators. Furthermore, detection of more subtle degradation of scaling properties may provide a novel early warning system in subjects with a variety of pathologies including those at high risk of sudden death.

  19. Heterogeneities and diagenetic control on the spatial distribution of carbonate rocks acoustic properties at the outcrop scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonti, C.; Guglielmi, Y.; Viseur, S.; Bruna, P. O.; Borgomano, J.; Dahl, C.; Marié, L.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate rocks are characterized by a high heterogeneity of their properties at the outcrop scale that results from complex interactions between sedimentary, diagenetic and fracturing processes. Here we show acoustic P-wave velocity measurements conducted step-by-step on three decameter scale outcrop surfaces in Cretaceous carbonate rocks with contrasted heterogeneities: two shallow water highly-fractured (Cassis) and low-fractured (Calissanne) carbonates, and one basin highly-compacted (Grignantes). P-wave measurements were compared to outcrop geology, and with plug porosity, P-wave velocity laboratory measurements and a thin-section study. Results show a strong scale dependence of P-wave velocities which always are lower at the decimeter scale than at the plug scale. Vpin situ-versus-Vpplug large discrepancies (> 2000 m/s) highlight the signature of large heterogeneities (open fractures, stylolithes), and lower discrepancies (< 2000 m/s) highlight the signature of small matrix heterogeneities (porosity type, granulometry, and fracture filling). Variogram analyses were conducted to precise the contrasted outcrop scale Vp signatures. The oblique anisotropy Vpin situ distribution follows the dip of the ripple foresets which are controlling grain sorting and porosity in Calissanne outcrop, the near-isotropic Vp are explained by an early intense fracturing and cementation in Cassis outcrop and the strong horizontal anisotropy with a hole effect behavior on variograms highlights the late re-opening of multiple intervals of compaction bands in Grignantes. These results illustrate that the early diagenesis coupled to fracture or stylolithe reactivation/opening are two key processes that explain the outcrop scale P-wave velocity distribution anisotropy in carbonates.

  20. Acoustic emission analysis on tensile failure of steam-side oxide scales formed on T22 alloy superheater tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun-Lin; Zhou, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xin-Meng; Tu, Yi-You; Xu, Jian-Qun

    2014-07-01

    Failure of steam-side oxide scales on boiler tubes can seriously influence the safety of coal-fired power plants. Uniaxial tensile tests employing acoustic emission (AE) monitoring were performed, in this work, to investigate the failure behavior of steam-side oxide scales on T22 alloy boiler superheater tubes. The characteristic frequency spectra of the captured AE signals were obtained by performing fast Fourier transform. Three distinct peak frequency bands, 100-170, 175-250, and 280-390 kHz, encountered in different testing stages were identified in the frequency spectra, which were confirmed to, respectively, correspond to substrate plastic deformation, oxide vertical cracking, and oxide spalling with the aid of scanning electronic microscopy observations, and can thus be used for distinguishing different oxide failure mechanisms. Finally, the critical cracking strain of the oxide scale and the interfacial shear strength of the oxide/substrate interface were estimated, which are the critical parameters urgently desired for modeling the failure behavior of steam-side oxide scales on boiler tubes of coal-fired power plants.

  1. Acoustic emission analysis on tensile failure of steam-side oxide scales formed on T22 alloy superheater tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jun-Lin; Zhou, Ke-Yi Xu, Jian-Qun; Wang, Xin-Meng; Tu, Yi-You

    2014-07-28

    Failure of steam-side oxide scales on boiler tubes can seriously influence the safety of coal-fired power plants. Uniaxial tensile tests employing acoustic emission (AE) monitoring were performed, in this work, to investigate the failure behavior of steam-side oxide scales on T22 alloy boiler superheater tubes. The characteristic frequency spectra of the captured AE signals were obtained by performing fast Fourier transform. Three distinct peak frequency bands, 100-170, 175-250, and 280-390 kHz, encountered in different testing stages were identified in the frequency spectra, which were confirmed to, respectively, correspond to substrate plastic deformation, oxide vertical cracking, and oxide spalling with the aid of scanning electronic microscopy observations, and can thus be used for distinguishing different oxide failure mechanisms. Finally, the critical cracking strain of the oxide scale and the interfacial shear strength of the oxide/substrate interface were estimated, which are the critical parameters urgently desired for modeling the failure behavior of steam-side oxide scales on boiler tubes of coal-fired power plants.

  2. Reconstruction of the fine structure of an acoustic scatterer against the distorting influence of its large-scale inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Grishina, I. M.; Lapshenkina, O. I.; Morozov, S. A.; Rumyantseva, O. D.; Sukhov, E. G.

    2003-11-01

    In the ultrasonic diagnostics of small-size neoplasms of biological tissues at the earliest stage of their development, an efficient way to eliminate the distorting influence of high-contrast or large inhomogeneities of the biological medium is to apply the iterative technique. A simple approach is proposed, which makes it possible with only two iteration steps to achieve an efficient focusing of the tomograph array. At the first step, the unknown distribution of the large-scale inhomogeneities of sound velocity and absorption over the scatterer is reconstructed, where the large-scale inhomogeneities are those whose size exceeds several wavelengths. At the second step, the fine structure of the scatterer is reconstructed against the large-scale background, which can be performed with a high accuracy owing to the evaluation of the background at the first step. The possibility of simultaneous reconstruction of the large-scale and fine structures by the noniterative Grinevich-Novikov algorithm is considered as an alternative. This algorithm reconstructs in an explicit form two-dimensional refractive-absorbing acoustic scatterers of almost arbitrary shape and strength. Taking into account the effects of multiple scattering, this algorithm provides resolution of the fine structure almost as good as that achieved in reconstructing the same structure against an undistorting homogeneous background. The results of numerical simulations of both algorithms are presented.

  3. Scaling properties in time-varying networks with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyewon; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2015-12-01

    The formation of network structure is mainly influenced by an individual node's activity and its memory, where activity can usually be interpreted as the individual inherent property and memory can be represented by the interaction strength between nodes. In our study, we define the activity through the appearance pattern in the time-aggregated network representation, and quantify the memory through the contact pattern of empirical temporal networks. To address the role of activity and memory in epidemics on time-varying networks, we propose temporal-pattern coarsening of activity-driven growing networks with memory. In particular, we focus on the relation between time-scale coarsening and spreading dynamics in the context of dynamic scaling and finite-size scaling. Finally, we discuss the universality issue of spreading dynamics on time-varying networks for various memory-causality tests.

  4. Gust Acoustic Response of a Swept Rectilinear Cascade Using The Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Himansu, A.; Jorgenson, P. C.; Chang, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    The benchmark problem 3 in Category 3 of the third Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA) Workshop sponsored by NASA Glenn Research Center is solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. This problem concerns the unsteady response of a rectilinear swept cascade to an incident gust. The acoustic field generated by the interaction of the gust with swept at plates in the cascade is computed by solving the 3D nonlinear Euler equations using the space-time CE/SE method. A parallel version of the 3D CE/SE Euler solver is employed to obtain numerical solutions for several sweep angles. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with the analytical solutions.

  5. Thermodynamics Constrains Allometric Scaling of Optimal Development Time in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Frazier, Melanie R.

    2013-01-01

    Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1) the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2) numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the “hotter is better” hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of biological processes

  6. Deviations from uniform power law scaling in nonstationary time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, G. M.; Peng, C. K.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    A classic problem in physics is the analysis of highly nonstationary time series that typically exhibit long-range correlations. Here we test the hypothesis that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems are more stable than those of pathological systems by studying beat-to-beat fluctuations in the human heart rate. We develop techniques based on the Fano factor and Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis, for quantifying deviations from uniform power-law scaling in nonstationary time series. By analyzing extremely long data sets of up to N = 10(5) beats for 11 healthy subjects, we find that the fluctuations in the heart rate scale approximately uniformly over several temporal orders of magnitude. By contrast, we find that in data sets of comparable length for 14 subjects with heart disease, the fluctuations grow erratically, indicating a loss of scaling stability.

  7. Active Travel-Time Tomography using a Distributed Acoustic Sensing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancelle, C.; Fratta, D.; Lord, N. E.; Wang, H. F.; Chalari, A.

    2015-12-01

    Distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is a sensor array used for monitoring ground motion by utilizing the interaction of light pulses with sections of a fiber-optic cable. In September 2013 a field test was conducted at the NEES@UCSB Garner Valley field site in Southern California incorporating DAS technology. A 762-meter-long fiber-optic cable was trenched to a depth of about 0.3 m in a rectangular design with two interior diagonal segments. The fiber was excited by a number of sources, including a 45 kN shear shaker and a smaller 450 N portable mass shaker, both of which were available through NEES@UCLA. In addition to these sources, signals were recorded from a minivib source and hammer blows on a steel plate, as well as 8 hours of overnight ambient noise recording. One goal of the field test was to evaluate the use of DAS for tomographic studies. The large number of measurement points inherent to DAS lends itself well to this type of study. Tomograms were constructed using two of the active-sources at multiple locations. There were 8 minivib locations within the array and 13 hammer locations along the boundary of the array. Travel-time data were collected with the DAS array. Two-dimensional velocity tomograms were constructed for different resolutions from the two active sources and compared. In all the images, the lowest velocities lie near the center of the array with higher velocities surrounding this area. The impact results, however, may contain an artifact due to multiple propagation modes. This research is part of the DOE's PoroTomo project.

  8. Physics in space-time with scale-dependent metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.

    2013-10-01

    We construct three-dimensional space Rγ3 with the scale-dependent metric and the corresponding Minkowski space-time Mγ,β4 with the scale-dependent fractal (DH) and spectral (DS) dimensions. The local derivatives based on scale-dependent metrics are defined and differential vector calculus in Rγ3 is developed. We state that Mγ,β4 provides a unified phenomenological framework for dimensional flow observed in quite different models of quantum gravity. Nevertheless, the main attention is focused on the special case of flat space-time M1/3,14 with the scale-dependent Cantor-dust-like distribution of admissible states, such that DH increases from DH=2 on the scale ≪ℓ0 to DH=4 in the infrared limit ≫ℓ0, where ℓ0 is the characteristic length (e.g. the Planck length, or characteristic size of multi-fractal features in heterogeneous medium), whereas DS≡4 in all scales. Possible applications of approach based on the scale-dependent metric to systems of different nature are briefly discussed.

  9. Transient Development of Backward Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scattering on a Picosecond Time Scale Measured by Subpicosecond Thomson Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseaux, C.; Gremillet, L.; Casanova, M.; Loiseau, P.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Baton, S.D.; Amiranoff, F.; Adam, J. C.; Heron, A.

    2006-07-07

    The excitation and the relaxation of the plasma waves and ion acoustic waves (IAW), respectively, driven by stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) backscatterings have been experimentally investigated with short-pulse lasers. The spectra have been obtained with a 0.3 ps time resolution. It is shown that SRS develops before SBS and suddenly decays around the peak of the pump, as the IAW reaches saturation. On this short time scale, electron kinetic effects play a major role for SRS saturation, contrary to ion dynamics. These results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations.

  10. Inferring synaptic structure in presence of neural interaction time scales.

    PubMed

    Capone, Cristiano; Filosa, Carla; Gigante, Guido; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Biological networks display a variety of activity patterns reflecting a web of interactions that is complex both in space and time. Yet inference methods have mainly focused on reconstructing, from the network's activity, the spatial structure, by assuming equilibrium conditions or, more recently, a probabilistic dynamics with a single arbitrary time-step. Here we show that, under this latter assumption, the inference procedure fails to reconstruct the synaptic matrix of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons when the chosen time scale of interaction does not closely match the synaptic delay or when no single time scale for the interaction can be identified; such failure, moreover, exposes a distinctive bias of the inference method that can lead to infer as inhibitory the excitatory synapses with interaction time scales longer than the model's time-step. We therefore introduce a new two-step method, that first infers through cross-correlation profiles the delay-structure of the network and then reconstructs the synaptic matrix, and successfully test it on networks with different topologies and in different activity regimes. Although step one is able to accurately recover the delay-structure of the network, thus getting rid of any a priori guess about the time scales of the interaction, the inference method introduces nonetheless an arbitrary time scale, the time-bin dt used to binarize the spike trains. We therefore analytically and numerically study how the choice of dt affects the inference in our network model, finding that the relationship between the inferred couplings and the real synaptic efficacies, albeit being quadratic in both cases, depends critically on dt for the excitatory synapses only, whilst being basically independent of it for the inhibitory ones. PMID:25807389

  11. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  12. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  13. A methane-based time scale for Vostok ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddiman, William F.; Raymo, Maureen E.

    2003-02-01

    Tuning the Vostok methane signal to mid-July 30°N insolation yields a new ice-core gas time scale. This exercise has two rationales: (1) evidence supporting Kutzbach's theory that low-latitude summer insolation in the northern hemisphere controls the strength of tropical monsoons, and (2) interhemispheric CH 4 gradients showing that the main control of orbital-scale CH 4 variations is tropical (monsoonal) sources. The immediate basis for tuning CH 4 to mid-July insolation is the coincident timing of the most recent (pre-anthropogenic) CH 4 maximum at 11,000-10,500 calendar years ago and the most recent July 30°N insolation maximum (all ages in this paper are in calendar years unless specified as 14C years). The resulting CH 4 gas time scale diverges by as much as 15,000 years from the GT4 gas time scale (Petit et al., Nature 399 (1999) 429) prior to 250,000 years ago, but it matches fairly closely a time scale derived by tuning ice-core δ18O atm to a lagged insolation signal (Shackleton, Science 289 (2000) 1897). Most offsets between the CH 4 and δ18O atm time scales can be explained by assuming that tropical monsoons and ice sheets alternate in controlling the phase of the δ18O atm signal. The CH 4 time scale provides an estimate of the timing of the Vostok CO 2 signal against SPECMAP marine δ18O, often used as an index of global ice volume. On the CH 4 time scale, all CO 2 responses are highly coherent with SPECMAP δ18O at the orbital periods. CO 2 leads δ18O by 5000 years at 100,000 years (eccentricity), but the two signals are nearly in-phase at 41,000 years (obliquity) and 23,000 years (precession). The actual phasing between CO 2 and ice volume is difficult to infer because of likely SST overprints on the SPECMAP δ18O signal. CO 2 could lead, or be in phase with, ice volume, but is unlikely to lag behind the ice response.

  14. Trends in Surface Radiation Budgets at Climatic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Zhang, Banglin; Ma, Yingtao

    2015-04-01

    For assessment of variability and trends in the Earth Radiation Balance, information is needed at climatic time scales. Satellite observations have been instrumental for advancing the understanding of the radiative balance at global scale, however, due to the frequent changes in the observing systems, the length of available satellite records is limited. In this paper we report on an effort to synthesize satellite observations from independent sources to estimates shortwave, longwave and spectral surface radiative fluxes at climatic time scales and use them to learn about their variability and trends. The radiative fluxes were derived in the framework of the MEaSURES and NEWS programs; they are evaluated against ground observations and compared to independent satellite and model estimates. Attention is given to updates on the radiative balance as compared to what is known from shorter time records and from models.

  15. Segregation time-scales in model granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, Lydie; Phillips, Jeremy C.

    2016-04-01

    Segregation patterns in natural granular systems offer a singular picture of the systems evolution. In many cases, understanding segregation dynamics may help understanding the system's history as well as its future evolution. Among the key questions, one concerns the typical time-scales at which segregation occurs. In this contribution, we present model granular flows simulated by means of the discrete Contact Dynamics method. The granular flows are bi-disperse, namely exhibiting two grain sizes. The flow composition and its dynamics are systematically varied, and the segregation dynamics carefully analyzed. We propose a physical model for the segregation that gives account of the observed dependence of segregation time scales on composition and dynamics. References L. Staron and J. C. Phillips, Stress partition and micro-structure in size-segregating granular flows, Phys. Rev. E 92 022210 (2015) L. Staron and J. C. Phillips, Segregation time-scales in bi-disperse granular flows, Phys. Fluids 26 (3), 033302 (2014)

  16. An algorithm for the Italian atomic time scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordara, F.; Vizio, G.; Tavella, P.; Pettiti, V.

    1994-01-01

    During the past twenty years, the time scale at the IEN has been realized by a commercial cesium clock, selected from an ensemble of five, whose rate has been continuously steered towards UTC to maintain a long term agreement within 3 x 10(exp -13). A time scale algorithm, suitable for a small clock ensemble and capable of improving the medium and long term stability of the IEN time scale, has been recently designed taking care of reducing the effects of the seasonal variations and the sudden frequency anomalies of the single cesium clocks. The new time scale, TA(IEN), is obtained as a weighted average of the clock ensemble computed once a day from the time comparisons between the local reference UTC(IEN) and the single clocks. It is foreseen to include in the computation also ten cesium clocks maintained in other Italian laboratories to further improve its reliability and its long term stability. To implement this algorithm, a personal computer program in Quick Basic has been prepared and it has been tested at the IEN time and frequency laboratory. Results obtained using this algorithm on the real clocks data relative to a period of about two years are presented.

  17. Improving the Geologic Time Scale (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradstein, Felix M.

    2010-05-01

    The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) provides the framework for the physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth. The time scale is the tool "par excellence" of the geological trade, and insight in its construction, strength, and limitations enhances its function and its utility. Earth scientists should understand how time scales are constructed and its myriad of physical and abstract data are calibrated, rather than merely using ages plucked from a convenient chart or card. Calibration to linear time of the succession of events recorded in the rocks on Earth has three components: (1) the standard stratigraphic divisions and their correlation in the global rock record, (2) the means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record, and (3) the methods of effectively joining the two scales, the stratigraphic one and the linear one. Under the auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international stratigraphic divisions and their correlative events are now largely standardized, especially using the GSSP (Global Stratigraphic Section and Point) concept. The means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record are objectives in the EARTH TIME and GTS NEXT projects, that also are educating a new generation of GTS dedicated scientists. The U/Pb, Ar/Ar and orbital tuning methods are intercalibrated, and external error analysis improved. Existing Ar/Ar ages become almost 0.5% older, and U/Pb ages stratigraphically more realistic. The new Os/Re method has potential for directly dating more GSSP's and its correlative events. Such may reduce scaling uncertainty between the sedimentary levels of an age date and that of a stage boundary. Since 1981, six successive Phanerozoic GTS have been published, each new one achieving higher resolution and more users. The next GTS is scheduled for 2011/2012, with over 50 specialists taking part. New chapters include an expanded planetary time scale, sequence stratigraphy

  18. Evaluation of Scaling Invariance Embedded in Short Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xue; Hou, Lei; Stephen, Mutua; Yang, Huijie; Zhu, Chenping

    2014-01-01

    Scaling invariance of time series has been making great contributions in diverse research fields. But how to evaluate scaling exponent from a real-world series is still an open problem. Finite length of time series may induce unacceptable fluctuation and bias to statistical quantities and consequent invalidation of currently used standard methods. In this paper a new concept called correlation-dependent balanced estimation of diffusion entropy is developed to evaluate scale-invariance in very short time series with length . Calculations with specified Hurst exponent values of show that by using the standard central moving average de-trending procedure this method can evaluate the scaling exponents for short time series with ignorable bias () and sharp confidential interval (standard deviation ). Considering the stride series from ten volunteers along an approximate oval path of a specified length, we observe that though the averages and deviations of scaling exponents are close, their evolutionary behaviors display rich patterns. It has potential use in analyzing physiological signals, detecting early warning signals, and so on. As an emphasis, the our core contribution is that by means of the proposed method one can estimate precisely shannon entropy from limited records. PMID:25549356

  19. Going up in time and length scales in modeling polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    Polymer properties depend on a wide range of coupled length and time scales, with unique macroscopic viscoelastic behavior stemming from interactions at the atomistic level. The need to probe polymers across time and length scales and particularly computational modeling is inherently challenging. Here new paths to probing long time and length scales including introducing interactions into traditional bead-spring models and coarse graining of atomistic simulations will be compared and discussed. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, the degree of coarse graining with two to six methylene groups per coarse-grained bead derived from a fully atomistic melt simulation were probed. We show that the degree of coarse graining affects the measured dynamic. Using these models we were successful in probing highly entangled melts and were able reach the long-time diffusive regime which is computationally inaccessible using atomistic simulations. We simulated the relaxation modulus and shear viscosity of well-entangled polyethylene melts for scaled times of 500 µs. Results for plateau modulus are in good agreement with experiment. The long time and length scale is coupled to the macroscopic viscoelasticity where the degree of coarse graining sets the minimum length scale instrumental in defining polymer properties and dynamics. Results will be compared to those obtained from simple bead-spring models to demonstrate the additional insight that can be gained from atomistically inspired coarse grained models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Time scales of crystal mixing in magma mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, Jillian M.; Bergantz, George W.; Breidenthal, Robert E.; Burgisser, Alain

    2016-02-01

    Magma mixing is widely recognized as a means of producing compositional diversity and preconditioning magmas for eruption. However, the processes and associated time scales that produce the commonly observed expressions of magma mixing are poorly understood, especially under crystal-rich conditions. Here we introduce and exemplify a parameterized method to predict the characteristic mixing time of crystals in a crystal-rich magma mush that is subject to open-system reintrusion events. Our approach includes novel numerical simulations that resolve multiphase particle-fluid interactions. It also quantifies the crystal mixing by calculating both the local and system-wide progressive loss of the spatial correlation of individual crystals throughout the mixing region. Both inertial and viscous time scales for bulk mixing are introduced. Estimated mixing times are compared to natural examples and the time for basaltic mush systems to become well mixed can be on the order of 10 days.

  1. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  2. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Keke Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  3. Acoustic testing of a supersonic tip speed fan with acoustic treatment and rotor casting slots. Quiet engine program scale model fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic tests were conducted on a high tip speed (1550 ft/sec, 472.44 m/sec) single stage fan with varying amounts of wall acoustic treatment and with circumferential slots over the rotor blade tips. The slots were also tested with acoustic treatment placed behind the slots. The wall treatment results show that the inlet treatment is more effective at high fan speeds and aft duct treatment is more effective at low fan speeds. Maximum PNL's on a 200-foot (60.96 m) sideline show the untreated slots to have increased the rear radiated noise at approach. However, when the treatment was added to the slots inlet radiated noise was decreased, resulting in little change relative to the solid casing on an EPNL basis.

  4. Doppler effect reduction based on time-domain interpolation resampling for wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang; Liu, Yongbin

    2014-06-01

    In the wayside Acoustic Defective Bearing Detector (ADBD) system, the recorded acoustic signal will be severely distorted by the Doppler effect because of the high moving speed of the railway vehicle, which is a barrier that would badly reduce the effectiveness of online defect detection. This paper proposes a simple and effective method, called time-domain interpolation resampling (TIR), to remove the Doppler effect embedded in the acoustic signal. The TIR is conducted in three steps. First, the time vector for resampling is calculated according to the kinematic analysis. Second, the amplitude of the distorted signal is demodulated. Third, the distorted signal is re-sampled using spline interpolation. In this method, both the spectrum structure and the amplitudes of the distorted signal can be restored. The effectiveness of TIR is verified by means of simulation studies and train roller bearing experiments with various types of defects. It is also compared to an existing Doppler effect reduction method that is based on the instantaneous frequency estimation using Hilbert transform. Results indicate that the proposed TIR method has the superior performance in removing the Doppler effect, and can be well implemented to Doppler effect reduction for the ADBD system.

  5. A multi-band spectral subtraction-based algorithm for real-time noise cancellation applied to gunshot acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, António L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald

    2013-06-01

    Acoustical sniper positioning is based on the detection and direction-of-arrival estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast acoustical signals. In real-life situations, the detection and direction-of-arrival estimation processes is usually performed under the influence of background noise sources, e.g., vehicles noise, and might result in non-negligible inaccuracies than can affect the system performance and reliability negatively, specially when detecting the muzzle sound under long range distance and absorbing terrains. This paper introduces a multi-band spectral subtraction based algorithm for real-time noise reduction, applied to gunshot acoustical signals. The ballistic shockwave and the muzzle blast signals exhibit distinct frequency contents that are affected differently by additive noise. In most real situations, the noise component is colored and a multi-band spectral subtraction approach for noise reduction contributes to reducing the presence of artifacts in denoised signals. The proposed algorithm is tested using a dataset generated by combining signals from real gunshots and real vehicle noise. The noise component was generated using a steel tracked military tank running on asphalt and includes, therefore, the sound from the vehicle engine, which varies slightly in frequency over time according to the engine's rpm, and the sound from the steel tracks as the vehicle moves.

  6. Generation and Propagation of a Picosecond Acoustic Pulse at a Buried Interface: Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Cavalieri, A.L.; Fritz, D.M.; Swan, M.C.; Reis, D.A.; Hegde, R.S.; Reason, M.; Goldman, R.S.

    2005-12-09

    We report on the propagation of coherent acoustic wave packets in (001) surface oriented Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs heterostructure, generated through localized femtosecond photoexcitation of the GaAs. Transient structural changes in both the substrate and film are measured with picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The data indicate an elastic response consisting of unipolar compression pulses of a few hundred picosecond duration traveling along [001] and [001] directions that are produced by predominately impulsive stress. The transmission and reflection of the strain pulses are in agreement with an acoustic mismatch model of the heterostructure and free-space interfaces.

  7. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this

  8. Appropriate time scales for nonlinear analyses of deterministic jump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tomoya

    2011-06-01

    In the real world, there are many phenomena that are derived from deterministic systems but which fluctuate with nonuniform time intervals. This paper discusses the appropriate time scales that can be applied to such systems to analyze their properties. The financial markets are an example of such systems wherein price movements fluctuate with nonuniform time intervals. However, it is common to apply uniform time scales such as 1-min data and 1-h data to study price movements. This paper examines the validity of such time scales by using surrogate data tests to ascertain whether the deterministic properties of the original system can be identified from uniform sampled data. The results show that uniform time samplings are often inappropriate for nonlinear analyses. However, for other systems such as neural spikes and Internet traffic packets, which produce similar outputs, uniform time samplings are quite effective in extracting the system properties. Nevertheless, uniform samplings often generate overlapping data, which can cause false rejections of surrogate data tests.

  9. 4-D imaging of seepage in earthen embankments with time-lapse inversion of self-potential data constrained by acoustic emissions localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, J. B.; Revil, A.; Planes, T.; Mooney, M. A.; Koelewijn, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    New methods are required to combine the information contained in the passive electrical and seismic signals to detect, localize and monitor hydromechanical disturbances in porous media. We propose a field experiment showing how passive seismic and electrical data can be combined together to detect a preferential flow path associated with internal erosion in a Earth dam. Continuous passive seismic and electrical (self-potential) monitoring data were recorded during a 7-d full-scale levee (earthen embankment) failure test, conducted in Booneschans, Netherlands in 2012. Spatially coherent acoustic emissions events and the development of a self-potential anomaly, associated with induced concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena, were identified and imaged near the downstream toe of the embankment, in an area that subsequently developed a series of concentrated water flows and sand boils, and where liquefaction of the embankment toe eventually developed. We present a new 4-D grid-search algorithm for acoustic emissions localization in both time and space, and the application of the localization results to add spatially varying constraints to time-lapse 3-D modelling of self-potential data in the terms of source current localization. Seismic signal localization results are utilized to build a set of time-invariant yet spatially varying model weights used for the inversion of the self-potential data. Results from the combination of these two passive techniques show results that are more consistent in terms of focused ground water flow with respect to visual observation on the embankment. This approach to geophysical monitoring of earthen embankments provides an improved approach for early detection and imaging of the development of embankment defects associated with concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena. The same approach can be used to detect various types of hydromechanical disturbances at larger scales.

  10. Science Enabled by Ocean Observatory Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lee, C.; Gobat, J.; Freitag, L.; Miller, J. H.; Committee, I.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean observatories have the potential to examine the physical, chemical, biological, and geological parameters and processes of the ocean at time and space scales previously unexplored. Acoustics provides an efficient and cost-effective means by which these parameters and processes can be measured and information can be communicated. Integrated acoustics systems providing navigation and communications for mobile platforms and conducting acoustical measurements in support of science objectives are critical and essential elements of the ocean observatories presently in the planning and implementation stages. The ORION Workshop (Puerto Rico, 4-8 January 2004) developed science themes that can be addressed utilizing ocean observatory infrastructure. The use of acoustics to sense the 3-d/volumetric ocean environment on all temporal and spatial scales was discussed in many ORION working groups. Science themes that are related to acoustics and measurements using acoustics are reviewed and tabulated, as are the related and sometimes competing requirements for passive listening, acoustic navigation and acoustic communication around observatories. Sound in the sea, brought from observatories to universities and schools via the internet, will also be a major education and outreach mechanism.

  11. Separation of Time Scales in a Quantum Newton's Cradle.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, R; Wouters, B; Eliëns, S; De Nardis, J; Konik, R M; Caux, J-S

    2016-06-01

    We provide detailed modeling of the Bragg pulse used in quantum Newton's-cradle-like settings or in Bragg spectroscopy experiments for strongly repulsive bosons in one dimension. We reconstruct the postpulse time evolution and study the time-dependent local density profile and momentum distribution by a combination of exact techniques. We further provide a variety of results for finite interaction strengths using a time-dependent Hartree-Fock analysis and bosonization-refermionization techniques. Our results display a clear separation of time scales between rapid and trap-insensitive relaxation immediately after the pulse, followed by slow in-trap periodic behavior. PMID:27314723

  12. Separation of Time Scales in a Quantum Newton's Cradle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, R.; Wouters, B.; Eliëns, S.; De Nardis, J.; Konik, R. M.; Caux, J.-S.

    2016-06-01

    We provide detailed modeling of the Bragg pulse used in quantum Newton's-cradle-like settings or in Bragg spectroscopy experiments for strongly repulsive bosons in one dimension. We reconstruct the postpulse time evolution and study the time-dependent local density profile and momentum distribution by a combination of exact techniques. We further provide a variety of results for finite interaction strengths using a time-dependent Hartree-Fock analysis and bosonization-refermionization techniques. Our results display a clear separation of time scales between rapid and trap-insensitive relaxation immediately after the pulse, followed by slow in-trap periodic behavior.

  13. Satellite attitude prediction by multiple time scales method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Y. C.; Ramnath, R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made of the problem of predicting the attitude of satellites under the influence of external disturbing torques. The attitude dynamics are first expressed in a perturbation formulation which is then solved by the multiple scales approach. The independent variable, time, is extended into new scales, fast, slow, etc., and the integration is carried out separately in the new variables. The theory is applied to two different satellite configurations, rigid body and dual spin, each of which may have an asymmetric mass distribution. The disturbing torques considered are gravity gradient and geomagnetic. Finally, as multiple time scales approach separates slow and fast behaviors of satellite attitude motion, this property is used for the design of an attitude control device. A nutation damping control loop, using the geomagnetic torque for an earth pointing dual spin satellite, is designed in terms of the slow equation.

  14. Time scale algorithm: Definition of ensemble time and possible uses of the Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, Patrizia; Thomas, Claudine

    1990-01-01

    The comparative study of two time scale algorithms, devised to satisfy different but related requirements, is presented. They are ALGOS(BIPM), producing the international reference TAI at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, and AT1(NIST), generating the real-time time scale AT1 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. In each case, the time scale is a weighted average of clock readings, but the weight determination and the frequency prediction are different because they are adapted to different purposes. The possibility of using a mathematical tool, such as the Kalman filter, together with the definition of the time scale as a weighted average, is also analyzed. Results obtained by simulation are presented.

  15. Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogane, Rintaro; Honda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/. Method: Each utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory…

  16. Gott Time Machines, BTZ Black Hole Formation, and Choptuik Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmingham, Danny; Sen, Siddhartha

    2000-02-01

    We study the formation of Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes by the collision of point particles. It is shown that the Gott time machine, originally constructed for the case of vanishing cosmological constant, provides a precise mechanism for black hole formation. As a result, one obtains an exact analytic understanding of the Choptuik scaling.

  17. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  18. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  19. Spectral decomposition of time-scales in hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2015-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange of heat and solute mass in streams is manifested both in form of different exchange mechanisms and their associated distributions of residence times as well as the range of time-scales characterizing the forcing boundary conditions. A recently developed analytical technique separates the spectrum of time-scales and relates the forcing boundary fluctuations of heat and solute mass through a physical model of the hydrological transport to the response of heat and solute mass. This spectral decomposition can be done both for local (point-scale) observations in the hyporhiec zone itself as well as for transport processes on the watershed scale that can be considered 'well-behaved' in terms of knowledge of the forcing (input) quantities. This paper presents closed-form solutions in spectral form for the point-, reach- and watershed-scale and discusses their applicability to selected data of heat and solute concentration. We quantify the reliability and highlight the benefits of the spectral approach to different scenarios and, peculiarly, the importance for linking the periods in the spectral decomposition of the solute response to the distribution of transport times that arise due to the multitude of exchange mechanisms existing in a watershed. In a point-scale example the power spectra of in-stream temperature is related to the power spectrum of the temperature at a specific sediment depth by means of exact solutions of a physically based formulation of the vertical heat transport. It is shown that any frequency (ω) of in-stream temperature fluctuation scales with the effective thermal diffusivity (κe) and the vertical separation distance between the pairs of temperature (ɛ) data as ω ≈ κe/(2ɛ2), which implies a decreasing weight to higher frequencies (shorter periods) with depth. Similarly on the watershed-scale one can link the watershed dispersion to the damping of the concentration fluctuations in selected frequency intervals

  20. Characterization of a binary karst aquifer using process time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Within "a theoretical framework for the interpretation of karst spring signals" (Covington, EGU2012-853-1) process length scales that characterize the travel distances required for damping pulses of physicochemical parameters of spring waters such as electrical conductivity and temperature were derived (Covington et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2012). These length scales can be converted to corresponding process time scales characterizing the travel times needed for damping the pulses. This is particularly convenient if the travel distance is unknown. In this case the time lag between the increase of spring discharge and subsequent physicochemical responses at the spring may provide an estimate of the travel time. In binary karst aquifers with localized recharge from a sinking stream, the recharge pulse can be directly observed and thus travel times are readily obtained from the time delay of the physicochemical spring responses. If the spring response is strongly damped travel times can be inferred from artificial tracer testing. In this work, time scales for carbonate dissolution and heat transport were used for characterizing the binary Lurbach-Tanneben karst aquifer (Austria). This aquifer receives allogenic recharge from the sinking stream Lurbach and is drained by two springs, namely the Hammerbach and the Schmelzbach. The two springs show different thermal responses to two recharge events in December 2008: Whereas the temperature of the Schmelzbach responds within one day after the flood pulse in the Lurbach, the temperature signal is strongly damped at the Hammerbach. The evaluation based on the thermal time scale thus suggests that the Schmelzbach spring is fed by conduits with hydraulic diameters at least in the order of decimetres. In contrast, the damping of the thermal responses at the Hammerbach may be due to lower hydraulic diameters and/or longer residence times. Interestingly, the Hammerbach did show thermal responses in the time before a flood event in

  1. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 5; Analytical and Experimental Data Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, W. E.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study presented in this volume is to present the results and data analysis of in-duct transmission loss measurements. Transmission loss testing was performed on full-scale, 1/2-scale, and 115-scale treatment panel samples. The objective of the study was to compare predicted and measured transmission loss for full-scale and subscale panels in an attempt to evaluate the variations in suppression between full- and subscale panels which were ostensibly of equivalent design. Generally, the results indicated an unsatisfactory agreement between measurement and prediction, even for full-scale. This was attributable to difficulties encountered in obtaining sufficiently accurate test results, even with extraordinary care in calibrating the instrumentation and performing the test. Test difficulties precluded the ability to make measurements at frequencies high enough to be representative of subscale liners. It is concluded that transmission loss measurements without ducts and data acquisition facilities specifically designed to operate with the precision and complexity required for high subscale frequency ranges are inadequate for evaluation of subscale treatment effects.

  2. An evaluation of acoustic seabed classification techniques for marine biotope monitoring over broad-scales (>1 km 2) and meso-scales (10 m 2-1 km 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rein, H.; Brown, C. J.; Quinn, R.; Breen, J.; Schoeman, D.

    2011-07-01

    Acoustic seabed classification is a useful tool for monitoring marine benthic habitats over broad-scales (>1 km 2) and meso-scales (10 m 2-1 km 2). Its utility in this context was evaluated using two approaches: by describing natural changes in the temporal distribution of marine biotopes across the broad-scale (4 km 2), and by attempting to detect specific experimentally-induced changes to kelp-dominated biotopes across the meso-scale (100 m 2). For the first approach, acoustic backscatter mosaics were constructed using sidescan sonar and multibeam echosounder data collected from Church Bay (Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland) in 1999, 2008 and 2009. The mosaics were manually segmented into acoustic facies, which were ground-truthed using a drop-video camera. Biotopes were classified from the video by multivariate exploratory analysis and cross-tabulated with the acoustic facies, showing a positive correlation. These results were integrated with bathymetric data to map the distribution of seven unique biotopes in Church Bay. Kappa analysis showed the biotope distribution was highly similar between the biotope maps, possibly due to the stability of bedforms shaped by the tidal regime around Rathlin Island. The greatest biotope change in this approach was represented by seasonal and annual changes in the growth of the seagrass, Zostera marina. In the second approach, sidescan sonar data were collected before and after the removal of 100 m 2 of kelp from three sites. Comparison of the data revealed no differences between the high-resolution backscatter imagery. It is concluded that acoustic seabed classification can be used to monitor change over broad- and meso-scales but not necessarily for all biotopes; its success depends on the type of acoustic system employed and the biological characteristics of the target biotope.

  3. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  4. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. R.; Cleveland, R. O.; Coussios, C. C.

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252-61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy. Portions presented at the 13th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound, Heidelberg, Germany (2012).

  5. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL REAL-TIME 3-D TRANSCRANIAL ULTRASOUND IMAGING AT 1 MHZ THROUGH POOR ACOUSTIC WINDOWS

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a rapid, portable alternative imaging modality to examine stroke patients in pre-hospital or emergency room settings. However, in performing transcranial ultrasound examinations, 8%–29% of patients in a general population may present with window failure, in which case it is not possible to acquire clinically useful sonographic information through the temporal bone acoustic window. In this work, we describe the technical considerations, design and fabrication of low-frequency (1.2 MHz), large aperture (25.3 mm) sparse matrix array transducers for 3-D imaging in the event of window failure. These transducers are integrated into a system for real-time 3-D bilateral transcranial imaging—the ultrasound brain helmet—and color flow imaging capabilities at 1.2 MHz are directly compared with arrays operating at 1.8 MHz in a flow phantom with attenuation comparable to the in vivo case. Contrast-enhanced imaging allowed visualization of arteries of the Circle of Willis in 5 of 5 subjects and 8 of 10 sides of the head despite probe placement outside of the acoustic window. Results suggest that this type of transducer may allow acquisition of useful images either in individuals with poor windows or outside of the temporal acoustic window in the field. PMID:23415287

  6. The Available Time Scale: Measuring Foster Parents' Available Time to Foster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Donna J.; Orme, John G.; Rhodes, Kathryn W.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a new measure of available time specific to fostering, the Available Time Scale (ATS). It was tested with a national sample of 304 foster mothers and is designed to measure the amount of time foster parents are able to devote to fostering activities. The ATS has excellent reliability, and good support exists for its validity.…

  7. Apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Kerry, K.

    2008-10-28

    We have successfully designed, built and tested an experimental apparatus which is capable of providing the first real-time ultrasound images of Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection in optically opaque fluids confined to large aspect ratio experimental cells. The apparatus employs a modified version of a commercially available ultrasound camera to capture images (30 frames per second) of flow patterns in a fluid undergoing Rayleigh Bénard convection. The apparatus was validated by observing convection rolls in 5cSt polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer fluid. Our first objective, after having built the apparatus, was to use it to study the sequence of transitions from diffusive to time--dependent heat transport in liquid mercury. The aim was to provide important information on pattern formation in the largely unexplored regime of very low Prandtl number fluids. Based on the theoretical stability diagram for liquid mercury, we anticipated that straight rolls should be stable over a range of Rayleigh numbers, between 1708 and approximately 1900. Though some of our power spectral densities were suggestive of the existence of weak convection, we have been unable to unambiguously visualize stable convection rolls above the theoretical onset of convection in liquid mercury. Currently, we are seeking ways to increase the sensitivity of our apparatus, such as (i) improving the acoustic impedance matching between our materials in the ultrasound path and (ii) reducing the noise level in our acoustic images due to turbulence and cavitation in the cooling fluids circulating above and below our experimental cell. If we are able to convincingly improve the sensitivity of our apparatus, and we still do not observe stable convection rolls in liquid mercury, then it may be the case that the theoretical stability diagram requires revision. In that case, either (i) straight rolls are not stable in a large aspect ratio cell at the Prandtl numbers associated with liquid mercury, or (ii) they

  8. Energy and time determine scaling in biological and computer designs.

    PubMed

    Moses, Melanie; Bezerra, George; Edwards, Benjamin; Brown, James; Forrest, Stephanie

    2016-08-19

    Metabolic rate in animals and power consumption in computers are analogous quantities that scale similarly with size. We analyse vascular systems of mammals and on-chip networks of microprocessors, where natural selection and human engineering, respectively, have produced systems that minimize both energy dissipation and delivery times. Using a simple network model that simultaneously minimizes energy and time, our analysis explains empirically observed trends in the scaling of metabolic rate in mammals and power consumption and performance in microprocessors across several orders of magnitude in size. Just as the evolutionary transitions from unicellular to multicellular animals in biology are associated with shifts in metabolic scaling, our model suggests that the scaling of power and performance will change as computer designs transition to decentralized multi-core and distributed cyber-physical systems. More generally, a single energy-time minimization principle may govern the design of many complex systems that process energy, materials and information.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431524

  9. Time scales and heterogeneous structure in geodynamic earth models

    PubMed

    Bunge; Richards; Lithgow-Bertelloni; Baumgardner; Grand; Romanowicz

    1998-04-01

    Computer models of mantle convection constrained by the history of Cenozoic and Mesozoic plate motions explain some deep-mantle structural heterogeneity imaged by seismic tomography, especially those related to subduction. They also reveal a 150-million-year time scale for generating thermal heterogeneity in the mantle, comparable to the record of plate motion reconstructions, so that the problem of unknown initial conditions can be overcome. The pattern of lowermost mantle structure at the core-mantle boundary is controlled by subduction history, although seismic tomography reveals intense large-scale hot (low-velocity) upwelling features not explicitly predicted by the models. PMID:9525864

  10. Wavelet analysis and scaling properties of time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimaran, P.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Parikh, Jitendra C.

    2005-10-01

    We propose a wavelet based method for the characterization of the scaling behavior of nonstationary time series. It makes use of the built-in ability of the wavelets for capturing the trends in a data set, in variable window sizes. Discrete wavelets from the Daubechies family are used to illustrate the efficacy of this procedure. After studying binomial multifractal time series with the present and earlier approaches of detrending for comparison, we analyze the time series of averaged spin density in the 2D Ising model at the critical temperature, along with several experimental data sets possessing multifractal behavior.

  11. Wavelet analysis and scaling properties of time series.

    PubMed

    Manimaran, P; Panigrahi, Prasanta K; Parikh, Jitendra C

    2005-10-01

    We propose a wavelet based method for the characterization of the scaling behavior of nonstationary time series. It makes use of the built-in ability of the wavelets for capturing the trends in a data set, in variable window sizes. Discrete wavelets from the Daubechies family are used to illustrate the efficacy of this procedure. After studying binomial multifractal time series with the present and earlier approaches of detrending for comparison, we analyze the time series of averaged spin density in the 2D Ising model at the critical temperature, along with several experimental data sets possessing multifractal behavior. PMID:16383481

  12. Brownian motion at fast time scales and thermal noise imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rongxin

    This dissertation presents experimental studies on Brownian motion at fast time scales, as well as our recent developments in Thermal Noise Imaging which uses thermal motions of microscopic particles for spatial imaging. As thermal motions become increasingly important in the studies of soft condensed matters, the study of Brownian motion is not only of fundamental scientific interest but also has practical applications. Optical tweezers with a fast position-sensitive detector provide high spatial and temporal resolution to study Brownian motion at fast time scales. A novel high bandwidth detector was developed with a temporal resolution of 30 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 A. With this high bandwidth detector, Brownian motion of a single particle confined in an optical trap was observed at the time scale of the ballistic regime. The hydrodynamic memory effect was fully studied with polystyrene particles of different sizes. We found that the mean square displacements of different sized polystyrene particles collapse into one master curve which is determined by the characteristic time scale of the fluid inertia effect. The particle's inertia effect was shown for particles of the same size but different densities. For the first time the velocity autocorrelation function for a single particle was shown. We found excellent agreement between our experiments and the hydrodynamic theories that take into account the fluid inertia effect. Brownian motion of a colloidal particle can be used to probe three-dimensional nano structures. This so-called thermal noise imaging (TNI) has been very successful in imaging polymer networks with a resolution of 10 nm. However, TNI is not efficient at micrometer scale scanning since a great portion of image acquisition time is wasted on large vacant volume within polymer networks. Therefore, we invented a method to improve the efficiency of large scale scanning by combining traditional point-to-point scanning to explore large vacant

  13. Classifying acoustic signals into phoneme categories: average and dyslexic readers make use of complex dynamical patterns and multifractal scaling properties of the speech signal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several competing aetiologies of developmental dyslexia suggest that the problems with acquiring literacy skills are causally entailed by low-level auditory and/or speech perception processes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diverging claims about the specific deficient peceptual processes under conditions of strong inference. Theoretically relevant acoustic features were extracted from a set of artificial speech stimuli that lie on a /bAk/-/dAk/ continuum. The features were tested on their ability to enable a simple classifier (Quadratic Discriminant Analysis) to reproduce the observed classification performance of average and dyslexic readers in a speech perception experiment. The ‘classical’ features examined were based on component process accounts of developmental dyslexia such as the supposed deficit in Envelope Rise Time detection and the deficit in the detection of rapid changes in the distribution of energy in the frequency spectrum (formant transitions). Studies examining these temporal processing deficit hypotheses do not employ measures that quantify the temporal dynamics of stimuli. It is shown that measures based on quantification of the dynamics of complex, interaction-dominant systems (Recurrence Quantification Analysis and the multifractal spectrum) enable QDA to classify the stimuli almost identically as observed in dyslexic and average reading participants. It seems unlikely that participants used any of the features that are traditionally associated with accounts of (impaired) speech perception. The nature of the variables quantifying the temporal dynamics of the speech stimuli imply that the classification of speech stimuli cannot be regarded as a linear aggregate of component processes that each parse the acoustic signal independent of one another, as is assumed by the ‘classical’ aetiologies of developmental dyslexia. It is suggested that the results imply that the differences in speech perception performance between

  14. Classifying acoustic signals into phoneme categories: average and dyslexic readers make use of complex dynamical patterns and multifractal scaling properties of the speech signal.

    PubMed

    Hasselman, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Several competing aetiologies of developmental dyslexia suggest that the problems with acquiring literacy skills are causally entailed by low-level auditory and/or speech perception processes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diverging claims about the specific deficient peceptual processes under conditions of strong inference. Theoretically relevant acoustic features were extracted from a set of artificial speech stimuli that lie on a /bAk/-/dAk/ continuum. The features were tested on their ability to enable a simple classifier (Quadratic Discriminant Analysis) to reproduce the observed classification performance of average and dyslexic readers in a speech perception experiment. The 'classical' features examined were based on component process accounts of developmental dyslexia such as the supposed deficit in Envelope Rise Time detection and the deficit in the detection of rapid changes in the distribution of energy in the frequency spectrum (formant transitions). Studies examining these temporal processing deficit hypotheses do not employ measures that quantify the temporal dynamics of stimuli. It is shown that measures based on quantification of the dynamics of complex, interaction-dominant systems (Recurrence Quantification Analysis and the multifractal spectrum) enable QDA to classify the stimuli almost identically as observed in dyslexic and average reading participants. It seems unlikely that participants used any of the features that are traditionally associated with accounts of (impaired) speech perception. The nature of the variables quantifying the temporal dynamics of the speech stimuli imply that the classification of speech stimuli cannot be regarded as a linear aggregate of component processes that each parse the acoustic signal independent of one another, as is assumed by the 'classical' aetiologies of developmental dyslexia. It is suggested that the results imply that the differences in speech perception performance between average and

  15. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  16. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations

    PubMed Central

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; García, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars’ surface gravity (g). Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA’s Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode. PMID:26767193

  17. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations.

    PubMed

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; García, Rafael A; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars' surface gravity (g). Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA's Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode. PMID:26767193

  18. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; Garcia, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars' surface gravity g. Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA's Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode.

  19. Surface charge measurements in barrier discharges on different time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Robert; Volkhausen, Christian; Benduhn, Johannes; Stollenwerk, Lars

    2015-09-01

    The deposition of surface charge in barrier discharges is a process that influences the ongoing discharge significantly. This contribution presents the measurement of absolute surface charge densities and their dynamics in a laterally extended setup. An electro-optic BSO crystal is used as dielectric. The absolute charge density on its surface is deduced from the change of polarisation of light passing the crystal. Using different temporal resolutions, the behavior of charge is investigated on three different time scales. The highest temporal resolution of the technique is in the order of hundreds of nanoseconds. Therefore it is possible for the first time to observe the charge deposition process during an active discharge. On the time scale of the applied voltage period (several microseconds), the conservation mechanisms of a lateral discharge pattern is investigated. For this, the influence of surface charge and metastable species in the volume is estimated. Further, the behavior of the surface charge spots on a variation of the external voltage and gas pressure is studied. Measurements on a time scale in the magnitude of seconds reveal charge decay and transport phenomena. This work was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  20. Differential force microscope for long time-scale biophysical measurements

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jason L.; Parekh, Sapun H.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Liu, Allen P.; Bustamante, Carlos; Footer, Matthew J.; Theriot, Julie A.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Force microscopy techniques including optical trapping, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have facilitated quantification of forces and distances on the molecular scale. However, sensitivity and stability limitations have prevented the application of these techniques to biophysical systems that generate large forces over long times, such as actin filament networks. Growth of actin networks drives cellular shape change and generates nano-Newtons of force over time scales of minutes to hours, and consequently network growth properties have been difficult to study. Here, we present an AFM-based differential force microscope with integrated epifluorescence imaging in which two adjacent cantilevers on the same rigid support are used to provide increased measurement stability. We demonstrate 14 nm displacement control over measurement times of 3 hours and apply the instrument to quantify actin network growth in vitro under controlled loads. By measuring both network length and total network fluorescence simultaneously, we show that the average cross-sectional density of the growing network remains constant under static loads. The differential force microscope presented here provides a sensitive method for quantifying force and displacement with long time-scale stability that is useful for measurements of slow biophysical processes in whole cells or in reconstituted molecular systems in vitro. PMID:17477674

  1. Reconstructions of solar irradiance on centennial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria; Kok Leng, Yeo

    Solar irradiance is the main external source of energy to Earth's climate system. The record of direct measurements covering less than 40 years is too short to study solar influence on Earth's climate, which calls for reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past with the help of appropriate models. An obvious requirement to a competitive model is its ability to reproduce observed irradiance changes, and a successful example of such a model is presented by the SATIRE family of models. As most state-of-the-art models, SATIRE assumes that irradiance changes on time scales longer than approximately a day are caused by the evolving distribution of dark and bright magnetic features on the solar surface. The surface coverage by such features as a function of time is derived from solar observations. The choice of these depends on the time scale in question. Most accurate is the version of the model that employs full-disc spatially-resolved solar magnetograms and reproduces over 90% of the measured irradiance variation, including the overall decreasing trend in the total solar irradiance over the last four cycles. Since such magnetograms are only available for about four decades, reconstructions on time scales of centuries have to rely on disc-integrated proxies of solar magnetic activity, such as sunspot areas and numbers. Employing a surface flux transport model and sunspot observations as input, we have being able to produce synthetic magnetograms since 1700. This improves the temporal resolution of the irradiance reconstructions on centennial time scales. The most critical aspect of such reconstructions remains the uncertainty in the magnitude of the secular change.

  2. Sublinear scaling for time-dependent stochastic density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2015-01-21

    A stochastic approach to time-dependent density functional theory is developed for computing the absorption cross section and the random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energy. The core idea of the approach involves time-propagation of a small set of stochastic orbitals which are first projected on the occupied space and then propagated in time according to the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. The evolving electron density is exactly represented when the number of random orbitals is infinite, but even a small number (≈16) of such orbitals is enough to obtain meaningful results for absorption spectrum and the RPA correlation energy per electron. We implement the approach for silicon nanocrystals using real-space grids and find that the overall scaling of the algorithm is sublinear with computational time and memory.

  3. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  4. The Acoustic Signature of Woodford Shale and Upscale Relationship from Nano-Scale Mechanical Properties and Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, M. H.; Abousleiman, Y. N.; Hoang, S. K.; Ortega, A. J.; Bobko, C.; Ulm, F.

    2007-12-01

    The complex composition of shale, the most encountered and problematic lithology in the Earth's crust, has puzzled many researchers attempting to find the key for understanding their micro- and macro-scale acoustic and mechanical signatures. Recent advances in nano-technology, in particular the progress of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) base indentation technique, have made it possible to mechanically study porous material at a nano scale (10-9 m) and consequently have allowed linking shale mechanical properties to intrinsic micro- and macro-properties such as porosity, packing density, and mineralogy. Based on more than 20,000 nano- indentation tests conducted on a number of shales with varying physical properties, a GeoGenomeTM model was developed to upscale macroscopic shale mechanical parameters from mineralogy composition, porosity, and packing density. In this work, the mechanical properties such as the elastic stiffness coefficients, Cij, and the anisotropic Biot's Pore Pressure Coefficients, αij, of the Woodford shale, were acquired using sonic log data and Ultra-Sonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) measurements conducted on preserved retrieved shale core samples from a 200-ft well drilled in the Woodford formation, in Oklahoma. Furthermore, the dependency of the Cij and αij, on applied stresses and the relationship between the dynamic moduli and the quasi-static moduli were also investigated using an array of piezoelectric crystals mounted around the samples while subjecting the samples to different applied stress states using a series of tri-axial tests. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and mercury injection tests were also performed on the retrieved core samples to obtain mineralogy composition and porosity of the shale at different depths. Comparison of the simulated mechanical and poromechanical properties and stiffness coefficients using the Quantitative GeoGenomeTM Mineralogy Simulator (QGGMSTM) with field and acoustic lab measurements showed excellent agreement

  5. Space and time scales in human-landscape systems.

    PubMed

    Kondolf, G Mathias; Podolak, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Exploring spatial and temporal scales provides a way to understand human alteration of landscape processes and human responses to these processes. We address three topics relevant to human-landscape systems: (1) scales of human impacts on geomorphic processes, (2) spatial and temporal scales in river restoration, and (3) time scales of natural disasters and behavioral and institutional responses. Studies showing dramatic recent change in sediment yields from uplands to the ocean via rivers illustrate the increasingly vast spatial extent and quick rate of human landscape change in the last two millennia, but especially in the second half of the twentieth century. Recent river restoration efforts are typically small in spatial and temporal scale compared to the historical human changes to ecosystem processes, but the cumulative effectiveness of multiple small restoration projects in achieving large ecosystem goals has yet to be demonstrated. The mismatch between infrequent natural disasters and individual risk perception, media coverage, and institutional response to natural disasters results in un-preparedness and unsustainable land use and building practices. PMID:23716006

  6. Tailored real-time scaling of heteronuclear couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Franz; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2012-10-01

    Heteronuclear couplings are a valuable source of molecular information, which is measured from the multiplet splittings of an NMR spectrum. Radiofrequency irradiation on one coupled nuclear spin allows to modify the effective coupling constant, scaling down the multiplet splittings in the spectrum observed at the resonance frequency of the other nuclear spin. Such decoupling sequences are often used to collapse a multiplet into a singlet and can therefore simplify NMR spectra significantly. Continuous-wave (cw) decoupling has an intrinsic non-linear offset dependence of the scaling of the effective J-coupling constant. Using optimal control pulse optimization, we show that virtually arbitrary off-resonance scaling of the J-coupling constant can be achieved. The new class of tailored decoupling pulses is named SHOT (Scaling of Heteronuclear couplings by Optimal Tracking). Complementing cw irradiation, SHOT pulses offer an alternative approach of encoding chemical shift information indirectly through off-resonance decoupling, which however makes it possible for the first time to achieve linear J scaling as a function of offset frequency. For a simple mixture of eight aromatic compounds, it is demonstrated experimentally that a 1D-SHOT {1H}-13C experiment yields comparable information to a 2D-HSQC and can give full assignment of all coupled spins.

  7. Statistical Analysis of Sensor Network Time Series at Multiple Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granat, R. A.; Donnellan, A.

    2013-12-01

    Modern sensor networks often collect data at multiple time scales in order to observe physical phenomena that occur at different scales. Whether collected by heterogeneous or homogenous sensor networks, measurements at different time scales are usually subject to different dynamics, noise characteristics, and error sources. We explore the impact of these effects on the results of statistical time series analysis methods applied to multi-scale time series data. As a case study, we analyze results from GPS time series position data collected in Japan and the Western United States, which produce raw observations at 1Hz and orbit corrected observations at time resolutions of 5 minutes, 30 minutes, and 24 hours. We utilize the GPS analysis package (GAP) software to perform three types of statistical analysis on these observations: hidden Markov modeling, probabilistic principle components analysis, and covariance distance analysis. We compare the results of these methods at the different time scales and discuss the impact on science understanding of earthquake fault systems generally and recent large seismic events specifically, including the Tohoku-Oki earthquake in Japan and El Mayor-Cucupah earthquake in Mexico.

  8. Selective visual scaling of time-scale processes facilitates broadband learning of isometric force frequency tracking.

    PubMed

    King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2015-10-01

    The experiment investigated the effect of selectively augmenting faster time scales of visual feedback information on the learning and transfer of continuous isometric force tracking tasks to test the generality of the self-organization of 1/f properties of force output. Three experimental groups tracked an irregular target pattern either under a standard fixed gain condition or with selectively enhancement in the visual feedback display of intermediate (4-8 Hz) or high (8-12 Hz) frequency components of the force output. All groups reduced tracking error over practice, with the error lowest in the intermediate scaling condition followed by the high scaling and fixed gain conditions, respectively. Selective visual scaling induced persistent changes across the frequency spectrum, with the strongest effect in the intermediate scaling condition and positive transfer to novel feedback displays. The findings reveal an interdependence of the timescales in the learning and transfer of isometric force output frequency structures consistent with 1/f process models of the time scales of motor output variability. PMID:26041272

  9. The length and time scales of water's glass transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Using a general model for the equilibrium dynamics of supercooled liquids, I compute from molecular properties the emergent length and time scales that govern the nonequilibrium relaxation behavior of amorphous ice prepared by rapid cooling. Upon cooling, the liquid water falls out of equilibrium whereby the temperature dependence of its relaxation time is predicted to change from super-Arrhenius to Arrhenius. A consequence of this crossover is that the location of the apparent glass transition temperature depends logarithmically on cooling rate. Accompanying vitrification is the emergence of a dynamical length-scale, the size of which depends on the cooling rate and varies between angstroms and tens of nanometers. While this protocol dependence clarifies a number of previous experimental observations for amorphous ice, the arguments are general and can be extended to other glass forming liquids.

  10. Entropy Production of Nanosystems with Time Scale Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shou-Wen; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Sasa, Shin-ichi; Tang, Lei-Han

    2016-08-01

    Energy flows in biomolecular motors and machines are vital to their function. Yet experimental observations are often limited to a small subset of variables that participate in energy transport and dissipation. Here we show, through a solvable Langevin model, that the seemingly hidden entropy production is measurable through the violation spectrum of the fluctuation-response relation of a slow observable. For general Markov systems with time scale separation, we prove that the violation spectrum exhibits a characteristic plateau in the intermediate frequency region. Despite its vanishing height, the plateau can account for energy dissipation over a broad time scale. Our findings suggest a general possibility to probe hidden entropy production in nanosystems without direct observation of fast variables.

  11. Entropy Production of Nanosystems with Time Scale Separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Wen; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Sasa, Shin-Ichi; Tang, Lei-Han

    2016-08-12

    Energy flows in biomolecular motors and machines are vital to their function. Yet experimental observations are often limited to a small subset of variables that participate in energy transport and dissipation. Here we show, through a solvable Langevin model, that the seemingly hidden entropy production is measurable through the violation spectrum of the fluctuation-response relation of a slow observable. For general Markov systems with time scale separation, we prove that the violation spectrum exhibits a characteristic plateau in the intermediate frequency region. Despite its vanishing height, the plateau can account for energy dissipation over a broad time scale. Our findings suggest a general possibility to probe hidden entropy production in nanosystems without direct observation of fast variables. PMID:27563943

  12. Long-term variation time scales in OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jun-Hui; Liu, Yi; Qian, Bo-Chun; Tao, Jun; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Jiang-Shui; Huang, Yong; Wang, Jin

    2010-11-01

    The light curve data from 1894 to 2008 are compiled for the BL Lacertae object OJ 287 from the available literature. Periodicity analysis methods (the Discrete Correlation Function-DCF, the Jurkevich method, the power spectral (Fourier) analysis, and the CLEANest method) are performed to search for possible periodicites in the light curve of OJ 287. Significance levels are given for the possible periods. The analysis results confirm the existence of the 12.2±0.6 yr time scale and show a hint of a ~53 yr time scale. The 12.2±0.6 yr period is used as the orbital period to investigate the supermassive binary black hole system parameters.

  13. Sub-diffusive scaling with power-law trapping times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liang; Tang, Lei-Han

    2014-07-01

    Thermally driven diffusive motion of a particle underlies many physical and biological processes. In the presence of traps and obstacles, the spread of the particle is substantially impeded, leading to subdiffusive scaling at long times. The statistical mechanical treatment of diffusion in a disordered environment is often quite involved. In this short review, we present a simple and unified view of the many quantitative results on anomalous diffusion in the literature, including the scaling of the diffusion front and the mean first-passage time. Various analytic calculations and physical arguments are examined to highlight the role of dimensionality, energy landscape, and rare events in affecting the particle trajectory statistics. The general understanding that emerges will aid the interpretation of relevant experimental and simulation results.

  14. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  15. Adaptive Haar transforms with arbitrary time and scale splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiazarian, Karen O.; Astola, Jaakko T.

    2001-05-01

    The Haar transform is generalized to the case of an arbitrary time and scale splitting. To any binary tree we associate an orthogonal system of Haar-type functions - tree-structured Haar (TSH) functions. Unified fast algorithm for computation of the introduced tree-structured Haar transforms is presented. It requires 2(N - 1) additions and 3N - 2 multiplications, where N is transform order or, equivalently, the number of leaves of the binary tree.

  16. Biogenic Calcium Phosphate Transformation in Soils over Millennium Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, S.; Neves, E; Solomon, D; Liang, B; Lehmann, J

    2009-01-01

    Changes in bioavailability of phosphorus (P) during pedogenesis and ecosystem development have been shown for geogenic calcium phosphate (Ca-P). However, very little is known about long-term changes of biogenic Ca-P in soil. Long-term transformation characteristics of biogenic Ca-P were examined using anthropogenic soils along a chronosequence from centennial to millennial time scales. Phosphorus fractionation of Anthrosols resulted in overall consistency with the Walker and Syers model of geogenic Ca-P transformation during pedogenesis. The biogenic Ca-P (e.g., animal and fish bones) disappeared to 3% of total P within the first ca. 2,000 years of soil development. This change concurred with increases in P adsorbed on metal-oxides surfaces, organic P, and occluded P at different pedogenic time. Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that the crystalline and therefore thermodynamically most stable biogenic Ca-P was transformed into more soluble forms of Ca-P over time. While crystalline hydroxyapatite (34% of total P) dominated Ca-P species after about 600-1,000 years, {Beta}-tricalcium phosphate increased to 16% of total P after 900-1,100 years, after which both Ca-P species disappeared. Iron-associated P was observable concurrently with Ca-P disappearance. Soluble P and organic P determined by XANES maintained relatively constant (58-65%) across the time scale studied. Conclusions - Disappearance of crystalline biogenic Ca-P on a time scale of a few thousand years appears to be ten times faster than that of geogenic Ca-P.

  17. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  18. Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-09-01

    We present a coevolutionary view of hydrologic systems, revolving around feedbacks between environmental and social processes operating across different time scales. This brings to the fore an emphasis on emergent phenomena in changing water systems, such as the levee effect, adaptation to change, system lock-in, and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system. Guidance is provided for the framing and modeling of these phenomena to test alternative hypotheses about how they arose. A plurality of coevolutionary models, from stylized to comprehensive system-of-system models, may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesize the observed dynamics in a wide range of case studies. Future research opportunities lie in exploring emergent phenomena arising from time scale interactions through historical, comparative, and process studies of human-water feedbacks.

  19. Backpropagation and ordered derivatives in the time scales calculus.

    PubMed

    Seiffertt, John; Wunsch, Donald C

    2010-08-01

    Backpropagation is the most widely used neural network learning technique. It is based on the mathematical notion of an ordered derivative. In this paper, we present a formulation of ordered derivatives and the backpropagation training algorithm using the important emerging area of mathematics known as the time scales calculus. This calculus, with its potential for application to a wide variety of inter-disciplinary problems, is becoming a key area of mathematics. It is capable of unifying continuous and discrete analysis within one coherent theoretical framework. Using this calculus, we present here a generalization of backpropagation which is appropriate for cases beyond the specifically continuous or discrete. We develop a new multivariate chain rule of this calculus, define ordered derivatives on time scales, prove a key theorem about them, and derive the backpropagation weight update equations for a feedforward multilayer neural network architecture. By drawing together the time scales calculus and the area of neural network learning, we present the first connection of two major fields of research. PMID:20615808

  20. Small-Scale Trial for Evaluating Directional Resolution of Single Spherical Biconcave Acoustic Lens in Designing of Ambient Noise Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2008-05-01

    Ambient noise imaging (ANI) is the revolutionary idea of detecting objects by using natural ocean background noise. From the analysis results obtained by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in our previous studies, it was supposed that a spherical biconcave lens with an aperture diameter of 2.0 m has a sufficient directional resolution (for example, the beam width is 1° at 60 kHz) for realizing an ANI system. In this study, to confirm the analysis results, we performed a small-scale trial of one-fifth space in a water tank. The lens, made of acrylic resin, has an aperture diameter of 400 mm and a radius of curvature of 500 mm. A burst pulse of 25 cycles at 300 kHz, whose frequency increases 5 times, was radiated from the sound source. The sound pressure after passage through the acoustic lens was measured by moving the receiver around the image point. Results show that the shapes of -3 dB areas are similar to the FDTD analysis results at small incidence angles. It was verified that this lens has a sufficient directional resolution for use in the ANI system, because -3 dB areas do not overlap each other.

  1. Time evolution of nonplanar electron acoustic shock waves in a plasma with superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakzad, Hamid Reza; Javidan, Kurosh; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-07-01

    The propagation of cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic (EA) shock waves in unmagnetized plasmas consisting of cold fluid electrons, hot electrons obeying a superthermal distribution and stationary ions, has been investigated. The standard reductive perturbation method (RPM) has been employed to derive the cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de-Vries-Burger (KdVB) equation which governs the dynamics of the EA shock structures. The effects of nonplanar geometry, plasma kinematic viscosity and electron suprathermality on the temporal evolution of the cylindrical and spherical EA shock waves are numerically examined.

  2. On the resolution of phonological constraints in spoken production: Acoustic and response time evidence.

    PubMed

    Bürki, Audrey; Frauenfelder, Ulrich H; Alario, F-Xavier

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the production of words the pronunciation of which depends on the phonological context. Participants produced adjective-noun phrases starting with the French determiner un. The pronunciation of this determiner requires a liaison consonant before vowels. Naming latencies and determiner acoustic durations were shorter when the adjective and the noun both started with vowels or both with consonants, than when they had different onsets. These results suggest that the liaison process is not governed by the application of a local contextual phonological rule; they rather favor the hypothesis that pronunciation variants with and without the liaison consonant are stored in memory. PMID:26520356

  3. Scale dependence of the directional relationships between coupled time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Amir Hossein; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Bahraminasab, Alireza; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza; Peinke, Joachim; Sahimi, Muhammad; Marsili, Matteo

    2013-02-01

    Using the cross-correlation of the wavelet transformation, we propose a general method of studying the scale dependence of the direction of coupling for coupled time series. The method is first demonstrated by applying it to coupled van der Pol forced oscillators and coupled nonlinear stochastic equations. We then apply the method to the analysis of the log-return time series of the stock values of the IBM and General Electric (GE) companies. Our analysis indicates that, on average, IBM stocks react earlier to possible common sector price movements than those of GE.

  4. Scale and time dependence of serial correlations in word-length time series of written texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    This work considered the quantitative analysis of large written texts. To this end, the text was converted into a time series by taking the sequence of word lengths. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used for characterizing long-range serial correlations of the time series. To this end, the DFA was implemented within a rolling window framework for estimating the variations of correlations, quantified in terms of the scaling exponent, strength along the text. Also, a filtering derivative was used to compute the dependence of the scaling exponent relative to the scale. The analysis was applied to three famous English-written literary narrations; namely, Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carrol), Dracula (by Bram Stoker) and Sense and Sensibility (by Jane Austen). The results showed that high correlations appear for scales of about 50-200 words, suggesting that at these scales the text contains the stronger coherence. The scaling exponent was not constant along the text, showing important variations with apparent cyclical behavior. An interesting coincidence between the scaling exponent variations and changes in narrative units (e.g., chapters) was found. This suggests that the scaling exponent obtained from the DFA is able to detect changes in narration structure as expressed by the usage of words of different lengths.

  5. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis): selective filters and signal mismatch on two time scales.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Matti Michael; Hennig, Ralf Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as "Gryllus assimilis", the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2-3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz) emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems. PMID:22970154

  6. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis): Selective Filters and Signal Mismatch on Two Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Rothbart, Matti Michael; Hennig, Ralf Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as “Gryllus assimilis”, the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2–3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz) emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems. PMID:22970154

  7. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) performance, acoustic and weight estimation, January, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parzych, D.; Shenkman, A.; Cohen, S.

    1985-01-01

    In comparison to turbo-prop applications, the Prop-Fan is designed to operate in a significantly higher range of aircraft flight speeds. Two concerns arise regarding operation at very high speeds: aerodynamic performance and noise generation. This data package covers both topics over a broad range of operating conditions for the eight (8) bladed SR-7L Prop-Fan. Operating conditions covered are: Flight Mach Number 0 - 0.85; blade tip speed 600-800 ft/sec; and cruise power loading 20-40 SHP/D2. Prop-Fan weight and weight scaling estimates are also included.

  8. Evaluation of a scale-model experiment to investigate long-range acoustic propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Mcaninch, Gerry L.; Carlberg, Ingrid A.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using a scale-model experiment situated in an anechoic facility to investigate long-range sound propagation over ground terrain. For a nominal scale factor of 100:1, attenuations along a linear array of six microphones colinear with a continuous-wave type of sound source were measured over a wavelength range from 10 to 160 for a nominal test frequency of 10 kHz. Most tests were made for a hard model surface (plywood), but limited tests were also made for a soft model surface (plywood with felt). For grazing-incidence propagation over the hard surface, measured and predicted attenuation trends were consistent for microphone locations out to between 40 and 80 wavelengths. Beyond 80 wavelengths, significant variability was observed that was caused by disturbances in the propagation medium. Also, there was evidence of extraneous propagation-path contributions to data irregularities at more remote microphones. Sensitivity studies for the hard-surface and microphone indicated a 2.5 dB change in the relative excess attenuation for a systematic error in source and microphone elevations on the order of 1 mm. For the soft-surface model, no comparable sensitivity was found.

  9. Time scaling with efficient time-propagation techniques for atoms and molecules in pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hamido, Aliou; Frapiccini, Ana Laura; Piraux, Bernard; Eiglsperger, Johannes; Madronero, Javier; Mota-Furtado, Francisca; O'Mahony, Patrick

    2011-07-15

    We present an ab initio approach to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation to treat electron- and photon-impact multiple ionization of atoms or molecules. It combines the already known time-scaled coordinate method with a high-order time propagator based on a predictor-corrector scheme. In order to exploit in an optimal way the main advantage of the time-scaled coordinate method, namely, that the scaled wave packet stays confined and evolves smoothly toward a stationary state, of which the squared modulus is directly proportional to the electron energy spectra in each ionization channel, we show that the scaled bound states should be subtracted from the total scaled wave packet. In addition, our detailed investigations suggest that multiresolution techniques like, for instance, wavelets are the most appropriate ones to represent the scaled wave packet spatially. The approach is illustrated in the case of the interaction of a one-dimensional model atom as well as atomic hydrogen with a strong oscillating field.

  10. Adjoint problem in duct acoustics and its reciprocity to forward problem by the Time Domain Wave Packet method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocaogul, Ibrahim; Hu, Fang; Li, Xiaodong

    2014-03-01

    Radiation of acoustic waves at all frequencies can be obtained by Time Domain Wave Packet (TDWP) method in a single time domain computation. Other benefit of the TDWP method is that it makes possible the separation of acoustic and instability wave in the shear flow. The TDWP method is also particularly useful for computations in the ducted or waveguide environments where incident wave modes can be imposed cleanly without a potentially long transient period. The adjoint equations for the linearized Euler equations are formulated for the Cartesian coordinates. Analytical solution for adjoint equations is derived by using Green's function in 2D and 3D. The derivation of reciprocal relations is presented for closed and open ducts. The adjoint equations are then solved numerically in reversed time by the TDWP method. Reciprocal relation between the duct mode amplitudes and far field point sources in the presence of the exhaust shear flow is computed and confirmed numerically. Applications of the adjoint problem to closed and open ducts are also presented.

  11. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  12. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  13. SIGNIFICANT FOREGROUND UNRELATED NON-ACOUSTIC ANISOTROPY ON THE 1 DEGREE SCALE IN WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE 5-YEAR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bizhu; Zhang Shuangnan; Lieu, Richard; Wakker, Bart

    2010-01-01

    The spectral variation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as observed by WMAP was tested using foreground reduced WMAP5 data, by producing subtraction maps at the 1 deg. angular resolution between the two cosmological bands of V and W, for masked sky areas that avoid the Galactic disk. The resulting V - W map revealed a non-acoustic signal over and above the WMAP5 pixel noise, with two main properties. First, it possesses quadrupole power at the approx1 muK level which may be attributed to foreground residuals. Second, it fluctuates also at all values of l> 2, especially on the 1 deg. scale (200 approx< l approx< 300). The behavior is random and symmetrical about zero temperature with an rms approx7 muK, or 10% of the maximum CMB anisotropy, which would require a 'cosmic conspiracy' among the foreground components if it is a consequence of their existence. Both anomalies must be properly diagnosed and corrected if 'precision' cosmology is the claim. The second anomaly is, however, more interesting because it opens the question on whether the CMB anisotropy genuinely represents primordial density seeds.

  14. Is there a break in scaling on centennial time scale in Holocene temperature records?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Tine; Rypdal, Kristoffer; Fredriksen, Hege-Beate

    2015-04-01

    A variety of paleoclimatic records have been used to study scaling properties of past climate, including ice core paleotemperature records and multi-proxy reconstructions. Records extending further back in time than the Holocene are divided into glacial/interglacial segments before analysis. The methods used to infer the scaling include the power spectral density (Lomb-Scargle periodogram and standard periodogram), detrended fluctuation analysis, wavelet variance analysis and the Haar fluctuation function. All the methods have individual strengths, weaknesses, uncertainties and biases, and for this reason it is useful to compare results from different methods when possible. Proxy-based reconstructions have limited spatial and temporal coverage, and must be used and interpreted with great care due to uncertainties. By elaborating on physical mechanisms for the actual climate fluctuations seen in the paleoclimatic temperature records as well as uncertainties in both data and methods, we demonstrate the possible pitfalls that may lead to the conclusion that the variability in temperature time series can be separated into different scaling regimes. Categorizing the Earth's surface temperature variability into a «macroweather» and "climate" regime has little or no practical meaning since the different components in the climate system are connected and interact on all time scales. Our most important result is that a break between two different scaling regimes at time scales around one century cannot be identified in Holocene climate. We do, however, observe departures from scaling, which can be attributed to variability such as a single internal quasi-periodic oscillation, an externally forced trend, or a combination of factors. If two scaling regimes are claimed to be present in one single time series, both regimes must be persistent. We show that the limited temporal resolution/length of the records significantly lowers the confidence for such persistence. A total of

  15. Acoustic impedance microscopy for biological tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Hozumi, Naohiro

    2014-09-01

    A new method for two-dimensional acoustic impedance imaging for biological tissue characterization with micro-scale resolution was proposed. A biological tissue was placed on a plastic substrate with a thickness of 0.5mm. A focused acoustic pulse with a wide frequency band was irradiated from the "rear side" of the substrate. In order to generate the acoustic wave, an electric pulse with two nanoseconds in width was applied to a PVDF-TrFE type transducer. The component of echo intensity at an appropriate frequency was extracted from the signal received at the same transducer, by performing a time-frequency domain analysis. The spectrum intensity was interpreted into local acoustic impedance of the target tissue. The acoustic impedance of the substrate was carefully assessed prior to the measurement, since it strongly affects the echo intensity. In addition, a calibration was performed using a reference material of which acoustic impedance was known. The reference material was attached on the same substrate at different position in the field of view. An acoustic impedance microscopy with 200×200 pixels, its typical field of view being 2×2 mm, was obtained by scanning the transducer. The development of parallel fiber in cerebella cultures was clearly observed as the contrast in acoustic impedance, without staining the specimen. The technique is believed to be a powerful tool for biological tissue characterization, as no staining nor slicing is required. PMID:24852259

  16. Time scale hierarchies in the functional organization of complex behaviors.

    PubMed

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2011-09-01

    Traditional approaches to cognitive modelling generally portray cognitive events in terms of 'discrete' states (point attractor dynamics) rather than in terms of processes, thereby neglecting the time structure of cognition. In contrast, more recent approaches explicitly address this temporal dimension, but typically provide no entry points into cognitive categorization of events and experiences. With the aim to incorporate both these aspects, we propose a framework for functional architectures. Our approach is grounded in the notion that arbitrary complex (human) behaviour is decomposable into functional modes (elementary units), which we conceptualize as low-dimensional dynamical objects (structured flows on manifolds). The ensemble of modes at an agent's disposal constitutes his/her functional repertoire. The modes may be subjected to additional dynamics (termed operational signals), in particular, instantaneous inputs, and a mechanism that sequentially selects a mode so that it temporarily dominates the functional dynamics. The inputs and selection mechanisms act on faster and slower time scales then that inherent to the modes, respectively. The dynamics across the three time scales are coupled via feedback, rendering the entire architecture autonomous. We illustrate the functional architecture in the context of serial behaviour, namely cursive handwriting. Subsequently, we investigate the possibility of recovering the contributions of functional modes and operational signals from the output, which appears to be possible only when examining the output phase flow (i.e., not from trajectories in phase space or time). PMID:21980278

  17. Time scaling of tree rings cell production in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkova, Margarita; Babushkina, Elena; Tychkov, Ivan; Shishov, Vladimir; Vaganov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    It is assumed that an annual tree-ring growth is adequately determined by a linear function of local or regional precipitation and temperature with a set of coefficients that are temporally invariant. But often that relations are non-linear. The process-based tree-ring VS-model can be used to resolve the critical processes linking climate variables to tree-ring formation. This work describes a new block of VS-model which allows to estimate a cell production in tree rings and transfer it into time scale based on the simulated integral growth rates of the model. In the algorithm of time identification for cell production we used a integral growth rates simulated by the VS-model for each growing season. The obtained detailed approach with a calculation of the time of each cell formation improves significantly the date accuracy of new cell formation in growing season. As a result for each cell in the tree-ring we estimate the temporal moment of the cell production corresponded to the seasonal growth rate in the same time scale. The approach was applied and tested for the cell measurements obtained for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) for the period 1964-2013 in Malaya Minusa river (Khakassia, South Siberia). The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RSF # 14-14-00219)

  18. Flow excursion time scales in the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    Flow excursion transients give rise to a key thermal limit for the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor because its core involves many parallel flow channels with a common pressure drop. Since one can envision certain accident scenarios in which the thermal limits set by flow excursion correlations might be exceeded for brief intervals, a key objective is to determine how long a flow excursion would take to bring about a system failure that could lead to fuel damage. The anticipated time scale for flow excursions has been examined by subdividing the process into its component phenomena: bubble nucleation and growth, deceleration of the resulting two-phase flow, and finally overcoming thermal inertia to heat up the reactor fuel plates. Models were developed to estimate the time required for each individual stage. Accident scenarios involving sudden reduction in core flow or core exit pressure have been examined, and the models compared with RELAP5 output for the ANS geometry. For a high-performance reactor like the ANS, flow excursion time scales were predicted to be in the millisecond range, so that even very brief transients might lead to fuel damage. These results should prove useful whenever one must determine the time involved in any portion of a flow excursion transient.

  19. Time Scale Hierarchies in the Functional Organization of Complex Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional approaches to cognitive modelling generally portray cognitive events in terms of ‘discrete’ states (point attractor dynamics) rather than in terms of processes, thereby neglecting the time structure of cognition. In contrast, more recent approaches explicitly address this temporal dimension, but typically provide no entry points into cognitive categorization of events and experiences. With the aim to incorporate both these aspects, we propose a framework for functional architectures. Our approach is grounded in the notion that arbitrary complex (human) behaviour is decomposable into functional modes (elementary units), which we conceptualize as low-dimensional dynamical objects (structured flows on manifolds). The ensemble of modes at an agent’s disposal constitutes his/her functional repertoire. The modes may be subjected to additional dynamics (termed operational signals), in particular, instantaneous inputs, and a mechanism that sequentially selects a mode so that it temporarily dominates the functional dynamics. The inputs and selection mechanisms act on faster and slower time scales then that inherent to the modes, respectively. The dynamics across the three time scales are coupled via feedback, rendering the entire architecture autonomous. We illustrate the functional architecture in the context of serial behaviour, namely cursive handwriting. Subsequently, we investigate the possibility of recovering the contributions of functional modes and operational signals from the output, which appears to be possible only when examining the output phase flow (i.e., not from trajectories in phase space or time). PMID:21980278

  20. Spatiotemporally resolved granular acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Eli; Daniels, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic techniques provide a non-invasive method of characterizing granular material properties; however, there are many challenges in formulating accurate models of sound propagation due to the inherently heterogeneous nature of granular materials. In order to quantify acoustic responses in space and time, we perform experiments in a photoelastic granular material in which the internal stress pattern (in the form of force chains) is visible. We utilize two complementary methods, high-speed imaging and piezoelectric transduction, to provide particle-scale measurements of the amplitude of the acoustic wave. We observe that the average wave amplitude is largest within particles experiencing the largest forces. The force-dependence of this amplitude is in qualitative agreement with a simple Hertzian-like model for contact area. In addition, we investigate the power spectrum of the propagating signal using the piezoelectric sensors. For a Gaussian wave packet input, we observe a broad spectrum of transmitted frequencies below the driving frequency, and we quantify the characteristic frequencies and corresponding length scales of our material as the system pressure is varied.

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERACTION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Chitta, Lakshmi Pradeep; Kariyappa, R.; Jain, Rekha; Jefferies, Stuart M. E-mail: rkari@iiap.res.in E-mail: stuartj@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-01-10

    The effect of the magnetic field on photospheric intensity and velocity oscillations at the sites of small-scale magnetic fields (SMFs) in a quiet Sun near the solar disk center is studied. We use observations made by the G-band filter in the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode for intensity oscillations; Doppler velocity, magnetic field, and continuum intensity are derived from an Ni I photospheric absorption line at 6767.8 A using the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Our analysis shows that both the high-resolution intensity observed in the G band and velocity oscillations are influenced by the presence of a magnetic field. While intensity oscillations are suppressed at all frequencies in strong magnetic field regions compared to weak magnetic field regions, velocity oscillations show an enhancement of power in the frequency band 5.5-7 mHz. We find that there is a drop of 20%-30% in the p-mode power of velocity oscillations within the SMFs when compared to the regions surrounding them. Our findings indicate that the nature of the interaction of acoustic waves with the quiet Sun SMFs is similar to that of large-scale magnetic fields in active regions. We also report the first results of the center-to-limb variation of such effects using the observations of the quiet Sun from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The independent verification of these interactions using SDO/HMI suggests that the velocity power drop of 20%-30% in p-modes is fairly constant across the solar disk.

  2. Terrestrial Waters and Sea Level Variations on Interannual Time Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llovel, W.; Becker, M.; Cazenave, A.; Jevrejeva, S.; Alkama, R.; Decharme, B.; Douville, H.; Ablain, M.; Beckley, B.

    2011-01-01

    On decadal to multi-decadal time scales, thermal expansion of sea waters and land ice loss are the main contributors to sea level variations. However, modification of the terrestrial water cycle due to climate variability and direct anthropogenic forcing may also affect sea level. For the past decades, variations in land water storage and corresponding effects on sea level cannot be directly estimated from observations because these are almost non-existent at global continental scale. However, global hydrological models developed for atmospheric and climatic studies can be used for estimating total water storage. For the recent years (since mid-2002), terrestrial water storage change can be directly estimated from observations of the GRACE space gravimetry mission. In this study, we analyse the interannual variability of total land water storage, and investigate its contribution to mean sea level variability at interannual time scale. We consider three different periods that, each, depend on data availability: (1) GRACE era (2003-2009), (2) 1993-2003 and (3) 1955-1995. For the GRACE era (period 1), change in land water storage is estimated using different GRACE products over the 33 largest river basins worldwide. For periods 2 and 3, we use outputs from the ISBA-TRIP (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere-Total Runoff Integrating Pathways) global hydrological model. For each time span, we compare change in land water storage (expressed in sea level equivalent) to observed mean sea level, either from satellite altimetry (periods 1 and 2) or tide gauge records (period 3). For each data set and each time span, a trend has been removed as we focus on the interannual variability. We show that whatever the period considered, interannual variability of the mean sea level is essentially explained by interannual fluctuations in land water storage, with the largest contributions arising from tropical river basins.

  3. The Role of Time-Scales in Socio-hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöschl, Günter; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-04-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water. Water Resour. Res., 51, 6988-7022, doi:10.1002/2015WR017896.

  4. Numerical and experimental investigation of noise from small scale axial fans focusing on inflow condition and acoustic source type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yoon Shik

    The objective of this work was to conduct an experimental and numerical investigation of the noise radiated by a small-scale axial fan from two different points-of-view: the development of an inflow treatment to compensate for unfavorable inflow conditions that result in excessive noise, and a consideration of installation effects for the acoustic source type of small axial fans. The effect of disturbed inflow on axial fans was experimentally investigated by intentionally placing a blockage plate at four different locations upstream of a fan. The blocked inflow made the axial fan perform very poorly; the severely decreased pressure performance introduced an overly strong dependence of flow performance on pressure load condition. An inflow diffuser made from aluminum foam was suggested to improve the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the axial fan under such unfavorable inflow conditions. The inflow diffuser improved the stability of flow performance and reduced the blade passing tone by a small amount, but the levels of the high frequency harmonics of the blade passing tone were increased. A corresponding numerical model was built to model the flow change due to the inflow foam treatment. The inflow foam diffuser was approximated as a homogeneous porous zone to make the computational cost affordable, and it was shown that the model can predict the foam's influence on the pressure and flow performance of the fan. The aeroacoustic analogy model was applied to the solid surfaces of the fan and its housing to simulate the tonal noise at the blade passing frequency. The validity of the homogeneous foam model in terms of aeroacoustic predictions was also confirmed. As for the second aspect of the axial fan noise source, the dipole-like source behavior of an axial fan at the blade passing frequency was verified by directivity measurements. Thus, dipole modeling of an axial fan was justified. This result is associated with the problem of overestimated fan source

  5. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  6. Flight parameter estimation using instantaneous frequency and time delay measurements from a three-element planar acoustic array.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kam W

    2016-05-01

    The acoustic signal emitted by a turbo-prop aircraft consists of a strong narrowband tone superimposed on a broadband random component. A ground-based three-element planar acoustic array can be used to estimate the full set of flight parameters of a turbo-prop aircraft in transit by measuring the time delay (TD) between the signal received at the reference sensor and the signal received at each of the other two sensors of the array over a sufficiently long period of time. This paper studies the possibility of using instantaneous frequency (IF) measurements from the reference sensor to improve the precision of the flight parameter estimates. A simplified Cramer-Rao lower bound analysis shows that the standard deviations in the estimates of the aircraft velocity and altitude can be greatly reduced when IF measurements are used together with TD measurements. Two flight parameter estimation algorithms that utilize both IF and TD measurements are formulated and their performances are evaluated using both simulated and real data. PMID:27250134

  7. Massive particles in acoustic space-times: Emergent inertia and passive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2006-04-15

    I show that massive-particle dynamics can be simulated by a weak, external perturbation on a potential flow in an ideal fluid. The perturbation defining a particle is dictated in a small (spherical) region that is otherwise free to roam in the fluid. Here I take it as an external potential that couples to the fluid density or as a rigid distribution of sources with vanishing total outflux. The effective Lagrangian for such particles is shown to be of the form mc{sup 2}l(U{sup 2}/c{sup 2}), where U{yields} is the velocity of the particle relative to the fluid and c the speed of sound. This can serve as a model for emergent relativistic inertia a la Mach's principle with m playing the role of inertial mass, and also of analog gravity where m is also the passive gravitational mass. The mass m depends on the particle type and intrinsic structure (and on position if the background density is not constant), while l is universal: For D-dimensional particles l{proportional_to}F(1,1/2;D/2;U{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) (F is the hypergeometric function). These particles have the following interesting dynamics: Particles fall in the same way in the analog gravitational field mimicked by the flow, independent of their internal structure, thus satisfying the weak equivalence principle. For D{<=}5 they all have a relativistic limit with the acquired energy and momentum diverging as U{yields}c. For D{<=}7 the null geodesics of the standard acoustic metric solve our equation of motion. Interestingly, for D=4 the dynamics is very nearly Lorentzian: l{proportional_to}-mc{sup 2}{gamma}{sup -1}{lambda}({gamma}) (up to a constant), with {lambda}=(1+{gamma}{sup -1}){sup -1} varying between 1/2 and 1 ({gamma} is the 'Lorentz factor' for the particle velocity relative to the fluid). The particles can be said to follow the geodesics of a generalized acoustic metric of a Finslerian type that shares the null geodesics with the standard acoustic metric. In vortex geometries, the ergosphere is

  8. Multiple-Time Scaling and Universal Behavior of the Earthquake Interevent Time Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bottiglieri, M.; Godano, C.; Lippiello, E.; Arcangelis, L. de

    2010-04-16

    The interevent time distribution characterizes the temporal occurrence in seismic catalogs. Universal scaling properties of this distribution have been evidenced for entire catalogs and seismic sequences. Recently, these universal features have been questioned and some criticisms have been raised. We investigate the existence of universal scaling properties by analyzing a Californian catalog and by means of numerical simulations of an epidemic-type model. We show that the interevent time distribution exhibits a universal behavior over the entire temporal range if four characteristic times are taken into account. The above analysis allows us to identify the scaling form leading to universal behavior and explains the observed deviations. Furthermore, it provides a tool to identify the dependence on the mainshock magnitude of the c parameter that fixes the onset of the power law decay in the Omori law.

  9. Time Scale Optimization and the Hunt for Astronomical Cycles in Deep Time Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    2016-04-01

    A valuable attribute of astrochronology is the direct link between chronometer and climate change, providing a remarkable opportunity to constrain the evolution of the surficial Earth System. Consequently, the hunt for astronomical cycles in strata has spurred the development of a rich conceptual framework for climatic/oceanographic change, and has allowed exploration of the geologic record with unprecedented temporal resolution. Accompanying these successes, however, has been a persistent skepticism about appropriate astrochronologic testing and circular reasoning: how does one reliably test for astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, especially when time is poorly constrained? From this perspective, it would seem that the merits and promise of astrochronology (e.g., a geologic time scale measured in ≤400 kyr increments) also serves as its Achilles heel, if the confirmation of such short rhythms defies rigorous statistical testing. To address these statistical challenges in astrochronologic testing, a new approach has been developed that (1) explicitly evaluates time scale uncertainty, (2) is resilient to common problems associated with spectrum confidence level assessment and 'multiple testing', and (3) achieves high statistical power under a wide range of conditions (it can identify astronomical cycles when present in data). Designated TimeOpt (for "time scale optimization"; Meyers 2015), the method employs a probabilistic linear regression model framework to investigate amplitude modulation and frequency ratios (bundling) in stratigraphic data, while simultaneously determining the optimal time scale. This presentation will review the TimeOpt method, and demonstrate how the flexible statistical framework can be further extended to evaluate (and optimize upon) complex sedimentation rate models, enhancing the statistical power of the approach, and addressing the challenge of unsteady sedimentation. Meyers, S. R. (2015), The evaluation of eccentricity

  10. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-01

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5ps/K, and the long term stability is better than ±0.2ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis.

  11. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-01

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3 ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9 ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5 ps/K, and the long term stability is better than +/-0.2 ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis. PMID:17902964

  12. Ti diffusion in quartz inclusions: implications for metamorphic time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, Frank S.; Ashley, Kyle T.; Webb, Laura E.; Thomas, Jay B.

    2012-12-01

    Quartz inclusions in garnet from samples collected from the staurolite zone in central New England are zoned in cathodoluminescence (CL). The CL intensity is interpreted to be a proxy for Ti concentration and the zoning attributed to Ti diffusion into the quartz grains driven by Ti exchange between quartz and enclosing garnet as a function of changing temperature. The CL zoning has been interpreted using a numerical diffusion model to constrain the time scales over which the diffusion has occurred. Temperature-time histories are sensitive to the presumed peak temperature but not to other model parameters. The total time of the metamorphic heating and cooling cycle from around 450 °C to the peak temperature (550-600 °C) back to 450 °C is surprisingly short and encompasses only 0.2-2 million years for peak temperatures of 600-550 °C. The metamorphism was accompanied by large-scale nappe and dome formation, and it is suggested that this occurred as a consequence of in-sequence thrusting resulting in a mid-crustal ductile duplex structure.

  13. Role of relaxation time scale in noisy signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K

    2015-01-01

    Intra-cellular fluctuations, mainly triggered by gene expression, are an inevitable phenomenon observed in living cells. It influences generation of phenotypic diversity in genetically identical cells. Such variation of cellular components is beneficial in some contexts but detrimental in others. To quantify the fluctuations in a gene product, we undertake an analytical scheme for studying few naturally abundant linear as well as branched chain network motifs. We solve the Langevin equations associated with each motif under the purview of linear noise approximation and derive the expressions for Fano factor and mutual information in close analytical form. Both quantifiable expressions exclusively depend on the relaxation time (decay rate constant) and steady state population of the network components. We investigate the effect of relaxation time constraints on Fano factor and mutual information to indentify a time scale domain where a network can recognize the fluctuations associated with the input signal more reliably. We also show how input population affects both quantities. We extend our calculation to long chain linear motif and show that with increasing chain length, the Fano factor value increases but the mutual information processing capability decreases. In this type of motif, the intermediate components act as a noise filter that tune up input fluctuations and maintain optimum fluctuations in the output. For branched chain motifs, both quantities vary within a large scale due to their network architecture and facilitate survival of living system in diverse environmental conditions. PMID:25955500

  14. Role of Relaxation Time Scale in Noisy Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K

    2015-01-01

    Intra-cellular fluctuations, mainly triggered by gene expression, are an inevitable phenomenon observed in living cells. It influences generation of phenotypic diversity in genetically identical cells. Such variation of cellular components is beneficial in some contexts but detrimental in others. To quantify the fluctuations in a gene product, we undertake an analytical scheme for studying few naturally abundant linear as well as branched chain network motifs. We solve the Langevin equations associated with each motif under the purview of linear noise approximation and derive the expressions for Fano factor and mutual information in close analytical form. Both quantifiable expressions exclusively depend on the relaxation time (decay rate constant) and steady state population of the network components. We investigate the effect of relaxation time constraints on Fano factor and mutual information to indentify a time scale domain where a network can recognize the fluctuations associated with the input signal more reliably. We also show how input population affects both quantities. We extend our calculation to long chain linear motif and show that with increasing chain length, the Fano factor value increases but the mutual information processing capability decreases. In this type of motif, the intermediate components act as a noise filter that tune up input fluctuations and maintain optimum fluctuations in the output. For branched chain motifs, both quantities vary within a large scale due to their network architecture and facilitate survival of living system in diverse environmental conditions. PMID:25955500

  15. Time scale algorithms for an inhomogeneous group of atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, C.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Douglas, R. J.; Morris, D.; Cundy, S.; Lam, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    Through the past 17 years, the time scale requirements at the National Research Council (NRC) have been met by the unsteered output of its primary laboratory cesium clocks, supplemented by hydrogen masers when short-term stability better than 2 x 10(exp -12)tau(sup -1/2) has been required. NRC now operates three primary laboratory cesium clocks, three hydrogen masers, and two commercial cesium clocks. NRC has been using ensemble averages for internal purposes for the past several years, and has a realtime algorithm operating on the outputs of its high-resolution (2 x 10(exp -13) s at 1 s) phase comparators. The slow frequency drift of the hydrogen masers has presented difficulties in incorporating their short-term stability into the ensemble average, while retaining the long-term stability of the laboratory cesium frequency standards. We report on this work on algorithms for an inhomogeneous ensemble of atomic clocks, and on our initial work on time scale algorithms that could incorporate frequency calibrations at NRC from the next generation of Zacharias fountain cesium frequency standards having frequency accuracies that might surpass 10(exp -15), or from single-trapped-ion frequency standards (Ba+, Sr+,...) with even higher potential accuracies. The requirements for redundancy in all the elements (including the algorithms) of an inhomogeneous ensemble that would give a robust real-time output of the algorithms are presented and discussed.

  16. Two-Dimensional Beam Tracing from Visibility Diagrams for Real-Time Acoustic Rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonacci (Eurasip Member), F.; Sarti (Eurasip Member), A.; Tubaro (Eurasip Member), S.

    2010-12-01

    We present an extension of the fast beam-tracing method presented in the work of Antonacci et al. (2008) for the simulation of acoustic propagation in reverberant environments that accounts for diffraction and diffusion. More specifically, we show how visibility maps are suitable for modeling propagation phenomena more complex than specular reflections. We also show how the beam-tree lookup for path tracing can be entirely performed on visibility maps as well. We then contextualize such method to the two different cases of channel (point-to-point) rendering using a headset, and the rendering of a wave field based on arrays of speakers. Finally, we provide some experimental results and comparisons with real data to show the effectiveness and the accuracy of the approach in simulating the soundfield in an environment.

  17. Time scales in the context of general relativity.

    PubMed

    Guinot, Bernard

    2011-10-28

    Towards 1967, the accuracy of caesium frequency standards reached such a level that the relativistic effect could not be ignored anymore. Corrections began to be applied for the gravitational frequency shift and for distant time comparisons. However, these corrections were not applied to an explicit theoretical framework. Only in 1991 did the International Astronomical Union provide metrics (then improved in 2000) for a definition of space-time coordinates in reference systems centred at the barycentre of the Solar System and at the centre of mass of the Earth. In these systems, the temporal coordinates (coordinate times) can be realized on the basis of one of them, the International Atomic Time (TAI), which is itself a realized time scale. The definition and the role of TAI in this context will be recalled. There remain controversies regarding the name to be given to the unit of coordinate times and to other quantities appearing in the theory. However, the idea that astrometry and celestial mechanics should adopt the usual metrological rules is progressing, together with the use of the International System of Units, among astronomers. PMID:21930569

  18. Distributed acoustic sensing: towards partial discharge monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwetter, Philipp; Eisermann, René; Krebber, Katerina

    2015-09-01

    We report on the successful application of distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) to the detection of partial discharge (PD). A detection limit of about 1 nC discharge magnitude was achieved for PD in a real-scale model of a high voltage termination. Dedicated ultrasonic fibre-optic transducers were interrogated using coherent optical time-domain Rayleigh backscatter reflectometry (C-OTDR). Random quadrature demodulation was employed for retrieving relevant acoustic information from the raw C-OTDR backscatter traces. To our knowledge, our results are a first-time demonstration that quasi-distributed fibre-optic acoustic sensing is a candidate technology for the acoustic partial discharge monitoring of power cable joints and terminations.

  19. Scaling in a Continuous Time Model for Biological Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, R. M. C.; Thomas, G. L.

    In this paper, we consider a generalization to the asexual version of Penna model for biological aging, where we take a continuous time limit. The genotype associated to each individual is an interval of real numbers over which Dirac δ-functions are defined, representing genetically programmed diseases to be switched on at defined ages of the individual life. We discuss two different continuous limits for the evolution equation and two different mutation protocols, to be implemented during reproduction. Exact stationary solutions are obtained and scaling properties are discussed.

  20. Time-Dependent Earthquake Forecasts on a Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Graves, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    We develop and implement a new type of global earthquake forecast. Our forecast is a perturbation on a smoothed seismicity (Relative Intensity) spatial forecast combined with a temporal time-averaged ("Poisson") forecast. A variety of statistical and fault-system models have been discussed for use in computing forecast probabilities. An example is the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, which has been using fault-based models to compute conditional probabilities in California since 1988. An example of a forecast is the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS), which is based on the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) magnitude-frequency law, the Omori aftershock law, and Poisson statistics. The method discussed in this talk is based on the observation that GR statistics characterize seismicity for all space and time. Small magnitude event counts (quake counts) are used as "markers" for the approach of large events. More specifically, if the GR b-value = 1, then for every 1000 M>3 earthquakes, one expects 1 M>6 earthquake. So if ~1000 M>3 events have occurred in a spatial region since the last M>6 earthquake, another M>6 earthquake should be expected soon. In physics, event count models have been called natural time models, since counts of small events represent a physical or natural time scale characterizing the system dynamics. In a previous research, we used conditional Weibull statistics to convert event counts into a temporal probability for a given fixed region. In the present paper, we move belyond a fixed region, and develop a method to compute these Natural Time Weibull (NTW) forecasts on a global scale, using an internally consistent method, in regions of arbitrary shape and size. We develop and implement these methods on a modern web-service computing platform, which can be found at www.openhazards.com and www.quakesim.org. We also discuss constraints on the User Interface (UI) that follow from practical considerations of site usability.

  1. Natural vs human-induced changes at the Tauranga Harbour area (New Zealand): a time -series acoustic seabed classification comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capperucci, Ruggero Maria; Bartholomä, Alexander; Renken, Sabrina; De Lange, Willem

    2013-04-01

    to be described by a larger number of acoustic classes, allowing a better sub-division of acoustic zones that carries both the sedimentological and the topographic information into the final map. The evolution of the channel morphology and occurred largely in the past, thus the differences observed in the data can not be univocally ascribed to the dredging operations. Changes in the distribution of surface sediments, bedforms and shell lags can also be mapped. Although a general sedimentary pattern can be recognised over the time series data, a reduction in the shell coverage and the shallowing of the lower Western Channel could be related to an adjustment of the hydrodynamic conditions due to the dredging activities in the shipping channel nearby.

  2. Scaling and Universality in Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsen, Joern; Stanchits, Sergei; Dresen, Georg

    2007-03-23

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of acoustic emission time series from laboratory rock fracture obtained from different experiments on different materials including acoustic emission controlled triaxial fracture and punch-through tests. In all considered cases, the waiting time distribution can be described by a unique scaling function indicating its universality. This scaling function is even indistinguishable from that for earthquakes suggesting its general validity for fracture processes independent of time, space, and magnitude scales.

  3. Alignment of Noisy and Uniformly Scaled Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Constanze; Dranischnikow, Egor; Göttler, Herbert; Gottron, Thomas; Kemeter, Mathias; Schömer, Elmar

    The alignment of noisy and uniformly scaled time series is an important but difficult task. Given two time series, one of which is a uniformly stretched subsequence of the other, we want to determine the stretching factor and the offset of the second time series within the first one. We adapted and enhanced different methods to address this problem: classical FFT-based approaches to determine the offset combined with a naïve search for the stretching factor or its direct computation in the frequency domain, bounded dynamic time warping and a new approach called shotgun analysis, which is inspired by sequencing and reassembling of genomes in bioinformatics. We thoroughly examined the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods on synthetic and real data sets. The FFT-based approaches are very accurate on high quality data, the shotgun approach is especially suitable for data with outliers. Dynamic time warping is a candidate for non-linear stretching or compression. We successfully applied the presented methods to identify steel coils via their thickness profiles.

  4. The earth's angular momentum budget on subseasonal time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Steppe, J. A.; Hide, R.

    1992-01-01

    Irregular length of day (LOD) fluctuations on time scales of less than a few years are largely produced by atmospheric torques on the underlying planet. Significant coherence is found between the respective time series of LOD and atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) determinations at periods down to 8 days, with lack of coherence at shorter periods caused by the declining signal-to-measurement noise ratios of both data types. Refinements to the currently accepted model of tidal earth rotation variations are required, incorporating in particular the nonequilibrium effect of the oceans. The remaining discrepancies between LOD and AAM in the 100- to 10-day period range may be due to either a common error in the AAM data sets from different meteorological centers, or another component of the angular momentum budget.

  5. Acoustic signalling for mate attraction in crickets: Abdominal ganglia control the timing of the calling song pattern.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Pedro F; Hedwig, Berthold

    2016-08-01

    Decoding the neural basis of behaviour requires analysing how the nervous system is organised and how the temporal structure of motor patterns emerges from its activity. The stereotypical patterns of the calling song behaviour of male crickets, which consists of chirps and pulses, is an ideal model to study this question. We applied selective lesions to the abdominal nervous system of field crickets and performed long-term acoustic recordings of the songs. Specific lesions to connectives or ganglia abolish singing or reliably alter the temporal features of the chirps and pulses. Singing motor control appears to be organised in a modular and hierarchically fashion, where more posterior ganglia control the timing of the chirp pattern and structure and anterior ganglia the timing of the pulses. This modular organisation may provide the substrate for song variants underlying calling, courtship and rivalry behaviour and for the species-specific song patterns in extant crickets. PMID:27109338

  6. Passive time-domain numerical models of viscothermal wave propagation in acoustic tubes of variable cross section.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Stefan; Harrison, Reginald

    2016-07-01

    Numerical modeling of wave propagation in acoustic tubes is a subject of longstanding interest, particularly for enclosures of varying cross section, and especially when viscothermal losses due to boundary layer effects are taken into consideration. Though steady-state, or frequency domain methods, are a common avenue of approach, recursive time domain methods are an alternative, allowing for the generation of wideband responses, and offer a point of departure for more general modeling of nonlinear wave propagation. The design of time-domain methods is complicated by numerical stability considerations, and to this end, a passive representation is a useful design principle leading to simple stable and explicit numerical schemes, particularly in the case of viscothermal loss modeling. Such schemes and the accompanying energy and stability analysis are presented here. Numerical examples are presented for a variety of duct profiles, illustrating strict energy dissipation, and for comparison of computed input impedances against frequency-domain results. PMID:27475194

  7. Adaptive calibration of a three-microphone system for acoustic waveguide characterization under time-varying conditions.

    PubMed

    van Walstijn, Maarten; de Sanctis, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    The pressure and velocity field in a one-dimensional acoustic waveguide can be sensed in a non-intrusive manner using spatially distributed microphones. Experimental characterization with sensor arrangements of this type has many applications in measurement and control. This paper presents a method for measuring the acoustic variables in a duct under fluctuating propagation conditions with specific focus on in-system calibration and tracking of the system parameters of a three-microphone measurement configuration. The tractability of the non-linear optimization problem that results from taking a parametric approach is investigated alongside the influence of extraneous measurement noise on the parameter estimates. The validity and accuracy of the method are experimentally assessed in terms of the ability of the calibrated system to separate the propagating waves under controlled conditions. The tracking performance is tested through measurements with a time-varying mean flow, including an experiment conducted under propagation conditions similar to those in a wind instrument during playing. PMID:25234899

  8. Effect of Migration Pathway on Travel Time and Survival of Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Johnson, Gary E.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Hughes, Michael S.; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2012-02-01

    Off-channel areas (side channels, tidal flats, sand bars, and shallow-water bays) may serve as important migration corridors through estuarine environments for salmon and steelhead smolts. Relatively large percentages (21-33%) of acoustic-tagged yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts were detected migrating through off-channel areas of the Columbia River estuary in 2008. The probability of survival for off-channel migrants (0.78-0.94) was similar to or greater than the survival probability of main channel migrants (0.67-0.93). Median travel times were similar for all species or run types and migration pathways we examined, ranging from 1-2 d. The route used by smolts to migrate through the estuary may affect their vulnerability to predation. Acoustic-tagged steelhead that migrated nearest to avian predator nesting colonies experienced higher predation rates (24%) than those that migrated farthest from the colonies (10%). The use of multiple migration pathways may be advantageous to out-migrating smolts because it helps to buffer against high rates of mortality, which may occur in localized areas, and helps to minimize inter- and intraspecific competition.

  9. Investigation of the acoustic field in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator using time-resolved particule image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Poignand, G.; Jondeau, E.

    2012-09-01

    In thermoacoustic devices, the full understanding of the heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers is a key issue to improve the global efficiency of these devices. The goal of this paper is to investigate the vortex structures, which appear at the stack plates extremities and may impact the heat transfer. Here, the aerodynamic field between a stack and a heat exchanger is characterised with a time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR- PIV) set-up. Measurements are performed in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator operating at a frequency of 200 Hz. The employed TR-PIV set-up offers the possibility to acquire 3000 instantaneous velocity fields at a frequency of 3125 Hz (15 instantaneous velocity fields per acoustic period). Measurements show that vortex shedding can occur at high pressure level, when a nonlinear acoustic regime preveals, leading to an additional heating generated by viscous dissipation in the gap between the stack and the heat exchangers and a loss of efficiency.

  10. Nonlinear Dynamics of Extended Hydrologic Systems over long time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Upmanu

    2014-05-01

    We often view our knowledge of hydrology and hence of nature as intransient, at least over the time scales over which we study processes we wish to predict and understand. Over the last few decades, this assumption has come under question, largely because of the vocal expression of a changing climate, but also the recurrent demonstration of significant land use change, both of which significantly affect the boundary conditions for terrestrial hydrology that is our forte. Most recently, the concepts of hydromorphology and social hydrology have entered the discussion, and the notion that climate and hydrology influence human action, which in turn shapes hydrology, is being recognized. Finally, as a field, we seem to be coming to the conclusion that the hydrologic system is an open system, whose boundaries evolve in time, and that the hydrologic system, at many scales, has a profound effect on the systems that drive it -- whether they be the ecological and climatic systems, or the social system. What a mess! Complexity! Unpredictability! At a certain level of abstraction, one can consider the evolution of these coupled systems with nonlinear feedbacks and ask what types of questions are relevant in terms of such a coupled evolution? What are their implications at the planetary scale? What are their implications for a subsistence farmer in an arid landscape who may under external influence achieve a new transient hydro-ecological equilibrium? What are the implications for the economy and power of nations? In this talk, I will try to raise some of these questions and also provide some examples with very simple dynamical systems that suggest ways of thinking about some practical issues of feedback across climate, hydrology and human behavior.

  11. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control In Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. Overall stability of a two-loop control system is addressed. An optimal control allocation algorithm is designed that allocates torque commands into end-effector deflection commands, which are executed by the actuators. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. Simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. This is a significant advancement in performance over that achieved with linear, gain scheduled control systems currently being used for launch vehicles.

  12. Surface Radiation Budget Variability at Climatic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, R. T.; Ma, Y.; Nussbaumer, E.

    2014-12-01

    Information on Earth Radiation Balance is needed at climatic time scales for enabling assessment of variability and trends in the forcing functions of the climate system. Satellite observations have been instrumental for advancing the understanding of such balance at global scale; yet, the length of available records does not meet climatic needs. Major issues hindering such efforts are related to the frequent changes in satellite observing systems, including the specification of the satellite instruments, and changes in the quality of atmospheric inputs that drive the inference schemes. In this paper we report on an effort to synthesize estimates of shortwave, longwave and spectral surface radiative fluxes by fusing observations from numerous satellite platforms that include MODIS observations. This information was obtained in the framework of the MEaSURES and NEWS programs; it will be evaluated against ground observations and compared to independent satellite and model estimates. Attention will be given to updates on our knowledge on the radiative balance as compared to what is known from shorter time records.

  13. Complex processes from dynamical architectures with time-scale hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes. PMID:21347363

  14. Picosecond acoustics in vegetal cells: non-invasive in vitro measurements at a sub-cell scale.

    PubMed

    Audoin, B; Rossignol, C; Chigarev, N; Ducousso, M; Forget, G; Guillemot, F; Durrieu, M C

    2010-02-01

    A 100 fs laser pulse passes through a single transparent cell and is absorbed at the surface of a metallic substrate. Picosecond acoustic waves are generated and propagate through the cell in contact with the metal. Interaction of the high frequency acoustic pulse with a probe laser light gives rise to Brillouin oscillations. The measurements are thus made with lasers for both the opto-acoustic generation and the acousto-optic detection, and acoustic frequencies as high as 11 GHz can be detected, as reported in this paper. The technique offers perspectives for single cell imaging. The in-plane resolution is limited by the pump and probe spot sizes, i.e. approximately 1 microm, and the in-depth resolution is provided by the acoustic frequencies, typically in the GHz range. The effect of the technique on cell safety is discussed. Experiments achieved in vegetal cells illustrate the reproducibility and sensitivity of the measurements. The acoustic responses of cell organelles are significantly different. The results support the potentialities of the hypersonic non-invasive technique in the fields of bio-engineering and medicine. PMID:19879618

  15. Global Precipitation Analyses at Monthly to 3-HR Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Global precipitation analysis covering the last few decades and the impact of the new TRMM precipitation observations are discussed. The 20+ year, monthly, globally complete precipitation analysis of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP/GEWEX) Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) is used to explore global and regional variations and trends and is compared to the much shorter TRMM(Tropica1 Rainfall Measuring Mission) tropical data set. A trend pattern that is a combination of both El Nino and La Nina precipitation features is evident in the 20-year data set. This pattern is related to an increase with time in the number of combined months of El Nino and La Nina during the 20 year period. Monthly anomalies of precipitation are related to ENSO variations with clear signals extending into middle and high latitudes of both hemispheres. The GPCP daily, 1deg latitude-longitude analysis, which is available from January 1997 to the present is described and the evolution of precipitation patterns on this time scale related to El Nino and La Nina is described. Finally, a TRMM-based 3-hr analysis is described that uses TRMM to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I and geosynchronous IR observations and merges the various calibrated observations into a final, 3-hr resolution map. This TRMM standard product will soon be available for the entire TRMM period (January 1998- present). A real-time version of this merged product is being produced and is available at 0.25deg latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 50degN-50degS. Images from this data set can be seen at the U.S. TRMM web site (trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov). Examples will be shown, including its use in monitoring flood conditions and relating weather-scale events to climate variations.

  16. Critical time scales for advection-diffusion-reaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellery, Adam J.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of local accumulation time (LAT) was introduced by Berezhkovskii and co-workers to give a finite measure of the time required for the transient solution of a reaction-diffusion equation to approach the steady-state solution [A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1016/j.bpj.2010.07.045 99, L59 (2010); A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.051906 83, 051906 (2011)]. Such a measure is referred to as a critical time. Here, we show that LAT is, in fact, identical to the concept of mean action time (MAT) that was first introduced by McNabb [A. McNabb and G. C. Wake, IMA J. Appl. Math.IJAMDM0272-496010.1093/imamat/47.2.193 47, 193 (1991)]. Although McNabb's initial argument was motivated by considering the mean particle lifetime (MPLT) for a linear death process, he applied the ideas to study diffusion. We extend the work of these authors by deriving expressions for the MAT for a general one-dimensional linear advection-diffusion-reaction problem. Using a combination of continuum and discrete approaches, we show that MAT and MPLT are equivalent for certain uniform-to-uniform transitions; these results provide a practical interpretation for MAT by directly linking the stochastic microscopic processes to a meaningful macroscopic time scale. We find that for more general transitions, the equivalence between MAT and MPLT does not hold. Unlike other critical time definitions, we show that it is possible to evaluate the MAT without solving the underlying partial differential equation (pde). This makes MAT a simple and attractive quantity for practical situations. Finally, our work explores the accuracy of certain approximations derived using MAT, showing that useful approximations for nonlinear kinetic processes can be obtained, again without treating the governing pde directly.

  17. Time-fractional Gardner equation for ion-acoustic waves in negative-ion-beam plasma with negative ions and nonthermal nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin Mei, Liquan; Zhang, Zhengqiang

    2015-05-15

    Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a one-dimensional, unmagnetized plasma consisting of positive ions, negative ions, and nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution that is penetrated by a negative-ion-beam. The classical Gardner equation is derived to describe nonlinear behavior of ion-acoustic waves in the considered plasma system via reductive perturbation technique. We convert the classical Gardner equation into the time-fractional Gardner equation by Agrawal's method, where the time-fractional term is under the sense of Riesz fractional derivative. Employing variational iteration method, we construct solitary wave solutions of the time-fractional Gardner equation with initial condition which depends on the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients. The effect of the plasma parameters on the compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic solitary waves is also discussed in detail.

  18. Time-fractional Gardner equation for ion-acoustic waves in negative-ion-beam plasma with negative ions and nonthermal nonextensive electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; Zhang, Zhengqiang

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a one-dimensional, unmagnetized plasma consisting of positive ions, negative ions, and nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution that is penetrated by a negative-ion-beam. The classical Gardner equation is derived to describe nonlinear behavior of ion-acoustic waves in the considered plasma system via reductive perturbation technique. We convert the classical Gardner equation into the time-fractional Gardner equation by Agrawal's method, where the time-fractional term is under the sense of Riesz fractional derivative. Employing variational iteration method, we construct solitary wave solutions of the time-fractional Gardner equation with initial condition which depends on the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients. The effect of the plasma parameters on the compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic solitary waves is also discussed in detail.

  19. Continent-scale global change attribution in European birds - combining annual and decadal time scales.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Thorup, Kasper; Tøttrup, Anders P; Chylarecki, Przemysław; Jiguet, Frédéric; Lehikoinen, Aleksi; Noble, David G; Reif, Jiri; Schmid, Hans; van Turnhout, Chris; Burfield, Ian J; Foppen, Ruud; Voříšek, Petr; van Strien, Arco; Gregory, Richard D; Rahbek, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    Species attributes are commonly used to infer impacts of environmental change on multiyear species trends, e.g. decadal changes in population size. However, by themselves attributes are of limited value in global change attribution since they do not measure the changing environment. A broader foundation for attributing species responses to global change may be achieved by complementing an attributes-based approach by one estimating the relationship between repeated measures of organismal and environmental changes over short time scales. To assess the benefit of this multiscale perspective, we investigate the recent impact of multiple environmental changes on European farmland birds, here focusing on climate change and land use change. We analyze more than 800 time series from 18 countries spanning the past two decades. Analysis of long-term population growth rates documents simultaneous responses that can be attributed to both climate change and land-use change, including long-term increases in populations of hot-dwelling species and declines in long-distance migrants and farmland specialists. In contrast, analysis of annual growth rates yield novel insights into the potential mechanisms driving long-term climate induced change. In particular, we find that birds are affected by winter, spring, and summer conditions depending on the distinct breeding phenology that corresponds to their migratory strategy. Birds in general benefit from higher temperatures or higher primary productivity early on or in the peak of the breeding season with the largest effect sizes observed in cooler parts of species' climatic ranges. Our results document the potential of combining time scales and integrating both species attributes and environmental variables for global change attribution. We suggest such an approach will be of general use when high-resolution time series are available in large-scale biodiversity surveys. PMID:26486804

  20. The Time Scale of Recombination Rate Evolution in Great Apes.

    PubMed

    Stevison, Laurie S; Woerner, August E; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kelley, Joanna L; Veeramah, Krishna R; McManus, Kimberly F; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Wall, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-01

    We present three linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based recombination maps generated using whole-genome sequence data from 10 Nigerian chimpanzees, 13 bonobos, and 15 western gorillas, collected as part of the Great Ape Genome Project (Prado-Martinez J, et al. 2013. Great ape genetic diversity and population history. Nature 499:471-475). We also identified species-specific recombination hotspots in each group using a modified LDhot framework, which greatly improves statistical power to detect hotspots at varying strengths. We show that fewer hotspots are shared among chimpanzee subspecies than within human populations, further narrowing the time scale of complete hotspot turnover. Further, using species-specific PRDM9 sequences to predict potential binding sites (PBS), we show higher predicted PRDM9 binding in recombination hotspots as compared to matched cold spot regions in multiple great ape species, including at least one chimpanzee subspecies. We found that correlations between broad-scale recombination rates decline more rapidly than nucleotide divergence between species. We also compared the skew of recombination rates at centromeres and telomeres between species and show a skew from chromosome means extending as far as 10-15 Mb from chromosome ends. Further, we examined broad-scale recombination rate changes near a translocation in gorillas and found minimal differences as compared to other great ape species perhaps because the coordinates relative to the chromosome ends were unaffected. Finally, on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis, we found that various correlates of recombination rate persist throughout the African great apes including repeats, diversity, and divergence. Our study is the first to analyze within- and between-species genome-wide recombination rate variation in several close relatives. PMID:26671457