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Sample records for acoustic transfer function

  1. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  2. The acoustical cues to sound location in the rat: Measurements of directional transfer functions

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Read, Heather L.; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The acoustical cues for sound location are generated by spatial- and frequency-dependent filtering of propagating sound waves by the head and external ears. Although rats have been a common model system for anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics of localization, there have been few studies of the acoustical cues available to rats. Here, directional transfer functions (DTFs), the directional components of the head-related transfer functions, were measured in six adult rats. The cues to location were computed from the DTFs. In the frontal hemisphere, spectral notches were present for frequencies from ∼16 to 30 kHz; in general, the frequency corresponding to the notch increased with increases in source elevation and in azimuth toward the ipsilateral ear. The maximum high-frequency envelope-based interaural time differences (ITDs) were 130 μs, whereas low-frequency (<3.5 kHz) fine-structure ITDs were 160 μs; both types of ITDs were larger than predicted from spherical head models. Interaural level differences (ILDs) strongly depended on location and frequency. Maximum ILDs were <10 dB for frequencies <8 kHz and were as large as 20–40 dB for frequencies >20 kHz. Removal of the pinna eliminated the spectral notches, reduced the acoustic gain and ILDs, altered the acoustical axis, and reduced the ITDs. PMID:18537381

  3. The acoustical cues to sound location in the rat: measurements of directional transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Read, Heather L; Tollin, Daniel J

    2008-06-01

    The acoustical cues for sound location are generated by spatial- and frequency-dependent filtering of propagating sound waves by the head and external ears. Although rats have been a common model system for anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics of localization, there have been few studies of the acoustical cues available to rats. Here, directional transfer functions (DTFs), the directional components of the head-related transfer functions, were measured in six adult rats. The cues to location were computed from the DTFs. In the frontal hemisphere, spectral notches were present for frequencies from approximately 16 to 30 kHz; in general, the frequency corresponding to the notch increased with increases in source elevation and in azimuth toward the ipsilateral ear. The maximum high-frequency envelope-based interaural time differences (ITDs) were 130 mus, whereas low-frequency (<3.5 kHz) fine-structure ITDs were 160 mus; both types of ITDs were larger than predicted from spherical head models. Interaural level differences (ILDs) strongly depended on location and frequency. Maximum ILDs were <10 dB for frequencies <8 kHz and were as large as 20-40 dB for frequencies >20 kHz. Removal of the pinna eliminated the spectral notches, reduced the acoustic gain and ILDs, altered the acoustical axis, and reduced the ITDs. PMID:18537381

  4. Dimensional feature weighting utilizing multiple kernel learning for single-channel talker location discrimination using the acoustic transfer function.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Ryoichi; Takiguchi, Tetsuya; Ariki, Yasuo

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a method for discriminating the location of the sound source (talker) using only a single microphone. In a previous work, the single-channel approach for discriminating the location of the sound source was discussed, where the acoustic transfer function from a user's position is estimated by using a hidden Markov model of clean speech in the cepstral domain. In this paper, each cepstral dimension of the acoustic transfer function is newly weighted, in order to obtain the cepstral dimensions having information that is useful for classifying the user's position. Then, this paper proposes a feature-weighting method for the cepstral parameter using multiple kernel learning, defining the base kernels for each cepstral dimension of the acoustic transfer function. The user's position is trained and classified by support vector machine. The effectiveness of this method has been confirmed by sound source (talker) localization experiments performed in different room environments. PMID:23363107

  5. Pressure transfer function of a JT15D nozzle due to acoustic and convected entropy fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic transmission matrix analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct with and without flow is extended to include convected entropy fluctuations. The boundary conditions used in the analysis are a transfer function relating entropy and pressure at the nozzle inlet and the nozzle exit impedance. The nozzle pressure transfer function calculated is compared with JT15D turbofan engine nozzle data. The one dimensional theory for sound propagation in a variable area nozzle with flow but without convected entropy is good at the low engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is low (M=0.2) and the duct exit impedance model is good. The effect of convected entropy appears to be so negligible that it is obscured by the inaccuracy of the nozzle exit impedance model, the lack of information on the magnitude of the convected entropy and its phase relationship with the pressure, and the scatter in the data. An improved duct exit impedance model is required at the higher engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is high (M=0.56) and at low frequencies (below 120 Hz).

  6. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report. [nozzle transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; and (3) to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer function versus nondimensional frequency.

  7. Transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taback, I.

    1979-01-01

    The vulnerability of electronic equipment to carbon fibers is studied. The effectiveness of interfaces, such as filters, doors, window screens, and cabinets, which affect the concentration, exposure, or deposition of carbon fibers on both (internal and external) sides of the interface is examined. The transfer function of multilayer aluminum mesh, wet and dry, polyurethane foam, and window screen are determined as a function of air velocity. FIlters installed in typical traffic control boxes and air conditioners are also considered.

  8. Three-dimensional to two-dimensional data conversion for electromagnetic wave propagation using an acoustic transfer function: application to cross-hole GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vorst, Daryl G.; Yedlin, Matthew J.; Virieux, Jean; Krebes, Edward S.

    2014-07-01

    We show analytically that a well-known transfer function previously derived for the scalar acoustic problem that converts measurements from a 3-D (real-world) setting to a 2-D equivalent is directly applicable to the vector electromagnetic borehole ground penetrating radar problem. We also show that the transfer function's precision is improved for the low-loss case through the use of complex velocity. The transfer function has a strong effect on amplitude, and is therefore a critical preprocessing step for 2-D full-wave inversion when finding conductivity is of concern. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the transfer function through various numerical experiments and a synthetic frequency-domain full-wave inversion. We also compare the effectiveness of this curved-ray transfer function to a quasi-straight-ray transfer function. The inversion demonstrates the positive effect the transfer functions have on recovering conductivity and also that they are effective even when there are sharp velocity contrasts.

  9. Validation of Vehicle Panel/Equipment Response from Diffuse Acoustic Field Excitation Using Spatially Correlated Transfer Function Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Fulcher, Clay; Hunt, Ron

    2012-01-01

    An approach for predicting the vibration, strain, and force responses of a flight-like vehicle panel assembly to acoustic pressures is presented. Important validation for the approach is provided by comparison to ground test measurements in a reverberant chamber. The test article and the corresponding analytical model were assembled in several configurations to demonstrate the suitability of the approach for response predictions when the vehicle panel is integrated with equipment. Critical choices in the analysis necessary for convergence of the predicted and measured responses are illustrated through sensitivity studies. The methodology includes representation of spatial correlation of the pressure field over the panel surface. Therefore, it is possible to demonstrate the effects of hydrodynamic coincidence in the response. The sensitivity to pressure patch density clearly illustrates the onset of coincidence effects on the panel response predictions.

  10. Adaptive transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper details the approach and methodology used to build adaptive transfer functions in a feed-forward Back-Propagation neural network, and provides insight into the structure dependent properties of using non-scaled analog inputs. The results of using adaptive transfer functions are shown to outperform conventional architectures in the implementation of a mechanical power transmission gearbox design expert system knowledge base. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  12. Transfer function matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Given a multivariable system, it is proved that the numerator matrix N(s) of the transfer function evaluated at any system pole either has unity rank or is a null matrix. It is also shown that N(s) evaluated at any transmission zero of the system has rank deficiency. Examples are given for illustration.

  13. Acoustic radiation force expressed using complex phase shifts and momentum-transfer cross sections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force is expressed using complex phase shifts of partial wave scattering functions and the momentum-transfer cross section, herein incorporated into acoustics from quantum mechanisms. Imaginary parts of the phase shifts represent dissipation in the object and/or in the boundary layer adjacent to the object. The formula simplifies the force as summation of functions of complex phase shifts of adjacent partial waves involving differences of real parts and sums of imaginary parts, providing an efficient way of exploring the force parameter-space. The formula for the force is proportional to a generalized momentum-transfer cross section for plane waves and no dissipation. PMID:27586777

  14. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. |

    1993-06-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  15. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. Portland State Univ., OR . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  16. Operationalizing the Transfer Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Philip

    In statistical terms, transfer rates require two components: a numerator that represents community college students who transfer and a denominator that approximates the pool of potential transfer students. The California Task Force adopted a set of criteria to judge the appropriateness of prospective pairs of numerators and denominators. Its form…

  17. Nanolitre-scale crystallization using acoustic liquid-transfer technology

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Armando G.; Wong, April; Shao, Ada; Garg, Ankur; Donohue, Timothy J.; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Harris, Seth F.

    2012-01-01

    Focused acoustic energy allows accurate and precise liquid transfer on scales from picolitre to microlitre volumes. This technology was applied in protein crystallization, successfully transferring a diverse set of proteins as well as hundreds of precipitant solutions from custom and commercial crystallization screens and achieving crystallization in drop volumes as small as 20 nl. Only higher concentrations (>50%) of 2-­methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) appeared to be systematically problematic in delivery. The acoustic technology was implemented in a workflow, successfully reproducing active crystallization systems and leading to the discovery of crystallization conditions for previously uncharacterized proteins. The technology offers compelling advantages in low-nanolitre crystallization trials by providing significant reagent savings and presenting seamless scalability for those crystals that require larger volume optimization experiments using the same vapor-diffusion format. PMID:22868754

  18. Free Flap Functional Muscle Transfers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ryan M; Ruch, David S

    2016-08-01

    Free functional muscle transfers remain a powerful reconstructive tool to restore upper extremity function when other options such as tendon or nerve transfers are not available. This reconstructive technique is commonly used for patients following trauma, ischemic contractures, and brachial plexopathies. Variable outcomes have been reported following free functional muscle transfers that are related to motor nerve availability and reinnervation. This article highlights considerations around donor motor nerve selection, dissection, and use of the gracilis muscle, and the surgical approach to performing a free functional muscle transfer to restore elbow flexion and/or digit flexion. PMID:27387083

  19. Evaluation of human middle ear function via an acoustic power assessment.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jont B; Jeng, Patricia S; Levitt, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of middle ear (ME) acoustic power flow (power reflectance, power absorption, and transmittance) and normalized impedance (acoustic resistance, acoustic reactance, and impedance magnitude) were compared for their utility in clinical applications. Transmittance, a measure of the acoustic power absorbed by the ME, was found to have several important advantages over other measures of acoustic power flow. In addition to its simple and audiologically relevant physical interpretation (absorbed power), the normal transmittance curve has a simple shape that is visually similar to the ME transfer function. The acoustic impedance measures (resistance and reactance) provided important additional information about ME status and supplemented transmittance measurements. Together these measurements can help identify unusual conditions such as eardrum perforations. While this article is largely a review of the development of a commercial power reflectance measurement system, previously unpublished experimental results are presented. PMID:16470465

  20. Information transfer in auditoria and room-acoustical quality.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jason E

    2013-04-01

    It is hypothesized that room-acoustical quality correlates with the information-transfer rate. Auditoria are considered as multiple-input multiple-output communication channels and a theory of information-transfer is outlined that accounts for time-variant multipath, spatial hearing, and distributed directional sources. Source diversity and spatial hearing are shown to be the mechanisms through which multipath increases the information-transfer rate by overcoming finite spatial resolution. In addition to predictions that are confirmed by recent and historical findings, the theory provides explanations for the influence of factors such as musical repertoire and ensemble size on subjective preference and the influence of multisource, multichannel auralization on perceived realism. PMID:23556686

  1. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Entanglement Involved in Pair Coherent State Studied via Wigner Function Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Yun; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2009-12-01

    We calculate Wigner function, tomogram of the pair coherent state by using its Schmidt decomposition in the coherent state representation. It turns out that the Wigner function can be seen as the quantum entanglement (QE) between two two-variable Hermite polynomials (TVHP) and the tomogram is further simplified as QE of two single-variable Hermite polynomials. The Husimi function of pair coherent state is also calculated.

  2. Intermodal transfer in temporal discrimination. [of visual and acoustic stimuli duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warm, J. S.; Stutz, R. M.; Vassolo, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    This study determined if training for accuracy in temporal discrimination would transfer across sensory modalities. A fractionation method was used in which subjects bisected the durations of acoustic and visual signals at three standard intervals (6, 12, and 18 sec). Absolute error was the performance index. Half of the subjects were trained with acoustic stimuli and then tested in vision; the remainder were trained in vision and tested in audition. Similar negatively accelerated acquisition functions were noted for both modalities. Positive intermodal transfer, characterized by symmetry across modalities, was obtained at all standard durations. The results were considered to provide support for the notion that a common mechanism underlies temporal discriminations in different sensory systems.

  3. Automatic computation of transfer functions

    DOEpatents

    Atcitty, Stanley; Watson, Luke Dale

    2015-04-14

    Technologies pertaining to the automatic computation of transfer functions for a physical system are described herein. The physical system is one of an electrical system, a mechanical system, an electromechanical system, an electrochemical system, or an electromagnetic system. A netlist in the form of a matrix comprises data that is indicative of elements in the physical system, values for the elements in the physical system, and structure of the physical system. Transfer functions for the physical system are computed based upon the netlist.

  4. Acoustic signature of violins based on bridge transfer mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Elie, Benjamin; Gautier, François; David, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    This paper is an attempt to solve two problems related to musical acoustics. The first one consists in defining a signature of an instrument, namely, summarizing its vibroacoustical behavior. The second one deals with the existing relationship between the musical sound and the vibroacoustic properties of the instrument body. The violin is the application of this paper. A proposed solution for the first problem consists in an estimation of the bridge transfer mobility and the mean-value of the lateral bridge transfer mobility. The second problem is studied via the comparison between the amplitudes of harmonics, extracted from a glissando audio signal, and the lateral bridge transfer mobility: Both curves exhibit similar features. This is the main result of the paper. This is evidenced by studying the effect of a violin mute on both the lateral bridge transfer mobility and the produced sound. Finally, this is evidenced by successfully identifying which violin is played in an audio recording, using the computation of the Pearson distance between the distribution of the amplitude of harmonics and a database of measured mobilities. PMID:25190411

  5. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  6. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  7. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  8. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid.

    PubMed

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2016-03-14

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm(-1) oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology. PMID:26979698

  9. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron S.; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M.

    2016-03-01

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm-1 oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology.

  10. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  11. Transfer function characteristics of super resolving systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, Tom D.; Curtis, Craig H.

    1992-01-01

    Signal quality in an optical storage device greatly depends on the optical system transfer function used to write and read data patterns. The problem is similar to analysis of scanning optical microscopes. Hopkins and Braat have analyzed write-once-read-many (WORM) optical data storage devices. Herein, transfer function analysis of magnetooptic (MO) data storage devices is discussed with respect to improving transfer-function characteristics. Several authors have described improving the transfer function as super resolution. However, none have thoroughly analyzed the MO optical system and effects of the medium. Both the optical system transfer function and effects of the medium of this development are discussed.

  12. The Modulation Transfer Function for Speech Intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Taffeta M.; Theunissen, Frédéric E.

    2009-01-01

    We systematically determined which spectrotemporal modulations in speech are necessary for comprehension by human listeners. Speech comprehension has been shown to be robust to spectral and temporal degradations, but the specific relevance of particular degradations is arguable due to the complexity of the joint spectral and temporal information in the speech signal. We applied a novel modulation filtering technique to recorded sentences to restrict acoustic information quantitatively and to obtain a joint spectrotemporal modulation transfer function for speech comprehension, the speech MTF. For American English, the speech MTF showed the criticality of low modulation frequencies in both time and frequency. Comprehension was significantly impaired when temporal modulations <12 Hz or spectral modulations <4 cycles/kHz were removed. More specifically, the MTF was bandpass in temporal modulations and low-pass in spectral modulations: temporal modulations from 1 to 7 Hz and spectral modulations <1 cycles/kHz were the most important. We evaluated the importance of spectrotemporal modulations for vocal gender identification and found a different region of interest: removing spectral modulations between 3 and 7 cycles/kHz significantly increases gender misidentifications of female speakers. The determination of the speech MTF furnishes an additional method for producing speech signals with reduced bandwidth but high intelligibility. Such compression could be used for audio applications such as file compression or noise removal and for clinical applications such as signal processing for cochlear implants. PMID:19266016

  13. A probability density function method for acoustic field uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kevin R.; Dowling, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Acoustic field predictions, whether analytical or computational, rely on knowledge of the environmental, boundary, and initial conditions. When knowledge of these conditions is uncertain, acoustic field predictions will also be uncertain, even if the techniques for field prediction are perfect. Quantifying acoustic field uncertainty is important for applications that require accurate field amplitude and phase predictions, like matched-field techniques for sonar, nondestructive evaluation, bio-medical ultrasound, and atmospheric remote sensing. Drawing on prior turbulence research, this paper describes how an evolution equation for the probability density function (PDF) of the predicted acoustic field can be derived and used to quantify predicted-acoustic-field uncertainties arising from uncertain environmental, boundary, or initial conditions. Example calculations are presented in one and two spatial dimensions for the one-point PDF for the real and imaginary parts of a harmonic field, and show that predicted field uncertainty increases with increasing range and frequency. In particular, at 500 Hz in an ideal 100 m deep underwater sound channel with a 1 m root-mean-square depth uncertainty, the PDF results presented here indicate that at a range of 5 km, all phases and a 10 dB range of amplitudes will have non-negligible probability. Evolution equations for the two-point PDF are also derived.

  14. Community Colleges and the Transfer Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Mary E.

    This paper examines how the traditional transfer role of the community college has become less significant as a vocational and community-based role has assumed importance. The paper describes factors contributing to the transfer function's decline and illustrates various attitudes surrounding the issue. The history of transfer education is…

  15. VALIDATION OF BENEFIT-TRANSFER FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Identification of benefit-transfer functions that are the most credible. 2. Identification of benefit-transfer issues that are related to transfer method and those related to data limitations. 3. Clarification of issues t...

  16. Acoustic Streaming in Microgravity: Flow Stability and Heat Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for drops and bubbles levitated in a liquid host, with particular attention given to the effect of shape oscillations and capillary waves on the local flow fields. Some preliminary results are also presented on the use of streaming flows for the control of evaporation rate and rotation of electrostatically levitated droplets in 1 g. The results demonstrate the potential for the technological application of acoustic methods to active control of forced convection in microgravity.

  17. Investigations of Acoustics and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Thermoacoustic Driven Pulse Tube Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretagne, E.; François, M.-X.; Ishikawa, H.

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the design of the ThermoAcoustic Driven Pulse Tube Refrigerator which is a promising solution for large scale pulse tube applications. Designing concepts and preliminary studies of heat transfer in heat exchangers specifically for large scale TADPTR are presented. Thus, we introduce the way to deal with different components of the Pulse Tube Refrigerator to achieve the most efficient regenerator operation with the constraints imposed by the thermoacoustic driver. The main building-concepts are illustrated by considering the combinations of a standing wave Thermoacoustic prime mover with (i) an Inertance-Orifice PTR and (ii) a Lumped Boost PTR. Both experimental and numerical results support the models. Furthermore, we investigate the heat transfer mechanism for Reynolds number between 104 to 2×105 in helium. For the current experiment, measurements are taken at the cold heat exchanger of the prime mover. For the purpose of the analysis we select testing conditions so that the particle displacement is larger than the heat exchanger length and the boundary layer assumption applies. Adequacy of the steady flow assumption is discussed. Nusselt number obtained from the measurements is then correlated with a function of Prandtl, Reynolds and Valensi numbers.

  18. Modeling individual differences in ferret external ear transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnupp, Jan W. H.; Booth, John; King, Andrew J.

    2003-04-01

    Individual variations in head and outer ear size, as well as growth of these structures during development, can markedly alter the values of the binaural and monaural cues which form the basis for auditory localization. This study investigated individual differences in the directional component of the head-related transfer function of both adult and juvenile ferrets. In line with previous studies in humans and cats, intersubject spectral differences were found to be reduced by scaling one of the directional transfer functions on a log-frequency axis. The optimal scale factor correlated most highly with pinna cavity height. Optimal frequency scaling reduced interear spectral difference equally well for adult-juvenile comparisons as for comparisons between pairs of adult ears. This illustrates that the developmental changes in localization cue values should be at least partly predictable on the basis of the expected growth rate of the outer ear structures. Predictions of interaural time differences (ITDs) were also derived from the physical dimensions of the head. ITDs were found to be poorly fitted by the spherical head model, while much better predictions could be derived from a model based on von Mises spherical basis functions. Together, these findings show how more accurate estimates of spatial cue values can be made from knowledge of the dimensions of the head and outer ears, and may facilitate the generation of virtual acoustic space stimuli in the absence of acoustical measurements from individual subjects.

  19. Functional referents and acoustic similarity: field playback experiments with rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hauser

    1998-06-01

    Rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta, on the island of Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico produce one or more of five acoustically distinctive calls when they find food. Three of these calls ('warbles', 'harmonic arches' and 'chirps') are produced by individuals finding high-quality, rare food items, whereas the other two calls ('coos' and 'grunts') are produced upon encountering lower-quality, common food items, and in non-food contexts as well. To determine how rhesus classify such acoustic variation, I conducted habituation experiments using a subset of the five call types. I designed experiments to reveal whether classification is based primarily on acoustic features or on the basis of a call's functional referent; caller identity was held constant within sessions. Habituation to 'warbles' transferred to 'harmonic arches', and vice versa. Thus, although these two calls are acoustically distinctive, they appeared to be perceptually clustered into one category based on referential similarities. In contrast, habituation to 'grunts' was followed by dishabituation to 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches', and habituation to 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches' was followed by dishabituation to 'grunts'. Dishabituation could be due to acoustic or referential differences. Significantly, the magnitude of the dishabituating response was asymmetric and depended upon the call type used in the habituation series. Thus, when subjects were habituated to 'grunts', they responded significantly more to tests of 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches' than when the sequence was reversed. These results suggest that for rhesus monkey food-associated calls, referential differences carry more weight during perceptual classification than do acoustical differences. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9642008

  20. Wiener filter estimation of transfer functions.

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The use of a Wiener filter estimate for the linear transfer function can significantly improve the description of behavioral dynamics. This report presents a two-pass, Monte-Carlo-based algorithm that is well suited to repeated-trials local average measurements. The Wiener filter transfer functions strongly suppress noise artifacts as well as allow reliable transfer function determination under a much wider class of reinforcement schedules. Implications of expanding the possible form of experimental design are considered along with improvements in the fidelity of resulting predictions. PMID:15357511

  1. Nerve Transfers to Restore Elbow Function.

    PubMed

    Bulstra, Liselotte F; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the various nerve transfer options for restoration of elbow function. This article describes nerve transfer strategies for elbow flexion and extension including the indications, limitations, and expected outcomes based on current literature. PMID:27094889

  2. Controlled exciton transfer between quantum dots with acoustic phonons taken into account

    SciTech Connect

    Golovinski, P. A.

    2015-09-15

    A system of excitons in two quantum dots coupled by the dipole–dipole interaction is investigated. The excitation transfer process controlled by the optical Stark effect at nonresonant frequencies is considered and the effect of the interaction between excitons and acoustic phonons in a medium on this process is taken into account. The system evolution is described using quantum Heisenberg equations. A truncated set of equations is obtained and the transfer dynamics is numerically simulated. High-efficiency picosecond switching of the excitation transfer by a laser pulse with a rectangular envelope is demonstrated. The dependence of picosecond switching on the quantum-dot parameters and optical-pulse length is presented.

  3. Acoustics of a flanged cylindrical pipe using singular basis functions

    PubMed

    Amir; Matzner; Shtrikman

    2000-02-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation from a cylindrical pipe with an infinite flange has been discussed in a number of papers. The most common approach is to decompose the field inside the pipe over a basis of Bessel functions. A very large number of basis functions is usually required, with a large degree of ripple appearing as an artifact in the solution. In this paper it is shown that a close analysis of the velocity field near the corner yields a new family of functions, which are called "edge functions." Using this set of functions as test functions and applying the moment method on the boundary between the waveguide and free space, a solution is obtained with greatly improved convergence properties and no ripple. PMID:10687680

  4. Transfer Function Control for Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor); Grodinsky, Carlos M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular apparatus for acquiring biometric data may include circuitry operative to receive an input signal indicative of a biometric condition, the circuitry being configured to process the input signal according to a transfer function thereof and to provide a corresponding processed input signal. A controller is configured to provide at least one control signal to the circuitry to programmatically modify the transfer function of the modular system to facilitate acquisition of the biometric data.

  5. Nerve Transfers to Restore Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Malungpaishorpe, Kanchai; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Ng, Chye Yew; Witoonchart, Kiat

    2016-05-01

    The restoration of shoulder function after brachial plexus injury represents a significant challenge facing the peripheral nerve surgeons. This is owing to a combination of the complex biomechanics of the shoulder girdle, the multitude of muscles and nerves that could be potentially injured, and a limited number of donor options. In general, nerve transfer is favored over tendon transfer, because the biomechanics of the musculotendinous units are not altered. This article summarizes the surgical techniques and clinical results of nerve transfers for restoration of shoulder function. PMID:27094888

  6. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  7. Impact of permeability on seismoelectric transfer function of P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzhauer, J.; Bordes, C.; Oppermann, F.; Brito, D.; Yaramanci, U.

    2012-04-01

    Recent developments in the understanding of seismoelectrics have shown its potential relevance for porous media characterization with particular focus on permeability estimations. According to promising theoretical and numerical studies, permeability should influence the seismoelectric transfer function at higher frequencies. The dynamic seismoelectric transfer function E(ω)/ ü(ω), where E relates to the coseismic electric field induced by the seismic particle acceleration ü, is expected to increase with increasing permeabilities when crossing the Biot transition frequency. Still, only few experiments have been developed on that matter so far. To address the transfer function dependence on permeability, we adapted a column experiment to comply with steady-state permeability estimations. These observations were run in-situ, during the fluid-balancing phase prior to seismoelectric measurements. The 50 cm-long column had previously been carefully filled with perfectly rounded glass beads. The use of sorted glass beads is expected to achieve similar porosities reproducible throughout the experiment, opposed to varying permeabilities depending on the introduced particle size. The acoustic source delivered compressional waves with an optimal effect limited to the [1-3] kHz frequency range. These limitations are due to strong seismic attenuation in uncompacted porous media on one side, and to the dilemma of observing propagation in downsized laboratory setup on the other. First results validated the experimental protocol in terms of porosity/permeability independence: for particle size varying between 100 μm and 500 μm, permeability varied by a factor 20, with a maximum by 5.10-11 m2, while porosity remained by 39 ± 2 % during the whole experiment. Further investigations are being led regarding the normalised transfer function, corrected for both the fluid conductivity and the seismic energy. For that purpose, we compare the dependence of our measured transfer

  8. Transfer Function Identification Using Orthogonal Fourier Transform Modeling Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A method for transfer function identification, including both model structure determination and parameter estimation, was developed and demonstrated. The approach uses orthogonal modeling functions generated from frequency domain data obtained by Fourier transformation of time series data. The method was applied to simulation data to identify continuous-time transfer function models and unsteady aerodynamic models. Model fit error, estimated model parameters, and the associated uncertainties were used to show the effectiveness of the method for identifying accurate transfer function models from noisy data.

  9. Free Functional Muscle Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Emily M; Tung, Thomas H; Moore, Amy M

    2016-05-01

    Free functional muscle transfer provides an option for functional restoration when nerve reconstruction and tendon transfers are not feasible. To ensure a successful outcome, many factors need to be optimized, including proper patient selection, timing of intervention, donor muscle and motor nerve selection, optimal microneurovascular technique and tension setting, proper postoperative management, and appropriate rehabilitation. Functional outcomes of various applications to the upper extremity and the authors' algorithm for the use of free functional muscle transfer are also included in this article. PMID:27094895

  10. Design of the Coordinate Transformation Function for Cylindrical Acoustic Cloaks with a Quantity of Discrete Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li; Wen, Ji-Hong; Yu, Dian-Long; Lu, Zhi-Miao; Wen, Xi-Sen

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic cloak based on coordinate transformation is of great topical interest and has promise in potential applications such as sound transparency and insulation. The frequency response of acoustic cloaks with a quantity of discrete homogeneous layers is analyzed by the acoustic scattering theory. The effect of coordinate transformation function on the acoustic total scattering cross section is discussed to achieve low scattering with only a few layers of anisotropic metamaterials. Also, the physics of acoustic wave interaction with the interfaces between the discrete layers inside the cloak shell is discussed. These results provide a better way of designing a multilayered acoustic cloak with fewer layers.

  11. Determining the nominal power transfer coefficient for passive surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, A. N.; Palamarchuk, A. A.; Semenko, A. I.

    1982-05-01

    A method for calculating the nominal power transfer coefficient of passive SAW devices operating in a linear mode is described. Relations of practical importance are obtained, making it possible, on the basis of known characteristics of acousto-electric transducers and acoustic lines, to determine the losses incurred by devices when they are connected to radioelectronic equipment. The relations also permit an assessment of the uniformity of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the devices.

  12. Modulation transfer function for infrared reflectarrays.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pedrero, Jose Antonio; Ginn, James; Alda, Javier; Boreman, Glenn

    2011-09-20

    The quality of the image produced by optical reflectarrays as a function of the F/#, polarization, and wavelength is analyzed in this paper. The results are expressed as monochromatic and polychromatic modulation transfer functions. They show that large aperture multilevel reflectarrays perform quite close to the diffraction-limited case. The chromatic aberrations make these elements highly wavelength-selective. PMID:21947056

  13. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption of Natural and Functionalized Biochromophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) has recently been established as a tool for analytical chemistry. It is capable of launching intact, neutral, or low charged molecules into a high vacuum environment. This makes it ideally suited to mass spectrometry. LIAD can be used with fragile biomolecules and very massive compounds alike. Here, we apply LIAD time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) to the natural biochromophores chlorophyll, hemin, bilirubin, and biliverdin and to high mass fluoroalkyl-functionalized porphyrins. We characterize the variation in the molecular fragmentation patterns as a function of the desorption and the VUV postionization laser intensity. We find that LIAD can produce molecular beams an order of magnitude slower than matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD), although this depends on the substrate material. Using titanium foils we observe a most probable velocity of 20 m/s for functionalized molecules with a mass m = 10 000 Da. PMID:25946522

  14. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  15. Calculation of retroreflector array transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Computer programs have been developed for calculating the transfer function of a retroreflector array. The transfer functions provide range corrections and effective reflecting areas for the retroreflector arrays carried by satellites now in orbit. This information can be used to estimate laser echo signal strengths and to correct laser range measurements in order to obtain the range to the center of mass of the satellite. The values are tabulated for various angles of incidence of the laser beam with respect to the symmetry axis of the satellite. Transfer functions have been computed for the following satellites: BE-B, BE-C, Geos 1, D1C, D1D, Geos 2, Peole, and Geos C.

  16. Wavelet excited measurement of system transfer function.

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, H; Olkkonen, J T

    2007-02-01

    This article introduces a new method, which is referred to as the wavelet excitation method (WEM), for the measurement of the system transfer function. Instead of commonly used impulse or sine wave excitations, the method uses a sequential excitation by biorthogonal symmetric wavelets. The system transfer function is reconstructed from the output measurements. In the WEM the signals can be designed so that if N different excitation sequences are used and the excitation rate is f, the sampling rate of the analog-to-digital converter can be reduced to f/N. The WEM is especially advantageous in testing systems, where high quality impulse excitation cannot be applied. The WEM gave consistent results in transfer function measurements of various multistage amplifiers with the linear circuit analysis (SPICE) and the sine wave excitation methods. The WEM makes available new high speed sensor applications, where the sampling rate of the sensor may be considerably lower compared with the system bandwidth. PMID:17578145

  17. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s-1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  18. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; et al

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s-1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from themore » inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.« less

  19. Exploring the transferability of safety performance functions.

    PubMed

    Farid, Ahmed; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Eluru, Naveen; Wang, Jung-Han

    2016-09-01

    Safety performance functions (SPFs), by predicting the number of crashes on roadway facilities, have been a vital tool in the highway safety area. The SPFs are typically applied for identifying hot spots in network screening and evaluating the effectiveness of road safety countermeasures. The Highway Safety Manual (HSM) provides a series of SPFs for several crash types by various roadway facilities. The SPFs, provided in the HSM, were developed using data from multiple states. In regions without local jurisdiction based SPFs it is common practice to adopt national SPFs for crash prediction. There has been little research to examine the viability of such national level models for local jurisdictions. Towards understanding the influence of SPF transferability, we examine the rural divided multilane highway models from Florida, Ohio, and California. Traffic, roadway geometry and crash data from the three states are employed to estimate single-state SPFs, two-state SPFs and three-state SPFs. The SPFs are estimated using the negative binomial model formulation for several crash types and severities. To evaluate transferability of models, we estimate a transfer index that allows us to understand which models transfer adequately to other regions. The results indicate that models from Florida and California seem to be more transferable compared to models from Ohio. More importantly, we observe that the transfer index increases when we used pooled data (from two or three states). Finally, to assist in model transferability, we propose a Modified Empirical Bayes (MEB) measure that provides segment specific calibration factors for transferring SPFs to local jurisdictions. The proposed measure is shown to outperform the HSM calibration factor for transferring SPFs. PMID:27322637

  20. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s−1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening. PMID:25615864

  1. Energy Transfer and a Recurring Mathematical Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the interesting work of a previous contributor concerning the analogies between physical phenomena such as mechanical collisions and the transfer of power in an electric circuit. Emphasis is placed on a mathematical function linking these different areas of physics. This unifying principle is seen as an exciting opportunity to…

  2. Fish otolith mass asymmetry: morphometry and influence on acoustic functionality.

    PubMed

    Lychakov, D V; Rebane, Y T

    2005-03-01

    The role of the fish otolith mass asymmetry in acoustic functionality is studied. The saccular, lagenar and utricular otoliths are weighted in two species of the Black Sea rays, 15 species of the Black Sea teleost fish and guppy fish. The dimensionless otolith mass asymmetry chi is calculated as ratio of the difference between masses of the right and left paired otoliths to average otolith mass. In the most fish studied the otolith mass asymmetry is within the range of -0.2 < chi < +0.2 (< 20%). We do not find specific fish species with extremely large or extremely small otolith asymmetry. The large otoliths do not belong solely to any particular side, left or right. The heavier otoliths of different otolithic organs can be located in different labyrinths. No relationship has been found between the magnitude of the otolith mass asymmetry and the length (mass, age) of the animal. The suggested fluctuation model of the otolith growth can interpret these results. The model supposes that the otolith growth rate varies slightly hither and thither during lifetime of the individual fish. Therefore, the sign of the relative otolith mass asymmetry can change several times in the process of the individual fish growth but within the range outlined above. Mathematical modeling shows that acoustic functionality (sensitivity, temporal processing, sound localization) of the fish can be disturbed by the otolith mass asymmetry. But this is valid only for the fish with largest otolith masses, characteristic of the bottom and littoral fish, and with highest otolith asymmetry. For most fish the values of otolith mass asymmetry is well below critical values. Thus, the most fish get around the troubles related to the otolith mass asymmetry. We suggest that a specific physicochemical mechanism of the paired otolith growth that maintains the otolith mass asymmetry at the lowest possible level should exist. However, the principle and details of this mechanism are still far from being

  3. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-01

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  4. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  5. Woodwind Tone Hole Acoustics and the Spectrum Transformation Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefe, Douglas Howard

    This report describes an investigation of woodwind musical instrument tone holes and their effect on the radiated spectrum, the total dissipation, the stability of oscillation, the psychoacoustical cues important in perception, and the tuning and response of the instrument. Varying tone hole proportions significantly affect the radiative and frictional damping near a single hole, the mutual interactions between holes, the onset of streaming and turbulence near the holes, and the perceived woodwind timbre. The interconnections between related fields are explored through a brief review of sound production in woodwinds plus more extensive reviews of room and psychological acoustics. A theoretical and experimental discussion of the spectrum transformation function from the mouthpiece into the room relates all these fields. Also, considered are differences between cylindrical and conical bore woodwinds, the systematic shifts in saxophone spectra produced by the beating of the reed, the coupling of many closely spaced tone holes to the room excitation, the role of the player, and the results pertaining to computer music synthesis. The complicated acoustical flow inside the main air column near a single tone hole has been examined using a Green function, integral equation approach. A variational formulation allows explicit calculation of the open and closed hole impedance parameters needed in the transmission line description of a woodwind, and experiments have verified the theory in detail. Major acoustical topics considered are listed below. The effective length t(,e) of an open hole, relevant for instrument design and modification, is calculated and measured in terms of the main bore diameter 2a, hole diameter 2b, and the height t of the hole chimney; the effect of a hanging pad is a semi-empirical correction on t(,e). When the fundamental plane-wave mode of the main air column oscillation is at a pressure node, both the open and closed hole series impedances are

  6. One-dimensional pressure transfer models for acoustic-electric transmission channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, K. R.; Lawry, T. J.; Scarton, H. A.; Saulnier, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method for modeling piezoelectric-based ultrasonic acoustic-electric power and data transmission channels is presented. These channels employ piezoelectric disk transducers to convey signals across a series of physical layers using ultrasonic waves. This model decomposes the mechanical pathway of the signal into individual ultrasonic propagation layers which are generally independent of the layer's adjacent domains. Each layer is represented by a two-by-two traveling pressure wave transfer matrix which relates the forward and reverse pressure waves on one side of the layer to the pressure waves on the opposite face, where each face is assumed to be in contact with a domain of arbitrary reference acoustic impedance. A rigorous implementation of ultrasonic beam spreading is introduced and implemented within applicable domains. Compatible pressure-wave models for piezoelectric transducers are given, which relate the electric voltage and current interface of the transducer to the pressure waves on one mechanical interface while also allowing for passive acoustic loading of the secondary mechanical interface. It is also shown that the piezoelectric model's electrical interface is compatible with transmission line parameters (ABCD-parameters), allowing for connection of electronic components and networks. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing the behavior of realistic physical channels.

  7. Measuring Dynamic Transfer Functions of Cavitating Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baun, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A water-flow test facility has been built to enable measurement of dynamic transfer functions (DTFs) of cavitating pumps and of inducers in such pumps. Originally, the facility was intended for use in an investigation of the effects of cavitation in a rocket-engine low-pressure oxygen turbopump. The facility can also be used to measure DTFs of cavitating pumps in general

  8. Numerical and theoretical analysis of beam vibration induced acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qun

    The purpose of this research is to numerically and analytically investigate the acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer, which are induced by a beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms. Analytical results show that the beam vibrating in standing waveforms scatters the acoustic waves into the free space, which have a larger attenuation coefficient and longer propagating traveling wavelength than those of the plane wave. In contrast to a constant Reynolds stress in the plane wave, the Reynolds stress generated by such acoustic wave is expected to drive the free space streaming away from the anti-nodes and towards nodes of the standing wave vibration. The sonic and ultrasonic streamings within the channel between the vibrating beam and a parallel stationary beam are also investigated. The acoustic streaming is utilized to cool the stationary beam, which has either a heat source attached to it or subjected to a uniform heat flux. The sonic streaming is found to be mainly the boundary layer streaming dominating the whole channel while the ultrasonic streaming is clearly composed of two boundary layer streamings near both beams and a core region streaming, which is driven by the streaming velocity at the edge of the boundary layer near the vibrating beam. The standing wave vibration of the beam induces acoustic streaming in a series of counterclockwise eddies, which is directed away from the anti-nodes and towards the nodes. The magnitude of the sonic streaming is proportional to o2A 2 while that of the ultrasonic streaming is proportional to o 3/2A2. Numerical results show that the acoustic streaming induced by the beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms has almost the same cooling efficiency for the heat source and the heat flux cases although the flow and temperature fields within the channel are different. The hysteresis of the ultrasonic streaming flow patterns associated with the change of the aspect ratio of the channel

  9. Aerosol modulation transfer function: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeika, Norman S.

    1997-09-01

    The aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) describes blurring deriving from light scatter caused by aerosols. Little scintillations or image dancing are involved. When overall atmospheric point spread function (PSF) is analyzed for its turbulence component deriving from angle-of-arrival fluctuations or scintillations, a significant portion of the PSF is left over. This is the aerosol component. This overview describes the basic physical mechanisms for aerosol MTF and its wavelength, weather, and time exposure dependences, as well as a comparison to turbulence MiT.

  10. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  11. Spatially distributed flame transfer functions for predicting combustion dynamics in lean premixed gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper describes a methodology to improve the accuracy of prediction of the eigenfrequencies and growth rates of self-induced instabilities and demonstrates its application to a laboratory-scale, swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed, gas turbine combustor. The influence of the spatial heat release distribution is accounted for using local flame transfer function (FTF) measurements. The two-microphone technique and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence intensity measurements are used to determine the input (inlet velocity perturbation) and the output functions (heat release oscillation), respectively, for the local flame transfer functions. The experimentally determined local flame transfer functions are superposed using the flame transfer function superposition principle, and the result is incorporated into an analytic thermoacoustic model, in order to predict the linear stability characteristics of a given system. Results show that when the flame length is not acoustically compact the model prediction calculated using the local flame transfer functions is better than the prediction made using the global flame transfer function. In the case of a flame in the compact flame regime, accurate predictions of eigenfrequencies and growth rates can be obtained using the global flame transfer function. It was also found that the general response characteristics of the local FTF (gain and phase) are qualitatively the same as those of the global FTF. (author)

  12. Contextual Control by Function and Form of Transfer of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, David R.; Dougher, Michael J.; Greenway, David E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures,…

  13. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-12-01

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive-inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and dramatically

  14. Multiple functions of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) was first identified as a major cellular protein capable of transferring neutral lipids between membrane vesicles. Its role as an essential chaperone for the biosynthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing triglyceride-rich lipoproteins was established after the realization that abetalipoproteinemia patients carry mutations in the MTTP gene resulting in the loss of its lipid transfer activity. Now it is known that it also plays a role in the biosynthesis of CD1, glycolipid presenting molecules, as well as in the regulation of cholesterol ester biosynthesis. In this review, we will provide a historical perspective about the identification, purification and characterization of MTP, describe methods used to measure its lipid transfer activity, and discuss tissue expression and function. Finally, we will review the role MTP plays in the assembly of apoB-lipoprotein, the regulation of cholesterol ester synthesis, biosynthesis of CD1 proteins and propagation of hepatitis C virus. We will also provide a brief overview about the clinical potentials of MTP inhibition. PMID:22353470

  15. An experimentally validated contactless acoustic energy transfer model with resistive-reactive electrical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates analytical modeling and experimental validation of Ultrasonic Acoustic Energy Transfer (UAET) for low-power electricity transfer to exploit in wireless applications ranging from medical implants to underwater sensor systems. A piezoelectric receiver bar is excited by incident acoustic waves originating from a source of known strength located at a specific distance from the receiver. The receiver is a free-free piezoelectric cylinder operating in the 33- mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. In order to extract the electrical power output, the piezoelectric receiver bar is shunted to a generalized resistive-reactive circuit. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Experimental validations are presented along with parameter optimization studies. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the receiver's underwater resonance frequency, source-to-receiver distance, and source-strength level are reported. Resistive and resistive-reactive electrical loading cases are discussed for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Simulations and experiments reveal that the presented multiphysics analytical model for UAET can be used to predict the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy.

  16. Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Christine M.; Walton, Suzanne; Murry, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic phonatory events were identified in 14 women diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), a focal laryngeal dystonia that disturbs phonatory function, and compared with those of 14 age-matched women with no vocal dysfunction. Findings indicated ADSD subjects produced more aberrant acoustic events than controls during tasks of…

  17. Acoustic resonance excitation of turbulent heat transfer and flow reattachment downstream of a fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcan, Claudio; Cukurel, Beni; Shashank, Judah

    2015-12-01

    The current work investigates the aero-thermal impact of standing sound waves, excited in a straight channel geometry, on turbulent, separating and reattaching flow over a fence. Effects of distinct frequency resonant forcing (ReH = 10,050 and f = 122 Hz) are quantified by wall static pressure measurements and detailed convective heat transfer distributions via liquid crystal thermometry. Acoustic boundary conditions are numerically predicted and the computed longitudinal resonance mode shapes are experimentally verified by surface microphone measurements. Findings indicate the presence of a resonant sound field to exert strong influence on local heat transfer downstream of the fence, whereas the boundary layer upstream of the obstacle remains notable unaffected. Upstream shift of the maximum heat transfer location and an earlier pressure recovery indicate a reduction in time averaged flow reattachment length of up to 37 %. Although the streamwise peak Nusselt increased by only 5 %, the heat transfer level in the vicinity of the unexcited reattachment zone was locally enhanced up to 25 %. Despite prominent impact of resonant forcing on the fence wake flow, the total pressure drop penalty remained invariant. Observations demonstrate the significant aero-thermal implications of shear layer excitation by standing sound waves superimposed on the channel flow field.

  18. Simultaneous backward data transmission and power harvesting in an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link employing acoustically dependent electric impedance modulation.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron

    2014-09-01

    The advancement and miniaturization of body implanted medical devices pose several challenges to Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer (UTET), such as the need to reduce the size of the piezoelectric resonator, and the need to maximize the UTET link power-transfer efficiency. Accordingly, the same piezoelectric resonator that is used for energy harvesting at the body implant, may also be used for ultrasonic backward data transfer, for instance, through impedance modulation. This paper presents physical considerations and design guidelines of the body implanted transducer of a UTET link with impedance modulation for a backward data transfer. The acoustic matching design procedure was based on the 2×2 transfer matrix chain analysis, in addition to the Krimholtz Leedom and Matthaei KLM transmission line model. The UTET power transfer was carried out at a frequency of 765 kHz, continuous wave (CW) mode. The backward data transfer was attained by inserting a 9% load resistance variation around its matched value (550 Ohm), resulting in a 12% increase in the acoustic reflection coefficient. A backward data transmission rate of 1200 bits/s was experimentally demonstrated using amplitude shift keying, simultaneously with an acoustic power transfer of 20 mW to the implant. PMID:24861424

  19. Observation of orbital angular momentum transfer from bessel-shaped acoustic vortices to diphasic liquid-microparticle mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hong, ZhenYu; Zhang, Jie; Drinkwater, Bruce W

    2015-05-29

    We observe distinct regimes of orbital angular momentum (OAM) transfer from two-dimensional Bessel-shaped acoustic vortices to matter. In a homogeneous diphasic mixture of microparticles and water, slow swirling about the vortex axis is seen. This effect is driven by the absorption of OAM across the mixture, the motion following the OAM density distribution. Larger particles are formed into clusters by the acoustic radiation force, making the mixture nonhomogeneous. Here, the OAM transfer to the microparticle clusters dominates and they spin at high speeds entraining the surrounding fluid. PMID:26066437

  20. Partially coherent contrast-transfer-function approximation.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E

    2016-04-01

    The contrast-transfer-function (CTF) approximation, widely used in various phase-contrast imaging techniques, is revisited. CTF validity conditions are extended to a wide class of strongly absorbing and refracting objects, as well as to nonuniform partially coherent incident illumination. Partially coherent free-space propagators, describing amplitude and phase in-line contrast, are introduced and their properties are investigated. The present results are relevant to the design of imaging experiments with partially coherent sources, as well as to the analysis and interpretation of the corresponding images. PMID:27140752

  1. Pressure Transfer Functions for Interfacial Fluids Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Hur, Vera Mikyoung; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    We make a consistent derivation, from the governing equations, of the pressure transfer function in the small-amplitude Stokes wave regime and the hydrostatic approximation in the small-amplitude solitary water wave regime, in the presence of a background shear flow. The results agree with the well-known formulae in the zero vorticity case, but they incorporate the effects of vorticity through solutions to the Rayleigh equation. We extend the results to permit continuous density stratification and to internal waves between two constant-density fluids. Several examples are discussed.

  2. Computer method for identification of boiler transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Iterative computer aided procedure was developed which provides for identification of boiler transfer functions using frequency response data. Method uses frequency response data to obtain satisfactory transfer function for both high and low vapor exit quality data.

  3. Modulation transfer function of bar code scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Milster, Tom D.

    1998-09-01

    Bar code scanners are ubiquitous in supermarkets. As a bar code is passed over a scanner, a laser beam scans across the bar code. The scattered light is modulated by the reflectivity of the bars and spaces of the bar code. The bar code scanning process can be described as a 1D convolution of the scanning laser profile and the bar code reflectivity function. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of bar code scanning is the Fourier transform of the marginal profile of the laser beam. The properties of the MTF of bar code scanning is similar to that of an incoherent imaging system. Measurements of the MTF of bar code scanning at one focus position are presented. The experimental results are then discussed.

  4. Optical design of optical transfer function instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangjun; Chen, Xinhua; Chen, Yuheng; Ji, Yiqun; Xiang, Chunchang; Shen, Weimin

    2009-11-01

    The optical design of Optical transfer function (OTF) instrument, which is based on the image Fourier analysis method, is presented. To perform infinite conjugate testing of an optical system, the designed system is mainly composed of the object generator, lens under test, and image analyzer. The object generator offers an object at infinite distance with known spectral and spatial content. It includes the illumination system and the collimating system. The illumination system is analyzed and optimized with CODEV and LightTools software. Performance evaluation indicates that its illumination uniformity in the required area is above 95% .The collimation system based on an off-axis parabolic mirror is of the focal length of 2000mm and the entrance pupil diameter 200mm. Through optimization, the image quality of the collimator is excellent and its on-axis modulation transfer function (MTF) approaches diffraction limit. Collimated beam of the target is imaged by the lens under test. The image is magnified and acquired by image analyzer, which is made up of four parts: an infinite conjugate microscope objective, a tube lens, an eyepiece and a CCD camera. Image Results show that this designed scheme meets the requirements of this OTF instrument.

  5. Unbiased rigid registration using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Bautz, Werner; Kuwert, Torsten; Roemer, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    The evaluation of tumor growth as regression under therapy is an important clinical issue. Rigid registration of sequentially acquired 3D-images has proven its value for this purpose. Existing approaches to rigid image registration use the whole volume for the estimation of the rigid transform. Non-rigid soft tissue deformation, however, will imply a bias to the registration result, because local deformations cannot be modeled by rigid transforms. Anatomical substructures, like bones or teeth, are not affected by these deformations, but follow a rigid transform. This important observation is incorporated in the proposed registration algorithm. The selection of anatomical substructure is done by manual interaction of medical experts adjusting the transfer function of the volume rendering software. The parameters of the transfer function are used to identify the voxels that are considered for registration. A rigid transform is estimated by a quaternion gradient descent algorithm based on the intensity values of the specified tissue classes. Commonly used voxel intensity measures are adjusted to the modified registration algorithm. The contribution describes the mathematical framework of the proposed registration method and its implementation in a commercial software package. The experimental evaluation includes the discussion of different similarity measures, the comparison of the proposed method to established rigid registration techniques and the evaluation of the efficiency of the new method. We conclude with the discussion of potential medical applications of the proposed registration algorithm.

  6. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process. PMID:26223474

  7. Novel Transfer Method Using Near-Field Acoustic Levitation and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryuto; Aoyagi, Manabu; Tamura, Hideki; Takano, Takehiro

    2011-07-01

    The holding of a levitated object above stator vibrators by utilizing the holding force, which is generated by near-field acoustic levitation, is possible. The holding force yields at the edge of a vibration plate and nodes of a bending vibration mode, and it is in proportion to the vibration amplitude of the vibration plate. In this paper, we describe methods of transfer and positioning of a levitated object above many aligned stator vibrators, some experimental results, and the proposition of the application as a noncontact-stepping ultrasonic motor (NCS-USM). Linear-type and rotary-type NCS-USMs can be flexibly constructed. The NCS-USM has a possibility of high torque performance compared with an ordinary noncontact USM using a traveling wave.

  8. Enhancing the dynamic range of targeted energy transfer in acoustics using several nonlinear membrane absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellet, R.; Cochelin, B.; Côte, R.; Mattei, P.-O.

    2012-12-01

    In order to enhance the robustness and the energy range of efficiency of targeted energy transfer (TET) phenomena in acoustics, we discuss in this paper about the use of multiple nonlinear membrane absorbers (called nonlinear energy sinks or NES) placed in parallel. We show this way, mainly thanks to an experimental set-up with two membranes, that the different absorbers have additional effects that extend the efficiency and the possibilities of observation of TET. More precisely, we present the different behavior of the system under sinusoidal forcing and free oscillations, characterizing the phenomena for all input energies. The frequency responses are also presented, showing successive clipping of the original resonance peak of the system, and strongly modulated regimes (SMR). A model is finally used to generalize these results to more than two NES and to simulate the case of several very similar membranes in parallel which shows how to extend the existence zone of TET.

  9. A new calibration method for measuring acoustic transfer matrixes with flow and application to an automotive compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselet, Benoit; Gibiat, Vincent; Guilain, Stéphane; Lefebvre, Alain

    2014-12-01

    A new method for measuring acoustic transfer matrixes with flow has been developed. It is based on two-load technique. Great improvements were obtained on specific calibration of the connections. We present here the calibration principles and validation. Measurements of basic resonating systems, first without flow then with flow up to Mach 0.2 clearly validated the accuracy of the technique, even under extreme flow conditions. This technique was developed to allow the determination of the acoustic behavior of an automotive engine intake line, comprising a compressor. Measurements of the transfer matrix of an automotive compressor are presented without flow then under realistic engine conditions. The results obtained are compared to those of a basic acoustic model of the compressor.

  10. Underwater acoustic sensor networks: Medium access control, routing and reliable transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Peng

    Recently there have been growing interests in monitoring aquatic environments for scientific exploration, commercial exploitation and coastline protection. The ideal vehicle for this type of extensive monitoring is a mobile underwater sensor network (M-UWSN), consisting of a large number of low cost underwater sensors that can move with water currents and dispersion. M-UWSNs are significantly different from terrestrial sensor networks: (1) Radio channels do not work well under water. They must be replaced by acoustic channels, which feature long propagation delays, low communication bandwidth and high channel error rates; (2) While most ground sensors are static, underwater sensor nodes may move with water currents (and other underwater activities), as introduces passive sensor mobility. Due to the very different environment properties and the unique characteristics of acoustic channels, the protocols developed for terrestrial sensor networks are not applicable to M-UWSNs, and new research at every level of the protocol suite is demanded. In this dissertation work, we investigate three fundamental networking problems in M-UWSN design: medium access control, multi-hop routing and reliable data transfer. (1) Medium access control (MAC): the long propagation delays and narrow communication bandwidth of acoustic channels pose the major challenges to the energy-efficient MAC design in M-UWSNs. For the first time, we formally investigate the random access and RTS/CTS techniques in networks with long propagation delays and low communication bandwidth (as in M-UWSNs). Based on this study, we propose a novel reservation-based MAC approach, called R-MAC, for dense underwater sensor networks with unevenly distributed (spatially and temporally) traffic. Simulation results show that R-MAC is not only energy efficient but also supports fairness. (2) Multi-hop routing: In M-UWSNs, energy efficiency and mobility handling are the two major concerns for multi-hop routing, which have

  11. Toward Transfer Functions for Land Surface Phenologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henebry, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    A key problem in projecting future landscapes is simulating the associated land surface phenologies (or LSPs). A recent study of land surface models concluded that the representations of crop phenologies among the models diverged sufficiently to impede a useful intercomparison of simulation results from their associated climate models. Grassland phenologies are far more complicated than cropland phenologies due to multiple forcing factors, photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs C4), and spatial heterogeneities in both resource availabilities and land management practices. Furthermore, many tallgrass species (such as switchgrass) are widely distributed across temperature, but not moisture, gradients, resulting in significant ecotypic variation across the species' geographic range. Thus, how feasible is "transplanting" tallgrass LSPs across isotherms—but along isohyets—to simulate a shift in cultivation from maize-soy to switchgrass? Prior work has shown a quadratic model can provide a parsimonious link between a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (or NDVI) time series and thermal time, measured in terms of accumulated growing degree-days (or AGDD). Moreover, the thermal time to peak NDVI (or TTP) is a simple function of the parameter coefficients of fitted model. I fitted quadratic models to MODIS NDVI and weather station data at multiple sites across the Northern Great Plains over ten growing seasons, 2000-2009. There is a strong latitudinal gradient in TTP that results in part from a quasi-linear gradient in accumulated daylight hours (or ADH) between 30 and 50 degrees north. However, AGDD improves upon ADH by providing sensitivity to the variability of growing season weather. In the quadratic parameter coefficients there is a geographic pattern apparent as a function of TTP, although it is more variable at shorter TTPs. Using these patterns, an LSP transfer function was implemented along a latitudinal transect to simulate switchgrass cultivation in areas now

  12. Empirical and quadrature approximation of acoustic field and array response probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J; Oba, Roger M

    2013-07-01

    Numerical methods are presented for approximating the probability density functions (pdf's) of acoustic fields and receiver-array responses induced by a given joint pdf of a set of acoustic environmental parameters. An approximation to the characteristic function of the random acoustic field (the inverse Fourier transform of the field pdf) is first obtained either by construction of the empirical characteristic function (ECF) from a random sample of the acoustic parameters, or by application of generalized Gaussian quadrature to approximate the integral defining the characteristic function. The Fourier transform is then applied to obtain an approximation of the pdf by a continuous function of the field variables. Application of both the ECF and generalized Gaussian quadrature is demonstrated in an example of a shallow-water ocean waveguide with two-dimensional uncertainty of sound speed and attenuation coefficient in the ocean bottom. Both approximations lead to a smoother estimate of the field pdf than that provided by a histogram, with generalized Gaussian quadrature providing a smoother estimate at the tails of the pdf. Potential applications to acoustic system performance quantification and to nonparametric acoustic signal processing are discussed. PMID:23862782

  13. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus. PMID:26647655

  14. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus. PMID:26647655

  15. Seismic attenuation parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    We estimate frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany. The parameter estimations are based on fitting synthetic envelopes modeled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different methods yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Results suggest, that intrinsic seismic attenuation is larger than attenuation due to scattering of seismic energy in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. From the elastic simulations we conclude, that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the strength of forward scattering is not resolvable. The elastic approach shows smaller errors in the parameter estimation compared to the results of the acoustic simulations. The frequency dependence of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. However the parameters describing this random medium, fluctuation strength and correlation length, cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. We furthermore conclude from the results of the elastic simulations, that it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  16. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  17. Liver reserve function assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lan; Liang, Li-Wei; Cao, Hui; Men, Qiong; Hou, Ke-Zhu; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Ya-E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of liver reserve function by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging in patients with liver tumors. METHODS: Seventy-six patients with liver tumors were enrolled in this study. Serum biochemical indexes, such as aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (T-Bil), and other indicators were observed. Liver stiffness (LS) was measured by ARFI imaging, measurements were repeated 10 times, and the average value of the results was taken as the final LS value. Indocyanine green (ICG) retention was performed, and ICG-K and ICG-R15 were recorded. Child-Pugh (CP) scores were carried out based on patient’s preoperative biochemical tests and physical condition. Correlations among CP scores, ICG-R15, ICG-K and LS values were observed and analyzed using either the Pearson correlation coefficient or the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare LS values of CP scores, and the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze liver reserve function assessment accuracy. RESULTS: LS in the ICG-R15 10%-20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.19 ± 0.27 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). LS in the ICG-R15 > 20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.92 ± 0.29 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). The LS value in patients with CP class A was lower than in patients with CP class B (1.57 ± 0.34 vs 1.86 ± 0.27, P < 0.05), while the LS value in patients with CP class B was lower than in patients with CP class C (1.86 ± 0.27 vs 2.47 ± 0.33, P < 0.01). LS was positively correlated with ICG-R15 (r = 0.617, P < 0.01) and CP score (r = 0.772, P < 0.01). Meanwhile, LS was negatively correlated with ICG-K (r = -0.673, P < 0.01). AST, ALT and T-Bil were positively correlated with LS, while ALB was negatively

  18. Acoustical and functional analysis of Mountain lion (Puma concolor) vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Jacquelyn

    2002-05-01

    A 2-year study resulted in acoustic analysis of the structure of over 900 mountain lion vocalizations recorded in a seminatural setting at Wildlife Prairie Park near Peoria, Illinois. A vocal repertoire was obtained by describing quantitative variables about the sounds, i.e., frequency of the dominant part of the sound (beginning, ending, maximum, and minimum), duration, and number of components. Other variables described the tonal, harmonic, and wideband qualities of the sounds. Behavioral data were collected during the same period. Further analysis of both acoustic and behavioral data was completed to develop a correlation matrix between vocalizations and behavior. This study also looked at the effects of seasons on vocal behavior. Correlations were found between vocalization types and rates of usage with specific behaviors. Vocalization type and the usage rate also varied by season.

  19. Transfer Function Design for Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Huang

    2008-12-08

    As computation scales beyond terascale, the scientific problems under study through computing are increasingly pushing the boundaries of human knowledge about the physical world. It is more pivotal than ever to quickly and reliably extract new knowledge from these complex simulations of ultra scale. In this project, the PI expanded the traditional notion of transfer function, which maps physical quantities to visual cues via table look-ups, to include general temporal as well as multivariate patterns that can be described procedurally through specialty mini programming languages. Their efforts aimed at answering a perpetual question of fundamental importance. That is "what a visualization should show". Instead of waiting for application scientists to initiate the process, the team at University of Tennessee worked closely with scientists at ORNL in a proactive role to envision and design elegant, powerful, and reliable tools that a user can use to specify "what is interesting". Their new techniques include visualization operators that revolve around correlation and graph properties, relative patterns in statistical distribution, temporal regular expressions, concurrent attribute subspaces and traditional compound boolean range queries. The team also paid special attention to ensure that all visualization operators are inherently designed with great parallel scalability to handle tera-scale datasets in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Success has been demonstrated with leading edge computational science areas include climate modeling, combustion and systems genetics.

  20. Atmospheric modulation transfer function in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Buskila, Kobi; Towito, Shay; Shmuel, Elad; Levi, Ran; Kopeika, Natan; Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G; Vollmerhausen, Richard H; Halford, Carl E

    2004-01-10

    In high-resolution ultranarrow field-of-view thermal imagers, image quality over relatively long path lengths is typically limited by atmospheric degradation, especially atmospheric blur. We report our results and analyses of infrared images from two sites, Fort A. P. Hill and Aberdeen Proving Ground. The images are influenced by the various atmospheric phenomena: scattering, absorption, and turbulence. A series of experiments with high-resolution equipment in both the 3-5- and 8-13-microm regions at the two locations indicate that, as in the visible, image quality is limited much more by atmosphere than by the instrumentation for ranges even of the order of only a few kilometers. For paths close to the ground, turbulence is more dominant, whereas for paths involving higher average elevation, aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) is dominant. As wavelength increases, turbulence MTF also increases, thus permitting aerosol MTF to become more dominant. A critical role in aerosol MTF in the thermal infrared is attributed to absorption, which noticeably decreases atmospheric transmission much more than in the visible, thereby reducing high-spatial-frequency aerosol MTF. These measurements indicate that atmospheric MTF should be a basic component in imaging system design and analysis even in the infrared, especially as higher-resolution hardware becomes available. PMID:14735966

  1. Computer method for identification of boiler transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    An iterative computer method is described for identifying boiler transfer functions using frequency response data. An objective penalized performance measure and a nonlinear minimization technique are used to cause the locus of points generated by a transfer function to resemble the locus of points obtained from frequency response measurements. Different transfer functions can be tried until a satisfactory empirical transfer function to the system is found. To illustrate the method, some examples and some results from a study of a set of data consisting of measurements of the inlet impedance of a single tube forced flow boiler with inserts are given.

  2. Efficient positioning of absorbing material in complex systems by using the Patch Transfer Function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, N.; Guyader, J. L.

    2012-06-01

    Given the need to decrease energy consumption in the automobile industry, vehicle weight has become an important issue. Regarding acoustic comfort, the weight of noise reduction devices must be minimized inside vehicle compartments. Consequently, these devices, for example those using poro-elastic materials, must be designed carefully to maximize their influence on noise reduction. The present paper describes a method developed to obtain an efficient positioning of a given surface (or mass) of absorbing material characterized by its surface impedance. This technique is based on the Patch Transfer Function method used to couple complex vibro-acoustic sub-domains and which has been successfully applied in the European ViSPeR and Silence projects. First, a numerical analysis of the possibilities of this method is performed on a non-rectangular cavity with rigid walls after which an experimental validation of this numerical analysis is performed to evaluate the accuracy of the method under real conditions.

  3. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  4. Scaling of plane-wave functions in statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustic Holography (SONAH) is a Patch Holography method, meaning that it can be applied in cases where the measurement area covers only part of the source surface. The method performs projections directly in the spatial domain, avoiding the use of spatial discrete Fourier transforms and the associated errors. First, an inverse problem is solved using regularization. For each calculation point a multiplication must then be performed with two transfer vectors--one to get the sound pressure and the other to get the particle velocity. Considering SONAH based on sound pressure measurements, existing derivations consider only pressure reconstruction when setting up the inverse problem, so the evanescent wave amplification associated with the calculation of particle velocity is not taken into account in the regularized solution of the inverse problem. The present paper introduces a scaling of the applied plane wave functions that takes the amplification into account, and it is shown that the previously published virtual source-plane retraction has almost the same effect. The effectiveness of the different solutions is verified through a set of simulated measurements. PMID:25373969

  5. 16 CFR 1750.2 - Transfer of functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of functions. 1750.2 Section 1750.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION REFRIGERATOR SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR DEVICES TO PERMIT THE OPENING OF HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR DOORS FROM THE INSIDE § 1750.2 Transfer of functions. Effective May 14, 1973, section...

  6. A functional technique based on the Euclidean algorithm with applications to 2-D acoustic diffractal diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Vega, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We built, based on the Euclidean algorithm, a functional technique, which allows to discover a direct proof of Chinese Remainder Theorem. Afterwards, by using this functional approach, we present some applications to 2-D acoustic diffractal diffusers. The novelty of the method is their functional algorithmic character, which improves ideas, as well as, other results of the author and his collaborators in a previous work.

  7. Perfect function transfer in two and three dimensions without initialization

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Lianao; Byrd, Mark; Wang, Z. D.; Shao Bin

    2010-11-15

    We find analytic models that can perfectly transfer, without state initialization or remote collaboration, arbitrary functions in two- and three-dimensional interacting bosonic and fermionic networks. This provides for the possible experimental implementation of state transfer through bosonic or fermionic atoms trapped in optical lattices. A significant finding is that the state of a spin qubit can be perfectly transferred through a fermionic system. Families of Hamiltonians are described that are related to the linear models and that enable the perfect transfer of arbitrary functions. Furthermore, we propose methods for eliminating certain types of errors.

  8. Multivariable synthesis with transfer functions. [applications to gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peczkowski, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A transfer function design theory for multivariable control synthesis is highlighted. The use of unique transfer function matrices and two simple, basic relationships - a synthesis equation and a design equation - are presented and illustrated. This multivariable transfer function approach provides the designer with a capability to specify directly desired dynamic relationships between command variables and controlled or response variables. At the same time, insight and influence over response, simplifications, and internal stability is afforded by the method. A general, comprehensive multivariable synthesis capability is indicated including nonminmum phase and unstable plants. Gas turbine engine examples are used to illustrate the ideas and method.

  9. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  10. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  11. MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE IN THE HOME USING TRANSFER FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the theoretical and practical development of a multi-compartment indoor air quality model designed for predicting pollutant concentrations from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the home. he model is developed using transfer functions for each compartment, ...

  12. Newton algorithm for fitting transfer functions to frequency response measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, J. T.; Mingori, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the problem of synthesizing transfer functions from frequency response measurements is considered. Given a complex vector representing the measured frequency response of a physical system, a transfer function of specified order is determined that minimizes the sum of the magnitude-squared of the frequency response errors. This nonlinear least squares minimization problem is solved by an iterative global descent algorithm of the Newton type that converges quadratically near the minimum. The unknown transfer function is expressed as a sum of second-order rational polynomials, a parameterization that facilitates a numerically robust computer implementation. The algorithm is developed for single-input, single-output, causal, stable transfer functions. Two numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  13. Development of a transfer function method for dynamic stability measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    Flutter testing method based on transfer function measurements is developed. The error statistics of several dynamic stability measurement methods are reviewed. It is shown that the transfer function measurement controls the error level by averaging the data and correlating the input and output. The method also gives a direct estimate of the error in the response measurement. An algorithm is developed for obtaining the natural frequency and damping ratio of low damped modes of the system, using integrals of the transfer function in the vicinity of a resonant peak. Guidelines are given for selecting the parameters in the transfer function measurement. Finally, the dynamic stability measurement technique is applied to data from a wind tunnel test of a proprotor and wing model.

  14. Predicting Transfer Performance: A Comparison of Competing Function Learning Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Dimperio, Eric; Griego, Jacqueline A.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2009-01-01

    The population of linear experts (POLE) model suggests that function learning and transfer are mediated by activation of a set of prestored linear functions that together approximate the given function (Kalish, Lewandowsky, & Kruschke, 2004). In the extrapolation-association (EXAM) model, an exemplar-based architecture associates trained input…

  15. Transfer function analysis in epi-illumination Fourier ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Shaun; Salahieh, Basel; Milster, Tom; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J.; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    This letter explores Fourier ptychography (FP) using epi-illumination. The approach effectively modifies the FP transfer function to be coherent-like out to the incoherent limit of twice the numerical aperture over the wavelength 2NA/λ. Images reconstructed using this approach are shown to have higher contrast at finer details compared with images using incoherent illumination, indicating that the FP transfer function is superior in high spatial frequency regions. PMID:26565870

  16. Functional outcome in patients after excision of extracanalicular acoustic neuromas using the suboccipital approach.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, N. M.; Kazanas, S.; Maw, A. R.; Coakham, H. B.; Torrens, M. J.; Morgan, M. H.; Stranjalis, G.; Butler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    An audit of surgery for acoustic neuroma was carried out to determine the frequency and nature of postoperative symptoms and their impact upon the patient's quality of life and vocation. Fifty-six patients were interviewed between 6 months and 5 years (mean 26 months) after surgical excision of an acoustic neuroma. The objective surgical results in these patients are good, with normal or near normal functional preservation rates of 80% for the facial nerve (House-Brackmann grade I/II), and 27.3% for a previously functioning acoustic nerve. Despite this there was no significant overall reduction in the reported occurrence of balance problems, tinnitus, headache and other neurological sequelae of the tumour after surgical excision. In 20% of the patients persistent symptoms, including deafness and facial weakness, had prevented the resumption of former social activities. As a result of these symptoms 8.6% of the patients were certified medically unfit for work, but of those employed preoperatively over 70% had returned to their jobs. The success of neuro-otological surgical management of acoustic neuroma is offset by some degree of chronic morbidity. Our patients expressed the need to know whether their symptoms would resolve, but were often too afraid to ask. Patients can be reassured that the majority resume their former social and vocational activities, but should be advised that some symptoms can persist or occur de novo after surgery. Our data suggest that early intervention would reduce the incidence of these troublesome sequelae. PMID:7598420

  17. Three forms of omnidirectional acoustic invisibility engineered using fast elastodynamic transfer-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Patrick T.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav A.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic metamaterial structures with discrete and continuous rotational symmetries attract interest of theorists and engineers due to the relative simplicity of their design and fabrication. They are also likely candidates for omnidirectional acoustic cloaking and other transformation-acoustical novelties. In this paper, we employ a stratified description of such structures, and develop the theory and an efficient symbolic/numerical algorithm for analyzing the scattering properties of such structures immersed in homogeneous fluid environments. The algorithm calculates the partial scattering amplitudes and the related scattering phases for an arbitrary layered distribution of acoustic material properties. The efficiency of the algorithm enables us to find approximate solutions to certain inverse scattering problems through quasi-global optimization. The scattering problems addressed here are the three forms of cloaking: (1) extinction cross-section suppression, the canonical form of cloaking, (2) monostatic sonar invisibility (backscattering suppression), and (3) acoustic force cloaking (transport cross-section suppression). We also address the efficiency-bandwidth tradeoff and design approximate cloaks with wider bandwidth using a new optimization formulation.

  18. Forward and reverse transfer function model synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A process for synthesizing a mathematical model for a linear mechanical system using the forward and reverse Fourier transform functions is described. The differential equation for a system model is given. The Bode conversion of the differential equation, and the frequency and time-domain optimization matching of the model to the forward and reverse transform functions using the geometric simplex method of Nelder and Mead (1965) are examined. The effect of the window function on the linear mechanical system is analyzed. The model is applied to two examples; in one the signal damps down before the end of the time window and in the second the signal has significant energy at the end of the time window.

  19. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  20. Efficient Approximation of Head-Related Transfer Functions in Subbands for Accurate Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Damián; Baumgartner, Robert; Majdak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the acoustic filtering of incoming sounds by the human morphology and are essential for listeners to localize sound sources in virtual auditory displays. Since rendering complex virtual scenes is computationally demanding, we propose four algorithms for efficiently representing HRTFs in subbands, i.e., as an analysis filterbank (FB) followed by a transfer matrix and a synthesis FB. All four algorithms use sparse approximation procedures to minimize the computational complexity while maintaining perceptually relevant HRTF properties. The first two algorithms separately optimize the complexity of the transfer matrix associated to each HRTF for fixed FBs. The other two algorithms jointly optimize the FBs and transfer matrices for complete HRTF sets by two variants. The first variant aims at minimizing the complexity of the transfer matrices, while the second one does it for the FBs. Numerical experiments investigate the latency-complexity trade-off and show that the proposed methods offer significant computational savings when compared with other available approaches. Psychoacoustic localization experiments were modeled and conducted to find a reasonable approximation tolerance so that no significant localization performance degradation was introduced by the subband representation. PMID:26681930

  1. [Contrast transfer function of the visual system].

    PubMed

    Pak, M A; Cleveland, S J

    1991-09-01

    Visually evoked potentials were used to determine the spatial contrast response function of the visual system and the visual acuity of the pigeon. The spatial contrast response describes the relationship between the contrast in a pattern of vertical stripes, whose luminance is a function of position, and the amplitude of the visually evoked response at various spatial frequencies for a given temporal frequency (pattern reversal frequency); it indicates how particular spatial frequencies are attenuated in the visual system. The visually evoked responses were recorded using monopolar stainless steel electrodes inserted into the stratum griseum superficiale of the optic tectum; the depth of penetration was determined on the basis of a stereotactic atlas. The stimulus patterns were generated on a video monitor placed 75 cm in front of the animal's eye perpendicular to the optic axis. The spatial contrast response function measured at 10% contrast and 0.5 Hz reversal frequency shows a peak at a spatial frequency of 0.5 c/deg, corresponding to 1 degree of visual angle, and decreases progressively at higher spatial frequencies. The high-frequency limit (cut-off frequency) for resolution of sinusoidal gratings, estimated from the contrast response function, is 15.5 c/deg, corresponding to a visual acuity of 1.9 min of arc. PMID:1657228

  2. Parametric dependence of ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Cross, A.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave techniques at X and L band were used to determine the dependence of ocean-wave radar modulation transfer functions (MTFs) on various environmental and radar parameters during the Marine Remote Sensing experiment of 1979 (MARSEN 79). These MIF are presented, as are coherence functions between the AM and FM parts of the backscattered microwave signal. It is shown that they both depend on several of these parameters. Besides confirming many of the properties of transfer functions reported by previous authors, indications are found that MTFs decrease with increasing angle between wave propagation and antenna-look directions but are essentially independent of small changes in air-sea temperature difference. However, coherence functions are much smaller when the antennas are pointed perpendicular to long waves. It is found that X band transfer functions measured with horizontally polarized microwave radiation have larger magnitudes than those obtained by using vertical polarization.

  3. Application of transfer functions to canned tuna fish thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Ansorena, M R; del Valle, C; Salvadori, V O

    2010-02-01

    Design and optimization of thermal processing of foods need accurate dynamic models to ensure safe and high quality food products. Transfer functions had been demonstrated to be a useful tool to predict thermal histories, especially under variable operating conditions. This work presents the development and experimental validation of a dynamic model (discrete transfer function) for the thermal processing of tuna fish in steam retorts. Transfer function coefficients were obtained numerically, using commercial software of finite elements (COMSOL Multiphysics) to solve the heat transfer balance. Dependence of transfer function coefficients on the characteristic dimensions of cylindrical containers (diameter and height) and on the sampling interval is reported. A simple equation, with two empirical parameters that depends on the container dimensions, represented the behavior of transfer function coefficients with very high accuracy. Experimental runs with different size containers and different external conditions (constant and variable retort temperature) were carried out to validate the developed methodology. Performance of the thermal process simulation was tested for predicting internal product temperature of the cold point and lethality and very satisfactory results were found. The developed methodology can play an important role in reducing the computational effort while guaranteeing accuracy by simplifying the calculus involved in the solution of heat balances with variable external conditions and emerges as a potential approach to the implementation of new food control strategies leading not only to more efficient processes but also to product quality and safety. PMID:21339120

  4. Optimization of the acoustic absorption coefficients of certain functional absorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pocsa, V.; Biborosch, L.; Veres, A.; Halpert, E.; Lorian, R.; Botos, T.

    1974-01-01

    The sound absorption coefficients of some functional absorbents (mineral wool plates) are determined by the reverberation chamber method. The influence of the angle of inclination of the sound absorbing material with respect to the surface to be treated is analyzed as well as the influence of the covering index, defined as the ratio of the designed area of a plate and the area of the treated surface belonging to another plate. As compared with the conventional method of applying sound-absorbing plates, the analyzed structures have a higher technological and economical efficiency. The optimum structure corresponds to an angle of inclination of 15 deg and a covering index of 0.8.

  5. The Prediction of Jet Noise Ground Effects Using an Acoustic Analogy and a Tailored Green's Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of an acoustic analogy for the mixing noise component of jet noise in the presence of an infinite surface is presented. The reflection of jet noise by the ground changes the distribution of acoustic energy and is characterized by constructive and destructive interference patterns. The equivalent sources are modeled based on the two-point cross- correlation of the turbulent velocity fluctuations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solution. Propagation effects, due to reflection by the surface and refaction by the jet shear layer, are taken into account by calculating the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations (LEE). The vector Green's function of the LEE is written in relation to Lilley's equation; that is, approximated with matched asymptotic solutions and the Green's function of the convective Helmholtz equation. The Green's function of the convective Helmholtz equation for an infinite flat plane with impedance is the Weyl-van der Pol equation. Predictions are compared with an unheated Mach 0.95 jet produced by a nozzle with an exit diameter of 0.3302 meters. Microphones are placed at various heights and distances from the nozzle exit in the peak jet noise direction above an acoustically hard and an asphalt surface. The predictions are shown to accurately capture jet noise ground effects that are characterized by constructive and destructive interference patterns in the mid- and far-field and capture overall trends in the near-field.

  6. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on auditory function following acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Ou, Yongkang; Xu, Yaodong; Pang, Jiaqi; Lai, Lan; Zheng, Yiqing

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is one form of non-invasive brain stimulation and increasingly shows neuroprotection in multiple neurological disorders. However, the potential of rTMS for protective action on auditory function following acoustic trauma has not been investigated. Here, we examined effect of TMS on hearing conservation, neurons survival and brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) expression in the cochlea and auditory cortex following acoustic trauma in rats. Wistar rats were exposed to intense pure tone noise (10 kHz, 120 dB SPL for 2 h) followed by rTMS treatment or sham treatment (handling control) daily for 14 days. Auditory brainstem response revealed there was no significant difference in hearing threshold shifts between rTMS- and sham-treated rats, although rTMS-treated rats showed less neuron loss in the auditory cortex in comparison with sham rats. Additionally, acoustic trauma increased BDNF expression in the cochlea and auditory cortex, and this elevation could be attenuated by rTMS treatment. Our results suggest present regiment of rTMS does not protect hearing against acoustic trauma, but maybe have implications for tinnitus treatment. PMID:27230393

  7. Enhancements to the SSME transfer function modeling code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, R. Dennis; Mitchell, Jerrel R.; Bartholomew, David L.; Glenn, Russell D.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the results of a one year effort by Ohio University to apply the transfer function modeling and analysis tools developed under NASA Grant NAG8-167 (Irwin, 1992), (Bartholomew, 1992) to attempt the generation of Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Turbopump transfer functions from time domain data. In addition, new enhancements to the transfer function modeling codes which enhance the code functionality are presented, along with some ideas for improved modeling methods and future work. Section 2 contains a review of the analytical background used to generate transfer functions with the SSME transfer function modeling software. Section 2.1 presents the 'ratio method' developed for obtaining models of systems that are subject to single unmeasured excitation sources and have two or more measured output signals. Since most of the models developed during the investigation use the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) for model generation, Section 2.2 presents an introduction of ERA, and Section 2.3 describes how it can be used to model spectral quantities. Section 2.4 details the Residue Identification Algorithm (RID) including the use of Constrained Least Squares (CLS) and Total Least Squares (TLS). Most of this information can be found in the report (and is repeated for convenience). Section 3 chronicles the effort of applying the SSME transfer function modeling codes to the a51p394.dat and a51p1294.dat time data files to generate transfer functions from the unmeasured input to the 129.4 degree sensor output. Included are transfer function modeling attempts using five methods. The first method is a direct application of the SSME codes to the data files and the second method uses the underlying trends in the spectral density estimates to form transfer function models with less clustering of poles and zeros than the models obtained by the direct method. In the third approach, the time data is low pass filtered prior to the modeling process in an

  8. Acoustic waves from mechanical impulses due to fluorescence resonant energy (Förster) transfer: Blowing a whistle with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurita-Sánchez, J. R.; Henkel, C.

    2012-02-01

    We present a momentum transfer mechanism mediated by electromagnetic fields that originates in a system of two nearby molecules: one excited (donor D*) and the other in ground state (acceptor A). An intermolecular force related to fluorescence resonant energy or Förster transfer (FRET) arises in the unstable D*A molecular system, which differs from the equilibrium van der Waals interaction. Due to the its finite lifetime, a mechanical impulse is imparted to the relative motion in the system. We analyze the FRET impulse when the molecules are embedded in free space and find that its magnitude can be much greater than the single recoil photon momentum, getting comparable with the thermal momentum (Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution) at room temperature. In addition, we propose that this FRET impulse can be exploited in the generation of acoustic waves inside a film containing layers of donor and acceptor molecules, when a picosecond laser pulse excites the donors. This acoustic transient is distinguishable from that produced by thermal stress due to laser absorption, and may therefore play a role in photoacoustic spectroscopy. The effect can be seen as exciting a vibrating system like a string or organ pipe with light; it may be used as an opto-mechanical transducer.

  9. Förster-Induced Energy Transfer in Functionalized Graphene.

    PubMed

    Malic, Ermin; Appel, Heiko; Hofmann, Oliver T; Rubio, Angel

    2014-05-01

    Carbon nanostructures are ideal substrates for functionalization with molecules since they consist of a single atomic layer giving rise to an extraordinary sensitivity to changes in their surrounding. The functionalization opens a new research field of hybrid nanostructures with tailored properties. Here, we present a microscopic view on the substrate-molecule interaction in the exemplary hybrid material consisting of graphene functionalized with perylene molecules. First experiments on similar systems have been recently realized illustrating an extremely efficient transfer of excitation energy from adsorbed molecules to the carbon substrate, a process with a large application potential for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices and biomedical imaging and sensing. So far, there has been no microscopically founded explanation for the observed energy transfer. Based on first-principle calculations, we have explicitly investigated the different transfer mechanisms revealing the crucial importance of Förster coupling. Due to the efficient Coulomb interaction in graphene, we obtain strong Förster rates in the range of 1/fs. We investigate its dependence on the substrate-molecule distance R and describe the impact of the momentum transfer q for an efficient energy transfer. Furthermore, we find that the Dexter transfer mechanism is negligibly small due to the vanishing overlap between the involved strongly localized orbital functions. The gained insights are applicable to a variety of carbon-based hybrid nanostructures. PMID:24808936

  10. Förster-Induced Energy Transfer in Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures are ideal substrates for functionalization with molecules since they consist of a single atomic layer giving rise to an extraordinary sensitivity to changes in their surrounding. The functionalization opens a new research field of hybrid nanostructures with tailored properties. Here, we present a microscopic view on the substrate–molecule interaction in the exemplary hybrid material consisting of graphene functionalized with perylene molecules. First experiments on similar systems have been recently realized illustrating an extremely efficient transfer of excitation energy from adsorbed molecules to the carbon substrate, a process with a large application potential for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices and biomedical imaging and sensing. So far, there has been no microscopically founded explanation for the observed energy transfer. Based on first-principle calculations, we have explicitly investigated the different transfer mechanisms revealing the crucial importance of Förster coupling. Due to the efficient Coulomb interaction in graphene, we obtain strong Förster rates in the range of 1/fs. We investigate its dependence on the substrate–molecule distance R and describe the impact of the momentum transfer q for an efficient energy transfer. Furthermore, we find that the Dexter transfer mechanism is negligibly small due to the vanishing overlap between the involved strongly localized orbital functions. The gained insights are applicable to a variety of carbon-based hybrid nanostructures. PMID:24808936

  11. Autocorrelation method for measuring the transfer function of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, C. P.; van Driel, H. M.

    1980-03-01

    An unconventional autocorrelation method is described for measuring the transfer function of optical systems. The interference takes place between the scattered waves obtained from two laterally sheared correlated partial diffusers. The output of a detector responding only to an extremely narrowband of spatial frequencies is proportional to the autocorrelation of the system pupil function. An automatic display of the transfer function is obtained by continuously varying the shear between the diffusers. The theory and some experimental results of this simple and inexpensive device are presented. A study of various parameters affecting the performance of the instrument is also given.

  12. Transfer Functions Via Laplace- And Fourier-Borel Transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Can, Sumer; Unal, Aynur

    1991-01-01

    Approach to solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations involves transfer functions based on recently-introduced Laplace-Borel and Fourier-Borel transforms. Main theorem gives transform of response of nonlinear system as Cauchy product of transfer function and transform of input function of system, together with memory effects. Used to determine responses of electrical circuits containing variable inductances or resistances. Also possibility of doing all noncommutative algebra on computers in such symbolic programming languages as Macsyma, Reduce, PL1, or Lisp. Process of solution organized and possibly simplified by algebraic manipulations reducing integrals in solutions to known or tabulated forms.

  13. Optical transfer function of NTS-1 retroreflector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    An optical transfer function was computed for the retroreflector array carried by the NTS-1 satellite. Range corrections are presented for extrapolating laser range measurements to the center of mass of the satellite. The gain function of the array was computed for use in estimating laser-echo signal strengths.

  14. Applications of dispersion relations to the geomagnetic transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuello, A.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.

    2005-05-01

    The geomagnetic transfer function is nowadays used to constrain the magnetotelluric inversion procedure given that this function contains complementary information to the impedance tensor. For the models usually employed by inversions, the real and imaginary parts of the geomagnetic transfer function are related by dispersion relations. The computation of the dispersion relations involves the Hilbert transform, and here we discuss different expressions to compute them. This computation was verified using synthetically generated geomagnetic transfer function from 2D and 3D models. The dispersion relations were applied on two cases: (a) to study the consistency between the real and imaginary parts of field recorded data, and (b) to develop a procedure to complete or extend the amount of measured data.

  15. Prediction of acoustic radiation from functionally graded shells of revolution in light and heavy fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yegao; Meng, Guang

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical method for the vibro-acoustic analysis of a functionally graded shell of revolution immersed in an infinite light or heavy fluid. The structural model of the shell is formulated on the basis of a modified variational method combined with a multi-segment technique, whereas a spectral Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation is employed to model the exterior fluid field. The material properties of the shell are estimated by using the Voigt's rule of mixture and the Mori-Tanaka's homogenization scheme. Displacement and sound pressure variables of each segment are expanded in the form of a mixed series using Fourier series and Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials. A set of collocation nodes distributed over the roots of Chebyshev polynomials are employed to establish the algebraic system of the acoustic integral equations, and the non-uniqueness solution is eliminated using a combined Helmholtz integral equation formulation. Loosely and strongly coupled schemes are implemented for the structure-acoustic interaction problem of a functionally graded shell immersed in a light and heavy fluid, respectively. The present method provides a flexible way to account for the individual contributions of circumferential wave modes to the vibration and acoustic responses of functionally graded shells of revolution in an analytical manner. Numerical tests are presented for sound radiation problems of spherical, cylindrical, conical and coupled shells. The individual contributions of the circumferential modes to the radiated sound pressure and sound power of functionally graded shells are observed. Effects of the material profile on the sound radiation of the shells are also investigated.

  16. Perfect function transfer and interference effects in interacting boson lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Lianao; Miranowicz, Adam; Wang Xiangbin; Liu Yuxi; Nori, Franco

    2009-07-15

    We show how to perfectly transfer, without state initialization and remote collaboration, arbitrary functions in interacting boson lattices. We describe a possible implementation of state transfer through bosonic atoms trapped in optical lattices or polaritons in on-chip coupled cavities. Significantly, a family of Hamiltonians, both linear and nonlinear, is found which are related to the Bose-Hubbard model and that enable the perfect transfer of arbitrary functions. It is shown that the state transfer between two sites in two-dimensional lattices can result in quantum interference due to the different numbers of intermediate sites in different paths. The signature factor in nuclear physics can be useful to characterize this quantum interference.

  17. Modality interactions alter the shape of acoustic mate preference functions in gray treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Höbel, Gerlinde

    2015-09-01

    Sexual selection takes place in complex environments where females evaluating male mating signals are confronted with stimuli from multiple sources and modalities. The pattern of expression of female preferences may be influenced by interactions between modalities, changing the shape of female preference functions, and thus ultimately altering the selective landscape acting on male signal evolution. We tested the hypothesis that the responses of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, to acoustic male advertisement calls are affected by interactions with visual stimuli. We measured preference functions for several call traits under two experimental conditions: unimodal (only acoustic signals presented), and multimodal (acoustic signals presented along with a video-animated calling male). We found that females were more responsive to multimodal stimulus presentations and, compared to unimodal playbacks, had weaker preferences for temporal call characteristics. We compared the preference functions obtained in these two treatments to the distribution of male call characteristics to make inferences on the strength and direction of selection expected to act on male calls. Modality interactions have the potential to influence the course of signal evolution and thus are an important consideration in sexual selection studies. PMID:26282702

  18. Modulation transfer function of QWIP and superlattice focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Liu, J. K.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Keo, S. A.; Mumolo, J. M.; Nguyen, J.

    2013-07-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this paper we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of a 1024 × 1024 pixel multi-band quantum well infrared photodetector and 320 × 256 pixel long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays.

  19. Optical transfer function optimization based on linear expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiegerling, Jim

    2015-09-01

    The Optical Transfer Function (OTF) and its modulus the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) are metrics of optical system performance. However in system optimization, calculation times for the OTF are often substantially longer than more traditional optimization targets such as wavefront error or transverse ray error. The OTF is typically calculated as either the autocorrelation of the complex pupil function or as the Fourier transform of the Point Spread Function. We recently demonstrated that the on-axis OTF can be represented as a linear combination of analytical functions where the weighting terms are directly related to the wavefront error coefficients and apodization of the complex pupil function. Here, we extend this technique to the off-axis case. The expansion technique offers a potential for accelerating OTF optimization in lens design, as well as insight into the interaction of aberrations with components of the OTF.

  20. H2 -norm of fractional transfer functions of implicit type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malti, Rachid; Chevrié, Mathieu; Farges, Christophe; Sabatier, Jocelyn

    2015-09-01

    This paper studies the H2 -norm (or impulse response energy) of fractional transfer functions of implicit type. Stability conditions are first shown to be identical as in rational systems with all poles located in the open left half complex plane. Then, analytical expressions of the H2 -norm are derived for elementary fractional transfer functions of the first and the second kind cascaded with a pure fractional integrator. Next, general boundedness conditions are established in terms of transfer function relative degree. Three illustrative examples are finally proposed. The first one evaluates the quality of a rational approximation of a fractional model of implicit type on the basis of the H2 -norm of the error signal. The second one evaluates the Integral Squared Error of a CRONE control loop and compares it to a classical proportional-derivative controller in a vehicle suspension. Finally, the third one allows to set up an implicit fractional preshaping filter for closed-loop control.

  1. The dynamic transfer function for a cavitating inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.; Acosta, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Knowledge of the dynamic performance of pumps is essential for the prediction of transient behavior and instabilities in hydraulic systems; the necessary information is in the form of a transfer function which relates the instantaneous or fluctuating pressure and mass flow rate at inlet to the same quantities in the discharge from the pump. The presence of cavitation within the pump can have a major effect on this transfer function since dynamical changes in the volume of cavitation contribute to the difference in the instantaneous inlet and discharge mass flow rates. The present paper utilizes results from free streamline cascade theory to evaluate the elements in the transfer function for a cavitating inducer and shows that the numerical results are consistent with the characteristics observed in some dynamic tests on rocket engine turbopumps.

  2. Dust-ion-acoustic solitons in plasmas with non-Maxwellian electron distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Pajouh, H. Hakimi; Abbasi, H.

    2008-10-15

    Stationary dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) solitons in plasma with non-Maxwellian electron distribution function (DF) are studied. This is an important issue in low-pressure electrical gas discharges that the particle DF is generally non-Maxwellian. In the discharge plasmas, the electron temperature is usually much greater than the ion temperature. Thus, neglecting the ions velocity distribution, the electron DF is modeled by the generalized Lorentzian ({kappa})-DF. The formalism is derived near the ion-plasma frequency. In this range of frequency, the ion dynamics is considerable and the dust-ion-acoustic solitons are the stationary solution of the governing equations. Electron trapping is included in the model as the result of nonlinear resonant interaction of the DIA soliton with electrons. The solitons attributes and influence of the non-Maxwellian electrons are studied.

  3. Assessing the Transfer Function: Tracking Down Transfer Students at Frederick Community College. A Report of the Transfer Tracking System and the Successful Transfer Survey, 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, James M.

    During the 1990-91 academic year, Frederick Community College (FCC) in Maryland conducted a major research project to help determine the extent and effectiveness of the college's transfer function. In the study's first phase, a Transfer Tracking System (TTS) was developed by conducting a detailed audit of all transcript requests from FCC students.…

  4. Directional Hearing and Head-Related Transfer Function in Odontocete Cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Krysl, Petr; Cranford, Ted W

    2016-01-01

    The head-related transfer function (HRTF) is an important descriptor of spatial sound field reception by the listener. In this study, we computed the HRTF of the common dolphin Delphinus delphis. The received sound pressure level at various locations within the acoustic fats of the internal pinna near the surface of the tympanoperiotic complex (TPC) was calculated for planar incident waves directed toward the animal. The relative amplitude of the received pressure versus the incident pressure was the representation of the HRTF from the point of view of the animal. It is of interest that (1) different locations on the surface of the TPC resulted in different HRTFs, (2) the HRTFs for the left and right ears were slightly asymmetric, and (3) the locations of the peaks of the HRTF depended on the frequency of the incident wave. PMID:26611007

  5. A hybrid algorithm for selecting head-related transfer function based on similarity of anthropometric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shu-Guang; Gao, Li-Ping

    2010-09-01

    As the basic data for virtual auditory technology, head-related transfer function (HRTF) has many applications in the areas of room acoustic modeling, spatial hearing and multimedia. How to individualize HRTF fast and effectively has become an opening problem at present. Based on the similarity and relativity of anthropometric structures, a hybrid HRTF customization algorithm, which has combined the method of principal component analysis (PCA), multiple linear regression (MLR) and database matching (DM), has been presented in this paper. The HRTFs selected by both the best match and the worst match have been applied into obtaining binaurally auralized sounds, which are then used for subjective listening experiments and the results are compared. For the area in the horizontal plane, the localization results have shown that the selection of HRTFs can enhance the localization accuracy and can also abate the problem of front-back confusion.

  6. Horizontal functional gene transfer from bacteria to fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Li, Tong; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Jia, Ling-Yi; Liu, Li; Zhang, Peng; Murphy, Robert W.; He, Shun-Min; Huang, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Invertebrates can acquire functional genes via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria but fishes are not known to do so. We provide the first reliable evidence of one HGT event from marine bacteria to fishes. The HGT appears to have occurred after emergence of the teleosts. The transferred gene is expressed and regulated developmentally. Its successful integration and expression may change the genetic and metabolic repertoire of fishes. In addition, this gene contains conserved domains and similar tertiary structures in fishes and their putative donor bacteria. Thus, it may function similarly in both groups. Evolutionary analyses indicate that it evolved under purifying selection, further indicating its conserved function. We document the first likely case of HGT of functional gene from prokaryote to fishes. This discovery certifies that HGT can influence vertebrate evolution. PMID:26691285

  7. Track/train dynamics test procedure transfer function test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A transfer function vibration test was made on an 80 ton open hopper freight car in an effort to obtain validation data on the car's nonlinear elastic model. Test configuration, handling, test facilities, test operations, and data acquisition/reduction activities necessary to meet the conditions of test requirements are given.

  8. Modulation transfer function measurement using spatial noise targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, Glenn D.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the measurement of modulation transfer function (MTF) by means of spatially random, noise-like targets. We begin our discussion with the concept of shift- invariance and the measurement of MTF in pixelated systems. We then proceed to the methods for generation of these noise targets, using both laser speckle and transparency-based techniques.

  9. Human transfer functions used to predict system performance parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Automatic, parameter-tracking, model-matching technique compares the responses of a human operator with those of an analog computer model of a human operator to predict and analyze the performance of mechanical or electromechanical systems prior to construction. Transfer functions represent the input-output relation of an operator controlling a closed-loop system.

  10. Functional connectivity associated with acoustic stability during vowel production: implications for vocal-motor control.

    PubMed

    Sidtis, John J

    2015-03-01

    Vowels provide the acoustic foundation of communication through speech and song, but little is known about how the brain orchestrates their production. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during sustained production of the vowel /a/. Acoustic and blood flow data from 13, normal, right-handed, native speakers of American English were analyzed to identify CBF patterns that predicted the stability of the first and second formants of this vowel. Formants are bands of resonance frequencies that provide vowel identity and contribute to voice quality. The results indicated that formant stability was directly associated with blood flow increases and decreases in both left- and right-sided brain regions. Secondary brain regions (those associated with the regions predicting formant stability) were more likely to have an indirect negative relationship with first formant variability, but an indirect positive relationship with second formant variability. These results are not definitive maps of vowel production, but they do suggest that the level of motor control necessary to produce stable vowels is reflected in the complexity of an underlying neural system. These results also extend a systems approach to functional image analysis, previously applied to normal and ataxic speech rate that is solely based on identifying patterns of brain activity associated with specific performance measures. Understanding the complex relationships between multiple brain regions and the acoustic characteristics of vocal stability may provide insight into the pathophysiology of the dysarthrias, vocal disorders, and other speech changes in neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25295385

  11. Estimating Surficial Seafloor Sediment Mud Fraction Using Empirical Orthogonal Functions of Acoustic Backscatter Waveform Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberston, J.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor classification and environmental assessment in shallow marine waters are crucial to habitat mapping, coastal management policies and maintaining navigational waterways. Unfortunately, many current assessment techniques using remote acoustic methods have had limited success in shallow waters, often leading to sparse quantifiable data to support marine policy decisions. This problem is exacerbated by the highly variable bottom composition of typical coastal and estuarine environments. In this work, field observations from an Odom Echotrac vertical-incidence echosounder with a dual-frequency (24 and 200 khz) transducer were used to estimate seafloor sediment characteristics in regions with variable bottom types. Observations were obtained in water depths ranging 0.5-24 m of the Little Bay, NH, during February and March, 2013. Comparison between backscatter waveform properties and sediment grain size distributions show varied degrees of predictive capability. In an effort to better capture the collective effects of seafloor sediment's composition on acoustic returns, empirical orthogonal functions (EOF's) were computed from waveform properties and compared with observed mud-sand fractions and bulk density measurements. Results from this analysis will be presented and discussed. This empirical analysis provides an objective means to interpret acoustic backscatter, an important step towards a widespread quantitative assessment of shallow water seafloor sediments. This work was supported by NOAA, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, and ONR.

  12. An experimental study using flow visualization on the effect of an acoustic field on heat transfer from spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. W.; Baroth, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for the heat transfer process in a thermal-acoustic field were investigated using the technique of holographic interferometry for flow visualization. Experimental results were obtained with sound pressure levels in the range of 120 to 150 decibels, relative to a pressure of 0.0002 dynes/sq cm. Steady state laminar flow was observed when the vibrational Reynolds number was below 400; separated flow was observed when it was above 400. In the presence of a horizontal sound field, the data indicate that the relation between the vibrational Nusselt number, Nu(v) and the vibrational Reynolds number, Re(v) is given by Nu(v) = Re(v) exp 0.22. In the presence of a vertical sound field, the corresponding relation is Nu(v) = Re(v) exp 0.15.

  13. Rational function representation of flap noise spectra including correction for reflection effects. [acoustic properties of engine exhaust jets deflected for externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    A rational function is presented for the acoustic spectra generated by deflection of engine exhaust jets for under-the-wing and over-the-wing versions of externally blown flaps. The functional representation is intended to provide a means for compact storage of data and for data analysis. The expressions are based on Fourier transform functions for the Strouhal normalized pressure spectral density, and on a correction for reflection effects based on the N-independent-source model of P. Thomas extended by use of a reflected ray transfer function. Curve fit comparisons are presented for blown flap data taken from turbofan engine tests and from large scale cold-flow model tests. Application of the rational function to scrubbing noise theory is also indicated.

  14. Context transfer in reinforcement learning using action-value functions.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Amin; Nadjar Araabi, Babak; Nili Ahmadabadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the notion of context transfer in reinforcement learning tasks. Context transfer, as defined in this paper, implies knowledge transfer between source and target tasks that share the same environment dynamics and reward function but have different states or action spaces. In other words, the agents learn the same task while using different sensors and actuators. This requires the existence of an underlying common Markov decision process (MDP) to which all the agents' MDPs can be mapped. This is formulated in terms of the notion of MDP homomorphism. The learning framework is Q-learning. To transfer the knowledge between these tasks, the feature space is used as a translator and is expressed as a partial mapping between the state-action spaces of different tasks. The Q-values learned during the learning process of the source tasks are mapped to the sets of Q-values for the target task. These transferred Q-values are merged together and used to initialize the learning process of the target task. An interval-based approach is used to represent and merge the knowledge of the source tasks. Empirical results show that the transferred initialization can be beneficial to the learning process of the target task. PMID:25610457

  15. Influence of voxelization on finite difference time domain simulations of head-related transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Prepeliță, Sebastian; Geronazzo, Michele; Avanzini, Federico; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-05-01

    The scattering around the human pinna that is captured by the Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) is a complex problem that creates uncertainties in both acoustical measurements and simulations. Within the simulation framework of Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) with axis-aligned staircase boundaries resulting from a voxelization process, the voxelization-based uncertainty propagating in the HRTF-captured sound field is quantified for one solid and two surface voxelization algorithms. Simulated results utilizing a laser-scanned mesh of Knowles Electronics Manikin for Acoustic Research (KEMAR) show that in the context of complex geometries with local topology comparable to grid spacing such as the human pinna, the voxelization-related uncertainties in simulations emerge at lower frequencies than the generally used accuracy bandwidths. Numerical simulations show that the voxelization process induces both random error and algorithm-dependent bias in the simulated HRTF spectral features. Frequencies fr below which the random error is bounded by various dB thresholds are estimated and predicted. Particular shortcomings of the used voxelization algorithms are identified and the influence of the surface impedance on the induced errors is studied. Simulations are also validated against measurements. PMID:27250145

  16. Photoacoustic tomography based on the Green's function retrieval with ultrasound interferometry for sample partially behind an acoustically scattering layer

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jie; Tao, Chao Cai, Peng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-08

    Acoustically inhomogeneous mediums with multiple scattering are often the nightmare of photoacoustic tomography. In order to break this limitation, a photoacoustic tomography scheme combining ultrasound interferometry and time reversal is proposed to achieve images in acoustically scattering medium. An ultrasound interferometry is developed to determine the unknown Green's function of strong scattering tissue. Using the determined Greens' function, a time-reversal process is carried out to restore images behind an acoustically inhomogeneous layer from the scattering photoacoustic signals. This method effectively decreases the false contrast, noise, and position deviation of images induced by the multiple scattering. Phantom experiment is carried out to validate the method. Therefore, the proposed method could have potential value in extending the biomedical applications of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  17. Usage Autocorrelation Function in the Capacity of Indicator Shape of the Signal in Acoustic Emission Testing of Intricate Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, Artem

    2016-01-01

    The article contains information about acoustic emission signals analysing using autocorrelation function. Operation factors were analysed, such as shape of signal, the origins time and carrier frequency. The purpose of work is estimating the validity of correlations methods analysing signals. Acoustic emission signal consist of different types of waves, which propagate on different trajectories in object of control. Acoustic emission signal is amplitude-, phase- and frequency-modeling signal. It was described by carrier frequency at a given point of time. Period of signal make up 12.5 microseconds and carrier frequency make up 80 kHz for analysing signal. Usage autocorrelation function like indicator the origin time of acoustic emission signal raises validity localization of emitters.

  18. A simple transfer function for nonlinear dendritic integration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Matthew F.; Zald, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Relatively recent advances in patch clamp recordings and iontophoresis have enabled unprecedented study of neuronal post-synaptic integration (“dendritic integration”). Findings support a separate layer of integration in the dendritic branches before potentials reach the cell's soma. While integration between branches obeys previous linear assumptions, proximal inputs within a branch produce threshold nonlinearity, which some authors have likened to the sigmoid function. Here we show the implausibility of a sigmoidal relation and present a more realistic transfer function in both an elegant artificial form and a biophysically derived form that further considers input locations along the dendritic arbor. As the distance between input locations determines their ability to produce nonlinear interactions, models incorporating dendritic topology are essential to understanding the computational power afforded by these early stages of integration. We use the biophysical transfer function to emulate empirical data using biophysical parameters and describe the conditions under which the artificial and biophysically derived forms are equivalent. PMID:26321940

  19. Instrument transfer function of slope measuring deflectometry systems.

    PubMed

    Su, Tianquan; Maldonado, Alejandro; Su, Peng; Burge, James H

    2015-04-01

    Slope measuring deflectometry (SMD) systems are developing rapidly in testing freeform optics. They measure the surface slope using a camera and an incoherent source. The principle of the test is mainly discussed in geometric optic domain. The system response as a function of spatial frequency or instrument transfer function (ITF) has yet to be studied thoroughly. Through mathematical modeling, simulation, and experiment we show that the ITF of an SMD system is very close to the modulation transfer function of the camera used. Furthermore, the ITF can be enhanced using a deconvolution filter. This study will lead to more accurate measurements in SMD and will show the physical optics nature of these tests. PMID:25967213

  20. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject. PMID:26520354

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

  2. Transfer function analysis of dynamic cerebral autoregulation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Giller, C. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that spontaneous changes in cerebral blood flow are primarily induced by changes in arterial pressure and that cerebral autoregulation is a frequency-dependent phenomenon, we measured mean arterial pressure in the finger and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) during supine rest and acute hypotension induced by thigh cuff deflation in 10 healthy subjects. Transfer function gain, phase, and coherence function between changes in arterial pressure and VMCA were estimated using the Welch method. The impulse response function, calculated as the inverse Fourier transform of this transfer function, enabled the calculation of transient changes in VMCA during acute hypotension, which was compared with the directly measured change in VMCA during thigh cuff deflation. Beat-to-beat changes in VMCA occurred simultaneously with changes in arterial pressure, and the autospectrum of VMCA showed characteristics similar to arterial pressure. Transfer gain increased substantially with increasing frequency from 0.07 to 0.20 Hz in association with a gradual decrease in phase. The coherence function was > 0.5 in the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz and < 0.5 at < 0.07 Hz. Furthermore, the predicted change in VMCA was similar to the measured VMCA during thigh cuff deflation. These data suggest that spontaneous changes in VMCA that occur at the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz are related strongly to changes in arterial pressure and, furthermore, that short-term regulation of cerebral blood flow in response to changes in arterial pressure can be modeled by a transfer function with the quality of a high-pass filter in the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz.

  3. Comparison of geometrical and diffraction optical transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Virendra N.; Díaz, José Antonio

    2015-09-01

    The geometrical and diffraction point-spread functions of an optical imaging system have been reviewed and compared in the past [V. N. Mahajan, "Comparison of geometrical and diffraction point-spread functions," SPIE Proc. 3729, 434-445 (1999)]. In this paper, we review and compare its corresponding optical transfer functions. While the truth lies with the diffraction OTF, it is considered easier and quicker to calculate the geometrical OTF, especially for large aberrations. We briefly describe the theory of the two OTFs, and explore the range of spatial frequencies and the magnitude of the primary aberrations over which the geometrical OTF may provide a reasonable approximation of the diffraction OTF.

  4. Phase transfer and freezing processes investigated on acoustically levitated aqueous droplets.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Stockhaus, A; Hergenröder, R; Klockow, D

    2001-11-01

    An acoustic trap was designed and constructed to investigate, on a microscale, physicochemical processes relevant to the troposphere, mainly focusing on the temperature range below 0 degrees C. Droplets ranging from 0.5 nL to 4 microliter (0.1 to 2 mm in diameter) were introduced into the cooled reaction chamber by means of a piezo-driven micro pump with a reproducibility better than 5%. Up-take of H2O2 from the gas phase by the levitated droplet was measured and calibrated by in-situ chemiluminescence. Freezing of stably positioned droplets was observed and documented by means of a microscope and a video camera; this demonstrated the usefulness of the technique for simulation and investigation of cloud processes. Ex-situ microanalysis of sub-microliter droplets by use of a fiber optic luminometer was also shown to be a suitable means of investigating relevant physicochemical processes on a micro scale. PMID:11768458

  5. On the role of covarying functions in stimulus class formation and transfer of function.

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Rebecca G; Markham, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    This experiment investigated whether directly trained covarying functions are necessary for stimulus class formation and transfer of function in humans. Initial class training was designed to establish two respondent-based stimulus classes by pairing two visual stimuli with shock and two other visual stimuli with no shock. Next, two operant discrimination functions were trained to one stimulus of each putative class. The no-shock group received the same training and testing in all phases, except no stimuli were ever paired with shock. The data indicated that skin conductance response conditioning did not occur for the shock groups or for the no-shock group. Tests showed transfer of the established discriminative functions, however, only for the shock groups, indicating the formation of two stimulus classes only for those participants who received respondent class training. The results suggest that transfer of function does not depend on first covarying the stimulus class functions. PMID:12507017

  6. Filtering Non-Linear Transfer Functions on Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Eric; Nowrouzezahrai, Derek; Poulin, Pierre; Neyret, Fabrice

    2014-07-01

    Applying non-linear transfer functions and look-up tables to procedural functions (such as noise), surface attributes, or even surface geometry are common strategies used to enhance visual detail. Their simplicity and ability to mimic a wide range of realistic appearances have led to their adoption in many rendering problems. As with any textured or geometric detail, proper filtering is needed to reduce aliasing when viewed across a range of distances, but accurate and efficient transfer function filtering remains an open problem for several reasons: transfer functions are complex and non-linear, especially when mapped through procedural noise and/or geometry-dependent functions, and the effects of perspective and masking further complicate the filtering over a pixel's footprint. We accurately solve this problem by computing and sampling from specialized filtering distributions on the fly, yielding very fast performance. We investigate the case where the transfer function to filter is a color map applied to (macroscale) surface textures (like noise), as well as color maps applied according to (microscale) geometric details. We introduce a novel representation of a (potentially modulated) color map's distribution over pixel footprints using Gaussian statistics and, in the more complex case of high-resolution color mapped microsurface details, our filtering is view- and light-dependent, and capable of correctly handling masking and occlusion effects. Our approach can be generalized to filter other physical-based rendering quantities. We propose an application to shading with irradiance environment maps over large terrains. Our framework is also compatible with the case of transfer functions used to warp surface geometry, as long as the transformations can be represented with Gaussian statistics, leading to proper view- and light-dependent filtering results. Our results match ground truth and our solution is well suited to real-time applications, requires only a few

  7. Measurement of the modulation transfer function of infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzannes, Alexis P.; Mooney, Jonathan M.

    1995-06-01

    The performance of starting PtSi infrared cameras is characterized based on estimating their spatial frequency response. Applying a modified knife-edge technique, we arrive at an estimate of the edge spread function (ESF), which is used to obtain a profile through the center of the 2-D modulation transfer function (MTF). Using this technique, the complete system MTF in the horizontal and vertical direction is measured for various imaging systems. The influence of charge transfer efficiency (CTE) on the knife-edge measurement and resulting MTF is also modeled and discussed. An estimate of the CTE can actually be obtained from the shape of the ESF in the horizontal direction. In addition, we demonstrate that this technique can be used as a filed measurement. By applying the technique at long range, the MTF of the atmosphere can be measured.

  8. Structural model updating using incomplete transfer function of strain data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, A.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper a model updating algorithm is presented to estimate structural parameters at the element level utilizing frequency domain representation of the strain data. Sensitivity equations for mass and stiffness parameters estimation are derived using decomposed form of the strain-based transfer functions. The rate of changes of eigenvectors and a subset of measured natural frequencies are used to assemble the sensitivity equation of the strain-based transfer function. Solution of the derived sensitivity equations through the least square method resulted in a robust parameters estimation method. Numerical examples using simulated noise polluted data of 2D truss and frame models confirm that the proposed method is able to successfully update structural models even in the presence of mass modeling errors.

  9. Characterization of the modulation transfer function of discrete filtered backprojection.

    PubMed

    Glick, S J; King, M A; Penney, B C

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical expression for the modulation transfer function (MTF) of image reconstruction by discrete filtered backprojection (DFBP) is derived. A simulation study is used to investigate the dependence of the MTF of DFBP on: (1) the number of projection views; (2) the type of ramp filter used; (3) the interpolation method used during backprojection; and (4) the position of the object. These results were compared to MTFs calculated from point-source single-photon-emission computed tomographic (SPECT) acquisitions in air. The experimentally obtained MTFs contained much of the same structure as the MTFs of DFBP obtained through simulation. It is shown that the discretization of the filtered backprojection process can cause the tomographic transfer function to be anisotropic and nonstationary. However, through proper selection of the methods used in reconstruction, a nearly isotropic and stationary MTF can be obtained. PMID:18230518

  10. Properties of Zero-Free Transfer Function Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D. O. Anderson, Brian; Deistler, Manfred

    Transfer functions of linear, time-invariant finite-dimensional systems with more outputs than inputs, as arise in factor analysis (for example in econometrics), have, for state-variable descriptions with generic entries in the relevant matrices, no finite zeros. This paper gives a number of characterizations of such systems (and indeed square discrete-time systems with no zeros), using state-variable, impulse response, and matrix-fraction descriptions. Key properties include the ability to recover the input values at any time from a bounded interval of output values, without any knowledge of an initial state, and an ability to verify the no-zero property in terms of a property of the impulse response coefficient matrices. Results are particularized to cases where the transfer function matrix in question may or may not have a zero at infinity or a zero at zero.

  11. Variation analysis of transcriptome changes reveals cochlear genes and their associated functions in cochlear susceptibility to acoustic overstimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhi; Cai, Qunfeng; Bard, Jonathan; Jamison, Jennifer; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Weiping; Hu, Bo Hua

    2015-12-01

    Individual variation in the susceptibility of the auditory system to acoustic overstimulation has been well-documented at both the functional and structural levels. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this variation is unclear. The current investigation was designed to examine the variation patterns of cochlear gene expression using RNA-seq data and to identify the genes with expression variation that increased following acoustic trauma. This study revealed that the constitutive expressions of cochlear genes displayed diverse levels of gene-specific variation. These variation patterns were altered by acoustic trauma; approximately one-third of the examined genes displayed marked increases in their expression variation. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that the genes that exhibited increased variation were functionally related to cell death, biomolecule metabolism, and membrane function. In contrast, the stable genes were primarily related to basic cellular processes, including protein and macromolecular syntheses and transport. There was no functional overlap between the stable and variable genes. Importantly, we demonstrated that glutamate metabolism is related to the variation in the functional response of the cochlea to acoustic overstimulation. Taken together, the results indicate that our analyses of the individual variations in transcriptome changes of cochlear genes provide important information for the identification of genes that potentially contribute to the generation of individual variation in cochlear responses to acoustic overstimulation. PMID:26024952

  12. Root finding in the complex plane for seismo-acoustic propagation scenarios with Green's function solutions.

    PubMed

    McCollom, Brittany A; Collis, Jon M

    2014-09-01

    A normal mode solution to the ocean acoustic problem of the Pekeris waveguide with an elastic bottom using a Green's function formulation for a compressional wave point source is considered. Analytic solutions to these types of waveguide propagation problems are strongly dependent on the eigenvalues of the problem; these eigenvalues represent horizontal wavenumbers, corresponding to propagating modes of energy. The eigenvalues arise as singularities in the inverse Hankel transform integral and are specified by roots to a characteristic equation. These roots manifest themselves as poles in the inverse transform integral and can be both subtle and difficult to determine. Following methods previously developed [S. Ivansson et al., J. Sound Vib. 161 (1993)], a root finding routine has been implemented using the argument principle. Using the roots to the characteristic equation in the Green's function formulation, full-field solutions are calculated for scenarios where an acoustic source lies in either the water column or elastic half space. Solutions are benchmarked against laboratory data and existing numerical solutions. PMID:25190379

  13. Return of lymphatic function after flap transfer for acute lymphedema.

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, S A; Van den Abbeele, A D; Losken, A; Swartz, M A; Jain, R K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goals of this work were to develop animal models of lymphedema and tissue flap transfer, and to observe physiologic changes in lymphatic function that occur in these models over time, both systemically with lymphoscintigraphy (LS) and locally using fluorescence microlymphangiography (FM). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although lymphedema has been managed by a combination of medical and surgical approaches, no effective long-term cure exists. Surgical attempts aimed at reconnecting impaired lymphatic channels or bypassing obstructed areas have failed. METHODS: The tails of rats (A groups) and mice (B groups) were used because of their different features. Lymphedema was created by ligation of the lymphatics at the tail base and quantified by diameter measurements there. In the experimental group, rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was transferred across the ligation. In addition to the ligation (A1 and B1) and ligation + flap (A2 and B2) groups, three control groups were included: sham flap with ligation (B4), sham flap alone (B5), and normal (A3 and B3) animals. Observations were made at weekly time points for lymphatic function and continuity. RESULTS: Lymphedema was successfully created in the mouse ligation groups (B1 and B4) and sustained for the entire length of observation (up to 14 weeks). Lymphatic continuity was restored in those animals with transferred flaps across the ligation site (A2 and B2), as seen both by LS and FM. Sham flaps did not visibly affect lymphatic function nor did they cause any visible swelling in the tail. CONCLUSIONS: Acute lymphedema developing after ligation of tail lymphatics in mice can be prevented by myocutaneous flap transfer. Restored lymphatic continuity and function were demonstrable using lymphoscintigraphy and fluorescence microlymphangiography. Images Figure 2. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:10077056

  14. A Derived Transfer of Mood Functions through Equivalence Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Smeets, Paul M.; Luciano, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the transfer of induced happy and sad mood functions through equivalence relations. Sixteen subjects participated in a combined equivalence and mood induction procedure. In Phase 1, all subjects were trained in 2 conditional discriminations using a matching-to-sample format (i.e., A1-B1, A2-B2, A1-C1, A2-C2). In…

  15. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Christian; Klanner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode. The charge carriers in the sensor are produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for laser light of both wavelengths. The method has been applied successfully for the simulation of current transients of several different silicon pad diodes. It can also be applied for the analysis of transient-current measurements of radiation-damaged solid state sensors, as long as sensors properties, like high-frequency capacitance, are not too different.

  16. Photothermal transfer function of dielectric mirrors for precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Stefan W.

    2015-01-01

    The photothermal transfer function from absorbed power incident on a dielectric mirror to the effective mirror position is calculated using the coating design as input. The effect is found to change in amplitude and sign for frequencies corresponding to diffusion length comparable to the coating thickness. Transfer functions are calculated for the T i -doped Ta2O5:SiO2 coating used in Advanced LIGO and for a crystalline AlxGa1 -xAs coating. The shape of the transfer function at high frequencies is shown to be a sensitive indicator of the effective absorption depth, providing a potentially powerful tool to distinguish coating-internal absorption from surface contamination related absorption. The sign change of the photothermal effect could also be useful to stabilize radiation pressure-based optomechanical systems. High frequency corrections to the previously published thermo-optic noise estimates are also provided. Finally, estimating the quality of the thermo-optic noise cancellation occurring in fine-tuned AlxGa1 -xAs coatings requires the detailed heat flow analysis done in this paper.

  17. Boundary emphasis transfer function generation based on HSL color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Wu, Jianhuang; Luo, Shengzhou; Ma, Xin

    2011-10-01

    Direct volume rendering has been received much attention since it need not to extract geometric primitives for visualization and its performance is generally better than surface rendering. Transfer functions, which are used for mapping scalar field to optical properties, are of vital importance in obtaining a sensible rendering result from volume data. Though traditional color transfer functions are in RGB color space, HSL color space that conveys semantic meanings is more intuitive and user-friendly. In this paper, we present a novel approach aims to emphasize and distinguish strong boundaries between different materials. We achieve it by using data value, gradient magnitude and dimension of the volumetric data to set opacity. Then, through a linear map from data value, gradient magnitude and second derivative to hue, saturation and lightness respectively, a color transfer function is obtained in HSL color space. Experimental tests on real-world datasets indicate that our method could achieve desirable rendering results with revealing important boundaries between different structures and indicating data value's distribution in the volume by using different colors.

  18. Data formats for a library of Kerr metric transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Jonathan C.; Brenneman, Laura; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Keck, Mason; Risaliti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    As part of a project to model time-resolved X-ray obscuration in AGN, we have reimplemented and improved the Reynolds et al (1999, ApJ 514, 164) approach to calculating the transfer functions which give the redshift and projected orientation of an accretion disk element in the observer frame. We define a multi-extension FITS image array format which contains the computed transfer function for a given value of observation angle and black hole spin parameter. Each extension contains an image, in observer plane coordinates, of a different physical quantity: redshift, direction cosine, geodesic coordinates, etc. This allows us to build up a library of transfer function files for different observation angles, each with moderate (less than 200 Mbyte) storage requirements. Use of the FITS format allows us to record the associated model parameters and coordinate systems in a standard way and to visualize the results using standard analysis tools such as ds9. We illustrate preliminary spectral modelling results obtained using this approach.

  19. Transfer Function Identification of an Electro-Rheological Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookfield, D. J.; Dlodlo, Z. B.

    A fluid clutch utilising an Electro-Rheological (ER) suspension provides a controlled torque coupling between input and output through the control of the applied electric field. If the input is driven at constant speed the device can be considered as an ER torque actuator and thus be used to drive robot links or other mechanisms requiring precise positioning. Such an ER torque actuator can replace a DC servo-motor in robotic applications with the benefits of low time constant and smooth output torque unaffected by cogging (i.e. variation in torque of a DC motor as the magnetic reluctance of the armature-stator path changes with rotation). Although the ER actuator has many benefits, it suffers from a non-linear and time varying relationship between input voltage and output torque. These undesirable characteristics can be mitigated by providing a local closed loop controller around the system. The design of such a controller requires a knowledge of the relationship between the applied voltage and output torque; i.e. the transfer function of the actuator. This transfer function has been determined by observing the response of an ER torque actuator in the frequency domain. It is shown that a linear transfer function model reasonable represents the actuator behaviour, that the actuator is a stable second order system and that the time constant of the clutch studied is sufficiently short to hold considerable promise for robotic applications. Furthermore, the maximum torque capability is shown to be sufficient for many medium scale industrial robots.

  20. Resonant interaction of acoustic waves with subaqueous bedforms: Sand dunes in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Chang, Andrea Y Y; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The large subaqueous sand dunes in the South China Sea are expected to produce the coupling of energy between acoustic normal modes. In this letter, resonant interaction between acoustic propagating modes and subaqueous bedforms are numerically investigated as a function of bedform wavelength, acoustic frequency and bedform packet length. The results demonstrate that bedform wavelength impacts acoustic mode coupling behavior, with the principal transfer of energy occurring between acoustic modes whose eigenvalue difference is equal to the peak value in the bedform wavenumber spectrum. The observed effect of wavelength is greater than that of acoustic frequency and bedform packet length. PMID:26723360

  1. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for small-pixel detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchywka, Mike; Socker, Dennis G.

    1992-01-01

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement technique suitable for large-format, small-pixel detector characterization has been investigated. A volume interference grating is used as a test image instead of the bar or sine wave target images normally used. This technique permits a high-contrast, large-area, sinusoidal intensity distribution to illuminate the device being tested, avoiding the need to deconvolve raw data with imaging system characteristics. A high-confidence MTF result at spatial frequencies near 200 cycles/mm is obtained. We present results at several visible light wavelengths with a 6.8-micron-pixel CCD. Pixel response functions are derived from the MTF results.

  2. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network. PMID:27425612

  3. Density functional theory for protein transfer free energy.

    PubMed

    Mills, Eric A; Plotkin, Steven S

    2013-10-24

    We cast the problem of protein transfer free energy within the formalism of density functional theory (DFT), treating the protein as a source of external potential that acts upon the solvent. Solvent excluded volume, solvent-accessible surface area, and temperature dependence of the transfer free energy all emerge naturally within this formalism, and may be compared with simplified "back of the envelope" models, which are also developed here. Depletion contributions to osmolyte induced stability range from 5 to 10 kBT for typical protein lengths. The general DFT transfer theory developed here may be simplified to reproduce a Langmuir isotherm condensation mechanism on the protein surface in the limits of short-ranged interactions, and dilute solute. Extending the equation of state to higher solute densities results in non-monotonic behavior of the free energy driving protein or polymer collapse. Effective interaction potentials between protein backbone or side chains and TMAO are obtained, assuming a simple backbone/side chain two-bead model for the protein with an effective 6-12 potential with the osmolyte. The transfer free energy δg shows significant entropy: d(δg)/dT ≈ 20 kB for a 100-residue protein. The application of DFT to effective solvent forces for use in implicit-solvent molecular dynamics is also developed. The simplest DFT expressions for implicit-solvent forces contain both depletion interactions and an "impeded-solvation" repulsive force at larger distances. PMID:23944753

  4. Relating structure to function: Heschl’s Gyrus and acoustic processing

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Catherine; Wong, Patrick; Penhune, Virginia; Zatorre, Robert; Parrish, Todd; Abrams, Daniel; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The way in which normal variations in human neuroanatomy relate to brain function remains largely uninvestigated. This study addresses the question by relating anatomical measurements of Heschl’s gyrus (HG), the structure containing human primary auditory cortex, to how this region processes temporal and spectral acoustic information. In this study, subjects’ right and left HG were identified and manually indicated on anatomical MRI scans. Volumes of gray matter, white matter and total gyrus were recorded, and asymmetry indices were calculated. Additionally, cortical auditory activity in response to noise stimuli varying orthogonally in temporal and spectral dimensions was assessed and related to the volumetric measurements. A high degree of anatomical variability was seen, consistent with other reports in the literature. The auditory cortical responses showed the expected leftward lateralization to varying rates of stimulus change and rightward lateralization of increasing spectral information. However, the present data are the first to explicitly link anatomical variability of auditory cortex to individual differences in the way that cortex processes acoustic information. Specifically, larger volumes of left HG were associated with larger extents of rate-related cortex on the left, and larger volumes of right HG related to larger extents of spectral-related cortex on the right. This finding is discussed in relation to known microanatomical asymmetries of HG, including increased myelination of its fibers, and implications for language learning are considered. PMID:19129385

  5. Modulation transfer function technique for real time radioscopic system characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W. ); Brenizer, J.S. ); Mait, J.N. )

    1989-12-01

    At the University of Virginia neutron radiography facility, a modulation transfer function technique has been developed that can easily predict and compare the resolving characteristics of the real time system and the individual system components. We desired a simple method by which new system components could be analyzed to determine their image transfer characteristics and to estimate how they would affect the composite system during data acquisition. The method employed measures a small set of constant system parameters related to data collected across a cadmium cut-edge aperture. The effects of system noise and spatial variance on the measured data are reduced so that a representation of the true signal can be obtained for analysis. Resolution parameters for the total neutron radiography system and for the individual system components are reported.

  6. Modulation transfer function technique for real time radioscopic system characterization.

    PubMed

    Tobin, K W; Brenizer, J S; Mait, J N

    1989-12-01

    At the University of Virginia neutron radiography facility, a modulation transfer function technique has been developed that can easily predict and compare the resolving characteristics of the real time system and the individual system components. We desired a simple method by which new system components could be analyzed to determine their image transfer characteristics and to estimate how they would affect the composite system during data acquisition. The method employed measures a small set of constant system parameters related to data collected across a cadmium cut-edge aperture. The effects of system noise and spatial variance on the measured data are reduced so that a representation of the true signal can be obtained for analysis. Resolution parameters for the total neutron radiography system and for the individual system components are reported. PMID:20555991

  7. Prepulse Inhibition of the Acoustic Startle Reflex in High Functioning Autism

    PubMed Central

    Gruendler, Theo O. J.; Vogeley, Kai; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Kuhn, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background High functioning autism is an autism spectrum disorder that is characterized by deficits in social interaction and communication as well as repetitive and restrictive behavior while intelligence and general cognitive functioning are preserved. According to the weak central coherence account, individuals with autism tend to process information detail-focused at the expense of global form. This processing bias might be reflected by deficits in sensorimotor gating, a mechanism that prevents overstimulation during the transformation of sensory input into motor action. Prepulse inhibition is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating, which indicates an extensive attenuation of the startle reflex that occurs when a startling pulse is preceded by a weaker stimulus, the prepulse. Methods In the present study, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle was compared between 17 adults with high functioning autism and 17 sex-, age-, and intelligence-matched controls by means of electromyography. Results Results indicate that participants with high functioning autism exhibited significantly higher startle amplitudes than the control group. However, groups did not differ with regard to PPI or habituation of startle. Discussion These findings challenge the results of two previous studies that reported prepulse inhibition deficits in high-functioning autism and suggest that sensorimotor gating is only impaired in certain subgroups with autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24643088

  8. Mapped orthogonal functions method applied to acoustic waves-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, J. E.; Yu, J. G.; Ratolojanahary, F. E.; Elmaimouni, L.; Xu, W. J.; Gryba, T.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the modelling of acoustic wave-based devices of various geometries through a mapped orthogonal functions method. A specificity of the method, namely the automatic incorporation of boundary conditions into equations of motion through position-dependent physical constants, is presented in detail. Formulations are given for two classes of problems: (i) problems with guided mode propagation and (ii) problems with stationary waves. The method's interest is demonstrated by several examples, a seven-layered plate, a 2D rectangular resonator and a 3D cylindrical resonator, showing how it is easy to obtain either dispersion curves and field profiles for devices with guided mode propagation or electrical response for devices with stationary waves. Extensions and possible further developments are also given.

  9. On identifying transfer functions and state equations for linear systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Chen, C. F.; Huang, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Two methods are established for identifying constant-coefficient, C to the 2n power type of noise-free linear systems if the time response data of the input-output or of all states are known. 2n response data are required to identify an nth-order transfer function or state equation for an unknown linear system. The order of the unknown system can be identified by checking a sequence of determinants. The Z transform and its inversion are mainly used.

  10. Transfer function bounds on the performance of turbo codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Dolinar, S.; Pollara, F.; Mceliece, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    In this article we apply transfer function bounding techniques to obtain upper bounds on the bit-error rate for maximum likelihood decoding of turbo codes constructed with random permutations. These techniques are applied to two turbo codes with constraint length 3 and later extended to other codes. The performance predicted by these bounds is compared with simulation results. The bounds are useful in estimating the 'error floor' that is difficult to measure by simulation, and they provide insight on how to lower this floor. More refined bounds are needed for accurate performance measures at lower signal-to-noise ratios.

  11. Modulation transfer function of a trapezoidal pixel array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Guo, Rongli; Ni, Jinping; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is the tool most commonly used for quantifying the performance of an electro-optical imaging system. Recently, trapezoid-shaped pixels were designed and used in a retina-like sensor in place of rectangular-shaped pixels. The MTF of a detector with a trapezoidal pixel array is determined according to its definition. Additionally, the MTFs of detectors with differently shaped pixels, but the same pixel areas, are compared. The results show that the MTF values of the trapezoidal pixel array detector are obviously larger than those of rectangular and triangular pixel array detectors at the same frequencies.

  12. Two-dimensional modulation transfer function: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Marom, Emanuel; Milgrom, Benjamin; Konforti, Naim

    2010-12-10

    One-dimensional templates, such as the U.S. Air Force resolution target or the circular spoke target, are commonly used for the characterization of imaging systems via the modulation transfer function response. It is shown in this paper that one needs a new family of templates for a true characterization of imaging systems that acquire two-dimensional (2D) high-density images or handle 2D information, such as 2D bar code detection and identification. The contrast provided by the newly defined 2D templates is the "true" contrast of the acquired image that the electronic processors are challenged with. PMID:21151231

  13. Two-dimensional modulation transfer functions of image scanning systems.

    PubMed

    Simonds, R M

    1981-02-15

    Image data processing based on optical scanning and digital reconstruction frequently ignores artifacts produced by the scanning process itself. Characterization of these artifacts by measurement of system modulation transfer function (MTF) using the traditional knife-edge scan technique produces only one section of the 2-D MTF, and interpretation of this as representative of the complete MTF may yield misleading re A theoretical analysis is presented which allows reconstruction of the complete 2-D MTF from a sequence of knife-edge measurements, and an experimental example is shown for the case of a vidicon camera based scanning system. PMID:20309166

  14. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for image sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hui; Jiang, Huilin; Zhang, XiaoHui

    2010-08-01

    A new technique is demonstrated for measurement of modulation transfer function (MTF) on image sensor arrays. Fourier analysis of a low frequency bar target pattern is used to extract MTF at odd harmonics of a target pattern frequency up to and beyond Nyquist. The technique is particularly useful for linear image arrays (either conventional linescan or time-delay- integration devices) where conventional slanted-edge technique is not always applicable. The technique is well suited to simple implementation and can provide live presentation of the MTF curve, which helps to ensure optimal alignment conditions are achieved. Detailed analysis of the technique and demonstration of experimental results are presented.

  15. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in distributed parameter models which may be easily applied to models such as rod, plate, and beam equations. The general linear boundary value vibration equation is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes. The governing characteristic equations are decoupled through separation of variables yielding solutions similar to those of undamped classical theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as transient response. Example problems and solutions are provided demonstrating the similarity of the solutions to those of the classical theories and transient responses of nonviscous systems.

  16. Analysis of diagnostic calorimeter data by the transfer function technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, R. S.; Poggi, C.; Pimazzoni, A.; Rossi, G.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the analysis procedure applied to the thermal measurements on the rear side of a carbon fibre composite calorimeter with the purpose of reconstructing the energy flux due to an ion beam colliding on the front side. The method is based on the transfer function technique and allows a fast analysis by means of the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Its efficacy has been tested both on simulated and measured temperature profiles: in all cases, the energy flux features are well reproduced and beamlets are well resolved. Limits and restrictions of the method are also discussed, providing strategies to handle issues related to signal noise and digital processing.

  17. Analysis of diagnostic calorimeter data by the transfer function technique.

    PubMed

    Delogu, R S; Poggi, C; Pimazzoni, A; Rossi, G; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the analysis procedure applied to the thermal measurements on the rear side of a carbon fibre composite calorimeter with the purpose of reconstructing the energy flux due to an ion beam colliding on the front side. The method is based on the transfer function technique and allows a fast analysis by means of the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Its efficacy has been tested both on simulated and measured temperature profiles: in all cases, the energy flux features are well reproduced and beamlets are well resolved. Limits and restrictions of the method are also discussed, providing strategies to handle issues related to signal noise and digital processing. PMID:26932104

  18. Numerical calculation of listener-specific head-related transfer functions and sound localization: Microphone model and mesh discretization

    PubMed Central

    Ziegelwanger, Harald; Majdak, Piotr; Kreuzer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) can be numerically calculated by applying the boundary element method on the geometry of a listener’s head and pinnae. The calculation results are defined by geometrical, numerical, and acoustical parameters like the microphone used in acoustic measurements. The scope of this study was to estimate requirements on the size and position of the microphone model and on the discretization of the boundary geometry as triangular polygon mesh for accurate sound localization. The evaluation involved the analysis of localization errors predicted by a sagittal-plane localization model, the comparison of equivalent head radii estimated by a time-of-arrival model, and the analysis of actual localization errors obtained in a sound-localization experiment. While the average edge length (AEL) of the mesh had a negligible effect on localization performance in the lateral dimension, the localization performance in sagittal planes, however, degraded for larger AELs with the geometrical error as dominant factor. A microphone position at an arbitrary position at the entrance of the ear canal, a microphone size of 1 mm radius, and a mesh with 1 mm AEL yielded a localization performance similar to or better than observed with acoustically measured HRTFs. PMID:26233020

  19. Noise affects the shape of female preference functions for acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The shape of female mate preference functions influences the speed and direction of sexual signal evolution. However, the expression of female preferences is modulated by interactions between environmental conditions and the female's sensory processing system. Noise is an especially relevant environmental condition because it interferes directly with the neural processing of signals. Although noise is therefore likely a significant force in the evolution of communication systems, little is known about its effects on preference function shape. In the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus, female preferences for male calling song characteristics are likely to be affected by noise because its auditory system is sensitive to fine temporal details of songs. We measured female preference functions for variation in male song characteristics in several levels of masking noise and found strong effects of noise on preference function shape. The overall responsiveness to signals in noise generally decreased. Preference strength increased for some signal characteristics and decreased for others, largely corresponding to expectations based on neurophysiological studies of acoustic signal processing. These results suggest that different signal characteristics will be favored under different noise conditions, and thus that signal evolution may proceed differently depending on the extent and temporal patterning of environmental noise. PMID:25546134

  20. The Evolution of a More Rigorous Approach to Benefit Transfer: Benefit Function Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, John B.

    1992-03-01

    The desire for economic values of recreation for unstudied recreation resources dates back to the water resource development benefit-cost analyses of the early 1960s. Rather than simply applying existing estimates of benefits per trip to the study site, a fairly rigorous approach was developed by a number of economists. This approach involves application of travel cost demand equations and contingent valuation benefit functions from existing sites to the new site. In this way the spatial market of the new site (i.e., its differing own price, substitute prices and population distribution) is accounted for in the new estimate of total recreation benefits. The assumptions of benefit transfer from recreation sites in one state to another state for the same recreation activity is empirically tested. The equality of demand coefficients for ocean sport salmon fishing in Oregon versus Washington and for freshwater steelhead fishing in Oregon versus Idaho is rejected. Thus transfer of either demand equations or average benefits per trip are likely to be in error. Using the Oregon steelhead equation, benefit transfers to rivers within the state are shown to be accurate to within 5-15%.

  1. LANDSAT-4 thematic mapper Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A power spectrum (PS) analysis technique was used to compare thematic mapper (TM) A and P-tape data for a Washington, DC scene in two orthogonal directions, along scan and along track. The resulting effective modulation transfer functions (MTF) between the A and P data are repeatable from area to area and consistent with theoretical expectations. The average x-direction (along scan) MTF calculated with the PS technique is compared to the MTF of the cubic convolution resampling function used to create P data from A data. The two curves are nearly identical, indicating that the major factor affecting the image quality of P data relative to A data is the cubic convolution resampling.

  2. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for small-pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Marchywka, M; Socker, D G

    1992-12-01

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement technique suitable for large-format, small-pixel detector characterization has been investigated. A volume interference grating is used as a test image instead of the bar or sine wave target images normally used. This technique permits a high-contrast, large-area, sinusoidal intensity distribution to illuminate the device being tested, avoiding the need to deconvolve raw data with imaging system characteristics. A high-confidence MTF result at spatial frequencies near 200 cycles/mm is obtained. We present results at several visible light wavelengths with a 6.8-microm-pixel CCD. Pixel response functions are derived from the MTF results. PMID:20802584

  3. Off-Axis Nulling Transfer Function Measurement: A First Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedova, G. Dalla; Menut, J.-L.; Millour, F.; Petrov, R.; Cassaing, F.; Danchi, W. C.; Jacquinod, S.; Lhome, E.; Lopez, B.; Lozi, J.; Marcotto, A.; Parisot, J.; Reess, J.-M.

    2013-01-01

    We want to study a polychromatic inverse problem method with nulling interferometers to obtain information on the structures of the exozodiacal light. For this reason, during the first semester of 2013, thanks to the support of the consortium PERSEE, we launched a campaign of laboratory measurements with the nulling interferometric test bench PERSEE, operating with 9 spectral channels between J and K bands. Our objective is to characterise the transfer function, i.e. the map of the null as a function of wavelength for an off-axis source, the null being optimised on the central source or on the source photocenter. We were able to reach on-axis null depths better than 10(exp -4). This work is part of a broader project aiming at creating a simulator of a nulling interferometer in which typical noises of a real instrument are introduced. We present here our first results.

  4. Neural network identification of power system transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Gillard, D.M.; Bollinger, K.E.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the use of a multilayered neural network for measuring the transfer function of a power system for use in power system stabilizer (PSS) tuning and assessing PSS damping. The objectives are to quickly and accurately measure the transfer function relating the electric power output to the AVR PSS reference voltage input of a system with the plant operating under normal conditions. In addition, the excitation signal used in the identification procedure is such that it will not adversely affect the terminal voltage or the system frequency. This research emphasized the development of a neural network that is easily trained and robust to changing system conditions. Performance studies of the trained neural network are described. Simulation studies suggest the practical feasibility of the algorithm as a stand-alone identification package and as a portion of a self-tuning algorithm requiring identification in the strategy. The same technique applied to a forward modeling scheme can be used to test the damping contribution from different control strategies.

  5. Transferred interbacterial antagonism genes augment eukaryotic innate immune function

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Seemay; Daugherty, Matthew D.; Peterson, S. Brook; Biboy, Jacob; Yang, Youyun; Jutras, Brandon L.; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Ferrin, Michael A.; Harding, Brittany N.; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Yang, X. Frank; Vollmer, Waldemar; Malik, Harmit S.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) allows organisms to rapidly acquire adaptive traits1. Though documented instances of HGT from bacteria to eukaryotes remain rare, bacteria represent a rich source of new functions potentially available for co-option2. One benefit that genes of bacterial origin could provide to eukaryotes is the capacity to produce anti-bacterials, which have evolved in prokaryotes as the result of eons of interbacterial competition. The type VI secretion amidase effector (Tae) proteins are potent bacteriocidal enzymes that degrade the cell wall when delivered into competing bacterial cells by the type VI secretion system (T6SS)3. Here we show that tae genes have been transferred to eukaryotes on at least six occasions, and that the resulting domesticated amidase effector (dae) genes have been preserved for hundreds of millions of years via purifying selection. We show that the dae genes acquired eukaryotic secretion signals, are expressed within recipient organisms, and encode active antibacterial toxins that possess substrate specificity matching extant Tae proteins of the same lineage. Finally, we show that a dae gene in the deer tick Ixodes scapularis limits proliferation of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease. Our work demonstrates that a family of horizontally acquired toxins honed to mediate interbacterial antagonism confers previously undescribed antibacterial capacity to eukaryotes. We speculate that the selective pressure imposed by competition between bacteria has produced a reservoir of genes encoding diverse antimicrobial functions that are tailored for facile co-option by eukaryotic innate immune systems. PMID:25470067

  6. L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine inhibits the transfer function of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hiroaki; Westerman, Jan; Snoek, Gerry T; Taraschi, Theodore F; Janes, Nathan

    2003-12-30

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha (PITP-alpha) is a bifunctional phospholipid transfer protein that is highly selective for phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho). Polar lipid metabolites, including L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine (GroPCho), increasingly have been linked to changes in cellular function and to disease. In this study, polar lipid metabolites of PtdIns and PtdCho were tested for their ability to influence PITP-alpha activity. GroPCho inhibited the ability of PITP-alpha to transfer PtdIns or PtdCho between liposomes. The IC(50) of both processes was dependent on membrane composition. D-myo-inositol 1-phosphate and glycerylphosphorylinositol modestly enhanced PITP-alpha-mediated phospholipid transfer. Choline, phosphorylcholine (PCho), CDP-choline, glyceryl-3-phosphate, myo-inositol and D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate had little effect. Membrane surface charge was a strong determinant of the GroPCho inhibition with the inhibition being greatest for highly anionic membranes. GroPCho was shown to enhance the binding of PITP-alpha to anionic vesicles. In membranes of low surface charge, phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) was a determinant enabling the GroPCho inhibition. Anionic charge and PtdEtn content appeared to increase the strength of PITP-alpha-membrane interactions. The GroPCho-enhanced PITP-alpha-membrane binding was sufficient to cause inhibition, but not sufficient to account for the extent of inhibition observed. Processes associated with strengthened PITP-alpha-membrane binding in the presence of GroPCho appeared to impair the phospholipid insertion/extraction process. PMID:14729069

  7. Function Transfer in Human Operant Experiments: The Role of Stimulus Pairings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonneau, Francois; Gonzalez, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Although function transfer often has been studied in complex operant procedures (such as matching to sample), whether operant reinforcement actually produces function transfer in such settings has not been established. The present experiments, with high school students as subjects, suggest that stimulus pairings can promote function transfer in…

  8. Green's Function Retrieval and Marchenko Imaging in a Dissipative Acoustic Medium.

    PubMed

    Slob, Evert

    2016-04-22

    Single-sided Marchenko equations for Green's function construction and imaging relate the measured reflection response of a lossless heterogeneous medium to an acoustic wave field inside this medium. I derive two sets of single-sided Marchenko equations for the same purpose, each in a heterogeneous medium, with one medium being dissipative and the other a corresponding medium with negative dissipation. Double-sided scattering data of the dissipative medium are required as input to compute the surface reflection response in the corresponding medium with negative dissipation. I show that each set of single-sided Marchenko equations leads to Green's functions with a virtual receiver inside the medium: one exists inside the dissipative medium and one in the medium with negative dissipation. This forms the basis of imaging inside a dissipative heterogeneous medium. I relate the Green's functions to the reflection response inside each medium, from which the image can be constructed. I illustrate the method with a one-dimensional example that shows the image quality. The method has a potentially wide range of imaging applications where the material under test is accessible from two sides. PMID:27152808

  9. Green's Function Retrieval and Marchenko Imaging in a Dissipative Acoustic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slob, Evert

    2016-04-01

    Single-sided Marchenko equations for Green's function construction and imaging relate the measured reflection response of a lossless heterogeneous medium to an acoustic wave field inside this medium. I derive two sets of single-sided Marchenko equations for the same purpose, each in a heterogeneous medium, with one medium being dissipative and the other a corresponding medium with negative dissipation. Double-sided scattering data of the dissipative medium are required as input to compute the surface reflection response in the corresponding medium with negative dissipation. I show that each set of single-sided Marchenko equations leads to Green's functions with a virtual receiver inside the medium: one exists inside the dissipative medium and one in the medium with negative dissipation. This forms the basis of imaging inside a dissipative heterogeneous medium. I relate the Green's functions to the reflection response inside each medium, from which the image can be constructed. I illustrate the method with a one-dimensional example that shows the image quality. The method has a potentially wide range of imaging applications where the material under test is accessible from two sides.

  10. Vibro-acoustic response and sound transmission loss analysis of functionally graded plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, N.; Raja, S.; Nagendra Gopal, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents analytical studies on the vibro-acoustic and sound transmission loss characteristics of functionally graded material (FGM) plates using a simple first-order shear deformation theory. The material properties of the plate are assumed to vary according to power law distribution of the constituent materials in terms of volume fraction. The sound radiation due to sinusoidally varying point load, uniformly distributed load and obliquely incident sound wave is computed by solving the Rayleigh integral with a primitive numerical scheme. Displacement, velocity, acceleration, radiated sound power level, radiated sound pressure level and radiation efficiency of FGM plate for varying power law index are examined. The sound transmission loss of the FGM plate for several incidence angles and varying power law index is studied in detail. It has been found that, for the plate being considered, the sound power level increases monotonically with increase in power law index at lower frequency range (0-500 Hz) and a non-monotonic trend is appeared towards higher frequencies for both point and distributed force excitations. Increased vibration and acoustic response is observed for ceramic-rich FGM plate at higher frequency band; whereas a similar trend is seen for metal-rich FGM plate at lower frequency band. The dBA values are found to be decreasing with increase in power law index. The radiation efficiency of ceramic-rich FGM plate is noticed to be higher than that of metal and metal-rich FGM plates. The transmission loss below the first resonance frequency is high for ceramic-rich FGM plate and low for metal-rich FGM plate and further depends on the specific material property. The study has found that increased transmission loss can be achieved at higher frequencies with metal-rich FGM plates.

  11. Full-Scale Turbofan-Engine Turbine-Transfer Function Determination Using Three Internal Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    Existing NASA/Honeywell EVNERT full-scale static engine test data is analyzed by using source-separation techniques in order to determine the turbine transfer of the currently sub-dominant combustor noise. The results are used to assess the combustor-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). Time-series data from three sensors internal to the Honeywell TECH977 research engine is used in the analysis. The true combustor-noise turbine-transfer function is educed by utilizing a new three-signal approach. The resulting narrowband gain factors are compared with the corresponding constant values obtained from two empirical acoustic-turbine-loss formulas. It is found that a simplified Pratt & Whitney formula agrees better with the experimental results for frequencies of practical importance. The 130 deg downstream-direction far-field 1/3-octave sound-pressure levels (SPL) results of Hultgren & Miles are reexamined using a post-correction of their ANOPP predictions for both the total noise signature and the combustion-noise component. It is found that replacing the standard ANOPP turbine-attenuation function for combustion noise with the simplified Pratt & Whitney formula clearly improves the predictions. It is recommended that the GECOR combustion-noise module in ANOPP be updated to allow for a user-selectable switch between the current transmission-loss model and the simplified Pratt & Whitney formula. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic.

  12. Satellite modulation transfer function estimation from natural scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiyang, Zhi; Wei, Zhang; Xuan, Sun; Dawei, Wang

    2015-11-01

    We propose an in-orbit modulation transfer function (MTF) statistical estimation algorithm based on natural scene, called SeMTF. The algorithm can estimate the in-orbit MTF of a sensor from an image without specialized targets. First, the power spectrum of a satellite image is analyzed, then a two-dimensional (2-D) fractal Brownian motion model is adopted to represent the natural scene. The in-orbit MTF is modeled by a parametric exponential function. Subsequently, the statistical model of satellite imaging is established. Second, the model is solved by the improved profile-likelihood function method. In order to handle the nuisance parameter in the profile-likelihood function, we divided the estimation problem into two minimization problems for the parameters of the MTF model and nuisance parameters, respectively. By alternating the two iterative minimizations, the result will converge to the optimal MTF parameters. Then the SeMTF algorithm is proposed. Finally, the algorithm is tested using real satellite images. Experimental results indicate that the estimation of MTF is highly accurate.

  13. Relationships between vocal function measures derived from an acoustic microphone and a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring subglottal neck-surface acceleration has received renewed attention due to the ability of low-profile accelerometers to confidentially and noninvasively track properties related to normal and disordered voice characteristics and behavior. This study investigated the ability of subglottal neck-surface acceleration to yield vocal function measures traditionally derived from the acoustic voice signal and help guide the development of clinically functional accelerometer-based measures from a physiological perspective. Results are reported for 82 adult speakers with voice disorders and 52 adult speakers with normal voices who produced the sustained vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/ at a comfortable pitch and loudness during the simultaneous recording of radiated acoustic pressure and subglottal neck-surface acceleration. As expected, timing-related measures of jitter exhibited the strongest correlation between acoustic and neck-surface acceleration waveforms (r ≤ 0.99), whereas amplitude-based measures of shimmer correlated less strongly (r ≤ 0.74). Additionally, weaker correlations were exhibited by spectral measures of harmonics-to-noise ratio (r ≤ 0.69) and tilt (r ≤ 0.57), whereas the cepstral peak prominence correlated more strongly (r ≤ 0.90). These empirical relationships provide evidence to support the use of accelerometers as effective complements to acoustic recordings in the assessment and monitoring of vocal function in the laboratory, clinic, and during an individual’s daily activities. PMID:27066520

  14. Functional delay and sum beamforming for three-dimensional acoustic source identification with solid spherical arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Chu, Zhigang; Shen, Linbang; Xu, Zhongming

    2016-07-01

    Solid spherical arrays have become particularly attractive tools for doing acoustic sources identification in cabin environments. Spherical harmonics beamforming (SHB) is the popular conventional algorithm. Regrettably, its results suffer from severe sidelobe contaminations and the existing solutions are incapable of removing these contaminations both significantly and efficiently. This paper focuses on conquering these problems by creating a novel functional delay and sum (FDAS) algorithm. First and foremost, a new delay and sum (DAS) algorithm is established, and for which, the point spread function (PSF) is derived, the determination principle of the truncated upper limit of the spherical harmonics degree is explored, and the performance is examined as well as compared with that of SHB. Next, the FDAS algorithm is created by combining DAS and the functional beamforming (FB) approach initially suggested for planar arrays, and its merits are demonstrated. Additionally, performances of DAS and FDAS are probed into under the situation that the source is not at the focus point. Several interesting results have emerged: (1) the truncated upper limit of the spherical harmonics degree, capable of making DAS meet FB's requirement, exists and its minimum value depends only on the wave number and the array radius. (2) DAS can accurately locate and quantify the single source and the incoherent or coherent sources, and its comprehensive performance is not inferior to that of SHB. (3) For single source or incoherent sources, FDAS can not only accurately locate and quantify the source, but also significantly and efficiently attenuate sidelobes, effectively detect weak sources and acquire somewhat better spatial resolution. In contrast to that, for coherent sources, FDAS is not available. (4) DAS can invariably quantify the source accurately, irrespectively of the focus distance, whereas FDAS is burdened with a quantification deviation growing with the increase of the exponent

  15. Modulation transfer function of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Hill, C. J.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Keo, S. A.; Höglund, L.; Luong, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this presentation we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of 1024x1024 pixels mid-wavelength and long-wavelength quantum well infrared photodetector, and 320x256 pixels long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). Long wavelength Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) based on InAs/GaSb superlattice material is hybridized to recently designed and fabricated 320x256 pixel format ROIC. The n-type CBIRD was characterized in terms of performance and thermal stability. The experimentally measured NEΔT of the 8.8μm cutoff n-CBIRD FPA was 18.6 mK with 300 K background and f/2 cold stop at 78K FPA operating temperature. The horizontal and vertical MTFs of this pixel fully delineated CBIRD FPA at Nyquist frequency are 49% and 52%, respectively.

  16. Multi-functional surface acoustic wave sensor for monitoring enviromental and structural condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Y.; Kon, T.; Okazaki, T.; Saigusa, Y.; Nomura, T.

    2006-03-01

    As a first step to develop a health monitoring system with active and embedded nondestructive evaluation devices for the machineries and structures, multi-functional SAW (surface acoustic wave) device was developed. A piezoelectric LiNbO3(x-y cut) materials were used as a SAW substrate on which IDT(20μm pitch) was produced by lithography. On the surface of a path of SAW between IDTs, environmentally active material films of shape memory Ti50Ni41Cu(at%) with non-linear hysteresis and superelastic Ti48Ni43Cu(at%) with linear deformation behavior were formed by magnetron-sputtering technique. In this study, these two kinds of shape memory alloys SMA) system were used to measure 1) loading level, 2) phase transformation and 3)stress-strain hysteresis under cyclic loading by utilizing their linearity and non-linearity deformation behaviors. Temperature and stress dependencies of SAW signal were also investigated in the non-sputtered film state. Signal amplitude and phase change of SAW were chosen to measure as the sensing parameters. As a result, temperature, stress level, phase transformation in SMA depending on temperature and mechanical damage accumulation could be measured by the proposed multi-functional SAW sensor. Moreover, the wireless SAW sensing system which has a unique feature of no supplying electric battery was constructed, and the same characteristic evaluation is confirmed in comparison with wired case.

  17. A surface acoustic wave sensor functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer for selective dopamine detection.

    PubMed

    Maouche, Naima; Ktari, Nadia; Bakas, Idriss; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Seydou, Mahamadou; Maurel, François; Chehimi, Mohammed Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    A surface acoustic wave sensor operating at 104 MHz and functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer has been designed for selective detection of dopamine (DA). Optimization of pyrrole/DA ratio, polymerization and immersion times permitted to obtain a highly selective sensor, which has a sensitivity of 0.55°/mM (≈ 550 Hz/mM) and a detection limit of ≈ 10 nM. Morphology and related roughness parameters of molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces, before and after extraction of DA, as well as that of the non imprinted polymer were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The developed chemosensor selectively recognized dopamine over the structurally similar compound 4-hydroxyphenethylamine (referred as tyramine), or ascorbic acid,which co-exists with DA in body fluids at a much higher concentration. Selectivity tests were also carried out with dihydroxybenzene, for which an unexpected phase variation of order of 75% of the DA one was observed. Quantum chemical calculations, based on the density functional theory, were carried out to determine the nature of interactions between each analyte and the PPy matrix and the DA imprinted PPy polypyrrole sensing layer in order to account for the important phase variation observed during dihydroxybenzene injection. PMID:26095144

  18. Representation theorems and Green's function retrieval for scattering in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ivan; Snieder, Roel; Douma, Huub

    2009-09-01

    Reciprocity theorems for perturbed acoustic media are provided in the form of convolution- and correlation-type theorems. These reciprocity relations are particularly useful in the general treatment of both forward and inverse-scattering problems. Using Green's functions to describe perturbed and unperturbed waves in two distinct wave states, representation theorems for scattered waves are derived from the reciprocity relations. While the convolution-type theorems can be manipulated to obtain scattering integrals that are analogous to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, the correlation-type theorems can be used to retrieve the scattering response of the medium by cross correlations. Unlike previous formulations of Green's function retrieval, the extraction of scattered-wave responses by cross correlations does not require energy equipartitioning. Allowing for uneven energy radiation brings experimental advantages to the retrieval of fields scattered by remote lossless and/or attenuative scatterers. These concepts are illustrated with a number of examples, including analytic solutions to a one-dimensional scattering problem, and a numerical example in the context of seismic waves recorded on the ocean bottom. PMID:19905236

  19. Improved gene transfer with histidine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Brevet, David; Hocine, Ouahiba; Delalande, Anthony; Raehm, Laurence; Charnay, Clarence; Midoux, Patrick; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Pichon, Chantal

    2014-08-25

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) were functionalized with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (MSN-NH2) then L-histidine (MSN-His) for pDNA delivery in cells and in vivo. The complexation of pDNA with MSN-NH2 and MSN-His was first studied with gel shift assay. pDNA complexed with MSN-His was better protected from DNase degradation than with MSN-NH2. An improvement of the transfection efficiency in cells was observed with MSN-His/pDNA compared to MSN-NH2/pDNA, which could be explained by a better internalization of MSN-His. The improvement of the transfection efficiency with MSN-His was also observed for gene transfer in Achilles tendons in vivo. PMID:24853464

  20. LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for thematic mapping (TM) bands 3, 4, 5 and 7 is reliably estimated with the San Mateo Bridge target in the 12/31/82 scene. These results are to be compared with those from the 8/12/83 scene. Bands 1, 2 and 6 are to be analyzed with a different target possessing greater contrast. This may be possible with the underflight data comparison currently underway. The registration of this data to the TM image of 8/12/83 for a region arround the Stockton sewage pond east of San Francisco has begun. This particular approach has the advantage that the full two-dimensional MFT will be measured instead of the MFT in only one azimuth as reported.

  1. Modulation-transfer-function analysis for sampled image systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Kaczynski, M.-A.; Schowengerdt, R.

    1984-01-01

    Sampling generally causes the response of a digital imaging system to be locally shift-variant and not directly amenable to Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) analysis. However, this paper demonstrates that a meaningful system response can be calculated by averaging over an ensemble of point-source system inputs to yield an MTF which accounts for the combined effects of image formation, sampling, and image reconstruction. As an illustration, the MTF of the Landsat MSS system is analyzed to reveal an average effective instantaneous field of view which is significantly larger than the commonly accepted value, particularly in the along-track direction where undersampling contributes markedly to an MTF reduction and resultant increase in image blur.

  2. Modulation transfer function of antenna-coupled infrared detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Boreman, G D; Dogariu, A; Christodoulou, C; Kotter, D

    1996-11-01

    Individual antenna-coupled IR bolometers have recently been demonstrated at wavelengths near 10 μm. If focal-plane arrays (FPA's) of antenna-coupled detectors can be fabricated, enhancement of IR-imager performance is possible. A first step in the design process is to analyze the image-quality potential of antenna-coupled, FPA-based imagers in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The key step in our analysis is development of a cross-talk MTF that accounts for the electromagnetic coupling between adjacent antennas in the FPA. We find that electromagnetic cross talk will not be a significant image-quality factor in antenna-coupled IR FPA's. PMID:21127627

  3. Modulation transfer function of antenna-coupled infrared detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, Glenn D.; Dogariu, Aristide; Christodoulou, Christos; Kotter, Dale

    1996-11-01

    Individual antenna-coupled IR bolometers have recently been demonstrated at wavelengths near 10 mu m. If focal-plane arrays (FPA's) of antenna-coupled detectors can be fabricated, enhancement of IR-imager performance is possible. A first step in the design process is to analyze the image-quality potential of antenna-coupled, FPA-based imagers in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The key step in our analysis is development of a cross-talk MTF that accounts for the electromagnetic coupling between adjacent antennas in the FPA. We find that electromagnetic cross talk will not be a significant image-quality factor in antenna-coupled IR FPA's.

  4. Head-related transfer function database and its analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bosun; Zhong, Xiaoli; Rao, Dan; Liang, Zhiqiang

    2007-06-01

    Based on the measurements from 52 Chinese subjects (26 males and 26 females), a high-spatial-resolution head-related transfer function (HRTF) database with corresponding anthropometric parameters is established. By using the database, cues relating to sound source localization, including interaural time difference (ITD), interaural level difference (ILD), and spectral features introduced by pinna, are analyzed. Moreover, the statistical relationship between ITD and anthropometric parameters is estimated. It is proved that the mean values of maximum ITD for male and female are significantly different, so are those for Chinese and western subjects. The difference in ITD is due to the difference in individual anthropometric parameters. It is further proved that the spectral features introduced by pinna strongly depend on individual; while at high frequencies (f ⩾ 5.5 kHz), HRTFs are left-right asymmetric. This work is instructive and helpful for the research on binaural hearing and applications on virtual auditory in future.

  5. The Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters and Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z <= 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/R 0)-γ on the scales of 10 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 50 h -1 Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R 0 = 18.84 ± 0.27 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 15 and a smaller length of R 0 = 16.15 ± 0.13 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 5. The power-law index of γ = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r ~ 110 h -1 Mpc with a significance of ~1.9σ. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 200 h -1 Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are Dv (zm = 0.276) = 1077 ± 55(1σ) Mpc and h = 0.73 ± 0.039(1σ), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density Ω m h 2 = 0.093 ± 0.0077(1σ), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3σ. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  6. THE CORRELATION FUNCTION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AND DETECTION OF BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-10

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z {<=} 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model {xi}(r) = (r/R{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}} on the scales of 10 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R{sub 0} = 18.84 {+-} 0.27 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 15 and a smaller length of R{sub 0} = 16.15 {+-} 0.13 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 5. The power-law index of {gamma} = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r {approx} 110 h{sup -1} Mpc with a significance of {approx}1.9{sigma}. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 200 h{sup -1} Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are D{sub v} (z{sub m} = 0.276) = 1077 {+-} 55(1{sigma}) Mpc and h = 0.73 {+-} 0.039(1{sigma}), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density {Omega}{sub m} h{sup 2} = 0.093 {+-} 0.0077(1{sigma}), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3{sigma}. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  7. Himalayan sediment fluxes and the floodplain transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupker, Maarten; Lavé, Jérôme; France-Lanord, Christian; Blard, Pierre Henri

    2013-04-01

    Erosion produces sediments and thereby redistributes mass at the Earth surface. A better understanding of these erosion processes can be gained by studying the products of erosion, i.e. the nature, magnitude and variability of sediment fluxes. On continents, rivers are the main conveyer belts that transport these sediments from source to sink. Owing to the integrative nature of river networks, a downstream river reach can be used to infer erosion processes that occur in upstream catchments. However on large spatial scales, sediment transport processes may affect the sedimentary signal so that the quantification of upstream erosion may not be straightforward. This is especially the case for continental scale basins: sediment sources are separated from sedimentary basins by large alluvial floodplains, where sediments are transported over hundreds to thousands of kilometers. The floodplain transfer function needs to be understood whenever modern river sediments or sedimentary archives are used to reconstruct present and past erosion processes. In this contribution we discuss the magnitude of sediment fluxes from the Himalayan system using sediment gauging and cosmogenic nuclide data and address to what extent sediment transport may bias these estimates. The central part of the Himalayan range is drained by two major rivers, the Ganga and Brahmaputra that convey the products of Himalayan erosion over an extensive floodplain and ultimately to the Indian Ocean. This transfer may bias erosion rates derived from gauged sediment fluxes as part of the sediment flux is trapped in the subsiding foreland basin. This storage term remains however limited and can be quantified using a geochemical budget approach [1]. Floodplain transfer may also affect cosmogenic nuclide derived sediment budgets as sediments may accumulate nuclides during transport which will increase the overall nuclide concentration and hence lead to under-estimate denudation rates. By comparing cosmogenic

  8. Modeling the direction-continuous time-of-arrival in head-related transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Ziegelwanger, Harald; Majdak, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the filtering of the incoming sound by the torso, head, and pinna. As a consequence of the propagation path from the source to the ear, each HRTF contains a direction-dependent, broadband time-of-arrival (TOA). TOAs are usually estimated independently for each direction from HRTFs, a method prone to artifacts and limited by the spatial sampling. In this study, a continuous-direction TOA model combined with an outlier-removal algorithm is proposed. The model is based on a simplified geometric representation of the listener, and his/her arbitrary position within the HRTF measurement. The outlier-removal procedure uses the extreme studentized deviation test to remove implausible TOAs. The model was evaluated for numerically calculated HRTFs of sphere, torso, and pinna under various conditions. The accuracy of estimated parameters was within the resolution given by the sampling rate. Applied to acoustically measured HRTFs of 172 listeners, the estimated parameters were consistent with realistic listener geometry. The outlier removal further improved the goodness-of-fit, particularly for some problematic fits. The comparison with a simpler model that fixed the listener position to the center of the measurement geometry showed a clear advantage of listener position as an additional free model parameter. PMID:24606268

  9. Finite difference computation of head-related transfer function for human hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Tian; Huo Liu, Qing

    2003-05-01

    Modeling the head-related transfer function (HRTF) is a key to many applications in spatial audio. To understand and predict the effects of head geometry and the surrounding environment on the HRTF, a three-dimensional finite-difference time domain model (3D FDTD) has been developed to simulate acoustic wave interaction with a human head. A perfectly matched layer (PML) is used to absorb outgoing waves at the truncated boundary of an unbounded medium. An external source is utilized to reduce the computational domain size through the scattered-field/total-field formulation. This numerical model has been validated by analytical solutions for a spherical head model. The 3D FDTD code is then used as a computational tool to predict the HRTF for various scenarios. In particular, a simplified spherical head model is compared to a realistic head model up to about 7 kHz. The HRTF is also computed for a realistic head model in the presence of a wall. It is demonstrated that this 3D FDTD model can be a useful tool for spatial audio applications.

  10. Finite difference computation of head-related transfer function for human hearing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Tian; Liu, Qing Huo

    2003-05-01

    Modeling the head-related transfer function (HRTF) is a key to many applications in spatial audio. To understand and predict the effects of head geometry and the surrounding environment on the HRTF, a three-dimensional finite-difference time domain model (3D FDTD) has been developed to simulate acoustic wave interaction with a human head. A perfectly matched layer (PML) is used to absorb outgoing waves at the truncated boundary of an unbounded medium. An external source is utilized to reduce the computational domain size through the scattered-field/total-field formulation. This numerical model has been validated by analytical solutions for a spherical head model. The 3D FDTD code is then used as a computational tool to predict the HRTF for various scenarios. In particular, a simplified spherical head model is compared to a realistic head model up to about 7 kHz. The HRTF is also computed for a realistic head model in the presence of a wall. It is demonstrated that this 3D FDTD model can be a useful tool for spatial audio applications. PMID:12765362

  11. Frequency domain transfer function identification using the computer program SYSFIT

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    Because the primary application of SYSFIT for BPA involves studying power system dynamics, this investigation was geared toward simulating the effects that might be encountered in studying electromechanical oscillations in power systems. Although the intended focus of this work is power system oscillations, the studies are sufficiently genetic that the results can be applied to many types of oscillatory systems with closely-spaced modes. In general, there are two possible ways of solving the optimization problem. One is to use a least-squares optimization function and to write the system in such a form that the problem becomes one of linear least-squares. The solution can then be obtained using a standard least-squares technique. The other method involves using a search method to obtain the optimal model. This method allows considerably more freedom in forming the optimization function and model, but it requires an initial guess of the system parameters. SYSFIT employs this second approach. Detailed investigations were conducted into three main areas: (1) fitting to exact frequency response data of a linear system; (2) fitting to the discrete Fourier transformation of noisy data; and (3) fitting to multi-path systems. The first area consisted of investigating the effects of alternative optimization cost function options; using different optimization search methods; incorrect model order, missing response data; closely-spaced poles; and closely-spaced pole-zero pairs. Within the second area, different noise colorations and levels were studied. In the third area, methods were investigated for improving fitting results by incorporating more than one system path. The following is a list of guidelines and properties developed from the study for fitting a transfer function to the frequency response of a system using optimization search methods.

  12. Detection of respiratory compromise by acoustic monitoring, capnography, and brain function monitoring during monitored anesthesia care.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Pedro P; Tanaka, Maria; Drover, David R

    2014-12-01

    Episodes of apnea in sedated patients represent a risk of respiratory compromise. We hypothesized that acoustic monitoring would be equivalent to capnography for detection of respiratory pauses, with fewer false alarms. In addition, we hypothesized that the patient state index (PSI) would be correlated with the frequency of respiratory pauses and therefore could provide information about the risk of apnea during sedation. Patients undergoing sedation for surgical procedures were monitored for respiration rate using acoustic monitoring and capnography and for depth of sedation using the PSI. A clinician blinded to the acoustic and sedation monitor observed the capnograph and patient to assess sedation and episodes of apnea. Another clinician retrospectively reviewed the capnography and acoustic waveform and sound files to identify true positive and false positive respiratory pauses by each method (reference method). Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio for detection of respiratory pause was calculated for acoustic monitoring and capnography. The correlation of PSI with respiratory pause events was determined. For the 51 respiratory pauses validated by retrospective analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio positive for detection were 16, 96 %, and 3.5 for clinician observation; 88, 7 %, and 1.0 for capnography; and 55, 87 %, and 4.1 for acoustic monitoring. There was no correlation between PSI and respiratory pause events. Acoustic monitoring had the highest likelihood ratio positive for detection of respiratory pause events compared with capnography and clinician observation and, therefore, may provide the best method for respiration rate monitoring during these procedures. PMID:24420342

  13. A novel surface acoustic wave-based biosensor for highly sensitive functional assays of olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Wang, Di; Wang, Le; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping

    2011-04-01

    Olfactory receptors, which are responsible for sensing odor molecules, form the largest G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family in mammalian animals. These proteins play an important role in the detection of chemical signals and signal transduction to the brain. Currently, only a limited number of olfactory receptors have been characterized, which is mainly due to the lack of sensitive and efficient tools for performing functional assays of these receptors. This paper describes a novel surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based biosensor for highly sensitive functional assays of olfactory receptors. An olfactory receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans, ODR-10, was expressed on the plasma membrane of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, which was used as a model system for this study. For specific odorant response assays, the membrane fraction of MCF-7 cells containing ODR-10 was extracted and integrated with our SAW sensors. The response of ODR-10 to various odorants was monitored by recording the resonance frequency shifts of SAWs applied to the sensor. Our results show that heterologously expressed ODR-10 receptors can specifically respond to diacetyl, its natural ligand. Dose-dependent responses were obtained by performing measurements using various concentrations of diacetyl. The sensitivity of this biosensor is 2kHz/ng and can detect concentrations as low as 10(-10)mM, which is 10× lower than what has previously been reported. This biosensor can be used to characterize odorant response profiles of olfactory receptors and provide information rich data for functional assays of olfactory receptors. In addition to providing a greater understanding of the biological mechanisms of GPCRs, such data holds great potential in many other fields such as food industry, biomedicine, and environmental protection. PMID:21333624

  14. Acoustic and Perceptual Measurement of Expressive Prosody in High-Functioning Autism: Increased Pitch Range and What it Means to Listeners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadig, Aparna; Shaw, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Are there consistent markers of atypical prosody in speakers with high functioning autism (HFA) compared to typically-developing speakers? We examined: (1) acoustic measurements of pitch range, mean pitch and speech rate in conversation, (2) perceptual ratings of conversation for these features and overall prosody, and (3) acoustic measurements of…

  15. Robust algorithm for estimation of time-varying transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rui; Chon, Ki H

    2004-02-01

    We introduce a new method to estimate reliable time-varying (TV) transfer functions (TFs) and TV impulse response functions. The method is based on TV autoregressive moving average models in which the TV parameters are accurately obtained using the optimal parameter search method which we have previously developed. The new method is more accurate than the recursive least-squares (RLS), and remains robust even in the case of significant noise contamination. Furthermore, the new method is able to track dynamics that change abruptly, which is certainly a deficiency of the RLS. Application of the new method to renal blood pressure and flow revealed that hypertensive rats undergo more complex and TV autoregulation in maintaining stable blood flow than do normotensive rats. This observation has not been previously revealed using time-invariant TF analyses. The newly developed approach may promote the broader use of TV system identification in studies of physiological systems and makes linear and nonlinear TV modeling possible in certain cases previously thought intractable. PMID:14765694

  16. The functionality of female reciprocal calls in the Iberian midwife toad (Alytes cisternasii): female-female acoustic competition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Jaime

    2002-11-01

    Female midwife toads (genus Alytes) emit highly variable reciprocal calls of unclear function prior to and during courtship. In some species, female-female competition, expressed as physical fighting, has been reported. Males of Majorcan midwife toads (Alytes muletensis) show phonotactic response to female calls, and females of Iberian midwife toads (Alytes cisternasii) respond differently according to the male call characteristics. In this study, I test the hypothesis of female-female acoustic competition as an additional function of female reciprocal calls. Playback tests indicate that female calls are not clearly involved in female acoustic competition in the Iberian midwife toad, therefore female calls could be directed at males rather than towards competitive females.

  17. Acoustically assisted spin-transfer-torque switching of nanomagnets: An energy-efficient hybrid writing scheme for non-volatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ayan K.; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2013-12-02

    We show that the energy dissipated to write bits in spin-transfer-torque random access memory can be reduced by an order of magnitude if a surface acoustic wave (SAW) is launched underneath the magneto-tunneling junctions (MTJs) storing the bits. The SAW-generated strain rotates the magnetization of every MTJs' soft magnet from the easy towards the hard axis, whereupon passage of a small spin-polarized current through a target MTJ selectively switches it to the desired state with > 99.99% probability at room temperature, thereby writing the bit. The other MTJs return to their original states at the completion of the SAW cycle.

  18. Measurement of the modulation transfer function of paper.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G L

    1998-11-01

    In recent years there has been a renewed interest in modeling the halftone microstructure to better control the colors produced in a halftone image. Diffusion of light within the paper has a significant effect on the halftone color; this effect is known as optical dot gain or the Yule-Neilsen effect. Because of diffusion, a photon may exit the paper from a different region of the halftone microstructure than that into which it entered the paper. To account rigorously for this effect requires knowledge of the paper's point-spread function or, equivalently, the paper's modulation transfer function (MTF). A new technique for measuring the MTF of paper-the series-expansion bar-target technique-is introduced. The method uses a bar target, but the analysis more closely resembles that of the edge-gradient technique. In the series-expansion method, bar-target image data are expanded into a Fourier series, and the paper's MTF is given by the series-expansion coefficients. It differs from the typical bar-target analysis in that the typical method plots the amplitude of the fundamental frequency component for several targets of varying frequency, whereas the series-expansion method plots the amplitude of the fundamental and its harmonics for a single target. Two possible techniques for measuring the MTF with the bar-target series-expansion method are considered. In the first, the image of the bar target is projected onto the paper, and in the second, the bar target is placed directly on the paper, in close contact. PMID:18301552

  19. Abstracting Attribute Space for Transfer Function Exploration and Design.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Ross; Jang, Yun; Woo, Insoo; Jänicke, Heike; Gaither, Kelly P; Ebert, David S

    2013-01-01

    Currently, user centered transfer function design begins with the user interacting with a one or two-dimensional histogram of the volumetric attribute space. The attribute space is visualized as a function of the number of voxels, allowing the user to explore the data in terms of the attribute size/magnitude. However, such visualizations provide the user with no information on the relationship between various attribute spaces (e.g., density, temperature, pressure, x, y, z) within the multivariate data. In this work, we propose a modification to the attribute space visualization in which the user is no longer presented with the magnitude of the attribute; instead, the user is presented with an information metric detailing the relationship between attributes of the multivariate volumetric data. In this way, the user can guide their exploration based on the relationship between the attribute magnitude and user selected attribute information as opposed to being constrained by only visualizing the magnitude of the attribute. We refer to this modification to the traditional histogram widget as an abstract attribute space representation. Our system utilizes common one and two-dimensional histogram widgets where the bins of the abstract attribute space now correspond to an attribute relationship in terms of the mean, standard deviation, entropy, or skewness. In this manner, we exploit the relationships and correlations present in the underlying data with respect to the dimension(s) under examination. These relationships are often times key to insight and allow us to guide attribute discovery as opposed to automatic extraction schemes which try to calculate and extract distinct attributes a priori. In this way, our system aids in the knowledge discovery of the interaction of properties within volumetric data. PMID:22508900

  20. Ultrasonic backscatter from cancellous bone: the apparent backscatter transfer function.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Mcpherson, Joseph A; Smathers, Morgan R; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to detect changes in cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis. Many techniques are based on measurements of the apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF), which represents the backscattered power from bone corrected for the frequency response of the measurement system. The ABTF is determined from a portion of the backscatter signal selected by an analysis gate of width τw delayed by an amount τd from the start of the signal. The goal of this study was to characterize the ABTF for a wide range of gate delays (1 μs ≤ τd ≤ 6 μs) and gate widths (1 μs ≤ τw ≤ 6 μs). Measurements were performed on 29 specimens of human cancellous bone in the frequency range 1.5 to 6.0 MHz using a broadband 5-MHz transducer. The ABTF was found to be an approximately linear function of frequency for most choices of τd and τw. Changes in τd and τw caused the frequency-averaged ABTF [quantified by apparent integrated backscatter (AIB)] and the frequency dependence of the ABTF [quantified by frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB)] to change by as much as 24.6 dB and 6.7 dB/MHz, respectively. τd strongly influenced the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of AIB with bone density (-0.95 ≤ R ≤ +0.68). The correlation of FSAB with bone density was influenced less strongly by τd (-0.97 ≤ R ≤ -0.87). τw had a weaker influence than τd on the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of these parameters with bone density. PMID:26683412

  1. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  2. Source effects in mid-latitude geomagnetic transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya Vargas, Jaime; Ritter, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of more than 10 yr of vertical magnetic transfer function (VTF) estimates obtained at 12 mid-latitude sites, located in different continents and tectonic settings, reveals significant temporal variations for a period range between approximately 250 and 2000 s. The most ubiquitous pattern is a seasonal modulation of the VTF element that relates the vertical to the horizontal north-south magnetic components (Tx), which shows a high peak around the June solstice (and a low peak around the December solstice) regardless of the location of the site. To quantify the influence of this source effect on the amplitude of VTFs, we modelled the temporal variations of VTFs using a function with dependence on season and magnetic activity indexes. The model shows that differences between VTF estimates obtained at seasonal peaks can reach 0.08 of Tx absolute values and that the effect increases with latitude and period. Seasonal variations are observed also in the VTF component relating vertical to horizontal east-west magnetic components (Ty), but here the pattern with respect to the geographic distribution is less clear. In addition to seasonal trends, we observe long-term modulations correlating with the 11-yr solar cycle at some sites. The influence of these external source effects should be taken into account, before attempting a geological interpretation of the VTFs. It can be misleading, for example, to combine or compare VTFs obtained from long-period geomagnetic data acquired at different seasons or years. An effective method to estimate and remove these source effects from VTFs is by comparison with temporal variations of VTFs from synchronously recorded data at sites located at similar latitude (<5° of difference) and longitude (<10° of difference). Source effects in temporal variations of VTFs can be identified as those patterns that exhibit similar amplitudes and significant correlation with the geomagnetic activity at all compared sites. We also provide a

  3. Identification of boiler inlet transfer functions and estimation of system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    An iterative computer method is described for identifying boiler transfer functions using frequency response data. An objective penalized performance measure and a nonlinear minimization technique are used to cause the locus of points generated by a transfer function to resemble the locus of points obtained from frequency response measurements. Different transfer functions can be tried until a satisfactory empirical transfer function of the system is found. To illustrate the method, some examples and some results from a study of a set of data consisting of measurements of the inlet impedance of a single tube forced flow boiler with inserts are given.

  4. A Simple Approach of Presampled Modulation Transfer Function Measurement Tested on the Phoenix Nanotom Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkov, D.; Batranin, A.; Mamyrbayev, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper presampled modulation transfer function of the 2D images obtained on the Phoenix Nanotom scanner was investigated with different measurement set-ups. Three parameters were chosen to investigate their influence on modulation transfer function: source- detector distance, tube current and binning mode. A simple method for modulation transfer function determination of digital imaging detectors from edge images was applied. The following results were achieved and briefly discussed: modulation transfer function improves with increase of the source-detector distance, slightly improves with increase of the current and remains constant for different binning modes. All measurements were carried out in University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria at Wels campus.

  5. Acoustic field modeling for physiotherapy ultrasound applicators by using approximated functions of measured non-uniform radiation distributions.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Mario Ibrahín; Calás, Héctor; Ramos, Antonio; Vera, Arturo; Leija, Lorenzo

    2012-08-01

    The strongest therapeutic effects in ultrasonic physiotherapy are mainly produced at the first centimeters, i.e. close to the applicator surface and, in general, only in the near-field zone. The acoustic field produced in practice by this type of transducers differs from the classical models because the vibration distribution on the real transducer surfaces is non-uniform. However, neither models using uniform distribution, nor those using typical non-uniform distribution patterns for the source accurately represent the radiation of this kind of transducers. Although this therapy is widely used and many efforts have been made in experimentally studying the patterns of ultrasound radiation produced during physiotherapy applications (IEC-61689, 1998), additional modeling researches still would be needed in order to achieve improved models giving field patterns closer to the measured ultrasonic results. In this paper, acoustic patterns produced from two source radiation functions are proposed and evaluated for field modeling of physiotherapy applicators. Both the functions are approximations to the pressure distribution measured close to the emitting surface and they are based on the modulation of the classical simply-supported function using either sinusoidal or Bessel-type distributions. The simply-supported function is accounted for the radiator-fixing condition and the modulation function simulates the complex vibration distribution of this kind of transducer. The modulator Bessel function is based on reports about Bessel-type vibration distributions found in piezoelectric disk resonators. The use of a selected sinusoidal segment represents another analytical option for obtaining an approximated behavior of the measured data in a real applicator. Both the field models are implemented using the finite element method (FEM) to obtain the numerical solution of wave equation at each point in the radiated space. The solution is reached by considering axisymmetric

  6. Outcome of resonant voice therapy for female teachers with voice disorders: perceptual, physiological, acoustic, aerodynamic, and functional measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng Hwa; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu; Hsiao, Li-Chun; Chung, Yu-Mei; Chiang, Shu-Chiung

    2007-07-01

    Teachers have a high percentage of voice problems. For voice disordered teachers, resonant voice therapy is hypothesized to reduce voice problems. No research has been done on the physiological, acoustic, and aerodynamic effects of resonant voice therapy for school teachers. The purpose of this study is to investigate resonant voice therapy outcome from perceptual, physiological, acoustic, aerodynamic, and functional aspects for female teachers with voice disorders. A prospective study was designed for this research. The research subjects were 24 female teachers in Taipei. All subjects received resonant voice therapy in groups of 4 subjects, 90 minutes per session, and 1 session per week for 8 weeks. The outcome of resonant voice therapy was assessed from auditory perceptual judgment, videostroboscopic examination, acoustic measurements, aerodynamic measurements, and functional measurements before and after therapy. After therapy the severity of roughness, strain, monotone, resonance, hard attack, and glottal fry in auditory perceptual judgments, the severity of vocal fold pathology, mucosal wave, amplitude, and vocal fold closure in videostroboscopic examinations, phonation threshold pressure, and the score of physical scale in the Voice Handicap Index were significantly reduced. The speaking Fo, maximum range of speaking Fo, and maximum range of speaking intensity were significantly increased after therapy. No significant change was found in perturbation and breathiness measurements after therapy. Resonant voice therapy is effective for school teachers and is suggested as one of the therapy approaches in clinics for this population. PMID:16581227

  7. Quantifying swallowing function for healthy adults in different age groups using acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Man-Yin

    Dysphagia is a medical condition that can lead to devastating complications including weight loss, aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; hence, timely identification is essential. Current dysphagia evaluation tools are either invasive, time consuming, or highly dependent on the experience of an individual clinician. The present study aims to develop a non-invasive, quantitative screening tool for dysphagia identification by capturing acoustic data from swallowing and mastication. The first part of this study explores the feasibility of using acoustic data to quantify swallowing and mastication. This study then further identifies mastication and swallowing trends in a neurotypical adult population. An acoustic capture protocol for dysphagia screening is proposed. Finally, the relationship among speaking, lingual and mastication rates are explored. Results and future directions are discussed.

  8. Is There a Linear Building Transfer Function for Small Excitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Heaton, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    application of linear transfer functions timely.

  9. The Transfer Function Model (TFM) as a Tool for Simulating Gravity Wave Phenomena in the Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, H.; Mayr, H.; Moore, J.; Wilson, S.; Armaly, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Transfer Function Model (TFM) is semi-analytical and linear, and it is designed to describe the acoustic gravity waves (GW) propagating over the globe and from the ground to 600 km under the influence of vertical temperature variations. Wave interactions with the flow are not accounted for. With an expansion in terms of frequency-dependent spherical harmonics, the time consuming vertical integration of the conservation equations is reduced to computing the transfer function (TF). (The applied lower and upper boundary conditions assure that spurious wave reflections will not occur.) The TF describes the dynamical properties of the medium divorced from the complexities of the temporal and horizontal variations of the excitation source. Given the TF, the atmospheric response to a chosen source is then obtained in short order to simulate the GW propagating through the atmosphere over the globe. In the past, this model has been applied to study auroral processes, which produce distinct wave phenomena such as: (1) standing lamb modes that propagate horizontally in the viscous medium of the thermosphere, (2) waves generated in the auroral oval that experience geometric amplification propagating to the pole where constructive interference generates secondary waves that propagate equatorward, (3) ducted modes propagating through the middle atmosphere that leak back into the thermosphere, and (4) GWs reflected from the Earth's surface that reach the thermosphere in a narrow propagation cone. Well-defined spectral features characterize these wave modes in the TF to provide analytical understanding. We propose the TFM as a tool for simulating GW in the mesosphere and in particular the features observed in Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). With present-day computers, it takes less than one hour to compute the TF, so that there is virtually no practical limitation on the source configurations that can be applied and tested in the lower atmosphere. And there is no limitation on

  10. Assessing the transferability of ecosystem service production estimates and functions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of ecosystem service (ES) production, and their responses to stressors or policy actions, may be obtained by direct measurement, other empirical studies, or modeling. Direct measurement is costly and often impractical, and thus many studies transfer ES production estim...

  11. Transfer Function Calibration Using AN a2 Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupie, Olivia

    1996-07-01

    This proposal acquires FGS TRANS mode scans on asingle star (HD89309) for use in the reference star transfer scanlibrary. These reference scans are crucial calibrations used in theanalysis of the transfer scans of multiple systems.The binary has been studied by Otto Franz and is a puresingle star. This star has been selected to replace areference star which has subsequently shown indications ofduplicity.

  12. Function transfer in human operant experiments: the role of stimulus pairings.

    PubMed Central

    Tonneau, François; González, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Although function transfer often has been studied in complex operant procedures (such as matching to sample), whether operant reinforcement actually produces function transfer in such settings has not been established. The present experiments, with high school students as subjects, suggest that stimulus pairings can promote function transfer in conditions that closely approximate those of matching to sample. In Experiment 1, the subjects showed transfer of operant responding from three geometric figures (C1, C2, C3) to three colored shapes (B1, B2, B3) when the latter were paired with the former. Experiment 2 involved two groups of subjects. In the matching group, subjects matched the colored shapes with the geometric figures; in the yoked group, the shapes were merely paired with the geometric figures, and the schedule of stimulus pairing was yoked to the performance of the subjects in the matching group. Both groups of subjects showed function transfer. Experiment 3 documented function transfer from C stimuli to B stimuli through indirect stimulus pairings (A-B, A-C). In Experiment 4, function transfer was obtained even though the subjects vocalized continuously during the pairing trials, presumably preventing covert verbalization that might mediate transfer effects. Our results are consistent with a Pavlovian account and raise difficulties for current operant theories of function transfer. PMID:15357508

  13. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the k s (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  14. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  15. The bat head-related transfer function reveals binaural cues for sound localization in azimuth and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytekin, Murat; Grassi, Elena; Sahota, Manjit; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2004-12-01

    Directional properties of the sound transformation at the ear of four intact echolocating bats, Eptesicus fuscus, were investigated via measurements of the head-related transfer function (HRTF). Contributions of external ear structures to directional features of the transfer functions were examined by remeasuring the HRTF in the absence of the pinna and tragus. The investigation mainly focused on the interactions between the spatial and the spectral features in the bat HRTF. The pinna provides gain and shapes these features over a large frequency band (20-90 kHz), and the tragus contributes gain and directionality at the high frequencies (60 to 90 kHz). Analysis of the spatial and spectral characteristics of the bat HRTF reveals that both interaural level differences (ILD) and monaural spectral features are subject to changes in sound source azimuth and elevation. Consequently, localization cues for horizontal and vertical components of the sound source location interact. Availability of multiple cues about sound source azimuth and elevation should enhance information to support reliable sound localization. These findings stress the importance of the acoustic information received at the two ears for sound localization of sonar target position in both azimuth and elevation. .

  16. Characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-03-13

    A system for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate and animate sound sources. Electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as animate sound sources such as the human voice, or from machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The systems disclosed enable accurate calculation of transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  17. Origin and function of short-latency inputs to the neural substrates underlying the acoustic startle reflex

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Nieto, Ricardo; Horta-Júnior, José de Anchieta C.; Castellano, Orlando; Millian-Morell, Lymarie; Rubio, Maria E.; López, Dolores E.

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is a survival mechanism of alarm, which rapidly alerts the organism to a sudden loud auditory stimulus. In rats, the primary ASR circuit encompasses three serially connected structures: cochlear root neurons (CRNs), neurons in the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC), and motoneurons in the medulla and spinal cord. It is well-established that both CRNs and PnC neurons receive short-latency auditory inputs to mediate the ASR. Here, we investigated the anatomical origin and functional role of these inputs using a multidisciplinary approach that combines morphological, electrophysiological and behavioral techniques. Anterograde tracer injections into the cochlea suggest that CRNs somata and dendrites receive inputs depending, respectively, on their basal or apical cochlear origin. Confocal colocalization experiments demonstrated that these cochlear inputs are immunopositive for the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1). Using extracellular recordings in vivo followed by subsequent tracer injections, we investigated the response of PnC neurons after contra-, ipsi-, and bilateral acoustic stimulation and identified the source of their auditory afferents. Our results showed that the binaural firing rate of PnC neurons was higher than the monaural, exhibiting higher spike discharges with contralateral than ipsilateral acoustic stimulations. Our histological analysis confirmed the CRNs as the principal source of short-latency acoustic inputs, and indicated that other areas of the cochlear nucleus complex are not likely to innervate PnC. Behaviorally, we observed a strong reduction of ASR amplitude in monaural earplugged rats that corresponds with the binaural summation process shown in our electrophysiological findings. Our study contributes to understand better the role of neuronal mechanisms in auditory alerting behaviors and provides strong evidence that the CRNs-PnC pathway mediates fast neurotransmission and binaural summation

  18. Global excitation of wave phenomena in a dissipative multiconstituent medium. I - Transfer function of the earth's thermosphere. II - Impulsive perturbations in the earth's thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Herrero, F. A.; Varosi, F.

    1984-01-01

    A transfer function approach is taken in constructing a spectral model of the acoustic-gravity wave response in a multiconstituent thermosphere. The model is then applied to describing the thermospheric response to various sources around the globe. Zonal spherical harmonics serve to model the horizontal variations in propagating waves which, when integrated with respect to height, generate a transfer function for a vertical source distribution in the thermosphere. Four wave components are characterized as resonance phenomena and are associated with magnetic activity and ionospheric disturbances. The waves are either trapped or propagate, the latter becoming significant when possessing frequencies above 3 cycles/day. The energy input is distributed by thermospheric winds. The disturbances decay slowly, mainly due to heat conduction and diffusion. Gravity waves appear abruptly and are connected to a sudden switching on or off of a source. Turn off of a source coincides with a reversal of the local atmospheric circulation.

  19. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  20. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  1. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  2. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  3. Holographic elements for modulation transfer function testing of detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharme, Alfred D.; Boreman, Glenn D.

    1995-08-01

    A holographic technique is presented that increases the flux-transfer efficiency of laser speckle generation by a factor of 100 over the integrating sphere method. This makes a wider range of low-power lasers usable for the speckle MTF test, method, and increases the number of wavelengths at which the test can be applied.

  4. Computerized Analysis of Acoustic Characteristics of Patients with Internal Nasal Valve Collapse Before and After Functional Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Fariba; Omrani, Mohammad Reza; Abnavi, Fateme; Mojiri, Fariba; Golabbakhsh, Marzieh; Barati, Sohrab; Mahaki, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of sounds produced during speech provides significant information about the physiology of larynx and vocal tract. The analysis of voice power spectrum is a fundamental sensitive method of acoustic assessment that provides valuable information about the voice source and characteristics of vocal tract resonance cavities. The changes in long-term average spectrum (LTAS) spectral tilt and harmony to noise ratio (HNR) were analyzed to assess the voice quality before and after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse. Before and 3 months after functional rhinoplasty, 12 participants were evaluated and HNR and LTAS spectral tilt in /a/ and /i/ vowels were estimated. It was seen that an increase in HNR and a decrease in LTAS spectral tilt existed after surgery. Mean LTAS spectral tilt in vowel /a/ decreased from 2.37 ± 1.04 to 2.28 ± 1.17 (P = 0.388), and it was decreased from 4.16 ± 1.65 to 2.73 ± 0.69 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.008). Mean HNR in the vowel /a/ increased from 20.71 ± 3.93 to 25.06 ± 2.67 (P = 0.002), and it was increased from 21.28 ± 4.11 to 25.26 ± 3.94 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.002). Modification of the vocal tract caused the vocal cords to close sufficiently, and this showed that although rhinoplasty did not affect the larynx directly, it changes the structure of the vocal tract and consequently the resonance of voice production. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in voice parameters after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse by computerized analysis of acoustic characteristics. PMID:26955564

  5. Computerized Analysis of Acoustic Characteristics of Patients with Internal Nasal Valve Collapse Before and After Functional Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Fariba; Omrani, Mohammad Reza; Abnavi, Fateme; Mojiri, Fariba; Golabbakhsh, Marzieh; Barati, Sohrab; Mahaki, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of sounds produced during speech provides significant information about the physiology of larynx and vocal tract. The analysis of voice power spectrum is a fundamental sensitive method of acoustic assessment that provides valuable information about the voice source and characteristics of vocal tract resonance cavities. The changes in long-term average spectrum (LTAS) spectral tilt and harmony to noise ratio (HNR) were analyzed to assess the voice quality before and after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse. Before and 3 months after functional rhinoplasty, 12 participants were evaluated and HNR and LTAS spectral tilt in /a/ and /i/ vowels were estimated. It was seen that an increase in HNR and a decrease in LTAS spectral tilt existed after surgery. Mean LTAS spectral tilt in vowel /a/ decreased from 2.37 ± 1.04 to 2.28 ± 1.17 (P = 0.388), and it was decreased from 4.16 ± 1.65 to 2.73 ± 0.69 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.008). Mean HNR in the vowel /a/ increased from 20.71 ± 3.93 to 25.06 ± 2.67 (P = 0.002), and it was increased from 21.28 ± 4.11 to 25.26 ± 3.94 in vowel /i/ (P = 0.002). Modification of the vocal tract caused the vocal cords to close sufficiently, and this showed that although rhinoplasty did not affect the larynx directly, it changes the structure of the vocal tract and consequently the resonance of voice production. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in voice parameters after functional rhinoplasty in patients with internal nasal valve collapse by computerized analysis of acoustic characteristics. PMID:26955564

  6. Measurement and calculation of individual head-related transfer functions using a boundary element model including the measurement and effect of skin and hair impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian Fredrick Gray

    1998-12-01

    This research investigates various aspects of the Head- Related Transfer Function (HRTF), which is a description of the acoustic frequency filtering performed by the geometry of the head as a function of incident angle. The effects of this filtering are used in the brain to determine the location of sound sources in space. Initially, various methods for measuring the HRTF are examined, as well as several means of normalizing or equalizing the data. One method is chosen which best represents the informational content of the measured data for comparisons between experimental methods. The question as to whether the acoustic properties of skin and hair contribute to the HRTF is also examined. Measurements are made of the acoustic absorption and impedance of various skin and hair samples using a plane wave tube and two microphones. The limitations of this technique and published standards are also included. Finally, an individual HRTF is calculated using an optically generated surface mesh and a numerical boundary element (BEM) solution. The results of the impedance measurements are included in the calculations. Final analysis consists of comparing the various calculated HRTFs and measured HRTFs. Geometric variations in the head mesh such as removal of the pinna are also included. Good agreement is found given the assumptions made in the generation of the computational model (i.e. lack of torso) throughout the frequency range of the model, which extends from 1-6 kHz. Computational speed and size of the numerical problem limit the work to this region.

  7. The Transfer Velocity Project: A Comprehensive Look at the Transfer Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The 1999-2000 Transfer Velocity Project (TVP) cohort of 147,207 community college students is used to develop both a college-level endogenous model, appropriate for applied research and guidance for campus action, and a student-level model. Survival analysis (Cox regression) is employed to evaluate the relative contribution of 53 student-level…

  8. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  9. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  10. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  11. Imaging performance of annular apertures. III - Apodization and modulation transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1979-01-01

    Apodization functions with decreasing transmission and their opposite, functions with increasing transmission, are investigated for various central obstruction ratios. The resultant modulation transfer functions are presented for various transmission functions and central obstruction ratios. Conclusions applicable to the improvement of imaging performance are discussed.

  12. Characterizing short-term stability for Boolean networks over any distribution of transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadhri, C.; Smith, Andrew M.; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R.; Armstrong, Robert C.

    2016-07-01

    We present a characterization of short-term stability of Kauffman's N K (random) Boolean networks under arbitrary distributions of transfer functions. Given such a Boolean network where each transfer function is drawn from the same distribution, we present a formula that determines whether short-term chaos (damage spreading) will happen. Our main technical tool which enables the formal proof of this formula is the Fourier analysis of Boolean functions, which describes such functions as multilinear polynomials over the inputs. Numerical simulations on mixtures of threshold functions and nested canalyzing functions demonstrate the formula's correctness.

  13. Characterizing short-term stability for Boolean networks over any distribution of transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Seshadhri, C; Smith, Andrew M; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R; Armstrong, Robert C

    2016-07-01

    We present a characterization of short-term stability of Kauffman's NK (random) Boolean networks under arbitrary distributions of transfer functions. Given such a Boolean network where each transfer function is drawn from the same distribution, we present a formula that determines whether short-term chaos (damage spreading) will happen. Our main technical tool which enables the formal proof of this formula is the Fourier analysis of Boolean functions, which describes such functions as multilinear polynomials over the inputs. Numerical simulations on mixtures of threshold functions and nested canalyzing functions demonstrate the formula's correctness. PMID:27575142

  14. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  15. Experimental characterization of the transfer function for a Silver-dielectric superlens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran P; Blaikie, Richard J

    2012-03-12

    We describe a technique for experimentally determining the spatial-frequency modulation transfer function for near-field super-resolution imaging systems and present such a modulation transfer function for a 20|40|20 nm poly(vinyl alcohol)~(PVA)|Silver|PVA superlens exposed to 365 nm wavelength (i-line) radiation through a 50-nm thick tungsten mask. An extensive spectral characterization is achieved from only two exposures, with transmission coefficients determined for spatial frequencies as high as 13 µm-1, corresponding to λ / 4.75. The resulting transfer function is in good agreement with analytical models that incorporate the effects of mask-superlens interactions. PMID:22418523

  16. A Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor as a Receiver for Acoustic Communications Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    A Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) acoustic sensor is used as a receiver for acoustic communications signals. Acoustic transmissions were generated in aluminium and Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) panels. The FBG receiver was coupled to the bottom surface opposite a piezoelectric transmitter. For the CFC, a second FBG was embedded within the layup for comparison. We show the transfer function, frequency response, and transient response of the acoustic communications channels. In addition, the FBG receiver was used to detect Phase Shift Keying (PSK) communications signals, which was shown to be the most robust method in a highly resonant communications channel. PMID:22346585

  17. Transfer of Chemically Modified Graphene with Retention of Functionality for Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Whitener, Keith E; Lee, Woo-Kyung; Bassim, Nabil D; Stroud, Rhonda M; Robinson, Jeremy T; Sheehan, Paul E

    2016-02-10

    Single-layer graphene chemically reduced by the Birch process delaminates from a Si/SiOx substrate when exposed to an ethanol/water mixture, enabling transfer of chemically functionalized graphene to arbitrary substrates such as metals, dielectrics, and polymers. Unlike in previous reports, the graphene retains hydrogen, methyl, and aryl functional groups during the transfer process. This enables one to functionalize the receiving substrate with the properties of the chemically modified graphene (CMG). For instance, magnetic force microscopy shows that the previously reported magnetic properties of partially hydrogenated graphene remain after transfer. We also transfer hydrogenated graphene from its copper growth substrate to a Si/SiOx wafer and thermally dehydrogenate it to demonstrate a polymer- and etchant-free graphene transfer for potential use in transmission electron microscopy. Finally, we show that the Birch reduction facilitates delamination of CMG by weakening van der Waals forces between graphene and its substrate. PMID:26784372

  18. Training and Transfer Effects of Executive Functions in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorell, Lisa B.; Lindqvist, Sofia; Nutley, Sissela Bergman; Bohlin, Gunilla; Klingberg, Torkel

    2009-01-01

    Executive functions, including working memory and inhibition, are of central importance to much of human behavior. Interventions intended to improve executive functions might therefore serve an important purpose. Previous studies show that working memory can be improved by training, but it is unknown if this also holds for inhibition, and whether…

  19. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1987-07-10

    A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

  20. Pregnancy following nonsurgical donor ovum transfer to a functionally agonadal woman

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, M.V.; Macaso, T.M.; Ishida, E.H.; Giudice, L.; Marshall, J.R.; Buster, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report this country's first nonsurgical donor ovum transfer pregnancy in a functionally agonadal woman who had received chemotherapy and radiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma. For women with ovarian failure, nonsurgical uterine lavage and ovum transfer may provide an opportunity for motherhood that was not possible previously.

  1. Hybrid Surface Acoustic Wave- Electrohydrodynamic Atomization (SAW-EHDA) For the Development of Functional Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Bum; Ali, Kamran; Sajid, Memoon; Uddin Siddiqui, Ghayas; Chang, Dong Eui; Kim, Hyung Chan; Ko, Jeong Beom; Dang, Hyun Woo; Doh, Yang Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Conventional surface acoustic wave - electrostatic deposition (SAW-ED) technology is struggling to compete with other thin film fabrication technologies because of its limitation in atomizing high density solutions or solutions with strong inter-particle bonding that requires very high frequency (100 MHz) and power. In this study, a hybrid surface acoustic wave - electrohydrodynamic atomization (SAW-EHDA) system has been introduced to overcome this problem by integrating EHDA with SAW to achieve the deposition of different types of conductive inks at lower frequency (19.8 MHZ) and power. Three materials, Poly [2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), and Poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene):Polystyrene Sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) have been successfully deposited as thin films through the hybrid SAW-EHDA. The films showed good morphological, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics. To further evaluate the characteristics of deposited films, a humidity sensor was fabricated with active layer of PEDOT:PSS deposited using the SAW-EHDA system. The response of sensor was outstanding and much better when compared to similar sensors fabricated using other manufacturing techniques. The results of the device and the films’ characteristics suggest that the hybrid SAW-EHDA technology has high potential to efficiently produce wide variety of thin films and thus predict its promising future in certain areas of printed electronics. PMID:26478189

  2. Hybrid Surface Acoustic Wave- Electrohydrodynamic Atomization (SAW-EHDA) For the Development of Functional Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Bum; Ali, Kamran; Sajid, Memoon; Uddin Siddiqui, Ghayas; Chang, Dong Eui; Kim, Hyung Chan; Ko, Jeong Beom; Dang, Hyun Woo; Doh, Yang Hoi

    2015-10-01

    Conventional surface acoustic wave - electrostatic deposition (SAW-ED) technology is struggling to compete with other thin film fabrication technologies because of its limitation in atomizing high density solutions or solutions with strong inter-particle bonding that requires very high frequency (100 MHz) and power. In this study, a hybrid surface acoustic wave - electrohydrodynamic atomization (SAW-EHDA) system has been introduced to overcome this problem by integrating EHDA with SAW to achieve the deposition of different types of conductive inks at lower frequency (19.8 MHZ) and power. Three materials, Poly [2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), and Poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene):Polystyrene Sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) have been successfully deposited as thin films through the hybrid SAW-EHDA. The films showed good morphological, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics. To further evaluate the characteristics of deposited films, a humidity sensor was fabricated with active layer of PEDOT:PSS deposited using the SAW-EHDA system. The response of sensor was outstanding and much better when compared to similar sensors fabricated using other manufacturing techniques. The results of the device and the films’ characteristics suggest that the hybrid SAW-EHDA technology has high potential to efficiently produce wide variety of thin films and thus predict its promising future in certain areas of printed electronics.

  3. A reciprocal band-limited Green's function approach for modelling acoustic emission using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naber, R. R.; Bahai, H.; Jones, B. E.

    2006-05-01

    The ability to model acoustic emission (AE) plays an important role in advancing the reliability of AE source characterisation. In this paper, an efficient numerical approach is proposed for modelling AE waves in isotropic solids. The approach is based on evaluating the reciprocal band-limited Green's functions using the finite element (FE) method. In the first section, known analytical solutions of the Green's function for an elastic isotropic infinite plate subjected to point monopole surface loading are used to validate the approach. Then, a study investigating the effects of the spatial resolution of the FE model on the accuracy of the numerical solutions is presented. Furthermore, comparisons between numerical calculations and experimental measurements are presented for a glass plate subjected to two known AE sources (pencil lead break and ball impact). Finally, the reciprocal relation between the source and the receiver is confirmed using numerical simulations of a plane stress model of an elastic isotropic plate.

  4. OrbView-3 Technical Performance Evaluation 2005: Modulation Transfer Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    The Technical performance evaluation of OrbView-3 using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is presented. The contents include: 1) MTF Results and Methodology; 2) Radiometric Calibration Methodology; and 3) Relative Radiometric Assessment Results

  5. Semi-automatic time-series transfer functions via temporal clustering and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, Jonathan L; Shen, H W

    2009-01-01

    When creating transfer functions for time-varying data, it is not clear what range of values to use for classification, as data value ranges and distributions change over time. In order to generate time-varying transfer functions, they search the data for classes that have similar behavior over time, assuming that data points that behave similarly belong to the same feature. They utilize a method they call temporal clustering and sequencing to find dynamic features in value space and create a corresponding transfer function. First, clustering finds groups of data points that have the same value space activity over time. Then, sequencing derives a progression of clusters over time, creating chains that follow value distribution changes. Finally, the cluster sequences are used to create transfer functions, as sequences describe the value range distributions over time in a data set.

  6. Time variation of the electromagnetic transfer function of the earth estimated by using wavelet transform

    PubMed Central

    SUTO, Noriko; HARADA, Makoto; IZUTSU, Jun; NAGAO, Toshiyasu

    2006-01-01

    In order to accurately estimate the geomagnetic transfer functions in the area of the volcano Mt. Iwate (IWT), we applied the interstation transfer function (ISTF) method to the three-component geomagnetic field data observed at Mt. Iwate station (IWT), using the Kakioka Magnetic Observatory, JMA (KAK) as remote reference station. Instead of the conventional Fourier transform, in which temporary transient noises badly degrade the accuracy of long term properties, continuous wavelet transform has been used. The accuracy of the results was as high as that of robust estimations of transfer functions obtained by the Fourier transform method. This would provide us with possibilities for routinely monitoring the transfer functions, without sophisticated statistical procedures, to detect changes in the underground electrical conductivity structure. PMID:25792780

  7. Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Marvin E.; Higgins, Matthew B.

    2007-04-01

    This report documents measurements and analytical modeling of electromagnetic transfer functions to quantify the ability of cloud-to-ground lightning strokes (including horizontal arc-channel components) to couple electromagnetic energy into the Sago mine located near Buckhannon, WV. Two coupling mechanisms were measured: direct and indirect drive. These transfer functions are then used to predict electric fields within the mine and induced voltages on conductors that were left abandoned in the sealed area of the Sago mine.

  8. Uniformly Asymptotic Frequency Domain Green's Functions for the Acoustic Equation - Theory and Applications in Two and Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, Matthew; Virieux, Jean

    2010-05-01

    As data collection in both seismic data acquisition and radar continues to improve, more emphasis is being placed on data pre-processing and inversion, in particular frequency domain waveform inversion in seismology [1], and, for example, time-domain waveform inversion in crosshole radar measurements [2]. Complementary to these methods are the sensitivity kernel techniques established initially in seismology [3, 4]. However, these methods have also been employed in crosshole radar tomography [5]. The sensitivity kernel technique has most recently been applied to the analysis of diffraction of waves in shallow water [6]. Central to the sensitivity kernel techniques is the use of an appropriate Green's function in either two or three dimensions and a background model is assumed for the calculation of the Green's function. In some situations, the constant velocity Green's function is used [5] but in other situations a smooth background model is used in a ray-type approximation. In the case of the smooth background model, computation of a ray-tracing type Green's function is problematic since at the source point the rays convergence, creating a singularity in the computation of the Jacobian used in the amplitude calculation. In fact the source is an axial caustic in two dimensions and a point caustic in three dimensions [7]. To obviate this problem, we will create a uniform asymptotic ansatz [8], explaining in detail how it is obtained in two dimensions. We will then show how to extend the results to three dimensions. In both cases, the Green's function will be obtained in the frequency domain for the acoustic equation with smoothly varying density and bulk modulus. The application of the new Green's function technique will provide more flexibility in the computation of sensitivities, both in seismological and radar applications. References [1] R. G. Pratt. 1999, Seismic waveform inversion in the frequency domain, part 1: Theory and verification in a physical scale

  9. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  10. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  11. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  12. Transfer Relations Between Landscape Functions - The Hydrological Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohrer, N.; Lenhart, T.; Eckhardt, K.; Frede, H.-G.

    EC market policies and regional subsidy programs have an enormous impact on local land use. This has far reaching consequences on various landscape functions. In the joint research project SFB299 at the Giessen University the effect of land use options on economic, ecological and hydrological landscape functions are under investigation. The continuous time step model SWAT-G (Eckhardt et al., 2000; Arnold et al., 1998) is employed to characterize the influence of land use patterns on hydrological processes. The model was calibrated and validated employing a split sample approach. For two mesoscale watersheds (Aar, 60 km2; Dietzhölze, 81 km2) located in the Lahn-Dill- Bergland, Germany, different land use scenarios were analyzed with regard to their hydrological impact. Additionally the effect of land use change was analyzed with an ecological and an agro-economic model. The impact of the stepwise changing land use was expressed as trade off relations between different landscape functions.

  13. Determining A Purely Symbolic Transfer Function from Symbol Streams: Theory and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    Transfer function modeling is a \\emph{standard technique} in classical Linear Time Invariant and Statistical Process Control. The work of Box and Jenkins was seminal in developing methods for identifying parameters associated with classical $(r,s,k)$ transfer functions. Discrete event systems are often \\emph{used} for modeling hybrid control structures and high-level decision problems. \\emph{Examples include} discrete time, discrete strategy repeated games. For these games, a \\emph{discrete transfer function in the form of} an accurate hidden Markov model of input-output relations \\emph{could be used to derive optimal response strategies.} In this paper, we develop an algorithm \\emph{for} creating probabilistic \\textit{Mealy machines} that act as transfer function models for discrete event dynamic systems (DEDS). Our models are defined by three parameters, $(l_1, l_2, k)$ just as the Box-Jenkins transfer function models. Here $l_1$ is the maximal input history lengths to consider, $l_2$ is the maximal output history lengths to consider and $k$ is the response lag. Using related results, We show that our Mealy machine transfer functions are optimal in the sense that they maximize the mutual information between the current known state of the DEDS and the next observed input/output pair.

  14. Global Propagation of Gravity Waves Generated with the Whole Atmosphere Transfer Function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Wolven, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity waves are ubiquitous phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere, accounting for a significant fraction of its observed variability. These waves, with periods ranging from minutes to hours, are thought to be a major means for exchange of momentum and energy between atmospheric regions. The Transfer Function Model (TFM) describes acoustic gravity waves (AGW) that propagate across the globe in a dissipative static background atmosphere extending from the ground to 700 km. The model is limited to waves with periods << 12 hr where the Coriolis force is not important. Formulated in terms of zonal vector spherical harmonics and oscillation frequencies, the linearized equations of energy, mass, and momentum conservation are solved to generate the transfer function (TF) for a chosen height distribution of the excitation source. The model accounts for momentum exchange between atmospheric species (He, O, N2, O2, Ar), which affects significantly the wave amplitudes and phases of thermospheric temperature, densities, and wind fields. Covering a broad range of frequencies and spherical harmonic wave numbers (wavelengths), without limitations, the assembled TF captures the physics that controls the propagation of AGW, and the computational effort is considerable. For a chosen horizontal geometry and impulsive time dependence of the source, however, the global wave response is then obtained in short order. The model is computationally efficient and well suited to serve as an experimental and educational tool for simulating propagating wave patterns on the globe. The model is also semi-analytical and therefore well suited to explore the different wave modes that can be generated under varying dynamical conditions. The TFM has been applied to simulate the AGW, which are generated in the auroral region of the thermosphere by joule heating and momentum coupling due to solar wind induced electric fields [e.g., Mayr et al., Space Science Reviews, 1990]. The auroral source generates

  15. Functionalization of Rhenium Aryl Bonds by O-Atom Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, Steven M.; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Nielsen, Robert J.; Gunnoe, T. Brent; Goddard, William A.; Periana, Roy A.

    2011-03-29

    Aryltrioxorhenium (ArReO3) has been demonstrated to show rapid oxy-functionalization upon reaction with O-atom donors, YO, to selectively generate the corresponding phenols in near quantitative yields. 18O-Labeling experiments show that the oxygen in the products is exclusively from YO. DFT studies reveal a 10.7 kcal/mol barrier (Ar = Ph) for oxy-functionalization with H2O2 via a Baeyer-Villiger type mechanism involving nucleophilic attack of the aryl group on an electrophilic oxygen of YO coordinated to rhenium.

  16. Study of non-Maxwellian trapped electrons by using generalized (r,q) distribution function and their effects on the dynamics of ion acoustic solitary wave

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, H.A.

    2006-01-15

    By using the generalized (r,q) distribution function, the effect of particle trapping on the linear and nonlinear evolution of an ion-acoustic wave in an electron-ion plasma has been discussed. The spectral indices q and r contribute to the high-energy tails and flatness on top of the distribution function respectively. The generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations with associated solitary wave solutions for different ranges of parameter r are derived by employing a reductive perturbation technique. It is shown that spectral indices r and q affect the trapping of electrons and subsequently the dynamics of the ion acoustic solitary wave significantly.

  17. Helicopter far-field acoustic levels as a function of reduced rotor speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Lemasurier, Philip; Smith, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will present far-field measured noise levels relative to tests conducted with a model S-76A helicopter. The project was designed to provide supplemental experimental flight data which may be used to further study reduced helicopter rotor speeds (and thus, advancing blade-tip Mach number) effects on far-field acoustic levels. The aircraft was flown in straight and level flight while operating with both the rotor speed and flight speed as test variables. The rotor speed was varied over the range of 107 percent of the main-rotor speed (NR) to 90 percent NR and with the forward flight speed varied over the range of 155 to 35 knots indicated air speed. These conditions produced a wide range of advancing blade-tip Mach numbers to which the noise data are related.

  18. Evolution of the electron acoustic signal as function of doping level in III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bresse, J.F.; Papadopoulo, A.C.

    1988-07-01

    The evolution of the electron acoustic signal has been measured for Be- and Si-doped GaAs and Ga/sub 0.28/Al/sub 0.19/In/sub 0.53/As layers with doping levels from10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/ at. cm/sup -3/. The samples have also been analyzed by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy for near-band-edge transition and deep level emission. The results are explained by the reduction of the mean free path of phonons, giving rise to a lattice thermal conductivity decrease. Meanwhile, the electronic part of the thermal conductivity of these compounds is found to be nearly negligible.

  19. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with themore » corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.« less

  20. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Busha, M. T.; Wechsler, R. H.; Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Rykoff, E.; Becker, M. R.; Bruderer, C.; Gamper, L.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero, A.; Desai, S.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Eifler, T.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with the corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.

  1. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with the corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.

  2. Acoustic underwater signals with a probable function during competitive feeding in a tadpole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Erik; Ndriantsoa, Serge Herilala; Strauß, Axel; Randrianiaina, Roger-Daniel; Rasolonjatovo Hiobiarilanto, Tahiry; Glaw, Frank; Glos, Julian; Vences, Miguel

    2011-02-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread among adult stages of terrestrial animals and fish and has also been observed in insect larvae. We report underwater acoustic communication in the larvae of a frog, Gephyromantis azzurrae, from Isalo, a sandstone massif in western Madagascar. According to our field data, these tadpoles live in streams and prefer habitats characterized by comparatively low temperatures, shallow water depth, and a relatively fast current. Feeding experiments indicated that the tadpoles are carnivorous and macrophagous. They consumed insect larvae and, to a lesser extent, small shrimps, and conspecific as well as heterospecific tadpoles. Calls of these tadpoles consisted either of single click notes or of irregular series of various clicks. Some complex calls have a pulsed structure with three to nine indistinct energy pulses. Production of the pulses coincided with rapid closure of the jaw sheaths and often with an upward movement of the body. Calls were emitted while attacking prey and occurred significantly more often when attacking conspecifics. Tadpoles that had not been fed for some time emitted sounds more frequently than those that had been regularly fed. The spectral frequency of the calls differed in tadpole groups of different size and was higher in groups of smaller tadpoles, suggesting that spectral frequency carries some information about tadpole size which might be important during competitive feeding to assess size and strength of competitors. This report differs from those for the larvae of South American horned frogs, Ceratophrys ornata. These are the only other tadpoles for which sound production has reliably been reported but the calls of Ceratophrys tadpoles occur mainly in a defensive context.

  3. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Ng, L.C.

    1998-03-17

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching. 35 figs.

  4. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    1998-01-01

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching.

  5. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications. PMID:25418084

  6. Improved Displacement Transfer Functions for Structure Deformed Shape Predictions Using Discretely Distributed Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    In the formulations of earlier Displacement Transfer Functions for structure shape predictions, the surface strain distributions, along a strain-sensing line, were represented with piecewise linear functions. To improve the shape-prediction accuracies, Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated using piecewise nonlinear strain representations. Through discretization of an embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a strain-sensing line) into multiple small domains, piecewise nonlinear functions were used to describe the surface strain distributions along the discretized embedded beam. Such piecewise approach enabled the piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations to yield slope and deflection equations in recursive forms. The resulting Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, written in summation forms, were expressed in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By feeding the surface strains into the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, structural deflections could be calculated at multiple points for mapping out the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The shape-prediction accuracies of the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were then examined in view of finite-element-calculated deflections using different tapered cantilever tubular beams. It was found that by using the piecewise nonlinear strain representations, the shape-prediction accuracies could be greatly improved, especially for highly-tapered cantilever tubular beams.

  7. Inverse transfer method using polymers with various functional groups for controllable graphene doping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Kyu; Yang, Jae Won; Kim, Hyun Ho; Jo, Sae Byeok; Kang, Boseok; Bong, Hyojin; Lee, Hyo Chan; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S; Cho, Kilwon

    2014-08-26

    The polymer-supported transfer of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene provides large-area and high-quality graphene on a target substrate; however, the polymer and organic solvent residues left by the transfer process hinder the application of CVD-grown graphene in electronic and photonic devices. Here, we describe an inverse transfer method (ITM) that permits the simultaneous transfer and doping of graphene without generating undesirable residues by using polymers with different functional groups. Unlike conventional wet transfer methods, the polymer supporting layer used in the ITM serves as a graphene doping layer placed at the interface between the graphene and the substrate. Polymers bearing functional groups can induce n-doping or p-doping into the graphene depending on the electron-donating or -withdrawing characteristics of functional groups. Theoretical models of dipole layer-induced graphene doping offered insights into the experimentally measured change in the work function and the Dirac point of the graphene. Finally, the electrical properties of pentacene field effect transistors prepared using graphene electrodes could be enhanced by employing the ITM to introduce a polymer layer that tuned the work function of graphene. The versatility of polymer functional groups suggests that the method developed here will provide valuable routes to the development of applications of CVD-grown graphene in organic electronic devices. PMID:25050634

  8. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B.; Barry, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. The modulation transfer function of an optical coherence tomography imaging system in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolliams, P. D.; Tomlins, P. H.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we describe measurements of the contrast transfer function, modulation transfer function and point-spread function of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system through scattering layers having a dimension-less scattering depth over the range 0.2-6.9. The results were found to be insensitive to scattering density, indicating that these measurement parameters alone do not well characterize the practical imaging ability of an OCT instrument. Attenuation and increased noise floor due to optical scattering were found to be the primary imaging limit and the effect of multiple scattering on OCT resolution was negligible.

  10. Application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to line-by-line radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, B. M.; Abrarov, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    We show that a new approach based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) enables the computation of line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution without loss of accuracy. The algorithm provides rapid and accurate computation of area under the Voigt function in a way that preserves spectral radiance and, consequently, radiant intensity. The error analysis we provide shows the high-accuracy of the proposed SIVF approximations. A comparison of the performance of the method with that of the traditional LBL approach is presented. Motivations for the use and advantage of the SIVF as a replacement for conventional line function computations in radiative transfer are discussed.

  11. Spherical Harmonics, Singular-Value Decomposition and the Head-Related Transfer Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NELSON, P. A.; KAHANA, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The singular-value decomposition (SVD) can be used to analyze the matrix of Green functions relating the acoustic pressure at a number of field points to the strengths of a number of point sources on the surface of a body which radiates or scatters sound. The left and right singular vectors of the resulting decomposition yield, at a given frequency, two sets of orthogonal basis functions describing “field mode shapes” and “source mode shapes” respectively. This paper attempts to make the connection between this decomposition and the basis functions of classical acoustics. In particular, it is found that for a spherical co-ordinate system, when the source points and field points are chosen in order to sample the source and field appropriately, then the matrices of left and right singular vectors are related to the sampled spherical harmonics by a unitary transformation. Preliminary investigations are presented of the sensitivity of this relationship to the manner in which the source and field are sampled. In addition, the great utility of the method is illustrated with some new results of numerical analysis of the scattering of sound by the outer ear. “Pinna resonances” and their associated “mode shapes” are identified at certain frequencies where high values of the dominant singular values indicate a strong coupling between source and field.

  12. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Quantum Information Processing in An Array of Fiber Coupled Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Zou, Jian; Shao, Bin

    2010-04-01

    We consider a fiber coupled cavity array. Each cavity is doped with a single two-level atom. By treating the atom-cavity systems as combined polaritonic qubits, we can transform it into a polaritonic qubit-qubit array in the dispersive regime. We show that the four fiber coupled cavity open chain and ring can both generate the four qubit W state and cluster state, and can both transfer one and two qubit arbitrary states. We also discuss the dynamical behaviors of the four fiber coupled cavity array with unequal couplings.

  13. Effects of aging on left atrial reservoir, conduit, and booster pump function: a multi-institution acoustic quantification study

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, K; Mor-Avi, V; Gorcsan, J; DeMaria, A; Kimball, T; Monaghan, M; Perez, J; Weinert, L; Bednarz, J; Edelman, K; Kwan, O; Glascock, B; Hancock, J; Baumann, C; Lang, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the feasibility of measuring left atrial (LA) function with acoustic quantification (AQ) and then assess the effects of age and sex on LA reservoir, conduit, and booster pump function.
PATIENTS AND SETTING—165 subjects without cardiovascular disease, 3-79 years old, were enrolled by six tertiary hospital centres.
INTERVENTIONS—Continuous LA AQ area data were acquired and signal averaged to form composite waveforms which were analysed off-line.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Parameters of LA performance according to age and sex.
RESULTS—Signal averaged LA waveforms were sufficiently stable and detailed to allow automated analysis in all cases. An age related increase in LA area was noted. LA reservoir function did not vary with age or sex. All parameters of LA passive and active emptying revealed a significant age dependency. Overall, the passive emptying phase accounted for 66% of total LA emptying ranging from 76% in the youngest to 44% in the oldest decade. LA contraction accounted for 34% of atrial emptying in all subjects combined with the older subjects being more dependent on atrial booster pump function. When adjusted for atrial size, there were no sex related differences in LA function.
CONCLUSIONS—LA reservoir, conduit, and booster pump function can be assessed with automated analysis of signal averaged LA area waveforms. As LA performance varies with age, establishment of normal values should enhance the evaluation of pathologic states in which LA function is important.


Keywords: aging; atrium; echocardiography PMID:11179264

  14. Effects of eye-glasses, hair, headgear, and clothing on measured head-related transfer functions Part Ib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, Klaus A. J.

    2003-10-01

    Extensive head-related transfer function (HRTF) measurements show high HRTF repeatability, consequences of different measurement methods, and conditions covering the whole three-dimensional space [Riederer, J. Audio Eng. Soc. (Abstracts) 46, 1036 (1998), preprint 4846]. This study concentrates on specific effects on HRTFs carefully re-measured on the same Cortex dummy head applying Sennheiser KE4-211-2 microphones at its silicone putty blocked ear-canal entrances, employing 252 sound incidents including seven elevations. The effects of five different wigs (synthetic, natural, thick, thin, long and short hair) with varied hairstyles, four hats (cap, bicycle helmet, mens and womens trilby), clothes (alpaca pullover, bicycling drymax-jacket) and spectacles were investigated under 28 combinations. The influences are highly dependent on direction, frequency, and case. Clothes and eye-glasses affect minimally HRTF; hair has a stronger effect, depending on the actual hairdo (typically above 7 kHz). Hats alter intensively HRTFs (typically above 5 kHz), depending on the model. The measurements give deeper insight to the development of idiosyncratic features in binaural localization cues. The second part of the study addresses their perceptual effects [Riederer, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., this issue]. [Work supported by Graduate School of Electronics, Telecommunication and Automation; thanks to Finnish Broadcasting Company, Mr. Hellstrom; Mrs. Chen.

  15. Effect of fuel mixture fraction and velocity perturbations on the flame transfer function of swirl stabilized flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Stefan; Di-Chiaro, Giacomo; Biagioli, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    A novel methodology is developed to decompose the classic Flame Transfer Function (FTF) used in the thermo-acoustic stability analysis of lean premix combustors into contributions of different types. The approach is applied, in the context of Large Eddy Simulation (LES), to partially-premixed and fully-premixed flames, which are stabilized via a central recirculation zone as a result of the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The first type of decomposition is into contributions driven by fuel mixture fraction and dynamic velocity fluctuations. Each of these two contributions is further split into the components of turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The flame surface area component, driven by the pure dynamic velocity fluctuation, which is shown to be a dominant contribution to the overall FTF, is also additionally decomposed over the coherent flow structures using proper orthogonal decomposition. Using a simplified model for the dynamic response of premixed flames, it is shown that the distribution of the FTF, as obtained from LES, is closely related to the characteristics of the velocity field frequency response to the inlet perturbation. Initially, the proposed method is tested and validated with a well characterized laboratory burner geometry. Subsequently, the method is applied to an industrial gas turbine burner.

  16. Determination of the transfer function for optical surface topography measuring instruments—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Matthew R.; Giusca, Claudiu L.; Coupland, Jeremy M.; Török, Peter; Leach, Richard K.

    2013-05-01

    A significant number of areal surface topography measuring instruments, largely based on optical techniques, are commercially available. However, implementation of optical instrumentation into production is currently difficult due to the lack of understanding of the complex interaction between the light and the component surface. Studying the optical transfer function of the instrument can help address this issue. Here a review is given of techniques for the measurement of optical transfer functions. Starting from the basis of a spatially coherent, monochromatic confocal scanning imaging system, the theory of optical transfer functions in three-dimensional (3D) imaging is presented. Further generalizations are reviewed allowing the extension of the theory to the description of conventional and interferometric 3D imaging systems. Polychromatic transfer functions and surface topography measurements are also discussed. Following presentation of theoretical results, experimental methods to measure the optical transfer function of each class of system are presented, with a focus on suitable methods for the establishment of calibration standards in 3D imaging and surface topography measurements.

  17. Flexor carpi ulnaris transfer for radial nerve palsy: functional testing of long-term results.

    PubMed

    Raskin, K B; Wilgis, E F

    1995-09-01

    Controversy persists over the use of the flexor carpi ulnaris for transfer to the extensor digitorum communis in the treatment of radial nerve palsy. Six patients with complete, irreparable radial nerve palsies were treated in part with the flexor carpi ulnaris to extensor digitorum communis tendon transfer (standard transfers: pronator teres to extensor carpi radialis brevis, flexor carpi ulnaris to extensor digitorum communis, and palmaris longus to the rerouted extensor pollicis longus) and were functionally tested for long-term results. The average follow-up time was 8 years (range, 3-15). A control group was comprised of 10 volunteers of similar demographics. This study evaluates the long-term functional recovery in three categories: range of motion, dynamic power of wrist motion, and functional ability as determined by work simulation techniques. The activities simulated were swinging a hammer, sawing wood, tightening screws, and using pliers. A functional range of motion was maintained in all patients, and the power of wrist motion was sufficient to perform all activities of daily living. The work simulation testing revealed no significant difference between the tendon transfer patients and control group with respect to hand dominance and normal variance. All patients were able to perform the simulated work with the same variance in power as the control group. Despite the obvious anatomic loss, wrist function is not significantly impaired after flexor carpi ulnaris tendon transfer for radial nerve palsy. PMID:8522738

  18. Modulation transfer function measurements of QWIP and superlattice focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Ting, D. Z.; Rafol, S. B.; Soibel, A.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Hill, C.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Keo, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this presentation we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of 1024x1024 pixels multi-band quantum well infrared photodetector and 320x256 pixels long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays.

  19. Targeted energy transfers and passive acoustic wave redirection in a two-dimensional granular network under periodic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yijing Moore, Keegan J.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; McFarland, D. Michael

    2015-12-21

    We study passive pulse redirection and nonlinear targeted energy transfer in a granular network composed of two semi-infinite, ordered homogeneous granular chains mounted on linear elastic foundations and coupled by weak linear stiffnesses. Periodic excitation in the form of repetitive half-sine pulses is applied to one of the chains, designated as the “excited chain,” whereas the other chain is initially at rest and is regarded as the “absorbing chain.” We show that passive pulse redirection and targeted energy transfer from the excited to the absorbing chain can be achieved by macro-scale realization of the spatial analog of the Landau-Zener quantum tunneling effect. This is realized by finite stratification of the elastic foundation of the excited chain and depends on the system parameters (e.g., the percentage of stratification) and on the parameters of the periodic excitation. Utilizing empirical mode decomposition and numerical Hilbert transforms, we detect the existence of two distinct nonlinear phenomena in the periodically forced network; namely, (i) energy localization in the absorbing chain due to sustained 1:1 resonance capture leading to irreversible pulse redirection from the excited chain, and (ii) continuous energy exchanges in the form of nonlinear beats between the two chains in the absence of resonance capture. Our results extend previous findings of transient passive energy redirection in impulsively excited granular networks and demonstrate that steady state passive pulse redirection in these networks can be robustly achieved under periodic excitation.

  20. Targeted energy transfers and passive acoustic wave redirection in a two-dimensional granular network under periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijing; Moore, Keegan J.; McFarland, D. Michael; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2015-12-01

    We study passive pulse redirection and nonlinear targeted energy transfer in a granular network composed of two semi-infinite, ordered homogeneous granular chains mounted on linear elastic foundations and coupled by weak linear stiffnesses. Periodic excitation in the form of repetitive half-sine pulses is applied to one of the chains, designated as the "excited chain," whereas the other chain is initially at rest and is regarded as the "absorbing chain." We show that passive pulse redirection and targeted energy transfer from the excited to the absorbing chain can be achieved by macro-scale realization of the spatial analog of the Landau-Zener quantum tunneling effect. This is realized by finite stratification of the elastic foundation of the excited chain and depends on the system parameters (e.g., the percentage of stratification) and on the parameters of the periodic excitation. Utilizing empirical mode decomposition and numerical Hilbert transforms, we detect the existence of two distinct nonlinear phenomena in the periodically forced network; namely, (i) energy localization in the absorbing chain due to sustained 1:1 resonance capture leading to irreversible pulse redirection from the excited chain, and (ii) continuous energy exchanges in the form of nonlinear beats between the two chains in the absence of resonance capture. Our results extend previous findings of transient passive energy redirection in impulsively excited granular networks and demonstrate that steady state passive pulse redirection in these networks can be robustly achieved under periodic excitation.

  1. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  2. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  3. Revisiting Neil Armstrongs Moon-Landing Quote: Implications for Speech Perception, Function Word Reduction, and Acoustic Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Baese-Berk, Melissa M; Dilley, Laura C; Schmidt, Stephanie; Morrill, Tuuli H; Pitt, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Neil Armstrong insisted that his quote upon landing on the moon was misheard, and that he had said one small step for a man, instead of one small step for man. What he said is unclear in part because function words like a can be reduced and spectrally indistinguishable from the preceding context. Therefore, their presence can be ambiguous, and they may disappear perceptually depending on the rate of surrounding speech. Two experiments are presented examining production and perception of reduced tokens of for and for a in spontaneous speech. Experiment 1 investigates the distributions of several acoustic features of for and for a. The results suggest that the distributions of for and for a overlap substantially, both in terms of temporal and spectral characteristics. Experiment 2 examines perception of these same tokens when the context speaking rate differs. The perceptibility of the function word a varies as a function of this context speaking rate. These results demonstrate that substantial ambiguity exists in the original quote from Armstrong, and that this ambiguity may be understood through context speaking rate. PMID:27603209

  4. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  5. On-orbit Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) Measurements for IKONOS and QuickBird

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helde, Dennis; Choi, Jason; Anderson, Cody

    2007-01-01

    Point Spread Function is a method of evaluation the spatial resolution of an imaging system. It is also a measure of the spread of a single point of light. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is a measure of the spatial frequency response. It is often calculated from th point spread function (PSF). System response at the Nyquist frequency (or 0.5 cycle/pixel) is often used as a figure of merit

  6. Clinical feasibility study of combined opto-acoustic and ultrasonic imaging modality providing coregistered functional and anatomical maps of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Smith, Remie J.; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Ermilov, Sergey; Conjusteau, André; Tsyboulski, Dmitri; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. C.; Otto, Pamela

    2013-03-01

    We report on findings from the clinical feasibility study of the ImagioTM. Breast Imaging System, which acquires two-dimensional opto-acoustic (OA) images co-registered with conventional ultrasound using a specialized duplex hand-held probe. Dual-wavelength opto-acoustic technology is used to generate parametric maps based upon total hemoglobin and its oxygen saturation in breast tissues. This may provide functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism and microvasculature, which is complementary to morphological information obtained with conventional gray-scale ultrasound. We present co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical feasibility study. The clinical results illustrate that the technology may have the capability to improve the efficacy of breast tumor diagnosis. In doing so, it may have the potential to reduce biopsies and to characterize cancers that were not seen well with conventional gray-scale ultrasound alone.

  7. A single-sided homogeneous Green's function representation for holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wapenaar, Kees; Thorbecke, Jan; van der Neut, Joost

    2016-04-01

    Green's theorem plays a fundamental role in a diverse range of wavefield imaging applications, such as holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval. In many of those applications, the homogeneous Green's function (i.e. the Green's function of the wave equation without a singularity on the right-hand side) is represented by a closed boundary integral. In practical applications, sources and/or receivers are usually present only on an open surface, which implies that a significant part of the closed boundary integral is by necessity ignored. Here we derive a homogeneous Green's function representation for the common situation that sources and/or receivers are present on an open surface only. We modify the integrand in such a way that it vanishes on the part of the boundary where no sources and receivers are present. As a consequence, the remaining integral along the open surface is an accurate single-sided representation of the homogeneous Green's function. This single-sided representation accounts for all orders of multiple scattering. The new representation significantly improves the aforementioned wavefield imaging applications, particularly in situations where the first-order scattering approximation breaks down.

  8. Effect of Higher-Order Spherical Aberration Term on Transfer Function in Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Yuji; Fujimoto, Fuminori

    1986-04-01

    The effect of the higher-order spherical aberration coefficient on the transfer function in transmission electron microscopy was calculated. In order to simplify the system, the optical illumination system was assumed to be perfectly coherent and axially symmetric. The result shows that the effect of the fifth-order spherical aberration coefficient, C5, on the usual transfer function with the third-order spherical aberration coefficient Cs\\equivC3{=}0.5 mm for 100 keV electrons cannot be neglected, if high-order Bragg reflections from net planes with smaller lattice spacings than 0.1 nm are utilized for lattice imaging. The effect of the higher-order term due to the defocussing on the transfer function is also discussed.

  9. Obtaining the Transfer Function of optical instruments using large calibrated reference objects.

    PubMed

    Henning, A J; Huntley, J M; Giusca, C L

    2015-06-29

    It has been suggested recently that the Transfer Function of instruments such as Coherence Scanning Interferometers could be measured via a single measurement of a large spherical artefact [Appl. Opt.53(8), 1554-1563 (2014)]. In the current paper we present analytical solutions for the Fourier transform of the 'foil' model used in this technique, which thus avoids the artefacts resulting from the numerical approach used earlier. The Fourier transform of a partial spherical shell is found to contain points of zero amplitude for spatial frequencies that lie within the Transfer Function. This implies that the Transfer Function is unmeasurable at these points when a single spherical artefact is used, in situations where the foil model is a valid representation of the physical system. We propose extensions to the method to address this issue. PMID:26191674

  10. Linear and nonlinear transfer functions of single mode fiber for optical transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Binh, Le Nguyen

    2009-07-01

    The transmittance transfer function of single mode optical fibers operating in both linear and nonlinear regions is presented. For the linear domain, Fresnel sine and cosine integrals are obtained via the Fourier transform. In the nonlinear region dominated by self-phase-modulation effects, the Volterra series is essential to obtain the nonlinear transfer function. A convergence criterion for the Volterra series transfer function (VSTF) approach is described for solving the nonlinear Schrödinger wave propagation equation. Soliton transmission over single fibers is demonstrated as a case study of the application of the VSTF and a modified VSTF with a number of segmented steps whose distance is within the limit of the convergence of the VSTF. PMID:19568291

  11. Investigating Gravity Wave-Ionosphere Interactions Using The Transfer Function Model And An Ionosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruntz, R. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Miller, E. S.; Bust, G. S.; Mayr, H. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Transfer Function Model (TFM) has been used in numerous studies to simulate gravity waves. In the TFM, the time dependence is formulated in terms of frequencies, and the horizontal wave pattern on the globe is formulated in terms of vector spherical harmonics. For a wide range of frequencies, the equations of mass, energy and momentum conservation are solved to compile a transfer function. The transfer function can then be easily combined with a time-dependent source whose spatial extent is also expressed in spherical harmonics, to produce a global atmospheric response, including gravity waves. This approach has significant benefits in that the solution is grid-independent (without any inherent limits on resolution), and the solutions do not suffer from singularities at the poles. We will show results from our simulations that couple the output of the TFM to an ionospheric model, to predict traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) driven by the simulated gravity waves.

  12. The Mid-Term Changes of Pulmonary Function Tests After Phrenic Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Masoud; Hassanpour, Seyed Esmail; Khodayari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the restoration of elbow flexion, the phrenic nerve has proven to be a good donor, but considering the role of the phrenic nerve in respiratory function, we cannot disregard the potential dangers of this method. Objectives: In the current study, we reviewed the results of pulmonary function tests (PFT) in four patients who underwent phrenic nerve transfer. Patients and Methods: We reviewed the results of serial spirometry tests, which were performed before and after phrenic nerve transfer surgery. Results: All patients regained Biceps power to M3 strength or above. None of our patients experienced pulmonary problems or respiratory complaints, but a significant reduction of spirometric parameters occurred after surgery. Conclusions: This study highlights the close link between the role of the phrenic nerve and pulmonary function, such that the use of this nerve as a transfer donor leads to spirometric impairments. PMID:27148498

  13. Experimental determination of the particle motions associated with the low order acoustic modes in enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, K. P.; Marshall, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for experimentally determining, in terms of the particle motions, the shapes of the low order acoustic modes in enclosures is described. The procedure is based on finding differentiable functions which approximate the shape functions of the low order acoustic modes when these modes are defined in terms of the acoustic pressure. The differentiable approximating functions are formed from polynomials which are fitted by a least squares procedure to experimentally determined values which define the shapes of the low order acoustic modes in terms of the acoustic pressure. These experimentally determined values are found by a conventional technique in which the transfer functions, which relate the acoustic pressures at an array of points in the enclosure to the volume velocity of a fixed point source, are measured. The gradient of the function which approximates the shape of a particular mode in terms of the acoustic pressure is evaluated to give the mode shape in terms of the particle motion. The procedure was tested by using it to experimentally determine the shapes of the low order acoustic modes in a small rectangular enclosure.

  14. Frequency and Category Factors in the Reduction and Assimilation of Function Words: EPG and Acoustic Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Rushen; Gick, Bryan; Kanwischer, Dara; Wilson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have observed phonetic and phonological differences between function words and content words. However, as many of the most commonly cited function words are also very high in frequency, it is unclear whether these differences are the result of syntactic category or word frequency. This study attempts to determine whether syntactically…

  15. An adaptive transfer function for deriving the aortic pressure waveform from a peripheral artery pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Gokul; Xu, Da; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2009-11-01

    We developed a new technique to mathematically transform a peripheral artery pressure (PAP) waveform distorted by wave reflections into the physiologically more relevant aortic pressure (AP) waveform. First, a transfer function relating PAP to AP is defined in terms of the unknown parameters of a parallel tube model of pressure and flow in the arterial tree. The parameters are then estimated from the measured PAP waveform along with a one-time measurement of the wave propagation delay time between the aorta and peripheral artery measurement site (which may be accomplished noninvasively) by exploiting preknowledge of aortic flow. Finally, the transfer function with its estimated parameters is applied to the measured waveform so as to derive the AP waveform. Thus, in contrast to the conventional generalized transfer function, the transfer function is able to adapt to the intersubject and temporal variability of the arterial tree. To demonstrate the feasibility of this adaptive transfer function technique, we performed experiments in 6 healthy dogs in which PAP and reference AP waveforms were simultaneously recorded during 12 different hemodynamic interventions. The AP waveforms derived by the technique showed agreement with the measured AP waveforms (overall total waveform, systolic pressure, and pulse pressure root mean square errors of 3.7, 4.3, and 3.4 mmHg, respectively) statistically superior to the unprocessed PAP waveforms (corresponding errors of 8.6, 17.1, and 20.3 mmHg) and the AP waveforms derived by two previously proposed transfer functions developed with a subset of the same canine data (corresponding errors of, on average, 5.0, 6.3, and 6.7 mmHg). PMID:19783780

  16. Acoustic Techniques for Measuring Surface Sealing and Crusting of Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, C. J.; Leary, D.; Dicarlo, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The microtopography of soils is an important surface characteristic that effects water ponding, infiltration, and consequently soil erosion. During a rainstorm event the surface microtopography and soil matrix evolve, thereby altering the erosion and runoff dynamics. The impact of raindrops cause the breakdown of soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can then be deposited into the smaller depressions. The redistribution of soil particles on the surface during rainfall produce a thin surface layer often referred to as surface sealing or crusting. For the purpose of this presentation, surface sealing will be used to describe a reduction in the ability of fluid to flow across the surface. Surface crusting will be associated with the formation of a thin layer of higher stiffness or larger mechanical strength. The sensitivity of acoustics to the effects of sealing and crusting was examined by measuring the acoustic-to seismic (A/S) transfer function and acoustic reflectivity on two different soils in a dry, wetted and rained-on state. The A/S transfer function measurement involves the use of a suspended loud speaker to impinge acoustic energy from the air onto the sample and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the induced surface particle velocity. Therefore, the A/S transfer function is a measure of the seismic energy that has been transferred into the soil from the airborne wave. The acoustic surface reflectivity is a measurement of the amount of acoustic energy reflected from the surface and requires the use of a microphone suspended above the surface. Results suggests that the seismic energy transferred (A/S transfer function) is sensitive to crust formation but is not as sensitive to sealing. The amount of reflected acoustic energy appears to be more sensitive to sealing than crusting.

  17. Virtual Acoustics: Evaluation of Psychoacoustic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current virtual acoustic displays for teleconferencing and virtual reality are usually limited to very simple or non-existent renderings of reverberation, a fundamental part of the acoustic environmental context that is encountered in day-to-day hearing. Several research efforts have produced results that suggest that environmental cues dramatically improve perceptual performance within virtual acoustic displays, and that is possible to manipulate signal processing parameters to effectively reproduce important aspects of virtual acoustic perception in real-time. However, the computational resources for rendering reverberation remain formidable. Our efforts at NASA Ames have been focused using a several perceptual threshold metrics, to determine how various "trade-offs" might be made in real-time acoustic rendering. This includes both original work and confirmation of existing data that was obtained in real rather than virtual environments. The talk will consider the importance of using individualized versus generalized pinnae cues (the "Head-Related Transfer Function"); the use of head movement cues; threshold data for early reflections and late reverberation; and consideration of the necessary accuracy for measuring and rendering octave-band absorption characteristics of various wall surfaces. In addition, a consideration of the analysis-synthesis of the reverberation within "everyday spaces" (offices, conference rooms) will be contrasted to the commonly used paradigm of concert hall spaces.

  18. Effects of finite spectral bandwidth and focusing error on the transfer function in stellar speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsubo, J.

    1985-05-01

    The normal model of light propagation through a turbulent atmosphere is used to investigate the telescope-atmosphere transfer function in stellar speckle interferometry. The effect of the finite bandwidth of a spectral filter on the transfer function is considered. The permissible focusing errors for successful processing in stellar speckle interferometry are obtained based on the normal model. Some observational results are presented and compared with theory. The normal model leads to an analytically simple solution and properly describes light scattering from turbulent atmosphere. The results for the normal model are compared with those for the log-normal model.

  19. Amino-functionalized green fluorescent carbon dots as surface energy transfer biosensors for hyaluronidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Ning; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-04-21

    Amino-functionalized fluorescent carbon dots have been prepared by hydrothermal treatment of glucosamine with excess pyrophosphate. The produced carbon dots showed stabilized green emission fluorescence at various excitation wavelengths and pH environments. Herein, we demonstrate the surface energy transfer between the amino-functionalized carbon dots and negatively charged hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles. Hyaluronidase can degrade hyaluronate and break down the hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles to inhibit the surface energy transfer. The developed fluorescent carbon dot/gold nanoparticle system can be utilized as a biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of hyaluronidase by two modes which include fluorescence measurements and colorimetric analysis. PMID:25807038

  20. Transfer function analysis of the autonomic response to respiratory activity during random interval breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Stevenson, K.; Cohen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    We report a new method for the noninvasive characterization of the frequency response of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in mediating fluctuations in heart rate (HR). The approach entails computation of the transfer function magnitude and phase between instantaneous lung volume and HR. Broad band fluctuations in lung volume were initiated when subjects breathed on cue to a sequence of beeps spaced randomly in time. We studied 10 subjects in both supine and standing positions. The transfer function, averaged among all the subjects, showed systematic differences between the two postures, reflecting the differing frequency responses of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS.

  1. Dynamic Acoustic Radiation Force Retains Bone Structural and Mechanical Integrity in a Functional Disuse Osteopenia Model

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Sardar M. Z.; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Disuse osteopenia and bone loss have been extensively reported in long duration space mission and long term bed rest. The pathology of the bone loss is similar to osteoporosis but highly confined to weight bearing bones. The current anabolic and/or anti-resorptive drugs have systemic effects and are costly over extended time, with concerns of long term fracture risk. This study use Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) as a non-invasive acoustic force and anabolic stimulus to countermeasure disuse induced bone loss. Four-month old C57BL/6 mice were randomized to five groups, 1) age-matched (AM), 2) non-suspended sham (NS), 3) nonsuspended –LIPUS (NU), 4) suspended sham (SS), and 5) suspended-LIPUS (SU) groups. After four weeks of suspension, µCT analyses showed significant decreases in trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) (−36%, p<0.005), bone tissue mineral density (TMD) (−3%, p<0.05), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (−12.5%, p<0.005), and increase in bone surface/bone volume (+BS/BV) (+16%, p<0.005), relative to age-matched (AM). Application of LIPUS for 20 min/day for 5 days/week, significantly increased TMD (+3%, p<0.05), Tb.Th (+6%, p<0.05), and decreased BS/BV (−10%, p<0.005), relative to suspension alone (SS) mice. Histomorphometry analyses showed a breakdown of bone microstructure under disuse conditions consist with µCT results. In comparison to SS mice, LIPUS treated bone showed increased structural integrity with increased bone formation rates at metaphysical endosteal and trabecular surfaces (+0.104±0.07 vs 0.031±0.30 µm3/µm2/d) relative to SS. Four-point bending mechanical tests of disused SS femurs showed reduced elastic modulus (−53%, p<0.05), yield (−33%, p<0.05) and ultimate strength (−45%, p<0.05) at the femoral diaphysis relative to AM bone. LIPUS stimulation mitigated the adverse effects of disuse on bone elastic modulus (+42%, p<0.05), yield strength (+29%, p<0.05), and ultimate strength (+39%, p<0.05) relative to SS

  2. Inverse material identification in coupled acoustic-structure interaction using a modified error in constitutive equation functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-09-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level.

  3. A Study of Mexican Free-Tailed Bat Chirp Syllables: Bayesian Functional Mixed Models for Nonstationary Acoustic Time Series

    PubMed Central

    MARTINEZ, Josue G.; BOHN, Kirsten M.; CARROLL, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new approach to analyze chirp syllables of free-tailed bats from two regions of Texas in which they are predominant: Austin and College Station. Our goal is to characterize any systematic regional differences in the mating chirps and assess whether individual bats have signature chirps. The data are analyzed by modeling spectrograms of the chirps as responses in a Bayesian functional mixed model. Given the variable chirp lengths, we compute the spectrograms on a relative time scale interpretable as the relative chirp position, using a variable window overlap based on chirp length. We use 2D wavelet transforms to capture correlation within the spectrogram in our modeling and obtain adaptive regularization of the estimates and inference for the regions-specific spectrograms. Our model includes random effect spectrograms at the bat level to account for correlation among chirps from the same bat, and to assess relative variability in chirp spectrograms within and between bats. The modeling of spectrograms using functional mixed models is a general approach for the analysis of replicated nonstationary time series, such as our acoustical signals, to relate aspects of the signals to various predictors, while accounting for between-signal structure. This can be done on raw spectrograms when all signals are of the same length, and can be done using spectrograms defined on a relative time scale for signals of variable length in settings where the idea of defining correspondence across signals based on relative position is sensible. PMID:23997376

  4. Inverse Material Identification in Coupled Acoustic-Structure Interaction using a Modified Error in Constitutive Equation Functional

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level. PMID:25339790

  5. A Study of Mexican Free-Tailed Bat Chirp Syllables: Bayesian Functional Mixed Models for Nonstationary Acoustic Time Series.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Josue G; Bohn, Kirsten M; Carroll, Raymond J; Morris, Jeffrey S

    2013-06-01

    We describe a new approach to analyze chirp syllables of free-tailed bats from two regions of Texas in which they are predominant: Austin and College Station. Our goal is to characterize any systematic regional differences in the mating chirps and assess whether individual bats have signature chirps. The data are analyzed by modeling spectrograms of the chirps as responses in a Bayesian functional mixed model. Given the variable chirp lengths, we compute the spectrograms on a relative time scale interpretable as the relative chirp position, using a variable window overlap based on chirp length. We use 2D wavelet transforms to capture correlation within the spectrogram in our modeling and obtain adaptive regularization of the estimates and inference for the regions-specific spectrograms. Our model includes random effect spectrograms at the bat level to account for correlation among chirps from the same bat, and to assess relative variability in chirp spectrograms within and between bats. The modeling of spectrograms using functional mixed models is a general approach for the analysis of replicated nonstationary time series, such as our acoustical signals, to relate aspects of the signals to various predictors, while accounting for between-signal structure. This can be done on raw spectrograms when all signals are of the same length, and can be done using spectrograms defined on a relative time scale for signals of variable length in settings where the idea of defining correspondence across signals based on relative position is sensible. PMID:23997376

  6. Dynamics of charge transfer: Rate processes formulated with nonequilibrium Green's functions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeganeh, Sina; Ratner, Mark A.; Mujica, Vladimiro

    2007-04-28

    The authors examine the connection between electron transport under bias in a junction and nonadiabatic intramolecular electron transfer (ET). It is shown that under certain assumptions it is possible to define a stationary current that allows the computation of the intramolecular transfer rate using the same formalism that is employed in the description of transport. They show that the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism of quantum transport can be used to calculate the ET rate. The formal connection between electron transport and electron transfer is made, and they work out the simple case of an electronic level coupled to a vibrational mode representing a thermal bath and show that the result is the same as expected from a Fermi golden rule treatment, and in the high-temperature limit yields the Marcus electron transfer theory. The usefulness of this alternative formulation of rates is discussed.

  7. Functional evaluation of the hand and foot after one-stage toe-to-hand transfer.

    PubMed

    Frykman, G K; O'Brien, B M; Morrison, W A; MacLeod, A M

    1986-01-01

    Twenty toe-to-hand transfers in 17 patients with an average follow-up of 54 months have been reviewed to quantify hand function and donor morbidity. Eleven toe-to-thumb and nine toe-to-finger procedures were performed. Surgical and follow-up data were available for all patients. Twelve patients (14 procedures) were reviewed in detail, with particular attention given to foot and hand function. Total active motion after toe-to-thumb transfer was 48 degrees and 106 degrees after toe-to-finger transfer. Two-point discrimination was less than or equal to 15 mm in 13 digits (65%). Grip and pinch power were related to the number of digits present on the reconstructed hand and to the presence or absence of functioning thenar muscles. Eleven of 12 patients can walk and run normally (mean of 5 years after surgery). Six (50%) cannot wear thongs or heavy boots, but all can wear normal shoes. The transferred great toe decreased in volume by an average of 10% over the years since the operation. Transferred toes became useful digits in the hand, and foot morbidity was minor and not progressive. PMID:3944453

  8. Direct metal transfer printing on flexible substrate for fabricating optics functional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yingjie; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Feng; Shi, Zhenwu; Chen, Linsen; Peng, Changsi

    2015-11-01

    New functional materials and devices based on metal patterns can be widely used in many new and expanding industries,such as flat panel displays, alternative energy,sensors and so on. In this paper, we introduce a new transfer printing method for fabricating metal optics functional devices. This method can directly transfer a metal pattern from a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)supported UV or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern to another PET substrate. Purely taking advantage of the anaerobic UV curing adhesive (a-UV) on PET substrate, metal film can be easily peeled off from micro/nano-structured surface. As a result, metal film on the protrusion can be selectively transferred onto the target substrate, to make it the metal functional surface. But which on the bottom can not be transferred. This method provides low cost fabrication of metal thin film devices by avoiding high cost lithography process. Compared with conventional approach, this method can get more smooth rough edges and has wider tolerance range for the original master mold. Future developments and potential applications of this metal transfer method will be addressed.

  9. Transfer function approach for artificial tracer test interpretation in karstic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, D.; Mangin, A.

    2015-10-01

    A karstic formation consists in a three-dimensional hydrological system which involves horizontal and vertical, diphasic or saturated water transfers characterised by a large range of velocity. These subsurface flow processes correspond to various water pathways through fractured, fissured, and underground streams or conduits leading to a nonlinear global behaviour of the system. An efficient way of investigating of a karstic system behaviour consists in the injection of artificial tracer tests at loss points and in careful analysis of the recovery tracer fluxes at one or several outlets of the systems. These injections are also an efficient way of providing hypotheses on characteristic time of contaminant transfer in these type of aquifers. Here, we propose a Laplace-transform transfer function of the Residence Time Distribution function that allows to discriminate between a quick-flow advection-dominated component and a slow-flow advection-dispersion/dominated component in the artificial tracer transfer in the system. We apply this transfer function on five high resolution sampling rate artificial tracer tests operated on the Baget system in the Pyrenees (France) in order to illustrate the advantages and limitations of this approach. We provide then an interpretation of the relationship between tracer test recovery shape and karstic system organisation between inlet and outlet site.

  10. Acoustic Resonance of a Two-Dimensional Isotropic Medium Studied Using Airy Stress Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarumi, Ryuichi; Yamada, Shinpei; Shibutani, Yoji

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a theory that determines a complete set of stress field, σij, in a freely vibrating two-dimensional isotropic medium within the framework of the calculus of variation. Our formulation is based on the Airy stress function φ and the minimization of the complementary strain energy under the constrain condition || φ|| 2L2 =const. By the Ritz method, the constrained variational problem becomes a linear eigenvalue problem. Numerical analysis yields 36 types of the stress functions φi. Unlike the stress fields determined from the conventional resonant ultrasound spectroscopy theory, the stress fields derived from the stress functions φi explicitly satisfy the stress-free natural boundary condition and the equilibrium equation. It is also confirmed that the 36 resonant modes can be classified into four groups according to the parity of the coefficient of the basis function. Furthermore, the stress functions φi are orthogonal in the sense of the L2 inner product. These features are similar to those of the conventional resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) theory.

  11. Assessment of systolic and diastolic function in heart failure using ambulatory monitoring with acoustic cardiography.

    PubMed

    Dillier, Roger; Zuber, Michel; Arand, Patricia; Erne, Susanne; Erne, Paul

    2011-08-01

    INTRODUCTION. The circadian variation of heart function and heart sounds in patients with and without heart failure (HF) is poorly understood. We hypothesized HF patients would exhibit less circadian variation with worsened cardiac function and sleep apnea. METHODS. We studied 67 HF patients (age 67.4 ± 8.2 years; 42% acute HF) and 63 asymptomatic control subjects with no history of HF (age 61.6 ± 7.7 years). Subjects wore a heart sound/ECG/respiratory monitor. The data were analyzed for sleep apnea, diastolic heart sounds, and systolic time intervals. RESULTS. The HF group had significantly greater prevalence of the third heart sound and prolongation of electro-mechanical activation time, while the control group had an age-related increase in the prevalence of the fourth heart sound. The control group showed more circadian variation in cardiac function. The HF subjects had more sleep apnea and higher occurrence of heart rate non-dipping. CONCLUSIONS. The control subjects demonstrated an increasing incidence of diastolic dysfunction with age, while systolic function was mostly unchanged with aging. Parameters related to systolic function were significantly worse in the HF group with little diurnal variation, indicating a constant stimulation of sympathetic tone in HF and reduction of diurnal regulation. PMID:21361859

  12. Phase-function normalization for accurate analysis of ultrafast collimated radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Brian; Guo, Zhixiong

    2012-04-20

    The scattering of radiation from collimated irradiation is accurately treated via normalization of phase function. This approach is applicable to any numerical method with directional discretization. In this study it is applied to the transient discrete-ordinates method for ultrafast collimated radiative transfer analysis in turbid media. A technique recently developed by the authors, which conserves a phase-function asymmetry factor as well as scattered energy for the Henyey-Greenstein phase function in steady-state diffuse radiative transfer analysis, is applied to the general Legendre scattering phase function in ultrafast collimated radiative transfer. Heat flux profiles in a model tissue cylinder are generated for various phase functions and compared to those generated when normalization of the collimated phase function is neglected. Energy deposition in the medium is also investigated. Lack of conservation of scattered energy and the asymmetry factor for the collimated scattering phase function causes overpredictions in both heat flux and energy deposition for highly anisotropic scattering media. In addition, a discussion is presented to clarify the time-dependent formulation of divergence of radiative heat flux. PMID:22534933

  13. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  14. Evaluation Of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) And Veiling Glare Characteristics For Cathode Ray Tube Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banbury, J. R.

    1981-10-01

    Cathode-ray tube evaluation is becoming increasingly important in connection with the prediction of overall performance for systems incorporating an imaging display. Modulation transfer function has been measured by a method which takes account of the basic non-linearities of the crt and also offers improved accuracy by reducing the effects of phosphor screen noise. Two tests for crt internal veiling glare are discussed. Standard test conditions, which have been successfully used for a wide range of displays are described for both mtf and veiling glare. A contrast index is employed to indicate the extent of nonlinearity in the display transfer characteristic, and the paper also discusses briefly the use of generalised drive characteristics and limiting contrast curves as a supplement or alternative to modulation transfer function for definition of display performance.

  15. Structure and Function of Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP)/StarD2

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno,K.; Wu, M.; Scapa, E.; Roderick, S.; Cohen, D.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a highly specific soluble lipid binding protein that transfers phosphatidylcholine between membranes in vitro. PC-TP is a member of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related transfer (START) domain superfamily. Although its biochemical properties and structure are well characterized, the functions of PC-TP in vivo remain incompletely understood. Studies of mice with homozygous disruption of the Pctp gene have largely refuted the hypotheses that this protein participates in the hepatocellular selection and transport of biliary phospholipids, in the production of lung surfactant, in leukotriene biosynthesis and in cellular phosphatidylcholine metabolism. Nevertheless, Pctp-/- mice exhibit interesting defects in lipid homeostasis, the understanding of which should elucidate the biological functions of PC-TP.

  16. Analytic Transfer Functions for the Dynamics & Control of Flexible Rotating Spacecraft Performing Large Angle Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgohary, Tarek A.; Turner, James D.; Junkins, John L.

    2015-06-01

    A symmetric flexible rotating spacecraft can be modeled as a distributed parameter system of a rigid hub attached to two flexible appendages with tip masses. First, Hamilton's extended principle is utilized to establish a general treatment for deriving the dynamics of multi-body dynamical systems to establish a hybrid system of integro-partial differential equations that model the evolution of the system in space and time. A Generalized State Space (GSS) system of equations is constructed in the frequency domain to obtain analytic transfer functions for the rotating spacecraft. This model does not include spatial discretization. The frequency response of the generally modeled spacecraft and a special case with no tip masses are presented. Numerical results for the system frequency response obtained from the analytic transfer functions are presented and compared against the classical assumed modes numerical method with two choices of admissible functions. The truncation-error-free analytic results are used to validate the numerical approximations and to agree well with the classical widely used finite dimensional numerical solutions. Fundamentally, we show that the rigorous transfer function, without introduction of spatial discretization, can be directly used in control law design with a guarantee of Lyapunov stable closed loop dynamics. The frequency response of the system is used in a classical control problem where the Lyapunov stable controller is derived and tested for gain selection. The correlation between the controller design in the frequency domain utilizing the analytic transfer functions and the system response is analyzed and verified. The derived analytic transfer functions provide a powerful tool to test various control schemes in the frequency domain and a validation platform for existing numerical methods for distributed parameters models. The same platform has been used to obtain the frequency response of more complex beam models following

  17. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  18. Back-illuminated CCD imager adapted for contrast transfer function measurements thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Peter A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Stripe patterns of varying spatial frequency, formed in the top-metalization of a back-illuminated solid-state imager, facilitate on-line measurement of contrast transfer function during wafer-probe testing. The imager may be packaged to allow front-illumination during in-the-field testing after its manufacture.

  19. Time-resolved diffuse spectroscopy measurements using a hybrid Green's function for the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Emanuel; Foschum, Florian; Kienle, Alwin

    2013-06-01

    Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy measurements of phantoms at small source-detector separations yield good results for the retrieved coefficients of reduced scattering and absorption when a hybrid Green's function of the radiative transfer equation for semi-infinite media is used.

  20. 5 CFR 351.303 - Identification of positions with a transferring function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS REDUCTION IN FORCE Transfer of Function § 351.303 Identification of positions with a... agency may supplement the employee's official position description by the use of appropriate records (e.g... separation or demotion by reduction in force at the losing competitive area of any employee with...

  1. 5 CFR 351.303 - Identification of positions with a transferring function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS REDUCTION IN FORCE Transfer of Function § 351.303 Identification of positions with a... agency may supplement the employee's official position description by the use of appropriate records (e.g... separation or demotion by reduction in force at the losing competitive area of any employee with...

  2. Dual Nerve Transfers for Restoration of Shoulder Function After Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bin; Wang, Huan; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yudong; Hu, Shaonan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of shoulder function restoration by dual nerve transfers, spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve and 2 intercostal nerves to the anterior branch of the axillary nerve, in patients with shoulder paralysis that resulted from brachial plexus avulsion injury. It was a retrospective analysis to assess the impact of a variety of factors on reanimation of shoulder functions with dual nerve transfers. A total of 19 patients were included in this study. Most of these patients sustained avulsions of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots (16 patients). Three of them had avulsions of C5 and C6 roots only. Through a posterior approach, direct coaptation of the intercostal nerves and the anterior branch of the axillary nerve was performed, along with accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve. Satisfactory shoulder function recovery (93.83° of shoulder abduction and 54.00° of external rotation on average) was achieved after a 62-month follow-up. This dual nerve transfer procedure provided us with a reliable and effective method for shoulder function reconstruction after brachial plexus root avulsion, especially C5/C6/C7 avulsion. The level of evidence is therapeutic IV. PMID:26835823

  3. The Derived Transfer and Reversal of Mood Functions through Equivalence Relations: II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Jane; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel; Luciano, Carmen; Smeets, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated the transfer of induced mood functions through equivalence relations by means of a musical mood-induction procedure. The research described in this article replicated and extended such work, primarily with the inclusion of a baseline and two types of reversal procedures. First, 16 adult participants were trained…

  4. Transfer functions of double- and multiple-cavity Fabry Perot filters driven by Lorentzian sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Javier; Capmany, Jose

    1996-12-01

    We derive expressions for the transfer functions of double- and multiple-cavity Fabry Perot filters driven by laser sources with Lorentzian spectrum. These are of interest because of their applications in sensing and channel filtering in optical frequency-division multiplexing networks.

  5. 5 CFR 351.303 - Identification of positions with a transferring function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS REDUCTION IN FORCE Transfer of Function § 351.303 Identification of positions with a... agency may supplement the employee's official position description by the use of appropriate records (e.g... separation or demotion by reduction in force at the losing competitive area of any employee with...

  6. Functional outcomes of post-traumatic metacarpal hand reconstruction with free toe-to-hand transfer

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Hari; Bhardwaj, Praveen; Sierakowski, Adam; Sabapathy, S. Raja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We present the functional outcomes of microvascular toe transfer to reconstruct the post-traumatic metacarpal hand deformity. Twelve toe transfers were successfully carried out in 11 patients. Materials and Methods: In each patient, the level of injury was classified according to the Wei classification system. Functional outcome was measured in seven patients using the Tamai score. Additional objective tests of function were carried out in three patients, including the Jebsen test, grip strength, pinch strength, web opening, static and moving two-point discrimination and Semmes–Weinstein monofilament testing. Observation and Results: The average Tamai score was 69 (range 60–83.5). Six patients achieved ‘good’ outcomes and one patient, with a double toe transfer, an ‘excellent’ outcome. The average follow-up time was 43 months (range 10–148 months). Conclusion: This study shows how even a single toe transfer can restore useful function to a hand that has otherwise lost all prehensile ability. PMID:27274118

  7. Modulation transfer function testing of detector arrays using narrow-band laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensiper, Martin; Boreman, Glenn D.; Ducharme, Alfred D.; Snyder, Donald R.

    1993-02-01

    A method for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a detector array from zero spatial frequency to twice the Nyquist frequency is presented. Laser speckle with a tunable, narrow spatial-frequency bandpass is used. The MTF measured with this method is compared to the MTF measured using sine targets. The results of the two methods agree to within 2%.

  8. Quantitative characterization of x-ray differential interference contrast microscopy using modulation transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Chang, Chang

    2011-08-01

    Performance of two types of differential interference contrast objectives, i.e., the XOR pattern and the zone-plate doublet, is quantitatively characterized and compared using modulation transfer function. Effects of partial coherence, finite absorption and phase in a complex object, as well as bias retardation are also examined.

  9. Quantitative characterization of x-ray differential interference contrast microscopy using modulation transfer function.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Chang, Chang

    2011-08-01

    Performance of two types of differential interference contrast objectives, i.e., the XOR pattern and the zone-plate doublet, is quantitatively characterized and compared using modulation transfer function. Effects of partial coherence, finite absorption and phase in a complex object, as well as bias retardation are also examined. PMID:21934894

  10. How Toddlers Acquire and Transfer Tool Knowledge: Developmental Changes and the Role of Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauen, Sabina; Bechtel-Kuehne, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    This report investigates tool learning and its relations to executive functions (EFs) in toddlers. In Study 1 (N = 93), 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-month-old children learned equally well to choose a correct tool from observation, whereas performance based on feedback improved with age. Knowledge transfer showed significant progress after 22 months of…

  11. Moire modulation transfer function of alexandrite rods and their thresholds as lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kafri, O.; Samelson, H.; Chin, T.; Heller, D.F.

    1986-04-01

    We show that there is a simple correlation between the modulation transfer function (MTF) of alexandrite laser rods and the thresholds of these rods as cw lasers. Thus the MTF provides a novel and important way to evaluate material (before or after fabrication) for use in solid-state lasers. This approach should be generally applicable to all solid-state laser materials.

  12. Using Multiple Schedules during Functional Communication Training to Promote Rapid Transfer of Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wayne W.; Greer, Brian D.; Fuhrman, Ashley M.; Querim, Angie C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple schedules with signaled periods of reinforcement and extinction have been used to thin reinforcement schedules during functional communication training (FCT) to make the intervention more practical for parents and teachers. We evaluated whether these signals would also facilitate rapid transfer of treatment effects across settings and…

  13. Amino-functionalized green fluorescent carbon dots as surface energy transfer biosensors for hyaluronidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Ning; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-04-01

    Amino-functionalized fluorescent carbon dots have been prepared by hydrothermal treatment of glucosamine with excess pyrophosphate. The produced carbon dots showed stabilized green emission fluorescence at various excitation wavelengths and pH environments. Herein, we demonstrate the surface energy transfer between the amino-functionalized carbon dots and negatively charged hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles. Hyaluronidase can degrade hyaluronate and break down the hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles to inhibit the surface energy transfer. The developed fluorescent carbon dot/gold nanoparticle system can be utilized as a biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of hyaluronidase by two modes which include fluorescence measurements and colorimetric analysis.Amino-functionalized fluorescent carbon dots have been prepared by hydrothermal treatment of glucosamine with excess pyrophosphate. The produced carbon dots showed stabilized green emission fluorescence at various excitation wavelengths and pH environments. Herein, we demonstrate the surface energy transfer between the amino-functionalized carbon dots and negatively charged hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles. Hyaluronidase can degrade hyaluronate and break down the hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles to inhibit the surface energy transfer. The developed fluorescent carbon dot/gold nanoparticle system can be utilized as a biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of hyaluronidase by two modes which include fluorescence measurements and colorimetric analysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00070j

  14. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) measurement techniques for lenses and linear detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnabel, J. J., Jr.; Kaishoven, J. E., Jr.; Tom, D.

    1984-01-01

    Application is the determination of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for linear detector arrays. A system set up requires knowledge of the MTF of the imaging lens. Procedure for this measurement is described for standard optical lab equipment. Given this information, various possible approaches to MTF measurement for linear arrays is described. The knife edge method is then described in detail.

  15. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals. PMID:27423052

  16. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses. PMID:25920860

  17. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  18. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  19. Structure-based modeling of head-related transfer functions towards interactive customization of binaural sound systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Navarun

    2003-10-01

    One of the most popular techniques for creating spatialized virtual sounds is based on the use of Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs). HRTFs are signal processing models that represent the modifications undergone by the acoustic signal as it travels from a sound source to each of the listener's eardrums. These modifications are due to the interaction of the acoustic waves with the listener's torso, shoulders, head and pinnae, or outer ears. As such, HRTFs are somewhat different for each listener. For a listener to perceive synthesized 3-D sound cues correctly, the synthesized cues must be similar to the listener's own HRTFs. One can measure individual HRTFs using specialized recording systems, however, these systems are prohibitively expensive and restrict the portability of the 3-D sound system. HRTF-based systems also face several computational challenges. This dissertation presents an alternative method for the synthesis of binaural spatialized sounds. The sound entering the pinna undergoes several reflective, diffractive and resonant phenomena, which determine the HRTF. Using signal processing tools, such as Prony's signal modeling method, an appropriate set of time delays and a resonant frequency were used to approximate the measured Head-Related Impulse Responses (HRIRs). Statistical analysis was used to find out empirical equations describing how the reflections and resonances are determined by the shape and size of the pinna features obtained from 3D images of 15 experimental subjects modeled in the project. These equations were used to yield "Model HRTFs" that can create elevation effects. Listening tests conducted on 10 subjects show that these model HRTFs are 5% more effective than generic HRTFs when it comes to localizing sounds in the frontal plane. The number of reversals (perception of sound source above the horizontal plane when actually it is below the plane and vice versa) was also reduced by 5.7%, showing the perceptual effectiveness of this

  20. Nonlinear analysis of spatial vision using first-and-second-order Volterra transfer functions measurement.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, A D

    1990-01-01

    The harmonic input method of nonlinear system identification is modified to allow the Volterra series approach to be used for psychophysical investigation of various aspects of human pattern vision in the spatial frequency domain. While it is well known that only one modulation transfer function provides a complete characterization of a linear system, a number of multidimensional transfer functions are needed to identify a nonlinear system. We have shown, that so far as the contrast sensitivity to sine-wave gratings may be used for an empirical estimate of the first-order modulation transfer function of the human visual system, the contrast sensitivity to difference harmonics may be used as an empirical estimate of the second-order modulation transfer function. A difference harmonic arises from a mixture of two sine-wave gratings resulting from the nonlinearity of the visual system. Difference harmonic, experienced as some periodic beatlike structure, may still be observed if frequencies of the component gratings are higher than the maximum visual acuity. The visibility of the low-frequency beatlike pattern produced by pairs of sine-wave gratings, which themselves are of spatial frequencies too high to be resolved, could be accounted for either by a difference frequency distortion product (Burton, 1973) or by a special beat detector (Derrington & Badcock, 1985). We found that increasing the contrast of one component grating may be compensated for by reducing the contrast of the other component grating, the beatlike pattern being at threshold. This is exactly what would be expected if the beatlike pattern is detected because of the difference harmonics produced by nonlinearity of the visual system. We have determined contrast thresholds for the difference harmonics which occur between two unresolved different spatial frequencies. The contrast sensitivity function for difference harmonics was found to have a marked similarity both in the shape and position of peak

  1. An optimal perfectly matched layer with unbounded absorbing function for time-harmonic acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, A.; Hervella-Nieto, L.; Prieto, A.; Rodríguez, R.

    2007-05-01

    We introduce an optimal bounded perfectly matched layer (PML) technique by choosing a particular absorbing function with unbounded integral. With this choice, spurious reflections are avoided, even though the thickness of the layer is finite. We show that such choice is easy to implement in a finite element method and overcomes the dependency of parameters for the discrete problem. Finally, its efficiency and accuracy are illustrated with some numerical tests.

  2. Characterization of the point spread function and modulation transfer function of scattered radiation using a digital imaging system.

    PubMed

    Boone, J M; Arnold, B A; Seibert, J A

    1986-01-01

    A digital radiographic system was used to measure the distribution of scattered x radiation from uniform slabs of Lucite at various thicknesses. Using collimation and air gap techniques, [primary + scatter] images and primary images were digitally acquired, and subtracted to obtain scatter images. The scatter distributions measured using small circular apertures were computer fit to an analytical function, representing the circular aperture function convolved with a modified Gaussian point spread function (PSF). On the basis of goodness of fit criterion, the proposed Gaussian function is a very good model for the scatter PSF. The measured scatter PSF's are reported for various Lucite thicknesses. Using the PSF's, the modulation transfer functions are calculated, and this spatial frequency information may have value in analytical scatter removal techniques, grid design, and air gap optimization. PMID:3702823

  3. The effects of asymmetric hearing on bilateral brainstem function: findings in children with bimodal (electric and acoustic) hearing.

    PubMed

    Polonenko, Melissa J; Papsin, Blake C; Gordon, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    As implantation criteria are broadening to include children with asymmetric hearing loss, it is important to determine the degree of residual hearing needed to protect the bilateral auditory pathways for binaural hearing and whether there is a sensitive period in development for implantation in these children. We have been studying these questions in a growing cohort of children. In the present study, auditory brainstem responses were recorded in 21 children who had 2.2 ± 2.2 years of bimodal hearing. Responses were evoked by 11-Hz acoustic clicks presented to the non-implanted ear and with biphasic electric pulses presented to the implanted ear. Twelve of these children also completed a behavioural task in which they were asked to which side of their heads bilaterally presented clicks/pulses that varied in interaural level or timing lateralized. All children experienced a delay in the non-implanted ear that resulted in 2.0 ± 0.35 ms longer peak latencies. These were further prolonged in 7 children as measured by longer interwave latencies from this ear than from the implanted ear. Despite large asymmetries in timing of brainstem activity between the two ears, all children perceived changes in interaural level differences. They were unable to detect differences in interaural timing cues. Symmetric brainstem function suggests bilateral development was preserved in some children. Future work will explore whether these children have better potential for developing binaural hearing using bimodal input. PMID:25998954

  4. Audibility of dispersion error in room acoustic finite-difference time-domain simulation as a function of simulation distance.

    PubMed

    Saarelma, Jukka; Botts, Jonathan; Hamilton, Brian; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-04-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation has been a popular area of research in room acoustics due to its capability to simulate wave phenomena in a wide bandwidth directly in the time-domain. A downside of the method is that it introduces a direction and frequency dependent error to the simulated sound field due to the non-linear dispersion relation of the discrete system. In this study, the perceptual threshold of the dispersion error is measured in three-dimensional FDTD schemes as a function of simulation distance. Dispersion error is evaluated for three different explicit, non-staggered FDTD schemes using the numerical wavenumber in the direction of the worst-case error of each scheme. It is found that the thresholds for the different schemes do not vary significantly when the phase velocity error level is fixed. The thresholds are found to vary significantly between the different sound samples. The measured threshold for the audibility of dispersion error at the probability level of 82% correct discrimination for three-alternative forced choice is found to be 9.1 m of propagation in a free field, that leads to a maximum group delay error of 1.8 ms at 20 kHz with the chosen phase velocity error level of 2%. PMID:27106330

  5. Incorporation of charge transfer into the explicit polarization fragment method by grand canonical density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Isegawa, Miho; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular fragmentation algorithms provide a powerful approach to extending electronic structure methods to very large systems. Here we present a method for including charge transfer between molecular fragments in the explicit polarization (X-Pol) fragment method for calculating potential energy surfaces. In the conventional X-Pol method, the total charge of each fragment is preserved, and charge transfer between fragments is not allowed. The description of charge transfer is made possible by treating each fragment as an open system with respect to the number of electrons. To achieve this, we applied Mermin's finite temperature method to the X-Pol wave function. In the application of this method to X-Pol, the fragments are open systems that partially equilibrate their number of electrons through a quasithermodynamics electron reservoir. The number of electrons in a given fragment can take a fractional value, and the electrons of each fragment obey the Fermi–Dirac distribution. The equilibrium state for the electrons is determined by electronegativity equalization with conservation of the total number of electrons. The amount of charge transfer is controlled by re-interpreting the temperature parameter in the Fermi–Dirac distribution function as a coupling strength parameter. We determined this coupling parameter so as to reproduce the charge transfer energy obtained by block localized energy decomposition analysis. We apply the new method to ten systems, and we show that it can yield reasonable approximations to potential energy profiles, to charge transfer stabilization energies, and to the direction and amount of charge transferred. PMID:21895159

  6. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bramlette, T. Tazwell; Keller, Jay O.

    1989-01-01

    A heat transfer apparatus includes a first chamber having a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, and an outlet. A first heat transfer gas source provides a first gas flow to the first chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A second gas flow through a second chamber connected to the side of the first chamber, generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling of the first and second gases in the acoustically augmented first chamber. The first chamber may also include a material inlet for receiving material to be dried, in which case the gas outlet serves as a dried material and gas outlet.

  7. [Music-Acoustic Signals Controlled by Subject's Brain Potentials in the Correction of Unfavorable Functional States].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2016-01-01

    Literature review and the results of own studies on the development and experimental testing of musical EEG neurofeedback technology are presented. The technology is based on exposure of subjects to music or music-like signals that are organized in strict accordance with the current values of brain potentials of the patient. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the effectiveness of several versions of the technology, using specific and meaningful for the individual narrow-frequency EEG oscillators during the correction of unfavorable changes of the functional state. PMID:27149824

  8. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program was developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions showed significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. The velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation, since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field, as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provided a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  9. Green's function solution to heat transfer of a transparent gas through a tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, J. I.

    1989-01-01

    A heat transfer analysis of a transparent gas flowing through a circular tube of finite thickness is presented. This study includes the effects of wall conduction, internal radiative exchange, and convective heat transfer. The natural mathematical formulation produces a nonlinear, integrodifferential equation governing the wall temperature and an ordinary differential equation describing the gas temperature. This investigation proposes to convert the original system of equations into an equivalent system of integral equations. The Green's function method permits the conversion of an integrodifferential equation into a pure integral equation. The proposed integral formulation and subsequent computational procedure are shown to be stable and accurate.

  10. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative functionalization via a single electron transfer (SET) process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Tang, Conghui; Jiao, Ning

    2012-05-01

    Copper salts have been developed as versatile catalysts for oxidative coupling reactions in organic synthesis. During these processes, Cu-catalysts are often proposed to serve as a one-electron oxidant to promote the single-electron transfer process. Recently, the transition-metal catalyzed direct dehydrogenative transformation has attracted considerable attention. This tutorial review summarizes the recent advances in the copper-catalyzed dehydrogenative functionalization via a single electron transfer (SET) process achieving C-C, C-N, C-O, C-halogen atoms, C-P, and N-N bond formation. PMID:22349590

  11. Thermal imaging through the atmosphere: Atmospheric modulation transfer function theory and verification

    SciTech Connect

    Sadot, D.; Kitron, G.; Kitron, N.; Kopeika, N.S. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    Atmospheric modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements carried out simultaneously in both thermal imaging atmospheric windows using both passive and actively heated targets are presented. Results indicate rather significant angular spatial frequency dependence of the MTF, in contradiction to the conventional approach, which assumes contrast transfer is atmospheric transmission only. A theoretical explanation is discussed, based on aerosol forward scattering and absorption effects, which is shown to be angular spatial frequency dependent and yields MTF results similar to those measured. This means that small details are blurred much more than large details by the atmosphere, thus also affecting target acquisition probabilities.

  12. Efficient application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to radiative transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrarov, Sanjar

    We present a new application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) to the radiative transfer spectroscopy that enables computation of the spectral radiance and radiance at reduced spectral resolution. Applying a technique based on the Fourier expansion of the exponential multiplier we obtain the series approximations providing high-accuracy and rapid SIVF computation. In contrast to traditional line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer models, the proposed SIVF algorithm prevents underestimation in the absorption coefficients and, therefore, preserves the radiant energy. LBL sample computations utilizing SIVF algorithm show the advantages of the proposed methodology in terms of the accuracy and computational speed.

  13. Transfer function approach based on simulation results for the determination of pod curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeyer, S.; Jenson, F.; Dominguez, N.; Iakovleva, E.

    2012-05-01

    POD curves estimations are based on statistical studies of empirical data which are obtained thru costly and time consuming experimental campaigns. Currently, cost reduction of POD trials is a major issue. A proposed solution is to replace some of the experimental data required to determine the POD with model based results. Following this idea, the concept of Model Assisted POD (MAPOD) has been introduced first in the US in 2004 through the constitution of the MAPOD working group. One approach to Model Assisted POD is based on a transfer function which uses empirical data and models to transfer POD measured for one specific application to another related application. The objective of this paper is to show how numerical simulations could help to determine such transfer functions. A practical implementation of the approach to a high frequency eddy current inspection for fatigue cracks is presented. Empirical data is available for the titanium alloy plates. A model based transfer function is used to assess a POD curve for the inspection of aluminum components.

  14. Charge-transfer-directed radical substitution enables para-selective C-H functionalization.

    PubMed

    Boursalian, Gregory B; Ham, Won Seok; Mazzotti, Anthony R; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Efficient C-H functionalization requires selectivity for specific C-H bonds. Progress has been made for directed aromatic substitution reactions to achieve ortho and meta selectivity, but a general strategy for para-selective C-H functionalization has remained elusive. Herein we introduce a previously unappreciated concept that enables nearly complete para selectivity. We propose that radicals with high electron affinity elicit arene-to-radical charge transfer in the transition state of radical addition, which is the factor primarily responsible for high positional selectivity. We demonstrate with a simple theoretical tool that the selectivity is predictable and show the utility of the concept through a direct synthesis of aryl piperazines. Our results contradict the notion, widely held by organic chemists, that radical aromatic substitution reactions are inherently unselective. The concept of radical substitution directed by charge transfer could serve as the basis for the development of new, highly selective C-H functionalization reactions. PMID:27442288

  15. Charge-transfer-directed radical substitution enables para-selective C–H functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boursalian, Gregory B.; Ham, Won Seok; Mazzotti, Anthony R.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Efficient C–H functionalization requires selectivity for specific C–H bonds. Progress has been made for directed aromatic substitution reactions to achieve ortho and meta selectivity, but a general strategy for para-selective C–H functionalization has remained elusive. Herein we introduce a previously unappreciated concept that enables nearly complete para selectivity. We propose that radicals with high electron affinity elicit arene-to-radical charge transfer in the transition state of radical addition, which is the factor primarily responsible for high positional selectivity. We demonstrate with a simple theoretical tool that the selectivity is predictable and show the utility of the concept through a direct synthesis of aryl piperazines. Our results contradict the notion, widely held by organic chemists, that radical aromatic substitution reactions are inherently unselective. The concept of radical substitution directed by charge transfer could serve as the basis for the development of new, highly selective C–H functionalization reactions.

  16. Structural and functional effects of acoustic exposure in goldfish: evidence for tonotopy in the teleost saccule

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mammalian and avian auditory hair cells display tonotopic mapping of frequency along the length of the cochlea and basilar papilla. It is not known whether the auditory hair cells of fishes possess a similar tonotopic organization in the saccule, which is thought to be the primary auditory receptor in teleosts. To investigate this question, we determined the location of hair cell damage in the saccules of goldfish (Carassius auratus) following exposure to specific frequencies. Subjects were divided into six groups of six fish each (five treatment groups plus control). The treatment groups were each exposed to one of five tones: 100, 400, 800, 2000, and 4000 Hz at 176 dB re 1 μPa root mean squared (RMS) for 48 hours. The saccules of each fish were dissected and labeled with phalloidin in order to visualize hair cell bundles. The hair cell bundles were counted at 19 specific locations in each saccule to determine the extent and location of hair cell damage. In addition to quantification of anatomical injury, hearing tests (using auditory evoked potentials) were performed on each fish immediately following sound exposure. Threshold shifts were calculated by subtracting control thresholds from post-sound exposure thresholds. Results All sound-exposed fish exhibited significant hair cell and hearing loss following sound exposure. The location of hair cell loss varied along the length of the saccule in a graded manner with the frequency of sound exposure, with lower and higher frequencies damaging the more caudal and rostral regions of the saccule, respectively. Similarly, fish exposed to lower frequency tones exhibited greater threshold shifts at lower frequencies, while high-frequency tone exposure led to hearing loss at higher frequencies. In general, both hair cell and hearing loss declined as a function of increasing frequency of exposure tone, and there was a significant linear relationship between hair cell loss and hearing loss. Conclusions The

  17. Electric-acoustic pitch comparisons in single-sided-deaf cochlear implant users: frequency-place functions and rate pitch.

    PubMed

    Schatzer, Reinhold; Vermeire, Katrien; Visser, Daniel; Krenmayr, Andreas; Kals, Mathias; Voormolen, Maurits; Van de Heyning, Paul; Zierhofer, Clemens

    2014-03-01

    Eight cochlear implant users with near-normal hearing in their non-implanted ear compared pitch percepts for pulsatile electric and acoustic pure-tone stimuli presented to the two ears. Six subjects were implanted with a 31-mm MED-EL FLEX(SOFT) electrode, and two with a 24-mm medium (M) electrode, with insertion angles of the most apical contacts ranging from 565° to 758°. In the first experiment, frequency-place functions were derived from pure-tone matches to 1500-pps unmodulated pulse trains presented to individual electrodes and compared to Greenwood's frequency position map along the organ of Corti. While the overall median downward shift of the obtained frequency-place functions (-0.16 octaves re. Greenwood) and the mean shifts in the basal (<240°; -0.33 octaves) and middle (-0.35 octaves) regions were statistically significant, the shift in the apical region (>480°; 0.26 octaves) was not. Standard deviations of frequency-place functions were approximately half an octave at electrode insertion angles below 480°, increasing to an octave at higher angular locations while individual functions were gradually leveling off. In a second experiment, subjects matched the rates of unmodulated pulse trains presented to individual electrodes in the apical half of the array to low-frequency pure tones between 100 Hz and 450 Hz. The aim was to investigate the influence of electrode place on the salience of temporal pitch cues, for coding strategies that present temporal fine structure information via rate modulations on select apical channels. Most subjects achieved reliable matches to tone frequencies from 100 Hz to 300 Hz only on electrodes at angular insertion depths beyond 360°, while rate-matches to 450-Hz tones were primarily achieved on electrodes at shallower insertion angles. Only for electrodes in the second turn the average slopes of rate-pitch functions did not differ significantly from the pure-tone references, suggesting their use for the encoding

  18. True Katydids (Pseudophyllinae) from Guadeloupe: Acoustic Signals and Functional Considerations of Song Production

    PubMed Central

    Stumpner, Andreas; Dann, Angela; Schink, Matthias; Gubert, Silvia; Hugel, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Guadeloupe, the largest of the Leeward Islands, harbors three species of Pseudophyllinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) belonging to distinct tribes. This study examined the basic aspects of sound production and acousto-vibratory behavior of these species. As the songs of many Pseudophyllinae are complex and peak at high frequencies, they require high quality recordings. Wild specimens were therefore recorded ex situ. Collected specimens were used in structure-function experiments. Karukerana aguilari Bonfils (Pterophyllini) is a large species with a mirror in each tegmen and conspicuous folds over the mirror. It sings 4–6 syllables, each comprising 10–20 pulses, with several peaks in the frequency spectrum between 4 and 20 kHz. The song is among the loudest in Orthoptera (> 125 dB SPL in 10 cm distance). The folds are protective and have no function in song production. Both mirrors may work independently in sound radiation. Nesonotus reticulatus (Fabricius) (Cocconotini) produces verses from two syllables at irregular intervals. The song peaks around 20 kHz. While singing, the males often produce a tremulation signal with the abdomen at about 8–10 Hz. To our knowledge, it is the first record of simultaneous calling song and tremulation in Orthoptera. Other males reply to the tremulation with their own tremulation. Xerophyllopteryx fumosa (Brunner von Wattenwyl) (Pleminiini) is a large, bark-like species, producing a syllable of around 20 pulses. The syllables are produced with irregular rhythms (often two with shorter intervals). The song peaks around 2–3 kHz and 10 kHz. The hind wings are relatively thick and are held between the half opened tegmina during singing. Removal of the hind wings reduces song intensity by about 5 dB, especially of the low frequency component, suggesting that the hind wings have a role in amplifying the song. PMID:24785151

  19. Estimating contrast transfer function and associated parameters by constrained non-linear optimization

    PubMed Central

    YANG, C.; JIANG, W.; CHEN, D. -H.; ADIGA, U.; NG, E. G.; CHIU, W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The three-dimensional reconstruction of macromolecules from two-dimensional single-particle electron images requires determination and correction of the contrast transfer function (CTF) and envelope function. A computational algorithm based on constrained non-linear optimization is developed to estimate the essential parameters in the CTF and envelope function model simultaneously and automatically. The application of this estimation method is demonstrated with focal series images of amorphous carbon film as well as images of ice-embedded icosahedral virus particles suspended across holes. PMID:19250460

  20. The phase-integral method for radiative transfer problems with highly-peaked phase functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Complete solutions to the radiative transfer equation, including both azimuth and depth dependence, are provided by the discrete-ordinate method of Chandrasekhar, but these solutions are often limited because of large computer requirements. This paper presents a 'phase-integral' method which greatly reduces the number of discrete ordinates needed in the solution for highly peaked phase functions. A composite quadrature method is shown to be effective in further reducing the number of discrete ordinates required for highly anisotropic phase functions. Examples are given to indicate convergence requirements and expected accuracy in the complete solution for Henyey-Greenstein and cloud-type phase functions.

  1. Estimating Contrast Transfer Function and Associated Parameters by Constrained Nonlinear Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Jiang, Wen; Chen, Dong-Hua; Adiga, Umesh; Ng, Esmond G.; Chiu, Wah

    2008-07-28

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of macromolecules from two-dimensional single-particle electron images requires determination and correction of the contrast transfer function (CTF) and envelope function. A computational algorithm based on constrained non-linear optimization is developed to estimate the essential parameters in the CTF and envelope function model simultaneously and automatically. The application of this estimation method is demonstrated with focal series images of amorphous carbon film as well as images of ice-embedded icosahedral virus particles suspended across holes.

  2. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Finkina, E. I.; Melnikova, D. N.; Bogdanov, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life. PMID:27437139

  3. Comparisons of bidirectional reflectance distribution function measurements on prepared particulate surfaces and radiative-transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Voss, Kenneth J.

    2005-02-01

    To understand the connection between single-particle optics and the optics of a closely packed surface, controlled laboratory measurements of bidirectional reflectance distribution functions on layers of polymer and glass spheres are carried out. The measurements are compared with predictions from five radiative-transfer models; the Hapke's models, the Lumme-Bowell model, the BRF algorithm of Mishchenko et al., and the discrete ordinate radiative transfer. It is found that models of strict numerical radiative-transfer equations (RTEs) predict measurements well in some regions but have errors in both forward-and backward-scattering directions. The improved Hapke's model, although it has an anisotropic multiple-scattering term, still produces considerable errors compared with the strict RTE. The difference can be attributed to the exclusion of a diffraction contribution in the Hapke model.

  4. Photophysical properties of charge transfer pairs encapsulated inside macrocycle cage: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on three charge transfer donor-acceptor (D-A) molecular pairs, i.e. naphthalene-diamine (Naph) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) molecules as electron donors and benzene-diimide (Diimide) and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) as electron acceptors. Structural, charge transfer and optical properties of the systems have been studied. The D-A pairs then has been considered inside a macrocycle (cucurbit[8]uril) cavity and Naph-Diimide and TTF-Diimide pairs have been shown to exhibit changes in their structures and orientations, TTF-TCNQ pair does not show any significant structural change. Our work suggests that these changes in structures or orientations are result of electronic repulsion between the keto group oxygen atoms and it can lead to tuning of charge transfer and optical properties of the systems.

  5. How Toddlers Acquire and Transfer Tool Knowledge: Developmental Changes and the Role of Executive Functions.

    PubMed

    Pauen, Sabina; Bechtel-Kuehne, Sabrina

    2016-07-01

    This report investigates tool learning and its relations to executive functions (EFs) in toddlers. In Study 1 (N = 93), 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-month-old children learned equally well to choose a correct tool from observation, whereas performance based on feedback improved with age. Knowledge transfer showed significant progress after 22 months of age: Older children ignored irrelevant features more easily and adjusted their behavior more flexibly. Study 2 (N = 62) revealed that spontaneous transfer in 22- to 24-month-olds was related to set-shifting skills and response inhibition. Flexible adaptation to feedback correlated with working-memory capacity. These findings suggest that toddlerhood is a highly dynamic phase of tool learning and that EFs are related to transfer performance at this age. PMID:27138651

  6. New Precision Measurements of Deuteron Structure Function A(Q) at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byungwuek

    2009-08-01

    Differences between previous measurements of low momentum transfer electron-deuteron elastic scattering prevent a clean determination of even the sign of the leading low momentum transfer relativistic corrections, or of the convergence of chiral perturbation theory. We have attempted to resolve this issue with a new high-precision measurement in Jefferson Lab Hall A. Elastic electron scattering was measured on targets of tantalum, carbon, hydrogen, and deuterium at beam energy of 685 MeV. The four-momentum transfer covered the range of 0.15 - 0.7 GeV. The experiment included a new beam calorimeter, to better calibrate the low beam currents used in the experiment, and new collimators to better define the spectrometer solid angles. We obtained cross sections of deuteron as ratios to hydrogen cross sections. A fit function of B(Q) world data is newly made and subtracted from cross sections to find values of A(Q).

  7. Sound source identification in a noisy environment based on inverse patch transfer functions with evanescent Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shang; Jiang, Weikang; Pan, Siwei

    2015-12-01

    A modified inverse patch transfer function (iPTF) method is used to reconstruct the normal velocities of the target source in a noisy environment. The iPTF method simplifies the Helmholtz integral equation to one term by constructing a Green's function satisfying Neumann boundary conditions for an enclosure, which is generally constructed by slowly convergent modal expansions. The main objective of the present work is to provide an evanescent Green's function to improve the convergence of calculations. A brief description of the iPTF method and two sets of Green's functions for a rectangular cavity are presented firstly. In simulations, both the Green's functions are used to calculate the condition numbers of impedance matrices describing the relation between source and measurement patches, and the time cost of calculation based on the two sets of Green's functions at 450 Hz is compared. Double pressure measurements are then employed as the input data instead of pressure and velocity measurements. The normal velocities of two baffled loudspeakers are reconstructed by the combination of a measurement method and a Green's function in the presence of a disturbing source in the frequency range of 50-1000 Hz. In addition, the double pressure measurements are examined by an experiment. The precise identification of the sources indicates that the double pressure measurements are capable of localizing sources in a noisy environment. It is also found that the reconstruction with the evanescent Green's functions is slightly better than that with the modal expansions.

  8. Modulation transfer function and three-dimensional shape measurement using pseudorandom structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teipen, Brian Thomas

    2000-12-01

    Over the years, several optical and opto-electronic systems have been invented in order to reproduce or improve an ability to image a physical scene. Optical imaging (vision) delivers the capability to collect an enormous amount of information about the surrounding environment. The quality of any imaging system can be conveniently defined by the amount of information that is ultimately gathered. Information transfer is the fundamental process of imaging systems and often can be described in terms of linear systems. Conveniently, transfer functions common to linear systems theory (communications theory) can be adopted to accurately describe optical information transfer in imaging systems. In this dissertation, we report on the advancements of two areas of optical imaging. Firstly, we present a new measurement process involving pseudo-random spatial patterns generated with a liquid crystal display (LCD) that allows convenient determination of the spatial- frequency transfer function commonly known as the modulation transfer function (MTF) of digital imaging systems. We present horizontal and vertical MTF measurements for color and monochrome charge-coupled device (CCD) video systems, common to machine vision and robotic vision applications. Results are found to agree with previously applied methods of measuring imaging resolution, while increasing the speed, adaptability, and convenience of the measurement. Secondly, we present three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurements from a new experimental method using polarization-encoded spatial patterns. The measurement technique is an active method of vision using projected patterns from a LCD projector. Part of the polarization-encoded pattern, a sub-pattern that is a pseudo-random code, is dedicated to solve the difficult problem of measuring the absolute height of an object with edge discontinuities. This technique conveniently allows lost fringe-order information of the classic synthetic-fringe pattern to be regained.

  9. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  10. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two-frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  11. Sensor modulation transfer function measurement using band-limited laser speckle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; George, Nicholas; Agranov, Gennadiy; Liu, Changmeng; Gravelle, Bob

    2008-11-24

    A new methodology for image sensor modulation transfer function measurement using band-limited laser speckle is presented. We use a circular opal milk glass diffuser illuminated by a 5 mW He-Ne laser and a linear polarizer to generate band-limited speckle on the sensor. The power spectral density cut-off frequency of the speckle is chosen to be twice that of the sensor Nyquist frequency by placing the sensor at the specific Z location along the optical axis. For the speckle input, we calculate the power spectral density at the sensor using the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral and then measure the output power spectral density for the speckle pattern captured by the sensor. With these data, the two-dimensional image sensor modulation transfer function (MTF) is calculated. PMID:19030090

  12. Recent advances in the modulation transfer function testing of detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharme, Alfred D.

    2008-08-01

    The increased complexity of imaging sensors and total number of discrete detector sites has challenged traditional testing methods. The importance of reliable modulation transfer function testing of imaging sensors with high uncertainty has consequently grown more difficult. In this paper we demonstrate the design of an aperture for the generation of laser speckle with a flat power spectrum covering a wide-band of the measurement spatial frequency range. This aperture allows for the measurement of modulation transfer function (MTF) from zero to twice the Nyquist frequency of a twodimensional detector array. This design mitigates many of the measurement issues inherent in other aperture designs. The MTF measurement of a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector array is used to demonstrate the measurement technique and illustrate the advantages of the new aperture design.

  13. Modulation transfer function analysis for a digitally spectrum-controllable light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Suodong; Wang, Yan; Pan, Qiao; Shen, Weimin

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the ability of generating designated spectrums as special requirements, spectrum-controllable light source has attracted huge interesting in several fields, e.g. medical science, industrial detection, defense-related testing. In principle, optical performance of a spectrum-controllable light source can be predicted by some transfer functions of the corresponding system, e.g. modulation transfer function (MTF). Unfortunately, the aforementioned research work is still lacking at present although it is meaningful for the optical design and evaluation of this new kind of light sources. Hence, a MTF model for a modified version of our previously-proposed spectrum-controllable light source system based on a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) and an Offner dispersion configuration with a convex grating is deduced as an example. Related preliminary analyses have been present in this paper as well.

  14. Flight Controllability Limits and Related Human Transfer Functions as Determined from Simulator and Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Day, Richard E.

    1961-01-01

    A simulator study and flight tests were performed to determine the levels of static stability and damping necessary to enable a pilot to control the longitudinal and lateral-directional dynamics of a vehicle for short periods of time. Although a basic set of aerodynamic characteristics was used, the study was conducted so that the results would be applicable to a wide range of flight conditions and configurations. Novel piloting techniques were found which enabled the pilot to control the vehicle at conditions that were otherwise uncontrollable. The influence of several critical factors in altering the controllability limits was also investigated. Several human transfer functions were used which gave fairly good representations of the controllability limits determined experimentally for the short-period longitudinal, directional, and lateral modes. A transfer function with approximately the same gain and phase angle as the pilot at the controlling frequencies along the controllability limits was also derived.

  15. Determination of poles and zeros of transfer functions for flexible spacecraft attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohkami, Y.; Likins, P. W.

    1976-01-01

    The transfer function matrix is obtained for a three-input and three-output model of minimum sensors and actuators for the attitude control system of flexible spacecraft, and a method is described for determining the poles and zeros of this transfer function. Three cases are considered: (1) the actuators and the sensors are all attached to the primary body, (2) the actuators are on the primary body and the sensors are on the sub-body, and (3) the actuators are on the sub-body and the sensors are on the primary body. The zero-determination problem is shown to reduce to eigenvalue calculations of a matrix which is constructed from the inertial and modal matrices in a simple fashion.

  16. Determining the Transfer Function for Unsteady Pressure Measurements Using a Method of Characteristics Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Edward L.; Henfling, John F.; McBride, Donald D.

    1999-05-12

    An inverse Fourier transform method for removing lag from pressure measurements has been used by various researchers, given an experimentally derived transfer function to characterize the pressure plumbing. This paper presents a Method of Characteristics (MOC) solution technique for predicting the transfer function and thus easily determining its sensitivity to various plumbing pammeters. The MOC solution has been used in the pipeline industry for some time for application to transient flow in pipelines, but it also lends itself well to this application. For highly nonsteady pressures frequency-dependent friction can cause significant distortion of the traveling waves. This is accounted for in the formulation. A simple bench experiment and proof-of-principle test provide evidence to establish the range of validity of the method.

  17. Modulation transfer function measuring of charge-coupled devices using laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghua; Zhen, Wenlong; Liang, Yinzhong; Yu, Mozhi; He, Ping'an; Cheng, Changjun

    1996-10-01

    Based on the statistical properties of laser speckle, the response for laser speckle passing through a linear shift- invariant system is studied. This paper presents a method for testing the modulation transfer function (MTF) of charge-coupled devices below the Nyquist frequency. A new scattering microcrystalline glass material generates laser speckle. The instrument is designed and test results show that this technique is a variable MTF measurement approach. The difference of the results of each test is within 0.03.

  18. Method For Measuring Modulation Transfer Function Of CCD's Using Laser Speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, G.; Dereniak, E. L.

    1984-11-01

    A new method has been developed to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of an array out to the Nyquist frequency without high-quality optical or mechanical components, without precision alignment, and with only one moving part. Test results for an infrared staring array of PtSi Schottky barrier construction show that this technique is a viable MTF measurement approach in the 3 to 5 pm spectral regions.

  19. Method for measuring modulation transfer function of charge-coupled devices using laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, G.; Dereniak, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new method has been developed to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of an array out to the Nyquist frequency without high quality optical or mechanical components, without precision alignment, and with only one moving part. Test results for an infrared staring array of PtSi Schottky barrier construction show that this technique is a viable MTF measurement approach in the 3 to 5 micron spectral region.

  20. Modulation Transfer Function Measurement of Infrared Focal-Plane Arrays with Small Fill Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Barrière, Florence; Druart, Guillaume; Guérineau, Nicolas; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Mugnier, Laurent; Gravrand, Olivier; Baier, Nicolas; Lhermet, Nicolas; Destefanis, Gérard; Derelle, Sophie

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an original method to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of an infrared focal-plane array (IRFPA), based on a diffraction grating called a continuously self-imaging grating (CSIG). We give a general methodology to design the test bench, and we describe the data processing approach which has been developed to extract relevant information about the size of the photodiodes and filtering effects. The MTF measurement capability of this method is illustrated with a cooled IRFPA.

  1. Measurement of modulation transfer function for four types of imaging elements used in fast cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Estrella, R.M.; Sammons, T.J. . Amador Valley Operations); Thomas, S.W. )

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the modulation transfer function (MTF) of fiber- optic bundles (reducers), minifiers (inverting, electrostatically focused imaging tube reducers), microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPIs), and streak tubes as part of our ongoing device evaluation program aimed at precise characterization of various imaging elements used in fast cameras. This paper describes our measurement equipment and techniques and shows plots of MTF measurements for each of four types of fast-camera elements tested. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Modulation Transfer Function Measurement Using Three- and Four-bar Targets.

    PubMed

    Boreman, G D; Yang, S

    1995-12-01

    Modulation-transfer-function (MTF) measurement often involves the use of three- and four-bar resolution targets. In the conversion of three- and four-bar image data to MTF, biased results can occur when we use series-expansion techniques appropriate for square-wave targets of infinite extent. For systems where the image data are digitally recorded, a convenient and accurate conversion of bar-target data to MTF can be performed using a Fourier-domain method. PMID:21068904

  3. Modulation transfer function of a lens measured with a random target method.

    PubMed

    Levy, E; Peles, D; Opher-Lipson, M; Lipson, S G

    1999-02-01

    We measured the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a lens in the visible region using a random test target generated on a computer screen. This is a simple method to determine the entire MTF curve in one measurement. The lens was obscured by several masks so that the measurements could be compared with the theoretically calculated MTF. Excellent agreement was obtained. Measurement noise was reduced by use of a large number of targets generated on the screen. PMID:18305663

  4. Testing peatland water-table depth transfer functions using high-resolution hydrological monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindles, Graeme T.; Holden, Joseph; Raby, Cassandra L.; Turner, T. Edward; Blundell, Antony; Charman, Dan J.; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-07-01

    Transfer functions are now commonly used to reconstruct past environmental variability from palaeoecological data. However, such approaches need to be critically appraised. Testate amoeba-based transfer functions are an established method for the quantitative reconstruction of past water-table variations in peatlands, and have been applied to research questions in palaeoclimatology, peatland ecohydrology and archaeology. We analysed automatically-logged peatland water-table data from dipwells located in England, Wales and Finland and a suite of three year, one year and summer water-table statistics were calculated from each location. Surface moss samples were extracted from beside each dipwell and the testate amoebae community composition was determined. Two published transfer functions were applied to the testate-amoeba data for prediction of water-table depth (England and Europe). Our results show that estimated water-table depths based on the testate amoeba community reflect directional changes, but that they are poor representations of the real mean or median water-table magnitudes for the study sites. We suggest that although testate amoeba-based reconstructions can be used to identify past shifts in peat hydrology, they cannot currently be used to establish precise hydrological baselines such as those needed to inform management and restoration of peatlands. One approach to avoid confusion with contemporary water-table determinations is to use residuals or standardised values for peatland water-table reconstructions. We contend that our test of transfer functions against independent instrumental data sets may be more powerful than relying on statistical testing alone.

  5. Instrumentation system for determination and compensation of electro-optic modulator transfer function drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Bui, Dang; Thanh Nguyen, Chi; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Zyss, Joseph; Journet, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents an instrumentation system developed to improve the operation of an electro-optic modulator (EOM). During their operating time, EOM are subject to a drift of the optical transfer function; therefore the initial tuning of the bias point no longer corresponds to the best characteristics of the device. Because of this drift the EOM no longer behaves linearly and there is degradation during time of the performances of the system in which the EOM is included. To determine the drift, a low frequency modulation signal (at 500 Hz) is applied to the EOM and the second harmonic component at 1 kHz is detected. A new criterion is introduced for estimating the nonlinearity and for compensating the drift of the transfer function, keeping the optical bias point at the quadrature position. Temperature changes significantly influence the EOM characteristics. Thus, the instrumentation system has to be simultaneously developed with temperature control and drift compensation of the optical transfer function. The design is based on PSOC microcontrollers for tuning the different parameters, for data acquisition and regulation process. By setting the temperature to some specific values, it is possible to test the behaviour of the modulator. Finally, by using both temperature and bias point control, a significant reduction of the nonlinearity can be obtained during 2 h of experiment: the biasing point at the quadrature point of the transfer function which corresponds to the most linear behaviour can be stabilized within ±0.22% of the half-wave voltage. All the works presented here were carried out with a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator made of lithium niobate, but it is also possible to apply this method to other kinds of material, for example polymer material.

  6. A simple parameterization for quality factor as a function of linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a simple analytic approximation of the radiation quality factor (Q) as a function of linear energy transfer for use in radiation protection calculations. The paper also presents estimated quality factors in water for protons over a broad range of incident energies. It is shown that the quality factors are less than unity for all proton energies greater than 13 MeV.

  7. Method of calculating retroreflector-array transfer functions. [laser range finders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques and equations used in calculating the transfer functions to relate the observed return laser pulses to the center of mass of the Lageos satellite retroflector array, and for most of the retroreflector-equipped satellites now in orbit are described. The methods derived include the effects of coherent interference, diffraction, polarization, and dihedral-angle offsets. Particular emphasis is given to deriving expressions for the diffraction pattern and active reflecting area of various cube-corner designs.

  8. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  9. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  10. Stability Analysis of Absorption Chiller-Heaters by Applying Transfer Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tatsuo; Miyake, Satoshi; Oka, Masahiro; Mori, Kiyoyuki

    A transfer function approach is found to be a practical method for ensuring stable operation of absorption chiller-heaters. The transfer function model is based on a solution-circuit of the machine, which dominates the stability of the operation. This model includes a solution pump, a generator with an overflow weir, and a float valve. We found that the solution-circuit system is designed with the cascade control, which makes the system stable. In this construction, the float valve actuates a primary control loop, and the overflow weir actuates a secondary loop. The effects of the characteristic of the solution pump and the overflow weir are estimated by the degree of the stabilities, which are the gain margin and the phase margin. We found that the characteristic of the solution pump strongly effects the stability by enhancing the effect of the cascade control and improving the stability. So it is essential for a better stability analysis model. According to these results, the established model is useful for quantitatively predicting the stabilities of a chiller-heater in operation, and simultaneously reducing its size and improving the stability of operation. We conclude that the methodology based on transfer function can provide compact and reliable absorption chiller-heaters.

  11. Detecting damage in non-uniform beams using the dereverberated transfer function response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purekar, A. S.; Pines, D. J.; Purekar, A. S.

    2000-08-01

    Delamination damage in composite rotorcraft flexbeams caused by excessive vibratory and fatigue loads can lead to degradation in flapwise and lagwise performance of the rotor blade. In addition, delaminations can result in rapid fatigue failure of these tailored composite elements leading to catastrophic results. A novel damage detection strategy is evaluated in this work which attempts to exploit the dereverberated transfer function response of beams with tapered geometries. This approach avoids high fidelity finite element models of damaged one-dimensional beams with non-uniform geometries. To obtain the dereverberated transfer function response, a virtual control force is applied to the reverberated transfer function response to remove resonant and anti-resonant dynamics associated with the beam's boundary conditions. Magnitude and phase characteristics between each actuator and sensor can then be used to infer changing structural properties. Analytical and experimental results suggest that this approach can be used to quantitatively and qualitatively infer delamination damage in non-uniform beams. Experimental results are displayed for beams with varying thickness and width tapers.

  12. Single-input/single-output transfer functions for a flexible slewing link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique

    1993-01-01

    Truncated linear models based on constrained and unconstrained mode expansions for a flexible link with torque actuation at its hub led us to examine the behavior of the open-loop-zeros of five commonly used SISO transfer functions. We arrive at new conclusions with regard to minimum- and non-minimum-phase zeros, and passivity of the transfer functions. The flexible-to-rigid inertia (FRI) ratio plays an important role in the determination of these characteristics. This paper illustrates how the zero locations of some of the transfer functions are dramatically affected by the FRI ratio. We also investigate the performance of a hub angle, hub rate, and relative tip position static feedback controller based on a reduced-order constrained mode model when applied to both unconstrained and constrained mode models of the same dimension. Simulations indicate that the constrained model can be stable while the unconstrained model is not for high FRI ratios. Our findings can provide useful information to designers in cases where the controller is sensitive to the 1ocation of the plant's zeros.

  13. Non-invasive baroreflex sensitivity assessment using wavelet transfer function-based time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Keissar, K; Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; La Rovere, M T; Gilad, O

    2010-07-01

    A novel approach for the estimation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is introduced based on time-frequency analysis of the transfer function (TF). The TF method (TF-BRS) is a well-established non-invasive technique which assumes stationarity. This condition is difficult to meet, especially in cardiac patients. In this study, the classical TF was replaced with a wavelet transfer function (WTF) and the classical coherence was replaced with wavelet transform coherence (WTC), adding the time domain as an additional degree of freedom with dynamic error estimation. Error analysis and comparison between WTF-BRS and TF-BRS were performed using simulated signals with known transfer function and added noise. Similar comparisons were performed for ECG and blood pressure signals, in the supine position, of 19 normal subjects, 44 patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction (MI) and 45 patients with chronic heart failure. This yielded an excellent linear association (R > 0.94, p < 0.001) for time-averaged WTF-BRS, validating the new method as consistent with a known method. The additional advantage of dynamic analysis of coherence and TF estimates was illustrated in two physiological examples of supine rest and change of posture showing the evolution of BRS synchronized with its error estimations and sympathovagal balance. PMID:20585147

  14. Contrast transfer function in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianheng; Du, Yang; Lin, Danying; Liu, Xin; Niu, Hanben

    2014-05-01

    x-Ray grating interferometry is a method for x-ray wave front sensing and phase-contrast imaging that has been developed over past few years. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the quality of an image. In characterizing the performance of this interferometer, the contrast transfer function is considered in this paper. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function (CTF) is derived and quantified for this interferometer. The illumination source and digital detector are both considered as significant factors controlling image quality, and it can be noted that contrast and resolution in turn depends primarily on the projected intensity profile of the array source and the pixel size of the detector. Furthermore, a test pattern phantom with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies was designed and imaging of this phantom was simulated by a computer. Contrast transfer function behavior observed in the simulated image is consistent with our theoretical CTF. This might be beneficial for the evaluation and optimization of a grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system.

  15. The secret assumption of transfer functions: problems with spatial autocorrelation in evaluating model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, R. J.; Birks, H. J. B.

    2005-11-01

    The estimation of the predictive power of transfer functions assumes that the test sites are independent of the modelling sites. Cross-validation in the presence of spatial autocorrelation seriously violates this assumption. This assumption and the consequences of its violation have not been discussed before. We show, by simulation, that the expected r2 of a transfer function model from an autocorrelated environment can be high, and is not near zero as commonly assumed. We investigate a foraminiferal sea surface temperature training set for the North Atlantic, for which, with cross-validation, the modern analogue technique (MAT) and artificial neural networks (ANN) outperform transfer function methods based on a unimodal species-environment response model. However, when a spatially independent test set, the South Atlantic, is used, all models have a similar predictive power. We show that there is a spatial structure in the foraminiferal assemblages even after accounting for temperature, presumably due to autocorrelations in other environmental variables. Since the residuals from MAT show little spatial structure, in contrast to the residuals of unimodal response models, we contend that MAT has inappropriately internalized the non-temperature spatial structure to improve its performance. We argue that most, if not all, estimates of the predictive power of MAT and ANN models for sea surface temperatures hitherto published are over-optimistic and misleading.

  16. Functional carbon nanotubes for high-quality charge transfer and moisture regulation through membranes: structural and functional insights.

    PubMed

    Gugliuzza, Annarosa; Pingitore, Valentino; Miriello, Domenico; Drioli, Enrico

    2015-05-21

    Functional single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are assembled onto porous supports by using layer-by-layer (LBL) approaches. Directed nano-assembly of nanotubes is identified as a crucial factor for controlling the combined functions of hybrid-composite membranes, including charge and moisture transport. In both the cases, donor-acceptor interactions are indicated to be responsible for the rearrangement of nanotubes inside the LBL multilayer and their related properties. Aggregation and stratification of the carbon nanotubes along with the availability of selective-site interactions are complementarily investigated by using SEM, Raman and infrared spectroscopy, while high electrical charge and water vapor transfer are achievable, provided that a large number of connections and competitive interactions are allowed. Ohmic behavior is observed for all types of carbon nanotubes, even if better-quality charge transfer pathways are obtained with carboxylated conductive filaments. Likewise, assisted moisture regulation is succeeded when using functional filaments with the capability to establish competitive H-donor-acceptor interactions with water. PMID:25909584

  17. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  18. Large-Deformation Displacement Transfer Functions for Shape Predictions of Highly Flexible Slender Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2013-01-01

    Large deformation displacement transfer functions were formulated for deformed shape predictions of highly flexible slender structures like aircraft wings. In the formulation, the embedded beam (depth wise cross section of structure along the surface strain sensing line) was first evenly discretized into multiple small domains, with surface strain sensing stations located at the domain junctures. Thus, the surface strain (bending strains) variation within each domain could be expressed with linear of nonlinear function. Such piecewise approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations [classical (Eulerian), physical (Lagrangian), and shifted curvature equations] to yield closed form slope and deflection equations in recursive forms.

  19. Using contrast transfer function to evaluate the effect of motion blur on microscope image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Marc C.; Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2008-02-01

    Scanning of microscope slides is an important part of cytogenetic diagnosis. Metaphase chromosomes arranged in a karyotype reveal the nature and severity of cancer and other diseases. Searching for metaphases spreads is a lengthy and tedious process that can benefit from computer aided systems. When slides are searched by such systems in continuous motion, the image quality is reduced. The motion blur is a function of the scan speed, the camera frame rate and sample time, and the level of magnification. In this study, normalized contrast transfer function (CTF) is used to define the amount of image degradation.

  20. Parameterization of the three-dimensional room transfer function in horizontal plane.

    PubMed

    Bu, Bing; Abhayapala, Thushara D; Bao, Chang-chun; Zhang, Wen

    2015-09-01

    This letter proposes an efficient parameterization of the three-dimensional room transfer function (RTF) which is robust for the position variations of source and receiver in respective horizontal planes. Based on azimuth harmonic analysis, the proposed method exploits the underlying properties of the associated Legendre functions to remove a portion of the spherical harmonic coefficients of RTF which have no contribution in the horizontal plane. This reduction leads to a flexible measuring-point structure consisting of practical concentric circular arrays to extract horizontal plane RTF coefficients. The accuracy of the above parameterization is verified through numerical simulations. PMID:26428827

  1. Apodization and image contrast. [performance prediction in terms of modulation transfer function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1979-01-01

    Apodization is often defined in a restricted sense as the suppression of the outer parts (i.e., the concentric rings) of wave optical point images, which results in a higher relative concentration of energy in the central image area. In a wider sense, apodization is defined as any modification of the transmission distribution across the aperture. Generally the modulation transfer function (MTF) is not used in the treatment of apodization. To see how the imaging performance is modified, the MTF is introduced into the discussion. Besides the constant transmission, two transmission distributions which are functions of the aperture radius are considered.

  2. Modified slanted-edge method and multidirectional modulation transfer function estimation.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Kenichiro; Yamashita, Takayuki; Nishida, Yukihiro; Sugawara, Masayuki

    2014-03-10

    The slanted-edge method specified in ISO Standard 12233, which measures the modulation transfer function (MTF) by analyzing an image of a slightly slanted knife-edge target, is not robust against noise because it takes the derivative of each data line in the edge-angle estimation. We propose here a modified method that estimates the edge angle by fitting a two-dimensional function to the image data. The method has a higher accuracy, precision, and robustness against noise than the ISO 12233 method and is applicable to any arbitrary pixel array, enabling a multidirectional MTF estimate in a single measurement of a starburst image. PMID:24663939

  3. Analysis of existing data from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing experiment at Garner Valley, California using noise correlation functions (PoroTomo Substask 3.2)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xiangfang Zeng

    2015-03-26

    In September 2013, an experiment using Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) was conducted at Garner Valley, a test site of the University of California Santa Barbara (Lancelle et al., 2014). This submission includes noise cross-correlation functions (NCF) . Each file includes a NCF between two channels. The name of each channel denotes the distance in meters from starting point of the fiber-optic cable. Lancelle, C., N. Lord, H. Wang, D. Fratta, R. Nigbor, A. Chalari, R. Karaulanov, J. Baldwin, and E. Castongia (2014), Directivity and Sensitivity of Fiber-Optic Cable Measuring Ground Motion using a Distributed Acoustic Sensing Array (abstract # NS31C-3935), AGU Fall Meeting. 
https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/meetingapp.cgi#Paper/19828 The e-poster is available at: https://agu.confex.com/data/handout/agu/fm14/Paper_19828_handout_696_0.pdf

  4. Prediction of the vibroacoustic behavior of a submerged shell with non-axisymmetric internal substructures by a condensed transfer function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, V.; Maxit, L.; Guyader, J.-L.; Leissing, T.

    2016-01-01

    The vibroacoustic behavior of axisymmetric stiffened shells immersed in water has been intensively studied in the past. On the contrary, little attention has been paid to the modeling of these shells coupled to non-axisymmetric internal frames. Indeed, breaking the axisymmetry couples the circumferential orders of the Fourier series and considerably increases the computational costs. In order to tackle this issue, we propose a sub-structuring approach called the Condensed Transfer Function (CTF) method that will allow assembling a model of axisymmetric stiffened shell with models of non-axisymmetric internal frames. The CTF method is developed in the general case of mechanical subsystems coupled along curves. A set of orthonormal functions called condensation functions, which depend on the curvilinear abscissa along the coupling line, is considered. This set is then used as a basis for approximating and decomposing the displacements and the applied forces at the line junctions. Thanks to the definition and calculation of condensed transfer functions for each uncoupled subsystem and by using the superposition principle for passive linear systems, the behavior of the coupled subsystems can be deduced. A plane plate is considered as a test case to study the convergence of the method with respect to the type and the number of condensation functions taken into account. The CTF method is then applied to couple a submerged non-periodically stiffened shell described using the Circumferential Admittance Approach (CAA) with internal substructures described by Finite Element Method (FEM). The influence of non-axisymmetric internal substructures can finally be studied and it is shown that it tends to increase the radiation efficiency of the shell and can modify the vibrational and acoustic energy distribution.

  5. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  6. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  7. X-ray modulation transfer functions of photostimulable phosphor image plates and scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Holland, Glenn E.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The modulation transfer functions of two types of photostimulable phosphor image plates were determined in the 10 keV to 50 keV x-ray energy range using a resolution test pattern with up to 10 line pairs per mm (LP/mm) and a wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer. Techniques were developed for correcting for the partial transmittance of the high energy x rays through the lead bars of the resolution test pattern, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined from the measured change in contrast with LP/mm values. The MTF was convolved with the slit function of the image plate scanner, and the resulting point spread functions (PSFs) were in good agreement with the observed shapes and widths of x-ray spectral lines and with the PSF derived from edge spread functions. The shapes and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the PSF curves of the Fuji Superior Resolution (SR) and Fuji Maximum Sensitivity (MS) image plate detectors, consisting of the image plate and the scanner, determined by the three methods gave consistent results: The SR PSF is Gaussian with 0.13 mm FWHM, and the MS PSF is Lorentzian with 0.19 mm FWHM. These techniques result in the accurate determination of the spatial resolution achievable using image plate and scanner combinations and enable the optimization of spatial resolution for x-ray spectroscopy and radiography.

  8. Efficient Load Transfer to Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes as Reinforcement in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakoli, Ali Nabipour; Cai, Wei; Jiehe, Sui; Feng, Jiang Tao

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grafted with poly(L-lactide-e-caprolactone) (PCLA) were synthesized by in situ ring opening polymerization and used as a reinforcement for neat PCLA. The analyzed data revealed that the applied tensile load on the composite was transferred to the functionalized MWCNTs, leading to a strain failure of the MWCNTs rather than an adhesive failure between the MWCNTs and the matrix. In comparison between the functionalized and pristine MWCNTs, as reinforcement materials for PCLA random copolymers (80% L-lactide (LA), 20% e-caprolactone (CL)) (PCLAR80), the functionalized MWCNTs are more effective reinforcement materials than pristine MWCNTs. In comparison with the neat PCLAR80, the increasing in tensile strength (28.03%) and elongation at failure (49.6%) when functionalized MWCNT loading reaches 1.0 wt%, indicate that an effective reinforcement of the MWCNT-OH-g-PCLA.

  9. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation. PMID:26827343

  10. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  11. Ru(II)-diimine functionalized metalloproteins: From electron transfer studies to light-driven biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Lam, Quan; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The unique photochemical properties of Ru(II)-diimine complexes have helped initiate a series of seminal electron transfer studies in metalloenzymes. It has thus been possible to experimentally determine rate constants for long-range electron transfers. These studies have laid the foundation for the investigation of reactive intermediates in heme proteins and for the design of light-activated biocatalysts. Various metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, laccase and cytochrome P450 BM3 have been functionalized with Ru(II)-diimine complexes. Upon visible light-excitation, these photosensitized metalloproteins are capable of sustaining photocatalytic activity to reduce small molecules such as protons, acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide or activate molecular dioxygen to produce hydroxylated products. The Ru(II)-diimine photosensitizers are hence able to deliver multiple electrons to metalloenzymes buried active sites, circumventing the need for the natural redox partners. In this review, we will highlight the key achievements of the light-driven biocatalysts, which stem from the extensive electron transfer investigations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26392147

  12. Landslide velocity prediction using a rainfall to displacements transfer function. La Barmasse case study (Valais, Switzerland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellán, Antonio; Michoud, Clément; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Baillifard, François; Demierre, Jonathan; Carrea, Dario

    2013-04-01

    We present a model for ground displacements prediction using a transfer function. Model was mainly tested at the Barmasse rockslide (Valais, Switzerland) which is an active structurally-controlled instability formed by intensively deformed and metamorphosed mica schists. The kinematics of the slide, which currently threatens roads and inhabitants of the Bal de Bagnes Valley, is characterized by a continuous displacement with variable rates of displacements. Indeed, the velocity is strongly affected by external forces: a sharp increase in landslide velocity is observed with a short delay after every snow melting period and after each rainfall pulse. The instability is currently monitored by different remote sensing and in situ techniques (Terrestrial LiDAR, GB Radar and extensometers). In order to predict ground displacements, we developed a new model composed by two different parts: (a) calculation of the Effective Rainfall (Peff) and (b) modelling of the landslide velocity. First of all, Peff was obtained using Thornthwaite (1946) method, which estimates the water that infiltrates into the terrain as a function of the total precipitation, Real Evapo-Transpiration (ETR) and water recharge. Afterwards, the rates of displacement were modelled through a stochastic transfer function which links the Peff (input) with daily displacements (output). Model computes the displacement rates at each time lapse (e.g. one day) as a convolution of the above mentioned transfer function times daily effective rainfall during a certain time lapse (50 days in our case). The transfer function has two components: first component account for the sudden increase of landslide velocities after each rainfall pulse and second component account for the progressive decay. The variables of these functions were optimized in Matlab in order to minimize the error between the real and the modelled velocities. The model performance was assessed for two different response functions (following either

  13. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  14. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program has been developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions show significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. In addition, as shown in the paper, the velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provides a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  15. Measuring the spatial frequency transfer function of phase measuring interferometers for laser optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Downie, J.D.; Lawson, J.K.

    1996-06-27

    The power spectral density (PSD) function is being employed to specify the surface finish and transmitted wavefront in the mid- spatial frequency regime for laser beam optics of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The instrument used to measure the PSD is a phase measuring Fizeau interferometer. The phase map produced by the interferometer is digitally processed to create the PSD. Before one can use the PSD information, it is necessary to evaluate the fidelity of the interferometer spatial frequency response. Specifically, one must measure the overall transfer function of the instrument. To accomplish this, we perform a two-step ``calibration`` process. We first measure a known precision phase object with the interferometer and then compare the measured PSD to an ideal numerical simulation which represents the theoretical PSD. The square root of the ratio of the measured function to the simulation is defined as the transfer function of the instrument. We present experimental results for both reflective and transmissive test objects, including effects such as the test object orientation and longitudinal location in the interferometer cavity. We also evaluate the accuracy levels obtained using different test objects. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Range, Doppler and astrometric observables computed from Time Transfer Functions: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, A.; Bertone, S.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Teyssandier, P.

    2015-08-01

    Determining range, Doppler and astrometric observables is of crucial interest for modelling and analyzing space observations. We recall how these observables can be computed when the travel time of a light ray is known as a function of the positions of the emitter and the receiver for a given instant of reception (or emission). For a long time, such a function-called a reception (or emission) time transfer function has been almost exclusively calculated by integrating the null geodesic equations describing the light rays. However, other methods avoiding such an integration have been considerably developed in the last twelve years. We give a survey of the analytical results obtained with these new methods up to the third order in the gravitational constant G for a mass monopole. We briefly discuss the case of quasi-conjunctions, where higher-order enhanced terms must be taken into account for correctly calculating the effects. We summarize the results obtained at the first order in G when the multipole structure and the motion of an axisymmetric body is taken into account. We present some applications to on-going or future missions like Gaia and Juno. We give a short review of the recent works devoted to the numerical estimates of the time transfer functions and their derivatives.

  17. The Time Transfer Functions: an efficient tool to compute range, Doppler and astrometric observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, A.; Bertone, S.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Teyssandier, P.

    2015-12-01

    Determining range, Doppler and astrometric observables is of crucial interest for modelling and analyzing space observations. We recall how these observables can be computed when the travel time of a light ray is known as a function of the positions of the emitter and the receiver for a given instant of reception (or emission). For a long time, such a function--called a reception (or emission) time transfer function--has been almost exclusively calculated by integrating the null geodesic equations describing the light rays. However, other methods avoiding such an integration have been considerably developped in the last twelve years. We give a survey of the analytical results obtained with these new methods up to the third order in the gravitational constant G for a mass monopole. We briefly discuss the case of quasi-conjunctions, where higher-order enhanced terms must be taken into account for correctly calculating the effects. We summarize the results obtained at the first order in G when the multipole structure and the motion of an axisymmetric body is taken into account. We present some applications to on-going or future missions like Gaia and Juno. We give a short review of the recent works devoted to the numerical estimates of the time transfer functions and their derivatives.

  18. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E. J.; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

  19. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E J; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-05-27

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

  20. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  1. First-and Second-Order Displacement Transfer Functions for Structural Shape Calculations Using Analytically Predicted Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    New first- and second-order displacement transfer functions have been developed for deformed shape calculations of nonuniform cross-sectional beam structures such as aircraft wings. The displacement transfer functions are expressed explicitly in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains (uniaxial bending strains) obtained at equally spaced strain stations along the surface of the beam structure. By inputting the measured or analytically calculated surface strains into the displacement transfer functions, one could calculate local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles of the nonuniform beam structure for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The accuracy of deformed shape calculations by the first- and second-order displacement transfer functions are determined by comparing these values to the analytically predicted values obtained from finite element analyses. This comparison shows that the new displacement transfer functions could quite accurately calculate the deformed shapes of tapered cantilever tubular beams with different tapered angles. The accuracy of the present displacement transfer functions also are compared to those of the previously developed displacement transfer functions.

  2. Functional Transfer of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 to Salmonella bongori and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hansen-Wester, Imke; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Hensel, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) has a central role in systemic infections by Salmonella enterica and for the intracellular phenotype. Intracellular S. enterica uses the SPI2-encoded T3SS to translocate a set of effector proteins into the host cell, which modify host cell functions, enabling intracellular survival and replication of the bacteria. We sought to determine whether specific functions of the SPI2-encoded T3SS can be transferred to heterologous hosts Salmonella bongori and Escherichia coli Mutaflor, species that lack the SPI2 locus and loci encoding effector proteins. The SPI2 virulence locus was cloned and functionally expressed in S. bongori and E. coli. Here, we demonstrate that S. bongori harboring the SPI2 locus is capable of secretion of SPI2 substrate proteins under culture conditions, as well as of translocation of effector proteins under intracellular conditions. An SPI2-mediated cellular phenotype was induced by S. bongori harboring the SPI2 if the sifA locus was cotransferred. An interference with the host cell microtubule cytoskeleton, a novel SPI2-dependent phenotype, was observed in epithelial cells infected with S. bongori harboring SPI2 without additional effector genes. S. bongori harboring SPI2 showed increased intracellular persistence in a cell culture model, but SPI2 transfer was not sufficient to confer to S. bongori systemic pathogenicity in a murine model. Transfer of SPI2 to heterologous hosts offers a new tool for the study of SPI2 functions and the phenotypes of individual effectors. PMID:15102800

  3. Modulation transfer function cascade model for a sampled IR imaging system.

    PubMed

    de Luca, L; Cardone, G

    1991-05-01

    The performance of the infrared scanning radiometer (IRSR) is strongly stressed in convective heat transfer applications where high spatial frequencies in the signal that describes the thermal image are present. The need to characterize more deeply the system spatial resolution has led to the formulation of a cascade model for the evaluation of the actual modulation transfer function of a sampled IR imaging system. The model can yield both the aliasing band and the averaged modulation response for a general sampling subsystem. For a line scan imaging system, which is the case of a typical IRSR, a rule of thumb that states whether the combined sampling-imaging system is either imaging-dependent or sampling-dependent is proposed. The model is tested by comparing it with other noncascade models as well as by ad hoc measurements performed on a commercial digitized IRSR. PMID:20700340

  4. The Effects of Radiative Transfer on the Probability Distribution Functions of Molecular Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Ossenkopf, V.; Lazarian, A.; Stutzki, J.

    2013-07-01

    We study the effects of radiative transfer on the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the widely studied 13CO 2-1 transition. We find that the integrated intensity maps generally follow a log-normal distribution, with the cases that have τ ≈ 1 best matching the PDF of the column density. We fit a two-dimensional variance-sonic Mach number relationship to our logarithmic PDFs of the form \\sigma _{\\ln (\\Sigma /\\Sigma _0)}^2=A\\times \\ln (1+b^2{\\cal M}_s^2) and find that, for parameter b = 1/3, parameter A depends on the radiative transfer environment. We also explore the variance, skewness, and kurtosis of the linear PDFs finding that higher moments reflect both higher sonic Mach number and lower optical depth. Finally, we apply the Tsallis incremental PDF function and find that the fit parameters depend on both Mach numbers, but also are sensitive to the radiative transfer parameter space, with the τ ≈ 1 case best fitting the incremental PDF of the true column density. We conclude that, for PDFs of low optical depth cases, part of the gas is always subthermally excited so that the spread of the line intensities exceeds the spread of the underlying column densities and hence the PDFs do not reflect the true column density. Similarly, PDFs of optically thick cases are dominated by the velocity dispersion and therefore do not represent the true column density PDF. Thus, in the case of molecules like carbon monoxide, the dynamic range of intensities, structures observed, and, consequently, the observable PDFs are less determined by turbulence and more often determined by radiative transfer effects.

  5. Uncertainty of Monetary Valued Ecosystem Services - Value Transfer Functions for Global Mapping.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Manceur, Ameur M; Seppelt, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Growing demand of resources increases pressure on ecosystem services (ES) and biodiversity. Monetary valuation of ES is frequently seen as a decision-support tool by providing explicit values for unconsidered, non-market goods and services. Here we present global value transfer functions by using a meta-analytic framework for the synthesis of 194 case studies capturing 839 monetary values of ES. For 12 ES the variance of monetary values could be explained with a subset of 93 study- and site-specific variables by utilizing boosted regression trees. This provides the first global quantification of uncertainties and transferability of monetary valuations. Models explain from 18% (water provision) to 44% (food provision) of variance and provide statistically reliable extrapolations for 70% (water provision) to 91% (food provision) of the terrestrial earth surface. Although the application of different valuation methods is a source of uncertainty, we found evidence that assuming homogeneity of ecosystems is a major error in value transfer function models. Food provision is positively correlated with better life domains and variables indicating positive conditions for human well-being. Water provision and recreation service show that weak ownerships affect valuation of other common goods negatively (e.g. non-privately owned forests). Furthermore, we found support for the shifting baseline hypothesis in valuing climate regulation. Ecological conditions and societal vulnerability determine valuation of extreme event prevention. Valuation of habitat services is negatively correlated with indicators characterizing less favorable areas. Our analysis represents a stepping stone to establish a standardized integration of and reporting on uncertainties for reliable and valid benefit transfer as an important component for decision support. PMID:26938447

  6. THE EFFECTS OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER ON THE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF MOLECULAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Ossenkopf, V.; Stutzki, J.

    2013-07-10

    We study the effects of radiative transfer on the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the widely studied {sup 13}CO 2-1 transition. We find that the integrated intensity maps generally follow a log-normal distribution, with the cases that have {tau} Almost-Equal-To 1 best matching the PDF of the column density. We fit a two-dimensional variance-sonic Mach number relationship to our logarithmic PDFs of the form {sigma}{sub ln}{sup 2}{sub ({Sigma}/{Sigma}0}) = A x ln(1+b{sup 2}M{sub s}{sup 2}) and find that, for parameter b = 1/3, parameter A depends on the radiative transfer environment. We also explore the variance, skewness, and kurtosis of the linear PDFs finding that higher moments reflect both higher sonic Mach number and lower optical depth. Finally, we apply the Tsallis incremental PDF function and find that the fit parameters depend on both Mach numbers, but also are sensitive to the radiative transfer parameter space, with the {tau} Almost-Equal-To 1 case best fitting the incremental PDF of the true column density. We conclude that, for PDFs of low optical depth cases, part of the gas is always subthermally excited so that the spread of the line intensities exceeds the spread of the underlying column densities and hence the PDFs do not reflect the true column density. Similarly, PDFs of optically thick cases are dominated by the velocity dispersion and therefore do not represent the true column density PDF. Thus, in the case of molecules like carbon monoxide, the dynamic range of intensities, structures observed, and, consequently, the observable PDFs are less determined by turbulence and more often determined by radiative transfer effects.

  7. Uncertainty of Monetary Valued Ecosystem Services – Value Transfer Functions for Global Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stefan; Manceur, Ameur M.; Seppelt, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Growing demand of resources increases pressure on ecosystem services (ES) and biodiversity. Monetary valuation of ES is frequently seen as a decision-support tool by providing explicit values for unconsidered, non-market goods and services. Here we present global value transfer functions by using a meta-analytic framework for the synthesis of 194 case studies capturing 839 monetary values of ES. For 12 ES the variance of monetary values could be explained with a subset of 93 study- and site-specific variables by utilizing boosted regression trees. This provides the first global quantification of uncertainties and transferability of monetary valuations. Models explain from 18% (water provision) to 44% (food provision) of variance and provide statistically reliable extrapolations for 70% (water provision) to 91% (food provision) of the terrestrial earth surface. Although the application of different valuation methods is a source of uncertainty, we found evidence that assuming homogeneity of ecosystems is a major error in value transfer function models. Food provision is positively correlated with better life domains and variables indicating positive conditions for human well-being. Water provision and recreation service show that weak ownerships affect valuation of other common goods negatively (e.g. non-privately owned forests). Furthermore, we found support for the shifting baseline hypothesis in valuing climate regulation. Ecological conditions and societal vulnerability determine valuation of extreme event prevention. Valuation of habitat services is negatively correlated with indicators characterizing less favorable areas. Our analysis represents a stepping stone to establish a standardized integration of and reporting on uncertainties for reliable and valid benefit transfer as an important component for decision support. PMID:26938447

  8. Properties of Noise Cross Correlation Functions Obtained from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Array at Garner Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Lancelle, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.; Chalari, A.; Clarke, A.

    2015-12-01

    The field test of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) conducted at Garner Valley, California on September 11-12, 2013 provided a continuous overnight record of ambient noise. The DAS array recorded ground motions every one meter of optical cable that was arranged approximately in the shape of a rectangle with dimensions of 160 m by 80 m. The long dimension of the array was adjacent to a state highway. Three hours of record were used to compute noise cross-correlation functions (NCFs) in one-minute windows. The trace from each sensor channel was pre-processed by downsampling to 200 Hz, followed by normalization in the time-domain and bandpass filtering between 2 and 20 Hz (Bensen et al., 2007). The one-minute NCFs were then stacked using the time-frequency domain phase-weighted stacking method (Schimmel & Gallart, 2007). The NCFs between channels were asymmetrical reflecting the direction of traffic noise. The group velocities were found using the frequency-time analysis method. The energy was concentrated between 5 and 15 Hz, which falls into the typical traffic noise frequency band. The resulting velocities were between 100 and 300 m/s for frequencies between 10 and 20 Hz, which are in the same range as described in the results for surface-wave dispersion obtained using an active source for the same site (Lancelle et al., 2015). The group velocity starts to decrease for frequencies greater than ~10 Hz, which was expected on the basis of a previous shear-wave velocity model (Steidl et al., 1996). Then, the phase velocity was calculated using the multichannel analysis of surface wave technique (MASW - Park et al., 1999) with 114 NCFs spaced one meter apart. The resulting dispersion curve between 5 and 15 Hz gave phase velocities that ranged from approximately 170 m/s at 15 Hz to 250 m/s at 5 Hz. These results are consistent with other results of active-source DAS and seismometer records obtained at the Garner Valley site (e.g., Stokoe et al. 2004). This analysis is

  9. Trophic transfer of differently functionalized zinc oxide nanoparticles from crustaceans (Daphnia magna) to zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Skjolding, L M; Winther-Nielsen, M; Baun, A

    2014-12-01

    The potential uptake and trophic transfer of nanoparticles (NP) is not well understood so far and for ZnO NP the data presented in peer-reviewed literature is limited. In this paper the influence of surface functionalization on the uptake and depuration behavior of ZnO NP, ZnO-OH NP and ZnO-octyl NP in D. magna was studied. Bulk ZnO particles (≤5 μm) and ZnCl2 were used as references for uptake of particles and dissolved species of Zn, respectively. Furthermore, the trophic transfer of ZnO NP and ZnO-octyl NP from daphnids (Daphnia magna) to zebra fish (Danio rerio) was studied. For ZnO NP and ZnO-octyl NP fast uptakes in D. magna were observed, whereas no measurable uptake took place for ZnO-OH NP. Lower body burden of ZnCl2 was found compared to both ZnO NP and ZnO-octyl. Contrary, the body burden for bulk ZnO was higher than that of ZnO NP but lower than ZnO-octyl. The higher body burdens found for functionalized ZnO-octyl NP than for non-functionalized ZnO NP showed that that the functionalization of the NP has a high influence on the uptake and depuration behavior. Though no mortality was observed, the resulting body burdens were 9.6 times (ZnO NP) and 47 times (ZnO-octyl NP) higher than toxic levels reported for zinc in D. magna. Consequently, the zinc recovered in the animals was not solely due to soluble zinc, but agglomerates/aggregates of ZnO NP or ZnO-octyl NP contributed to the body burdens. The trophic transfer study showed uptake of both ZnO NP and ZnO-octyl NP reaching more than tenfold higher levels than those obtained through aqueous exposure in other studies. This study contributes to expand the available data on uptake behavior of differently functionalized ZnO NP in D. magna and the potential trophic transfer from zooplankton to fish. PMID:25456224

  10. Combined parameter and function estimation in heat transfer with application to contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, J. V.

    1988-11-01

    This paper discusses parameter estimation, function estimation, and a combination of the two. An example of parameter estimation is the determination of thermal conductivity of solids from transient temperature measurements. An example of function estimation is the inverse heat conduction problem, which uses transient temperature measurements to determine the surface heat flux history. The examples used herein involve the determination of the thermal contact conductance. Two sets of very good data are analyzed. One set of steady-state data was obtained by Antonetti and Eid (1987). The other set was obtained by Moses and Johnson (1986) under transient conditions for periodic contact. Both sets of data are used to illustrate parameter, function, and combined estimation. It is demonstrated that the proposed methods are more powerful then commonly accepted methods. Many other heat transfer problems can be treated using the proposed techniques.

  11. Xenogenic transfer of isolated murine mitochondria into human rho0 cells can improve respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Katrangi, Eyad; D'Souza, Gerard; Boddapati, Sarathi V; Kulawiec, Mariola; Singh, Keshav K; Bigger, Brian; Weissig, Volkmar

    2007-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are the direct cause of several physiological disorders and are also associated with the aging process. The modest progress made over the past two decades towards manipulating the mitochondrial genome and understanding its function within living mammalian cells means that cures for mitochondrial DNA mutations are still elusive. Here, we report that transformed mammalian cells internalize exogenous isolated mitochondria upon simple co-incubation. We first demonstrate the physical presence of internalized mitochondria within recipient cells using fluorescence microscopy. Second, we show that xenogenic transfer of murine mitochondria into human cells lacking functional mitochondria can functionally restore respiration in cells lacking mtDNA. Third, utilizing the natural competence of isolated mitochondria to take up linear DNA molecules, we demonstrate the feasibility of using cellular internalization of isolated exogenous mitochondria as a potential tool for studying mitochondrial genetics in living mammalian cells. PMID:18069915

  12. Efficient assessment method of on-board modulation transfer function of optical remote sensing sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xing, Fei; Sun, Ting; You, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) can be used to evaluate the imaging performance of on-board optical remote sensing sensors, as well as recover and restore images to improve imaging quality. Laboratory measurement approaches for MTF have achieved high precision. However, they are not yet suitable for on-board measurement. In this paper, a new five-step approach to calculate MTF of space optical remote sensing sensors is proposed. First, a pixel motion model is used to extract the conditional sub-frame images. Second, a mathematical morphology algorithm and a correlation-homomorphic filter algorithm are used to eliminate noise and enhance sub-frame image. Third, an image partial differentiation determines the accurate position of edge points. Fourth, a model optical function is used to build a high-resolution edge spread function. Finally, MTF is calculated by derivation and Fourier transform. The experiment shows that the assessment method of MTF is superior to others. PMID:25836841

  13. Simplified methods for interpreting the effect of transfer-function zeros on the transient response of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onken, R.

    1972-01-01

    Two simple methods are outlined for evaluating the effect of transfer-function zeros on the system time response. The pole effects can also be evaluated. These methods are useful for simplified analysis or creating design criteria in terms of desirable regions of pole-zero locations. The type of transfer function studied is limited to those linear systems. Corresponding to ordinary longitudinal or lateral aircraft transfer functions, the denominator polynomial is of fourth order and the numerator of third order at most. With the longitudinal motion of the aircraft as an example, the methods are used in the evaluation of optimal regulator control with respect to a particular performance index structure.

  14. On the location of frequencies of maximum acoustic-to-seismic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatier, J.M.; Bass, H.E.; Elliott, G.R.

    1986-10-01

    Measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic transfer function (ratio of the normal soil particle velocity at a depth d to the acoustic pressure at the surface) for outdoor ground surfaces quite typically reveal a series of maxima and minima. In a publication (Sabatier et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 80, 646--649 (1986)), the location and magnitude of these maxima are measured and predicted for several outdoor ground surfaces using a layered poroelastic model of the ground surface. In this paper, the seismic transfer function for a desert site is compared to the seismic transfer function for holes dug in the desert floor which were filled with pumice (volcanic rock). The hole geometry was rectangular and the hole depths varied from 0.25--2.0 m. The p- and s-wave speeds, densities, porosities, and flow resistivities for the desert floor and pumice were all measured. By varying the hole depth and the fill material, the maxima in the seismic transfer function can be shifted in frequency and the locations of the maxima compare reasonably with that of a hard-backed layer calculation. The area or extent of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling for pumice was determined to be less than 1 m/sup 2/.

  15. Measurement of thin films using very long acoustic wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, G. T.; Nomura, H.; Adachi, H.; Kamakura, T.

    2013-12-01

    A procedure for measuring material thickness by means of necessarily long acoustic wavelengths is examined. The approach utilizes a temporal phase lag caused by the impulse time of wave momentum transferred through a thin layer that is much denser than its surrounding medium. In air, it is predicted that solid or liquid layers below approximately 1/2000 of the acoustic wavelength will exhibit a phase shift with an arctangent functional dependence on thickness and layer density. The effect is verified for thin films on the scale of 10 μm using audible frequency sound (7 kHz). Soap films as thin as 100 nm are then measured using 40 kHz air ultrasound. The method's potential for imaging applications is demonstrated by combining the approach with near-field holography, resulting in reconstructions with sub-wavelength resolution in both the depth and lateral directions. Potential implications at very high and very low acoustic frequencies are discussed.

  16. Objective evaluation of the relative modulation transfer function of densitometers for digitisation of electron micrographs.

    PubMed

    Roseman, A M; Neumann, K

    2003-08-01

    Digitisation of images recorded on film is a crucial part of data acquisition in electron microscopy, particularly for electron cryo-microscopy of biological specimens where the contrast and signal-to-noise ratio are low. A quantitative method to evaluate and compare the quality of densitometers, as measured by the modulation transfer function (MTF), is described here. The densitometer is modelled as a linear system, the output being the convolution of the input image and a point spread function. The MTF is the magnitude of the Fourier transform of the point spread function. The relative MTF describes the quality of signal transfer with spatial frequency. It is important that fine structural details in the micrograph are digitised with a high value for the MTF which does not vary with direction. A test pattern has been generated by projecting an electron image of a grid pattern onto film. The film is scanned and a computer program measures the intensities of the diffraction orders of the repeating pattern. Three different scanners are compared, one is a point scanner and the other two are line scanners. The test can be used to check if a scanner is set up optimally, and how it compares with another scanner. PMID:12672572

  17. Impact of water saturation on seismoelectric transfer functions: a laboratory study of coseismic phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordes, C.; Sénéchal, P.; Barrière, J.; Brito, D.; Normandin, E.; Jougnot, D.

    2015-03-01

    Seismic waves propagating in a porous medium, under favourable conditions, generate measurable electromagnetic fields due to electrokinetic effects. It has been proposed, following experimental and numerical studies, that these so-called `seismoelectromagnetic' couplings depend on pore fluid properties. The theoretical frame describing these phenomena are based on the original Biot's theory, assuming that pores are fluid-filled. We study here the impact of a partially saturated medium on amplitudes of those seismoelectric couplings by comparing experimental data to an effective fluid model. We have built a 1-m-length-scale experiment designed for imbibition and drainage of an homogeneous silica sand; the experimental set-up includes a seismic source, accelerometers, electric dipoles and capacitance probes in order to monitor seismic and seismoelectric fields during water saturation. Apparent velocities and frequency spectra (in the kiloHertz range) are derived from seismic and electrical measurements during experiments in varying saturation conditions. Amplitudes of seismic and seismoelectric waves and their ratios (i.e. transfer functions) are discussed using a spectral analysis performed by continuous wavelet transform. The experiments reveal that amplitude ratios of seismic to coseismic electric signals remain rather constant as a function of the water saturation in the Sw = [0.2-0.9] range, consistently with theoretically predicted transfer functions.

  18. [Effect of spectrum distortion on modulation transfer function in imaging fiber-optic spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Bao; Hong, Yong-Feng

    2011-10-01

    Imaging fiber bundles were introduced to dispersion imaging spectrometer and substituted for slit, connecting the telescope and spectrometer to yield the imaging fiber-optic spectrometer. It is a double sampling system, the misalignment between image of optical fiber and detector pixel has arisen because of the spectrum distortion of spectrometer, which affected the second sampling process, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) therefore degraded. Optical transfer function of sampling process was derived from line spread function. The effect of spectrum distortion on system MTF was analyzed, and a model evaluating the MTF of imaging fiber-optic spectrometer was developed. Compared to the computation model of MTF of slit imaging spectrometer, a MTF item of sampling by optical fiber and a MTF item of misalignment arising from spectrum distortion were added in this model. Employing this, the MTF of an airborne imaging fiber-optic spectrometer for visible near infrared band was evaluated. The approach ro deriving and developing the MTF model has a reference signification for the computation of MTF of double sampling system, which can direct the design of imaging fiber-optic spectrometer also. PMID:22250572

  19. Aerosol modulation transfer function model for passive long-range imaging over a nonuniform atmospheric path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eismann, Michael T.; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2013-04-01

    An aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) model is developed to assess the impact of aerosol scattering on passive long-range imaging sensors. The methodology extends from previous work to explicitly address imaging scenarios with a nonuniform distribution of scattering characteristics over the propagation path and incorporates the moderate resolution transfer code database of aerosol cross-section and phase function characteristics in order to provide an empirical foundation for realistic quantitative MTF assessments. The resulting model is compared with both predictions from a Monte-Carlo scattering simulation and a scene-derived MTF estimate from an empirical image, with reasonable agreement in both cases. Application to long-range imaging situations at both visible and infrared wavelengths indicates that the magnitude and functional form of the aerosol MTF differ significantly from other contributors to the composite system MTF. Furthermore, the image-quality impact is largely radiometric in the sense that the contrast reduction is approximately independent of spatial frequency, and image blur is practically negligible.

  20. Parametric transfer function analysis and modeling of blood flow autoregulation in the optic nerve head

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jintao; Liang, Yi; Thompson, Simon; Cull, Grant; Wang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish a parametric transfer function to describe the relationship between ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) and blood flow (BF) in the optic nerve head (ONH). A third-order parametric theoretical model was proposed to describe the ONH OPP-BF relationship within the lower OPP range of the autoregulation curve (< 80 mmHg) based on experimentally induced BF response to a rapid intraocular pressure (IOP) increase in 6 rhesus monkeys. The theoretical and actual data fitted well and suggest that this parametric third-order transfer function can effectively describe both the linear and nonlinear feature in dynamic and static autoregulation in the ONH within the OPP range studied. It shows that the BF autoregulation fully functions when the OPP was > 40 mmHg and becomes incomplete when the OPP was < 40 mmHg. This model may be used to help investigating the features of autoregulation in the ONH under different experimental conditions. PMID:24665355

  1. Resist-based measurement of contrast transfer function in a 0.3-NAmicrofield optic

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-11

    Although extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography offers the possibility of very high-resolution patterning, the projection optics must be of extremely high quality in order to meet this potential. One key metric of the projection optic quality is the contrast transfer function (CTF), which is a measure of the aerial image contrast as a function of pitch. A static microfield exposure tool based on the 0.3-NA MET optic and operating at a wavelength of 13.5 nm has been installed at the Advanced Light Source, a synchrotron facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This tool provides a platform for a wide variety of research into EUV lithography. In this work we present resist-based measurements of the contrast transfer function for the MET optic. These measurements are based upon line/space patterns printed in several different EUV photoresists. The experimental results are compared with the CTF in aerial-image simulations using the aberrations measured in the projection optic using interferometry. In addition, the CTF measurements are conducted for both bright-field and dark-field mask patterns. Finally, the orientation dependence of the CTF is measured in order to evaluate the effect of non-rotationally symmetric lens aberrations. These measurements provide valuable information in interpreting the results of other experiments performed using the MET and similar systems.

  2. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  3. Line-ratio based ring artifact correction method using transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Daejoong; Hwang, Dosik; Kim, Younguk

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used for medical purposes. However there are many artifacts at CT images and that makes distorted image. Ring artifact is caused by non-uniform sensitivity of detectors and makes ring shape artifact. Line-ratio method was proposed to solve the problem however there are some problem at specific case. Therefore we propose advanced method to correct ring artifact using transfer function. As a result, ring artifacts can be removed at more global cases. Simulation data shows the proposed method outperforms the conventional line-ratio method.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of carbon fibers functionalized with poly (glycidyl methacrylate) via atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongwei; Xiong, Lei; Qin, Xiaokang; Wang, Zhengyue; Ding, Bei; Ren, Huan; Pi, Xiaolong

    2015-07-01

    In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers (CF) were chemically modified with poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to improve the interaction between the CF and polymer matrix. The FT-IR, TGA, and XPS were used to determine the chemical structure of the resulting products and the quantities of PGMA chains grafted from the CF surface. The experimental results confirm that the CF surface was functionalized and glycidyl methacrylate was graft-polymerized onto the CF, and the grafting content of polymer could reach 10.2%.

  5. Transfer-function-parameter estimation from frequency response data: A FORTRAN program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program designed to fit a linear transfer function model to given frequency response magnitude and phase data is presented. A conjugate gradient search is used that minimizes the integral of the absolute value of the error squared between the model and the data. The search is constrained to insure model stability. A scaling of the model parameters by their own magnitude aids search convergence. Efficient computer algorithms result in a small and fast program suitable for a minicomputer. A sample problem with different model structures and parameter estimates is reported.

  6. Security camera resolution measurements: Horizontal TV lines versus modulation transfer function measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark

    2015-01-01

    The horizontal television lines (HTVL) metric has been the primary quantity used by division 6000 related to camera resolution for high consequence security systems. This document shows HTVL measurements are fundamen- tally insufficient as a metric to determine camera resolution, and propose a quantitative, standards based methodology by measuring the camera system modulation transfer function (MTF), the most common and accepted metric of res- olution in the optical science community. Because HTVL calculations are easily misinterpreted or poorly defined, we present several scenarios in which HTVL is frequently reported, and discuss their problems. The MTF metric is discussed, and scenarios are presented with calculations showing the application of such a metric.

  7. Modulation transfer function determination of video capture cards by speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, José J.; Rubiño, Manuel

    2012-10-01

    Today, video cameras connected to frame grabbers or video capture cards (VCCs) are used in many applications such as traffic control, surveillance, medical systems or machine vision. In this work, we present a method for determining the spatial-frequency response of VCCs. This method is based on the modulation transfer function (MTF) determination from speckle patterns using a low-cost experimental setup. We have evaluated and compared three different VCCs. The three VCCs produce an amplification (boost) in the horizontal MTF in a different spatial-frequency range, also differing in the maximum amplification value.

  8. Ground Test of the Urine Processing Assembly for Accelerations and Transfer Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Almond, Deborah F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the ground test of the urine processing assembly for accelerations and transfer functions. Details are given on the test setup, test data, data analysis, analytical results, and microgravity assessment. The conclusions of the tests include the following: (1) the single input/multiple output method is useful if the data is acquired by tri-axial accelerometers and inputs can be considered uncorrelated; (2) tying coherence with the matrix yields higher confidence in results; (3) the WRS#2 rack ORUs need to be isolated; (4) and future work includes a plan for characterizing performance of isolation materials.

  9. DC trains and Pc3s: Source effects in mid-latitude geomagnetic transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Egbert, G.D.; Eisel, M.; Boyde, O.S.; Morrison, H.F.

    1999-10-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data from two sites 150 and 300 km southeast of San Francisco, California (geomagnetic dipole latitude: 43 degrees, L approximately 1.9) show that the usual MT assumption of spatially uniform external magnetic fields is violated to a significant degree in the period range 10-30 s. Inter-station transfer functions exhibit large systematic:temporal variations which are consistent with a combination of two distinct sources: electromagnetic noise due to the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) DC electric railway, and Pc3 geomagnetic pulsations. There is a suggestion in the data that some of the Pc activity may actually be excited by BART.

  10. Comparison of beam-position-transfer functions using circular beam-position monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    A cylindrical beam-position monitor (BPM) used in many accelerator facilities has four electrodes on which beam-image currents induce bunched-beam signals. These probe-electrode signals are geometrically configured to provide beam-position information about two orthogonal axes. An electronic processor performs a mathematical transfer function (TF) on these BPM-electrode signals to produce output signals whose time-varying amplitude is proportional to the beam`s vertical and horizontal position. This paper will compare various beam-position TFs using both pencil beams and will further discuss how diffuse beams interact with some of these TFs.

  11. Site Transfer Functions of Three-Component Ground Motion in Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgur Kurtulmus, Tevfik; Akyol, Nihal; Camyildiz, Murat; Gungor, Talip

    2015-04-01

    Because of high seismicity accommodating crustal deformation and deep graben structures, on which have, urbanized and industrialized large cities in western Turkey, the importance of site-specific seismic hazard assessments becomes more crucial. Characterizing source, site and path effects is important for both assessing the seismic hazard in a specific region and generation of the building codes/or renewing previous ones. In this study, we evaluated three-component recordings for micro- and moderate-size earthquakes with local magnitudes ranging between 2.0 and 5.6. This dataset is used for site transfer function estimations, utilizing two different spectral ratio approaches 'Standard Spectral Ratio-(SSR)' and 'Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio-(HVSR)' and a 'Generalized Inversion Technique-(GIT)' to highlight site-specific seismic hazard potential of deep basin structures of the region. Obtained transfer functions revealed that the sites located near the basin edges are characterized by broader HVSR curves. Broad HVSR peaks could be attributed to the complexity of wave propagation related to significant 2D/3D velocity variations at the sediment-bedrock interface near the basin edges. Comparison of HVSR and SSR estimates for the sites located on the grabens showed that SSR estimates give larger values at lower frequencies which could be attributed to lateral variations in regional velocity and attenuation values caused by basin geometry and edge effects. However, large amplitude values of vertical component GIT site transfer functions were observed at varying frequency ranges for some of the stations. These results imply that vertical component of ground motion is not amplification free. Contamination of HVSR site transfer function estimates at different frequency bands could be related to complexities in the wave field caused by deep or shallow heterogeneities in the region such as differences in the basin geometries, fracturing and fluid saturation along

  12. Study on utility of an approximated transfer function of dynamically tuned dry gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingu, H.; Otsuki, M.; Hayano, T.

    The use of a dry gyro in analog rebalance loops is described and a method to improve the static and dynamic characteristics is presented. The transfer function is derived by transforming a generalized equation into the approximated form based on the design specifications of the mechanical parts. This approximation is proved to be reasonable by the result that the differences between the numerical solutions of a generalized equation and those of an approximated equation are less than 1.0%, and their mean values are less than 0.003%. Noninteracting control is analyzed and the stability conditions are investigated. A fundamental design conception for rebalance loops was established.

  13. Full-Scale Turbofan-Engine Turbine-Transfer Function Determination Using Three Internal Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    Noise-source separation techniques, using three engine-internal sensors, are applied to existing static-engine test data to determine the turbine transfer function for the currently subdominant combustion noise. The results are used to assess the combustion-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) and an improvement to the combustion-noise module GECOR is suggested. The work was carried out in response to the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Program s Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge.

  14. XML Storage for Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions: Towards a Comprehensive Online Reference Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbert, A.; Blum, C.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions (MT TFs) represent most of the information about Earth electrical conductivity found in the raw electromagnetic data, providing inputs for further inversion and interpretation. To be useful for scientific interpretation, they must also contain carefully recorded metadata. Making these data available in a discoverable and citable fashion would provide the most benefit to the scientific community, but such a development requires that the metadata is not only present in the file but is also searchable. The most commonly used MT TF format to date, the historical Society of Exploration Geophysicists Electromagnetic Data Interchange Standard 1987 (EDI), no longer supports some of the needs of modern magnetotellurics, most notably accurate error bars recording. Moreover, the inherent heterogeneity of EDI's and other historic MT TF formats has mostly kept the community away from healthy data sharing practices. Recently, the MT team at Oregon State University in collaboration with IRIS Data Management Center developed a new, XML-based format for MT transfer functions, and an online system for long-term storage, discovery and sharing of MT TF data worldwide (IRIS SPUD; www.iris.edu/spud/emtf). The system provides a query page where all of the MT transfer functions collected within the USArray MT experiment and other field campaigns can be searched for and downloaded; an automatic on-the-fly conversion to the historic EDI format is also included. To facilitate conversion to the new, more comprehensive and sustainable, XML format for MT TFs, and to streamline inclusion of historic data into the online database, we developed a set of open source format conversion tools, which can be used for rotation of MT TFs as well as a general XML <-> EDI converter (https://seiscode.iris.washington.edu/projects/emtf-fcu). Here, we report on the newly established collaboration between the USGS Geomagnetism Program and the Oregon State University to gather

  15. Track/train dynamics test report transfer function test. Volume 1: Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A description is presented of the transfer function test performed on an open hopper freight car loaded with 80 tons of coal. Test data and a post-test update of the requirements document and test procedure are presented. Included are a statement of the test objective, a description of the test configurations, test facilities, test methods, data acquisition/reduction operations, and a chronological test summary. An index to the data for the three test configurations (X, Y, and Z-axis tests) is presented along with test sequence, run number, test reference, and input parameters.

  16. Physics of psychophysics: Stevens and Weber-Fechner laws are transfer functions of excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli, Mauro; Roque, Antônio C.; Oliveira, Rodrigo F.; Kinouchi, Osame

    2002-06-01

    Sensory arrays made of coupled excitable elements can improve both their input sensitivity and dynamic range due to collective nonlinear wave properties. This mechanism is studied in a neural network of electrically coupled (e.g., via gap junctions) elements subject to a Poisson signal process. The network response interpolates between a Weber-Fechner logarithmic law, and a Stevens power law depending on the relative refractory period of the cell. Therefore, these nonlinear transformations of the input level could be performed in the sensory periphery simply due to a basic property: the transfer function of excitable media.

  17. Assessment of functional gametes in chickens after transfer of primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Petitte, J N; Clark, M E; Etches, R J

    1991-05-01

    The ability of primordial germ cells (PGCs) transferred from donor to recipient embryos to form functional gametes was assessed using feather colour as a phenotypic marker. Donor primordial germ cells were obtained in blood samples taken from Dwarf White Leghorn embryos, homozygous for the dominant allele at the locus for 'dominant white' plumage (I), which had been incubated for 52 h. Blood samples containing PGCs were transferred by intravascular injection to Barred Plymouth Rock embryos (ii) incubated for 53, 72 and 96 h. Of the embryos which hatched, 28 were male and 31 were female. All chicks were raised to sexual maturity and test mated with Barred Plymouth Rock fowl. All of the 3117 offspring exhibited the typical Barred Plymouth Rock phenotype; no Barred Plymouth Rock x Dwarf White Leghorn chicks were obtained. The results of this study suggest that the frequency of transmission of the donor line genotype after PGC transfer must be improved for this technique to be useful for the routine development of transgenic poultry. PMID:2056493

  18. A Functional Bacterium-to-Plant DNA Transfer Machinery of Rhizobium etli

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Different strains and species of the soil phytopathogen Agrobacterium possess the ability to transfer and integrate a segment of DNA (T-DNA) into the genome of their eukaryotic hosts, which is mainly mediated by a set of virulence (vir) genes located on the bacterial Ti-plasmid that also contains the T-DNA. To date, Agrobacterium is considered to be unique in its capacity to mediate genetic transformation of eukaryotes. However, close homologs of the vir genes are encoded by the p42a plasmid of Rhizobium etli; this microorganism is related to Agrobacterium, but known only as a symbiotic bacterium that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules in several species of beans. Here, we show that R. etli can mediate functional DNA transfer and stable genetic transformation of plant cells, when provided with a plasmid containing a T-DNA segment. Thus, R. etli represents another bacterial species, besides Agrobacterium, that encodes a protein machinery for DNA transfer to eukaryotic cells and their subsequent genetic modification. PMID:26968003

  19. An adapted modulation transfer function for x-ray backscatter radiography by selective detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Nissia; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.; Shedlock, Daniel

    2007-09-01

    The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is a quantitative function based on frequency resolution that characterizes imaging system performance. In this study, a new MTF methodology is investigated for application to Radiography by Selective Detection (RSD), an enhanced single-side x-ray Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) technique which detects selected scatter components. The RSD imaging modality is a unique type of real-time radiography that uses a set of fin and sleeve collimators to preferentially select different components of the x-ray backscattered field. Radiography by selective detection has performed successfully in different non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications. A customized RSD imaging system was built at the University of Florida for inspection of the space shuttle external tank spray-on foam insulation (SOFI). The x-ray backscatter RSD imaging system has been successfully used for crack and corrosion detection in a variety of materials. The conventional transmission x-ray image quality characterization tools do not apply for RSD because of the different physical process involved. Thus, the main objective of this project is to provide an adapted tool for dynamic evaluation of RSD system image quality. For this purpose, an analytical model of the RSD imaging system response is developed and supported. Two approaches are taken for the MTF calculations: one using the Fourier Transform of a line spread function and the other one using a sine function pattern. Calibration and test targets are then designed according to this proposed model. A customized Matlab code using image contrast and digital curve recognition is developed to support the experimental data and provide the Modulation Transfer Functions for RSD.

  20. A simple analytic treatment of linear growth of structure with baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    In linear perturbation theory, all information about the growth of structure is contained in the Green's function, or equivalently, transfer function. These functions are generally computed using numerical codes or by phenomenological fitting formula anchored in accurate analytic results in the limits of large and small scale. Here, we present a framework for analytically solving all scales, in particular the intermediate scales relevant for the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We solve for the Green's function and transfer function using spherically averaged overdensities and the approximation that the density of the coupled baryon-photon fluid is constant interior to the sound horizon.