Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic transfer function

  1. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  2. The acoustical cues to sound location in the rat: Measurements of directional transfer functions

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Read, Heather L.; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The acoustical cues for sound location are generated by spatial- and frequency-dependent filtering of propagating sound waves by the head and external ears. Although rats have been a common model system for anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics of localization, there have been few studies of the acoustical cues available to rats. Here, directional transfer functions (DTFs), the directional components of the head-related transfer functions, were measured in six adult rats. The cues to location were computed from the DTFs. In the frontal hemisphere, spectral notches were present for frequencies from ∼16 to 30 kHz; in general, the frequency corresponding to the notch increased with increases in source elevation and in azimuth toward the ipsilateral ear. The maximum high-frequency envelope-based interaural time differences (ITDs) were 130 μs, whereas low-frequency (<3.5 kHz) fine-structure ITDs were 160 μs; both types of ITDs were larger than predicted from spherical head models. Interaural level differences (ILDs) strongly depended on location and frequency. Maximum ILDs were <10 dB for frequencies <8 kHz and were as large as 20–40 dB for frequencies >20 kHz. Removal of the pinna eliminated the spectral notches, reduced the acoustic gain and ILDs, altered the acoustical axis, and reduced the ITDs. PMID:18537381

  3. The acoustical cues to sound location in the rat: measurements of directional transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Read, Heather L; Tollin, Daniel J

    2008-06-01

    The acoustical cues for sound location are generated by spatial- and frequency-dependent filtering of propagating sound waves by the head and external ears. Although rats have been a common model system for anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics of localization, there have been few studies of the acoustical cues available to rats. Here, directional transfer functions (DTFs), the directional components of the head-related transfer functions, were measured in six adult rats. The cues to location were computed from the DTFs. In the frontal hemisphere, spectral notches were present for frequencies from approximately 16 to 30 kHz; in general, the frequency corresponding to the notch increased with increases in source elevation and in azimuth toward the ipsilateral ear. The maximum high-frequency envelope-based interaural time differences (ITDs) were 130 mus, whereas low-frequency (<3.5 kHz) fine-structure ITDs were 160 mus; both types of ITDs were larger than predicted from spherical head models. Interaural level differences (ILDs) strongly depended on location and frequency. Maximum ILDs were <10 dB for frequencies <8 kHz and were as large as 20-40 dB for frequencies >20 kHz. Removal of the pinna eliminated the spectral notches, reduced the acoustic gain and ILDs, altered the acoustical axis, and reduced the ITDs. PMID:18537381

  4. Modeling and estimating acoustic transfer functions of external ears with or without headphones.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiqun; Yang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    The acoustic transfer functions of external ears with or without headphones affect the features of perceived sounds and vary considerably with listeners and headphones. A method for estimating the frequency responses of external-ear transfer functions from the sound at the entrance of a blocked ear canal (or from the input of a headphone) to the sound at the eardrum for different listeners and headphones is developed based on an acoustic signal model of external ears. The model allows for applying realistic data about individual external ears and headphones and is advantageous over current standard ear simulators with fixed structures limited to simulating average ear canals and eardrum impedances below 10 kHz. Given different eardrum impedances, ear canal shapes, lengths, and headphones, the frequency responses of external-ear transfer functions are estimated and presented. In addition, a method of determining the Norton equivalent volume velocity or Thevenien equivalent sound pressure sources of a headphone from sound pressure signals in an acoustic tube is presented. These methods are validated via direct measurements and expected to have applications in headphone sound reproduction, headphone and hearing aid design, and audiometric and psychoacoustic measurements to produce desired sounds at the eardrums of different listeners.

  5. Monaural sound-source-direction estimation using the acoustic transfer function of a parabolic reflection board.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Ryoichi; Takiguchi, Tetsuya; Ariki, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a sound-source-direction estimation method using only a single microphone with a parabolic reflection board. A simple signal-power-based method using a parabolic antenna has been proposed in the radar field. But the signal-power-based method is not effective for finding the direction of a talking person due to the varying power of the uttered speech signals. In this paper, the sound-source-direction estimation method focuses on the acoustic transfer function instead of the signal power. The use of the parabolic reflection board leads to a difference in the acoustic transfer functions of the target direction and the non-target directions, where the parabolic reflector and its associated microphone rotate together and observe the speech at each angle. The acoustic transfer function is estimated from the observed speech using the statistics of clean speech signals. Its effectiveness has been confirmed by monaural sound-source-direction estimation experiments in a room environment.

  6. Pressure transfer function of a JT15D nozzle due to acoustic and convected entropy fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, J. H.

    An acoustic transmission matrix analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct with and without flow is extended to include convected entropy fluctuations. The boundary conditions used in the analysis are a transfer function relating entropy and pressure at the nozzle inlet and the nozzle exit impedance. The nozzle pressure transfer function calculated is compared with JT15D turbofan engine nozzle data. The one dimensional theory for sound propagation in a variable area nozzle with flow but without convected entropy is good at the low engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is low (M=0.2) and the duct exit impedance model is good. The effect of convected entropy appears to be so negligible that it is obscured by the inaccuracy of the nozzle exit impedance model, the lack of information on the magnitude of the convected entropy and its phase relationship with the pressure, and the scatter in the data. An improved duct exit impedance model is required at the higher engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is high (M=0.56) and at low frequencies (below 120 Hz).

  7. Pressure transfer function of a JT15D nozzle due to acoustic and convected entropy fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic transmission matrix analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct with and without flow is extended to include convected entropy fluctuations. The boundary conditions used in the analysis are a transfer function relating entropy and pressure at the nozzle inlet and the nozzle exit impedance. The nozzle pressure transfer function calculated is compared with JT15D turbofan engine nozzle data. The one dimensional theory for sound propagation in a variable area nozzle with flow but without convected entropy is good at the low engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is low (M=0.2) and the duct exit impedance model is good. The effect of convected entropy appears to be so negligible that it is obscured by the inaccuracy of the nozzle exit impedance model, the lack of information on the magnitude of the convected entropy and its phase relationship with the pressure, and the scatter in the data. An improved duct exit impedance model is required at the higher engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is high (M=0.56) and at low frequencies (below 120 Hz).

  8. Effects of maturation on tympanometric wideband acoustic transfer functions in human infants1

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Chris A.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Wideband acoustic transfer function (ATF) measurements of energy reflectance (ER) and admittance magnitude (∣Y∣) were obtained at varying static ear-canal pressures in 4-, 12-, and 27-week-old infants and young adults. Developmental changes in wideband ATF measurements varied as a function of frequency. For frequencies from 0.25 to 0.75 kHz there was as much as a 30% change in mean ER and ∣Y∣ with changes in static ear-canal pressure between 4 and 24 weeks of age. From 0.75 to 2 kHz, the effects of pressure produced a small number of significant differences in ER and ∣Y∣ with age, suggestive of a developmentally stable frequency range. Between 2 and 6 kHz, there were differential effects of pressure for the youngest infants; negative pressures caused increased ER and ∣Y∣ and positive pressures caused decreased ER and ∣Y∣; the magnitude of this effect decreased with age. Findings from this study demonstrate developmental differences in wideband tympanometric ATF measurements in 4-, 12- and 24-week-old infants and provide additional insight on the effects of static ear-canal pressure in the young infant’s ear. The maturational effects shown in the experimental data are discussed in light of known age-related anatomical changes in the developing outer and middle ear. PMID:19062852

  9. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report. [nozzle transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; and (3) to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer function versus nondimensional frequency.

  10. Validation of Vehicle Panel/Equipment Response from Diffuse Acoustic Field Excitation Using Spatially Correlated Transfer Function Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Fulcher, Clay; Hunt, Ron

    2012-01-01

    An approach for predicting the vibration, strain, and force responses of a flight-like vehicle panel assembly to acoustic pressures is presented. Important validation for the approach is provided by comparison to ground test measurements in a reverberant chamber. The test article and the corresponding analytical model were assembled in several configurations to demonstrate the suitability of the approach for response predictions when the vehicle panel is integrated with equipment. Critical choices in the analysis necessary for convergence of the predicted and measured responses are illustrated through sensitivity studies. The methodology includes representation of spatial correlation of the pressure field over the panel surface. Therefore, it is possible to demonstrate the effects of hydrodynamic coincidence in the response. The sensitivity to pressure patch density clearly illustrates the onset of coincidence effects on the panel response predictions.

  11. Convective Heat Transfer in Acoustic Streaming Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Convective heat transfer due to acoustic streaming has been studied in the absence of an imposed mean flow. The work is motivated by the need to design and control the thermal features of a suitable experimental rig for the containerless processing of materials by heat treatment of acoustically levitated alloy samples at near zero-gravity. First the problem of heat transfer from an isolated sphere (in a standing sound field) is explored in detail. The streaming Reynolds number, Rs, which characterizes the resulting steady flows, is determined from the acoustic signal. A scale analysis is used to ascertain the importance of buoyancy and viscous dissipation. The steady velocity and temperature fields are determined using asymptotic techniques and numerical methods for the limiting cases of Rs<<1 and Rsgg1. Working correlations for the average Nusselt number are obtained for a wide range of Prandtl numbers. A simple experiment is conducted to verify the predictions for the more relevant case of Rsgg1. The acoustic levitation chamber itself is modelled as a Kundt tube (supporting a plane axial standing sound wave) with insulated side-wall and isothermal end-walls. Analytical solution techniques are used to determine the steady fields close to the tube walls. For the steady recirculatory transport in the core, the numerical solver PHOENICS is adopted for the solution of the complete elliptic form of the governing equations. A study of the effects of a range of acoustic and geometric parameters on the flow and heat transfer is performed and Nusselt number correlations are obtained for air. PHOENICS is also used to study the effects of variable fluid properties and axial side-wall conduction (coupled with radiation). The role of normal/reduced gravity is assessed and suggestions made for terrestrial testing of the levitation apparatus. Finally, with the sample located at a node in the levitation chamber, the effect of the interaction of the streaming flows (on the sphere

  12. Acoustic Rotational Manipulation Using Orbital Angular Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhäuser, Andreas; Wunenburger, Régis; Brasselet, Etienne

    2012-07-01

    We report on the first quantitative test of acoustic orbital angular momentum transfer to a sound absorbing object immersed in a viscous liquid. This is done by realizing an original experiment that is to spin a millimeter-size target disk using an ultrasonic vortex beam. We demonstrate the balance between the acoustic radiation torque calculated from the Brillouin stress tensor and the viscous torque evaluated from the steady state spinning frequency. Moreover, we unveil a rotational acoustic streaming phenomenon that results from the acoustic angular momentum transfer to the host fluid. We show that it lowers the viscous torque, thereby restoring the torque balance.

  13. Effect of Forcing Function on Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkheiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Chris; Steinetz, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustic standing waves of high amplitude have been demonstrated by utilizing the effects of resonator shape to prevent the pressure waves from entering saturation. Experimentally, nonlinear acoustic standing waves have been generated by shaking an entire resonating cavity. While this promotes more efficient energy transfer than a piston-driven resonator, it also introduces complicated structural dynamics into the system. Experiments have shown that these dynamics result in resonator forcing functions comprised of a sum of several Fourier modes. However, previous numerical studies of the acoustics generated within the resonator assumed simple sinusoidal waves as the driving force. Using a previously developed numerical code, this paper demonstrates the effects of using a forcing function constructed with a series of harmonic sinusoidal waves on resonating cavities. From these results, a method will be demonstrated which allows the direct numerical analysis of experimentally generated nonlinear acoustic waves in resonators driven by harmonic forcing functions.

  14. Comparisons of power transfer functions and flow transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-11-15

    Transfer functions may be used to calculate component feedbacks or temperature increments by convolution of the transfer function with the appropriate fractional change in system-quantity. Power-change transfer functions have been reported. The corresponding flow transfer functions for this case, and comparison with the power transfer functions, are reported here. Results of feedback simulation of ramped flow transients using flow transfer functions are also described.

  15. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  16. Introduction of acoustical diffraction in the radiative transfer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboul, Emeline; Le Bot, Alain; Perret-Liaudet, Joël

    2004-07-01

    This Note presents an original approach to include diffraction in the radiative transfer method when applied to acoustics. This approach leads to a better spatial description of the acoustical energy. An energetic diffraction coefficient and some diffraction sources are introduced to model the diffraction phenomena. The amplitudes of these sources are determined by solving a linear sytem of equations resulting from the power balance between all acoustical sources. The approach is applied on bidimensional examples and gives good results except at geometrical boundaries. To cite this article: E. Reboul et al., C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  17. Acoustic radiation force expressed using complex phase shifts and momentum-transfer cross sections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force is expressed using complex phase shifts of partial wave scattering functions and the momentum-transfer cross section, herein incorporated into acoustics from quantum mechanisms. Imaginary parts of the phase shifts represent dissipation in the object and/or in the boundary layer adjacent to the object. The formula simplifies the force as summation of functions of complex phase shifts of adjacent partial waves involving differences of real parts and sums of imaginary parts, providing an efficient way of exploring the force parameter-space. The formula for the force is proportional to a generalized momentum-transfer cross section for plane waves and no dissipation. PMID:27586777

  18. A surface acoustic wave /SAW/ charge transfer imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanicolauo, N. A.; Lin, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    An 80 MHz, 2-microsecond surface acoustic wave charge transfer device (SAW-CTD) has been fabricated in which surface acoustic waves are used to create traveling longitudinal electric fields in the silicon substrate and to replace the multiphase clocks of charge coupled devices. The traveling electric fields create potential wells which will carry along charges that may be stored in the wells; the charges may be injected into the wells by light. An optical application is proposed where the SAW-CTD structure is used in place of a conventional interline transfer design.

  19. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. |

    1993-06-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  20. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. Portland State Univ., OR . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  1. Free Flap Functional Muscle Transfers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ryan M; Ruch, David S

    2016-08-01

    Free functional muscle transfers remain a powerful reconstructive tool to restore upper extremity function when other options such as tendon or nerve transfers are not available. This reconstructive technique is commonly used for patients following trauma, ischemic contractures, and brachial plexopathies. Variable outcomes have been reported following free functional muscle transfers that are related to motor nerve availability and reinnervation. This article highlights considerations around donor motor nerve selection, dissection, and use of the gracilis muscle, and the surgical approach to performing a free functional muscle transfer to restore elbow flexion and/or digit flexion. PMID:27387083

  2. Information transfer in auditoria and room-acoustical quality.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jason E

    2013-04-01

    It is hypothesized that room-acoustical quality correlates with the information-transfer rate. Auditoria are considered as multiple-input multiple-output communication channels and a theory of information-transfer is outlined that accounts for time-variant multipath, spatial hearing, and distributed directional sources. Source diversity and spatial hearing are shown to be the mechanisms through which multipath increases the information-transfer rate by overcoming finite spatial resolution. In addition to predictions that are confirmed by recent and historical findings, the theory provides explanations for the influence of factors such as musical repertoire and ensemble size on subjective preference and the influence of multisource, multichannel auralization on perceived realism.

  3. Information transfer in auditoria and room-acoustical quality.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jason E

    2013-04-01

    It is hypothesized that room-acoustical quality correlates with the information-transfer rate. Auditoria are considered as multiple-input multiple-output communication channels and a theory of information-transfer is outlined that accounts for time-variant multipath, spatial hearing, and distributed directional sources. Source diversity and spatial hearing are shown to be the mechanisms through which multipath increases the information-transfer rate by overcoming finite spatial resolution. In addition to predictions that are confirmed by recent and historical findings, the theory provides explanations for the influence of factors such as musical repertoire and ensemble size on subjective preference and the influence of multisource, multichannel auralization on perceived realism. PMID:23556686

  4. The study of surface acoustic wave charge transfer device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanicolaou, N.; Lin, H. C.

    1978-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave-charge transfer device, consisting of an n-type silicon substrate, a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer, and a sputtered film of piezoelectric zinc oxide is proposed as a means of circumventing problems associated with charge-coupled device (CCD) applications in memory, signal processing, and imaging. The proposed device creates traveling longitudinal electric fields in the silicon and replaces the multiphase clocks in CCD's. The traveling electric fields create potential wells which carry along charges stored there. These charges may be injected into the wells by light or by using a p-n junction as in conventional CCD's.

  5. Intermodal transfer in temporal discrimination. [of visual and acoustic stimuli duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warm, J. S.; Stutz, R. M.; Vassolo, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    This study determined if training for accuracy in temporal discrimination would transfer across sensory modalities. A fractionation method was used in which subjects bisected the durations of acoustic and visual signals at three standard intervals (6, 12, and 18 sec). Absolute error was the performance index. Half of the subjects were trained with acoustic stimuli and then tested in vision; the remainder were trained in vision and tested in audition. Similar negatively accelerated acquisition functions were noted for both modalities. Positive intermodal transfer, characterized by symmetry across modalities, was obtained at all standard durations. The results were considered to provide support for the notion that a common mechanism underlies temporal discriminations in different sensory systems.

  6. Automatic computation of transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Atcitty, Stanley; Watson, Luke Dale

    2015-04-14

    Technologies pertaining to the automatic computation of transfer functions for a physical system are described herein. The physical system is one of an electrical system, a mechanical system, an electromechanical system, an electrochemical system, or an electromagnetic system. A netlist in the form of a matrix comprises data that is indicative of elements in the physical system, values for the elements in the physical system, and structure of the physical system. Transfer functions for the physical system are computed based upon the netlist.

  7. Acoustic signature of violins based on bridge transfer mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Elie, Benjamin; Gautier, François; David, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    This paper is an attempt to solve two problems related to musical acoustics. The first one consists in defining a signature of an instrument, namely, summarizing its vibroacoustical behavior. The second one deals with the existing relationship between the musical sound and the vibroacoustic properties of the instrument body. The violin is the application of this paper. A proposed solution for the first problem consists in an estimation of the bridge transfer mobility and the mean-value of the lateral bridge transfer mobility. The second problem is studied via the comparison between the amplitudes of harmonics, extracted from a glissando audio signal, and the lateral bridge transfer mobility: Both curves exhibit similar features. This is the main result of the paper. This is evidenced by studying the effect of a violin mute on both the lateral bridge transfer mobility and the produced sound. Finally, this is evidenced by successfully identifying which violin is played in an audio recording, using the computation of the Pearson distance between the distribution of the amplitude of harmonics and a database of measured mobilities. PMID:25190411

  8. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  9. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  10. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  11. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  12. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid.

    PubMed

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2016-03-14

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm(-1) oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology.

  13. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid.

    PubMed

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2016-03-14

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm(-1) oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology. PMID:26979698

  14. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  15. Transfer function characteristics of super resolving systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, Tom D.; Curtis, Craig H.

    1992-01-01

    Signal quality in an optical storage device greatly depends on the optical system transfer function used to write and read data patterns. The problem is similar to analysis of scanning optical microscopes. Hopkins and Braat have analyzed write-once-read-many (WORM) optical data storage devices. Herein, transfer function analysis of magnetooptic (MO) data storage devices is discussed with respect to improving transfer-function characteristics. Several authors have described improving the transfer function as super resolution. However, none have thoroughly analyzed the MO optical system and effects of the medium. Both the optical system transfer function and effects of the medium of this development are discussed.

  16. The Modulation Transfer Function for Speech Intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Taffeta M.; Theunissen, Frédéric E.

    2009-01-01

    We systematically determined which spectrotemporal modulations in speech are necessary for comprehension by human listeners. Speech comprehension has been shown to be robust to spectral and temporal degradations, but the specific relevance of particular degradations is arguable due to the complexity of the joint spectral and temporal information in the speech signal. We applied a novel modulation filtering technique to recorded sentences to restrict acoustic information quantitatively and to obtain a joint spectrotemporal modulation transfer function for speech comprehension, the speech MTF. For American English, the speech MTF showed the criticality of low modulation frequencies in both time and frequency. Comprehension was significantly impaired when temporal modulations <12 Hz or spectral modulations <4 cycles/kHz were removed. More specifically, the MTF was bandpass in temporal modulations and low-pass in spectral modulations: temporal modulations from 1 to 7 Hz and spectral modulations <1 cycles/kHz were the most important. We evaluated the importance of spectrotemporal modulations for vocal gender identification and found a different region of interest: removing spectral modulations between 3 and 7 cycles/kHz significantly increases gender misidentifications of female speakers. The determination of the speech MTF furnishes an additional method for producing speech signals with reduced bandwidth but high intelligibility. Such compression could be used for audio applications such as file compression or noise removal and for clinical applications such as signal processing for cochlear implants. PMID:19266016

  17. Instrument function of a broadband acoustic thermometric detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Sharakshane, A. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Sanin, A. G.; Sharakshane, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The instrument function of a broadband (1.6-2.5 MHz) detector that is used in acoustic thermometry has been calculated. Experimental tests have proved that measured and computed results are in agreement. The effect of the pass band characteristics and the detector's dimension on the instrument function has been studied as well as the effect that the instrument function has on an acoustic thermometric signal that is measured by the detector. The ratio of the wavelength (for the mean reception frequency) to the detector's radius has been shown to be the main parameter that determines the acoustic thermometric signal at distances that are typical of acoustic thermometry. For problems of localizing a heated domain, it is optimal to locate the receiver at a distance of 15-25 mm from the domain. For example, for a detector 8 mm in diameter, the width of the instrument function at a level of 0.5 of the maximum is 1.2 ± 0.1 mm in this zone.

  18. Acoustic Streaming in Microgravity: Flow Stability and Heat Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for drops and bubbles levitated in a liquid host, with particular attention given to the effect of shape oscillations and capillary waves on the local flow fields. Some preliminary results are also presented on the use of streaming flows for the control of evaporation rate and rotation of electrostatically levitated droplets in 1 g. The results demonstrate the potential for the technological application of acoustic methods to active control of forced convection in microgravity.

  19. Acoustic microscopy of functionally graded thermal sprayed coatings using stiffness matrix method and Stroh formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, X. D.; Monnier, T.; Guy, P.; Courbon, J.

    2013-06-01

    Acoustic microscopy of multilayered media as well as functionally graded coatings on substrate necessitates to model acoustic wave propagation in such materials. In particular, we chose to use Stroh formalism and the recursive stiffness matrix method to obtain the reflection coefficient of acoustic waves on these systems because this allows us to address the numerical instability of the conventional transfer matrix method. In addition, remarkable simplification and computational efficiency are obtained. We proposed a modified formulation of the angular spectrum of the transducer based on the theoretical analysis of a line-focus transducer for broadband acoustic microscopy. A thermally sprayed coating on substrate is treated as a functionally graded material along the depth of the coating and is approximately represented by a number of homogeneous elastic layers with exponentially graded elastic properties. The agreement between our experimental and numerical analyses on such thermal sprayed coatings with different thicknesses confirms the efficiency of the method. We proved the ability of the inversion procedure to independently determine both thickness and gradient of elastic properties. The perspective of this work is the opportunity to non-destructively measure these features in functionally graded materials.

  20. Application Of Digital Image Processing To Acoustic Ambiguity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, J. Brian

    1983-03-01

    The passive acoustic ambiguity function is a measure of the cross-spectrum in a Doppler-shift and time-delay space that arises when two or more passive receivers are used to monitor a moving acoustic source. Detection of a signal source in the presence of noise has been treated in the past from a communications-theory point of view, with considerable effort devoted to establishing a threshold to which the maximum value of the function is compared. That approach disregards ambiguity function topography information which in practice is manually used to interpret source characteristics and source kinematics. Because of the two-dimensional representation of the ambiguity function, digital image processing techniques can be easily applied for the purposes of topography enhancement and characterization. This work presents an overview of techniques previously reported as well as more current research being conducted to improve detection performance and automate topography characterization.

  1. The acoustical Klein-Gordon equation: the wave-mechanical step and barrier potential functions.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy; Sharp, David B

    2003-09-01

    The transformed form of the Webster equation is investigated. Usually described as analogous to the Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics, it is noted that the second-order time dependency defines a Klein-Gordon problem. This "acoustical Klein-Gordon equation" is analyzed with particular reference to the acoustical properties of wave-mechanical potential functions, U(x), that give rise to geometry-dependent dispersions at rapid variations in tract cross section. Such dispersions are not elucidated by other one-dimensional--cylindrical or conical--duct models. Since Sturm-Liouville analysis is not appropriate for inhomogeneous boundary conditions, the exact solution of the Klein-Gordon equation is achieved through a Green's-function methodology referring to the transfer matrix of an arbitrary string of square potential functions, including a square barrier equivalent to a radiation impedance. The general conclusion of the paper is that, in the absence of precise knowledge of initial conditions on the area function, any given potential function will map to a multiplicity of area functions of identical relative resonance characteristics. Since the potential function maps uniquely to the acoustical output, it is suggested that the one-dimensional wave physics is both most accurately and most compactly described within the Klein-Gordon framework.

  2. Acoustic orbital angular momentum transfer to matter by chiral scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunenburger, Régis; Israel Vazquez Lozano, Juan; Brasselet, Etienne

    2015-10-01

    We report on orbital angular momentum exchange between sound and matter mediated by a non-dissipative chiral scattering process. An experimental demonstration is made possible by irradiating a three-dimensional printed, spiral-shaped chiral object with an incident ultrasonic beam carrying zero orbital angular momentum. Chiral refraction is shown to impart a nonzero orbital angular momentum to the scattered field and to rotate the object. This result constitutes a proof of concept of a novel kind of acoustic angular manipulation of matter.

  3. Investigations of Acoustics and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Thermoacoustic Driven Pulse Tube Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretagne, E.; François, M.-X.; Ishikawa, H.

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the design of the ThermoAcoustic Driven Pulse Tube Refrigerator which is a promising solution for large scale pulse tube applications. Designing concepts and preliminary studies of heat transfer in heat exchangers specifically for large scale TADPTR are presented. Thus, we introduce the way to deal with different components of the Pulse Tube Refrigerator to achieve the most efficient regenerator operation with the constraints imposed by the thermoacoustic driver. The main building-concepts are illustrated by considering the combinations of a standing wave Thermoacoustic prime mover with (i) an Inertance-Orifice PTR and (ii) a Lumped Boost PTR. Both experimental and numerical results support the models. Furthermore, we investigate the heat transfer mechanism for Reynolds number between 104 to 2×105 in helium. For the current experiment, measurements are taken at the cold heat exchanger of the prime mover. For the purpose of the analysis we select testing conditions so that the particle displacement is larger than the heat exchanger length and the boundary layer assumption applies. Adequacy of the steady flow assumption is discussed. Nusselt number obtained from the measurements is then correlated with a function of Prandtl, Reynolds and Valensi numbers.

  4. Wiener Filter Estimation of Transfer Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessel, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The use of a Wiener filter estimate for the linear transfer function can significantly improve the description of behavioral dynamics. This report presents a two-pass, Monte-Carlo-based algorithm that is well suited to repeated-trials local average measurements. The Wiener filter transfer functions strongly suppress noise artifacts as well as…

  5. Rational transfer function models for biofilm reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wik, T.; Breitholtz, C.

    1998-12-01

    Design of controllers and optimization of plants using biofilm reactors often require dynamic models and efficient simulation methods. Standard model assumptions were used to derive nonrational transfer functions describing the fast dynamics of stirred-tank reactors with zero- or first-order reactions inside the biofilm. A method based on the location of singularities was used to derive rational transfer functions that approximate nonrational ones. These transfer functions can be used in efficient simulation routines and in standard methods of controller design. The order of the transfer functions can be chosen in a natural way, and changes in physical parameters may directly be related to changes in the transfer functions. Further, the mass balances used and, hence, the transfer functions, are applicable to catalytic reactors with porous catalysts as well. By applying the methods to a nitrifying trickling filter, reactor parameters are estimated from residence-time distributions and low-order rational transfer functions are achieved. Simulated effluent dynamics, using these transfer functions, agree closely with measurements.

  6. Surface acoustic wave depth profiling of a functionally graded material

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, Jozefien; Leclaire, Philippe; Xu Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Martinez, Loic; Sola, Antonella; Siligardi, Cristina; Cannillo, Valeria; Van der Donck, Tom; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2007-09-01

    The potential and limitations of Rayleigh wave spectroscopy to characterize the elastic depth profile of heterogeneous functional gradient materials are investigated by comparing simulations of the surface acoustic wave dispersion curves of different profile-spectrum pairs. This inverse problem is shown to be quite ill posed. The method is then applied to extract information on the depth structure of a glass-ceramic (alumina) functionally graded material from experimental data. The surface acoustic wave analysis suggests the presence of a uniform coating region consisting of a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and glass, with a sharp transition between the coating and the substrate. This is confirmed by scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis.

  7. Controlled exciton transfer between quantum dots with acoustic phonons taken into account

    SciTech Connect

    Golovinski, P. A.

    2015-09-15

    A system of excitons in two quantum dots coupled by the dipole–dipole interaction is investigated. The excitation transfer process controlled by the optical Stark effect at nonresonant frequencies is considered and the effect of the interaction between excitons and acoustic phonons in a medium on this process is taken into account. The system evolution is described using quantum Heisenberg equations. A truncated set of equations is obtained and the transfer dynamics is numerically simulated. High-efficiency picosecond switching of the excitation transfer by a laser pulse with a rectangular envelope is demonstrated. The dependence of picosecond switching on the quantum-dot parameters and optical-pulse length is presented.

  8. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  9. Transfer Function Control for Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor); Grodinsky, Carlos M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular apparatus for acquiring biometric data may include circuitry operative to receive an input signal indicative of a biometric condition, the circuitry being configured to process the input signal according to a transfer function thereof and to provide a corresponding processed input signal. A controller is configured to provide at least one control signal to the circuitry to programmatically modify the transfer function of the modular system to facilitate acquisition of the biometric data.

  10. Nerve Transfers to Restore Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Malungpaishorpe, Kanchai; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Ng, Chye Yew; Witoonchart, Kiat

    2016-05-01

    The restoration of shoulder function after brachial plexus injury represents a significant challenge facing the peripheral nerve surgeons. This is owing to a combination of the complex biomechanics of the shoulder girdle, the multitude of muscles and nerves that could be potentially injured, and a limited number of donor options. In general, nerve transfer is favored over tendon transfer, because the biomechanics of the musculotendinous units are not altered. This article summarizes the surgical techniques and clinical results of nerve transfers for restoration of shoulder function. PMID:27094888

  11. Design of the Coordinate Transformation Function for Cylindrical Acoustic Cloaks with a Quantity of Discrete Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li; Wen, Ji-Hong; Yu, Dian-Long; Lu, Zhi-Miao; Wen, Xi-Sen

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic cloak based on coordinate transformation is of great topical interest and has promise in potential applications such as sound transparency and insulation. The frequency response of acoustic cloaks with a quantity of discrete homogeneous layers is analyzed by the acoustic scattering theory. The effect of coordinate transformation function on the acoustic total scattering cross section is discussed to achieve low scattering with only a few layers of anisotropic metamaterials. Also, the physics of acoustic wave interaction with the interfaces between the discrete layers inside the cloak shell is discussed. These results provide a better way of designing a multilayered acoustic cloak with fewer layers.

  12. Transfer Function Identification Using Orthogonal Fourier Transform Modeling Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A method for transfer function identification, including both model structure determination and parameter estimation, was developed and demonstrated. The approach uses orthogonal modeling functions generated from frequency domain data obtained by Fourier transformation of time series data. The method was applied to simulation data to identify continuous-time transfer function models and unsteady aerodynamic models. Model fit error, estimated model parameters, and the associated uncertainties were used to show the effectiveness of the method for identifying accurate transfer function models from noisy data.

  13. Free Functional Muscle Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Emily M; Tung, Thomas H; Moore, Amy M

    2016-05-01

    Free functional muscle transfer provides an option for functional restoration when nerve reconstruction and tendon transfers are not feasible. To ensure a successful outcome, many factors need to be optimized, including proper patient selection, timing of intervention, donor muscle and motor nerve selection, optimal microneurovascular technique and tension setting, proper postoperative management, and appropriate rehabilitation. Functional outcomes of various applications to the upper extremity and the authors' algorithm for the use of free functional muscle transfer are also included in this article. PMID:27094895

  14. Acoustic patterns of infant vocalizations expressing emotions and communicative functions.

    PubMed

    Papaeliou, C; Minadakis, G; Cavouras, D

    2002-04-01

    The present study aimed at identifying the acoustic pattern of vocalizations, produced by 7- to 11-month-old infants, that were interpreted by their mothers as expressing emotions or communicative functions. Participants were 6 healthy, first-born English infants, 3 boys and 3 girls, and their mothers. The acoustic analysis of the vocalizations was performed using a pattern recognition (PR) software system. A PR system not only calculates signal features, it also automatically detects patterns in the arrangement of such features. The following results were obtained: (a) the PR system distinguished vocalizations interpreted as emotions from vocalizations interpreted as communicative functions with an overall accuracy of 87.34%; (b) the classification accuracy of the PR system for vocalizations that convey emotions was 85.4% and for vocalizations that convey communicative functions was 89.5%; and (c) compared to vocalizations that express emotions, vocalizations that express communicative functions were shorter, displayed lower fundamental frequency values, and had greater overall intensity. These findings suggest that in the second half of the first year, infants possess a vocal repertoire that contributes to regulating cooperative interaction with their mothers, which is considered one of the major prerequisites for language acquisition.

  15. Optical transfer function of Starlette retroreflector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An optical transfer function was computed for the retroreflector array carried by the Starlette satellite (1975 10A). The range correction is given for extrapolating laser range measurements to the center of mass of the satellite. The gain function and active reflecting area of the array are computed for estimating laser-echo signal strengths.

  16. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s-1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  17. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    DOE PAGES

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; et al

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s-1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from themore » inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.« less

  18. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s−1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening. PMID:25615864

  19. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  20. Exploring the transferability of safety performance functions.

    PubMed

    Farid, Ahmed; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Eluru, Naveen; Wang, Jung-Han

    2016-09-01

    Safety performance functions (SPFs), by predicting the number of crashes on roadway facilities, have been a vital tool in the highway safety area. The SPFs are typically applied for identifying hot spots in network screening and evaluating the effectiveness of road safety countermeasures. The Highway Safety Manual (HSM) provides a series of SPFs for several crash types by various roadway facilities. The SPFs, provided in the HSM, were developed using data from multiple states. In regions without local jurisdiction based SPFs it is common practice to adopt national SPFs for crash prediction. There has been little research to examine the viability of such national level models for local jurisdictions. Towards understanding the influence of SPF transferability, we examine the rural divided multilane highway models from Florida, Ohio, and California. Traffic, roadway geometry and crash data from the three states are employed to estimate single-state SPFs, two-state SPFs and three-state SPFs. The SPFs are estimated using the negative binomial model formulation for several crash types and severities. To evaluate transferability of models, we estimate a transfer index that allows us to understand which models transfer adequately to other regions. The results indicate that models from Florida and California seem to be more transferable compared to models from Ohio. More importantly, we observe that the transfer index increases when we used pooled data (from two or three states). Finally, to assist in model transferability, we propose a Modified Empirical Bayes (MEB) measure that provides segment specific calibration factors for transferring SPFs to local jurisdictions. The proposed measure is shown to outperform the HSM calibration factor for transferring SPFs. PMID:27322637

  1. Energy Transfer and a Recurring Mathematical Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the interesting work of a previous contributor concerning the analogies between physical phenomena such as mechanical collisions and the transfer of power in an electric circuit. Emphasis is placed on a mathematical function linking these different areas of physics. This unifying principle is seen as an exciting opportunity to…

  2. Strictly positive real transfer functions revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozano-Leal, Rogelio; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1990-01-01

    The two most commonly used definitions of strictly positive real (SPR) transfer functions are reviewed. Contrary to what has been suggested in the literature, it is proven that the least restrictive (weak) definition of the two is clearly related to the Yacubovich-Kalman lemma. The relationship between time- and frequency-domain conditions pertaining to the weak definition of SPR systems is established.

  3. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  4. One-dimensional pressure transfer models for acoustic-electric transmission channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, K. R.; Lawry, T. J.; Scarton, H. A.; Saulnier, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method for modeling piezoelectric-based ultrasonic acoustic-electric power and data transmission channels is presented. These channels employ piezoelectric disk transducers to convey signals across a series of physical layers using ultrasonic waves. This model decomposes the mechanical pathway of the signal into individual ultrasonic propagation layers which are generally independent of the layer's adjacent domains. Each layer is represented by a two-by-two traveling pressure wave transfer matrix which relates the forward and reverse pressure waves on one side of the layer to the pressure waves on the opposite face, where each face is assumed to be in contact with a domain of arbitrary reference acoustic impedance. A rigorous implementation of ultrasonic beam spreading is introduced and implemented within applicable domains. Compatible pressure-wave models for piezoelectric transducers are given, which relate the electric voltage and current interface of the transducer to the pressure waves on one mechanical interface while also allowing for passive acoustic loading of the secondary mechanical interface. It is also shown that the piezoelectric model's electrical interface is compatible with transmission line parameters (ABCD-parameters), allowing for connection of electronic components and networks. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing the behavior of realistic physical channels.

  5. Numerical and theoretical analysis of beam vibration induced acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qun

    The purpose of this research is to numerically and analytically investigate the acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer, which are induced by a beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms. Analytical results show that the beam vibrating in standing waveforms scatters the acoustic waves into the free space, which have a larger attenuation coefficient and longer propagating traveling wavelength than those of the plane wave. In contrast to a constant Reynolds stress in the plane wave, the Reynolds stress generated by such acoustic wave is expected to drive the free space streaming away from the anti-nodes and towards nodes of the standing wave vibration. The sonic and ultrasonic streamings within the channel between the vibrating beam and a parallel stationary beam are also investigated. The acoustic streaming is utilized to cool the stationary beam, which has either a heat source attached to it or subjected to a uniform heat flux. The sonic streaming is found to be mainly the boundary layer streaming dominating the whole channel while the ultrasonic streaming is clearly composed of two boundary layer streamings near both beams and a core region streaming, which is driven by the streaming velocity at the edge of the boundary layer near the vibrating beam. The standing wave vibration of the beam induces acoustic streaming in a series of counterclockwise eddies, which is directed away from the anti-nodes and towards the nodes. The magnitude of the sonic streaming is proportional to o2A 2 while that of the ultrasonic streaming is proportional to o 3/2A2. Numerical results show that the acoustic streaming induced by the beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms has almost the same cooling efficiency for the heat source and the heat flux cases although the flow and temperature fields within the channel are different. The hysteresis of the ultrasonic streaming flow patterns associated with the change of the aspect ratio of the channel

  6. Woodwind Tone Hole Acoustics and the Spectrum Transformation Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefe, Douglas Howard

    This report describes an investigation of woodwind musical instrument tone holes and their effect on the radiated spectrum, the total dissipation, the stability of oscillation, the psychoacoustical cues important in perception, and the tuning and response of the instrument. Varying tone hole proportions significantly affect the radiative and frictional damping near a single hole, the mutual interactions between holes, the onset of streaming and turbulence near the holes, and the perceived woodwind timbre. The interconnections between related fields are explored through a brief review of sound production in woodwinds plus more extensive reviews of room and psychological acoustics. A theoretical and experimental discussion of the spectrum transformation function from the mouthpiece into the room relates all these fields. Also, considered are differences between cylindrical and conical bore woodwinds, the systematic shifts in saxophone spectra produced by the beating of the reed, the coupling of many closely spaced tone holes to the room excitation, the role of the player, and the results pertaining to computer music synthesis. The complicated acoustical flow inside the main air column near a single tone hole has been examined using a Green function, integral equation approach. A variational formulation allows explicit calculation of the open and closed hole impedance parameters needed in the transmission line description of a woodwind, and experiments have verified the theory in detail. Major acoustical topics considered are listed below. The effective length t(,e) of an open hole, relevant for instrument design and modification, is calculated and measured in terms of the main bore diameter 2a, hole diameter 2b, and the height t of the hole chimney; the effect of a hanging pad is a semi-empirical correction on t(,e). When the fundamental plane-wave mode of the main air column oscillation is at a pressure node, both the open and closed hole series impedances are

  7. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-09

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  8. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  9. Extracting the Green's function between receivers using underwater acoustic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Philippe; Lynch, Steve; Kuperman, W. A.

    2002-11-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical works in ultrasonics show that the Green's function between transducers fastened to an aluminum sample can be measured from the correlation of thermal noise [R. L. Weaver and O. J. Lobkis, ''Ultrasonics without a source. Thermal fluctuation correlations at MHz frequencies,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 134301 (2001)]. Similar results have been obtained in geophysics using seismic noise data [A. Paul and M. Campillo, ''Extracting the Green's function between two stations from coda waves,'' Trans. Am. Geophys. Union 82-47, F842 (2001)]. Sources of noise in underwater acoustics range from ship noise at low frequency to surface noise and even thermal noise at very high frequencies. We theoretically demonstrate that at least an approximate Green's function can be obtained from surface noise. This result is confirmed by noise data recorded on arrays of receivers during the NPAL98 experiment. [Work supported by ONR.] a)The NPAL group is composed of J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, B. M. Howe, J. A. Mercer, R. C. Spindel, and P. F. Worcester.

  10. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-12-01

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive-inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and dramatically

  11. Transfer function analysis of thermospheric perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Varosi, F.; Herrero, F. A.; Spencer, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    Applying perturbation theory, a spectral model in terms of vectors spherical harmonics (Legendre polynomials) is used to describe the short term thermospheric perturbations originating in the auroral regions. The source may be Joule heating, particle precipitation or ExB ion drift-momentum coupling. A multiconstituent atmosphere is considered, allowing for the collisional momentum exchange between species including Ar, O2, N2, O, He and H. The coupled equations of energy, mass and momentum conservation are solved simultaneously for the major species N2 and O. Applying homogeneous boundary conditions, the integration is carred out from the Earth's surface up to 700 km. In the analysis, the spherical harmonics are treated as eigenfunctions, assuming that the Earth's rotation (and prevailing circulation) do not significantly affect perturbations with periods which are typically much less than one day. Under these simplifying assumptions, and given a particular source distribution in the vertical, a two dimensional transfer function is constructed to describe the three dimensional response of the atmosphere. In the order of increasing horizontal wave numbers (order of polynomials), this transfer function reveals five components. To compile the transfer function, the numerical computations are very time consuming (about 100 hours on a VAX for one particular vertical source distribution). However, given the transfer function, the atmospheric response in space and time (using Fourier integral representation) can be constructed with a few seconds of a central processing unit. This model is applied in a case study of wind and temperature measurements on the Dynamics Explorer B, which show features characteristic of a ringlike excitation source in the auroral oval. The data can be interpreted as gravity waves which are focused (and amplified) in the polar region and then are reflected to propagate toward lower latitudes.

  12. Measuring Dynamic Transfer Functions of Cavitating Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baun, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A water-flow test facility has been built to enable measurement of dynamic transfer functions (DTFs) of cavitating pumps and of inducers in such pumps. Originally, the facility was intended for use in an investigation of the effects of cavitation in a rocket-engine low-pressure oxygen turbopump. The facility can also be used to measure DTFs of cavitating pumps in general

  13. Spatially distributed flame transfer functions for predicting combustion dynamics in lean premixed gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper describes a methodology to improve the accuracy of prediction of the eigenfrequencies and growth rates of self-induced instabilities and demonstrates its application to a laboratory-scale, swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed, gas turbine combustor. The influence of the spatial heat release distribution is accounted for using local flame transfer function (FTF) measurements. The two-microphone technique and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence intensity measurements are used to determine the input (inlet velocity perturbation) and the output functions (heat release oscillation), respectively, for the local flame transfer functions. The experimentally determined local flame transfer functions are superposed using the flame transfer function superposition principle, and the result is incorporated into an analytic thermoacoustic model, in order to predict the linear stability characteristics of a given system. Results show that when the flame length is not acoustically compact the model prediction calculated using the local flame transfer functions is better than the prediction made using the global flame transfer function. In the case of a flame in the compact flame regime, accurate predictions of eigenfrequencies and growth rates can be obtained using the global flame transfer function. It was also found that the general response characteristics of the local FTF (gain and phase) are qualitatively the same as those of the global FTF. (author)

  14. Multiple functions of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) was first identified as a major cellular protein capable of transferring neutral lipids between membrane vesicles. Its role as an essential chaperone for the biosynthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing triglyceride-rich lipoproteins was established after the realization that abetalipoproteinemia patients carry mutations in the MTTP gene resulting in the loss of its lipid transfer activity. Now it is known that it also plays a role in the biosynthesis of CD1, glycolipid presenting molecules, as well as in the regulation of cholesterol ester biosynthesis. In this review, we will provide a historical perspective about the identification, purification and characterization of MTP, describe methods used to measure its lipid transfer activity, and discuss tissue expression and function. Finally, we will review the role MTP plays in the assembly of apoB-lipoprotein, the regulation of cholesterol ester synthesis, biosynthesis of CD1 proteins and propagation of hepatitis C virus. We will also provide a brief overview about the clinical potentials of MTP inhibition. PMID:22353470

  15. Contextual Control by Function and Form of Transfer of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, David R.; Dougher, Michael J.; Greenway, David E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures,…

  16. Acoustic resonance excitation of turbulent heat transfer and flow reattachment downstream of a fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcan, Claudio; Cukurel, Beni; Shashank, Judah

    2015-12-01

    The current work investigates the aero-thermal impact of standing sound waves, excited in a straight channel geometry, on turbulent, separating and reattaching flow over a fence. Effects of distinct frequency resonant forcing (ReH = 10,050 and f = 122 Hz) are quantified by wall static pressure measurements and detailed convective heat transfer distributions via liquid crystal thermometry. Acoustic boundary conditions are numerically predicted and the computed longitudinal resonance mode shapes are experimentally verified by surface microphone measurements. Findings indicate the presence of a resonant sound field to exert strong influence on local heat transfer downstream of the fence, whereas the boundary layer upstream of the obstacle remains notable unaffected. Upstream shift of the maximum heat transfer location and an earlier pressure recovery indicate a reduction in time averaged flow reattachment length of up to 37 %. Although the streamwise peak Nusselt increased by only 5 %, the heat transfer level in the vicinity of the unexcited reattachment zone was locally enhanced up to 25 %. Despite prominent impact of resonant forcing on the fence wake flow, the total pressure drop penalty remained invariant. Observations demonstrate the significant aero-thermal implications of shear layer excitation by standing sound waves superimposed on the channel flow field.

  17. Acoustic resonance excitation of turbulent heat transfer and flow reattachment downstream of a fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcan, Claudio; Cukurel, Beni; Shashank, Judah

    2016-10-01

    The current work investigates the aero-thermal impact of standing sound waves, excited in a straight channel geometry, on turbulent, separating and reattaching flow over a fence. Effects of distinct frequency resonant forcing (ReH = 10,050 and f = 122 Hz) are quantified by wall static pressure measurements and detailed convective heat transfer distributions via liquid crystal thermometry. Acoustic boundary conditions are numerically predicted and the computed longitudinal resonance mode shapes are experimentally verified by surface microphone measurements. Findings indicate the presence of a resonant sound field to exert strong influence on local heat transfer downstream of the fence, whereas the boundary layer upstream of the obstacle remains notable unaffected. Upstream shift of the maximum heat transfer location and an earlier pressure recovery indicate a reduction in time averaged flow reattachment length of up to 37 %. Although the streamwise peak Nusselt increased by only 5 %, the heat transfer level in the vicinity of the unexcited reattachment zone was locally enhanced up to 25 %. Despite prominent impact of resonant forcing on the fence wake flow, the total pressure drop penalty remained invariant. Observations demonstrate the significant aero-thermal implications of shear layer excitation by standing sound waves superimposed on the channel flow field.

  18. Simultaneous backward data transmission and power harvesting in an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link employing acoustically dependent electric impedance modulation.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron

    2014-09-01

    The advancement and miniaturization of body implanted medical devices pose several challenges to Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer (UTET), such as the need to reduce the size of the piezoelectric resonator, and the need to maximize the UTET link power-transfer efficiency. Accordingly, the same piezoelectric resonator that is used for energy harvesting at the body implant, may also be used for ultrasonic backward data transfer, for instance, through impedance modulation. This paper presents physical considerations and design guidelines of the body implanted transducer of a UTET link with impedance modulation for a backward data transfer. The acoustic matching design procedure was based on the 2×2 transfer matrix chain analysis, in addition to the Krimholtz Leedom and Matthaei KLM transmission line model. The UTET power transfer was carried out at a frequency of 765 kHz, continuous wave (CW) mode. The backward data transfer was attained by inserting a 9% load resistance variation around its matched value (550 Ohm), resulting in a 12% increase in the acoustic reflection coefficient. A backward data transmission rate of 1200 bits/s was experimentally demonstrated using amplitude shift keying, simultaneously with an acoustic power transfer of 20 mW to the implant. PMID:24861424

  19. Simultaneous backward data transmission and power harvesting in an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link employing acoustically dependent electric impedance modulation.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron

    2014-09-01

    The advancement and miniaturization of body implanted medical devices pose several challenges to Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer (UTET), such as the need to reduce the size of the piezoelectric resonator, and the need to maximize the UTET link power-transfer efficiency. Accordingly, the same piezoelectric resonator that is used for energy harvesting at the body implant, may also be used for ultrasonic backward data transfer, for instance, through impedance modulation. This paper presents physical considerations and design guidelines of the body implanted transducer of a UTET link with impedance modulation for a backward data transfer. The acoustic matching design procedure was based on the 2×2 transfer matrix chain analysis, in addition to the Krimholtz Leedom and Matthaei KLM transmission line model. The UTET power transfer was carried out at a frequency of 765 kHz, continuous wave (CW) mode. The backward data transfer was attained by inserting a 9% load resistance variation around its matched value (550 Ohm), resulting in a 12% increase in the acoustic reflection coefficient. A backward data transmission rate of 1200 bits/s was experimentally demonstrated using amplitude shift keying, simultaneously with an acoustic power transfer of 20 mW to the implant.

  20. Observation of orbital angular momentum transfer from bessel-shaped acoustic vortices to diphasic liquid-microparticle mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hong, ZhenYu; Zhang, Jie; Drinkwater, Bruce W

    2015-05-29

    We observe distinct regimes of orbital angular momentum (OAM) transfer from two-dimensional Bessel-shaped acoustic vortices to matter. In a homogeneous diphasic mixture of microparticles and water, slow swirling about the vortex axis is seen. This effect is driven by the absorption of OAM across the mixture, the motion following the OAM density distribution. Larger particles are formed into clusters by the acoustic radiation force, making the mixture nonhomogeneous. Here, the OAM transfer to the microparticle clusters dominates and they spin at high speeds entraining the surrounding fluid. PMID:26066437

  1. Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Christine M.; Walton, Suzanne; Murry, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic phonatory events were identified in 14 women diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), a focal laryngeal dystonia that disturbs phonatory function, and compared with those of 14 age-matched women with no vocal dysfunction. Findings indicated ADSD subjects produced more aberrant acoustic events than controls during tasks of…

  2. Localization of acoustic sensors from passive Green's function estimation.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Thibault; Daudet, Laurent; de Rosny, Julien

    2015-11-01

    A number of methods have recently been developed for passive localization of acoustic sensors, based on the assumption that the acoustic field is diffuse. This article presents the more general case of equipartition fields, which takes into account reflections off boundaries and/or scatterers. After a thorough discussion on the fundamental differences between the diffuse and equipartition models, it is shown that the method is more robust when dealing with wideband noise sources. Finally, experimental results show, for two types of boundary conditions, that this approach is especially relevant when acoustic sensors are close to boundaries.

  3. Phase transfer function of digital imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Vikrant R.

    For the past several decades, optical engineering has relied heavily on Fourier analysis of linear systems as a valuable aid in realizing numerous imaging applications. Today, spatial frequency analysis via the optical transfer function (OTF) remains an integral tool for the design, characterization and testing of incoherent imaging systems. The magnitude of the complex OTF is known as the modulation transfer function (MTF) and its phase is given by the phase transfer function (PTF). The MTF represents the contrast reduction at each spatial frequency; whereas, the PTF represents the spatial shift of these frequencies. While the MTF has been used extensively to characterize imaging systems, the PTF has long been ignored because it was thought to have an insignificant presence and to be difficult to understand and measure. Through theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations, this work addresses all of these issues and shows that the PTF is a valuable tool for modern-day digital imaging systems. The effects of optical aberrations on the PTF of an imaging system in the absence of aliasing have been analyzed in detail. However, for the digital imaging systems, the effect of aliasing on the overall system behavior becomes an important consideration. To this end, the effects of aliasing on the PTF of the sampled imaging system are described and its key properties are derived. The role of PTF as an essential metric in today's imaging systems necessitates practical PTF measurement techniques. Two, easy-to-implement, image-based methods for PTF measurement are described and experimentally validated. These measurement methods and the insights gained from the theoretical analysis are leveraged for several applications spanning diverse fields such as optical system characterization, computational imaging, and image processing.

  4. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process. PMID:26223474

  5. Partially coherent contrast-transfer-function approximation.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E

    2016-04-01

    The contrast-transfer-function (CTF) approximation, widely used in various phase-contrast imaging techniques, is revisited. CTF validity conditions are extended to a wide class of strongly absorbing and refracting objects, as well as to nonuniform partially coherent incident illumination. Partially coherent free-space propagators, describing amplitude and phase in-line contrast, are introduced and their properties are investigated. The present results are relevant to the design of imaging experiments with partially coherent sources, as well as to the analysis and interpretation of the corresponding images. PMID:27140752

  6. Pressure Transfer Functions for Interfacial Fluids Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Hur, Vera Mikyoung; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    We make a consistent derivation, from the governing equations, of the pressure transfer function in the small-amplitude Stokes wave regime and the hydrostatic approximation in the small-amplitude solitary water wave regime, in the presence of a background shear flow. The results agree with the well-known formulae in the zero vorticity case, but they incorporate the effects of vorticity through solutions to the Rayleigh equation. We extend the results to permit continuous density stratification and to internal waves between two constant-density fluids. Several examples are discussed.

  7. Computer method for identification of boiler transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Iterative computer aided procedure was developed which provides for identification of boiler transfer functions using frequency response data. Method uses frequency response data to obtain satisfactory transfer function for both high and low vapor exit quality data.

  8. Unbiased rigid registration using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Bautz, Werner; Kuwert, Torsten; Roemer, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    The evaluation of tumor growth as regression under therapy is an important clinical issue. Rigid registration of sequentially acquired 3D-images has proven its value for this purpose. Existing approaches to rigid image registration use the whole volume for the estimation of the rigid transform. Non-rigid soft tissue deformation, however, will imply a bias to the registration result, because local deformations cannot be modeled by rigid transforms. Anatomical substructures, like bones or teeth, are not affected by these deformations, but follow a rigid transform. This important observation is incorporated in the proposed registration algorithm. The selection of anatomical substructure is done by manual interaction of medical experts adjusting the transfer function of the volume rendering software. The parameters of the transfer function are used to identify the voxels that are considered for registration. A rigid transform is estimated by a quaternion gradient descent algorithm based on the intensity values of the specified tissue classes. Commonly used voxel intensity measures are adjusted to the modified registration algorithm. The contribution describes the mathematical framework of the proposed registration method and its implementation in a commercial software package. The experimental evaluation includes the discussion of different similarity measures, the comparison of the proposed method to established rigid registration techniques and the evaluation of the efficiency of the new method. We conclude with the discussion of potential medical applications of the proposed registration algorithm.

  9. Cochlear Implant Electrode Effect on Sound Energy Transfer within the Cochlea during Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nathaniel T.; Mattingly, Jameson K.; Jenkins, Herman A.; Tollin, Daniel J.; Easter, James R.; Cass, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Cochlear implants (CI) designed for hearing preservation will not alter mechanical properties of the middle and inner ear as measured by intracochlear pressure (PIC) and stapes velocity (Vstap). Background CIs designed to provide combined electrical and acoustic stimulation (EAS) are now available. To maintain functional acoustic hearing, it is important to know if a CI electrode can alter middle or inner ear mechanics, as any alteration could contribute to elevated low-frequency thresholds in EAS patients. Methods Seven human cadaveric temporal bones were prepared, and pure-tone stimuli from 120Hz–10kHz were presented at a range of intensities up to 110 dB SPL. PIC in the scala vestibuli (PSV) and tympani (PST) were measured with fiber-optic pressure sensors concurrently with VStap using laser Doppler vibrometry. Five CI electrodes from two different manufacturers, with varying dimensions were inserted via a round window approach at six different depths (16–25 mm). Results The responses of PIC and VStap to acoustic stimulation were assessed as a function of stimulus frequency, normalized to SPL in the external auditory canal (EAC), in baseline and electrode inserted conditions. Responses measured with electrodes inserted were generally within ~5 dB of baseline, indicating little effect of cochlear implant electrode insertion on PIC and VStap. Overall, mean differences across conditions were small for all responses, and no substantial differences were consistently visible across electrode types. Conclusions Results suggest that the influence of a CI electrode on middle and inner ear mechanics is minimal, despite variation in electrode lengths and configurations. PMID:26333018

  10. A hybrid finite element-transfer matrix model for vibroacoustic systems with flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Luca; Atalla, Noureddine; Berry, Alain; Sgard, Franck

    2015-02-01

    Practical vibroacoustic systems involve passive acoustic treatments consisting of highly dissipative media such as poroelastic materials. The numerical modeling of such systems at low to mid frequencies typically relies on substructuring methodologies based on finite element models. Namely, the master subsystems (i.e., structural and acoustic domains) are described by a finite set of uncoupled modes, whereas condensation procedures are typically preferred for the acoustic treatments. However, although accurate, such methodology is computationally expensive when real life applications are considered. A potential reduction of the computational burden could be obtained by approximating the effect of the acoustic treatment on the master subsystems without introducing physical degrees of freedom. To do that, the treatment has to be assumed homogeneous, flat, and of infinite lateral extent. Under these hypotheses, simple analytical tools like the transfer matrix method can be employed. In this paper, a hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology is proposed. The impact of the limiting assumptions inherent within the analytical framework are assessed for the case of plate-cavity systems involving flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments. The results prove that the hybrid model can capture the qualitative behavior of the vibroacoustic system while reducing the computational effort.

  11. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus. PMID:26647655

  12. Seismic attenuation parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    We estimate frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany. The parameter estimations are based on fitting synthetic envelopes modeled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different methods yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Results suggest, that intrinsic seismic attenuation is larger than attenuation due to scattering of seismic energy in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. From the elastic simulations we conclude, that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the strength of forward scattering is not resolvable. The elastic approach shows smaller errors in the parameter estimation compared to the results of the acoustic simulations. The frequency dependence of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. However the parameters describing this random medium, fluctuation strength and correlation length, cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. We furthermore conclude from the results of the elastic simulations, that it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  13. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  14. Toward Transfer Functions for Land Surface Phenologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henebry, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    A key problem in projecting future landscapes is simulating the associated land surface phenologies (or LSPs). A recent study of land surface models concluded that the representations of crop phenologies among the models diverged sufficiently to impede a useful intercomparison of simulation results from their associated climate models. Grassland phenologies are far more complicated than cropland phenologies due to multiple forcing factors, photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs C4), and spatial heterogeneities in both resource availabilities and land management practices. Furthermore, many tallgrass species (such as switchgrass) are widely distributed across temperature, but not moisture, gradients, resulting in significant ecotypic variation across the species' geographic range. Thus, how feasible is "transplanting" tallgrass LSPs across isotherms—but along isohyets—to simulate a shift in cultivation from maize-soy to switchgrass? Prior work has shown a quadratic model can provide a parsimonious link between a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (or NDVI) time series and thermal time, measured in terms of accumulated growing degree-days (or AGDD). Moreover, the thermal time to peak NDVI (or TTP) is a simple function of the parameter coefficients of fitted model. I fitted quadratic models to MODIS NDVI and weather station data at multiple sites across the Northern Great Plains over ten growing seasons, 2000-2009. There is a strong latitudinal gradient in TTP that results in part from a quasi-linear gradient in accumulated daylight hours (or ADH) between 30 and 50 degrees north. However, AGDD improves upon ADH by providing sensitivity to the variability of growing season weather. In the quadratic parameter coefficients there is a geographic pattern apparent as a function of TTP, although it is more variable at shorter TTPs. Using these patterns, an LSP transfer function was implemented along a latitudinal transect to simulate switchgrass cultivation in areas now

  15. Liver reserve function assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lan; Liang, Li-Wei; Cao, Hui; Men, Qiong; Hou, Ke-Zhu; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Ya-E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of liver reserve function by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging in patients with liver tumors. METHODS: Seventy-six patients with liver tumors were enrolled in this study. Serum biochemical indexes, such as aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (T-Bil), and other indicators were observed. Liver stiffness (LS) was measured by ARFI imaging, measurements were repeated 10 times, and the average value of the results was taken as the final LS value. Indocyanine green (ICG) retention was performed, and ICG-K and ICG-R15 were recorded. Child-Pugh (CP) scores were carried out based on patient’s preoperative biochemical tests and physical condition. Correlations among CP scores, ICG-R15, ICG-K and LS values were observed and analyzed using either the Pearson correlation coefficient or the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare LS values of CP scores, and the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze liver reserve function assessment accuracy. RESULTS: LS in the ICG-R15 10%-20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.19 ± 0.27 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). LS in the ICG-R15 > 20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.92 ± 0.29 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). The LS value in patients with CP class A was lower than in patients with CP class B (1.57 ± 0.34 vs 1.86 ± 0.27, P < 0.05), while the LS value in patients with CP class B was lower than in patients with CP class C (1.86 ± 0.27 vs 2.47 ± 0.33, P < 0.01). LS was positively correlated with ICG-R15 (r = 0.617, P < 0.01) and CP score (r = 0.772, P < 0.01). Meanwhile, LS was negatively correlated with ICG-K (r = -0.673, P < 0.01). AST, ALT and T-Bil were positively correlated with LS, while ALB was negatively

  16. [Acoustic neuroma: clinical-functional finding, results and surgical complication].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, A; Zini, C; Gandolfi, A; Piazza, F; De Thomasis, G; Frisina, A; Mercante, G; Quaranta, N; Scaringi, A; Uccelli, M

    2001-10-01

    The present work provides clinical-functional findings, results and surgical complications observed in a consecutive series of 100 subjects with acoustic neuroma (AN). Analysis of the data has made it possible to draw some important conclusions. Compromised hearing is found in 90% of the ears affected by AN. Indeed the percentage of normal hearing in such cases does not exceed 5%. There is, however, no clear correlation between degree of hearing and tumor size. The symptoms of AN do not always present unilateral or asymmetrical hearing loss, unilateral tinnitus and/or dizziness. At times AN presents atypical symptoms and can even be asymptomatic. Sudden onset of unilateral hearing loss, acute vertigo, persistent monolateral tinnitus and even isolated symptoms of the V or VI cranial nerve should lead one to suspect AN. Only by applying the diagnosis of suspected AN in a large number of cases is it possible to lower the time gap between the onset of symptoms and the definitive diagnosis of AN, increasing the number of cases diagnosed while the AN is still small. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) are still the means of choice for screening and following up subjects where AN is suspected. Reduced ABR sensitivity reported in the literature for intracanal ANs must induce further testing with magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium in all subjects where an AN is suspected, even when the ABR is normal. Recording of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in the presence and in the absence of contralateral white noise has proved to be a simple, inexpensive, non-invasive test for the diagnosis of suspected retrocochlear pathologies. A deficit in vestibular function is most frequently encountered when the AN is already quite large and an alteration in the smooth pursuit test is only found when the AN involves the brainstem. These data have led us to conclude that vestibular reflex studies do not play any role in early diagnosis of AN. Surgical exeresis is the treatment of

  17. Acoustical and functional analysis of Mountain lion (Puma concolor) vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Jacquelyn

    2002-05-01

    A 2-year study resulted in acoustic analysis of the structure of over 900 mountain lion vocalizations recorded in a seminatural setting at Wildlife Prairie Park near Peoria, Illinois. A vocal repertoire was obtained by describing quantitative variables about the sounds, i.e., frequency of the dominant part of the sound (beginning, ending, maximum, and minimum), duration, and number of components. Other variables described the tonal, harmonic, and wideband qualities of the sounds. Behavioral data were collected during the same period. Further analysis of both acoustic and behavioral data was completed to develop a correlation matrix between vocalizations and behavior. This study also looked at the effects of seasons on vocal behavior. Correlations were found between vocalization types and rates of usage with specific behaviors. Vocalization type and the usage rate also varied by season.

  18. Transfer Function Design for Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Huang

    2008-12-08

    As computation scales beyond terascale, the scientific problems under study through computing are increasingly pushing the boundaries of human knowledge about the physical world. It is more pivotal than ever to quickly and reliably extract new knowledge from these complex simulations of ultra scale. In this project, the PI expanded the traditional notion of transfer function, which maps physical quantities to visual cues via table look-ups, to include general temporal as well as multivariate patterns that can be described procedurally through specialty mini programming languages. Their efforts aimed at answering a perpetual question of fundamental importance. That is "what a visualization should show". Instead of waiting for application scientists to initiate the process, the team at University of Tennessee worked closely with scientists at ORNL in a proactive role to envision and design elegant, powerful, and reliable tools that a user can use to specify "what is interesting". Their new techniques include visualization operators that revolve around correlation and graph properties, relative patterns in statistical distribution, temporal regular expressions, concurrent attribute subspaces and traditional compound boolean range queries. The team also paid special attention to ensure that all visualization operators are inherently designed with great parallel scalability to handle tera-scale datasets in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Success has been demonstrated with leading edge computational science areas include climate modeling, combustion and systems genetics.

  19. Atmospheric modulation transfer function in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskila, Kobi; Towito, Shay; Shmuel, Elad; Levi, Ran; Kopeika, Natan; Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G.; Vollmerhausen, Richard H.; Halford, Carl E.

    2004-01-01

    In high-resolution ultranarrow field-of-view thermal imagers, image quality over relatively long path lengths is typically limited by atmospheric degradation, especially atmospheric blur. We report our results and analyses of infrared images from two sites, Fort A. P. Hill and Aberdeen Proving Ground. The images are influenced by the various atmospheric phenomena: scattering, absorption, and turbulence. A series of experiments with high-resolution equipment in both the 3-5- and 8-13-μm regions at the two locations indicate that, as in the visible, image quality is limited much more by atmosphere than by the instrumentation for ranges even of the order of only a few kilometers. For paths close to the ground, turbulence is more dominant, whereas for paths involving higher average elevation, aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) is dominant. As wavelength increases, turbulence MTF also increases, thus permitting aerosol MTF to become more dominant. A critical role in aerosol MTF in the thermal infrared is attributed to absorption, which noticeably decreases atmospheric transmission much more than in the visible, thereby reducing high-spatial-frequency aerosol MTF. These measurements indicate that atmospheric MTF should be a basic component in imaging system design and analysis even in the infrared, especially as higher-resolution hardware becomes available.

  20. Atmospheric modulation transfer function in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Buskila, Kobi; Towito, Shay; Shmuel, Elad; Levi, Ran; Kopeika, Natan; Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G; Vollmerhausen, Richard H; Halford, Carl E

    2004-01-10

    In high-resolution ultranarrow field-of-view thermal imagers, image quality over relatively long path lengths is typically limited by atmospheric degradation, especially atmospheric blur. We report our results and analyses of infrared images from two sites, Fort A. P. Hill and Aberdeen Proving Ground. The images are influenced by the various atmospheric phenomena: scattering, absorption, and turbulence. A series of experiments with high-resolution equipment in both the 3-5- and 8-13-microm regions at the two locations indicate that, as in the visible, image quality is limited much more by atmosphere than by the instrumentation for ranges even of the order of only a few kilometers. For paths close to the ground, turbulence is more dominant, whereas for paths involving higher average elevation, aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) is dominant. As wavelength increases, turbulence MTF also increases, thus permitting aerosol MTF to become more dominant. A critical role in aerosol MTF in the thermal infrared is attributed to absorption, which noticeably decreases atmospheric transmission much more than in the visible, thereby reducing high-spatial-frequency aerosol MTF. These measurements indicate that atmospheric MTF should be a basic component in imaging system design and analysis even in the infrared, especially as higher-resolution hardware becomes available.

  1. Usefulness of acoustic studies on the differential diagnostics of organic and functional dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Pruszewicz, A; Obrebowski, A; Swidziński, P; Demeńko, G; Wika, T; Wojciechowska, A

    1991-01-01

    Phoniatric and acoustic examinations were carried out in a group of 30 patients with dysphonia, including 15 with organic type and 15 with functional type. A complex phoniatric assessment offered the possibility to differentiate between these two groups of pathological voices. This was achieved also on the basis of acoustic analysis of the voice by extracting characteristics such as: formant frequency, Fo and its range, percentage of noise in the analysed verbal text, mean and maximum values of jitter. The possibility of differential diagnosis of these two different types of dysphonia in acoustic studies was confirmed by clinical examinations. The acoustic studies presented can be regarded as a new approach to a fast and sufficiently precise method in the screening diagnostics of dysphonia conditioned by growth of the vocal fold mass.

  2. Computer method for identification of boiler transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    An iterative computer method is described for identifying boiler transfer functions using frequency response data. An objective penalized performance measure and a nonlinear minimization technique are used to cause the locus of points generated by a transfer function to resemble the locus of points obtained from frequency response measurements. Different transfer functions can be tried until a satisfactory empirical transfer function to the system is found. To illustrate the method, some examples and some results from a study of a set of data consisting of measurements of the inlet impedance of a single tube forced flow boiler with inserts are given.

  3. Efficient positioning of absorbing material in complex systems by using the Patch Transfer Function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, N.; Guyader, J. L.

    2012-06-01

    Given the need to decrease energy consumption in the automobile industry, vehicle weight has become an important issue. Regarding acoustic comfort, the weight of noise reduction devices must be minimized inside vehicle compartments. Consequently, these devices, for example those using poro-elastic materials, must be designed carefully to maximize their influence on noise reduction. The present paper describes a method developed to obtain an efficient positioning of a given surface (or mass) of absorbing material characterized by its surface impedance. This technique is based on the Patch Transfer Function method used to couple complex vibro-acoustic sub-domains and which has been successfully applied in the European ViSPeR and Silence projects. First, a numerical analysis of the possibilities of this method is performed on a non-rectangular cavity with rigid walls after which an experimental validation of this numerical analysis is performed to evaluate the accuracy of the method under real conditions.

  4. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  5. Scaling of plane-wave functions in statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustic Holography (SONAH) is a Patch Holography method, meaning that it can be applied in cases where the measurement area covers only part of the source surface. The method performs projections directly in the spatial domain, avoiding the use of spatial discrete Fourier transforms and the associated errors. First, an inverse problem is solved using regularization. For each calculation point a multiplication must then be performed with two transfer vectors--one to get the sound pressure and the other to get the particle velocity. Considering SONAH based on sound pressure measurements, existing derivations consider only pressure reconstruction when setting up the inverse problem, so the evanescent wave amplification associated with the calculation of particle velocity is not taken into account in the regularized solution of the inverse problem. The present paper introduces a scaling of the applied plane wave functions that takes the amplification into account, and it is shown that the previously published virtual source-plane retraction has almost the same effect. The effectiveness of the different solutions is verified through a set of simulated measurements. PMID:25373969

  6. Mechanisms of acoustical energy transfer by a cylindrical shell near the ring frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbe, M.; Gotteland, M.; Cacciolati, C.

    An analytical model is developed for the propagation of acoustic energy through a long cylinder with a large radius, such as encountered in aerospace applications. An acoustic wave is assumed to strike the exterior of the shell obliquely, part of the energy being reflected, the other absorbed. Account is taken of the displacements of the shell towards the interior, the appearance of a circular mode for the acoustic energy, the acoustic impedance of the shell, and the frequencies of the reflected and transmitted energy. A mass law is obtained for certain frequency zones. The law is useful for predicting when the acoustic energy transmitted to the interior will be zero. The model can be applied to controlling the noise levels transmitted to the interior of a fuselage.

  7. [Acoustic trauma from firearms: study of auditory function].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J; Porto, I; Carbayeda, M; Labella, T

    1989-01-01

    This article deals with the shift in audiometric tracings brought about by the discharge of firearms (acute acoustic trauma). The study included 60 subjects with normal hearing, between 18 and 20 years of age. Each individual shot 25 bullets in about 5 minutes, at an intensity level calculated at 163 dB. None of them related antecedents of sensorineural deafness. The audiometric examinations were performed as follows: the first one prior to the experiment, the second immediately after the series of shots, and others 8 and 40 hours later. These are the conclusions drawn out by the AA.: the most important and lasting deafness was verified in the left ear. The 6000 c/s frequency was the most affected. Recovery of the previous hearing level was total in 80.5% of the cases within 40 hours. Two subjects having otosclerotic relatives showed certain difficulties in recovering.

  8. Transfer function concept for ultrasonic characterization of material microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Kautz, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    The approach given depends on treating material microstructures as elastomechanical filters that have analytically definable transfer functions. These transfer functions can be defined in terms of the frequency dependence of the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient. The transfer function concept provides a basis for synthesizing expressions that characterize polycrystalline materials relative to microstructural factors such as mean grain size, grain-size distribution functions, and grain boundary energy transmission. Although the approach is nonrigorous, it leads to a rational basis for combining the previously mentioned diverse and fragmented equations for ultrasonic attenuation coefficients.

  9. Perfect function transfer in two and three dimensions without initialization

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Lianao; Byrd, Mark; Wang, Z. D.; Shao Bin

    2010-11-15

    We find analytic models that can perfectly transfer, without state initialization or remote collaboration, arbitrary functions in two- and three-dimensional interacting bosonic and fermionic networks. This provides for the possible experimental implementation of state transfer through bosonic or fermionic atoms trapped in optical lattices. A significant finding is that the state of a spin qubit can be perfectly transferred through a fermionic system. Families of Hamiltonians are described that are related to the linear models and that enable the perfect transfer of arbitrary functions. Furthermore, we propose methods for eliminating certain types of errors.

  10. A functional technique based on the Euclidean algorithm with applications to 2-D acoustic diffractal diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Vega, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We built, based on the Euclidean algorithm, a functional technique, which allows to discover a direct proof of Chinese Remainder Theorem. Afterwards, by using this functional approach, we present some applications to 2-D acoustic diffractal diffusers. The novelty of the method is their functional algorithmic character, which improves ideas, as well as, other results of the author and his collaborators in a previous work.

  11. Nucleation and growth synthesis of siloxane gels to form functional, monodisperse, and acoustically programmable particles.

    PubMed

    Shields, C Wyatt; Sun, Danping; Johnson, Kennita A; Duval, Korine A; Rodriguez, Aura V; Gao, Lu; Dayton, Paul A; López, Gabriel P

    2014-07-28

    Nucleation and growth methods offer scalable means of synthesizing colloidal particles with precisely specified size for applications in chemical research, industry, and medicine. These methods have been used to prepare a class of silicone gel particles that display a range of programmable properties and narrow size distributions. The acoustic contrast factor of these particles in water is estimated and can be tuned such that the particles undergo acoustophoresis to either the pressure nodes or antinodes of acoustic standing waves. These particles can be synthesized to display surface functional groups that can be covalently modified for a range of bioanalytical and acoustophoretic sorting applications.

  12. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  13. 16 CFR 1750.2 - Transfer of functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfer of functions. 1750.2 Section 1750.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION REFRIGERATOR SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR DEVICES TO PERMIT THE OPENING OF HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR DOORS FROM THE INSIDE § 1750.2 Transfer...

  14. 16 CFR 1750.2 - Transfer of functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of functions. 1750.2 Section 1750.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION REFRIGERATOR SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR DEVICES TO PERMIT THE OPENING OF HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR DOORS FROM THE INSIDE § 1750.2 Transfer...

  15. 16 CFR 1750.2 - Transfer of functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of functions. 1750.2 Section 1750.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION REFRIGERATOR SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR DEVICES TO PERMIT THE OPENING OF HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR DOORS FROM THE INSIDE § 1750.2 Transfer...

  16. 16 CFR 1750.2 - Transfer of functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of functions. 1750.2 Section 1750.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION REFRIGERATOR SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR DEVICES TO PERMIT THE OPENING OF HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR DOORS FROM THE INSIDE § 1750.2 Transfer...

  17. 16 CFR 1750.2 - Transfer of functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer of functions. 1750.2 Section 1750.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION REFRIGERATOR SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR DEVICES TO PERMIT THE OPENING OF HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR DOORS FROM THE INSIDE § 1750.2 Transfer...

  18. Assessment of Institutional Effectiveness in Community Colleges: The Transfer Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybert, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    In order to measure the effectiveness of Johnson County Community College's (JCCC's) transfer function and to examine an overall approach to research on institutional effectiveness, this paper applies Jeffrey A. Seybert's (1990) Effectiveness Assertiveness Matrix (EAM) to a transfer follow-up survey conducted at JCCC (Kansas) and to a 1984-85…

  19. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  20. Three forms of omnidirectional acoustic invisibility engineered using fast elastodynamic transfer-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Patrick T.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav A.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic metamaterial structures with discrete and continuous rotational symmetries attract interest of theorists and engineers due to the relative simplicity of their design and fabrication. They are also likely candidates for omnidirectional acoustic cloaking and other transformation-acoustical novelties. In this paper, we employ a stratified description of such structures, and develop the theory and an efficient symbolic/numerical algorithm for analyzing the scattering properties of such structures immersed in homogeneous fluid environments. The algorithm calculates the partial scattering amplitudes and the related scattering phases for an arbitrary layered distribution of acoustic material properties. The efficiency of the algorithm enables us to find approximate solutions to certain inverse scattering problems through quasi-global optimization. The scattering problems addressed here are the three forms of cloaking: (1) extinction cross-section suppression, the canonical form of cloaking, (2) monostatic sonar invisibility (backscattering suppression), and (3) acoustic force cloaking (transport cross-section suppression). We also address the efficiency-bandwidth tradeoff and design approximate cloaks with wider bandwidth using a new optimization formulation.

  1. Derivation of various transfer functions of ideal or aberrated imaging systems from the three-dimensional transfer function.

    PubMed

    Braat, Joseph J M; Janssen, Augustus J E M

    2015-06-01

    The three-dimensional frequency transfer function for optical imaging systems was introduced by Frieden in the 1960s. The analysis of this function and its partly back-transformed functions (two-dimensional and one-dimensional optical transfer functions) in the case of an ideal or aberrated imaging system has received relatively little attention in the literature. Regarding ideal imaging systems with an incoherently illuminated object volume, we present analytic expressions for the classical two-dimensional x-y-transfer function in a defocused plane, for the axial z-transfer function in the presence of defocusing and for the x-z-transfer function in the presence of a lateral shift δy with respect to the imaged pattern in the x-z-plane. For an aberrated imaging system we use the common expansion of the aberrated pupil function with the aid of Zernike polynomials. It is shown that the line integral appearing in Frieden's three-dimensional transfer function can be evaluated for aberrated systems using a relationship established first by Cormack between the line integral of a Zernike polynomial over a full chord of the unit disk and a Chebyshev polynomial of the second kind. Some new developments in the theory of Zernike polynomials from the last decade allow us to present explicit expressions for the line integral in the case of a weakly aberrated imaging system. We outline a similar, but more complicated, analytic scheme for the case of severely aberrated systems.

  2. Measurement of the space-time correlation function of thermal acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passechnik, V. I.; Anosov, A. A.; Barabanenkov, Yu. N.; Sel'Sky, A. G.

    2003-09-01

    The space-time correlation function of thermal acoustic radiation pressure is measured for a stationary heated source (a narrow plasticine plate). The correlation dependence is obtained by the multiplication of two signals shifted in time with respect to each other and measured by two receivers. The dependence exhibits an oscillating behavior and changes sign when the source is displaced by half the spatial period of the correlation function.

  3. Newton algorithm for fitting transfer functions to frequency response measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, J. T.; Mingori, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the problem of synthesizing transfer functions from frequency response measurements is considered. Given a complex vector representing the measured frequency response of a physical system, a transfer function of specified order is determined that minimizes the sum of the magnitude-squared of the frequency response errors. This nonlinear least squares minimization problem is solved by an iterative global descent algorithm of the Newton type that converges quadratically near the minimum. The unknown transfer function is expressed as a sum of second-order rational polynomials, a parameterization that facilitates a numerically robust computer implementation. The algorithm is developed for single-input, single-output, causal, stable transfer functions. Two numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  4. Transfer function analysis in epi-illumination Fourier ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Shaun; Salahieh, Basel; Milster, Tom; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J.; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    This letter explores Fourier ptychography (FP) using epi-illumination. The approach effectively modifies the FP transfer function to be coherent-like out to the incoherent limit of twice the numerical aperture over the wavelength 2NA/λ. Images reconstructed using this approach are shown to have higher contrast at finer details compared with images using incoherent illumination, indicating that the FP transfer function is superior in high spatial frequency regions. PMID:26565870

  5. Efficient Approximation of Head-Related Transfer Functions in Subbands for Accurate Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Damián; Baumgartner, Robert; Majdak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the acoustic filtering of incoming sounds by the human morphology and are essential for listeners to localize sound sources in virtual auditory displays. Since rendering complex virtual scenes is computationally demanding, we propose four algorithms for efficiently representing HRTFs in subbands, i.e., as an analysis filterbank (FB) followed by a transfer matrix and a synthesis FB. All four algorithms use sparse approximation procedures to minimize the computational complexity while maintaining perceptually relevant HRTF properties. The first two algorithms separately optimize the complexity of the transfer matrix associated to each HRTF for fixed FBs. The other two algorithms jointly optimize the FBs and transfer matrices for complete HRTF sets by two variants. The first variant aims at minimizing the complexity of the transfer matrices, while the second one does it for the FBs. Numerical experiments investigate the latency-complexity trade-off and show that the proposed methods offer significant computational savings when compared with other available approaches. Psychoacoustic localization experiments were modeled and conducted to find a reasonable approximation tolerance so that no significant localization performance degradation was introduced by the subband representation. PMID:26681930

  6. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  7. Multi-Channel Transfer Function with Dimensionality Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Suk; Schulze, Jürgen P.; Cone, Angela C.; Sosinsky, Gina E.; Martone, Maryann E.

    2010-01-01

    The design of transfer functions for volume rendering is a difficult task. This is particularly true for multi-channel data sets, where multiple data values exist for each voxel. In this paper, we propose a new method for transfer function design. Our new method provides a framework to combine multiple approaches and pushes the boundary of gradient-based transfer functions to multiple channels, while still keeping the dimensionality of transfer functions to a manageable level, i.e., a maximum of three dimensions, which can be displayed visually in a straightforward way. Our approach utilizes channel intensity, gradient, curvature and texture properties of each voxel. The high-dimensional data of the domain is reduced by applying recently developed nonlinear dimensionality reduction algorithms. In this paper, we used Isomap as well as a traditional algorithm, Principle Component Analysis (PCA). Our results show that these dimensionality reduction algorithms significantly improve the transfer function design process without compromising visualization accuracy. In this publication we report on the impact of the dimensionality reduction algorithms on transfer function design for confocal microscopy data. PMID:20582228

  8. Utilizing Low-Volume Aqueous Acoustic Transfer with the Echo 525 to Enable Miniaturization of qRT-PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sony; Cifelli, Steven; Johnstone, Richard; Pechter, David; Barbey, Deborah A; Lin, Karen; Allison, Tim; Agrawal, Shree; Rivera-Gines, Aida; Milligan, James A; Schneeweis, Jonathan; Houle, Kevin; Struck, Alice J; Visconti, Richard; Sills, Matthew; Wildey, Mary Jo

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a valuable tool for characterizing the effects of inhibitors on viral replication. The amplification of target viral genes through the use of specifically designed fluorescent probes and primers provides a reliable method for quantifying RNA. Due to reagent costs, use of these assays for compound evaluation is limited. Until recently, the inability to accurately dispense low volumes of qRT-PCR assay reagents precluded the routine use of this PCR assay for compound evaluation in drug discovery. Acoustic dispensing has become an integral part of drug discovery during the past decade; however, acoustic transfer of microliter volumes of aqueous reagents was time consuming. The Labcyte Echo 525 liquid handler was designed to enable rapid aqueous transfers. We compared the accuracy and precision of a qPCR assay using the Labcyte Echo 525 to those of the BioMek FX, a traditional liquid handler, with the goal of reducing the volume and cost of the assay. The data show that the Echo 525 provides higher accuracy and precision compared to the current process using a traditional liquid handler. Comparable data for assay volumes from 500 nL to 12 µL allowed the miniaturization of the assay, resulting in significant cost savings of drug discovery and process streamlining.

  9. Acoustic waves from mechanical impulses due to fluorescence resonant energy (Förster) transfer: Blowing a whistle with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurita-Sánchez, J. R.; Henkel, C.

    2012-02-01

    We present a momentum transfer mechanism mediated by electromagnetic fields that originates in a system of two nearby molecules: one excited (donor D*) and the other in ground state (acceptor A). An intermolecular force related to fluorescence resonant energy or Förster transfer (FRET) arises in the unstable D*A molecular system, which differs from the equilibrium van der Waals interaction. Due to the its finite lifetime, a mechanical impulse is imparted to the relative motion in the system. We analyze the FRET impulse when the molecules are embedded in free space and find that its magnitude can be much greater than the single recoil photon momentum, getting comparable with the thermal momentum (Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution) at room temperature. In addition, we propose that this FRET impulse can be exploited in the generation of acoustic waves inside a film containing layers of donor and acceptor molecules, when a picosecond laser pulse excites the donors. This acoustic transient is distinguishable from that produced by thermal stress due to laser absorption, and may therefore play a role in photoacoustic spectroscopy. The effect can be seen as exciting a vibrating system like a string or organ pipe with light; it may be used as an opto-mechanical transducer.

  10. The Prediction of Jet Noise Ground Effects Using an Acoustic Analogy and a Tailored Green's Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of an acoustic analogy for the mixing noise component of jet noise in the presence of an infinite surface is presented. The reflection of jet noise by the ground changes the distribution of acoustic energy and is characterized by constructive and destructive interference patterns. The equivalent sources are modeled based on the two-point cross- correlation of the turbulent velocity fluctuations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solution. Propagation effects, due to reflection by the surface and refaction by the jet shear layer, are taken into account by calculating the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations (LEE). The vector Green's function of the LEE is written in relation to Lilley's equation; that is, approximated with matched asymptotic solutions and the Green's function of the convective Helmholtz equation. The Green's function of the convective Helmholtz equation for an infinite flat plane with impedance is the Weyl-van der Pol equation. Predictions are compared with an unheated Mach 0.95 jet produced by a nozzle with an exit diameter of 0.3302 meters. Microphones are placed at various heights and distances from the nozzle exit in the peak jet noise direction above an acoustically hard and an asphalt surface. The predictions are shown to accurately capture jet noise ground effects that are characterized by constructive and destructive interference patterns in the mid- and far-field and capture overall trends in the near-field.

  11. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on auditory function following acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Ou, Yongkang; Xu, Yaodong; Pang, Jiaqi; Lai, Lan; Zheng, Yiqing

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is one form of non-invasive brain stimulation and increasingly shows neuroprotection in multiple neurological disorders. However, the potential of rTMS for protective action on auditory function following acoustic trauma has not been investigated. Here, we examined effect of TMS on hearing conservation, neurons survival and brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) expression in the cochlea and auditory cortex following acoustic trauma in rats. Wistar rats were exposed to intense pure tone noise (10 kHz, 120 dB SPL for 2 h) followed by rTMS treatment or sham treatment (handling control) daily for 14 days. Auditory brainstem response revealed there was no significant difference in hearing threshold shifts between rTMS- and sham-treated rats, although rTMS-treated rats showed less neuron loss in the auditory cortex in comparison with sham rats. Additionally, acoustic trauma increased BDNF expression in the cochlea and auditory cortex, and this elevation could be attenuated by rTMS treatment. Our results suggest present regiment of rTMS does not protect hearing against acoustic trauma, but maybe have implications for tinnitus treatment. PMID:27230393

  12. Enhancements to the SSME transfer function modeling code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, R. Dennis; Mitchell, Jerrel R.; Bartholomew, David L.; Glenn, Russell D.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the results of a one year effort by Ohio University to apply the transfer function modeling and analysis tools developed under NASA Grant NAG8-167 (Irwin, 1992), (Bartholomew, 1992) to attempt the generation of Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Turbopump transfer functions from time domain data. In addition, new enhancements to the transfer function modeling codes which enhance the code functionality are presented, along with some ideas for improved modeling methods and future work. Section 2 contains a review of the analytical background used to generate transfer functions with the SSME transfer function modeling software. Section 2.1 presents the 'ratio method' developed for obtaining models of systems that are subject to single unmeasured excitation sources and have two or more measured output signals. Since most of the models developed during the investigation use the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) for model generation, Section 2.2 presents an introduction of ERA, and Section 2.3 describes how it can be used to model spectral quantities. Section 2.4 details the Residue Identification Algorithm (RID) including the use of Constrained Least Squares (CLS) and Total Least Squares (TLS). Most of this information can be found in the report (and is repeated for convenience). Section 3 chronicles the effort of applying the SSME transfer function modeling codes to the a51p394.dat and a51p1294.dat time data files to generate transfer functions from the unmeasured input to the 129.4 degree sensor output. Included are transfer function modeling attempts using five methods. The first method is a direct application of the SSME codes to the data files and the second method uses the underlying trends in the spectral density estimates to form transfer function models with less clustering of poles and zeros than the models obtained by the direct method. In the third approach, the time data is low pass filtered prior to the modeling process in an

  13. Acoustical impedance defined by wave-function solutions of the reduced Webster equation.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Barbara J

    2005-07-01

    The electrical impedance was first defined by Heaviside in 1884, and the analogy of the acoustical impedance was made by Webster in 1919. However, it can be shown that Webster did not draw a full analogy with the electromagnetic potential, the potential energy per unit charge. This paper shows that the analogous "acoustical potential" the potential energy per unit displacement of fluid, corresponds to the wave function Psi of the reduced Webster equation, which is of Klein-Gordon form. The wave function is found to obey all of Dirichlet, Von Neumann, and mixed (Robins) boundary conditions, and the latter give rise to resonance phenomena that are not elucidated by Webster's analysis. It is shown that the exact Heaviside analogy yields a complete analytic account of the one-dimensional input impedance, that accounts for both plane- and dispersive-wave propagation both at the origin and throughout the duct.

  14. Transfer Functions Via Laplace- And Fourier-Borel Transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Can, Sumer; Unal, Aynur

    1991-01-01

    Approach to solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations involves transfer functions based on recently-introduced Laplace-Borel and Fourier-Borel transforms. Main theorem gives transform of response of nonlinear system as Cauchy product of transfer function and transform of input function of system, together with memory effects. Used to determine responses of electrical circuits containing variable inductances or resistances. Also possibility of doing all noncommutative algebra on computers in such symbolic programming languages as Macsyma, Reduce, PL1, or Lisp. Process of solution organized and possibly simplified by algebraic manipulations reducing integrals in solutions to known or tabulated forms.

  15. Two-point function for a BEC acoustic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Richard; Anderson, Paul; Fabbri, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    The two point function for phonons for a Bose-Einstein condensate, BEC, with effectively one spatial dimension is calculated using the formalism of quantum field theory in curved space. The BEC has a constant flow velocity and the speed of sound is modified in such a way as to create regions of subsonic and supersonic flow. Excitations of the modes occur in the transverse direction and the direction of flow. The mode equation can be written as a wave equation with a potential in a 1+1 dimensional spacetime. Excitations in the transverse direction contribute a mass-like term to this equation. An approximation is used for this term which allows the mode equation to be solved analytically which greatly simplifies the calculation. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-0856050 and PHY-1308325.

  16. Assessment of a hybrid finite element-transfer matrix model for flat structures with homogeneous acoustic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Luca; Atalla, Noureddine; Berry, Alain; Sgard, Franck

    2014-05-01

    Modeling complex vibroacoustic systems including poroelastic materials using finite element based methods can be unfeasible for practical applications. For this reason, analytical approaches such as the transfer matrix method are often preferred to obtain a quick estimation of the vibroacoustic parameters. However, the strong assumptions inherent within the transfer matrix method lead to a lack of accuracy in the description of the geometry of the system. As a result, the transfer matrix method is inherently limited to the high frequency range. Nowadays, hybrid substructuring procedures have become quite popular. Indeed, different modeling techniques are typically sought to describe complex vibroacoustic systems over the widest possible frequency range. As a result, the flexibility and accuracy of the finite element method and the efficiency of the transfer matrix method could be coupled in a hybrid technique to obtain a reduction of the computational burden. In this work, a hybrid methodology is proposed. The performances of the method in predicting the vibroacoutic indicators of flat structures with attached homogeneous acoustic treatments are assessed. The results prove that, under certain conditions, the hybrid model allows for a reduction of the computational effort while preserving enough accuracy with respect to the full finite element solution.

  17. Optical transfer function of NTS-1 retroreflector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    An optical transfer function was computed for the retroreflector array carried by the NTS-1 satellite. Range corrections are presented for extrapolating laser range measurements to the center of mass of the satellite. The gain function of the array was computed for use in estimating laser-echo signal strengths.

  18. Determination of transfer function of COPE correlation interferometer instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twitty, J.; Kindle, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    The comparison of theoretical and instrument response functions and its use as a procedure for determining the transfer function of the COPE correlation interferometer are summarized. Data show qualitative agreement can be obtained when discrepancies between theory and instrument are investigated and instrument components are analyzed in detail. Data were obtained using a set of calibration data and computer algorithms.

  19. Prediction of acoustic radiation from functionally graded shells of revolution in light and heavy fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yegao; Meng, Guang

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical method for the vibro-acoustic analysis of a functionally graded shell of revolution immersed in an infinite light or heavy fluid. The structural model of the shell is formulated on the basis of a modified variational method combined with a multi-segment technique, whereas a spectral Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation is employed to model the exterior fluid field. The material properties of the shell are estimated by using the Voigt's rule of mixture and the Mori-Tanaka's homogenization scheme. Displacement and sound pressure variables of each segment are expanded in the form of a mixed series using Fourier series and Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials. A set of collocation nodes distributed over the roots of Chebyshev polynomials are employed to establish the algebraic system of the acoustic integral equations, and the non-uniqueness solution is eliminated using a combined Helmholtz integral equation formulation. Loosely and strongly coupled schemes are implemented for the structure-acoustic interaction problem of a functionally graded shell immersed in a light and heavy fluid, respectively. The present method provides a flexible way to account for the individual contributions of circumferential wave modes to the vibration and acoustic responses of functionally graded shells of revolution in an analytical manner. Numerical tests are presented for sound radiation problems of spherical, cylindrical, conical and coupled shells. The individual contributions of the circumferential modes to the radiated sound pressure and sound power of functionally graded shells are observed. Effects of the material profile on the sound radiation of the shells are also investigated.

  20. Modality interactions alter the shape of acoustic mate preference functions in gray treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Höbel, Gerlinde

    2015-09-01

    Sexual selection takes place in complex environments where females evaluating male mating signals are confronted with stimuli from multiple sources and modalities. The pattern of expression of female preferences may be influenced by interactions between modalities, changing the shape of female preference functions, and thus ultimately altering the selective landscape acting on male signal evolution. We tested the hypothesis that the responses of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, to acoustic male advertisement calls are affected by interactions with visual stimuli. We measured preference functions for several call traits under two experimental conditions: unimodal (only acoustic signals presented), and multimodal (acoustic signals presented along with a video-animated calling male). We found that females were more responsive to multimodal stimulus presentations and, compared to unimodal playbacks, had weaker preferences for temporal call characteristics. We compared the preference functions obtained in these two treatments to the distribution of male call characteristics to make inferences on the strength and direction of selection expected to act on male calls. Modality interactions have the potential to influence the course of signal evolution and thus are an important consideration in sexual selection studies. PMID:26282702

  1. The Use of Dispersion Relations For The Geomagnetic Transfer Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuello, A.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J. J.

    The magnetotelluric responses are complex magnitudes, where real and imaginary parts contain the same information on the geoelectrical structure. It seems possible, from very general hypotheses on the geoelectrical models (causality, stability and passivity), to apply the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations to the magnetotelluric responses (impedance, geomagnetic transfer functions,...). In particular, the applica- bility of these relations to the impedance is a current point of discussion, but there are not many examples of their application to the geomagnetic transfer functions (tipper). The aim of this paper is to study how the relations of dispersion are applied to the real and imaginary part of the geomagnetic transfer functions, and to check its validity. For this reason, we have considered data (or responses) from two- and three-dimensional structures, and for these data, we have taken two situations: 1.- Responses that have been synthetically generated from numerical modelling, that allows us to control the quality of the data. 2.- Responses obtained from fieldwork, that are affected by exper- imental error. Additionally, we have also explored the use of these relations to extrap- olate the geomagnetic transfer functions outside the interval of measured frequencies, in order to obtain constrains on the values of these extrapolated data. The results have shown that the dispersion relations are accomplished for the geomag- netic transfer functions, and they can offer information about how these responses are behaved outside (but near) the range of measured frequencies.

  2. Functionalized organic nanotubes as tubular nonviral gene transfer vector.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wuxiao; Wada, Momoyo; Kameta, Naohiro; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Toshimi; Masuda, Mitsutoshi

    2011-11-30

    Tubular nanomaterials are expected to represent a novel nonviral gene transfer vectors due to the unique morphology and potential biological functionalities. Here we rationally constructed functionalized organic nanotubes (ONTs) for gene delivery through the co-assembly of bipolar glycolipid, arginine-lipid and PEG-lipid. The arginine- and PEG-functionalized ONTs efficiently formed complexes with plasmid DNA without aggregation, and protect DNA from enzymatic degradation; while the arginine-functionalized ONTs aggregated with DNA as large bundles. Long ONTs exceeding 1μm in length was rarely taken up into the cells, while those with a length of 400-800nm could effectively deliver plasmid DNA into cells and induce high transgene expression of green fluorescense protein. This study demonstrated the usefulness of functionalized ONT in gene delivery, and the functionalized ONT represents a novel type of tubular nonviral gene transfer vector.

  3. The effects of probe-tone frequency on the acoustic-reflex growth function.

    PubMed

    Lutolf, John J; O'Malley, Honor; Silman, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic-reflex growth functions (ARGFs) were obtained from 20 normal-hearing listeners. Contralateral acoustic reflexes (ARs) were elicited with pure tones of 2000 Hz. The magnitude of changes in static compliant susceptance (BA) and conductance (GA) were monitored with probe-tone frequencies of 226 Hz, 678 Hz and 1000 Hz. ARGFs were obtained with six combinations of probe-tone frequency/admittance component: 226 Hz BA, 226 Hz GA, 678 Hz BA, 678 Hz GA, 1000 Hz BA, and 1000 Hz GA. Peak conductance (GA) and susceptance (BA) ARs were largest within the 678 Hz GA and 1000 Hz BAARGFs, respectively. Among high-frequency probe tones, the patterns of AR growth were larger and less variable for the 678 Hz GA ARGF and the 1000 Hz BA ARGF as determined by the magnitude of their linear (b1) and quadratic (b2) polynomial coefficients and the value of their squared correlation coefficients (R2).

  4. Matrix Transfer Function Design for Flexible Structures: An Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, T. J.; Compito, A. V.; Doran, A. L.; Gustafson, C. L.; Wong, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The application of matrix transfer function design techniques to the problem of disturbance rejection on a flexible space structure is demonstrated. The design approach is based on parameterizing a class of stabilizing compensators for the plant and formulating the design specifications as a constrained minimization problem in terms of these parameters. The solution yields a matrix transfer function representation of the compensator. A state space realization of the compensator is constructed to investigate performance and stability on the nominal and perturbed models. The application is made to the ACOSSA (Active Control of Space Structures) optical structure.

  5. System gain function calculation for acoustic arrays using ray optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, O.; Vonwinterfeld, C.

    1980-11-01

    The gain function of an acoustic antenna array is calculated with respect to waves, propagating from a point source into an homogeneous medium (water) with a sinusoidally varying surface of known phase statistics, treating antenna and environment as one system. An asymptotic solution (high frequency approximation) is developed. For distances of several wavelengths between the array and the surface of the medium, the propagation mechanism is described by a geometrical theory of diffraction applied to scalar waves. The gain function of the antenna together with the reflecting surface is obtained from the cross correlations of the resulting sound fields of each antenna element.

  6. A hybrid algorithm for selecting head-related transfer function based on similarity of anthropometric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shu-Guang; Gao, Li-Ping

    2010-09-01

    As the basic data for virtual auditory technology, head-related transfer function (HRTF) has many applications in the areas of room acoustic modeling, spatial hearing and multimedia. How to individualize HRTF fast and effectively has become an opening problem at present. Based on the similarity and relativity of anthropometric structures, a hybrid HRTF customization algorithm, which has combined the method of principal component analysis (PCA), multiple linear regression (MLR) and database matching (DM), has been presented in this paper. The HRTFs selected by both the best match and the worst match have been applied into obtaining binaurally auralized sounds, which are then used for subjective listening experiments and the results are compared. For the area in the horizontal plane, the localization results have shown that the selection of HRTFs can enhance the localization accuracy and can also abate the problem of front-back confusion.

  7. Horizontal functional gene transfer from bacteria to fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Li, Tong; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Jia, Ling-Yi; Liu, Li; Zhang, Peng; Murphy, Robert W.; He, Shun-Min; Huang, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Invertebrates can acquire functional genes via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria but fishes are not known to do so. We provide the first reliable evidence of one HGT event from marine bacteria to fishes. The HGT appears to have occurred after emergence of the teleosts. The transferred gene is expressed and regulated developmentally. Its successful integration and expression may change the genetic and metabolic repertoire of fishes. In addition, this gene contains conserved domains and similar tertiary structures in fishes and their putative donor bacteria. Thus, it may function similarly in both groups. Evolutionary analyses indicate that it evolved under purifying selection, further indicating its conserved function. We document the first likely case of HGT of functional gene from prokaryote to fishes. This discovery certifies that HGT can influence vertebrate evolution. PMID:26691285

  8. Transfer function tests of the Joy longwall shearer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, P. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A series of operational tests was performed on the Joy longwall shearer located at the Bureau of Mines in Bructon, Pennsylvania. The purpose of these tests was to determine the transfer function and operational characteristics of the system. These characteristics will be used to generate a simulation model of the longwall shearer used in the development of the closed-loop vertical control system.

  9. Optical and infrared transfer function of the Lageos retroreflector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The transfer function of the retroreflector array carried by the LAGEOS satellite (1976 39A) was computed at three wavelengths: 5230, 6943, and 106000 A. The range correction is given for extrapolating laser range measurements to the center of gravity of the satellite. The reflectivity of the array was calculated for estimating laser-echo signal strengths.

  10. TRANSVERSE BEAM TRANSFER FUNCTIONS OF COLLIDING BEAMS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; CALAGA, R.; CAMERON, P.; HERR, W.; PIELONI, T.

    2007-06-25

    We use transverse beam transfer functions to measure tune distributions of colliding beams in RHIC. The tune has a distribution due to the beam-beam interaction, nonlinear magnetic fields -- particularly in the interaction region magnets, and non-zero chromaticity in conjunction with momentum spread. The measured tune distributions are compared with calculations.

  11. Functional Connectivity Associated with Acoustic Stability During Vowel Production: Implications for Vocal-Motor Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vowels provide the acoustic foundation of communication through speech and song, but little is known about how the brain orchestrates their production. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during sustained production of the vowel /a/. Acoustic and blood flow data from 13, normal, right-handed, native speakers of American English were analyzed to identify CBF patterns that predicted the stability of the first and second formants of this vowel. Formants are bands of resonance frequencies that provide vowel identity and contribute to voice quality. The results indicated that formant stability was directly associated with blood flow increases and decreases in both left- and right-sided brain regions. Secondary brain regions (those associated with the regions predicting formant stability) were more likely to have an indirect negative relationship with first formant variability, but an indirect positive relationship with second formant variability. These results are not definitive maps of vowel production, but they do suggest that the level of motor control necessary to produce stable vowels is reflected in the complexity of an underlying neural system. These results also extend a systems approach to functional image analysis, previously applied to normal and ataxic speech rate that is solely based on identifying patterns of brain activity associated with specific performance measures. Understanding the complex relationships between multiple brain regions and the acoustic characteristics of vocal stability may provide insight into the pathophysiology of the dysarthrias, vocal disorders, and other speech changes in neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25295385

  12. Middle-ear velocity transfer function, cochlear input immittance, and middle-ear efficiency in chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2013-10-01

    The transfer function H(V) between stapes velocity V(S) and sound pressure near the tympanic membrane P(TM) is a descriptor of sound transmission through the middle ear (ME). The ME power transmission efficiency (MEE), the ratio of sound power entering the cochlea to power entering the middle ear, was computed from H(V) measured in seven chinchilla ears and previously reported measurements of ME input admittance Y(TM) and ME pressure gain G(MEP) [Ravicz and Rosowski, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2437-2454 (2012); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2208-2223 (2013)] in the same ears. The ME was open, and a pressure sensor was inserted into the cochlear vestibule for most measurements. The cochlear input admittance Y(C) computed from H(V) and G(MEP) is controlled by a combination of mass and resistance and is consistent with a minimum-phase system up to 27 kHz. The real part Re{Y(C)}, which relates cochlear sound power to inner-ear sound pressure, decreased gradually with frequency up to 25 kHz and more rapidly above that. MEE was about 0.5 between 0.1 and 8 kHz, higher than previous estimates in this species, and decreased sharply at higher frequencies.

  13. Context transfer in reinforcement learning using action-value functions.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Amin; Nadjar Araabi, Babak; Nili Ahmadabadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the notion of context transfer in reinforcement learning tasks. Context transfer, as defined in this paper, implies knowledge transfer between source and target tasks that share the same environment dynamics and reward function but have different states or action spaces. In other words, the agents learn the same task while using different sensors and actuators. This requires the existence of an underlying common Markov decision process (MDP) to which all the agents' MDPs can be mapped. This is formulated in terms of the notion of MDP homomorphism. The learning framework is Q-learning. To transfer the knowledge between these tasks, the feature space is used as a translator and is expressed as a partial mapping between the state-action spaces of different tasks. The Q-values learned during the learning process of the source tasks are mapped to the sets of Q-values for the target task. These transferred Q-values are merged together and used to initialize the learning process of the target task. An interval-based approach is used to represent and merge the knowledge of the source tasks. Empirical results show that the transferred initialization can be beneficial to the learning process of the target task. PMID:25610457

  14. Phase transfer and freezing processes investigated on acoustically levitated aqueous droplets.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Stockhaus, A; Hergenröder, R; Klockow, D

    2001-11-01

    An acoustic trap was designed and constructed to investigate, on a microscale, physicochemical processes relevant to the troposphere, mainly focusing on the temperature range below 0 degrees C. Droplets ranging from 0.5 nL to 4 microliter (0.1 to 2 mm in diameter) were introduced into the cooled reaction chamber by means of a piezo-driven micro pump with a reproducibility better than 5%. Up-take of H2O2 from the gas phase by the levitated droplet was measured and calibrated by in-situ chemiluminescence. Freezing of stably positioned droplets was observed and documented by means of a microscope and a video camera; this demonstrated the usefulness of the technique for simulation and investigation of cloud processes. Ex-situ microanalysis of sub-microliter droplets by use of a fiber optic luminometer was also shown to be a suitable means of investigating relevant physicochemical processes on a micro scale. PMID:11768458

  15. Photoacoustic tomography based on the Green's function retrieval with ultrasound interferometry for sample partially behind an acoustically scattering layer

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jie; Tao, Chao Cai, Peng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-08

    Acoustically inhomogeneous mediums with multiple scattering are often the nightmare of photoacoustic tomography. In order to break this limitation, a photoacoustic tomography scheme combining ultrasound interferometry and time reversal is proposed to achieve images in acoustically scattering medium. An ultrasound interferometry is developed to determine the unknown Green's function of strong scattering tissue. Using the determined Greens' function, a time-reversal process is carried out to restore images behind an acoustically inhomogeneous layer from the scattering photoacoustic signals. This method effectively decreases the false contrast, noise, and position deviation of images induced by the multiple scattering. Phantom experiment is carried out to validate the method. Therefore, the proposed method could have potential value in extending the biomedical applications of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  16. A simple transfer function for nonlinear dendritic integration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Matthew F; Zald, David H

    2015-01-01

    Relatively recent advances in patch clamp recordings and iontophoresis have enabled unprecedented study of neuronal post-synaptic integration ("dendritic integration"). Findings support a separate layer of integration in the dendritic branches before potentials reach the cell's soma. While integration between branches obeys previous linear assumptions, proximal inputs within a branch produce threshold nonlinearity, which some authors have likened to the sigmoid function. Here we show the implausibility of a sigmoidal relation and present a more realistic transfer function in both an elegant artificial form and a biophysically derived form that further considers input locations along the dendritic arbor. As the distance between input locations determines their ability to produce nonlinear interactions, models incorporating dendritic topology are essential to understanding the computational power afforded by these early stages of integration. We use the biophysical transfer function to emulate empirical data using biophysical parameters and describe the conditions under which the artificial and biophysically derived forms are equivalent.

  17. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  18. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject. PMID:26520354

  19. Transfer function analysis of dynamic cerebral autoregulation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Giller, C. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that spontaneous changes in cerebral blood flow are primarily induced by changes in arterial pressure and that cerebral autoregulation is a frequency-dependent phenomenon, we measured mean arterial pressure in the finger and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) during supine rest and acute hypotension induced by thigh cuff deflation in 10 healthy subjects. Transfer function gain, phase, and coherence function between changes in arterial pressure and VMCA were estimated using the Welch method. The impulse response function, calculated as the inverse Fourier transform of this transfer function, enabled the calculation of transient changes in VMCA during acute hypotension, which was compared with the directly measured change in VMCA during thigh cuff deflation. Beat-to-beat changes in VMCA occurred simultaneously with changes in arterial pressure, and the autospectrum of VMCA showed characteristics similar to arterial pressure. Transfer gain increased substantially with increasing frequency from 0.07 to 0.20 Hz in association with a gradual decrease in phase. The coherence function was > 0.5 in the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz and < 0.5 at < 0.07 Hz. Furthermore, the predicted change in VMCA was similar to the measured VMCA during thigh cuff deflation. These data suggest that spontaneous changes in VMCA that occur at the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz are related strongly to changes in arterial pressure and, furthermore, that short-term regulation of cerebral blood flow in response to changes in arterial pressure can be modeled by a transfer function with the quality of a high-pass filter in the frequency range of 0.07-0.30 Hz.

  20. Resonant interaction of acoustic waves with subaqueous bedforms: Sand dunes in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Chang, Andrea Y Y; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The large subaqueous sand dunes in the South China Sea are expected to produce the coupling of energy between acoustic normal modes. In this letter, resonant interaction between acoustic propagating modes and subaqueous bedforms are numerically investigated as a function of bedform wavelength, acoustic frequency and bedform packet length. The results demonstrate that bedform wavelength impacts acoustic mode coupling behavior, with the principal transfer of energy occurring between acoustic modes whose eigenvalue difference is equal to the peak value in the bedform wavenumber spectrum. The observed effect of wavelength is greater than that of acoustic frequency and bedform packet length.

  1. On the role of covarying functions in stimulus class formation and transfer of function.

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Rebecca G; Markham, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    This experiment investigated whether directly trained covarying functions are necessary for stimulus class formation and transfer of function in humans. Initial class training was designed to establish two respondent-based stimulus classes by pairing two visual stimuli with shock and two other visual stimuli with no shock. Next, two operant discrimination functions were trained to one stimulus of each putative class. The no-shock group received the same training and testing in all phases, except no stimuli were ever paired with shock. The data indicated that skin conductance response conditioning did not occur for the shock groups or for the no-shock group. Tests showed transfer of the established discriminative functions, however, only for the shock groups, indicating the formation of two stimulus classes only for those participants who received respondent class training. The results suggest that transfer of function does not depend on first covarying the stimulus class functions. PMID:12507017

  2. Acoustic emission descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, Franciszek; Malecki, Ignacy

    The authors present selected problems associated with acoustic emission interpreted as a physical phenomenon and as a measurement technique. The authors examine point sources of acoustic emission in isotropic, homogeneous linearly elastic media of different shapes. In the case of an unbounded medium the authors give the analytical form of the stress field and the wave shift field of the acoustic emission. In the case of a medium which is unbounded plate the authors give a form for the equations which is suitable for numerical calculation of the changes over time of selected acoustic emission values. For acoustic emission as a measurement technique, the authors represent the output signal as the resultant of a mechanical input value which describes the source, the transient function of the medium, and the transient function of specific components of the measurement loop. As an effect of this notation, the authors introduce the distinction between an acoustic measurement signal and an acoustic measurement impulse. The authors define the basic parameters of an arbitrary impulse. The authors extensively discuss the signal functions of acoustic emission impulses and acoustic emission signals defined in this article as acoustic emission descriptors (or signal functions of acoustic emission impulses) and advanced acoustic emission descriptors (which are either descriptors associated with acoustic emission applications or the signal functions of acoustic emission signals). The article also contains the results of experimental research on three different problems in which acoustic emission descriptors associated with acoustic emission pulses, acoustic emission applications, and acoustic emission signals are used. These problems are respectively: a problem of the amplitude-load characteristics of acoustic emission pulses in carbon samples subjected to compound uniaxial compression, the use of acoustic emission to predict the durability characteristics of conveyor belts, and

  3. Transfer function between tibial acceleration and ground reaction force.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, M A; Lake, M J; Hennig, E

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to capture the relationship between ground reaction force (GRF) and tibial axial acceleration. Tibia acceleration and GRF were simultaneously recorded from five subjects during running. The acceleration of the bone was measured with a transducer mounted onto an intracortical pin. The signals were analyzed in the frequency domain to characterize the relationship between GRF and tibial acceleration. The results confirmed that for each subject this relationship could be represented by a frequency transfer function. The existence of a more general relationship for all five subjects was also confirmed by the results. The transfer functions provided information about transient shock transmissibility for the entire impact phase of running.

  4. [Quantification and improvement of speech transmission performance using headphones in acoustic stimulated functional magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Ken ichiro; Takatsu, Yasuo; Miyati, Tosiaki; Kimura, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has made a major contribution to the understanding of higher brain function, but fMRI with auditory stimulation, used in the planning of brain tumor surgery, is often inaccurate because there is a risk that the sounds used in the trial may not be correctly transmitted to the subjects due to acoustic noise. This prompted us to devise a method of digitizing sound transmission ability from the accuracy rate of 67 syllables, classified into three types. We evaluated this with and without acoustic noise during imaging. We also improved the structure of the headphones and compared their sound transmission ability with that of conventional headphones attached to an MRI device (a GE Signa HDxt 3.0 T). We calculated and compared the sound transmission ability of the conventional headphones with that of the improved model. The 95 percent upper confidence limit (UCL) was used as the threshold for accuracy rate of hearing for both headphone models. There was a statistically significant difference between the conventional model and the improved model during imaging (p < 0.01). The rate of accuracy of the improved model was 16 percent higher. 29 and 22 syllables were accurate at a 95% UCL in the improved model and the conventional model, respectively. This study revealed the evaluation system used in this study to be useful for correctly identifying syllables during fMRI.

  5. Smaller nets may perform better: special transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Elsken, T

    1999-06-01

    In an earlier study we stated sufficient conditions on the transfer function f of a feedforward multilayered neural net such that the output on R(n) defines the net up to trivial changes and smaller nets can have better performance on finite sets. Here we prove that 1/(1+e(-x)), tanhx, (1-e(-x))/(1+e(-x)) and invtanx satisfy these conditions.

  6. A Derived Transfer of Mood Functions through Equivalence Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Smeets, Paul M.; Luciano, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the transfer of induced happy and sad mood functions through equivalence relations. Sixteen subjects participated in a combined equivalence and mood induction procedure. In Phase 1, all subjects were trained in 2 conditional discriminations using a matching-to-sample format (i.e., A1-B1, A2-B2, A1-C1, A2-C2). In…

  7. Boundary emphasis transfer function generation based on HSL color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Wu, Jianhuang; Luo, Shengzhou; Ma, Xin

    2011-10-01

    Direct volume rendering has been received much attention since it need not to extract geometric primitives for visualization and its performance is generally better than surface rendering. Transfer functions, which are used for mapping scalar field to optical properties, are of vital importance in obtaining a sensible rendering result from volume data. Though traditional color transfer functions are in RGB color space, HSL color space that conveys semantic meanings is more intuitive and user-friendly. In this paper, we present a novel approach aims to emphasize and distinguish strong boundaries between different materials. We achieve it by using data value, gradient magnitude and dimension of the volumetric data to set opacity. Then, through a linear map from data value, gradient magnitude and second derivative to hue, saturation and lightness respectively, a color transfer function is obtained in HSL color space. Experimental tests on real-world datasets indicate that our method could achieve desirable rendering results with revealing important boundaries between different structures and indicating data value's distribution in the volume by using different colors.

  8. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network.

  9. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network. PMID:27425612

  10. ANALYTIC PROPERTIES OF THE LONGITUDINAL BEAM TRANSFER FUNCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    TOWNE, N.

    2001-06-18

    The frequency dependence of the longitudinal beam transfer function (BTF) in a storage ring, when expressed in a basis of azimuthal harmonics of the line density, is the Fourier transform of a causal function that depends on the radio-frequency potential well in which the bunch moves. The effect of all synchrotron harmonics are included in this function, which is derived from Krinsky and Wang's expression for the BTF expressed in the same basis (S. Krinsky and J.-M. Wang, Part. Accel. 17, 109-139 (1985)). Analytic properties of the terms of the BTF expressed in a series of synchrotron harmonics, which are approximately Shaposhnikova's BTF matrix elements (E. Shaposhnikova, CERN Report No. SL-94-19-RF (1994)), are studied through the large-argument asymptotics of corresponding causal functions.

  11. Transferred interbacterial antagonism genes augment eukaryotic innate immune function.

    PubMed

    Chou, Seemay; Daugherty, Matthew D; Peterson, S Brook; Biboy, Jacob; Yang, Youyun; Jutras, Brandon L; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Ferrin, Michael A; Harding, Brittany N; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Yang, X Frank; Vollmer, Waldemar; Malik, Harmit S; Mougous, Joseph D

    2015-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer allows organisms to rapidly acquire adaptive traits. Although documented instances of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes remain rare, bacteria represent a rich source of new functions potentially available for co-option. One benefit that genes of bacterial origin could provide to eukaryotes is the capacity to produce antibacterials, which have evolved in prokaryotes as the result of eons of interbacterial competition. The type VI secretion amidase effector (Tae) proteins are potent bacteriocidal enzymes that degrade the cell wall when delivered into competing bacterial cells by the type VI secretion system. Here we show that tae genes have been transferred to eukaryotes on at least six occasions, and that the resulting domesticated amidase effector (dae) genes have been preserved for hundreds of millions of years through purifying selection. We show that the dae genes acquired eukaryotic secretion signals, are expressed within recipient organisms, and encode active antibacterial toxins that possess substrate specificity matching extant Tae proteins of the same lineage. Finally, we show that a dae gene in the deer tick Ixodes scapularis limits proliferation of Borrelia burgdorferi, the aetiologic agent of Lyme disease. Our work demonstrates that a family of horizontally acquired toxins honed to mediate interbacterial antagonism confers previously undescribed antibacterial capacity to eukaryotes. We speculate that the selective pressure imposed by competition between bacteria has produced a reservoir of genes encoding diverse antimicrobial functions that are tailored for co-option by eukaryotic innate immune systems. PMID:25470067

  12. Optical transfer function measurment facility for aerial survey cameras.

    PubMed

    Bewsher, A; Powell, I

    1994-10-01

    The optical transfer function measurement facility developed at the National Research Council of Canada primarily for testing aerial survey cameras has been upgraded to perform the task in an appreciably more convenient manner. Modifications made to the facility, which is based on the line spread function technique, include the replacement of the cumbersome physical scanning mechanism and detector unit with a detector assembly comprising a relay lens and a linear photodiode array. While eliminating the need for physically scanning the line spread function, it did require a change of light source, a daylight filter, and a new computer software package. The new setup is described in this paper. Several aerial survey cameras have been evaluated with the system, and results are given for a fairly standard Zeiss camera. PMID:20941194

  13. Prepulse Inhibition of the Acoustic Startle Reflex in High Functioning Autism

    PubMed Central

    Gruendler, Theo O. J.; Vogeley, Kai; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Kuhn, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background High functioning autism is an autism spectrum disorder that is characterized by deficits in social interaction and communication as well as repetitive and restrictive behavior while intelligence and general cognitive functioning are preserved. According to the weak central coherence account, individuals with autism tend to process information detail-focused at the expense of global form. This processing bias might be reflected by deficits in sensorimotor gating, a mechanism that prevents overstimulation during the transformation of sensory input into motor action. Prepulse inhibition is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating, which indicates an extensive attenuation of the startle reflex that occurs when a startling pulse is preceded by a weaker stimulus, the prepulse. Methods In the present study, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle was compared between 17 adults with high functioning autism and 17 sex-, age-, and intelligence-matched controls by means of electromyography. Results Results indicate that participants with high functioning autism exhibited significantly higher startle amplitudes than the control group. However, groups did not differ with regard to PPI or habituation of startle. Discussion These findings challenge the results of two previous studies that reported prepulse inhibition deficits in high-functioning autism and suggest that sensorimotor gating is only impaired in certain subgroups with autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24643088

  14. Geometrical modulation transfer function for different pixel active area shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2000-04-01

    In this work we consider the effect of the pixel active area geometrical shape on the modulation transfer function (MTF) of an image sensor. When designing a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor, or a CCD or CID sensor for this matter, the active area of the pixel would have a certain geometrical shape which might not cover the whole pixel area. To improve the device performance, it is important to understand the effect this has on the pixel sensitivity and on the resulting MTF. We perform a theoretical analysis of the MTF for the active area shape and derive explicit formulas for the transfer function for pixel arrays with a square, a rectangular and an L shaped active area (most commonly used), and generalize for any connected active area shape. Preliminary experimental results of subpixel scanning sensitivity maps and the corresponding MTFs have also bee obtained, which confirm the theoretical derivations. Both the simulation results and the MTF calculated from the point spread function measurements of the actual pixel arrays show that the active area shape contributes significantly to the behavior of the overall MTF. The results also indicate that for any potential pixel active area shape, the effect of its diversion from the square pixel could be calculated, so that tradeoff between the conflicting requirements, such as SNR and MTF, could be compared per each pixel design for better overall sensor performance.

  15. Numerical calculation of listener-specific head-related transfer functions and sound localization: Microphone model and mesh discretization

    PubMed Central

    Ziegelwanger, Harald; Majdak, Piotr; Kreuzer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) can be numerically calculated by applying the boundary element method on the geometry of a listener’s head and pinnae. The calculation results are defined by geometrical, numerical, and acoustical parameters like the microphone used in acoustic measurements. The scope of this study was to estimate requirements on the size and position of the microphone model and on the discretization of the boundary geometry as triangular polygon mesh for accurate sound localization. The evaluation involved the analysis of localization errors predicted by a sagittal-plane localization model, the comparison of equivalent head radii estimated by a time-of-arrival model, and the analysis of actual localization errors obtained in a sound-localization experiment. While the average edge length (AEL) of the mesh had a negligible effect on localization performance in the lateral dimension, the localization performance in sagittal planes, however, degraded for larger AELs with the geometrical error as dominant factor. A microphone position at an arbitrary position at the entrance of the ear canal, a microphone size of 1 mm radius, and a mesh with 1 mm AEL yielded a localization performance similar to or better than observed with acoustically measured HRTFs. PMID:26233020

  16. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in distributed parameter models which may be easily applied to models such as rod, plate, and beam equations. The general linear boundary value vibration equation is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes. The governing characteristic equations are decoupled through separation of variables yielding solutions similar to those of undamped classical theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as transient response. Example problems and solutions are provided demonstrating the similarity of the solutions to those of the classical theories and transient responses of nonviscous systems.

  17. On identifying transfer functions and state equations for linear systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Chen, C. F.; Huang, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Two methods are established for identifying constant-coefficient, C to the 2n power type of noise-free linear systems if the time response data of the input-output or of all states are known. 2n response data are required to identify an nth-order transfer function or state equation for an unknown linear system. The order of the unknown system can be identified by checking a sequence of determinants. The Z transform and its inversion are mainly used.

  18. Analysis of diagnostic calorimeter data by the transfer function technique.

    PubMed

    Delogu, R S; Poggi, C; Pimazzoni, A; Rossi, G; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the analysis procedure applied to the thermal measurements on the rear side of a carbon fibre composite calorimeter with the purpose of reconstructing the energy flux due to an ion beam colliding on the front side. The method is based on the transfer function technique and allows a fast analysis by means of the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Its efficacy has been tested both on simulated and measured temperature profiles: in all cases, the energy flux features are well reproduced and beamlets are well resolved. Limits and restrictions of the method are also discussed, providing strategies to handle issues related to signal noise and digital processing. PMID:26932104

  19. Transfer function bounds on the performance of turbo codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Dolinar, S.; Pollara, F.; Mceliece, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    In this article we apply transfer function bounding techniques to obtain upper bounds on the bit-error rate for maximum likelihood decoding of turbo codes constructed with random permutations. These techniques are applied to two turbo codes with constraint length 3 and later extended to other codes. The performance predicted by these bounds is compared with simulation results. The bounds are useful in estimating the 'error floor' that is difficult to measure by simulation, and they provide insight on how to lower this floor. More refined bounds are needed for accurate performance measures at lower signal-to-noise ratios.

  20. Autologous Fat Transfer: An Aesthetic and Functional Refinement for Parotidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vico, Pierre G.; Delange, Axel; De Vooght, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Parotidectomy is a surgical procedure associated to functional (Frey's syndrome) as well as aesthetic (facial asymmetry) complications that can be very disturbing for the patient. Several procedures have been described to primarily avoid or secondarily reconstruct the facial defect and treat the neurological iatrogenic syndrome. Autologous fat transfer was primarily used in 10 cases to avoid such complications. It is an easy technique widely used in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. This technique gives very satisfying long-term results on the cosmetic as well as on the physiological point of view. PMID:25379564

  1. The Evolution of a More Rigorous Approach to Benefit Transfer: Benefit Function Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, John B.

    1992-03-01

    The desire for economic values of recreation for unstudied recreation resources dates back to the water resource development benefit-cost analyses of the early 1960s. Rather than simply applying existing estimates of benefits per trip to the study site, a fairly rigorous approach was developed by a number of economists. This approach involves application of travel cost demand equations and contingent valuation benefit functions from existing sites to the new site. In this way the spatial market of the new site (i.e., its differing own price, substitute prices and population distribution) is accounted for in the new estimate of total recreation benefits. The assumptions of benefit transfer from recreation sites in one state to another state for the same recreation activity is empirically tested. The equality of demand coefficients for ocean sport salmon fishing in Oregon versus Washington and for freshwater steelhead fishing in Oregon versus Idaho is rejected. Thus transfer of either demand equations or average benefits per trip are likely to be in error. Using the Oregon steelhead equation, benefit transfers to rivers within the state are shown to be accurate to within 5-15%.

  2. Investigation of Balance Function Using Dynamic Posturography under Electrical-Acoustic Stimulation in Cochlear Implant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Schwab, B; Durisin, M; Kontorinis, G

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of electrical-acoustic stimulation on vestibular function in CI patients by using the EquiTest and to help answer the question of whether electrically stimulating the inner ear using a cochlear implant influences the balance system in any way. Material and Methods. A test population (n = 50) was selected at random from among the cochlear implant recipients. Dynamic posturography (using the EquiTest) was performed with the device switched off an switched on. Results. In summary, it can be said that an activated cochlear implant affects the function of the vestibular system and may, to an extent, even lead to a stabilization of balance function under the static conditions of dynamic posturography, but nevertheless also to a significant destabilization. Significant improvements in vestibular function were seen mainly in equilibrium scores under conditions 4 and 5, the composite equilibrium score, and the vestibular components as revealed by sensory analysis. Conclusions. Only under the static conditions are significantly poorer scores achieved when stimulation is applied. It may be that the explanation for any symptoms of dizziness lies precisely in the fact that they occur in supposedly noncritical situations, since, when the cochlear implant makes increased demands on the balance system, induced disturbances can be centrally suppressed. PMID:20671908

  3. Investigation of Balance Function Using Dynamic Posturography under Electrical-Acoustic Stimulation in Cochlear Implant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, B.; Durisin, M.; Kontorinis, G.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of electrical-acoustic stimulation on vestibular function in CI patients by using the EquiTest and to help answer the question of whether electrically stimulating the inner ear using a cochlear implant influences the balance system in any way. Material and Methods. A test population (n = 50) was selected at random from among the cochlear implant recipients. Dynamic posturography (using the EquiTest) was performed with the device switched off an switched on. Results. In summary, it can be said that an activated cochlear implant affects the function of the vestibular system and may, to an extent, even lead to a stabilization of balance function under the static conditions of dynamic posturography, but nevertheless also to a significant destabilization. Significant improvements in vestibular function were seen mainly in equilibrium scores under conditions 4 and 5, the composite equilibrium score, and the vestibular components as revealed by sensory analysis. Conclusions. Only under the static conditions are significantly poorer scores achieved when stimulation is applied. It may be that the explanation for any symptoms of dizziness lies precisely in the fact that they occur in supposedly noncritical situations, since, when the cochlear implant makes increased demands on the balance system, induced disturbances can be centrally suppressed. PMID:20671908

  4. Noise affects the shape of female preference functions for acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The shape of female mate preference functions influences the speed and direction of sexual signal evolution. However, the expression of female preferences is modulated by interactions between environmental conditions and the female's sensory processing system. Noise is an especially relevant environmental condition because it interferes directly with the neural processing of signals. Although noise is therefore likely a significant force in the evolution of communication systems, little is known about its effects on preference function shape. In the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus, female preferences for male calling song characteristics are likely to be affected by noise because its auditory system is sensitive to fine temporal details of songs. We measured female preference functions for variation in male song characteristics in several levels of masking noise and found strong effects of noise on preference function shape. The overall responsiveness to signals in noise generally decreased. Preference strength increased for some signal characteristics and decreased for others, largely corresponding to expectations based on neurophysiological studies of acoustic signal processing. These results suggest that different signal characteristics will be favored under different noise conditions, and thus that signal evolution may proceed differently depending on the extent and temporal patterning of environmental noise.

  5. Off-Axis Nulling Transfer Function Measurement: A First Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedova, G. Dalla; Menut, J.-L.; Millour, F.; Petrov, R.; Cassaing, F.; Danchi, W. C.; Jacquinod, S.; Lhome, E.; Lopez, B.; Lozi, J.; Marcotto, A.; Parisot, J.; Reess, J.-M.

    2013-01-01

    We want to study a polychromatic inverse problem method with nulling interferometers to obtain information on the structures of the exozodiacal light. For this reason, during the first semester of 2013, thanks to the support of the consortium PERSEE, we launched a campaign of laboratory measurements with the nulling interferometric test bench PERSEE, operating with 9 spectral channels between J and K bands. Our objective is to characterise the transfer function, i.e. the map of the null as a function of wavelength for an off-axis source, the null being optimised on the central source or on the source photocenter. We were able to reach on-axis null depths better than 10(exp -4). This work is part of a broader project aiming at creating a simulator of a nulling interferometer in which typical noises of a real instrument are introduced. We present here our first results.

  6. Extracting electron transfer coupling elements from constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2006-10-01

    Constrained density functional theory (DFT) is a useful tool for studying electron transfer (ET) reactions. It can straightforwardly construct the charge-localized diabatic states and give a direct measure of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. In this work, a method is presented for calculating the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) based on constrained DFT. This method completely avoids the use of ground-state DFT energies because they are known to irrationally predict fractional electron transfer in many cases. Instead it makes use of the constrained DFT energies and the Kohn-Sham wave functions for the diabatic states in a careful way. Test calculations on the Zn2+ and the benzene-Cl atom systems show that the new prescription yields reasonable agreement with the standard generalized Mulliken-Hush method. We then proceed to produce the diabatic and adiabatic potential energy curves along the reaction pathway for intervalence ET in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q) anion. While the unconstrained DFT curve has no reaction barrier and gives Hab≈17kcal /mol, which qualitatively disagrees with experimental results, the Hab calculated from constrained DFT is about 3kcal /mol and the generated ground state has a barrier height of 1.70kcal/mol, successfully predicting (Q-TTF-Q)- to be a class II mixed-valence compound.

  7. [Development and technological transfer of functional pastas extended with legumes].

    PubMed

    Granito, Marisela; Ascanio, Vanesa

    2009-03-01

    Development and technological transfer of functional pastas extended with legumes. Semolina pasta is a highly consumed foodstuff, the biological value of which is low because its protein is deficient in lysine. However, if the semolina is extended with legumes rich in this essential aminoacid, not only and aminoacid supplementation is produced, but also the dietary fibre and minerals are increased. In this work, pastas extended in 10% with a white variety of Phaseolus vulgaris and with Cajanus cajan were produced on a pilot plant scale, and this technology was transferred to a cooperative producing artisanal pastas. The cooking qualities and the physical, chemical, and nutritional characteristics of the pastas were evaluated, as well as the sensorial acceptability in institutionalized elderly people. The extension of the pastas with legume flours increased the optimum cooking time (15 to 20%), the weight (20% and 25%), and the loss of solids by cooking. Similarly, the functional value of the pastas increased by increasing the contents of minerals and dietary fibre. The protein content, as well as the protein digestibility in vitro also increased; however, the parameters of colour L, a and b, and the total starch content of the pastas decreased. At consumer level, the pastas extended with legumes had a good acceptability, for what it was concluded that the extension of the semolina with legume flours in the manufacture of pastas is technologically feasible. PMID:19480347

  8. Transfer Function between EEG and BOLD Signals of Epileptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Marco; Leal, Alberto; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) recordings have seen growing application in the evaluation of epilepsy, namely in the characterization of brain networks related to epileptic activity. In EEG-correlated fMRI studies, epileptic events are usually described as boxcar signals based on the timing information retrieved from the EEG, and subsequently convolved with a hemodynamic response function to model the associated Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) changes. Although more flexible approaches may allow a higher degree of complexity for the hemodynamics, the issue of how to model these dynamics based on the EEG remains an open question. In this work, a new methodology for the integration of simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in epilepsy is proposed, which incorporates a transfer function from the EEG to the BOLD signal. Independent component analysis of the EEG is performed, and a number of metrics expressing different models of the EEG-BOLD transfer function are extracted from the resulting time courses. These metrics are then used to predict the fMRI data and to identify brain areas associated with the EEG epileptic activity. The methodology was tested on both ictal and interictal EEG-fMRI recordings from one patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma. When compared to the conventional analysis approach, plausible, consistent, and more significant activations were obtained. Importantly, frequency-weighted EEG metrics yielded superior results than those weighted solely on the EEG power, which comes in agreement with previous literature. Reproducibility, specificity, and sensitivity should be addressed in an extended group of patients in order to further validate the proposed methodology and generalize the presented proof of concept. PMID:23355832

  9. 5 CFR 353.109 - Transfer of function to another agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of function to another agency... Transfer of function to another agency. If the function of an employee absent because of uniformed service or compensable injury is transferred to another agency, and if the employee would have...

  10. 5 CFR 353.109 - Transfer of function to another agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of function to another agency... Transfer of function to another agency. If the function of an employee absent because of uniformed service or compensable injury is transferred to another agency, and if the employee would have...

  11. 5 CFR 353.109 - Transfer of function to another agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer of function to another agency... Transfer of function to another agency. If the function of an employee absent because of uniformed service or compensable injury is transferred to another agency, and if the employee would have...

  12. 5 CFR 353.109 - Transfer of function to another agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfer of function to another agency... Transfer of function to another agency. If the function of an employee absent because of uniformed service or compensable injury is transferred to another agency, and if the employee would have...

  13. 5 CFR 353.109 - Transfer of function to another agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of function to another agency... Transfer of function to another agency. If the function of an employee absent because of uniformed service or compensable injury is transferred to another agency, and if the employee would have...

  14. Function Transfer in Human Operant Experiments: The Role of Stimulus Pairings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonneau, Francois; Gonzalez, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Although function transfer often has been studied in complex operant procedures (such as matching to sample), whether operant reinforcement actually produces function transfer in such settings has not been established. The present experiments, with high school students as subjects, suggest that stimulus pairings can promote function transfer in…

  15. Green's Function Retrieval and Marchenko Imaging in a Dissipative Acoustic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slob, Evert

    2016-04-01

    Single-sided Marchenko equations for Green's function construction and imaging relate the measured reflection response of a lossless heterogeneous medium to an acoustic wave field inside this medium. I derive two sets of single-sided Marchenko equations for the same purpose, each in a heterogeneous medium, with one medium being dissipative and the other a corresponding medium with negative dissipation. Double-sided scattering data of the dissipative medium are required as input to compute the surface reflection response in the corresponding medium with negative dissipation. I show that each set of single-sided Marchenko equations leads to Green's functions with a virtual receiver inside the medium: one exists inside the dissipative medium and one in the medium with negative dissipation. This forms the basis of imaging inside a dissipative heterogeneous medium. I relate the Green's functions to the reflection response inside each medium, from which the image can be constructed. I illustrate the method with a one-dimensional example that shows the image quality. The method has a potentially wide range of imaging applications where the material under test is accessible from two sides.

  16. Vibro-acoustic response and sound transmission loss analysis of functionally graded plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, N.; Raja, S.; Nagendra Gopal, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents analytical studies on the vibro-acoustic and sound transmission loss characteristics of functionally graded material (FGM) plates using a simple first-order shear deformation theory. The material properties of the plate are assumed to vary according to power law distribution of the constituent materials in terms of volume fraction. The sound radiation due to sinusoidally varying point load, uniformly distributed load and obliquely incident sound wave is computed by solving the Rayleigh integral with a primitive numerical scheme. Displacement, velocity, acceleration, radiated sound power level, radiated sound pressure level and radiation efficiency of FGM plate for varying power law index are examined. The sound transmission loss of the FGM plate for several incidence angles and varying power law index is studied in detail. It has been found that, for the plate being considered, the sound power level increases monotonically with increase in power law index at lower frequency range (0-500 Hz) and a non-monotonic trend is appeared towards higher frequencies for both point and distributed force excitations. Increased vibration and acoustic response is observed for ceramic-rich FGM plate at higher frequency band; whereas a similar trend is seen for metal-rich FGM plate at lower frequency band. The dBA values are found to be decreasing with increase in power law index. The radiation efficiency of ceramic-rich FGM plate is noticed to be higher than that of metal and metal-rich FGM plates. The transmission loss below the first resonance frequency is high for ceramic-rich FGM plate and low for metal-rich FGM plate and further depends on the specific material property. The study has found that increased transmission loss can be achieved at higher frequencies with metal-rich FGM plates.

  17. Full-Scale Turbofan-Engine Turbine-Transfer Function Determination Using Three Internal Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    Existing NASA/Honeywell EVNERT full-scale static engine test data is analyzed by using source-separation techniques in order to determine the turbine transfer of the currently sub-dominant combustor noise. The results are used to assess the combustor-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). Time-series data from three sensors internal to the Honeywell TECH977 research engine is used in the analysis. The true combustor-noise turbine-transfer function is educed by utilizing a new three-signal approach. The resulting narrowband gain factors are compared with the corresponding constant values obtained from two empirical acoustic-turbine-loss formulas. It is found that a simplified Pratt & Whitney formula agrees better with the experimental results for frequencies of practical importance. The 130 deg downstream-direction far-field 1/3-octave sound-pressure levels (SPL) results of Hultgren & Miles are reexamined using a post-correction of their ANOPP predictions for both the total noise signature and the combustion-noise component. It is found that replacing the standard ANOPP turbine-attenuation function for combustion noise with the simplified Pratt & Whitney formula clearly improves the predictions. It is recommended that the GECOR combustion-noise module in ANOPP be updated to allow for a user-selectable switch between the current transmission-loss model and the simplified Pratt & Whitney formula. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic.

  18. Relationships between vocal function measures derived from an acoustic microphone and a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring subglottal neck-surface acceleration has received renewed attention due to the ability of low-profile accelerometers to confidentially and noninvasively track properties related to normal and disordered voice characteristics and behavior. This study investigated the ability of subglottal neck-surface acceleration to yield vocal function measures traditionally derived from the acoustic voice signal and help guide the development of clinically functional accelerometer-based measures from a physiological perspective. Results are reported for 82 adult speakers with voice disorders and 52 adult speakers with normal voices who produced the sustained vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/ at a comfortable pitch and loudness during the simultaneous recording of radiated acoustic pressure and subglottal neck-surface acceleration. As expected, timing-related measures of jitter exhibited the strongest correlation between acoustic and neck-surface acceleration waveforms (r ≤ 0.99), whereas amplitude-based measures of shimmer correlated less strongly (r ≤ 0.74). Additionally, weaker correlations were exhibited by spectral measures of harmonics-to-noise ratio (r ≤ 0.69) and tilt (r ≤ 0.57), whereas the cepstral peak prominence correlated more strongly (r ≤ 0.90). These empirical relationships provide evidence to support the use of accelerometers as effective complements to acoustic recordings in the assessment and monitoring of vocal function in the laboratory, clinic, and during an individual’s daily activities. PMID:27066520

  19. Representation theorems and Green's function retrieval for scattering in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ivan; Snieder, Roel; Douma, Huub

    2009-09-01

    Reciprocity theorems for perturbed acoustic media are provided in the form of convolution- and correlation-type theorems. These reciprocity relations are particularly useful in the general treatment of both forward and inverse-scattering problems. Using Green's functions to describe perturbed and unperturbed waves in two distinct wave states, representation theorems for scattered waves are derived from the reciprocity relations. While the convolution-type theorems can be manipulated to obtain scattering integrals that are analogous to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, the correlation-type theorems can be used to retrieve the scattering response of the medium by cross correlations. Unlike previous formulations of Green's function retrieval, the extraction of scattered-wave responses by cross correlations does not require energy equipartitioning. Allowing for uneven energy radiation brings experimental advantages to the retrieval of fields scattered by remote lossless and/or attenuative scatterers. These concepts are illustrated with a number of examples, including analytic solutions to a one-dimensional scattering problem, and a numerical example in the context of seismic waves recorded on the ocean bottom. PMID:19905236

  20. Time Reversal Mirrors and Cross Correlation Functions in Acoustic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Louis; Jonsson, B. Lars G.; de Hoop, Maarten V.

    2009-03-01

    In time reversal acoustics (TRA), a signal is recorded by an array of transducers, time reversed, and then retransmitted into the configuration. The retransmitted signal propagates back through the same medium and retrofocuses on the source that generated the signal. If the transducer array is a single, planar (flat) surface, then this configuration is referred to as a planar, one-sided, time reversal mirror (TRM). In signal processing, for example, in active-source seismic interferometry, the measurement of the wave field at two distinct receivers, generated by a common source, is considered. Cross correlating these two observations and integrating the result over the sources yield the cross correlation function (CCF). Adopting the TRM experiments as the basic starting point and identifying the kinematically correct correspondences, it is established that the associated CCF signal processing constructions follow in a specific, infinite recording time limit. This perspective also provides for a natural rationale for selecting the Green's function components in the TRM and CCF expressions. For a planar, one-sided, TRM experiment and the corresponding CCF signal processing construction, in a three-dimensional homogeneous medium, the exact expressions are explicitly calculated, and the connecting limiting relationship verified. Finally, the TRM and CCF results are understood in terms of the underlying, governing, two-way wave equation, its corresponding time reversal invariance (TRI) symmetry, and the absence of TRI symmetry in the associated one-way wave equations, highlighting the role played by the evanescent modal contributions.

  1. A surface acoustic wave sensor functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer for selective dopamine detection.

    PubMed

    Maouche, Naima; Ktari, Nadia; Bakas, Idriss; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Seydou, Mahamadou; Maurel, François; Chehimi, Mohammed Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    A surface acoustic wave sensor operating at 104 MHz and functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer has been designed for selective detection of dopamine (DA). Optimization of pyrrole/DA ratio, polymerization and immersion times permitted to obtain a highly selective sensor, which has a sensitivity of 0.55°/mM (≈ 550 Hz/mM) and a detection limit of ≈ 10 nM. Morphology and related roughness parameters of molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces, before and after extraction of DA, as well as that of the non imprinted polymer were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The developed chemosensor selectively recognized dopamine over the structurally similar compound 4-hydroxyphenethylamine (referred as tyramine), or ascorbic acid,which co-exists with DA in body fluids at a much higher concentration. Selectivity tests were also carried out with dihydroxybenzene, for which an unexpected phase variation of order of 75% of the DA one was observed. Quantum chemical calculations, based on the density functional theory, were carried out to determine the nature of interactions between each analyte and the PPy matrix and the DA imprinted PPy polypyrrole sensing layer in order to account for the important phase variation observed during dihydroxybenzene injection. PMID:26095144

  2. Head-related transfer function database and its analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bosun; Zhong, Xiaoli; Rao, Dan; Liang, Zhiqiang

    2007-06-01

    Based on the measurements from 52 Chinese subjects (26 males and 26 females), a high-spatial-resolution head-related transfer function (HRTF) database with corresponding anthropometric parameters is established. By using the database, cues relating to sound source localization, including interaural time difference (ITD), interaural level difference (ILD), and spectral features introduced by pinna, are analyzed. Moreover, the statistical relationship between ITD and anthropometric parameters is estimated. It is proved that the mean values of maximum ITD for male and female are significantly different, so are those for Chinese and western subjects. The difference in ITD is due to the difference in individual anthropometric parameters. It is further proved that the spectral features introduced by pinna strongly depend on individual; while at high frequencies (f ⩾ 5.5 kHz), HRTFs are left-right asymmetric. This work is instructive and helpful for the research on binaural hearing and applications on virtual auditory in future.

  3. LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for thematic mapping (TM) bands 3, 4, 5 and 7 is reliably estimated with the San Mateo Bridge target in the 12/31/82 scene. These results are to be compared with those from the 8/12/83 scene. Bands 1, 2 and 6 are to be analyzed with a different target possessing greater contrast. This may be possible with the underflight data comparison currently underway. The registration of this data to the TM image of 8/12/83 for a region arround the Stockton sewage pond east of San Francisco has begun. This particular approach has the advantage that the full two-dimensional MFT will be measured instead of the MFT in only one azimuth as reported.

  4. Himalayan sediment fluxes and the floodplain transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupker, Maarten; Lavé, Jérôme; France-Lanord, Christian; Blard, Pierre Henri

    2013-04-01

    Erosion produces sediments and thereby redistributes mass at the Earth surface. A better understanding of these erosion processes can be gained by studying the products of erosion, i.e. the nature, magnitude and variability of sediment fluxes. On continents, rivers are the main conveyer belts that transport these sediments from source to sink. Owing to the integrative nature of river networks, a downstream river reach can be used to infer erosion processes that occur in upstream catchments. However on large spatial scales, sediment transport processes may affect the sedimentary signal so that the quantification of upstream erosion may not be straightforward. This is especially the case for continental scale basins: sediment sources are separated from sedimentary basins by large alluvial floodplains, where sediments are transported over hundreds to thousands of kilometers. The floodplain transfer function needs to be understood whenever modern river sediments or sedimentary archives are used to reconstruct present and past erosion processes. In this contribution we discuss the magnitude of sediment fluxes from the Himalayan system using sediment gauging and cosmogenic nuclide data and address to what extent sediment transport may bias these estimates. The central part of the Himalayan range is drained by two major rivers, the Ganga and Brahmaputra that convey the products of Himalayan erosion over an extensive floodplain and ultimately to the Indian Ocean. This transfer may bias erosion rates derived from gauged sediment fluxes as part of the sediment flux is trapped in the subsiding foreland basin. This storage term remains however limited and can be quantified using a geochemical budget approach [1]. Floodplain transfer may also affect cosmogenic nuclide derived sediment budgets as sediments may accumulate nuclides during transport which will increase the overall nuclide concentration and hence lead to under-estimate denudation rates. By comparing cosmogenic

  5. Analysis of Transport Through a Fault Using Transfer Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, G. W.; Salve, R.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock (i.e., matrix and fracture flow, and fracture-matrix interactions) is important for performance assessment and the design of the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A key factor affecting performance of the proposed repository is the transport of radionuclides through unsaturated fractured rock that lies between the repository horizon and water table located ~300 m below. Of particular importance is the need for an understanding of diffusive mass transfer between high-permeability, advection-dominated domains and low-permeability domains. An in situ field experiment was conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada to examine flow and transport in the vicinity of a fault located in unsaturated fractured rock. This experiment involved the release of ~75,000 liters of ponded water over a period of 14 months directly into a near-vertical fault located in the fractured welded tuff of the Topopah Spring Tuff unit. Seepage rates were monitored in a large cavity (niche) excavated 20 m below where the water was released along the fault. Seven months after water was introduced, two conservative tracers (pentafluorobenzoic acid [PFBA] and bromide) were simultaneously released along the fault over a period of nine days. After the release of the tracers, seepage water was continuously collected from three locations in the niche and analyzed for the injected tracers. The results from this field experiment demonstrate that flow and transport near a fault located in unsaturated fractured rock is complex due to mechanisms such as dynamic flow behavior. Continuum-based models may not be applicable when these types of mechanisms affect flow and transport. Measured breakthrough curves from this field experiment are analyzed using transfer functions as an alternative to the continuum-based models, and the applicability of using transfer functions to describe transport

  6. The Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters and Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z <= 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/R 0)-γ on the scales of 10 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 50 h -1 Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R 0 = 18.84 ± 0.27 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 15 and a smaller length of R 0 = 16.15 ± 0.13 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 5. The power-law index of γ = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r ~ 110 h -1 Mpc with a significance of ~1.9σ. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 200 h -1 Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are Dv (zm = 0.276) = 1077 ± 55(1σ) Mpc and h = 0.73 ± 0.039(1σ), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density Ω m h 2 = 0.093 ± 0.0077(1σ), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3σ. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  7. THE CORRELATION FUNCTION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AND DETECTION OF BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-10

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z {<=} 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model {xi}(r) = (r/R{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}} on the scales of 10 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R{sub 0} = 18.84 {+-} 0.27 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 15 and a smaller length of R{sub 0} = 16.15 {+-} 0.13 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 5. The power-law index of {gamma} = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r {approx} 110 h{sup -1} Mpc with a significance of {approx}1.9{sigma}. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 200 h{sup -1} Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are D{sub v} (z{sub m} = 0.276) = 1077 {+-} 55(1{sigma}) Mpc and h = 0.73 {+-} 0.039(1{sigma}), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density {Omega}{sub m} h{sup 2} = 0.093 {+-} 0.0077(1{sigma}), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3{sigma}. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  8. Detection of respiratory compromise by acoustic monitoring, capnography, and brain function monitoring during monitored anesthesia care.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Pedro P; Tanaka, Maria; Drover, David R

    2014-12-01

    Episodes of apnea in sedated patients represent a risk of respiratory compromise. We hypothesized that acoustic monitoring would be equivalent to capnography for detection of respiratory pauses, with fewer false alarms. In addition, we hypothesized that the patient state index (PSI) would be correlated with the frequency of respiratory pauses and therefore could provide information about the risk of apnea during sedation. Patients undergoing sedation for surgical procedures were monitored for respiration rate using acoustic monitoring and capnography and for depth of sedation using the PSI. A clinician blinded to the acoustic and sedation monitor observed the capnograph and patient to assess sedation and episodes of apnea. Another clinician retrospectively reviewed the capnography and acoustic waveform and sound files to identify true positive and false positive respiratory pauses by each method (reference method). Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio for detection of respiratory pause was calculated for acoustic monitoring and capnography. The correlation of PSI with respiratory pause events was determined. For the 51 respiratory pauses validated by retrospective analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio positive for detection were 16, 96 %, and 3.5 for clinician observation; 88, 7 %, and 1.0 for capnography; and 55, 87 %, and 4.1 for acoustic monitoring. There was no correlation between PSI and respiratory pause events. Acoustic monitoring had the highest likelihood ratio positive for detection of respiratory pause events compared with capnography and clinician observation and, therefore, may provide the best method for respiration rate monitoring during these procedures. PMID:24420342

  9. Acoustic and Perceptual Measurement of Expressive Prosody in High-Functioning Autism: Increased Pitch Range and What it Means to Listeners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadig, Aparna; Shaw, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Are there consistent markers of atypical prosody in speakers with high functioning autism (HFA) compared to typically-developing speakers? We examined: (1) acoustic measurements of pitch range, mean pitch and speech rate in conversation, (2) perceptual ratings of conversation for these features and overall prosody, and (3) acoustic measurements of…

  10. Range dependent characteristics in the head-related transfer functions of a bat-head cast: part 1. Monaural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Allen, R; Rowan, D

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of biological sonar systems has revolutionized many aspects of sonar engineering and further advances will benefit from more detailed understanding of their underlying acoustical processes. The anatomically diverse, complex and dynamic heads and ears of bats are known to be important for echolocation although their range-dependent properties are not well understood, particularly across the wide frequency range of some bats' vocalizations. The aim of this and a companion paper Kim et al (2012 Bioinspir. Biomim.) is to investigate bat-head acoustics as a function of bat-target distance, based on measurements up to 100 kHz and more robust examination of hardware characteristics in measurements than previously reported, using a cast of a bat head. In this first paper, we consider the spectral features at either ear (i.e. monaural head-related transfer functions). The results show, for example, that there is both higher magnitude and a stronger effect of distance at close range at relatively low frequencies. This might explain, at least in part, why bats adopt a strategy of changing the frequency range of their vocalizations while approaching a target. There is also potential advantage in the design of bio-inspired receivers of using range-dependent HRTFs and utilizing their distinguished frequency characteristics over the distance.

  11. Optical transfer function of the supersonic mixing layer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiong; Yi, Shihe; Jiang, Zongfu; He, Lin; Wang, Xiaohu

    2012-12-01

    The optical path difference (OPD) of the supersonic mixing layer with convective Mach number 0.5 is measured using the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering technique, and its short-exposure optical transfer function (OTF) is computed with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The OPD is analyzed from the viewpoint of structure function, and remarkable power law behavior is found. The power exponent is computed and analyzed. Taking the advantage of POD in capturing the energy of a signal, we present a model for the temporal evolution of OPD, which combines the deterministic and random factors together. With this model, the short-exposure OTF of the mixing layer is computed and analyzed. The amplitude modulation is evident at low frequencies, and it is almost negligible at high frequencies. The imaginary part of OTF for the mixing layer with developed vortex structures is of considerable amplitude, and the phase modulation becomes important for image degradation. We compare this phenomenon with the early result in aero-optics and explain it with the non-Gaussian statistics of OPD. PMID:23455913

  12. Robust algorithm for estimation of time-varying transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rui; Chon, Ki H

    2004-02-01

    We introduce a new method to estimate reliable time-varying (TV) transfer functions (TFs) and TV impulse response functions. The method is based on TV autoregressive moving average models in which the TV parameters are accurately obtained using the optimal parameter search method which we have previously developed. The new method is more accurate than the recursive least-squares (RLS), and remains robust even in the case of significant noise contamination. Furthermore, the new method is able to track dynamics that change abruptly, which is certainly a deficiency of the RLS. Application of the new method to renal blood pressure and flow revealed that hypertensive rats undergo more complex and TV autoregulation in maintaining stable blood flow than do normotensive rats. This observation has not been previously revealed using time-invariant TF analyses. The newly developed approach may promote the broader use of TV system identification in studies of physiological systems and makes linear and nonlinear TV modeling possible in certain cases previously thought intractable. PMID:14765694

  13. Extraction of acoustic normal mode depth functions using vertical line array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Westwood, Evan K.

    2002-02-01

    A method for extracting the normal modes of acoustic propagation in the shallow ocean from sound recorded on a vertical line array (VLA) of hydrophones as a source travels nearby is presented. The mode extraction is accomplished by performing a singular value decomposition (SVD) of individual frequency components of the signal's temporally averaged, spatial cross-spectral density matrix. The SVD produces a matrix containing a mutually orthogonal set of basis functions, which are proportional to the depth-dependent normal modes, and a diagonal matrix containing the singular values, which are proportional to the modal source excitations and mode eigenvalues. The conditions under which the method is expected to work are found to be (1) sufficient depth sampling of the propagating modes by the VLA receivers; (2) sufficient source-VLA range sampling, and (3) sufficient range interval traversed by the source. The mode extraction method is applied to data from the Area Characterization Test II, conducted in September 1993 in the Hudson Canyon Area off the New Jersey coast. Modes are successfully extracted from cw tones recorded while (1) the source traveled along a range-independent track with constant bathymetry and (2) the source traveled up-slope with gradual changes in bathymetry. In addition, modes are successfully extracted at multiple frequencies from ambient noise.

  14. Acoustically assisted spin-transfer-torque switching of nanomagnets: An energy-efficient hybrid writing scheme for non-volatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ayan K.; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2013-12-02

    We show that the energy dissipated to write bits in spin-transfer-torque random access memory can be reduced by an order of magnitude if a surface acoustic wave (SAW) is launched underneath the magneto-tunneling junctions (MTJs) storing the bits. The SAW-generated strain rotates the magnetization of every MTJs' soft magnet from the easy towards the hard axis, whereupon passage of a small spin-polarized current through a target MTJ selectively switches it to the desired state with > 99.99% probability at room temperature, thereby writing the bit. The other MTJs return to their original states at the completion of the SAW cycle.

  15. [Application of acoustic analysis of the voice to diagnosis and treatment of functional dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Chernobel'skiĭ, S I

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of the voice was used to facilitate diagnosis and to objectively evaluate results of the treatment of psychogenic dysphonia (PD) in 20 women. The control group comprised 20 women showing no signs of laryngeal pathology. The following parameters were measure: jitter, shimmer, signal to noise ratio, and response in the voicing test. Other methods applied included laryngoscopy, videolaryngoscopy, and laryngostroboscopy. It was shown that hoarseness in patients with PD results from the disturbances of mechanisms controlling stability of phonation. This observation is confirmed by the results of the acoustic test. It is concluded that dysphonia confirmed in the acoustic test in the absence of organic changes in the larynx is caused by psychogenic factors. Acoustic analysis of the voice is indicated to objectively evaluate results of the treatment of psychogenic dysphonia.

  16. On the transferability of a parametrized kinetic functional for orbital-free density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Alexander; Espinosa Leal, Leonardo; Caro, Miguel; Lehtomaki, Jouko; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga

    Because of issues with accuracy and transferability of existing orbital-free (OF) density functionals, OF functional development remains an active research area. Due to numerical difficulties, all-electron self-consistent assessment of OF functionals is limited. Using the projector augmented wave method we compute OFDFT all-electron values and we evaluate the performance of a parametrized OF functional for atoms and molecules. We combine the parametrized Thomas-Fermi-Weizsäcker (TF-W) kinetic model λ and γ for the fractions of Weizsäcker and TF functionals, respectively, with LDA for atoms. We found that one-to-one relation between λ and γ values defines a region in parameter space that allows the atomic energies and eigenvalues to be approximated with a small average error with respect to the Kohn-Sham values. The optimum values is however different for every property and for every atom. Recently, these results have been combined to test parameter transferability from atoms to molecules and we expect will help for further systematic improvement of OF density functionals. Karpenko et al., in preparation.

  17. The functionality of female reciprocal calls in the Iberian midwife toad (Alytes cisternasii): female-female acoustic competition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Jaime

    2002-11-01

    Female midwife toads (genus Alytes) emit highly variable reciprocal calls of unclear function prior to and during courtship. In some species, female-female competition, expressed as physical fighting, has been reported. Males of Majorcan midwife toads (Alytes muletensis) show phonotactic response to female calls, and females of Iberian midwife toads (Alytes cisternasii) respond differently according to the male call characteristics. In this study, I test the hypothesis of female-female acoustic competition as an additional function of female reciprocal calls. Playback tests indicate that female calls are not clearly involved in female acoustic competition in the Iberian midwife toad, therefore female calls could be directed at males rather than towards competitive females.

  18. Tissue elasticity quantification by acoustic radiation force impulse for the assessment of renal allograft function.

    PubMed

    He, Wan-Yuan; Jin, Yun-Jie; Wang, Wen-Ping; Li, Chao-Lun; Ji, Zheng-Biao; Yang, Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) quantification, a novel ultrasound-based elastography method, has been used to measure liver fibrosis. However, few studies have been performed on the use of ARFI quantification in kidney examinations. We evaluated renal allograft stiffness using ARFI quantification in patients with stable renal function (n = 52) and those with biopsy-proven allograft dysfunction (n = 50). ARFI quantification, given as shear wave velocity (SWV), was performed. The resistance index (RI) was calculated by pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound, and clinical and laboratory data were collected. Morphologic changes in transplanted kidneys were diagnosed by an independent pathologist. Mean SWV was more significantly negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (r = -0.657, p < 0.0001) than was RI (r = -0.429, p = 0.0004) in transplanted kidneys. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative ultrasound in the diagnosis of renal allograft dysfunction were 72.0% and 86.5% (cutoff value = 2.625), respectively. The latter values were better than those of RI, which were 62.0% and 69.2% (cutoff value = 0.625), respectively. The coefficient of variation for repeat SWV measurements of the middle part of transplanted kidney was 8.64%, and inter-observer agreement on SWV was good (Bland-Altman method, ICC = 0.890). In conclusion, tissue elasticity quantification by ARFI is more accurate than the RI in diagnosing renal allograft function.

  19. Measurement and numerical simulation of the changes in the open-loop transfer function in hearing aid as a function telephone handset proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Gilles A.; Stinson, Michael R.

    2002-11-01

    The presence of a nearby object (telephone handset, cupped hand, etc.) can cause acoustical feedback to occur in a hearing aid. The object reflects or scatters additional sound energy to the microphone position causing the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) to increase. Feedback can occur when the OLTF>0 dB. To investigate this problem, measurements of the OLTF were made for three hearing aids (BTE, ITC, ITE) mounted on a KEMAR manikin. A telephone handset, positioned initially in a typical user position, was translated to positions between 0 and 100 mm away from the pinna, repeatibly, using a linear translation system. Changes of up to 15 dB or more were observed as the handset moved, particularly for positions within 20 mm of the pinna. In parallel, numerical simulations were made using a boundary element method. Computed changes in OLTF were consistent with the measured changes.

  20. Coherent transfer functions and extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, M.; Pache, C.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Lasser, Theo

    2010-02-01

    To preserve the speed advantage of Fourier Domain detection in Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), extended depth of field (DOF) is needed. To assess and improve the DOF and the lateral resolution, we analyzed the coherent transfer function (CTF) of OCM. In the spectral domain detection, each wavelength has its own specific CTF, sampling a different part of the object's spatial frequency spectrum. For classical optics and increasing numerical apertures these regions start to overlap and bend, which limits the depth of field. Bessel-like beams produced by axicon lenses circumvent these detrimental effects, but introduce side lobes. Decoupling the detection and the illumination apertures gives more flexibility in engineering a CTF and optimizes the lateral resolution and the DOF at the same time all while reducing these side lobes. We evaluated different combinations of Gaussian and Bessel-like illumination and detection optics. Using Bessel-like beams as well in the illumination as in the detection paths, but with different side-lobe radii, we obtained a lateral resolution of 2μm invariant over an extended depth of field of more than 300μm, at a signal penalty of only 12dB compared to classical Gaussian optics.

  1. Abstracting Attribute Space for Transfer Function Exploration and Design.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Ross; Jang, Yun; Woo, Insoo; Jänicke, Heike; Gaither, Kelly P; Ebert, David S

    2013-01-01

    Currently, user centered transfer function design begins with the user interacting with a one or two-dimensional histogram of the volumetric attribute space. The attribute space is visualized as a function of the number of voxels, allowing the user to explore the data in terms of the attribute size/magnitude. However, such visualizations provide the user with no information on the relationship between various attribute spaces (e.g., density, temperature, pressure, x, y, z) within the multivariate data. In this work, we propose a modification to the attribute space visualization in which the user is no longer presented with the magnitude of the attribute; instead, the user is presented with an information metric detailing the relationship between attributes of the multivariate volumetric data. In this way, the user can guide their exploration based on the relationship between the attribute magnitude and user selected attribute information as opposed to being constrained by only visualizing the magnitude of the attribute. We refer to this modification to the traditional histogram widget as an abstract attribute space representation. Our system utilizes common one and two-dimensional histogram widgets where the bins of the abstract attribute space now correspond to an attribute relationship in terms of the mean, standard deviation, entropy, or skewness. In this manner, we exploit the relationships and correlations present in the underlying data with respect to the dimension(s) under examination. These relationships are often times key to insight and allow us to guide attribute discovery as opposed to automatic extraction schemes which try to calculate and extract distinct attributes a priori. In this way, our system aids in the knowledge discovery of the interaction of properties within volumetric data.

  2. Ultrasonic backscatter from cancellous bone: the apparent backscatter transfer function.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Mcpherson, Joseph A; Smathers, Morgan R; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to detect changes in cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis. Many techniques are based on measurements of the apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF), which represents the backscattered power from bone corrected for the frequency response of the measurement system. The ABTF is determined from a portion of the backscatter signal selected by an analysis gate of width τw delayed by an amount τd from the start of the signal. The goal of this study was to characterize the ABTF for a wide range of gate delays (1 μs ≤ τd ≤ 6 μs) and gate widths (1 μs ≤ τw ≤ 6 μs). Measurements were performed on 29 specimens of human cancellous bone in the frequency range 1.5 to 6.0 MHz using a broadband 5-MHz transducer. The ABTF was found to be an approximately linear function of frequency for most choices of τd and τw. Changes in τd and τw caused the frequency-averaged ABTF [quantified by apparent integrated backscatter (AIB)] and the frequency dependence of the ABTF [quantified by frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB)] to change by as much as 24.6 dB and 6.7 dB/MHz, respectively. τd strongly influenced the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of AIB with bone density (-0.95 ≤ R ≤ +0.68). The correlation of FSAB with bone density was influenced less strongly by τd (-0.97 ≤ R ≤ -0.87). τw had a weaker influence than τd on the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of these parameters with bone density.

  3. Acoustic radiation from weakly wrinkled premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lieuwen, Tim; Mohan, Sripathi; Rajaram, Rajesh; Preetham,

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of acoustic radiation from weakly wrinkled (i.e., u'/S{sub L}<1) premixed flames. Specifically, it determines the transfer function relating the spectrum of the acoustic pressure oscillations, P'({omega}), to that of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the approach flow, U'({omega}). In the weakly wrinkled limit, this transfer function is local in frequency space; i.e., velocity fluctuations at a frequency {omega} distort the flame and generate sound at the same frequency. This transfer function primarily depends upon the flame Strouhal number St (based on mean flow velocity and flame length) and the correlation length, {lambda}, of the flow fluctuations. For cases where the ratio of the correlation length and duct radius {lambda}/a>>1, the acoustic pressure and turbulent velocity power spectra are related by P'({omega})-{omega}{sup 2}U'({omega}) and P'({omega})-U'({omega}) for St<<1 and St>>1, respectively. For cases where {lambda}/a<<1, the transfer functions take the form P'({omega})-{omega}{sup 2}({lambda}/a){sup 2}U'({omega}) and P'({omega})-{omega}{sup 2}({lambda}/a){sup 2}({psi}-{delta}ln({lambda}/a))U'({omega}) for St<<1 and St>>1, respectively, where (PS) and {delta} are constants. The latter result demonstrates that this transfer function does not exhibit a simple power law relationship in the high frequency region of the spectra. The simultaneous dependence of this pressure-velocity transfer function upon the Strouhal number and correlation length suggests a mechanism for the experimentally observed maximum in acoustic spectra and provides some insight into the controversy in the literature over how this peak should scale with the flame Strouhal number.

  4. Detection of the baryon acoustic peak in the large-scale correlation function of SDSS luminous red galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Zehavi, Idit; Hogg, David W.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Blanton, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Scranton, Ryan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tegmark, Max; Zheng, Zheng; Anderson, Scott F.; Annis, Jim; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, Jon; Burles, Scott; Castander, Francisco J.; Connolly, Andrew; Csabai, Istvan; Doi, Mamoru; Fukugita, Masataka; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /CCPP, New York /Portsmouth U., ICG /Pittsburgh U. /Pennsylvania U. /MIT /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Fermilab /Princeton U. Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Barcelona, IEEC /Eotvos U. /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Johns Hopkins U. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Colorado U., CASA /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Michigan U.

    2005-01-01

    We present the large-scale correlation function measured from a spectroscopic sample of 46,748 luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The survey region covers 0.72h{sup -3} Gpc{sup 3} over 3816 square degrees and 0.16 < z < 0.47, making it the best sample yet for the study of large-scale structure. We find a well-detected peak in the correlation function at 100h{sup -1} Mpc separation that is an excellent match to the predicted shape and location of the imprint of the recombination-epoch acoustic oscillations on the low-redshift clustering of matter. This detection demonstrates the linear growth of structure by gravitational instability between z {approx} 1000 and the present and confirms a firm prediction of the standard cosmological theory. The acoustic peak provides a standard ruler by which we can measure the ratio of the distances to z = 0.35 and z = 1089 to 4% fractional accuracy and the absolute distance to z = 0.35 to 5% accuracy. From the overall shape of the correlation function, we measure the matter density {Omega}{sub m}h{sup 2} to 8% and find agreement with the value from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Independent of the constraints provided by the CMB acoustic scale, we find {Omega}{sub m} = 0.273 {+-} 0.025 + 0.123(1 + w{sub 0}) + 0.137{Omega}{sub K}. Including the CMB acoustic scale, we find that the spatial curvature is {Omega}{sub K} = -0.010 {+-} 0.009 if the dark energy is a cosmological constant. More generally, our results provide a measurement of cosmological distance, and hence an argument for dark energy, based on a geometric method with the same simple physics as the microwave background anisotropies. The standard cosmological model convincingly passes these new and robust tests of its fundamental properties.

  5. A Simple Approach of Presampled Modulation Transfer Function Measurement Tested on the Phoenix Nanotom Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkov, D.; Batranin, A.; Mamyrbayev, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper presampled modulation transfer function of the 2D images obtained on the Phoenix Nanotom scanner was investigated with different measurement set-ups. Three parameters were chosen to investigate their influence on modulation transfer function: source- detector distance, tube current and binning mode. A simple method for modulation transfer function determination of digital imaging detectors from edge images was applied. The following results were achieved and briefly discussed: modulation transfer function improves with increase of the source-detector distance, slightly improves with increase of the current and remains constant for different binning modes. All measurements were carried out in University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria at Wels campus.

  6. Identification of boiler inlet transfer functions and estimation of system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    An iterative computer method is described for identifying boiler transfer functions using frequency response data. An objective penalized performance measure and a nonlinear minimization technique are used to cause the locus of points generated by a transfer function to resemble the locus of points obtained from frequency response measurements. Different transfer functions can be tried until a satisfactory empirical transfer function of the system is found. To illustrate the method, some examples and some results from a study of a set of data consisting of measurements of the inlet impedance of a single tube forced flow boiler with inserts are given.

  7. Quantifying swallowing function for healthy adults in different age groups using acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Man-Yin

    Dysphagia is a medical condition that can lead to devastating complications including weight loss, aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; hence, timely identification is essential. Current dysphagia evaluation tools are either invasive, time consuming, or highly dependent on the experience of an individual clinician. The present study aims to develop a non-invasive, quantitative screening tool for dysphagia identification by capturing acoustic data from swallowing and mastication. The first part of this study explores the feasibility of using acoustic data to quantify swallowing and mastication. This study then further identifies mastication and swallowing trends in a neurotypical adult population. An acoustic capture protocol for dysphagia screening is proposed. Finally, the relationship among speaking, lingual and mastication rates are explored. Results and future directions are discussed.

  8. ERS-1 modulation transfer function impact on shoreline change model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marghany, Maged

    2003-11-01

    The impact of wave spectra modulation transfer function (MTF) in shoreline change model accuracy has been presented. The MTF consisted of real aperture radar (RAR) and velocity-bunching which is utilized to map the wave spectra observed from ERS-1 into the observed real ocean wave spectra. Based on this information, the shoreline change model have developed. Two hypotheses were concerned with the shoreline change model based on ERS-1 wave spectra. First, there is a significant difference between RAR and velocity-bunching modulations for ERS-1 wave spectra modeling. Second, this significant difference is induced a different spatial variation for shoreline change pattern. This study shows that there was the significant difference between velocity-bunching and quasi-linear models. The study shows that velocity-bunching model produces wave spectra pattern approximately close to the real ocean wave compared to the quasi-linear model. The error percentage occurred with velocity-bunching and quasi-linear models were 33.5 and 46.7%, respectively. The highest rate of erosion occurred to the shore south of Chendering with -5 m per year and the highest rate of sedimentation occurred to north of Chendering headland with 3 m per year. It can be concluded that ERS-1 data could be used to model shoreline change and identify the locations of erosion and sedimentation. The sedimentation was occurred due to the effect of lowest wave spectra energy captured along the range direction while the erosion was occurred due to highest spectra energy captured near azimuth direction.

  9. Is There a Linear Building Transfer Function for Small Excitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Heaton, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    application of linear transfer functions timely.

  10. The Transfer Function Model (TFM) as a Tool for Simulating Gravity Wave Phenomena in the Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, H.; Mayr, H.; Moore, J.; Wilson, S.; Armaly, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Transfer Function Model (TFM) is semi-analytical and linear, and it is designed to describe the acoustic gravity waves (GW) propagating over the globe and from the ground to 600 km under the influence of vertical temperature variations. Wave interactions with the flow are not accounted for. With an expansion in terms of frequency-dependent spherical harmonics, the time consuming vertical integration of the conservation equations is reduced to computing the transfer function (TF). (The applied lower and upper boundary conditions assure that spurious wave reflections will not occur.) The TF describes the dynamical properties of the medium divorced from the complexities of the temporal and horizontal variations of the excitation source. Given the TF, the atmospheric response to a chosen source is then obtained in short order to simulate the GW propagating through the atmosphere over the globe. In the past, this model has been applied to study auroral processes, which produce distinct wave phenomena such as: (1) standing lamb modes that propagate horizontally in the viscous medium of the thermosphere, (2) waves generated in the auroral oval that experience geometric amplification propagating to the pole where constructive interference generates secondary waves that propagate equatorward, (3) ducted modes propagating through the middle atmosphere that leak back into the thermosphere, and (4) GWs reflected from the Earth's surface that reach the thermosphere in a narrow propagation cone. Well-defined spectral features characterize these wave modes in the TF to provide analytical understanding. We propose the TFM as a tool for simulating GW in the mesosphere and in particular the features observed in Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). With present-day computers, it takes less than one hour to compute the TF, so that there is virtually no practical limitation on the source configurations that can be applied and tested in the lower atmosphere. And there is no limitation on

  11. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  12. Characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-03-13

    A system for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate and animate sound sources. Electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as animate sound sources such as the human voice, or from machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The systems disclosed enable accurate calculation of transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  13. Assessing the transferability of ecosystem service production estimates and functions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of ecosystem service (ES) production, and their responses to stressors or policy actions, may be obtained by direct measurement, other empirical studies, or modeling. Direct measurement is costly and often impractical, and thus many studies transfer ES production estim...

  14. Transfer Function Calibration Using AN a2 Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupie, Olivia

    1996-07-01

    This proposal acquires FGS TRANS mode scans on asingle star (HD89309) for use in the reference star transfer scanlibrary. These reference scans are crucial calibrations used in theanalysis of the transfer scans of multiple systems.The binary has been studied by Otto Franz and is a puresingle star. This star has been selected to replace areference star which has subsequently shown indications ofduplicity.

  15. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  16. The bat head-related transfer function reveals binaural cues for sound localization in azimuth and elevation.

    PubMed

    Aytekin, Murat; Grassi, Elena; Sahota, Manjit; Moss, Cynthia F

    2004-12-01

    Directional properties of the sound transformation at the ear of four intact echolocating bats, Eptesicus fuscus, were investigated via measurements of the head-related transfer function (HRTF). Contributions of external ear structures to directional features of the transfer functions were examined by remeasuring the HRTF in the absence of the pinna and tragus. The investigation mainly focused on the interactions between the spatial and the spectral features in the bat HRTF. The pinna provides gain and shapes these features over a large frequency band (20-90 kHz), and the tragus contributes gain and directionality at the high frequencies (60 to 90 kHz). Analysis of the spatial and spectral characteristics of the bat HRTF reveals that both interaural level differences (ILD) and monaural spectral features are subject to changes in sound source azimuth and elevation. Consequently, localization cues for horizontal and vertical components of the sound source location interact. Availability of multiple cues about sound source azimuth and elevation should enhance information to support reliable sound localization. These findings stress the importance of the acoustic information received at the two ears for sound localization of sonar target position in both azimuth and elevation.

  17. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  18. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  19. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  20. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  1. Back-end algorithms that enhance the functionality of a biomimetic acoustic gunfire direction finding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yirong; Kelsall, Sarah; Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Increasing battlefield awareness can improve both the effectiveness and timeliness of response in hostile military situations. A system that processes acoustic data is proposed to handle a variety of possible applications. The front-end of the existing biomimetic acoustic direction finding system, a mammalian peripheral auditory system model, provides the back-end system with what amounts to spike trains. The back-end system consists of individual algorithms tailored to extract specific information. The back-end algorithms are transportable to FPGA platforms and other general-purpose computers. The algorithms can be modified for use with both fixed and mobile, existing sensor platforms. Currently, gunfire classification and localization algorithms based on both neural networks and pitch are being developed and tested. The neural network model is trained under supervised learning to differentiate and trace various gunfire acoustic signatures and reduce the effect of different frequency responses of microphones on different hardware platforms. The model is being tested against impact and launch acoustic signals of various mortars, supersonic and muzzle-blast of rifle shots, and other weapons. It outperforms the cross-correlation algorithm with regard to computational efficiency, memory requirements, and noise robustness. The spike-based pitch model uses the times between successive spike events to calculate the periodicity of the signal. Differences in the periodicity signatures and comparisons of the overall spike activity are used to classify mortar size and event type. The localization of the gunfire acoustic signals is further computed based on the classification result and the location of microphones and other parameters of the existing hardware platform implementation.

  2. Origin and function of short-latency inputs to the neural substrates underlying the acoustic startle reflex

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Nieto, Ricardo; Horta-Júnior, José de Anchieta C.; Castellano, Orlando; Millian-Morell, Lymarie; Rubio, Maria E.; López, Dolores E.

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is a survival mechanism of alarm, which rapidly alerts the organism to a sudden loud auditory stimulus. In rats, the primary ASR circuit encompasses three serially connected structures: cochlear root neurons (CRNs), neurons in the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC), and motoneurons in the medulla and spinal cord. It is well-established that both CRNs and PnC neurons receive short-latency auditory inputs to mediate the ASR. Here, we investigated the anatomical origin and functional role of these inputs using a multidisciplinary approach that combines morphological, electrophysiological and behavioral techniques. Anterograde tracer injections into the cochlea suggest that CRNs somata and dendrites receive inputs depending, respectively, on their basal or apical cochlear origin. Confocal colocalization experiments demonstrated that these cochlear inputs are immunopositive for the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1). Using extracellular recordings in vivo followed by subsequent tracer injections, we investigated the response of PnC neurons after contra-, ipsi-, and bilateral acoustic stimulation and identified the source of their auditory afferents. Our results showed that the binaural firing rate of PnC neurons was higher than the monaural, exhibiting higher spike discharges with contralateral than ipsilateral acoustic stimulations. Our histological analysis confirmed the CRNs as the principal source of short-latency acoustic inputs, and indicated that other areas of the cochlear nucleus complex are not likely to innervate PnC. Behaviorally, we observed a strong reduction of ASR amplitude in monaural earplugged rats that corresponds with the binaural summation process shown in our electrophysiological findings. Our study contributes to understand better the role of neuronal mechanisms in auditory alerting behaviors and provides strong evidence that the CRNs-PnC pathway mediates fast neurotransmission and binaural summation

  3. Technical note: Estimating unbiased transfer-function performances in spatially structured environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachsel, Mathias; Telford, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional cross validation schemes for assessing transfer-function performance assume that observations are independent. In spatially structured environments this assumption is violated, resulting in over-optimistic estimates of transfer-function performance. H-block cross validation, where all samples within h kilometres of the test samples are omitted, is a method for obtaining unbiased transfer-function performance estimates. In this study, we assess three methods for determining the optimal h. Using simulated data, we find that all three methods result in comparable values of h. Applying the three methods to published transfer functions, we find they yield similar values for h. Some transfer functions perform notably worse when h-block cross validation is used.

  4. Technical Note: Estimating unbiased transfer-function performances in spatially structured environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachsel, M.; Telford, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    Conventional cross-validation schemes for assessing transfer-function performance assume that observations are independent. In spatially-structured environments this assumption is violated, resulting in over-optimistic estimates of transfer-function performance. H block cross-validation, where all samples within h km of the test samples are omitted is a method for obtaining unbiased transfer function performance estimates. In this study, we assess three methods for determining the optimal h. Using simulated data, we find that all three methods result in comparable values of h. Applying the three methods to published transfer functions, we find they yield similar values for h. Some transfer functions perform notably worse when h block cross-validation is used.

  5. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  6. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  7. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  8. Assessing groundwater quality trends in pumping wells using spatially varying transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillieux, A.; Moeck, C.; Perrochet, P.; Hunkeler, D.

    2015-11-01

    When implementing remediation programs to mitigate diffuse-source contamination of aquifers, tools are required to anticipate if the measures are sufficient to meet groundwater quality objectives and, if so, in what time frame. Transfer function methods are an attractive approach, as they are easier to implement than numerical groundwater models. However, transfer function approaches as commonly applied in environmental tracer studies are limited to a homogenous input of solute across the catchment area and a unique transfer compartment. The objective of this study was to develop and test an original approach suitable for the transfer of spatially varying inputs across multiple compartments (e.g. unsaturated and saturated zone). The method makes use of a double convolution equation accounting for transfer across two compartments separately. The modified transfer function approach was applied to the Wohlenschwil aquifer (Switzerland), using a formulation of the exponential model of solute transfer for application to subareas of aquifer catchments. A minimum of information was required: (1) delimitation of the capture zone of the outlet of interest; (2) spatial distribution of historical and future pollution input within the capture zone; (3) contribution of each subarea of the recharge zone to the flow at the outlet; (4) transfer functions of the pollutant in the aquifer. A good fit to historical nitrate concentrations at the pumping well was obtained. This suggests that the modified transfer function approach is suitable to explore the effect of environmental projects on groundwater concentration trends, especially at an early screening stage.

  9. The Transfer Velocity Project: A Comprehensive Look at the Transfer Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The 1999-2000 Transfer Velocity Project (TVP) cohort of 147,207 community college students is used to develop both a college-level endogenous model, appropriate for applied research and guidance for campus action, and a student-level model. Survival analysis (Cox regression) is employed to evaluate the relative contribution of 53 student-level…

  10. Critical Race Theory and the Transfer Function: Introducing a Transfer Receptive Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Dimpal; Herrera, Alfred; Bernal, Santiago; Solorzano, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In California, the majority of students of color who enter postsecondary education do so in the community colleges. However large numbers of them leave and do not transfer to four-year institutions; in particular to highly selective pubic four-year colleges and universities. By using the theoretical perspective of critical race theory, transfer…

  11. Modulation transfer function of a digital dental x-ray system.

    PubMed

    Chen, S K; Hollender, L

    1994-03-01

    An impulse train method to control aliasing was used to measure the modulation transfer function of a digital dental x-ray system (RVG 32000 ZHR, Trophy Radiologie, Vincennes, France). The detector of this system is composed of an intensifying screen, a fiber optics taper, and a charged couple device chip. The modulation transfer function could not be measured by impulse method such as the line spread function or edge response function because of aliasing from undersampling of the digital system. The system modulation transfer function was difficult to recover at the spatial frequencies smaller than the Nyquist frequency. The modulation transfer function beyond the Nyquist frequencies was impossible to recover in this study.

  12. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  13. A Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor as a Receiver for Acoustic Communications Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    A Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) acoustic sensor is used as a receiver for acoustic communications signals. Acoustic transmissions were generated in aluminium and Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) panels. The FBG receiver was coupled to the bottom surface opposite a piezoelectric transmitter. For the CFC, a second FBG was embedded within the layup for comparison. We show the transfer function, frequency response, and transient response of the acoustic communications channels. In addition, the FBG receiver was used to detect Phase Shift Keying (PSK) communications signals, which was shown to be the most robust method in a highly resonant communications channel. PMID:22346585

  14. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1987-07-10

    A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

  15. Characterizing short-term stability for Boolean networks over any distribution of transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadhri, C.; Smith, Andrew M.; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R.; Armstrong, Robert C.

    2016-07-01

    We present a characterization of short-term stability of Kauffman's N K (random) Boolean networks under arbitrary distributions of transfer functions. Given such a Boolean network where each transfer function is drawn from the same distribution, we present a formula that determines whether short-term chaos (damage spreading) will happen. Our main technical tool which enables the formal proof of this formula is the Fourier analysis of Boolean functions, which describes such functions as multilinear polynomials over the inputs. Numerical simulations on mixtures of threshold functions and nested canalyzing functions demonstrate the formula's correctness.

  16. Characterizing short-term stability for Boolean networks over any distribution of transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Seshadhri, C; Smith, Andrew M; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R; Armstrong, Robert C

    2016-07-01

    We present a characterization of short-term stability of Kauffman's NK (random) Boolean networks under arbitrary distributions of transfer functions. Given such a Boolean network where each transfer function is drawn from the same distribution, we present a formula that determines whether short-term chaos (damage spreading) will happen. Our main technical tool which enables the formal proof of this formula is the Fourier analysis of Boolean functions, which describes such functions as multilinear polynomials over the inputs. Numerical simulations on mixtures of threshold functions and nested canalyzing functions demonstrate the formula's correctness. PMID:27575142

  17. Characterizing short-term stability for Boolean networks over any distribution of transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Seshadhri, C; Smith, Andrew M; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R; Armstrong, Robert C

    2016-07-01

    We present a characterization of short-term stability of Kauffman's NK (random) Boolean networks under arbitrary distributions of transfer functions. Given such a Boolean network where each transfer function is drawn from the same distribution, we present a formula that determines whether short-term chaos (damage spreading) will happen. Our main technical tool which enables the formal proof of this formula is the Fourier analysis of Boolean functions, which describes such functions as multilinear polynomials over the inputs. Numerical simulations on mixtures of threshold functions and nested canalyzing functions demonstrate the formula's correctness.

  18. Semiautomatic transfer function initialization for abdominal visualization using self-generating hierarchical radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Selver, M Alper; Güzeliş, Cüneyt

    2009-01-01

    As being a tool that assigns optical parameters used in interactive visualization, Transfer Functions (TF) have important effects on the quality of volume rendered medical images. Unfortunately, finding accurate TFs is a tedious and time consuming task because of the trade off between using extensive search spaces and fulfilling the physician's expectations with interactive data exploration tools and interfaces. By addressing this problem, we introduce a semi-automatic method for initial generation of TFs. The proposed method uses a Self Generating Hierarchical Radial Basis Function Network to determine the lobes of a Volume Histogram Stack (VHS) which is introduced as a new domain by aligning the histograms of slices of a image series. The new self generating hierarchical design strategy allows the recognition of suppressed lobes corresponding to suppressed tissues and representation of the overlapping regions which are parts of the lobes but can not be represented by the Gaussian bases in VHS. Moreover, approximation with a minimum set of basis functions provides the possibility of selecting and adjusting suitable units to optimize the TF. Applications on different CT and MR data sets show enhanced rendering quality and reduced optimization time in abdominal studies.

  19. Transfer Function Bounds for Partial-unit-memory Convolutional Codes Based on Reduced State Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of a coding system consisting of a convolutional encoder and a Viterbi decoder is analytically found by the well-known transfer function bounding technique. For the partial-unit-memory byte-oriented convolutional encoder with m sub 0 binary memory cells and (k sub 0 m sub 0) inputs, a state diagram of 2(K) (sub 0) was for the transfer function bound. A reduced state diagram of (2 (m sub 0) +1) is used for easy evaluation of transfer function bounds for partial-unit-memory codes.

  20. Analytical solution to the optical transfer function of a scattering medium with large particles.

    PubMed

    Zege, E P; Kokhanovsky, A A

    1994-09-20

    A new analytical expression for the optical transfer function of multiple-scattering media such as clouds, mists, and dust aerosols is given in terms of their microphysical characteristics. The geometrical optics approximation is used to find local optical parameters of a scattering medium, including the simple approximation of the phase function, which is the key to the solution of the problem considered here. The optical transfer function is taken within a small-angle approximation of the radiative transfer theory. A comparison with Monte Carlo data shows a fairly satisfactory accuracy of our analytic formulas.

  1. Time constants and transfer functions for a homogeneous 900 MWt metallic fueled LMR

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nodal transfer functions are calculated for a 900 MWt U10Zr-fueled sodium cooled reactor. From the transfer functions the time constants, feedback reactivity transfer function coefficients, and power coefficients can be determined. These quantities are calculated for core fuel, upper and lower axial reflector steel, radial blanket fuel, radial reflector steel, and B/sub 4/C rod shaft expansion effect. The quantities are compared to the analogous quantities of a 60 MWt metallic-fueled sodium cooled Experimental Breeder Reactor II configuration. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Pregnancy following nonsurgical donor ovum transfer to a functionally agonadal woman

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, M.V.; Macaso, T.M.; Ishida, E.H.; Giudice, L.; Marshall, J.R.; Buster, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report this country's first nonsurgical donor ovum transfer pregnancy in a functionally agonadal woman who had received chemotherapy and radiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma. For women with ovarian failure, nonsurgical uterine lavage and ovum transfer may provide an opportunity for motherhood that was not possible previously.

  3. Training and Transfer Effects of Executive Functions in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorell, Lisa B.; Lindqvist, Sofia; Nutley, Sissela Bergman; Bohlin, Gunilla; Klingberg, Torkel

    2009-01-01

    Executive functions, including working memory and inhibition, are of central importance to much of human behavior. Interventions intended to improve executive functions might therefore serve an important purpose. Previous studies show that working memory can be improved by training, but it is unknown if this also holds for inhibition, and whether…

  4. Performance of SEM scintillation detector evaluated by modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency function.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the SEM detector is evaluated by the modulation transfer function (MTF) which expresses the detector's influence on the SEM image contrast. This is a novel approach, since the MTF was used previously to describe only the area imaging detectors, or whole imaging systems. The measurement technique and calculation of the MTF for the SEM detector are presented. In addition, the measurement and calculation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of the spatial frequency for the SEM detector are described. In this technique, the time modulated e-beam is used in order to create well-defined input signal for the detector. The MTF and DQE measurements are demonstrated on the Everhart-Thornley scintillation detector. This detector was alternated using the YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, and CRY18 single-crystal scintillators. The presented MTF and DQE characteristics show good imaging properties of the detectors with the YAP:Ce or CRY18 scintillator, especially for a specific type of the e-beam scan. The results demonstrate the great benefit of the description of SEM detectors using the MTF and DQE. In addition, point-by-point and continual-sweep e-beam scans in SEM were discussed and their influence on the image quality was revealed using the MTF. PMID:24323770

  5. Vectorial point spread function and optical transfer function in oblique plane imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongmin; Li, Tongcang; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    Oblique plane imaging, using remote focusing with a tilted mirror, enables direct two-dimensional (2D) imaging of any inclined plane of interest in three-dimensional (3D) specimens. It can image real-time dynamics of a living sample that changes rapidly or evolves its structure along arbitrary orientations. It also allows direct observations of any tilted target plane in an object of which orientational information is inaccessible during sample preparation. In this work, we study the optical resolution of this innovative wide-field imaging method. Using the vectorial diffraction theory, we formulate the vectorial point spread function (PSF) of direct oblique plane imaging. The anisotropic lateral resolving power caused by light clipping from the tilted mirror is theoretically analyzed for all oblique angles. We show that the 2D PSF in oblique plane imaging is conceptually different from the inclined 2D slice of the 3D PSF in conventional lateral imaging. Vectorial optical transfer function (OTF) of oblique plane imaging is also calculated by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method to study effects of oblique angles on frequency responses.

  6. Performance of SEM scintillation detector evaluated by modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency function.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the SEM detector is evaluated by the modulation transfer function (MTF) which expresses the detector's influence on the SEM image contrast. This is a novel approach, since the MTF was used previously to describe only the area imaging detectors, or whole imaging systems. The measurement technique and calculation of the MTF for the SEM detector are presented. In addition, the measurement and calculation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of the spatial frequency for the SEM detector are described. In this technique, the time modulated e-beam is used in order to create well-defined input signal for the detector. The MTF and DQE measurements are demonstrated on the Everhart-Thornley scintillation detector. This detector was alternated using the YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, and CRY18 single-crystal scintillators. The presented MTF and DQE characteristics show good imaging properties of the detectors with the YAP:Ce or CRY18 scintillator, especially for a specific type of the e-beam scan. The results demonstrate the great benefit of the description of SEM detectors using the MTF and DQE. In addition, point-by-point and continual-sweep e-beam scans in SEM were discussed and their influence on the image quality was revealed using the MTF.

  7. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  8. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  9. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  10. Hybrid Surface Acoustic Wave- Electrohydrodynamic Atomization (SAW-EHDA) For the Development of Functional Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Hyun Bum; Ali, Kamran; Sajid, Memoon; Uddin Siddiqui, Ghayas; Chang, Dong Eui; Kim, Hyung Chan; Ko, Jeong Beom; Dang, Hyun Woo; Doh, Yang Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Conventional surface acoustic wave - electrostatic deposition (SAW-ED) technology is struggling to compete with other thin film fabrication technologies because of its limitation in atomizing high density solutions or solutions with strong inter-particle bonding that requires very high frequency (100 MHz) and power. In this study, a hybrid surface acoustic wave - electrohydrodynamic atomization (SAW-EHDA) system has been introduced to overcome this problem by integrating EHDA with SAW to achieve the deposition of different types of conductive inks at lower frequency (19.8 MHZ) and power. Three materials, Poly [2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), and Poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene):Polystyrene Sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) have been successfully deposited as thin films through the hybrid SAW-EHDA. The films showed good morphological, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics. To further evaluate the characteristics of deposited films, a humidity sensor was fabricated with active layer of PEDOT:PSS deposited using the SAW-EHDA system. The response of sensor was outstanding and much better when compared to similar sensors fabricated using other manufacturing techniques. The results of the device and the films’ characteristics suggest that the hybrid SAW-EHDA technology has high potential to efficiently produce wide variety of thin films and thus predict its promising future in certain areas of printed electronics. PMID:26478189

  11. Heart visualization based on hybrid transfer function using size and gradient.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Liu, Yixuan; Wang, Kuanquan

    2014-01-01

    Having the ability to visualize the heart clearly and precisely would be beneficial for pathology research, presurgical planning, and clinical approaches. Multi-dimensional transfer functions were employed to improve the overall performance of images. To provide a satisfactory visualization quality on the shape and boundaries of the heart, a new hybrid transfer function combining structure size with gradient was designed to highlight the area of the heart. Initially, a histogram of gradient and histogram of size was computed and then classification was performed for providing the spatial information. Finally, several hybrid strategies were presented for the design of the transfer function, including opacity and color. By experimental evaluation, the proposed hybrid transfer function visualized the cardiac outline and internal structure more clearly and easily.

  12. Semi-automatic time-series transfer functions via temporal clustering and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, Jonathan L; Shen, H W

    2009-01-01

    When creating transfer functions for time-varying data, it is not clear what range of values to use for classification, as data value ranges and distributions change over time. In order to generate time-varying transfer functions, they search the data for classes that have similar behavior over time, assuming that data points that behave similarly belong to the same feature. They utilize a method they call temporal clustering and sequencing to find dynamic features in value space and create a corresponding transfer function. First, clustering finds groups of data points that have the same value space activity over time. Then, sequencing derives a progression of clusters over time, creating chains that follow value distribution changes. Finally, the cluster sequences are used to create transfer functions, as sequences describe the value range distributions over time in a data set.

  13. Time variation of the electromagnetic transfer function of the earth estimated by using wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Suto, Noriko; Harada, Makoto; Izutsu, Jun; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2006-07-01

    In order to accurately estimate the geomagnetic transfer functions in the area of the volcano Mt. Iwate (IWT), we applied the interstation transfer function (ISTF) method to the three-component geomagnetic field data observed at Mt. Iwate station (IWT), using the Kakioka Magnetic Observatory, JMA (KAK) as remote reference station. Instead of the conventional Fourier transform, in which temporary transient noises badly degrade the accuracy of long term properties, continuous wavelet transform has been used. The accuracy of the results was as high as that of robust estimations of transfer functions obtained by the Fourier transform method. This would provide us with possibilities for routinely monitoring the transfer functions, without sophisticated statistical procedures, to detect changes in the underground electrical conductivity structure. PMID:25792780

  14. An improved FORTRAN program for calculating modulation transfer functions: concise communication.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, A R; Nusynowitz, M L

    1977-01-01

    An improved FORTRAN II program for calculating modulation transfer functions (MTFs) is presented. The program features (A) simplified input-data specifications; (B) a conversational mode of use; and (C) graphic printout of the MTF curve.

  15. Structure/function studies of phosphoryl transfer by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Delbaere, Louis T J; Sudom, Athena M; Prasad, Lata; Leduc, Yvonne; Goldie, Hughes

    2004-03-11

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) catalyzes the conversion of oxaloacetate (OAA) to PEP and carbon dioxide with the subsequent conversion of nucleoside triphosphate to nucleoside diphosphate (NDP). The 1.9 A resolution structure of Escherichia coli PCK consisted of a 275-residue N-terminal domain and a 265-residue C-terminal domain with the active site located in a cleft between these domains. Each domain has an alpha/beta topology and the overall structure represents a new protein fold. Furthermore, PCK has a unique mononucleotide-binding fold. The 1.8 A resolution structure of the complex of ATP/Mg(2+)/oxalate with PCK revealed a 20 degrees hinge-like rotation of the N- and C-terminal domains, which closed the active site cleft. The ATP was found in the unusual syn conformation as a result of binding to the enzyme. Along with the side chain of Lys254, Mg(2+) neutralizes charges on the P beta and P gamma oxygen atoms of ATP and stabilizes an extended, eclipsed conformation of the P beta and P gamma phosphoryl groups. The sterically strained high-energy conformation likely lowers the free energy of activation for phosphoryl transfer. Additionally, the gamma-phosphoryl group becomes oriented in-line with the appropriate enolate oxygen atom, which strongly supports a direct S(N)2-type displacement of this gamma-phosphoryl group by the enolate anion. In the 2.0 A resolution structure of the complex of PCK/ADP/Mg(2+)/AlF(3), the AlF(3) moiety represents the phosphoryl group being transferred during catalysis. There are three positively charged groups that interact with the fluorine atoms, which are complementary to the three negative charges that would occur for an associative transition state. PMID:15023367

  16. Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Marvin E.; Higgins, Matthew B.

    2007-04-01

    This report documents measurements and analytical modeling of electromagnetic transfer functions to quantify the ability of cloud-to-ground lightning strokes (including horizontal arc-channel components) to couple electromagnetic energy into the Sago mine located near Buckhannon, WV. Two coupling mechanisms were measured: direct and indirect drive. These transfer functions are then used to predict electric fields within the mine and induced voltages on conductors that were left abandoned in the sealed area of the Sago mine.

  17. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Ng, L.C.

    1998-03-17

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching. 35 figs.

  18. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    1998-01-01

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching.

  19. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  20. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  1. Global Propagation of Gravity Waves Generated with the Whole Atmosphere Transfer Function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Wolven, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity waves are ubiquitous phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere, accounting for a significant fraction of its observed variability. These waves, with periods ranging from minutes to hours, are thought to be a major means for exchange of momentum and energy between atmospheric regions. The Transfer Function Model (TFM) describes acoustic gravity waves (AGW) that propagate across the globe in a dissipative static background atmosphere extending from the ground to 700 km. The model is limited to waves with periods << 12 hr where the Coriolis force is not important. Formulated in terms of zonal vector spherical harmonics and oscillation frequencies, the linearized equations of energy, mass, and momentum conservation are solved to generate the transfer function (TF) for a chosen height distribution of the excitation source. The model accounts for momentum exchange between atmospheric species (He, O, N2, O2, Ar), which affects significantly the wave amplitudes and phases of thermospheric temperature, densities, and wind fields. Covering a broad range of frequencies and spherical harmonic wave numbers (wavelengths), without limitations, the assembled TF captures the physics that controls the propagation of AGW, and the computational effort is considerable. For a chosen horizontal geometry and impulsive time dependence of the source, however, the global wave response is then obtained in short order. The model is computationally efficient and well suited to serve as an experimental and educational tool for simulating propagating wave patterns on the globe. The model is also semi-analytical and therefore well suited to explore the different wave modes that can be generated under varying dynamical conditions. The TFM has been applied to simulate the AGW, which are generated in the auroral region of the thermosphere by joule heating and momentum coupling due to solar wind induced electric fields [e.g., Mayr et al., Space Science Reviews, 1990]. The auroral source generates

  2. A method of synthesis magnetotelluric time-series combining interstation transfer functions and a reference site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Campanyà, Joan

    2016-04-01

    A new method to Synthesis magnetotelluric (MT) data is proposed whereby the MT Time-series of local site are derived using an Inverse Fourier transform of electric and magnetic fields spectrum of local site, which are computed by Combining Interstation transfer functions and a Reference horizontal magnetic time series (STICIR). The method is based on the stability of interstation transfer function, assuming that the geoelectrical structures of the subsurface independent of time. Applying the suggested method, two interstation transfer functions need to be estimated: the quasi-MT impedance tensor and the interstation geomagnetic transfer functions, which are used to compute the horizontal electric fields and the vertical magnetic field at the local site, respectively. The interstation transfer functions can be estimated by single site robust or remote reference (RR) method if another reference site existed. STICIR provides a new way to synthesis MT time-series at the local site combining interstation transfer functions and the magnetic fields at a reference site. Due to this property, STICIR provides significant improvements processing MT data when time-series at the local site are affected by local noise or are truncated. A test with good quality of MT data shows that synthetic time-series are similar to natural electric and magnetic time series. For contaminated data example, when this method is used to remove noise present at the local site, the scatter of MT sounding curves are clear reduced, and the low frequency data quality are improved.

  3. Determining A Purely Symbolic Transfer Function from Symbol Streams: Theory and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    Transfer function modeling is a \\emph{standard technique} in classical Linear Time Invariant and Statistical Process Control. The work of Box and Jenkins was seminal in developing methods for identifying parameters associated with classical $(r,s,k)$ transfer functions. Discrete event systems are often \\emph{used} for modeling hybrid control structures and high-level decision problems. \\emph{Examples include} discrete time, discrete strategy repeated games. For these games, a \\emph{discrete transfer function in the form of} an accurate hidden Markov model of input-output relations \\emph{could be used to derive optimal response strategies.} In this paper, we develop an algorithm \\emph{for} creating probabilistic \\textit{Mealy machines} that act as transfer function models for discrete event dynamic systems (DEDS). Our models are defined by three parameters, $(l_1, l_2, k)$ just as the Box-Jenkins transfer function models. Here $l_1$ is the maximal input history lengths to consider, $l_2$ is the maximal output history lengths to consider and $k$ is the response lag. Using related results, We show that our Mealy machine transfer functions are optimal in the sense that they maximize the mutual information between the current known state of the DEDS and the next observed input/output pair.

  4. Transfer Relations Between Landscape Functions - The Hydrological Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohrer, N.; Lenhart, T.; Eckhardt, K.; Frede, H.-G.

    EC market policies and regional subsidy programs have an enormous impact on local land use. This has far reaching consequences on various landscape functions. In the joint research project SFB299 at the Giessen University the effect of land use options on economic, ecological and hydrological landscape functions are under investigation. The continuous time step model SWAT-G (Eckhardt et al., 2000; Arnold et al., 1998) is employed to characterize the influence of land use patterns on hydrological processes. The model was calibrated and validated employing a split sample approach. For two mesoscale watersheds (Aar, 60 km2; Dietzhölze, 81 km2) located in the Lahn-Dill- Bergland, Germany, different land use scenarios were analyzed with regard to their hydrological impact. Additionally the effect of land use change was analyzed with an ecological and an agro-economic model. The impact of the stepwise changing land use was expressed as trade off relations between different landscape functions.

  5. Functionalization of Rhenium Aryl Bonds by O-Atom Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, Steven M.; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Nielsen, Robert J.; Gunnoe, T. Brent; Goddard, William A.; Periana, Roy A.

    2011-03-29

    Aryltrioxorhenium (ArReO3) has been demonstrated to show rapid oxy-functionalization upon reaction with O-atom donors, YO, to selectively generate the corresponding phenols in near quantitative yields. 18O-Labeling experiments show that the oxygen in the products is exclusively from YO. DFT studies reveal a 10.7 kcal/mol barrier (Ar = Ph) for oxy-functionalization with H2O2 via a Baeyer-Villiger type mechanism involving nucleophilic attack of the aryl group on an electrophilic oxygen of YO coordinated to rhenium.

  6. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with themore » corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.« less

  7. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with the corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.

  8. Acoustic underwater signals with a probable function during competitive feeding in a tadpole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Erik; Ndriantsoa, Serge Herilala; Strauß, Axel; Randrianiaina, Roger-Daniel; Rasolonjatovo Hiobiarilanto, Tahiry; Glaw, Frank; Glos, Julian; Vences, Miguel

    2011-02-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread among adult stages of terrestrial animals and fish and has also been observed in insect larvae. We report underwater acoustic communication in the larvae of a frog, Gephyromantis azzurrae, from Isalo, a sandstone massif in western Madagascar. According to our field data, these tadpoles live in streams and prefer habitats characterized by comparatively low temperatures, shallow water depth, and a relatively fast current. Feeding experiments indicated that the tadpoles are carnivorous and macrophagous. They consumed insect larvae and, to a lesser extent, small shrimps, and conspecific as well as heterospecific tadpoles. Calls of these tadpoles consisted either of single click notes or of irregular series of various clicks. Some complex calls have a pulsed structure with three to nine indistinct energy pulses. Production of the pulses coincided with rapid closure of the jaw sheaths and often with an upward movement of the body. Calls were emitted while attacking prey and occurred significantly more often when attacking conspecifics. Tadpoles that had not been fed for some time emitted sounds more frequently than those that had been regularly fed. The spectral frequency of the calls differed in tadpole groups of different size and was higher in groups of smaller tadpoles, suggesting that spectral frequency carries some information about tadpole size which might be important during competitive feeding to assess size and strength of competitors. This report differs from those for the larvae of South American horned frogs, Ceratophrys ornata. These are the only other tadpoles for which sound production has reliably been reported but the calls of Ceratophrys tadpoles occur mainly in a defensive context.

  9. Improved Displacement Transfer Functions for Structure Deformed Shape Predictions Using Discretely Distributed Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    In the formulations of earlier Displacement Transfer Functions for structure shape predictions, the surface strain distributions, along a strain-sensing line, were represented with piecewise linear functions. To improve the shape-prediction accuracies, Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated using piecewise nonlinear strain representations. Through discretization of an embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a strain-sensing line) into multiple small domains, piecewise nonlinear functions were used to describe the surface strain distributions along the discretized embedded beam. Such piecewise approach enabled the piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations to yield slope and deflection equations in recursive forms. The resulting Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, written in summation forms, were expressed in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By feeding the surface strains into the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, structural deflections could be calculated at multiple points for mapping out the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The shape-prediction accuracies of the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were then examined in view of finite-element-calculated deflections using different tapered cantilever tubular beams. It was found that by using the piecewise nonlinear strain representations, the shape-prediction accuracies could be greatly improved, especially for highly-tapered cantilever tubular beams.

  10. Functional Knowledge Transfer for High-accuracy Prediction of Under-studied Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Jessica; Guan, Yuanfang; Bongo, Lars A.; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2013-01-01

    A key challenge in genetics is identifying the functional roles of genes in pathways. Numerous functional genomics techniques (e.g. machine learning) that predict protein function have been developed to address this question. These methods generally build from existing annotations of genes to pathways and thus are often unable to identify additional genes participating in processes that are not already well studied. Many of these processes are well studied in some organism, but not necessarily in an investigator's organism of interest. Sequence-based search methods (e.g. BLAST) have been used to transfer such annotation information between organisms. We demonstrate that functional genomics can complement traditional sequence similarity to improve the transfer of gene annotations between organisms. Our method transfers annotations only when functionally appropriate as determined by genomic data and can be used with any prediction algorithm to combine transferred gene function knowledge with organism-specific high-throughput data to enable accurate function prediction. We show that diverse state-of-art machine learning algorithms leveraging functional knowledge transfer (FKT) dramatically improve their accuracy in predicting gene-pathway membership, particularly for processes with little experimental knowledge in an organism. We also show that our method compares favorably to annotation transfer by sequence similarity. Next, we deploy FKT with state-of-the-art SVM classifier to predict novel genes to 11,000 biological processes across six diverse organisms and expand the coverage of accurate function predictions to processes that are often ignored because of a dearth of annotated genes in an organism. Finally, we perform in vivo experimental investigation in Danio rerio and confirm the regulatory role of our top predicted novel gene, wnt5b, in leftward cell migration during heart development. FKT is immediately applicable to many bioinformatics techniques and will

  11. a Radiative Transfer Equation/phase Function Approach to Vegetation Canopy Reflectance Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randolph, Marion Herbert

    Vegetation canopy reflectance models currently in use differ considerably in their treatment of the radiation scattering problem, and it is this fundamental difference which stimulated this investigation of the radiative transfer equation/phase function approach. The primary objective of this thesis is the development of vegetation canopy phase functions which describe the probability of radiation scattering within a canopy in terms of its biological and physical characteristics. In this thesis a technique based upon quadrature formulae is used to numerically generate a variety of vegetation canopy phase functions. Based upon leaf inclination distribution functions, phase functions are generated for plagiophile, extremophile, erectophile, spherical, planophile, blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and soybean canopies. The vegetation canopy phase functions generated are symmetric with respect to the incident and exitant angles, and hence satisfy the principle of reciprocity. The remaining terms in the radiative transfer equation are also derived in terms of canopy geometry and optical properties to complete the development of the radiative transfer equation/phase function description for vegetation canopy reflectance modeling. In order to test the radiative transfer equation/phase function approach the iterative discrete ordinates method for solving the radiative transfer equation is implemented. In comparison with field data, the approach tends to underestimate the visible reflectance and overestimate infrared reflectance. The approach does compare well, however, with other extant canopy reflectance models; for example, it agrees to within ten to fifteen percent of the Suits model (Suits, 1972). Sensitivity analysis indicates that canopy geometry may influence reflectance as much as 100 percent for a given wavelength. Optical thickness produces little change in reflectance after a depth of 2.5 (Leaf area index of 4.0) is reached, and reflectance generally increases

  12. Targeted energy transfers and passive acoustic wave redirection in a two-dimensional granular network under periodic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yijing Moore, Keegan J.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; McFarland, D. Michael

    2015-12-21

    We study passive pulse redirection and nonlinear targeted energy transfer in a granular network composed of two semi-infinite, ordered homogeneous granular chains mounted on linear elastic foundations and coupled by weak linear stiffnesses. Periodic excitation in the form of repetitive half-sine pulses is applied to one of the chains, designated as the “excited chain,” whereas the other chain is initially at rest and is regarded as the “absorbing chain.” We show that passive pulse redirection and targeted energy transfer from the excited to the absorbing chain can be achieved by macro-scale realization of the spatial analog of the Landau-Zener quantum tunneling effect. This is realized by finite stratification of the elastic foundation of the excited chain and depends on the system parameters (e.g., the percentage of stratification) and on the parameters of the periodic excitation. Utilizing empirical mode decomposition and numerical Hilbert transforms, we detect the existence of two distinct nonlinear phenomena in the periodically forced network; namely, (i) energy localization in the absorbing chain due to sustained 1:1 resonance capture leading to irreversible pulse redirection from the excited chain, and (ii) continuous energy exchanges in the form of nonlinear beats between the two chains in the absence of resonance capture. Our results extend previous findings of transient passive energy redirection in impulsively excited granular networks and demonstrate that steady state passive pulse redirection in these networks can be robustly achieved under periodic excitation.

  13. Application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to line-by-line radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, B. M.; Abrarov, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    We show that a new approach based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) enables the computation of line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution without loss of accuracy. The algorithm provides rapid and accurate computation of area under the Voigt function in a way that preserves spectral radiance and, consequently, radiant intensity. The error analysis we provide shows the high-accuracy of the proposed SIVF approximations. A comparison of the performance of the method with that of the traditional LBL approach is presented. Motivations for the use and advantage of the SIVF as a replacement for conventional line function computations in radiative transfer are discussed.

  14. Effect of fuel mixture fraction and velocity perturbations on the flame transfer function of swirl stabilized flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Stefan; Di-Chiaro, Giacomo; Biagioli, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    A novel methodology is developed to decompose the classic Flame Transfer Function (FTF) used in the thermo-acoustic stability analysis of lean premix combustors into contributions of different types. The approach is applied, in the context of Large Eddy Simulation (LES), to partially-premixed and fully-premixed flames, which are stabilized via a central recirculation zone as a result of the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The first type of decomposition is into contributions driven by fuel mixture fraction and dynamic velocity fluctuations. Each of these two contributions is further split into the components of turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The flame surface area component, driven by the pure dynamic velocity fluctuation, which is shown to be a dominant contribution to the overall FTF, is also additionally decomposed over the coherent flow structures using proper orthogonal decomposition. Using a simplified model for the dynamic response of premixed flames, it is shown that the distribution of the FTF, as obtained from LES, is closely related to the characteristics of the velocity field frequency response to the inlet perturbation. Initially, the proposed method is tested and validated with a well characterized laboratory burner geometry. Subsequently, the method is applied to an industrial gas turbine burner.

  15. Effects of eye-glasses, hair, headgear, and clothing on measured head-related transfer functions Part Ib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, Klaus A. J.

    2003-10-01

    Extensive head-related transfer function (HRTF) measurements show high HRTF repeatability, consequences of different measurement methods, and conditions covering the whole three-dimensional space [Riederer, J. Audio Eng. Soc. (Abstracts) 46, 1036 (1998), preprint 4846]. This study concentrates on specific effects on HRTFs carefully re-measured on the same Cortex dummy head applying Sennheiser KE4-211-2 microphones at its silicone putty blocked ear-canal entrances, employing 252 sound incidents including seven elevations. The effects of five different wigs (synthetic, natural, thick, thin, long and short hair) with varied hairstyles, four hats (cap, bicycle helmet, mens and womens trilby), clothes (alpaca pullover, bicycling drymax-jacket) and spectacles were investigated under 28 combinations. The influences are highly dependent on direction, frequency, and case. Clothes and eye-glasses affect minimally HRTF; hair has a stronger effect, depending on the actual hairdo (typically above 7 kHz). Hats alter intensively HRTFs (typically above 5 kHz), depending on the model. The measurements give deeper insight to the development of idiosyncratic features in binaural localization cues. The second part of the study addresses their perceptual effects [Riederer, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., this issue]. [Work supported by Graduate School of Electronics, Telecommunication and Automation; thanks to Finnish Broadcasting Company, Mr. Hellstrom; Mrs. Chen.

  16. Range dependent characteristics in the head-related transfer functions of a bat-head cast: part 2. Binaural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Allen, R; Rowan, D

    2012-12-01

    Further innovations in bio-inspired engineering based on biosonar systems, such as bats, may arise from more detailed understanding of the underlying acoustic processes. This includes the range-dependent properties of bat heads and ears, particularly at the higher frequencies of bat vocalizations. In a companion paper Kim et al (2012 Bioinspir. Biomim.), range-dependent head-related transfer functions of a bat head cast were investigated up to 100 kHz at either ear (i.e. monaural features). The current paper extends this to consider range-dependent spectral and temporal disparities between the two ears (i.e. binaural features), using experimental data and a spherical model of a bat head to provide insights into the physical basis for these features. It was found that binaural temporal and high-frequency binaural spectral features are approximately independent of distance, having the effect of decreasing their angular resolution at close range. In contrast, low-frequency binaural spectral features are strongly distance-dependent, such that angular sensitivity can be maintained by lowering the frequency of the echolocation emission at close range. Together with the companion paper Kim et al, we speculate that distance-dependent low-frequency monaural and binaural features at short range might help explain why some species of bats that drop the frequency of their calls on target approach while approaching a target. This also provides an impetus for the design of effective emissions in sonar engineering applied to similar tasks.

  17. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  18. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  19. Large oncosomes mediate intercellular transfer of functional microRNA.

    PubMed

    Morello, Matteo; Minciacchi, Valentina R; de Candia, Paola; Yang, Julie; Posadas, Edwin; Kim, Hyung; Griffiths, Duncan; Bhowmick, Neil; Chung, Leland W K; Gandellini, Paolo; Freeman, Michael R; Demichelis, Francesca; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2013-11-15

    Prostate cancer cells release atypically large extracellular vesicles (EVs), termed large oncosomes, which may play a role in the tumor microenvironment by transporting bioactive molecules across tissue spaces and through the blood stream. In this study, we applied a novel method for selective isolation of large oncosomes applicable to human platelet-poor plasma, where the presence of caveolin-1-positive large oncosomes identified patients with metastatic disease. This procedure was also used to validate results of a miRNA array performed on heterogeneous populations of EVs isolated from tumorigenic RWPE-2 prostate cells and from isogenic non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 cells. The results showed that distinct classes of miRNAs are expressed at higher levels in EVs derived from the tumorigenic cells in comparison to their non-tumorigenic counterpart. Large oncosomes enhanced migration of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), an effect that was increased by miR-1227, a miRNA abundant in large oncosomes produced by RWPE-2 cells. Our findings suggest that large oncosomes in the circulation report metastatic disease in patients with prostate cancer, and that this class of EV harbors functional molecules that may play a role in conditioning the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Optical transfer function for an f-theta lens based confocal fluorescent microarray analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan; Ni, Xuxiang; Xu, Guoxiong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Xi; Lu, Zukang

    2005-01-01

    Optical transfer function is widely used to evaluate the imaging performance of an optical system. Combined with confocal scanning technology, f-theta lens can increase the reading speed for microarrays greatly in guarantee of sufficient resolution and fluorescence collection efficiency, compared with micro-array analyzers that adopting mechanical scanning. In this paper, the characteristics of a confocal scanning f-theta objective lens, which was used in micro-array analyzing instrument, were analyzed by means of optical transfer function. In the whole system, laser passed through the f-theta lens, and arrived at the microarray slide where fluorophores were excited. Fluorescence emitting from the micro-array slide was collected by the same f-theta lens, and was captured by a detector. As a laser illumination system, the objective lens had a smaller stop aperture. As a fluorescence collection system, it had a bigger stop aperture. In conclusion, optical transfer function for the whole system, from source to detector, is the combination of that of the laser illumination, a coherent system, and that of the fluorescence collection system, an incoherent system. Uniformity of laser illumination at the micro-array slide was analyzed using optical transfer function during the course of scanning. The influence of aberrations on optical transfer function is given. The simulating results for above characteristics are also presented.

  1. Customer short term load forecasting by using ARIMA transfer function model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, M.Y.; Hwang, J.C.; Chen, C.S.

    1995-12-31

    Short-term load forecasting plays an important role in electric power system operation and planning. An accurate load forecasting not only reduces the generation cost in a power system, but also provides a good principle of effective operation. In this paper, the ARIMA model and transfer function model are applied to the short-term load forecasting by considering weather-load relationship. For four types of customer in Taiwan power (Taipower) system, residential load, commercial load, office load and industrial load customers, the summer ARIMA model transfer function model have been derived to proceed the short-term load forecasting during one week. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, this paper compares the results of the transfer function model and the univariate ARIMA model with conventional regression. Besides, the transfer function model`s accuracy of the load forecast on weekday and weekend is thoroughly investigated. To improve the accuracy level of load forecast, the temperature effect is considered in the transfer function. According to the short-term load forecasting for these four customer classes, it is concluded that the proposed method can achieve better accuracy of load forecast than ARIMA model by considering the causality between power consumption and temperature.

  2. Effects of Non-Homogeneities on the Eigenmodes of Acoustic Pressure in Combustion Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Williams, F. A.

    1998-02-01

    Modifications to acoustic eigenmodes in combustion chambers such as those of liquid propellant rocket engines, produced by spatial variations of density and sound speed that arise mainly through progress of combustion processes, are analyzed by using a variational method. The variational principle shows that the eigenvalue is the ratio of a weighted acoustic kinetic energy to a weighted acoustic potential energy, and the eigenfunction is the minimizing function of this ratio. A sample calculation is made for the case in which variations of the properties occur dominantly in the longitudinal direction, with lower temperatures and higher densities prevailing near the injector. The results of the calculation exhibit two major characteristics: the longitudinal density variation aids transfer of acoustic kinetic energy from a lower mode to the adjacent higher mode, so that the pure transverse modes have substantially larger reductions (sometimes exceeding 50%) of their eigenvalues than the combined modes; and variations of the acoustic pressure gradients are found to be larger in high-density regions, so that the acoustic pressure amplitude for purely tangential modes is found to be much higher near the injector than near the nozzle. The higher head acoustic pressure may contribute to the greater sensitivity of acoustic instability to characteristics of the flames near the injectors, as commonly found in engine tests. The improved acoustic eigensolutions can also be helpful in sizing damping devices, such as baffles or acoustic liners.

  3. Acoustic Techniques for Measuring Surface Sealing and Crusting of Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, C. J.; Leary, D.; Dicarlo, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The microtopography of soils is an important surface characteristic that effects water ponding, infiltration, and consequently soil erosion. During a rainstorm event the surface microtopography and soil matrix evolve, thereby altering the erosion and runoff dynamics. The impact of raindrops cause the breakdown of soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can then be deposited into the smaller depressions. The redistribution of soil particles on the surface during rainfall produce a thin surface layer often referred to as surface sealing or crusting. For the purpose of this presentation, surface sealing will be used to describe a reduction in the ability of fluid to flow across the surface. Surface crusting will be associated with the formation of a thin layer of higher stiffness or larger mechanical strength. The sensitivity of acoustics to the effects of sealing and crusting was examined by measuring the acoustic-to seismic (A/S) transfer function and acoustic reflectivity on two different soils in a dry, wetted and rained-on state. The A/S transfer function measurement involves the use of a suspended loud speaker to impinge acoustic energy from the air onto the sample and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the induced surface particle velocity. Therefore, the A/S transfer function is a measure of the seismic energy that has been transferred into the soil from the airborne wave. The acoustic surface reflectivity is a measurement of the amount of acoustic energy reflected from the surface and requires the use of a microphone suspended above the surface. Results suggests that the seismic energy transferred (A/S transfer function) is sensitive to crust formation but is not as sensitive to sealing. The amount of reflected acoustic energy appears to be more sensitive to sealing than crusting.

  4. Revisiting Neil Armstrongs Moon-Landing Quote: Implications for Speech Perception, Function Word Reduction, and Acoustic Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Baese-Berk, Melissa M; Dilley, Laura C; Schmidt, Stephanie; Morrill, Tuuli H; Pitt, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Neil Armstrong insisted that his quote upon landing on the moon was misheard, and that he had said one small step for a man, instead of one small step for man. What he said is unclear in part because function words like a can be reduced and spectrally indistinguishable from the preceding context. Therefore, their presence can be ambiguous, and they may disappear perceptually depending on the rate of surrounding speech. Two experiments are presented examining production and perception of reduced tokens of for and for a in spontaneous speech. Experiment 1 investigates the distributions of several acoustic features of for and for a. The results suggest that the distributions of for and for a overlap substantially, both in terms of temporal and spectral characteristics. Experiment 2 examines perception of these same tokens when the context speaking rate differs. The perceptibility of the function word a varies as a function of this context speaking rate. These results demonstrate that substantial ambiguity exists in the original quote from Armstrong, and that this ambiguity may be understood through context speaking rate. PMID:27603209

  5. Revisiting Neil Armstrongs Moon-Landing Quote: Implications for Speech Perception, Function Word Reduction, and Acoustic Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Baese-Berk, Melissa M.; Dilley, Laura C.; Schmidt, Stephanie; Morrill, Tuuli H.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Neil Armstrong insisted that his quote upon landing on the moon was misheard, and that he had said one small step for a man, instead of one small step for man. What he said is unclear in part because function words like a can be reduced and spectrally indistinguishable from the preceding context. Therefore, their presence can be ambiguous, and they may disappear perceptually depending on the rate of surrounding speech. Two experiments are presented examining production and perception of reduced tokens of for and for a in spontaneous speech. Experiment 1 investigates the distributions of several acoustic features of for and for a. The results suggest that the distributions of for and for a overlap substantially, both in terms of temporal and spectral characteristics. Experiment 2 examines perception of these same tokens when the context speaking rate differs. The perceptibility of the function word a varies as a function of this context speaking rate. These results demonstrate that substantial ambiguity exists in the original quote from Armstrong, and that this ambiguity may be understood through context speaking rate. PMID:27603209

  6. Revisiting Neil Armstrongs Moon-Landing Quote: Implications for Speech Perception, Function Word Reduction, and Acoustic Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Baese-Berk, Melissa M; Dilley, Laura C; Schmidt, Stephanie; Morrill, Tuuli H; Pitt, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Neil Armstrong insisted that his quote upon landing on the moon was misheard, and that he had said one small step for a man, instead of one small step for man. What he said is unclear in part because function words like a can be reduced and spectrally indistinguishable from the preceding context. Therefore, their presence can be ambiguous, and they may disappear perceptually depending on the rate of surrounding speech. Two experiments are presented examining production and perception of reduced tokens of for and for a in spontaneous speech. Experiment 1 investigates the distributions of several acoustic features of for and for a. The results suggest that the distributions of for and for a overlap substantially, both in terms of temporal and spectral characteristics. Experiment 2 examines perception of these same tokens when the context speaking rate differs. The perceptibility of the function word a varies as a function of this context speaking rate. These results demonstrate that substantial ambiguity exists in the original quote from Armstrong, and that this ambiguity may be understood through context speaking rate.

  7. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  8. Clinical feasibility study of combined opto-acoustic and ultrasonic imaging modality providing coregistered functional and anatomical maps of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Smith, Remie J.; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Ermilov, Sergey; Conjusteau, André; Tsyboulski, Dmitri; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. C.; Otto, Pamela

    2013-03-01

    We report on findings from the clinical feasibility study of the ImagioTM. Breast Imaging System, which acquires two-dimensional opto-acoustic (OA) images co-registered with conventional ultrasound using a specialized duplex hand-held probe. Dual-wavelength opto-acoustic technology is used to generate parametric maps based upon total hemoglobin and its oxygen saturation in breast tissues. This may provide functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism and microvasculature, which is complementary to morphological information obtained with conventional gray-scale ultrasound. We present co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical feasibility study. The clinical results illustrate that the technology may have the capability to improve the efficacy of breast tumor diagnosis. In doing so, it may have the potential to reduce biopsies and to characterize cancers that were not seen well with conventional gray-scale ultrasound alone.

  9. On-orbit Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) Measurements for IKONOS and QuickBird

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helde, Dennis; Choi, Jason; Anderson, Cody

    2007-01-01

    Point Spread Function is a method of evaluation the spatial resolution of an imaging system. It is also a measure of the spread of a single point of light. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is a measure of the spatial frequency response. It is often calculated from th point spread function (PSF). System response at the Nyquist frequency (or 0.5 cycle/pixel) is often used as a figure of merit

  10. Densification of functional plasma polymers by momentum transfer during film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hegemann, Dirk; Koerner, Enrico; Blanchard, Noemi; Drabik, Martin; Guimond, Sebastien

    2012-11-19

    Functional plasma polymers were deposited from pure ethylene discharges and with the addition of carbon dioxide or ammonia. The incorporation of oxygen and nitrogen-containing functional groups depends on the fragmentation in the gas phase as well as on the densification during film growth. While a minimum energy per deposited carbon atom is required for cross-linking, the densification and accompanying reduction of functional group incorporation was found to scale linearly with momentum transfer through ion bombardment during film growth.

  11. Centralized PI control for high dimensional multivariable systems based on equivalent transfer function.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xiaoli; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fei

    2014-09-01

    This article presents a new scheme to design full matrix controller for high dimensional multivariable processes based on equivalent transfer function (ETF). Differing from existing ETF method, the proposed ETF is derived directly by exploiting the relationship between the equivalent closed-loop transfer function and the inverse of open-loop transfer function. Based on the obtained ETF, the full matrix controller is designed utilizing the existing PI tuning rules. The new proposed ETF model can more accurately represent the original processes. Furthermore, the full matrix centralized controller design method proposed in this paper is applicable to high dimensional multivariable systems with satisfactory performance. Comparison with other multivariable controllers shows that the designed ETF based controller is superior with respect to design-complexity and obtained performance.

  12. On the pole of non-square transfer function matrix Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ou, Linlin; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-10-01

    An essential step in many controller design approaches is computing the inverse of the plant. For a square plant, its inverse is stable if the plant is minimum phase (MP). Nevertheless, this conclusion does not hold for a non-square plant. In this paper, the pole feature of the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of a non-square transfer function matrix is analysed. Instead of complicated advanced mathematical tools, only basic results of polynomial theory and the Binet-Cauchy theorem are used in the analysing procedure. The condition for testing the stability of the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of an MP non-square transfer function matrix is given. This condition implies that the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of a non-square transfer function matrix cannot be directly used as the optimal controller. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the correctness of the condition.

  13. Estimating the transfer function of the cantilever in atomic force microscopy: A system identification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Martin; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Stemmer, Andreas; Stark, Robert W.

    2005-12-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers many opportunities for the characterization and manipulation of matter on the nanometer scale with a high temporal resolution. The analysis of time-dependent forces is basic for a deeper understanding of phenomena such as friction, plastic deformation, and surface wetting. However, the dynamic characteristics of the force sensor used for such investigations are determined by various factors such as material and geometry of the cantilever, detection alignment, and the transfer characteristics of the detector. Thus, for a quantitative investigation of surface properties by dynamic AFM an appropriate system identification procedure is required, characterizing the force sensor beyond the usual parameters spring constant, quality factor, and detection sensitivity. Measurement of the transfer function provides such a characterization that fully accounts for the dynamic properties of the force sensor. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of the transfer function in a bandwidth of 1MHz from experimental data. To this end, we analyze the signal of the vibrations induced by snap-to-contact and snap-off-contact events. For the free cantilever, we determine both a parameter-free estimate [empirical transfer function estimate (ETFE)] and a parametric estimate of the transfer function. For the surface-coupled cantilever the ETFE is obtained. These identification procedures provide an intrinsic calibration as they dispense largely with a priori knowledge about the force sensor.

  14. Effects of select and reject control on equivalence class formation and transfer of function.

    PubMed

    Perez, William F; Tomanari, Gerson Y; Vaidya, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The present study used a single-subject design to evaluate the effects of select or reject control on equivalence class formation and transfer of function. Adults were exposed to a matching-to-sample task with observing requirements (MTS-OR) in order to bias the establishment of sample/S+ (select) or sample/S- (reject) relations. In Experiment 1, four sets of baseline conditional relations were taught-two under reject control (A1B2C1, A2B1C2) and two under select control (D1E1F1, D2E2F2). Participants were tested for transitivity, symmetry, equivalence and reflexivity. They also learned a simple discrimination involving one of the stimuli from the equivalence classes and were tested for the transfer of the discriminative function. In general, participants performed with high accuracy on all equivalence-related probes as well as the transfer of function probes under select control. Under reject control, participants had high scores only on the symmetry test; transfer of function was attributed to stimuli programmed as S-. In Experiment 2, the equivalence class under reject control was expanded to four members (A1B2C1D2; A2B1C2D1). Participants had high scores only on symmetry and on transitivity and equivalence tests involving two nodes. Transfer of function was extended to the programmed S- added to each class. Results from both experiments suggest that select and reject controls might differently affect the formation of equivalence classes and the transfer of stimulus functions. PMID:26332076

  15. Effects of select and reject control on equivalence class formation and transfer of function.

    PubMed

    Perez, William F; Tomanari, Gerson Y; Vaidya, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The present study used a single-subject design to evaluate the effects of select or reject control on equivalence class formation and transfer of function. Adults were exposed to a matching-to-sample task with observing requirements (MTS-OR) in order to bias the establishment of sample/S+ (select) or sample/S- (reject) relations. In Experiment 1, four sets of baseline conditional relations were taught-two under reject control (A1B2C1, A2B1C2) and two under select control (D1E1F1, D2E2F2). Participants were tested for transitivity, symmetry, equivalence and reflexivity. They also learned a simple discrimination involving one of the stimuli from the equivalence classes and were tested for the transfer of the discriminative function. In general, participants performed with high accuracy on all equivalence-related probes as well as the transfer of function probes under select control. Under reject control, participants had high scores only on the symmetry test; transfer of function was attributed to stimuli programmed as S-. In Experiment 2, the equivalence class under reject control was expanded to four members (A1B2C1D2; A2B1C2D1). Participants had high scores only on symmetry and on transitivity and equivalence tests involving two nodes. Transfer of function was extended to the programmed S- added to each class. Results from both experiments suggest that select and reject controls might differently affect the formation of equivalence classes and the transfer of stimulus functions.

  16. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  17. Amino-functionalized green fluorescent carbon dots as surface energy transfer biosensors for hyaluronidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Ning; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-04-21

    Amino-functionalized fluorescent carbon dots have been prepared by hydrothermal treatment of glucosamine with excess pyrophosphate. The produced carbon dots showed stabilized green emission fluorescence at various excitation wavelengths and pH environments. Herein, we demonstrate the surface energy transfer between the amino-functionalized carbon dots and negatively charged hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles. Hyaluronidase can degrade hyaluronate and break down the hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles to inhibit the surface energy transfer. The developed fluorescent carbon dot/gold nanoparticle system can be utilized as a biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of hyaluronidase by two modes which include fluorescence measurements and colorimetric analysis.

  18. Dynamic Acoustic Radiation Force Retains Bone Structural and Mechanical Integrity in a Functional Disuse Osteopenia Model

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Sardar M. Z.; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Disuse osteopenia and bone loss have been extensively reported in long duration space mission and long term bed rest. The pathology of the bone loss is similar to osteoporosis but highly confined to weight bearing bones. The current anabolic and/or anti-resorptive drugs have systemic effects and are costly over extended time, with concerns of long term fracture risk. This study use Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) as a non-invasive acoustic force and anabolic stimulus to countermeasure disuse induced bone loss. Four-month old C57BL/6 mice were randomized to five groups, 1) age-matched (AM), 2) non-suspended sham (NS), 3) nonsuspended –LIPUS (NU), 4) suspended sham (SS), and 5) suspended-LIPUS (SU) groups. After four weeks of suspension, µCT analyses showed significant decreases in trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) (−36%, p<0.005), bone tissue mineral density (TMD) (−3%, p<0.05), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (−12.5%, p<0.005), and increase in bone surface/bone volume (+BS/BV) (+16%, p<0.005), relative to age-matched (AM). Application of LIPUS for 20 min/day for 5 days/week, significantly increased TMD (+3%, p<0.05), Tb.Th (+6%, p<0.05), and decreased BS/BV (−10%, p<0.005), relative to suspension alone (SS) mice. Histomorphometry analyses showed a breakdown of bone microstructure under disuse conditions consist with µCT results. In comparison to SS mice, LIPUS treated bone showed increased structural integrity with increased bone formation rates at metaphysical endosteal and trabecular surfaces (+0.104±0.07 vs 0.031±0.30 µm3/µm2/d) relative to SS. Four-point bending mechanical tests of disused SS femurs showed reduced elastic modulus (−53%, p<0.05), yield (−33%, p<0.05) and ultimate strength (−45%, p<0.05) at the femoral diaphysis relative to AM bone. LIPUS stimulation mitigated the adverse effects of disuse on bone elastic modulus (+42%, p<0.05), yield strength (+29%, p<0.05), and ultimate strength (+39%, p<0.05) relative to SS

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  20. Inverse Material Identification in Coupled Acoustic-Structure Interaction using a Modified Error in Constitutive Equation Functional

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level. PMID:25339790

  1. Inverse material identification in coupled acoustic-structure interaction using a modified error in constitutive equation functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-09-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level.

  2. A Study of Mexican Free-Tailed Bat Chirp Syllables: Bayesian Functional Mixed Models for Nonstationary Acoustic Time Series

    PubMed Central

    MARTINEZ, Josue G.; BOHN, Kirsten M.; CARROLL, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new approach to analyze chirp syllables of free-tailed bats from two regions of Texas in which they are predominant: Austin and College Station. Our goal is to characterize any systematic regional differences in the mating chirps and assess whether individual bats have signature chirps. The data are analyzed by modeling spectrograms of the chirps as responses in a Bayesian functional mixed model. Given the variable chirp lengths, we compute the spectrograms on a relative time scale interpretable as the relative chirp position, using a variable window overlap based on chirp length. We use 2D wavelet transforms to capture correlation within the spectrogram in our modeling and obtain adaptive regularization of the estimates and inference for the regions-specific spectrograms. Our model includes random effect spectrograms at the bat level to account for correlation among chirps from the same bat, and to assess relative variability in chirp spectrograms within and between bats. The modeling of spectrograms using functional mixed models is a general approach for the analysis of replicated nonstationary time series, such as our acoustical signals, to relate aspects of the signals to various predictors, while accounting for between-signal structure. This can be done on raw spectrograms when all signals are of the same length, and can be done using spectrograms defined on a relative time scale for signals of variable length in settings where the idea of defining correspondence across signals based on relative position is sensible. PMID:23997376

  3. A Study of Mexican Free-Tailed Bat Chirp Syllables: Bayesian Functional Mixed Models for Nonstationary Acoustic Time Series.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Josue G; Bohn, Kirsten M; Carroll, Raymond J; Morris, Jeffrey S

    2013-06-01

    We describe a new approach to analyze chirp syllables of free-tailed bats from two regions of Texas in which they are predominant: Austin and College Station. Our goal is to characterize any systematic regional differences in the mating chirps and assess whether individual bats have signature chirps. The data are analyzed by modeling spectrograms of the chirps as responses in a Bayesian functional mixed model. Given the variable chirp lengths, we compute the spectrograms on a relative time scale interpretable as the relative chirp position, using a variable window overlap based on chirp length. We use 2D wavelet transforms to capture correlation within the spectrogram in our modeling and obtain adaptive regularization of the estimates and inference for the regions-specific spectrograms. Our model includes random effect spectrograms at the bat level to account for correlation among chirps from the same bat, and to assess relative variability in chirp spectrograms within and between bats. The modeling of spectrograms using functional mixed models is a general approach for the analysis of replicated nonstationary time series, such as our acoustical signals, to relate aspects of the signals to various predictors, while accounting for between-signal structure. This can be done on raw spectrograms when all signals are of the same length, and can be done using spectrograms defined on a relative time scale for signals of variable length in settings where the idea of defining correspondence across signals based on relative position is sensible. PMID:23997376

  4. Dynamics of charge transfer: Rate processes formulated with nonequilibrium Green's functions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeganeh, Sina; Ratner, Mark A.; Mujica, Vladimiro

    2007-04-28

    The authors examine the connection between electron transport under bias in a junction and nonadiabatic intramolecular electron transfer (ET). It is shown that under certain assumptions it is possible to define a stationary current that allows the computation of the intramolecular transfer rate using the same formalism that is employed in the description of transport. They show that the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism of quantum transport can be used to calculate the ET rate. The formal connection between electron transport and electron transfer is made, and they work out the simple case of an electronic level coupled to a vibrational mode representing a thermal bath and show that the result is the same as expected from a Fermi golden rule treatment, and in the high-temperature limit yields the Marcus electron transfer theory. The usefulness of this alternative formulation of rates is discussed.

  5. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals. PMID:27423052

  6. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals.

  7. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  8. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses.

  9. Direct metal transfer printing on flexible substrate for fabricating optics functional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yingjie; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Feng; Shi, Zhenwu; Chen, Linsen; Peng, Changsi

    2015-11-01

    New functional materials and devices based on metal patterns can be widely used in many new and expanding industries,such as flat panel displays, alternative energy,sensors and so on. In this paper, we introduce a new transfer printing method for fabricating metal optics functional devices. This method can directly transfer a metal pattern from a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)supported UV or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern to another PET substrate. Purely taking advantage of the anaerobic UV curing adhesive (a-UV) on PET substrate, metal film can be easily peeled off from micro/nano-structured surface. As a result, metal film on the protrusion can be selectively transferred onto the target substrate, to make it the metal functional surface. But which on the bottom can not be transferred. This method provides low cost fabrication of metal thin film devices by avoiding high cost lithography process. Compared with conventional approach, this method can get more smooth rough edges and has wider tolerance range for the original master mold. Future developments and potential applications of this metal transfer method will be addressed.

  10. Transfer function approach for artificial tracer test interpretation in karstic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, D.; Mangin, A.

    2015-10-01

    A karstic formation consists in a three-dimensional hydrological system which involves horizontal and vertical, diphasic or saturated water transfers characterised by a large range of velocity. These subsurface flow processes correspond to various water pathways through fractured, fissured, and underground streams or conduits leading to a nonlinear global behaviour of the system. An efficient way of investigating of a karstic system behaviour consists in the injection of artificial tracer tests at loss points and in careful analysis of the recovery tracer fluxes at one or several outlets of the systems. These injections are also an efficient way of providing hypotheses on characteristic time of contaminant transfer in these type of aquifers. Here, we propose a Laplace-transform transfer function of the Residence Time Distribution function that allows to discriminate between a quick-flow advection-dominated component and a slow-flow advection-dispersion/dominated component in the artificial tracer transfer in the system. We apply this transfer function on five high resolution sampling rate artificial tracer tests operated on the Baget system in the Pyrenees (France) in order to illustrate the advantages and limitations of this approach. We provide then an interpretation of the relationship between tracer test recovery shape and karstic system organisation between inlet and outlet site.

  11. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  12. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  13. Assessment of systolic and diastolic function in heart failure using ambulatory monitoring with acoustic cardiography.

    PubMed

    Dillier, Roger; Zuber, Michel; Arand, Patricia; Erne, Susanne; Erne, Paul

    2011-08-01

    INTRODUCTION. The circadian variation of heart function and heart sounds in patients with and without heart failure (HF) is poorly understood. We hypothesized HF patients would exhibit less circadian variation with worsened cardiac function and sleep apnea. METHODS. We studied 67 HF patients (age 67.4 ± 8.2 years; 42% acute HF) and 63 asymptomatic control subjects with no history of HF (age 61.6 ± 7.7 years). Subjects wore a heart sound/ECG/respiratory monitor. The data were analyzed for sleep apnea, diastolic heart sounds, and systolic time intervals. RESULTS. The HF group had significantly greater prevalence of the third heart sound and prolongation of electro-mechanical activation time, while the control group had an age-related increase in the prevalence of the fourth heart sound. The control group showed more circadian variation in cardiac function. The HF subjects had more sleep apnea and higher occurrence of heart rate non-dipping. CONCLUSIONS. The control subjects demonstrated an increasing incidence of diastolic dysfunction with age, while systolic function was mostly unchanged with aging. Parameters related to systolic function were significantly worse in the HF group with little diurnal variation, indicating a constant stimulation of sympathetic tone in HF and reduction of diurnal regulation. PMID:21361859

  14. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bramlette, T. Tazwell; Keller, Jay O.

    1989-01-01

    A heat transfer apparatus includes a first chamber having a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, and an outlet. A first heat transfer gas source provides a first gas flow to the first chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A second gas flow through a second chamber connected to the side of the first chamber, generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling of the first and second gases in the acoustically augmented first chamber. The first chamber may also include a material inlet for receiving material to be dried, in which case the gas outlet serves as a dried material and gas outlet.

  15. Endosperm transfer cell-specific genes and proteins: structure, function and applications in biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lopato, Sergiy; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells (ETC) are one of four main types of cells in endosperm. A characteristic feature of ETC is the presence of cell wall in-growths that create an enlarged plasma membrane surface area. This specialized cell structure is important for the specific function of ETC, which is to transfer nutrients from maternal vascular tissue to endosperm. ETC-specific genes are of particular interest to plant biotechnologists, who use genetic engineering to improve grain quality and yield characteristics of important field crops. The success of molecular biology-based approaches to manipulating ETC function is dependent on a thorough understanding of the functions of ETC-specific genes and ETC-specific promoters. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing data on structure and function of ETC-specific genes and their products. Potential applications of ETC-specific genes, and in particular their promoters for biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:24578704

  16. Acoustic wave propagation in continuous functionally graded plates: an extension of the Legendre polynomial approach.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, J E; Zhang, V; Gazalet, J; Gryba, T; Sadaune, V

    2001-09-01

    The propagation of guided waves in continuous functionally graded plates is studied by using Legendre polynomials. Dispersion curves, and power and field profiles are easily obtained. Our computer program is validated by comparing our results against other calculations from the literature. Numerical results are also given for a graded semiconductor plate. It is felt that the present method could be of quite practical interest in waveguiding engineering, non-destructive testing of functionally graded materials (FGMs) to identify the best inspection strategies, or by means of a numerical inversion algorithm to determine through-thickness gradients in material parameters.

  17. Structure-based modeling of head-related transfer functions towards interactive customization of binaural sound systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Navarun

    2003-10-01

    One of the most popular techniques for creating spatialized virtual sounds is based on the use of Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs). HRTFs are signal processing models that represent the modifications undergone by the acoustic signal as it travels from a sound source to each of the listener's eardrums. These modifications are due to the interaction of the acoustic waves with the listener's torso, shoulders, head and pinnae, or outer ears. As such, HRTFs are somewhat different for each listener. For a listener to perceive synthesized 3-D sound cues correctly, the synthesized cues must be similar to the listener's own HRTFs. One can measure individual HRTFs using specialized recording systems, however, these systems are prohibitively expensive and restrict the portability of the 3-D sound system. HRTF-based systems also face several computational challenges. This dissertation presents an alternative method for the synthesis of binaural spatialized sounds. The sound entering the pinna undergoes several reflective, diffractive and resonant phenomena, which determine the HRTF. Using signal processing tools, such as Prony's signal modeling method, an appropriate set of time delays and a resonant frequency were used to approximate the measured Head-Related Impulse Responses (HRIRs). Statistical analysis was used to find out empirical equations describing how the reflections and resonances are determined by the shape and size of the pinna features obtained from 3D images of 15 experimental subjects modeled in the project. These equations were used to yield "Model HRTFs" that can create elevation effects. Listening tests conducted on 10 subjects show that these model HRTFs are 5% more effective than generic HRTFs when it comes to localizing sounds in the frontal plane. The number of reversals (perception of sound source above the horizontal plane when actually it is below the plane and vice versa) was also reduced by 5.7%, showing the perceptual effectiveness of this

  18. Moire modulation transfer function of alexandrite rods and their thresholds as lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kafri, O.; Samelson, H.; Chin, T.; Heller, D.F.

    1986-04-01

    We show that there is a simple correlation between the modulation transfer function (MTF) of alexandrite laser rods and the thresholds of these rods as cw lasers. Thus the MTF provides a novel and important way to evaluate material (before or after fabrication) for use in solid-state lasers. This approach should be generally applicable to all solid-state laser materials.

  19. Validity of transfer-function representation of input-output relation in allosteric models.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, N; Naka, T

    1986-01-01

    A transfer-function representation of reaction velocity is devised to describe analytically and approximately an input-output response of allosteric enzyme around a steady state. The transfer function is derived on assuming an exponential change in reaction velocity for the indicial response to substrate influx rate. The validity of the representation with variation in the kinetic parameters and flow rates is examined for the response of Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer (KNF) and Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) dimeric models by comparing with the exact response obtained from the computer simulation, that is, by numerical integration of the rate equation. The representation has a wider valid region with a decrease in influx rate than with an increase. For the KNF model the representation is valid for negative cooperativity, but invalid for positive cooperativity. For the MWC model the validity decreases with stronger cooperativity. With the transfer functions valid for the Michaelis-Menten and allosteric reactions, we may derive the transfer-function representation for many metabolic pathways.

  20. Measurement of MODIS optics effective focal length, distortion, and modulation transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurlow, Paul E.; Cline, Richard W.

    1993-08-01

    A combination MODIS optics characteristics, short back focal length, and relatively distorting optics, has required major revisions in techniques used earlier to characterize effective focal length (EFL) and modulation transfer function (MTF) in the thematic mapper (TM) project. This paper compares measurement approaches used to characterize TM optics and revised methodology intended to characterize MODIS optics at an integration and assembly level.

  1. 5 CFR 351.303 - Identification of positions with a transferring function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS REDUCTION IN FORCE Transfer of Function § 351.303 Identification of positions with a... agency may supplement the employee's official position description by the use of appropriate records (e.g... separation or demotion by reduction in force at the losing competitive area of any employee with...

  2. 5 CFR 351.303 - Identification of positions with a transferring function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS REDUCTION IN FORCE Transfer of Function § 351.303 Identification of positions with a... agency may supplement the employee's official position description by the use of appropriate records (e.g... separation or demotion by reduction in force at the losing competitive area of any employee with...

  3. Validation of the transfer function technique for generating central from peripheral upper limb pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, David; Adji, Audrey; O'Rourke, Michael F

    2004-11-01

    Central aortic pressure waveforms can be calculated from the radial artery pressure waveform using a generalized transfer function to correct for pressure wave distortion in the upper limb. Although validated to standards conventionally applied, reservations are still expressed on use of this process, because of the relatively small number of patients from whom appropriate invasive data were obtained. The study described here supplemented such data with noninvasive data obtained from carotid and radial artery tonometry in 439 patients and normal subjects. The carotid-radial artery transfer function was similar to the aortic-radial when allowance was made for wave travel from aorta to carotid artery. The carotid-radial transfer function was identical in male and female individuals, was similar at different arterial pressures and in mature adults. Differences are relatively small, are seen at frequencies where central pressure wave components are small and are similar to those seen with vasodilator agents in invasive studies. Findings provide further support for use of a generalized transfer function to calculate aortic from upper limb pressure and conform with previously established views on vascular impedance. PMID:15533735

  4. Using Multiple Schedules during Functional Communication Training to Promote Rapid Transfer of Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wayne W.; Greer, Brian D.; Fuhrman, Ashley M.; Querim, Angie C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple schedules with signaled periods of reinforcement and extinction have been used to thin reinforcement schedules during functional communication training (FCT) to make the intervention more practical for parents and teachers. We evaluated whether these signals would also facilitate rapid transfer of treatment effects across settings and…

  5. How Toddlers Acquire and Transfer Tool Knowledge: Developmental Changes and the Role of Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauen, Sabina; Bechtel-Kuehne, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    This report investigates tool learning and its relations to executive functions (EFs) in toddlers. In Study 1 (N = 93), 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-month-old children learned equally well to choose a correct tool from observation, whereas performance based on feedback improved with age. Knowledge transfer showed significant progress after 22 months of…

  6. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) measurement techniques for lenses and linear detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnabel, J. J., Jr.; Kaishoven, J. E., Jr.; Tom, D.

    1984-01-01

    Application is the determination of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for linear detector arrays. A system set up requires knowledge of the MTF of the imaging lens. Procedure for this measurement is described for standard optical lab equipment. Given this information, various possible approaches to MTF measurement for linear arrays is described. The knife edge method is then described in detail.

  7. A parametric transfer function methodology for analyzing reactive transport in nonuniform flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Cirpka, Olaf A; Fienen, Michael N; Wu, Wei-min; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Carley, Jack; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig S; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2006-02-01

    We analyze reactive transport during in-situ bioremediation in a nonuniform flow field, involving multiple extraction and injection wells, by the method of transfer functions. Gamma distributions are used as parametric models of the transfer functions. Apparent parameters of classical transport models may be estimated from those of the gamma distributions by matching temporal moments. We demonstrate the method by application to measured data taken at a field experiment on bioremediation conducted in a multiple-well system in Oak Ridge, TN. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of a conservative tracer (bromide) and a reactive compound (ethanol) are measured at multi-level sampling (MLS) wells and in extraction wells. The BTCs of both compounds are jointly analyzed to estimate the first-order degradation rate of ethanol. To quantify the tracer loss, we compare the approaches of using a scaling factor and a first-order decay term. Results show that by including a scaling factor both gamma distributions and inverse-Gaussian distributions (transfer functions according to the advection-dispersion equation) are suitable to approximate the transfer functions and estimate the reactive rate coefficients for both MLS and extraction wells. However, using a first-order decay term for tracer loss fails to describe the BTCs at the extraction well, which is affected by the nonuniform distribution of travel paths.

  8. The Derived Transfer and Reversal of Mood Functions through Equivalence Relations: II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Jane; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel; Luciano, Carmen; Smeets, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated the transfer of induced mood functions through equivalence relations by means of a musical mood-induction procedure. The research described in this article replicated and extended such work, primarily with the inclusion of a baseline and two types of reversal procedures. First, 16 adult participants were trained…

  9. Transfer functions of double- and multiple-cavity Fabry Perot filters driven by Lorentzian sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Javier; Capmany, Jose

    1996-12-01

    We derive expressions for the transfer functions of double- and multiple-cavity Fabry Perot filters driven by laser sources with Lorentzian spectrum. These are of interest because of their applications in sensing and channel filtering in optical frequency-division multiplexing networks.

  10. Radiative transfer in inhomogeneous stratified scattering media with use of the auxiliary function method.

    PubMed

    Elias, Mady; Elias, Georges

    2004-04-01

    The auxiliary function method consists of taking full advantage of the expansion of the phase function on spherical harmonics in order to deduce an integral equation from the radiative transfer equation. In contrast to the discrete-ordinate method, it is free of the channel concept, the unknowns being a function only of the optical depth. After presenting the method, we show that it is very accurate and particularly well fitted when the scattering medium is continuously inhomogeneous in albedo and phase function and also for sublayers with different refractive index.

  11. Transference-focused psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder: change in reflective function.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Kern, Melitta; Doering, Stephan; Taubner, Svenja; Hörz, Susanne; Zimmermann, Johannes; Rentrop, Michael; Schuster, Peter; Buchheim, Peter; Buchheim, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Borderline personality disorder is associated with deficits in personality functioning and mentalisation. In a randomised controlled trial 104 people with borderline personality disorder received either transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) or treatment by experienced community therapists. Among other outcome variables, mentalisation was assessed by means of the Reflective Functioning Scale (RF Scale). Findings revealed only significant improvements in reflective function in the TFP group within 1 year of treatment. The between-group effect was of medium size (d = 0.45). Improvements in reflective function were significantly correlated with improvements in personality organisation. PMID:25999334

  12. Transference-focused psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder: change in reflective function.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Kern, Melitta; Doering, Stephan; Taubner, Svenja; Hörz, Susanne; Zimmermann, Johannes; Rentrop, Michael; Schuster, Peter; Buchheim, Peter; Buchheim, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Borderline personality disorder is associated with deficits in personality functioning and mentalisation. In a randomised controlled trial 104 people with borderline personality disorder received either transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) or treatment by experienced community therapists. Among other outcome variables, mentalisation was assessed by means of the Reflective Functioning Scale (RF Scale). Findings revealed only significant improvements in reflective function in the TFP group within 1 year of treatment. The between-group effect was of medium size (d = 0.45). Improvements in reflective function were significantly correlated with improvements in personality organisation.

  13. Surface-to-food pesticide transfer as a function of moisture and fat content.

    PubMed

    Vonderheide, Anne P; Bernard, Craig E; Hieber, Thomas E; Kauffman, Peter E; Morgan, Jeffrey N; Melnyk, Lisa Jo

    2009-01-01

    Transfer of pesticides from household surfaces to foods may result in excess dietary exposure in children (i.e., beyond that inherent in foods due to agricultural application). In this study, transfer was evaluated as a function of the moisture and fat content of various foods. Surfaces chosen for investigation were those commonly found in homes and included Formica, ceramic tile, plastic, carpet, and upholstery fabric. Each surface type was sprayed with an aqueous emulsion of organophosphates, fipronil, and synthetic pyrethroids. In the first phase of the study, multiple foods (apples, watermelon, wheat crackers, graham crackers, white bread, flour tortillas, bologna, fat-free bologna, sugar cookies, ham, Fruit Roll-ups, pancakes, and processed American cheese) were categorized with respect to moisture and fat content. All were evaluated for potential removal of applied pesticides from a Formica surface. In the second phase of the study, representative foods from each classification were investigated for their potential for pesticide transfer with an additional four surfaces: ceramic tile, plastic, upholstery, and carpet. Moisture content, not fat, was found to be a determining factor in most transfers. For nearly all surfaces, more efficient transfer occurred with increased hardness (Formica and ceramic tile). Comparatively, the polymer composition of the plastic delivered overall lower transfer efficiencies, presumably due to an attraction between it and the organic pesticides of interest.

  14. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species) with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of individual transfer

  15. Incorporation of charge transfer into the explicit polarization fragment method by grand canonical density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Isegawa, Miho; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular fragmentation algorithms provide a powerful approach to extending electronic structure methods to very large systems. Here we present a method for including charge transfer between molecular fragments in the explicit polarization (X-Pol) fragment method for calculating potential energy surfaces. In the conventional X-Pol method, the total charge of each fragment is preserved, and charge transfer between fragments is not allowed. The description of charge transfer is made possible by treating each fragment as an open system with respect to the number of electrons. To achieve this, we applied Mermin's finite temperature method to the X-Pol wave function. In the application of this method to X-Pol, the fragments are open systems that partially equilibrate their number of electrons through a quasithermodynamics electron reservoir. The number of electrons in a given fragment can take a fractional value, and the electrons of each fragment obey the Fermi–Dirac distribution. The equilibrium state for the electrons is determined by electronegativity equalization with conservation of the total number of electrons. The amount of charge transfer is controlled by re-interpreting the temperature parameter in the Fermi–Dirac distribution function as a coupling strength parameter. We determined this coupling parameter so as to reproduce the charge transfer energy obtained by block localized energy decomposition analysis. We apply the new method to ten systems, and we show that it can yield reasonable approximations to potential energy profiles, to charge transfer stabilization energies, and to the direction and amount of charge transferred. PMID:21895159

  16. Audibility of dispersion error in room acoustic finite-difference time-domain simulation as a function of simulation distance.

    PubMed

    Saarelma, Jukka; Botts, Jonathan; Hamilton, Brian; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-04-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation has been a popular area of research in room acoustics due to its capability to simulate wave phenomena in a wide bandwidth directly in the time-domain. A downside of the method is that it introduces a direction and frequency dependent error to the simulated sound field due to the non-linear dispersion relation of the discrete system. In this study, the perceptual threshold of the dispersion error is measured in three-dimensional FDTD schemes as a function of simulation distance. Dispersion error is evaluated for three different explicit, non-staggered FDTD schemes using the numerical wavenumber in the direction of the worst-case error of each scheme. It is found that the thresholds for the different schemes do not vary significantly when the phase velocity error level is fixed. The thresholds are found to vary significantly between the different sound samples. The measured threshold for the audibility of dispersion error at the probability level of 82% correct discrimination for three-alternative forced choice is found to be 9.1 m of propagation in a free field, that leads to a maximum group delay error of 1.8 ms at 20 kHz with the chosen phase velocity error level of 2%. PMID:27106330

  17. Audibility of dispersion error in room acoustic finite-difference time-domain simulation as a function of simulation distance.

    PubMed

    Saarelma, Jukka; Botts, Jonathan; Hamilton, Brian; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-04-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation has been a popular area of research in room acoustics due to its capability to simulate wave phenomena in a wide bandwidth directly in the time-domain. A downside of the method is that it introduces a direction and frequency dependent error to the simulated sound field due to the non-linear dispersion relation of the discrete system. In this study, the perceptual threshold of the dispersion error is measured in three-dimensional FDTD schemes as a function of simulation distance. Dispersion error is evaluated for three different explicit, non-staggered FDTD schemes using the numerical wavenumber in the direction of the worst-case error of each scheme. It is found that the thresholds for the different schemes do not vary significantly when the phase velocity error level is fixed. The thresholds are found to vary significantly between the different sound samples. The measured threshold for the audibility of dispersion error at the probability level of 82% correct discrimination for three-alternative forced choice is found to be 9.1 m of propagation in a free field, that leads to a maximum group delay error of 1.8 ms at 20 kHz with the chosen phase velocity error level of 2%.

  18. Neurochemical Architecture of the Central Complex Related to Its Function in the Control of Grasshopper Acoustic Communication

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Michael; Pförtner, Ramona; Aschenbrenner, Katja; Heinrich, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The central complex selects and coordinates the species- and situation-specific song production in acoustically communicating grasshoppers. Control of sound production is mediated by several neurotransmitters and modulators, their receptors and intracellular signaling pathways. It has previously been shown that muscarinic cholinergic excitation in the central complex promotes sound production whereas both GABA and nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling suppress its performance. The present immunocytochemical and pharmacological study investigates the question whether GABA and nitric oxide mediate inhibition of sound production independently. Muscarinic ACh receptors are expressed by columnar output neurons of the central complex that innervate the lower division of the central body and terminate in the lateral accessory lobes. GABAergic tangential neurons that innervate the lower division of the central body arborize in close proximity of columnar neurons and thus may directly inhibit these central complex output neurons. A subset of these GABAergic tangential neurons accumulates cyclic GMP following the release of nitric oxide from neurites in the upper division of the central body. While sound production stimulated by muscarine injection into the central complex is suppressed by co-application of sodium nitroprusside, picrotoxin-stimulated singing was not affected by co-application of this nitric oxide donor, indicating that nitric oxide mediated inhibition requires functional GABA signaling. Hence, grasshopper sound production is controlled by processing of information in the lower division of the central body which is subject to modulation by nitric oxide released from neurons in the upper division. PMID:21980504

  19. Controlled multiple functionalization of mesoporous silica nanoparticles: homogeneous implementation of pairs of functionalities communicating through energy or proton transfers.

    PubMed

    Noureddine, Achraf; Lichon, Laure; Maynadier, Marie; Garcia, Marcel; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Zink, Jeffrey I; Cattoën, Xavier; Wong Chi Man, Michel

    2015-07-14

    The synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles bearing organic functionalities is strained by the careful adjustment of the reaction parameters, as the incorporation of functional and/or voluminous organosilanes during the sol-gel synthesis strongly affects the final structure of the nanoparticles. In this paper we describe the design of new clickable mesoporous silica nanoparticles as spheres or rods, synthesized by the co-condensation of TEOS with two clickable organosilanes (bearing alkyne and azide groups) and readily multi-functionalizable by CuAAC click chemistry. We show that controlled loadings of clickable functions can be homogeneously distributed within the MSN, allowing us to efficiently click-graft various pairs of functionalities while preserving the texture and morphology of the particles. The homogeneous distribution of the grafted functionalities was probed by FRET experiments between two anchored fluorophores. Moreover, a communication by proton transfer between two functions was demonstrated by constructing a light-actuated nanomachine that works through a proton transfer between a photoacid generator and a pH-sensitive supramolecular nanogate. The activation of the nanomachine enabled the successful release of rhodamine B in buffered solutions and the delivery of doxorubicin in breast cancer cells (MCF-7) upon blue irradiation.

  20. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  1. Green's function solution to heat transfer of a transparent gas through a tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, J. I.

    1989-01-01

    A heat transfer analysis of a transparent gas flowing through a circular tube of finite thickness is presented. This study includes the effects of wall conduction, internal radiative exchange, and convective heat transfer. The natural mathematical formulation produces a nonlinear, integrodifferential equation governing the wall temperature and an ordinary differential equation describing the gas temperature. This investigation proposes to convert the original system of equations into an equivalent system of integral equations. The Green's function method permits the conversion of an integrodifferential equation into a pure integral equation. The proposed integral formulation and subsequent computational procedure are shown to be stable and accurate.

  2. Efficient application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to radiative transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrarov, Sanjar

    We present a new application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) to the radiative transfer spectroscopy that enables computation of the spectral radiance and radiance at reduced spectral resolution. Applying a technique based on the Fourier expansion of the exponential multiplier we obtain the series approximations providing high-accuracy and rapid SIVF computation. In contrast to traditional line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer models, the proposed SIVF algorithm prevents underestimation in the absorption coefficients and, therefore, preserves the radiant energy. LBL sample computations utilizing SIVF algorithm show the advantages of the proposed methodology in terms of the accuracy and computational speed.

  3. Mechanism of transfer of functional microRNAs between mouse dendritic cells via exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Montecalvo, Angela; Larregina, Adriana T.; Shufesky, William J.; Beer Stolz, Donna; Sullivan, Mara L. G.; Karlsson, Jenny M.; Baty, Catherine J.; Gibson, Gregory A.; Erdos, Geza; Wang, Zhiliang; Milosevic, Jadranka; Tkacheva, Olga A.; Divito, Sherrie J.; Jordan, Rick; Lyons-Weiler, James; Watkins, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent APCs. Whereas immature DCs down-regulate T-cell responses to induce/maintain immunologic tolerance, mature DCs promote immunity. To amplify their functions, DCs communicate with neighboring DCs through soluble mediators, cell-to-cell contact, and vesicle exchange. Transfer of nanovesicles (< 100 nm) derived from the endocytic pathway (termed exosomes) represents a novel mechanism of DC-to-DC communication. The facts that exosomes contain exosome-shuttle miRNAs and DC functions can be regulated by exogenous miRNAs, suggest that DC-to-DC interactions could be mediated through exosome-shuttle miRNAs, a hypothesis that remains to be tested. Importantly, the mechanism of transfer of exosome-shuttle miRNAs from the exosome lumen to the cytosol of target cells is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that DCs release exosomes with different miRNAs depending on the maturation of the DCs. By visualizing spontaneous transfer of exosomes between DCs, we demonstrate that exosomes fused with the target DCs, the latter followed by release of the exosome content into the DC cytosol. Importantly, exosome-shuttle miRNAs are functional, because they repress target mRNAs of acceptor DCs. Our findings unveil a mechanism of transfer of exosome-shuttle miRNAs between DCs and its role as a means of communication and posttranscriptional regulation between DCs. PMID:22031862

  4. [Music-Acoustic Signals Controlled by Subject's Brain Potentials in the Correction of Unfavorable Functional States].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2016-01-01

    Literature review and the results of own studies on the development and experimental testing of musical EEG neurofeedback technology are presented. The technology is based on exposure of subjects to music or music-like signals that are organized in strict accordance with the current values of brain potentials of the patient. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the effectiveness of several versions of the technology, using specific and meaningful for the individual narrow-frequency EEG oscillators during the correction of unfavorable changes of the functional state. PMID:27149824

  5. [Music-Acoustic Signals Controlled by Subject's Brain Potentials in the Correction of Unfavorable Functional States].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2016-01-01

    Literature review and the results of own studies on the development and experimental testing of musical EEG neurofeedback technology are presented. The technology is based on exposure of subjects to music or music-like signals that are organized in strict accordance with the current values of brain potentials of the patient. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the effectiveness of several versions of the technology, using specific and meaningful for the individual narrow-frequency EEG oscillators during the correction of unfavorable changes of the functional state.

  6. Direct measurement of the spectral transfer function of a laser based anemometer.

    PubMed

    Angelou, Nikolas; Mann, Jakob; Sjöholm, Mikael; Courtney, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a continuous-wave (cw) laser based anemometer's probe volume on the measurement of wind turbulence is studied in this paper. Wind speed time series acquired by both a remote sensing cw laser anemometer, whose line-of-sight was aligned with the wind direction, and by a reference sensor (sonic anemometer) located in the same direction, were used. The spectral transfer function, which describes the attenuation of the power spectral density of the wind speed turbulence, was calculated and found to be in good agreement with the theoretical exponential function, which is based on the properties of the probe volume of a focused Gaussian laser beam. Parameters such as fluctuations of the wind direction, as well as the overestimation of the laser Doppler spectrum threshold, were found to affect the calculation of the spectral transfer function by introducing high frequency noise.

  7. Semiclassical Green's functions and an instanton formulation of electron-transfer rates in the nonadiabatic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jeremy O.; Bauer, Rainer; Thoss, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We present semiclassical approximations to Green's functions of multidimensional systems, extending Gutzwiller's work to the classically forbidden region. Based on steepest-descent integrals over these functions, we derive an instanton method for computing the rate of nonadiabatic reactions, such as electron transfer, in the weak-coupling limit, where Fermi's golden-rule can be employed. This generalizes Marcus theory to systems for which the environment free-energy curves are not harmonic and where nuclear tunnelling plays a role. The derivation avoids using the Im F method or short-time approximations to real-time correlation functions. A clear physical interpretation of the nuclear tunnelling processes involved in an electron-transfer reaction is thus provided. In Paper II [J. O. Richardson, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134116 (2015)], we discuss numerical evaluation of the formulae.

  8. Direct measurement of the spectral transfer function of a laser based anemometer.

    PubMed

    Angelou, Nikolas; Mann, Jakob; Sjöholm, Mikael; Courtney, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a continuous-wave (cw) laser based anemometer's probe volume on the measurement of wind turbulence is studied in this paper. Wind speed time series acquired by both a remote sensing cw laser anemometer, whose line-of-sight was aligned with the wind direction, and by a reference sensor (sonic anemometer) located in the same direction, were used. The spectral transfer function, which describes the attenuation of the power spectral density of the wind speed turbulence, was calculated and found to be in good agreement with the theoretical exponential function, which is based on the properties of the probe volume of a focused Gaussian laser beam. Parameters such as fluctuations of the wind direction, as well as the overestimation of the laser Doppler spectrum threshold, were found to affect the calculation of the spectral transfer function by introducing high frequency noise. PMID:22462910

  9. Charge-transfer-directed radical substitution enables para-selective C-H functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boursalian, Gregory B.; Ham, Won Seok; Mazzotti, Anthony R.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Efficient C-H functionalization requires selectivity for specific C-H bonds. Progress has been made for directed aromatic substitution reactions to achieve ortho and meta selectivity, but a general strategy for para-selective C-H functionalization has remained elusive. Herein we introduce a previously unappreciated concept that enables nearly complete para selectivity. We propose that radicals with high electron affinity elicit arene-to-radical charge transfer in the transition state of radical addition, which is the factor primarily responsible for high positional selectivity. We demonstrate with a simple theoretical tool that the selectivity is predictable and show the utility of the concept through a direct synthesis of aryl piperazines. Our results contradict the notion, widely held by organic chemists, that radical aromatic substitution reactions are inherently unselective. The concept of radical substitution directed by charge transfer could serve as the basis for the development of new, highly selective C-H functionalization reactions.

  10. Charge-transfer-directed radical substitution enables para-selective C–H functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boursalian, Gregory B.; Ham, Won Seok; Mazzotti, Anthony R.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Efficient C–H functionalization requires selectivity for specific C–H bonds. Progress has been made for directed aromatic substitution reactions to achieve ortho and meta selectivity, but a general strategy for para-selective C–H functionalization has remained elusive. Herein we introduce a previously unappreciated concept that enables nearly complete para selectivity. We propose that radicals with high electron affinity elicit arene-to-radical charge transfer in the transition state of radical addition, which is the factor primarily responsible for high positional selectivity. We demonstrate with a simple theoretical tool that the selectivity is predictable and show the utility of the concept through a direct synthesis of aryl piperazines. Our results contradict the notion, widely held by organic chemists, that radical aromatic substitution reactions are inherently unselective. The concept of radical substitution directed by charge transfer could serve as the basis for the development of new, highly selective C–H functionalization reactions.

  11. The phase-integral method for radiative transfer problems with highly-peaked phase functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Complete solutions to the radiative transfer equation, including both azimuth and depth dependence, are provided by the discrete-ordinate method of Chandrasekhar, but these solutions are often limited because of large computer requirements. This paper presents a 'phase-integral' method which greatly reduces the number of discrete ordinates needed in the solution for highly peaked phase functions. A composite quadrature method is shown to be effective in further reducing the number of discrete ordinates required for highly anisotropic phase functions. Examples are given to indicate convergence requirements and expected accuracy in the complete solution for Henyey-Greenstein and cloud-type phase functions.

  12. Estimating Contrast Transfer Function and Associated Parameters by Constrained Nonlinear Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Jiang, Wen; Chen, Dong-Hua; Adiga, Umesh; Ng, Esmond G.; Chiu, Wah

    2008-07-28

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of macromolecules from two-dimensional single-particle electron images requires determination and correction of the contrast transfer function (CTF) and envelope function. A computational algorithm based on constrained non-linear optimization is developed to estimate the essential parameters in the CTF and envelope function model simultaneously and automatically. The application of this estimation method is demonstrated with focal series images of amorphous carbon film as well as images of ice-embedded icosahedral virus particles suspended across holes.

  13. An exact analysis of surface acoustic waves in a plate of functionally graded materials.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liming; Wang, Ji; Zhong, Zheng; Du, Jianke

    2009-12-01

    Some traditional applications of structures and devices with homogeneous materials are being gradually replaced by functionally graded materials (FGM) with spatial variation of properties. The analysis of SAW propagating in FGM structures will be different primarily due to variations of material properties and resulting differential equations with variable coefficients. To provide an effective method and accurate results for the analysis of SAWs in FGM structures, we employed the Frobenius method as the only available method for a detailed analysis of SAW in materials with property variations in a linear pattern. Analytical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method and the effect of FGM on changes of surface displacements in SAW propagation.

  14. Efficient calculation of two-dimensional periodic and waveguide acoustic Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoshenkov, K. V.; Chandler-Wilde, Simon N.

    2002-04-01

    New representations and efficient calculation methods are derived for the problem of propagation from an infinite regularly spaced array of coherent line sources above a homogeneous impedance plane, and for the Green's function for sound propagation in the canyon formed by two infinitely high, parallel rigid or sound soft walls and an impedance ground surface. The infinite sum of source contributions is replaced by a finite sum and the remainder is expressed as a Laplace-type integral. A pole subtraction technique is used to remove poles in the integrand which lie near the path of integration, obtaining a smooth integrand, more suitable for numerical integration, and a specific numerical integration method is proposed. Numerical experiments show highly accurate results across the frequency spectrum for a range of ground surface types. It is expected that the methods proposed will prove useful in boundary element modeling of noise propagation in canyon streets and in ducts, and for problems of scattering by periodic surfaces.

  15. True Katydids (Pseudophyllinae) from Guadeloupe: Acoustic Signals and Functional Considerations of Song Production

    PubMed Central

    Stumpner, Andreas; Dann, Angela; Schink, Matthias; Gubert, Silvia; Hugel, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Guadeloupe, the largest of the Leeward Islands, harbors three species of Pseudophyllinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) belonging to distinct tribes. This study examined the basic aspects of sound production and acousto-vibratory behavior of these species. As the songs of many Pseudophyllinae are complex and peak at high frequencies, they require high quality recordings. Wild specimens were therefore recorded ex situ. Collected specimens were used in structure-function experiments. Karukerana aguilari Bonfils (Pterophyllini) is a large species with a mirror in each tegmen and conspicuous folds over the mirror. It sings 4–6 syllables, each comprising 10–20 pulses, with several peaks in the frequency spectrum between 4 and 20 kHz. The song is among the loudest in Orthoptera (> 125 dB SPL in 10 cm distance). The folds are protective and have no function in song production. Both mirrors may work independently in sound radiation. Nesonotus reticulatus (Fabricius) (Cocconotini) produces verses from two syllables at irregular intervals. The song peaks around 20 kHz. While singing, the males often produce a tremulation signal with the abdomen at about 8–10 Hz. To our knowledge, it is the first record of simultaneous calling song and tremulation in Orthoptera. Other males reply to the tremulation with their own tremulation. Xerophyllopteryx fumosa (Brunner von Wattenwyl) (Pleminiini) is a large, bark-like species, producing a syllable of around 20 pulses. The syllables are produced with irregular rhythms (often two with shorter intervals). The song peaks around 2–3 kHz and 10 kHz. The hind wings are relatively thick and are held between the half opened tegmina during singing. Removal of the hind wings reduces song intensity by about 5 dB, especially of the low frequency component, suggesting that the hind wings have a role in amplifying the song. PMID:24785151

  16. True katydids (Pseudophyllinae) from Guadeloupe: acoustic signals and functional considerations of song production.

    PubMed

    Stumpner, Andreas; Dann, Angela; Schink, Matthias; Gubert, Silvia; Hugel, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Guadeloupe, the largest of the Leeward Islands, harbors three species of Pseudophyllinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) belonging to distinct tribes. This study examined the basic aspects of sound production and acousto-vibratory behavior of these species. As the songs of many Pseudophyllinae are complex and peak at high frequencies, they require high quality recordings. Wild specimens were therefore recorded ex situ. Collected specimens were used in structure-function experiments. Karukerana aguilari Bonfils (Pterophyllini) is a large species with a mirror in each tegmen and conspicuous folds over the mirror. It sings 4-6 syllables, each comprising 10-20 pulses, with several peaks in the frequency spectrum between 4 and 20 kHz. The song is among the loudest in Orthoptera (> 125 dB SPL in 10 cm distance). The folds are protective and have no function in song production. Both mirrors may work independently in sound radiation. Nesonotus reticulatus (Fabricius) (Cocconotini) produces verses from two syllables at irregular intervals. The song peaks around 20 kHz. While singing, the males often produce a tremulation signal with the abdomen at about 8-10 Hz. To our knowledge, it is the first record of simultaneous calling song and tremulation in Orthoptera. Other males reply to the tremulation with their own tremulation. Xerophyllopteryx fumosa (Brunner von Wattenwyl) (Pleminiini) is a large, bark-like species, producing a syllable of around 20 pulses. The syllables are produced with irregular rhythms (often two with shorter intervals). The song peaks around 2-3 kHz and 10 kHz. The hind wings are relatively thick and are held between the half opened tegmina during singing. Removal of the hind wings reduces song intensity by about 5 dB, especially of the low frequency component, suggesting that the hind wings have a role in amplifying the song. PMID:24785151

  17. Photophysical properties of charge transfer pairs encapsulated inside macrocycle cage: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on three charge transfer donor-acceptor (D-A) molecular pairs, i.e. naphthalene-diamine (Naph) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) molecules as electron donors and benzene-diimide (Diimide) and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) as electron acceptors. Structural, charge transfer and optical properties of the systems have been studied. The D-A pairs then has been considered inside a macrocycle (cucurbit[8]uril) cavity and Naph-Diimide and TTF-Diimide pairs have been shown to exhibit changes in their structures and orientations, TTF-TCNQ pair does not show any significant structural change. Our work suggests that these changes in structures or orientations are result of electronic repulsion between the keto group oxygen atoms and it can lead to tuning of charge transfer and optical properties of the systems.

  18. Elucidation of the methyl transfer mechanism catalyzed by chalcone O-methyltransferase: a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng-Chao; Pan, Xiao-Liang; Liu, Wei; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2011-11-15

    The mechanism of the methyl transfer catalyzed by chalcone O-methyltransferase has been computationally investigated by employing the hybrid functional B3LYP. Two models are constructed based on the two conformations of the substrate isoliquiritigenin in the X-ray structure. Our calculations show that the overall reaction is divided into two elementary steps: the water-assisted deprotonation of the substrate by His278 as a catalytic base, followed by the methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to the substrate. The calculated rate-limiting barriers for the methyl-transfer step indicate that the catalytic reactions are energetically feasible for both conformations adopted by the substrate. PMID:21815175

  19. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Finkina, E. I.; Melnikova, D. N.; Bogdanov, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life. PMID:27437139

  20. New Precision Measurements of Deuteron Structure Function A(Q) at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byungwuek

    2009-08-01

    Differences between previous measurements of low momentum transfer electron-deuteron elastic scattering prevent a clean determination of even the sign of the leading low momentum transfer relativistic corrections, or of the convergence of chiral perturbation theory. We have attempted to resolve this issue with a new high-precision measurement in Jefferson Lab Hall A. Elastic electron scattering was measured on targets of tantalum, carbon, hydrogen, and deuterium at beam energy of 685 MeV. The four-momentum transfer covered the range of 0.15 - 0.7 GeV. The experiment included a new beam calorimeter, to better calibrate the low beam currents used in the experiment, and new collimators to better define the spectrometer solid angles. We obtained cross sections of deuteron as ratios to hydrogen cross sections. A fit function of B(Q) world data is newly made and subtracted from cross sections to find values of A(Q).

  1. Acoustic and non-acoustic factors in modeling listener-specific performance of sagittal-plane sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Baumgartner, Robert; Laback, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The ability of sound-source localization in sagittal planes (along the top-down and front-back dimension) varies considerably across listeners. The directional acoustic spectral features, described by head-related transfer functions (HRTFs), also vary considerably across listeners, a consequence of the listener-specific shape of the ears. It is not clear whether the differences in localization ability result from differences in the encoding of directional information provided by the HRTFs, i.e., an acoustic factor, or from differences in auditory processing of those cues (e.g., spectral-shape sensitivity), i.e., non-acoustic factors. We addressed this issue by analyzing the listener-specific localization ability in terms of localization performance. Directional responses to spatially distributed broadband stimuli from 18 listeners were used. A model of sagittal-plane localization was fit individually for each listener by considering the actual localization performance, the listener-specific HRTFs representing the acoustic factor, and an uncertainty parameter representing the non-acoustic factors. The model was configured to simulate the condition of complete calibration of the listener to the tested HRTFs. Listener-specifically calibrated model predictions yielded correlations of, on average, 0.93 with the actual localization performance. Then, the model parameters representing the acoustic and non-acoustic factors were systematically permuted across the listener group. While the permutation of HRTFs affected the localization performance, the permutation of listener-specific uncertainty had a substantially larger impact. Our findings suggest that across-listener variability in sagittal-plane localization ability is only marginally determined by the acoustic factor, i.e., the quality of directional cues found in typical human HRTFs. Rather, the non-acoustic factors, supposed to represent the listeners' efficiency in processing directional cues, appear to be

  2. Bacterial Genes in the Aphid Genome: Absence of Functional Gene Transfer from Buchnera to Its Host

    PubMed Central

    Nikoh, Naruo; McCutcheon, John P.; Kudo, Toshiaki; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Moran, Nancy A.; Nakabachi, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Genome reduction is typical of obligate symbionts. In cellular organelles, this reduction partly reflects transfer of ancestral bacterial genes to the host genome, but little is known about gene transfer in other obligate symbioses. Aphids harbor anciently acquired obligate mutualists, Buchnera aphidicola (Gammaproteobacteria), which have highly reduced genomes (420–650 kb), raising the possibility of gene transfer from ancestral Buchnera to the aphid genome. In addition, aphids often harbor other bacteria that also are potential sources of transferred genes. Previous limited sampling of genes expressed in bacteriocytes, the specialized cells that harbor Buchnera, revealed that aphids acquired at least two genes from bacteria. The newly sequenced genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, presents the first opportunity for a complete inventory of genes transferred from bacteria to the host genome in the context of an ancient obligate symbiosis. Computational screening of the entire A. pisum genome, followed by phylogenetic and experimental analyses, provided strong support for the transfer of 12 genes or gene fragments from bacteria to the aphid genome: three LD–carboxypeptidases (LdcA1, LdcA2,ψLdcA), five rare lipoprotein As (RlpA1-5), N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiD), 1,4-beta-N-acetylmuramidase (bLys), DNA polymerase III alpha chain (ψDnaE), and ATP synthase delta chain (ψAtpH). Buchnera was the apparent source of two highly truncated pseudogenes (ψDnaE and ψAtpH). Most other transferred genes were closely related to genes from relatives of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria). At least eight of the transferred genes (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5, bLys) appear to be functional, and expression of seven (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5) are highly upregulated in bacteriocytes. The LdcAs and RlpAs appear to have been duplicated after transfer. Our results excluded the hypothesis that genome reduction in Buchnera has been accompanied by gene transfer to the host

  3. Modulation transfer function and three-dimensional shape measurement using pseudorandom structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teipen, Brian Thomas

    2000-12-01

    Over the years, several optical and opto-electronic systems have been invented in order to reproduce or improve an ability to image a physical scene. Optical imaging (vision) delivers the capability to collect an enormous amount of information about the surrounding environment. The quality of any imaging system can be conveniently defined by the amount of information that is ultimately gathered. Information transfer is the fundamental process of imaging systems and often can be described in terms of linear systems. Conveniently, transfer functions common to linear systems theory (communications theory) can be adopted to accurately describe optical information transfer in imaging systems. In this dissertation, we report on the advancements of two areas of optical imaging. Firstly, we present a new measurement process involving pseudo-random spatial patterns generated with a liquid crystal display (LCD) that allows convenient determination of the spatial- frequency transfer function commonly known as the modulation transfer function (MTF) of digital imaging systems. We present horizontal and vertical MTF measurements for color and monochrome charge-coupled device (CCD) video systems, common to machine vision and robotic vision applications. Results are found to agree with previously applied methods of measuring imaging resolution, while increasing the speed, adaptability, and convenience of the measurement. Secondly, we present three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurements from a new experimental method using polarization-encoded spatial patterns. The measurement technique is an active method of vision using projected patterns from a LCD projector. Part of the polarization-encoded pattern, a sub-pattern that is a pseudo-random code, is dedicated to solve the difficult problem of measuring the absolute height of an object with edge discontinuities. This technique conveniently allows lost fringe-order information of the classic synthetic-fringe pattern to be regained.

  4. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  5. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  6. Determining the Transfer Function for Unsteady Pressure Measurements Using a Method of Characteristics Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Edward L.; Henfling, John F.; McBride, Donald D.

    1999-05-12

    An inverse Fourier transform method for removing lag from pressure measurements has been used by various researchers, given an experimentally derived transfer function to characterize the pressure plumbing. This paper presents a Method of Characteristics (MOC) solution technique for predicting the transfer function and thus easily determining its sensitivity to various plumbing pammeters. The MOC solution has been used in the pipeline industry for some time for application to transient flow in pipelines, but it also lends itself well to this application. For highly nonsteady pressures frequency-dependent friction can cause significant distortion of the traveling waves. This is accounted for in the formulation. A simple bench experiment and proof-of-principle test provide evidence to establish the range of validity of the method.

  7. Electron transfer and localization in endohedral metallofullerenes: Ab initio density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shenyuan; Yoon, Mina; Hicke, Christian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Enge

    2008-09-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes constitute an appealing class of nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of a wide range of materials. One open question of fundamental importance is the precise nature of charge redistribution within the carbon cages (Cn) upon metal encapsulation. Using ab initio density functional theory, we systematically study the electronic structure of metallofullerenes, focusing on the spatial charge redistribution. For large metallofullerenes (n>32) , the valence electrons of the metal atoms are all transferred to the fullerene states. Surprisingly, the transferred charge is found to be highly localized inside the cage near the metal cations rather than uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the carbon cage as traditionally believed. This counterintuitive charge localization picture is attributed to the strong metal-cage interactions within the systems. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the design of fullerene-based functional nanomaterials.

  8. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  9. Method and apparatus for transfer function simulator for testing complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing the operation of a complex stabilization circuit in a closed loop system is presented. The method is comprised of a programmed analog or digital computing system for implementing the transfer function of a load thereby providing a predictable load. The digital computing system employs a table stored in a microprocessor in which precomputed values of the load transfer function are stored for values of input signal from the stabilization circuit over the range of interest. This technique may be used not only for isolating faults in the stabilization circuit, but also for analyzing a fault in a faulty load by so varying parameters of the computing system as to simulate operation of the actual load with the fault.

  10. Transfer matrices combined with Green's functions for the multiple-scattering simulation of electronic projection imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Vigneron, J.-P.

    1999-07-01

    Electronic projection imaging is described in the framework of a multiple-scattering theory, by using a combination of transfer-matrix and Green's-function formalisms. The transfer-matrix methodology is used to compute the wave propagation within the tip and object scattering region, while the Green's-function formalism is used to describe the electron projection from the scatterers towards a distant imaging screen. This full-order theory is needed to overcome the limits of the first Born approximation and deal with three-dimensional effects. In particular, this approach is able to account for sucking-in and standing-wave effects taking place close to or inside the object. The simulation of the electronic diffraction by a model nanoscopic carbon rod, eventually containing inhomogeneities, is considered in detail.

  11. Digital decoupling controller design for multiple time-delay continuous-time transfer function matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Shieh, L. S.; Tsai, J. S. H.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an extended adjoint decoupling method to conduct the digital decoupling controller design for the continuous-time transfer function matrices with multiple (integer/fractional) time delays in both the denominator and the numerator matrix. First, based on the sampled unit-step response data of the afore-mentioned multiple time-delay system, the conventional balanced model-reduction method is utilised to construct an approximated discrete-time model of the original (known/unknown) multiple time-delay continuous-time transfer function matrix. Then, a digital decoupling controller is designed by utilising the extended adjoint decoupling method together with the conventional discrete-time root-locus method. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Simultaneous determination of position and mass in the cantilever sensor using transfer function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deokman; Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung; Park, Junhong

    2013-07-01

    We present the simultaneous measurement of mass and position of micro-beads attached to the cantilever-based mass sensors using the transfer function method. 10 μm diameter micro-beads were placed on micro-cantilevers and the cantilevers were excited by lead-zirconate-titanate through low-pass filtered random voltages. The cantilever vibration was measured via a laser Doppler vibrometer before and after applying the beads. From the measured transfer function, the bead position was identified using its influence on the cantilever kinetic energy. The bead mass was then obtained by analyzing the wave propagation near the beads. The predicted position and mass agreed well with actual values.

  13. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  14. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  15. A Comparison of Acoustic Radiation Force-Derived Indices of Cardiac Function in the Langendorff Perfused Rabbit Heart.

    PubMed

    Vejdani-Jahromi, Maryam; Nagle, Mathew; Jiang, Yang; Trahey, Gregg E; Wolf, Patrick D

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade, there has been an increased interest in characterizing cardiac tissue mechanics utilizing newly developed ultrasound-based elastography techniques. These methods excite the tissue mechanically and track the response. Two frequently used methods, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) and shear-wave elasticity imaging (SWEI), have been considered qualitative and quantitative techniques providing relative and absolute measures of tissue stiffness, respectively. Depending on imaging conditions, it is desirable to identify indices of cardiac function that could be measured by ARFI and SWEI and to characterize the relationship between the measures. In this study, we have compared two indices (i.e., relaxation time constant used for diastolic dysfunction assessment and systolic/diastolic stiffness ratio) measured nearly simultaneously by M-mode ARFI and SWEI techniques. We additionally correlated ARFI-measured inverse displacements with SWEI-measured values of the shear modulus of stiffness. For the eight animals studied, the average relaxation time constant ( τ) measured by ARFI and SWEI were ([Formula: see text]) and ([Formula: see text]), respectively ([Formula: see text]). Average systolic/diastolic stiffness ratios for ARFI and SWEI measurements were 6.01±1.37 and 7.12±3.24, respectively ([Formula: see text]). Shear modulus of stiffness (SWEI) was linearly related to inverse displacement values (ARFI) with a 95% CI for the slope of 0.010-0.011 [Formula: see text] ( R(2)=0.73). In conclusion, the relaxation time constant and the systolic/diastolic stiffness ratio were calculated with good agreement between the ARFI- and SWEI-derived measurements. ARFI relative and SWEI absolute stiffness measurements were linearly related with varying slopes based on imaging conditions and subject tissue properties. PMID:27008665

  16. Method of calculating retroreflector-array transfer functions. [laser range finders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques and equations used in calculating the transfer functions to relate the observed return laser pulses to the center of mass of the Lageos satellite retroflector array, and for most of the retroreflector-equipped satellites now in orbit are described. The methods derived include the effects of coherent interference, diffraction, polarization, and dihedral-angle offsets. Particular emphasis is given to deriving expressions for the diffraction pattern and active reflecting area of various cube-corner designs.

  17. SUMO-1 gene transfer improves cardiac function in a large-animal model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tilemann, Lisa; Lee, Ahyoung; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Aguero, Jaume; Rapti, Kleopatra; Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Fish, Kenneth M; Kho, Changwon; Hajjar, Roger J

    2013-11-13

    Recently, the impact of small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (SUMO-1) on the regulation and preservation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA2a) function was discovered. The amount of myocardial SUMO-1 is decreased in failing hearts, and its knockdown results in severe heart failure (HF) in mice. In a previous study, we showed that SUMO-1 gene transfer substantially improved cardiac function in a murine model of pressure overload-induced HF. Toward clinical translation, we evaluated in this study the effects of SUMO-1 gene transfer in a swine model of ischemic HF. One month after balloon occlusion of the proximal left anterior descending artery followed by reperfusion, the animals were randomized to receive either SUMO-1 at two doses, SERCA2a, or both by adeno-associated vector type 1 (AAV1) gene transfer via antegrade coronary infusion. Control animals received saline infusions. After gene delivery, there was a significant increase in the maximum rate of pressure rise [dP/dt(max)] that was most pronounced in the group that received both SUMO-1 and SERCA2a. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved after high-dose SUMO-1 with or without SERCA2a gene delivery, whereas there was a decline in LVEF in the animals receiving saline. Furthermore, the dilatation of LV volumes was prevented in the treatment groups. SUMO-1 gene transfer therefore improved cardiac function and stabilized LV volumes in a large-animal model of HF. These results support the critical role of SUMO-1 in SERCA2a function and underline the therapeutic potential of SUMO-1 for HF patients.

  18. Analysis of voltage effect on holographic gratings by modulation transfer function.

    PubMed

    Fontanilla-Urdaneta, Rosangela Coromoto; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Fuentes-Tapia, Israel; Ríos-Velasco, Mónica Areli

    2011-05-01

    The experimental data allow us to determine the imaging quality of holographic gratings with photosensitive film using organic material based on a polyvinyl alcohol matrix doped with potassium dichromate and nickel (II) chloride hexahydrate. The diffraction efficiency is estimated by different spatial frequencies, and the readout image quality is analyzed by the modulation transfer function. The experiment is carried out, with and without voltage application, at different spatial frequencies to obtain the image quality of photosensitive film.

  19. Assessing functional annotation transfers with inter-species conserved coexpression: application to Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum is the main causative agent of malaria. Of the 5 484 predicted genes of P. falciparum, about 57% do not have sufficient sequence similarity to characterized genes in other species to warrant functional assignments. Non-homology methods are thus needed to obtain functional clues for these uncharacterized genes. Gene expression data have been widely used in the recent years to help functional annotation in an intra-species way via the so-called Guilt By Association (GBA) principle. Results We propose a new method that uses gene expression data to assess inter-species annotation transfers. Our approach starts from a set of likely orthologs between a reference species (here S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster) and a query species (P. falciparum). It aims at identifying clusters of coexpressed genes in the query species whose coexpression has been conserved in the reference species. These conserved clusters of coexpressed genes are then used to assess annotation transfers between genes with low sequence similarity, enabling reliable transfers of annotations from the reference to the query species. The approach was used with transcriptomic data sets of P. falciparum, S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster, and enabled us to propose with high confidence new/refined annotations for several dozens hypothetical/putative P. falciparum genes. Notably, we revised the annotation of genes involved in ribosomal proteins and ribosome biogenesis and assembly, thus highlighting several potential drug targets. Conclusions Our approach uses both sequence similarity and gene expression data to help inter-species gene annotation transfers. Experiments show that this strategy improves the accuracy achieved when using solely sequence similarity and outperforms the accuracy of the GBA approach. In addition, our experiments with P. falciparum show that it can infer a function for numerous hypothetical genes. PMID:20078859

  20. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor) subassembly types

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-09-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel.

  1. Applications of Displacement Transfer Functions to Deformed Shape Predictions of the GIII Swept-Wing Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-Fat; Ko, William L.

    2016-01-01

    The displacement transfer functions (DTFs) were applied to the GIII swept wing for the deformed shape prediction. The calculated deformed shapes are very close to the correlated finite element results as well as the measured data. The convergence study showed that using 17 strain stations, the wing-tip displacement prediction error was 1.6 percent, and that there is no need to use a large number of strain stations for G-III wing shape predictions.

  2. Testing peatland water-table depth transfer functions using high-resolution hydrological monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindles, Graeme T.; Holden, Joseph; Raby, Cassandra L.; Turner, T. Edward; Blundell, Antony; Charman, Dan J.; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-07-01

    Transfer functions are now commonly used to reconstruct past environmental variability from palaeoecological data. However, such approaches need to be critically appraised. Testate amoeba-based transfer functions are an established method for the quantitative reconstruction of past water-table variations in peatlands, and have been applied to research questions in palaeoclimatology, peatland ecohydrology and archaeology. We analysed automatically-logged peatland water-table data from dipwells located in England, Wales and Finland and a suite of three year, one year and summer water-table statistics were calculated from each location. Surface moss samples were extracted from beside each dipwell and the testate amoebae community composition was determined. Two published transfer functions were applied to the testate-amoeba data for prediction of water-table depth (England and Europe). Our results show that estimated water-table depths based on the testate amoeba community reflect directional changes, but that they are poor representations of the real mean or median water-table magnitudes for the study sites. We suggest that although testate amoeba-based reconstructions can be used to identify past shifts in peat hydrology, they cannot currently be used to establish precise hydrological baselines such as those needed to inform management and restoration of peatlands. One approach to avoid confusion with contemporary water-table determinations is to use residuals or standardised values for peatland water-table reconstructions. We contend that our test of transfer functions against independent instrumental data sets may be more powerful than relying on statistical testing alone.

  3. Contrast transfer function in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianheng; Du, Yang; Lin, Danying; Liu, Xin; Niu, Hanben

    2014-05-01

    x-Ray grating interferometry is a method for x-ray wave front sensing and phase-contrast imaging that has been developed over past few years. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the quality of an image. In characterizing the performance of this interferometer, the contrast transfer function is considered in this paper. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function (CTF) is derived and quantified for this interferometer. The illumination source and digital detector are both considered as significant factors controlling image quality, and it can be noted that contrast and resolution in turn depends primarily on the projected intensity profile of the array source and the pixel size of the detector. Furthermore, a test pattern phantom with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies was designed and imaging of this phantom was simulated by a computer. Contrast transfer function behavior observed in the simulated image is consistent with our theoretical CTF. This might be beneficial for the evaluation and optimization of a grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system.

  4. Detecting damage in non-uniform beams using the dereverberated transfer function response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purekar, A. S.; Pines, D. J.; Purekar, A. S.

    2000-08-01

    Delamination damage in composite rotorcraft flexbeams caused by excessive vibratory and fatigue loads can lead to degradation in flapwise and lagwise performance of the rotor blade. In addition, delaminations can result in rapid fatigue failure of these tailored composite elements leading to catastrophic results. A novel damage detection strategy is evaluated in this work which attempts to exploit the dereverberated transfer function response of beams with tapered geometries. This approach avoids high fidelity finite element models of damaged one-dimensional beams with non-uniform geometries. To obtain the dereverberated transfer function response, a virtual control force is applied to the reverberated transfer function response to remove resonant and anti-resonant dynamics associated with the beam's boundary conditions. Magnitude and phase characteristics between each actuator and sensor can then be used to infer changing structural properties. Analytical and experimental results suggest that this approach can be used to quantitatively and qualitatively infer delamination damage in non-uniform beams. Experimental results are displayed for beams with varying thickness and width tapers.

  5. Non-invasive baroreflex sensitivity assessment using wavelet transfer function-based time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Keissar, K; Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; La Rovere, M T; Gilad, O

    2010-07-01

    A novel approach for the estimation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is introduced based on time-frequency analysis of the transfer function (TF). The TF method (TF-BRS) is a well-established non-invasive technique which assumes stationarity. This condition is difficult to meet, especially in cardiac patients. In this study, the classical TF was replaced with a wavelet transfer function (WTF) and the classical coherence was replaced with wavelet transform coherence (WTC), adding the time domain as an additional degree of freedom with dynamic error estimation. Error analysis and comparison between WTF-BRS and TF-BRS were performed using simulated signals with known transfer function and added noise. Similar comparisons were performed for ECG and blood pressure signals, in the supine position, of 19 normal subjects, 44 patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction (MI) and 45 patients with chronic heart failure. This yielded an excellent linear association (R > 0.94, p < 0.001) for time-averaged WTF-BRS, validating the new method as consistent with a known method. The additional advantage of dynamic analysis of coherence and TF estimates was illustrated in two physiological examples of supine rest and change of posture showing the evolution of BRS synchronized with its error estimations and sympathovagal balance. PMID:20585147

  6. Prediction of the vibroacoustic behavior of a submerged shell with non-axisymmetric internal substructures by a condensed transfer function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, V.; Maxit, L.; Guyader, J.-L.; Leissing, T.

    2016-01-01

    The vibroacoustic behavior of axisymmetric stiffened shells immersed in water has been intensively studied in the past. On the contrary, little attention has been paid to the modeling of these shells coupled to non-axisymmetric internal frames. Indeed, breaking the axisymmetry couples the circumferential orders of the Fourier series and considerably increases the computational costs. In order to tackle this issue, we propose a sub-structuring approach called the Condensed Transfer Function (CTF) method that will allow assembling a model of axisymmetric stiffened shell with models of non-axisymmetric internal frames. The CTF method is developed in the general case of mechanical subsystems coupled along curves. A set of orthonormal functions called condensation functions, which depend on the curvilinear abscissa along the coupling line, is considered. This set is then used as a basis for approximating and decomposing the displacements and the applied forces at the line junctions. Thanks to the definition and calculation of condensed transfer functions for each uncoupled subsystem and by using the superposition principle for passive linear systems, the behavior of the coupled subsystems can be deduced. A plane plate is considered as a test case to study the convergence of the method with respect to the type and the number of condensation functions taken into account. The CTF method is then applied to couple a submerged non-periodically stiffened shell described using the Circumferential Admittance Approach (CAA) with internal substructures described by Finite Element Method (FEM). The influence of non-axisymmetric internal substructures can finally be studied and it is shown that it tends to increase the radiation efficiency of the shell and can modify the vibrational and acoustic energy distribution.

  7. Acoustic FMRI noise: linear time-invariant system model.

    PubMed

    Rizzo Sierra, Carlos V; Versluis, Maarten J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Duifhuis, Hendrikus Diek

    2008-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For auditory system studies, however, the acoustic noise generated by the scanner tends to interfere with the assessments of this activation. Understanding and modeling fMRI acoustic noise is a useful step to its reduction. To study acoustic noise, the MR scanner is modeled as a linear electroacoustical system generating sound pressure signals proportional to the time derivative of the input gradient currents. The transfer function of one MR scanner is determined for two different input specifications: 1) by using the gradient waveform calculated by the scanner software and 2) by using a recording of the gradient current. Up to 4 kHz, the first method is shown as reliable as the second one, and its use is encouraged when direct measurements of gradient currents are not possible. Additionally, the linear order and average damping properties of the gradient coil system are determined by impulse response analysis. Since fMRI is often based on echo planar imaging (EPI) sequences, a useful validation of the transfer function prediction ability can be obtained by calculating the acoustic output for the EPI sequence. We found a predicted sound pressure level (SPL) for the EPI sequence of 104 dB SPL compared to a measured value of 102 dB SPL. As yet, the predicted EPI pressure waveform shows similarity as well as some differences with the directly measured EPI pressure waveform.

  8. Analysis of existing data from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing experiment at Garner Valley, California using noise correlation functions (PoroTomo Substask 3.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiangfang

    2015-03-26

    In September 2013, an experiment using Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) was conducted at Garner Valley, a test site of the University of California Santa Barbara (Lancelle et al., 2014). This submission includes noise cross-correlation functions (NCF) . Each file includes a NCF between two channels. The name of each channel denotes the distance in meters from starting point of the fiber-optic cable. Lancelle, C., N. Lord, H. Wang, D. Fratta, R. Nigbor, A. Chalari, R. Karaulanov, J. Baldwin, and E. Castongia (2014), Directivity and Sensitivity of Fiber-Optic Cable Measuring Ground Motion using a Distributed Acoustic Sensing Array (abstract # NS31C-3935), AGU Fall Meeting. https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/meetingapp.cgi#Paper/19828 The e-poster is available at: https://agu.confex.com/data/handout/agu/fm14/Paper_19828_handout_696_0.pdf

  9. Large-Deformation Displacement Transfer Functions for Shape Predictions of Highly Flexible Slender Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2013-01-01

    Large deformation displacement transfer functions were formulated for deformed shape predictions of highly flexible slender structures like aircraft wings. In the formulation, the embedded beam (depth wise cross section of structure along the surface strain sensing line) was first evenly discretized into multiple small domains, with surface strain sensing stations located at the domain junctures. Thus, the surface strain (bending strains) variation within each domain could be expressed with linear of nonlinear function. Such piecewise approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations [classical (Eulerian), physical (Lagrangian), and shifted curvature equations] to yield closed form slope and deflection equations in recursive forms.

  10. Parameterization of the three-dimensional room transfer function in horizontal plane.

    PubMed

    Bu, Bing; Abhayapala, Thushara D; Bao, Chang-chun; Zhang, Wen

    2015-09-01

    This letter proposes an efficient parameterization of the three-dimensional room transfer function (RTF) which is robust for the position variations of source and receiver in respective horizontal planes. Based on azimuth harmonic analysis, the proposed method exploits the underlying properties of the associated Legendre functions to remove a portion of the spherical harmonic coefficients of RTF which have no contribution in the horizontal plane. This reduction leads to a flexible measuring-point structure consisting of practical concentric circular arrays to extract horizontal plane RTF coefficients. The accuracy of the above parameterization is verified through numerical simulations. PMID:26428827

  11. Charge transfer in time-dependent density-functional theory via spin-symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Fuks, Johanna I.; Maitra, Neepa T.

    2011-04-15

    Long-range charge-transfer excitations pose a major challenge for time-dependent density-functional approximations. We show that spin-symmetry breaking offers a simple solution for molecules composed of open-shell fragments, yielding accurate excitations at large separations when the acceptor effectively contains one active electron. Unrestricted exact-exchange and self-interaction-corrected functionals are performed on one-dimensional models and on the real LiH molecule within the pseudopotential approximation to demonstrate our results.

  12. Ru(II)-diimine functionalized metalloproteins: From electron transfer studies to light-driven biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Lam, Quan; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The unique photochemical properties of Ru(II)-diimine complexes have helped initiate a series of seminal electron transfer studies in metalloenzymes. It has thus been possible to experimentally determine rate constants for long-range electron transfers. These studies have laid the foundation for the investigation of reactive intermediates in heme proteins and for the design of light-activated biocatalysts. Various metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, laccase and cytochrome P450 BM3 have been functionalized with Ru(II)-diimine complexes. Upon visible light-excitation, these photosensitized metalloproteins are capable of sustaining photocatalytic activity to reduce small molecules such as protons, acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide or activate molecular dioxygen to produce hydroxylated products. The Ru(II)-diimine photosensitizers are hence able to deliver multiple electrons to metalloenzymes buried active sites, circumventing the need for the natural redox partners. In this review, we will highlight the key achievements of the light-driven biocatalysts, which stem from the extensive electron transfer investigations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  13. Functional and Evolutionary Characterization of a Gene Transfer Agent's Multilocus "Genome".

    PubMed

    Hynes, Alexander P; Shakya, Migun; Mercer, Ryan G; Grüll, Marc P; Bown, Luke; Davidson, Fraser; Steffen, Ekaterina; Matchem, Heidi; Peach, Mandy E; Berger, Tim; Grebe, Katherine; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Lang, Andrew S

    2016-10-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) are phage-like particles that can package and transfer a random piece of the producing cell's genome, but are unable to transfer all the genes required for their own production. As such, GTAs represent an evolutionary conundrum: are they selfish genetic elements propagating through an unknown mechanism, defective viruses, or viral structures "repurposed" by cells for gene exchange, as their name implies? In Rhodobacter capsulatus, production of the R. capsulatus GTA (RcGTA) particles is associated with a cluster of genes resembling a small prophage. Utilizing transcriptomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we report that the RcGTA "genome" consists of at least 24 genes distributed across five distinct loci. We demonstrate that, of these additional loci, two are involved in cell recognition and binding and one in the production and maturation of RcGTA particles. The five RcGTA "genome" loci are widespread within Rhodobacterales, but not all loci have the same evolutionary histories. Specifically, two of the loci have been subject to frequent, probably virus-mediated, gene transfer events. We argue that it is unlikely that RcGTA is a selfish genetic element. Instead, our findings are compatible with the scenario that RcGTA is a virus-derived element maintained by the producing organism due to a selective advantage of within-population gene exchange. The modularity of the RcGTA "genome" is presumably a result of selection on the host organism to retain GTA functionality. PMID:27343288

  14. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  15. Crustal Properties Across the Mid-Continent Rift via Transfer Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, A. W.; Tyomkin, Y.; Campbell, R.; van der Lee, S.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Mid-Continent Rift (MCR), a failed Proterozoic rift structure in central North America, is a dominant feature of North American gravity maps. The rift underwent a combination of extension, magmatism, and later compression, and it is difficult to predict how these events affected the overall crustal thickness and bulk composition in the vicinity of the rift axis, though the associated gravity high indicates that large-volume mafic magmatism took place. The Superior Province Rifting Earthscope Experiment (SPREE) project instrumented the MCR with Flexible Array broadband seismographs from 2011 through 2013 in Minnesota and Wisconsin, along two lines crossing the rift axis as well as a line following the axis. We examine teleseismic P-coda data from SPREE and nearby Transportable Array instruments using a new technique: transfer-function analysis. In this approach, possible models of crustal structure are used to generate a predicted transfer function relating the radial and vertical components of the P coda at a particular site. The transfer function then allows generation of a misfit (between the true radial component and a synthetic radial component predicted from the vertical trace) without the need to perform receiver-function deconvolution, thus avoiding the deconvolution problems encountered with receiver functions in sedimentary basins. We use the transfer-function approach to perform a grid search over three crustal properties: crustal thickness, crustal P/S velocity ratio, and the thickness of an overlying sedimentary basin. Results for our SPREE/TA data set indicate that the crust is significantly thickened along the rift axis, with maximum thicknesses approaching 50 km; the crust is thinner (ca. 40 km) outside of the rift zone. The crustal thickness structure is particularly complex beneath southeastern Minnesota, where very strong Moho topography is present, as well as up to 2 km of sediment; further north, the Moho is smoother and the basin is not

  16. Landslide velocity prediction using a rainfall to displacements transfer function. La Barmasse case study (Valais, Switzerland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellán, Antonio; Michoud, Clément; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Baillifard, François; Demierre, Jonathan; Carrea, Dario

    2013-04-01

    We present a model for ground displacements prediction using a transfer function. Model was mainly tested at the Barmasse rockslide (Valais, Switzerland) which is an active structurally-controlled instability formed by intensively deformed and metamorphosed mica schists. The kinematics of the slide, which currently threatens roads and inhabitants of the Bal de Bagnes Valley, is characterized by a continuous displacement with variable rates of displacements. Indeed, the velocity is strongly affected by external forces: a sharp increase in landslide velocity is observed with a short delay after every snow melting period and after each rainfall pulse. The instability is currently monitored by different remote sensing and in situ techniques (Terrestrial LiDAR, GB Radar and extensometers). In order to predict ground displacements, we developed a new model composed by two different parts: (a) calculation of the Effective Rainfall (Peff) and (b) modelling of the landslide velocity. First of all, Peff was obtained using Thornthwaite (1946) method, which estimates the water that infiltrates into the terrain as a function of the total precipitation, Real Evapo-Transpiration (ETR) and water recharge. Afterwards, the rates of displacement were modelled through a stochastic transfer function which links the Peff (input) with daily displacements (output). Model computes the displacement rates at each time lapse (e.g. one day) as a convolution of the above mentioned transfer function times daily effective rainfall during a certain time lapse (50 days in our case). The transfer function has two components: first component account for the sudden increase of landslide velocities after each rainfall pulse and second component account for the progressive decay. The variables of these functions were optimized in Matlab in order to minimize the error between the real and the modelled velocities. The model performance was assessed for two different response functions (following either

  17. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  18. Low-thrust Orbit Transfers Using Candidate Lyapunov Functions with a Mechanism for Coasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropoulos, Anastassios E.

    2004-01-01

    We consider low-thrust orbit transfers around a central body, where specified changes are sought in orbit elements except true anomaly. The desired changes in the remaining five elements can be arbitrarily large. Candidate Lyapunov functions are created based on analytic expressions for maximum rates of change of the orbit elements and the desired changes in the elements. These functions may be thought of as proximity quotients because they provide R measure of the proximity to the target orbit. The direction of thrust needed for steepest descent to the target orbit is also available analytically. The thrust is shutoff if the effectivity of the thrust at the current location on the osculating orbit is below some threshhold value. Thus, the equations of motion can be numerically integrated to obtain quickly and simply a transfer to the target orbit. A series of transfers can be easily computed to assess the trade-off between propellant mass and flight time. Preliminary comparisons to optimal solutions show that the method, while sub-optimal, performs well.

  19. Improved transverse (e,e{sup '}) response function of {sup 3}He at intermediate momentum transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Efros, Victor D.; Leidemann, Winfried; Orlandini, Giuseppina; Tomusiak, Edward L.

    2010-03-15

    The transverse electron scattering response function of {sup 3}He is studied in the quasielastic peak region for momentum transfers between 500 and 700 MeV/c. A conventional description of the process leads to results that vary substantially from experiment. To improve the results, the present calculation is done in a reference frame [the active nucleon Breit (ANB) frame] that diminishes the influence of relativistic effects on nuclear states. The laboratory frame response function is then obtained via a kinematics transformation. In addition, a one-body nuclear current operator is employed that includes all leading-order relativistic corrections. Multipoles of this operator are listed. It is shown that the use of the ANB frame leads to a sizable shift in the quasielastic peak to lower energy and, contrary to the relativistic current, also to an increase in the peak height. The additionally considered meson exchange current contribution is quite small in the peak region. In comparison with experiment, there is excellent agreement of the peak positions. The peak height agrees well with experiment for the lowest considered momentum transfer (500 MeV/c) but tends to be too high for higher momentum transfer (10% at 700 MeV/c).

  20. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  1. Transference of function shapes organ identity in the dove tree inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Vekemans, Dries; Viaene, Tom; Caris, Pieter; Geuten, Koen

    2012-01-01

    • An important evolutionary mechanism shaping the biodiversity of flowering plants is the transfer of function from one plant organ to another. To investigate whether and how transference of function is associated with the remodeling of the floral organ identity program we studied Davidia involucrata, a species with conspicuous, petaloid bracts subtending a contracted inflorescence with reduced flowers. • A detailed ontogeny enabled the interpretation of expression patterns of B-, C- and E-class homeotic MADS-box genes using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization techniques. We investigated protein-protein interactions using yeast two-hybrid assays. • Although loss of organs does not appear to have affected organ identity in the retained organs of the reduced flowers of D. involucrata, the bracts express the B-class TM6 (Tomato MADS box gene 6) and GLOBOSA homologs, but not DEFICIENS, and the C-class AGAMOUS homolog, representing a subset of genes also involved in stamen identity. • Our results may illustrate how petal identity can be partially transferred outside the flower by expressing a subset of stamen identity genes. This adds to the molecular mechanisms explaining the diversity of plant reproductive morphology.

  2. Measurement of acoustic noise effect due to the gradient pulsing in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, SungTaek; Song, Inchang; Park, Hyun Wook

    1999-05-01

    In MRI, gradient magnetic fields are used to obtain the spatial information by frequency modulation of the received signal. The gradient fields are generated by switching currents on the gradient coils, which generates acoustic noise due to Lorentzian force. In particular, fast imaging methods, which are usually used for fMRI, require fast switching of the gradient pulse, thereby generating large acoustic noise. The intensity of the acoustic noise depends on the imaging method and the pulse sequences. The acoustic noise induced by gradient pulsing may interfere for signal enhancement of brain areas with the presentation of auditory stimuli during fMRI. In this paper, the gradient pulsing effects on fMRI are analyzed for different combinations of gradients. The experimental results show that total activations by visual stimulation are slightly larger for a combination of Z readout and Y phase-encoding gradients than those for a combination of Y readout and Z phase-encoding gradients when sagittal-view fMRI is performed.

  3. On the location of frequencies of maximum acoustic-to-seismic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatier, J.M.; Bass, H.E.; Elliott, G.R.

    1986-10-01

    Measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic transfer function (ratio of the normal soil particle velocity at a depth d to the acoustic pressure at the surface) for outdoor ground surfaces quite typically reveal a series of maxima and minima. In a publication (Sabatier et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 80, 646--649 (1986)), the location and magnitude of these maxima are measured and predicted for several outdoor ground surfaces using a layered poroelastic model of the ground surface. In this paper, the seismic transfer function for a desert site is compared to the seismic transfer function for holes dug in the desert floor which were filled with pumice (volcanic rock). The hole geometry was rectangular and the hole depths varied from 0.25--2.0 m. The p- and s-wave speeds, densities, porosities, and flow resistivities for the desert floor and pumice were all measured. By varying the hole depth and the fill material, the maxima in the seismic transfer function can be shifted in frequency and the locations of the maxima compare reasonably with that of a hard-backed layer calculation. The area or extent of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling for pumice was determined to be less than 1 m/sup 2/.

  4. Measurement of thin films using very long acoustic wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, G. T.; Nomura, H.; Adachi, H.; Kamakura, T.

    2013-12-01

    A procedure for measuring material thickness by means of necessarily long acoustic wavelengths is examined. The approach utilizes a temporal phase lag caused by the impulse time of wave momentum transferred through a thin layer that is much denser than its surrounding medium. In air, it is predicted that solid or liquid layers below approximately 1/2000 of the acoustic wavelength will exhibit a phase shift with an arctangent functional dependence on thickness and layer density. The effect is verified for thin films on the scale of 10 μm using audible frequency sound (7 kHz). Soap films as thin as 100 nm are then measured using 40 kHz air ultrasound. The method's potential for imaging applications is demonstrated by combining the approach with near-field holography, resulting in reconstructions with sub-wavelength resolution in both the depth and lateral directions. Potential implications at very high and very low acoustic frequencies are discussed.

  5. Acoustic radiation from a shell with internal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1989-01-01

    A method is developed to compute frequency response and acoustic radiation of a complex shell. The axisymmetric geometry of the shell includes cylindrical, conical, and spherical segments stiffened by discrete rings and bulkheads. The shell is coupled to internal masses and elastic frames. Shell segments are treated by transfer matrices. Rings, bulkheads, frames, and concentrated masses are treated by impedances at junctions of segments. The shell is coupled to an external acoustic fluid treated by Green's function and curved surface elements. A major issue facing the method's treatment of the fluid would be lack of existence or uniqueness encountered in the uncoupled, external acoustic problem at characteristic wavenumbers. By using a simple spherical shell, without internal structures, this potential hindrance is shown not to arise. A fuller application of the method awaits subsequent results.

  6. The Time Transfer Functions: an efficient tool to compute range, Doppler and astrometric observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, A.; Bertone, S.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Teyssandier, P.

    2015-12-01

    Determining range, Doppler and astrometric observables is of crucial interest for modelling and analyzing space observations. We recall how these observables can be computed when the travel time of a light ray is known as a function of the positions of the emitter and the receiver for a given instant of reception (or emission). For a long time, such a function--called a reception (or emission) time transfer function--has been almost exclusively calculated by integrating the null geodesic equations describing the light rays. However, other methods avoiding such an integration have been considerably developped in the last twelve years. We give a survey of the analytical results obtained with these new methods up to the third order in the gravitational constant G for a mass monopole. We briefly discuss the case of quasi-conjunctions, where higher-order enhanced terms must be taken into account for correctly calculating the effects. We summarize the results obtained at the first order in G when the multipole structure and the motion of an axisymmetric body is taken into account. We present some applications to on-going or future missions like Gaia and Juno. We give a short review of the recent works devoted to the numerical estimates of the time transfer functions and their derivatives.

  7. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E J; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-05-27

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

  8. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E. J.; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

  9. Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E J; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

    2014-05-27

    Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function.

  10. First-and Second-Order Displacement Transfer Functions for Structural Shape Calculations Using Analytically Predicted Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    New first- and second-order displacement transfer functions have been developed for deformed shape calculations of nonuniform cross-sectional beam structures such as aircraft wings. The displacement transfer functions are expressed explicitly in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains (uniaxial bending strains) obtained at equally spaced strain stations along the surface of the beam structure. By inputting the measured or analytically calculated surface strains into the displacement transfer functions, one could calculate local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles of the nonuniform beam structure for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The accuracy of deformed shape calculations by the first- and second-order displacement transfer functions are determined by comparing these values to the analytically predicted values obtained from finite element analyses. This comparison shows that the new displacement transfer functions could quite accurately calculate the deformed shapes of tapered cantilever tubular beams with different tapered angles. The accuracy of the present displacement transfer functions also are compared to those of the previously developed displacement transfer functions.

  11. Compensated Box-Jenkins transfer function for short term load forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Breipohl, A.; Yu, Z.; Lee, F.N. . School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1992-01-01

    In the past years, the Box-Jenkins ARIMA method and the Box-Jenkins transfer function method (BJTF) have been among the most commonly used methods for short term electrical load forecasting. But when there exists a sudden change in the temperature, both methods tend to exhibit larger errors in the forecast. This paper demonstrates that the load forecasting errors resulting from either the BJ ARIMA model or the BJTF model are not simply white noise, but rather well-patterned noise, and the patterns in the noise can be used to improve the forecasts. Thus a compensated Box-Jenkins transfer method (CBJTF) is proposed to improve the accuracy of the load prediction. Some case studies have been made which result in about a 14-33% reduction of the root mean square (RMS) errors of the forecasts, depending on the compensation time period as well as the compensation method used.

  12. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  13. Uncertainty of Monetary Valued Ecosystem Services - Value Transfer Functions for Global Mapping.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Manceur, Ameur M; Seppelt, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Growing demand of resources increases pressure on ecosystem services (ES) and biodiversity. Monetary valuation of ES is frequently seen as a decision-support tool by providing explicit values for unconsidered, non-market goods and services. Here we present global value transfer functions by using a meta-analytic framework for the synthesis of 194 case studies capturing 839 monetary values of ES. For 12 ES the variance of monetary values could be explained with a subset of 93 study- and site-specific variables by utilizing boosted regression trees. This provides the first global quantification of uncertainties and transferability of monetary valuations. Models explain from 18% (water provision) to 44% (food provision) of variance and provide statistically reliable extrapolations for 70% (water provision) to 91% (food provision) of the terrestrial earth surface. Although the application of different valuation methods is a source of uncertainty, we found evidence that assuming homogeneity of ecosystems is a major error in value transfer function models. Food provision is positively correlated with better life domains and variables indicating positive conditions for human well-being. Water provision and recreation service show that weak ownerships affect valuation of other common goods negatively (e.g. non-privately owned forests). Furthermore, we found support for the shifting baseline hypothesis in valuing climate regulation. Ecological conditions and societal vulnerability determine valuation of extreme event prevention. Valuation of habitat services is negatively correlated with indicators characterizing less favorable areas. Our analysis represents a stepping stone to establish a standardized integration of and reporting on uncertainties for reliable and valid benefit transfer as an important component for decision support. PMID:26938447

  14. THE EFFECTS OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER ON THE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF MOLECULAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Ossenkopf, V.; Stutzki, J.

    2013-07-10

    We study the effects of radiative transfer on the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the widely studied {sup 13}CO 2-1 transition. We find that the integrated intensity maps generally follow a log-normal distribution, with the cases that have {tau} Almost-Equal-To 1 best matching the PDF of the column density. We fit a two-dimensional variance-sonic Mach number relationship to our logarithmic PDFs of the form {sigma}{sub ln}{sup 2}{sub ({Sigma}/{Sigma}0}) = A x ln(1+b{sup 2}M{sub s}{sup 2}) and find that, for parameter b = 1/3, parameter A depends on the radiative transfer environment. We also explore the variance, skewness, and kurtosis of the linear PDFs finding that higher moments reflect both higher sonic Mach number and lower optical depth. Finally, we apply the Tsallis incremental PDF function and find that the fit parameters depend on both Mach numbers, but also are sensitive to the radiative transfer parameter space, with the {tau} Almost-Equal-To 1 case best fitting the incremental PDF of the true column density. We conclude that, for PDFs of low optical depth cases, part of the gas is always subthermally excited so that the spread of the line intensities exceeds the spread of the underlying column densities and hence the PDFs do not reflect the true column density. Similarly, PDFs of optically thick cases are dominated by the velocity dispersion and therefore do not represent the true column density PDF. Thus, in the case of molecules like carbon monoxide, the dynamic range of intensities, structures observed, and, consequently, the observable PDFs are less determined by turbulence and more often determined by radiative transfer effects.

  15. Uncertainty of Monetary Valued Ecosystem Services – Value Transfer Functions for Global Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stefan; Manceur, Ameur M.; Seppelt, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Growing demand of resources increases pressure on ecosystem services (ES) and biodiversity. Monetary valuation of ES is frequently seen as a decision-support tool by providing explicit values for unconsidered, non-market goods and services. Here we present global value transfer functions by using a meta-analytic framework for the synthesis of 194 case studies capturing 839 monetary values of ES. For 12 ES the variance of monetary values could be explained with a subset of 93 study- and site-specific variables by utilizing boosted regression trees. This provides the first global quantification of uncertainties and transferability of monetary valuations. Models explain from 18% (water provision) to 44% (food provision) of variance and provide statistically reliable extrapolations for 70% (water provision) to 91% (food provision) of the terrestrial earth surface. Although the application of different valuation methods is a source of uncertainty, we found evidence that assuming homogeneity of ecosystems is a major error in value transfer function models. Food provision is positively correlated with better life domains and variables indicating positive conditions for human well-being. Water provision and recreation service show that weak ownerships affect valuation of other common goods negatively (e.g. non-privately owned forests). Furthermore, we found support for the shifting baseline hypothesis in valuing climate regulation. Ecological conditions and societal vulnerability determine valuation of extreme event prevention. Valuation of habitat services is negatively correlated with indicators characterizing less favorable areas. Our analysis represents a stepping stone to establish a standardized integration of and reporting on uncertainties for reliable and valid benefit transfer as an important component for decision support. PMID:26938447

  16. A transfer of self-discrimination response functions through equivalence relations

    PubMed Central

    Dymond, Simon; Barnes, Dermot

    1994-01-01

    The present study tested the idea that human self-discrimination response functions may transfer through equivalence relations. Four subjects were trained in six symbolic matching-to-sample tasks (if see A1, choose B1; A1-C1, A2-B2, A2-C2, A3-B3, A3-C3) and were then tested for the formation of three equivalence relations (B1-C1, B2-C2, B3-C3). Two of the B stimuli (B1 and B2) were then used to train two different self-discrimination responses using either detailed instructions (Subjects 1 to 3) or minimal instructions (Subject 4) on two complex schedules of reinforcement (i.e., subjects were trained to pick the B1 stimulus if they had not emitted a response, and to pick the B2 stimulus if they had emitted one or more responses on the previous schedule). All 4 subjects showed the predicted transfer of self-discrimination response functions through equivalence relations (i.e., no response on the schedule, pick C1; one or more responses on the schedule, pick C2). Subjects also demonstrated this transfer when they were required to discriminate their schedule performance before exposure to the schedule (i.e., “what I intend to do”). Four control subjects were also used in the study. Two of these (Subjects 5 and 6) were not exposed to any form of matching-to-sample training and testing (nonequivalence controls). The 2 remaining subjects (7 and 8) were exposed to matching-to-sample training and testing that incorporated stimuli not used during the transfer test; C1 and C2 were replaced by N1 and N2 during the matching-to-sample training and testing, but C1 and C2 were used for the transfer tests (equivalence controls). All 4 subjects failed to produce the self-discrimination transfer performances observed with the experimental subjects. PMID:16812742

  17. Properties of Noise Cross Correlation Functions Obtained from a Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Array at Garner Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Lancelle, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.; Chalari, A.; Clarke, A.

    2015-12-01

    The field test of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) conducted at Garner Valley, California on September 11-12, 2013 provided a continuous overnight record of ambient noise. The DAS array recorded ground motions every one meter of optical cable that was arranged approximately in the shape of a rectangle with dimensions of 160 m by 80 m. The long dimension of the array was adjacent to a state highway. Three hours of record were used to compute noise cross-correlation functions (NCFs) in one-minute windows. The trace from each sensor channel was pre-processed by downsampling to 200 Hz, followed by normalization in the time-domain and bandpass filtering between 2 and 20 Hz (Bensen et al., 2007). The one-minute NCFs were then stacked using the time-frequency domain phase-weighted stacking method (Schimmel & Gallart, 2007). The NCFs between channels were asymmetrical reflecting the direction of traffic noise. The group velocities were found using the frequency-time analysis method. The energy was concentrated between 5 and 15 Hz, which falls into the typical traffic noise frequency band. The resulting velocities were between 100 and 300 m/s for frequencies between 10 and 20 Hz, which are in the same range as described in the results for surface-wave dispersion obtained using an active source for the same site (Lancelle et al., 2015). The group velocity starts to decrease for frequencies greater than ~10 Hz, which was expected on the basis of a previous shear-wave velocity model (Steidl et al., 1996). Then, the phase velocity was calculated using the multichannel analysis of surface wave technique (MASW - Park et al., 1999) with 114 NCFs spaced one meter apart. The resulting dispersion curve between 5 and 15 Hz gave phase velocities that ranged from approximately 170 m/s at 15 Hz to 250 m/s at 5 Hz. These results are consistent with other results of active-source DAS and seismometer records obtained at the Garner Valley site (e.g., Stokoe et al. 2004). This analysis is

  18. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  19. Simplified methods for interpreting the effect of transfer-function zeros on the transient response of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onken, R.

    1972-01-01

    Two simple methods are outlined for evaluating the effect of transfer-function zeros on the system time response. The pole effects can also be evaluated. These methods are useful for simplified analysis or creating design criteria in terms of desirable regions of pole-zero locations. The type of transfer function studied is limited to those linear systems. Corresponding to ordinary longitudinal or lateral aircraft transfer functions, the denominator polynomial is of fourth order and the numerator of third order at most. With the longitudinal motion of the aircraft as an example, the methods are used in the evaluation of optimal regulator control with respect to a particular performance index structure.

  20. Trophic transfer of differently functionalized zinc oxide nanoparticles from crustaceans (Daphnia magna) to zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Skjolding, L M; Winther-Nielsen, M; Baun, A

    2014-12-01

    The potential uptake and trophic transfer of nanoparticles (NP) is not well understood so far and for ZnO NP the data presented in peer-reviewed literature is limited. In this paper the influence of surface functionalization on the uptake and depuration behavior of ZnO NP, ZnO-OH NP and ZnO-octyl NP in D. magna was studied. Bulk ZnO particles (≤5 μm) and ZnCl2 were used as references for uptake of particles and dissolved species of Zn, respectively. Furthermore, the trophic transfer of ZnO NP and ZnO-octyl NP from daphnids (Daphnia magna) to zebra fish (Danio rerio) was studied. For ZnO NP and ZnO-octyl NP fast uptakes in D. magna were observed, whereas no measurable uptake took place for ZnO-OH NP. Lower body burden of ZnCl2 was found compared to both ZnO NP and ZnO-octyl. Contrary, the body burden for bulk ZnO was higher than that of ZnO NP but lower than ZnO-octyl. The higher body burdens found for functionalized ZnO-octyl NP than for non-functionalized ZnO NP showed that that the functionalization of the NP has a high influence on the uptake and depuration behavior. Though no mortality was observed, the resulting body burdens were 9.6 times (ZnO NP) and 47 times (ZnO-octyl NP) higher than toxic levels reported for zinc in D. magna. Consequently, the zinc recovered in the animals was not solely due to soluble zinc, but agglomerates/aggregates of ZnO NP or ZnO-octyl NP contributed to the body burdens. The trophic transfer study showed uptake of both ZnO NP and ZnO-octyl NP reaching more than tenfold higher levels than those obtained through aqueous exposure in other studies. This study contributes to expand the available data on uptake behavior of differently functionalized ZnO NP in D. magna and the potential trophic transfer from zooplankton to fish.

  1. Xenogenic transfer of isolated murine mitochondria into human rho0 cells can improve respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Katrangi, Eyad; D'Souza, Gerard; Boddapati, Sarathi V; Kulawiec, Mariola; Singh, Keshav K; Bigger, Brian; Weissig, Volkmar

    2007-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are the direct cause of several physiological disorders and are also associated with the aging process. The modest progress made over the past two decades towards manipulating the mitochondrial genome and understanding its function within living mammalian cells means that cures for mitochondrial DNA mutations are still elusive. Here, we report that transformed mammalian cells internalize exogenous isolated mitochondria upon simple co-incubation. We first demonstrate the physical presence of internalized mitochondria within recipient cells using fluorescence microscopy. Second, we show that xenogenic transfer of murine mitochondria into human cells lacking functional mitochondria can functionally restore respiration in cells lacking mtDNA. Third, utilizing the natural competence of isolated mitochondria to take up linear DNA molecules, we demonstrate the feasibility of using cellular internalization of isolated exogenous mitochondria as a potential tool for studying mitochondrial genetics in living mammalian cells. PMID:18069915

  2. [Effect of spectrum distortion on modulation transfer function in imaging fiber-optic spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Bao; Hong, Yong-Feng

    2011-10-01

    Imaging fiber bundles were introduced to dispersion imaging spectrometer and substituted for slit, connecting the telescope and spectrometer to yield the imaging fiber-optic spectrometer. It is a double sampling system, the misalignment between image of optical fiber and detector pixel has arisen because of the spectrum distortion of spectrometer, which affected the second sampling process, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) therefore degraded. Optical transfer function of sampling process was derived from line spread function. The effect of spectrum distortion on system MTF was analyzed, and a model evaluating the MTF of imaging fiber-optic spectrometer was developed. Compared to the computation model of MTF of slit imaging spectrometer, a MTF item of sampling by optical fiber and a MTF item of misalignment arising from spectrum distortion were added in this model. Employing this, the MTF of an airborne imaging fiber-optic spectrometer for visible near infrared band was evaluated. The approach ro deriving and developing the MTF model has a reference signification for the computation of MTF of double sampling system, which can direct the design of imaging fiber-optic spectrometer also.

  3. Change of middle ear transfer function in otitis media with effusion model of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chenkai; Gan, Rong Z

    2008-09-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is an inflammatory disease of the middle ear that causes most cases of conductive hearing loss observed in the pediatric population. With the long term goal of evaluating middle ear function with OME, the aim of the current study was to create an animal model of OME in which middle ear transfer functions could be measured. In guinea pigs, OME was created by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the middle ear. Evidence of OME was assessed by otoscopy, tympanometry, histology, and by measuring the volume of fluid in the middle ear. Vibrations of the umbo and round window membrane were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer at frequency range of 200-40 kHz in three groups of 3, 7, and 14 days after injection of LPS. Changes in displacement of the umbo and round window membrane in response to 80 dB SPL sound in the ear canal were measured across the frequency range. Displacement of both the umbo and round window membrane was reduced at all time points following LPS injections. Further, the change of the displacement transmission ratio (DTR) from the tympanic membrane to the round window occurred mainly in chronic (e.g. 14 days post-LPS injection) OME ears. This study provides useful data for analyzing the change of middle ear transfer function in OME ears. PMID:18586077

  4. Thermodynamic constraints on effective energy and mass transfer and catchment function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.

    2012-03-01

    Understanding how water, energy and carbon are partitioned to primary production and effective precipitation is central to quantifying the limits on critical zone evolution. Recent work suggests quantifying energetic transfers to the critical zone in the form of effective precipitation and primary production provides a first order approximation of critical zone process and structural organization. However, explicit linkage of this effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT; W m-2) to critical zone state variables and well defined physical limits remains to be developed. The objective of this work was to place EEMT in the context of thermodynamic state variables of temperature and vapor pressure deficit, with explicit definition of EEMT physical limits using a global climate dataset. The relation of EEMT to empirical measures of catchment function was also examined using a subset of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) catchments. The data demonstrated three physical limits for EEMT: (i) an absolute vapor pressure deficit threshold of 1200 Pa above which EEMT is zero; (ii) a temperature dependent vapor pressure deficit limit following the saturated vapor pressure function up to a temperature of 292 K; and (iii) a minimum precipitation threshold required from EEMT production at temperatures greater than 292 K. Within these limits, EEMT scales directly with precipitation, with increasing conversion of the precipitation to EEMT with increasing temperature. The state-space framework derived here presents a simplified framework with well-defined physical limits that has the potential for directly integrating regional to pedon scale heterogeneity in effective energy and mass transfer relative to critical zone structure and function within a common thermodynamic framework.

  5. Thermodynamic constraints on effective energy and mass transfer and catchment function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.

    2011-07-01

    Understanding how water, energy and carbon are partitioned to primary production and effective precipitation is central to quantifying the limits on critical zone evolution. Recent work suggests quantifying energetic transfers to the critical zone in the form of effective precipitation and primary production provides a first order approximation of critical zone process and structural organization. However, explicit linkage of this effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT; W m-2) to critical zone state variables and well defined physical limits remains to be developed. The objective of this work was to place EEMT in the context of thermodynamic state variables of temperature and vapor pressure deficit, with explicit definition of EEMT physical limits using a global climate dataset. The relation of EEMT to empirical measures of catchment function was also examined using a subset of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) catchments. The data demonstrated three physical limits for EEMT: (i) an absolute vapor pressure deficit threshold of 1200 Pa above which EEMT is zero; (ii) a temperature dependent vapor pressure deficit limit following the saturated vapor pressure function up to a temperature of 292 K; and (iii) a minimum precipitation threshold required from EEMT production at temperatures greater than 292 K. Within these limits, EEMT scales directly with precipitation, with increasing conversion of the precipitation to EEMT with increasing temperature. The state-space framework derived here presents a simplified framework with well-defined physical limits that has the potential for directly integrating regional to pedon scale heterogeneity in effective energy and mass transfer relative to critical zone structure and function within a common thermodynamic framework.

  6. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  7. XML Storage for Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions: Towards a Comprehensive Online Reference Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbert, A.; Blum, C.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions (MT TFs) represent most of the information about Earth electrical conductivity found in the raw electromagnetic data, providing inputs for further inversion and interpretation. To be useful for scientific interpretation, they must also contain carefully recorded metadata. Making these data available in a discoverable and citable fashion would provide the most benefit to the scientific community, but such a development requires that the metadata is not only present in the file but is also searchable. The most commonly used MT TF format to date, the historical Society of Exploration Geophysicists Electromagnetic Data Interchange Standard 1987 (EDI), no longer supports some of the needs of modern magnetotellurics, most notably accurate error bars recording. Moreover, the inherent heterogeneity of EDI's and other historic MT TF formats has mostly kept the community away from healthy data sharing practices. Recently, the MT team at Oregon State University in collaboration with IRIS Data Management Center developed a new, XML-based format for MT transfer functions, and an online system for long-term storage, discovery and sharing of MT TF data worldwide (IRIS SPUD; www.iris.edu/spud/emtf). The system provides a query page where all of the MT transfer functions collected within the USArray MT experiment and other field campaigns can be searched for and downloaded; an automatic on-the-fly conversion to the historic EDI format is also included. To facilitate conversion to the new, more comprehensive and sustainable, XML format for MT TFs, and to streamline inclusion of historic data into the online database, we developed a set of open source format conversion tools, which can be used for rotation of MT TFs as well as a general XML <-> EDI converter (https://seiscode.iris.washington.edu/projects/emtf-fcu). Here, we report on the newly established collaboration between the USGS Geomagnetism Program and the Oregon State University to gather

  8. Comparison of beam-position-transfer functions using circular beam-position monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    A cylindrical beam-position monitor (BPM) used in many accelerator facilities has four electrodes on which beam-image currents induce bunched-beam signals. These probe-electrode signals are geometrically configured to provide beam-position information about two orthogonal axes. An electronic processor performs a mathematical transfer function (TF) on these BPM-electrode signals to produce output signals whose time-varying amplitude is proportional to the beam`s vertical and horizontal position. This paper will compare various beam-position TFs using both pencil beams and will further discuss how diffuse beams interact with some of these TFs.

  9. Security camera resolution measurements: Horizontal TV lines versus modulation transfer function measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark

    2015-01-01

    The horizontal television lines (HTVL) metric has been the primary quantity used by division 6000 related to camera resolution for high consequence security systems. This document shows HTVL measurements are fundamen- tally insufficient as a metric to determine camera resolution, and propose a quantitative, standards based methodology by measuring the camera system modulation transfer function (MTF), the most common and accepted metric of res- olution in the optical science community. Because HTVL calculations are easily misinterpreted or poorly defined, we present several scenarios in which HTVL is frequently reported, and discuss their problems. The MTF metric is discussed, and scenarios are presented with calculations showing the application of such a metric.

  10. Skin color modeling using the radiative transfer equation solved by the auxiliary function method: inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Magnain, Caroline; Elias, Mady; Frigerio, Jean-Marc

    2008-07-01

    In a previous article [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 2196 (2007)] we have modeled skin color using the radiative transfer equation, solved by the auxiliary function method. Three main parameters have been determined as being predominant in the diversity of skin color: the concentrations of melanosomes and of red blood cells and the oxygen saturation of blood. From the reflectance spectrum measured on real Caucasian skin, these parameters are now evaluated by minimizing the standard deviation on the adjusted wavelength range between the experimental spectrum and simulated spectra gathered in a database.

  11. Ground Test of the Urine Processing Assembly for Accelerations and Transfer Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Almond, Deborah F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the ground test of the urine processing assembly for accelerations and transfer functions. Details are given on the test setup, test data, data analysis, analytical results, and microgravity assessment. The conclusions of the tests include the following: (1) the single input/multiple output method is useful if the data is acquired by tri-axial accelerometers and inputs can be considered uncorrelated; (2) tying coherence with the matrix yields higher confidence in results; (3) the WRS#2 rack ORUs need to be isolated; (4) and future work includes a plan for characterizing performance of isolation materials.

  12. Global distribution of gas hydrates in marine sediments: application of a general transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñero, Elena; Marquardt, Mathias; Hensen, Christian; Haeckel, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Many of the recently published estimates of the global inventory of marine methane hydrate are based on simplified diagenetic models, which were run for each grid point of a homogeneous grid of the seafloor. Since this is a very complex and time-consuming method, which may also be limited by data availability, we invented a simple transfer function, which calculates the amount of gas hydrates based on easily accessible data. The transfer function was derived from a large set of systematic runs of a numerical diagenetic model covering the wide range of environmental conditions that are typically met along the continental margins. An exhaustive parameter analysis established that the formation of gas hydrates from biogenic methane production can be sufficiently described by the total organic carbon accumulation rate and the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (Marquardt et al., submitted). The resulting transfer function was applied to available global datasets of 1x1-degree resolution in order to derive global estimates of the distribution and total inventory of gas hydrates. The global grids include the seafloor bathymetry, TOC input (Seiter et al., 2004), bottom water temperature, and geothermal gradient estimated from heat flow (Hamza et al., 2008). The global amount of gas hydrate is predicted to be about 2400 Gt of C and is in good agreement with previously published results (e.g. Archer et al., 2009). So far, our calculations do not consider any thermogenic methane, but only microbially produced and hence, represent only a minimum estimate of the gas hydrate budget. References: Archer et al., 2009. Ocean methane hydrates as a slow tipping point in the global carbon cycle. PNAS 106 (49), 20596-20601. Hamza et al., 2008. Spherical harmonic analysis of the Earth's conductive heat flow. Intern. J. Earth Sci., 97, 205-226 Marquardt et al. Submitted. Estimation of gas hydrate inventories in marine sediments: derivation and testing of a transfer function

  13. Site Transfer Functions of Three-Component Ground Motion in Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgur Kurtulmus, Tevfik; Akyol, Nihal; Camyildiz, Murat; Gungor, Talip

    2015-04-01

    Because of high seismicity accommodating crustal deformation and deep graben structures, on which have, urbanized and industrialized large cities in western Turkey, the importance of site-specific seismic hazard assessments becomes more crucial. Characterizing source, site and path effects is important for both assessing the seismic hazard in a specific region and generation of the building codes/or renewing previous ones. In this study, we evaluated three-component recordings for micro- and moderate-size earthquakes with local magnitudes ranging between 2.0 and 5.6. This dataset is used for site transfer function estimations, utilizing two different spectral ratio approaches 'Standard Spectral Ratio-(SSR)' and 'Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio-(HVSR)' and a 'Generalized Inversion Technique-(GIT)' to highlight site-specific seismic hazard potential of deep basin structures of the region. Obtained transfer functions revealed that the sites located near the basin edges are characterized by broader HVSR curves. Broad HVSR peaks could be attributed to the complexity of wave propagation related to significant 2D/3D velocity variations at the sediment-bedrock interface near the basin edges. Comparison of HVSR and SSR estimates for the sites located on the grabens showed that SSR estimates give larger values at lower frequencies which could be attributed to lateral variations in regional velocity and attenuation values caused by basin geometry and edge effects. However, large amplitude values of vertical component GIT site transfer functions were observed at varying frequency ranges for some of the stations. These results imply that vertical component of ground motion is not amplification free. Contamination of HVSR site transfer function estimates at different frequency bands could be related to complexities in the wave field caused by deep or shallow heterogeneities in the region such as differences in the basin geometries, fracturing and fluid saturation along

  14. Full-Scale Turbofan-Engine Turbine-Transfer Function Determination Using Three Internal Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    Noise-source separation techniques, using three engine-internal sensors, are applied to existing static-engine test data to determine the turbine transfer function for the currently subdominant combustion noise. The results are used to assess the combustion-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) and an improvement to the combustion-noise module GECOR is suggested. The work was carried out in response to the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Program s Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge.

  15. Theory of lidar method for measurement of the modulation transfer function of water layers.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Lev S

    2013-01-10

    We develop a method to evaluate the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a water layer from the characteristics of lidar signal backscattered by water volume. We propose several designs of a lidar system for remote measurement of the MTF and the procedure to determine optical properties of water using the measured MTF. We discuss a laser system for sea-bottom imaging that accounts for the influence of water slab on the image structure and allows for correction of image distortions caused by light scattering in water. PMID:23314635

  16. Study on utility of an approximated transfer function of dynamically tuned dry gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingu, H.; Otsuki, M.; Hayano, T.

    The use of a dry gyro in analog rebalance loops is described and a method to improve the static and dynamic characteristics is presented. The transfer function is derived by transforming a generalized equation into the approximated form based on the design specifications of the mechanical parts. This approximation is proved to be reasonable by the result that the differences between the numerical solutions of a generalized equation and those of an approximated equation are less than 1.0%, and their mean values are less than 0.003%. Noninteracting control is analyzed and the stability conditions are investigated. A fundamental design conception for rebalance loops was established.

  17. Line-ratio based ring artifact correction method using transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Daejoong; Hwang, Dosik; Kim, Younguk

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used for medical purposes. However there are many artifacts at CT images and that makes distorted image. Ring artifact is caused by non-uniform sensitivity of detectors and makes ring shape artifact. Line-ratio method was proposed to solve the problem however there are some problem at specific case. Therefore we propose advanced method to correct ring artifact using transfer function. As a result, ring artifacts can be removed at more global cases. Simulation data shows the proposed method outperforms the conventional line-ratio method.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of carbon fibers functionalized with poly (glycidyl methacrylate) via atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongwei; Xiong, Lei; Qin, Xiaokang; Wang, Zhengyue; Ding, Bei; Ren, Huan; Pi, Xiaolong

    2015-07-01

    In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers (CF) were chemically modified with poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to improve the interaction between the CF and polymer matrix. The FT-IR, TGA, and XPS were used to determine the chemical structure of the resulting products and the quantities of PGMA chains grafted from the CF surface. The experimental results confirm that the CF surface was functionalized and glycidyl methacrylate was graft-polymerized onto the CF, and the grafting content of polymer could reach 10.2%.

  19. Application of Model-Assisted Pod Using a Transfer Function Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, C. A.; Hugo, G. R.; Bowles, S. J.

    2009-03-01

    A transfer function approach to model-assisted probability of detection (POD) has been applied to the detection of fatigue cracks at fastener holes. The model uses data obtained from field trials and laboratory experiments and takes into account the effects of structural geometry, the natural variability in fatigue cracks and human factors in the inspection process. A fully representative POD trial was not feasible for this inspection procedure, and so this application provides an important real-world context for the development of model-assisted POD.

  20. Activation of the antigen presentation function of mononuclear phagocyte populations associated with the basilar membrane of the cochlea after acoustic overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiping; Vethanayagam, R. Robert; Dong, Youyi; Cai, Qunfeng; Hu, Bo Hua

    2015-01-01

    The immune response is an important component of the cochlear response to stress. As an important player in the cochlear immune system, the basilar membrane immune cells reside on the surface of the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. At present, the immune cell properties in this region and their responses to stress are not well understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of these immune cells in the immune response to acoustic overstimulation. This study reveals that tissue macrophages are present in the entire length of the basilar membrane under steady-state conditions. Notably, these cells in the apical and the basal sections of the basilar membrane display distinct morphologies and immune protein expression patterns. Following acoustic trauma, monocytes infiltrate into the region of the basilar membrane, and the infiltrated cells transform into macrophages. While monocyte infiltration and transformation occur in both the apical and the basal sections of the basilar membrane, only the basal monocytes and macrophages display a marked increase in the expression of MHC II and CIITA, a MHC II production cofactor, suggesting the site-dependent activation of antigen-presenting function. Consistent with the increased expression of the antigen-presenting proteins, CD4+ T cells, the antigen-presenting partner, infiltrate into the region of the basilar membrane where antigen-presenting proteins are upregulated. Further pathological analyses revealed that the basal section of the cochlea displays a greater level of sensory cell damage, which is spatially correlated with the region of antigen-presenting activity. Together, these results suggest that the antigen-presenting function of the mononuclear phagocyte population is activated in response to acoustic trauma, which could bridge the innate immune response to adaptive immunity. PMID:26102003

  1. Multiple determinants of transfer of evaluative function after conditioning with free-operant schedules of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Dack, Charlotte; Reed, Phil; McHugh, Louise

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the four present experiments was to explore how different schedules of reinforcement influence schedule-induced behavior, their impact on evaluative ratings given to conditioned stimuli associated with each schedule through evaluative conditioning, and the transfer of these evaluations through derived stimulus networks. Experiment 1 compared two contrasting response reinforcement rules (variable ratio [VR], variable interval [VI]). Experiment 2 varied the response to reinforcement rule between two schedules but equated the outcome to response rate (differential reinforcement of high rate [DRH] vs. VR). Experiment 3 compared molar and molecular aspects of contingencies of reinforcement (tandem VIVR vs. tandem VRVI). Finally, Experiment 4 employed schedules that induced low rates of responding to determine whether, under these circumstances, responses were more sensitive to the molecular aspects of a schedule (differential reinforcement of low rate [DRL] vs. VI). The findings suggest that the transfer of evaluative functions is determined mainly by differences in response rate between the schedules and the molar aspects of the schedules. However, when neither schedule was based on a strong response reinforcement rule, the transfer of evaluative judgments came under the control of the molecular aspects of the schedule.

  2. A Functional Bacterium-to-Plant DNA Transfer Machinery of Rhizobium etli

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Different strains and species of the soil phytopathogen Agrobacterium possess the ability to transfer and integrate a segment of DNA (T-DNA) into the genome of their eukaryotic hosts, which is mainly mediated by a set of virulence (vir) genes located on the bacterial Ti-plasmid that also contains the T-DNA. To date, Agrobacterium is considered to be unique in its capacity to mediate genetic transformation of eukaryotes. However, close homologs of the vir genes are encoded by the p42a plasmid of Rhizobium etli; this microorganism is related to Agrobacterium, but known only as a symbiotic bacterium that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules in several species of beans. Here, we show that R. etli can mediate functional DNA transfer and stable genetic transformation of plant cells, when provided with a plasmid containing a T-DNA segment. Thus, R. etli represents another bacterial species, besides Agrobacterium, that encodes a protein machinery for DNA transfer to eukaryotic cells and their subsequent genetic modification. PMID:26968003

  3. Accurate recovery of articulator positions from acoustics: New conclusions based on human data

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, J.; Lofqvist, A.; Gracco, V.; Zlokarnik, I.; Rubin, P.; Saltzman, E.

    1996-09-01

    Vocal tract models are often used to study the problem of mapping from the acoustic transfer function to the vocal tract area function (inverse mapping). Unfortunately, results based on vocal tract models are strongly affected by the assumptions underlying the models. In this study, the mapping from acoustics (digitized speech samples) to articulation (measurements of the positions of receiver coils placed on the tongue, jaw, and lips) is examined using human data from a single speaker: Simultaneous acoustic and articulator measurements made for vowel-to-vowel transitions, /g/ closures, and transitions into and out of /g/ closures. Articulator positions were measured using an EMMA system to track coils placed on the lips, jaw, and tongue. Using these data, look-up tables were created that allow articulator positions to be estimated from acoustic signals. On a data set not used for making look-up tables, correlations between estimated and actual coil positions of around 94{percent} and root-mean-squared errors around 2 mm are common for coils on the tongue. An error source evaluation shows that estimating articulator positions from quantized acoustics gives root-mean-squared errors that are typically less than 1 mm greater than the errors that would be obtained from quantizing the articulator positions themselves. This study agrees with and extends previous studies of human data by showing that for the data studied, speech acoustics can be used to accurately recover articulator positions. {copyright} {ital 1996 Acoustical Society of America.}

  4. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  6. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  7. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  8. Calibration of Modulation Transfer Function of Surface Profilometers with 1D and 2D Binary Pseudo-random Array Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2008-05-19

    We suggest and describe the use of a binary pseudo-random grating as a standard test surface for calibration of the modulation transfer function of microscopes. Results from calibration of a MicromapTM-570 interferometric microscope are presented.

  9. Functional and Evolutionary Characterization of a Gene Transfer Agent’s Multilocus “Genome”

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Alexander P.; Shakya, Migun; Mercer, Ryan G.; Grüll, Marc P.; Bown, Luke; Davidson, Fraser; Steffen, Ekaterina; Matchem, Heidi; Peach, Mandy E.; Berger, Tim; Grebe, Katherine; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Lang, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) are phage-like particles that can package and transfer a random piece of the producing cell’s genome, but are unable to transfer all the genes required for their own production. As such, GTAs represent an evolutionary conundrum: are they selfish genetic elements propagating through an unknown mechanism, defective viruses, or viral structures “repurposed” by cells for gene exchange, as their name implies? In Rhodobacter capsulatus, production of the R. capsulatus GTA (RcGTA) particles is associated with a cluster of genes resembling a small prophage. Utilizing transcriptomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we report that the RcGTA “genome” consists of at least 24 genes distributed across five distinct loci. We demonstrate that, of these additional loci, two are involved in cell recognition and binding and one in the production and maturation of RcGTA particles. The five RcGTA “genome” loci are widespread within Rhodobacterales, but not all loci have the same evolutionary histories. Specifically, two of the loci have been subject to frequent, probably virus-mediated, gene transfer events. We argue that it is unlikely that RcGTA is a selfish genetic element. Instead, our findings are compatible with the scenario that RcGTA is a virus-derived element maintained by the producing organism due to a selective advantage of within-population gene exchange. The modularity of the RcGTA “genome” is presumably a result of selection on the host organism to retain GTA functionality. PMID:27343288

  10. Acoustic Aspects of Photoacoustic Signal Generation and Detection in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper photoacoustic signal generation and detection in gases is investigated and discussed from the standpoint of acoustics. Four topics are considered: the effect of the absorption-desorption process of modulated and pulsed light on the heat power density released in the gas; the generation of the primary sound by the released heat in an unbounded medium; the excitation of an acoustic resonator by the primary sound; and finally, the generation of the measurable PA signal by a microphone. When light is absorbed by a molecule and the excess energy is relaxed by collisions with the surrounding molecules, the average kinetic energy, thus also the temperature of an ensemble of molecules (called "particle" in acoustics) will increase. In other words heat energy is added to the energy of the particle. The rate of the energy transfer is characterized by the heat power density. A simple two-level model of absorption-desorption is applied for describing the heat power generation process for modulated and pulsed illumination. Sound generation by a laser beam in an unbounded medium is discussed by means of the Green's function technique. It is shown that the duration of the generated sound pulse depends mostly on beam geometry. A photoacoustic signal is mostly detected in a photoacoustic cell composed of acoustic resonators, buffers, filters, etc. It is not easy to interpret the measured PA signal in such a complicated acoustic system. The acoustic response of a PA detector to different kinds of excitations (modulated cw, pulsed, periodic pulse train) is discussed. It is shown that acoustic resonators respond very differently to modulated cw excitation and to excitation by a pulse train. The microphone for detecting the PA signal is also a part of the acoustic system; its properties have to be taken into account by the design of a PA detector. The moving membrane of the microphone absorbs acoustic energy; thus, it may influence the resonance frequency and

  11. A transfer function approach to studying the size-of-source and distance effects in radiation thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuelban, E. M.; Dekker, P. R.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, a model based on the transfer function approach of the propagation of radiation through several apertures and optical components is presented. This transfer function formalism offers the possibility of studying various measurement scenarios involving different source geometries, distances, and varying complexities of the optics of the radiation thermometer. The impact of different types of source geometries, and the variation of source-thermometer distance are investigated using the above model. Simulation results and experimental validation are presented.

  12. Evaluating the integrity of the reinforced concrete structure repaired by epoxy injection using simulated transfer function of impact-echo response

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chia-Chi; Yu, Chih-peng; Wu, Jiunn-Hong; Hsu, Keng-Tsan; Ke, Ying-Tsu

    2014-02-18

    Cracks and honeycombs are often found inside reinforced concrete (RC) structure caused by excessive external force, or improper casting of concrete. The repairing method usually involves epoxy injection. The impact-echo method, which is a sensitive for detecting of the interior voids, may not be applicable to assess the integrity of the repaired member as both air and epoxy are less in acoustic impedances. In this study, the repaired RC structure was evaluated by the simulated transfer function of the IE displacement waveform where the R-wave displacement waveform is used as a base of a simulated force-time function. The effect of different thickness of the epoxy layer to the amplitude corresponding to the interface is studied by testing on specimen containing repaired naturally delaminated cracks with crack widths about 1 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm. The impact-echo responses were compared with the drilling cores at the test positions. The results showed the cracks were not fully filled with epoxy when the peak amplitude corresponding to the interface dropped less than 20%. The peak corresponding to the thicker epoxy layer tends to be larger in amplitude. A field study was also performed on a column damaged by earthquake before and after repairing.

  13. Ultrafast charge-transfer in organic photovoltaic interfaces: geometrical and functionalization effects.

    PubMed

    Santos, Elton J G; Wang, W L

    2016-09-21

    Understanding the microscopic mechanisms of electronic excitation in organic photovoltaic cells is a challenging problem in the design of efficient devices capable of performing sunlight harvesting. Here we develop and apply an ab initio approach based on time-dependent density functional theory and Ehrenfest dynamics to investigate photoinduced charge transfer in small organic molecules. Our calculations include mixed quantum-classical dynamics with ions moving classically and electrons quantum mechanically, where no experimental external parameter other than the material geometry is required. We show that the behavior of photocarriers in zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and C60 systems, an effective prototype system for organic solar cells, is sensitive to the atomic orientation of the donor and the acceptor units as well as the functionalization of covalent molecules at the interface. In particular, configurations with the ZnPc molecules facing on C60 facilitate charge transfer between substrate and molecules that occurs within 200 fs. In contrast, configurations where ZnPc is tilted above C60 present extremely low carrier injection efficiency even at longer times as an effect of the larger interfacial potential level offset and higher energetic barrier between the donor and acceptor molecules. An enhancement of charge injection into C60 at shorter times is observed as binding groups connect ZnPc and C60 in a dyad system. Our results demonstrate a promising way of designing and controlling photoinduced charge transfer on the atomic level in organic devices that would lead to efficient carrier separation and maximize device performance. PMID:27314747

  14. Ultrafast charge-transfer in organic photovoltaic interfaces: geometrical and functionalization effects.

    PubMed

    Santos, Elton J G; Wang, W L

    2016-09-21

    Understanding the microscopic mechanisms of electronic excitation in organic photovoltaic cells is a challenging problem in the design of efficient devices capable of performing sunlight harvesting. Here we develop and apply an ab initio approach based on time-dependent density functional theory and Ehrenfest dynamics to investigate photoinduced charge transfer in small organic molecules. Our calculations include mixed quantum-classical dynamics with ions moving classically and electrons quantum mechanically, where no experimental external parameter other than the material geometry is required. We show that the behavior of photocarriers in zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and C60 systems, an effective prototype system for organic solar cells, is sensitive to the atomic orientation of the donor and the acceptor units as well as the functionalization of covalent molecules at the interface. In particular, configurations with the ZnPc molecules facing on C60 facilitate charge transfer between substrate and molecules that occurs within 200 fs. In contrast, configurations where ZnPc is tilted above C60 present extremely low carrier injection efficiency even at longer times as an effect of the larger interfacial potential level offset and higher energetic barrier between the donor and acceptor molecules. An enhancement of charge injection into C60 at shorter times is observed as binding groups connect ZnPc and C60 in a dyad system. Our results demonstrate a promising way of designing and controlling photoinduced charge transfer on the atomic level in organic devices that would lead to efficient carrier separation and maximize device performance.

  15. Phosphonic Acid Functionalized Asymmetric Phthalocyanines: Synthesis, Modification of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO), and Charge Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Polaske, Nathan W.; Lin, Hsiao-Chu; Tang, Anna; Mayukh, Mayank; Oquendo, Luis E.; Green, John; Ratcliff, Erin L.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Saavedra, S. Scott; McGrath, Dominic V.

    2011-12-20

    Metalated and free-base A₃B-type asymmetric phthalocyanines (Pcs) bearing, in the asymmetric quadrant, a flexible alkyl linker of varying chain lengths terminating in a phosphonic acid (PA) group have been synthesized. Two parallel series of asymmetric Pc derivatives bearing aryloxy and arylthio substituents are reported, and their synthesis and characterization through NMR, combustion analysis, and MALDI-MS are described. We also demonstrate the modification of indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates using the PA functionalized asymmetric Pc derivatives and monitoring their electrochemistry. The PA functionalized asymmetric Pcs were anchored to the ITO surface through chemisorption and their electrochemical properties characterized using cyclic voltammetry to investigate the effects of PA structure on the thermodynamics and kinetics of charge transfer. Ionization energies of the modified ITO surfaces were measured using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy.

  16. Dark matter transfer function: Free streaming, particle statistics, and memory of gravitational clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H. deJ.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2008-09-15

    The transfer function T(k) of dark matter (DM) perturbations during matter domination is obtained by solving the linearized collisionless Boltzmann-Vlasov equation. We provide an exact expression for T(k) for arbitrary distribution functions of decoupled particles and initial conditions, which can be systematically expanded in a Fredholm series. An exhaustive numerical study of thermal relics for different initial conditions reveals that the first two terms in the expansion of T(k) provide a remarkably accurate and simple approximation valid on all scales of cosmological relevance for structure formation in the linear regime. The natural scale of suppression is the free-streaming wave vector at matter-radiation equality, k{sub fs}(t{sub eq})=[4{pi}{rho}{sub 0M}/[(1+z{sub eq})

  17. The transfer function method for gear system dynamics applied to conventional and minimum excitation gearing designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A transfer function method for predicting the dynamic responses of gear systems with more than one gear mesh is developed and applied to the NASA Lewis four-square gear fatigue test apparatus. Methods for computing bearing-support force spectra and temporal histories of the total force transmitted by a gear mesh, the force transmitted by a single pair of teeth, and the maximum root stress in a single tooth are developed. Dynamic effects arising from other gear meshes in the system are included. A profile modification design method to minimize the vibration excitation arising from a pair of meshing gears is reviewed and extended. Families of tooth loading functions required for such designs are developed and examined for potential excitation of individual tooth vibrations. The profile modification design method is applied to a pair of test gears.

  18. Charge transfer, chemical potentials, and the nature of functional groups: answers from quantum chemical topology.

    PubMed

    Pendás, A Martín; Francisco, E; Blanco, M A

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the response of a quantum group within a molecule to charge transfer by using the interacting quantum atoms approach (IQA), an energy partitioning scheme within the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAM). It is shown that this response lies at the core of the concept of the functional group. The manipulation of fractional electron populations is carried out by using distribution functions for the electron number within the quantum basins. Several test systems are studied to show that similar chemical potential groups are characterized by similar energetic behavior upon interaction with other groups. The origin of the empirical additivity rules for group energies in simple hydrocarbons is also investigated. It turns out to rest on the independent saturation of both the self-energies and the interaction energies of the groups as the size of the chain increases. We also show that our results are compatible with the standard group energies of the QTAM.

  19. Tunable fluorescence in chromophore-functionalized nanodiamond induced by energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Urmimala; Jain, Ankit; George, Subi J; Rao, C N R

    2011-08-01

    Hybrid materials comprising diamond nanoparticles (ND) and oligo(phenylenevinylenes) (OPVs) have been synthesized by the covalent linking of acid-functionalized ND and OPV-amine. Chromophore-functionalized ND particles with long alkyl and π-conjugated groups are readily dispersed in various organic solvents without any precipitation after several hours. A careful study of the properties of the hybrid materials revealed an aggregation-induced energy transfer from the blue fluorescent nanodiamonds to green emitting OPVs. At very low concentrations the hybrid emits in the blue region, but as the concentration is increased a gradual transition from blue to green emission occurs. Competitive processes such as aggregation-induced enhanced emission and self-absorption have been ruled out and a molecular picture of the phenomenon is proposed. This strategy can open a plethora of new avenues for fluorescent nanodiamonds in optoelectronics and light harvesting apart from bio-imaging.

  20. Unraveling the structure of membrane proteins in situ by transfer function corrected cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Eibauer, Matthias; Hoffmann, Christian; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan; Engelhardt, Harald

    2012-12-01

    Cryo-electron tomography in combination with subtomogram averaging allows to investigate the structure of protein assemblies in their natural environment in a close to live state. To make full use of the structural information contained in tomograms it is necessary to analyze the contrast transfer function (CTF) of projections and to restore the phases of higher spatial frequencies. CTF correction is however hampered by the difficulty of determining the actual defocus values from tilt series data, which is due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of electron micrographs. In this study, an extended acquisition scheme is introduced that enables an independent CTF determination. Two high-dose images are recorded along the tilt axis on both sides of each projection, which allow an accurate determination of the defocus values of these images. These values are used to calculate the CTF for each image of the tilt series. We applied this scheme to the mycobacterial outer membrane protein MspA reconstituted in lipid vesicles and tested several variants of CTF estimation in combination with subtomogram averaging and correction of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The 3D electron density map of MspA was compared with a structure previously determined by X-ray crystallography. We were able to demonstrate that structural information up to a resolution of 16.8Å can be recovered using our CTF correction approach, whereas the uncorrected 3D map had a resolution of only 26.2Å.

  1. Charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics for simulation of condensed phase electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2009-08-14

    We present a plane-wave basis set implementation of charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics (CDFT-MD) for simulation of electron transfer reactions in condensed phase systems. Following the earlier work of Wu and Van Voorhis [Phys. Rev. A 72, 024502 (2005)], the density functional is minimized under the constraint that the charge difference between donor and acceptor is equal to a given value. The classical ion dynamics is propagated on the Born-Oppenheimer surface of the charge constrained state. We investigate the dependence of the constrained energy and of the energy gap on the definition of the charge and present expressions for the constraint forces. The method is applied to the Ru{sup 2+}-Ru{sup 3+} electron self-exchange reaction in aqueous solution. Sampling the vertical energy gap along CDFT-MD trajectories and correcting for finite size effects, a reorganization free energy of 1.6 eV is obtained. This is 0.1-0.2 eV lower than a previous estimate based on a continuum model for solvation. The smaller value for the reorganization free energy can be explained by the fact that the Ru-O distances of the divalent and trivalent Ru hexahydrates are predicted to be more similar in the electron transfer complex than for the separated aqua ions.

  2. Charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics for simulation of condensed phase electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2009-08-01

    We present a plane-wave basis set implementation of charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics (CDFT-MD) for simulation of electron transfer reactions in condensed phase systems. Following the earlier work of Wu and Van Voorhis [Phys. Rev. A 72, 024502 (2005)], the density functional is minimized under the constraint that the charge difference between donor and acceptor is equal to a given value. The classical ion dynamics is propagated on the Born-Oppenheimer surface of the charge constrained state. We investigate the dependence of the constrained energy and of the energy gap on the definition of the charge and present expressions for the constraint forces. The method is applied to the Ru2+-Ru3+ electron self-exchange reaction in aqueous solution. Sampling the vertical energy gap along CDFT-MD trajectories and correcting for finite size effects, a reorganization free energy of 1.6 eV is obtained. This is 0.1-0.2 eV lower than a previous estimate based on a continuum model for solvation. The smaller value for the reorganization free energy can be explained by the fact that the Ru-O distances of the divalent and trivalent Ru hexahydrates are predicted to be more similar in the electron transfer complex than for the separated aqua ions.

  3. A Discrete Probability Function Method for the Equation of Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivathanu, Y. R.; Gore, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    A discrete probability function (DPF) method for the equation of radiative transfer is derived. The DPF is defined as the integral of the probability density function (PDF) over a discrete interval. The derivation allows the evaluation of the PDF of intensities leaving desired radiation paths including turbulence-radiation interactions without the use of computer intensive stochastic methods. The DPF method has a distinct advantage over conventional PDF methods since the creation of a partial differential equation from the equation of transfer is avoided. Further, convergence of all moments of intensity is guaranteed at the basic level of simulation unlike the stochastic method where the number of realizations for convergence of higher order moments increases rapidly. The DPF method is described for a representative path with approximately integral-length scale-sized spatial discretization. The results show good agreement with measurements in a propylene/air flame except for the effects of intermittency resulting from highly correlated realizations. The method can be extended to the treatment of spatial correlations as described in the Appendix. However, information regarding spatial correlations in turbulent flames is needed prior to the execution of this extension.

  4. Functional auditory hair cells produced in the mammalian cochlea by in utero gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Samuel. P.; Woessner, David W.; Mitchell, John C.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Brigande, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert mechanical stimuli into electrical impulses that subserve audition1,2. Loss of hair cells and their innervating neurons is the most frequent cause of hearing impairment3. Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also known as Math1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor required for hair cell development4-6 and its misexpression in vitro7,8 and in vivo9,10 generates hair-cell-like cells. Atoh1-based gene therapy to ameliorate auditory10 and vestibular11 dysfunction has been proposed. However, the biophysical properties of putative hair cells induced by Atoh1 misexpression have not been characterized. Here we show that in utero gene transfer of Atoh1 produces functional supernumerary hair cells in the mouse cochlea. The induced hair cells display stereociliary bundles, attract neuronal processes, and express the ribbon synapse marker C-terminal binding protein 2 (Ctbp2)12,13. Moreover, the hair cells are capable of mechanoelectrical transduction1,2 and display basolateral conductances with age-appropriate specializations. Our results demonstrate that manipulation of cell fate by transcription factor misexpression produces functional sensory cells in the postnatal mammalian cochlea. We anticipate that our in utero gene transfer paradigm will enable the design and validation of gene therapies to ameliorate hearing loss in mouse models of human deafness14,15. PMID:18754012

  5. Transfer function for vital infrasound pressures between the carotid artery and the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Furihata, Kenji; Yamashita, Masato

    2013-02-01

    While occupational injury is associated with numerous individual and work-related risk factors, including long working hours and short sleep duration, the complex mechanisms causing such injuries are not yet fully understood. The relationship between the infrasound pressures of the tympanic membrane [ear canal pressure (ECP)], detected using an earplug embedded with a low-frequency microphone, and the carotid artery [carotid artery pressure (CAP)], detected using a stethoscope fitted with the same microphone, can be quantitatively characterized using systems analysis. The transfer functions of 40 normal workers (19 to 57 years old) were characterized, involving the analysis of 446 data points. The ECP waveform exhibits a pulsatile character with a slow respiratory component, which is superimposed on a biphasic recording that is synchronous with the cardiac cycle. The respiratory ECP waveform correlates with the instantaneous heart rate. The results also revealed that various fatigue-related risk factors may affect the mean magnitudes of the measured pressures and the delay transfer functions between CAP and ECP in the study population; these factors include systolic blood pressure, salivary amylase activity, age, sleep duration, postural changes, chronic fatigue, and pulse rate. PMID:23363133

  6. Electrical Transfer Function and Poling Mechanisms for Nonlinear Optical Polymer Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael Dale

    2004-01-01

    Electro-Optic Polymers hold great promise in increased electro-optic coefficients as compared to their inorganic corollaries. Many researchers have focused on quantum chemistry to describe how the dipoles respond to temperature and electric fields. Much work has also been done for single layer films to confirm these results. For optical applications, waveguide structures are utilized to guide the optical waves in 3 layer stacks. Electrode poling is the only practical poling method for these structures. This research takes an electrical engineering approach to develop poling models and electrical and optical transfer functions of the waveguide structure. The key aspect of the poling model is the large boundary charge density deposited during the poling process. The boundary charge density also has a large effect on the electrical transfer function which is used to explain the transient response of the system. These models are experimentally verified. Exploratory experiment design is used to study poling parameters including time, temperature, and voltage. These studies verify the poling conditions for CLDX/APC and CLDZ/APEC guest host electro optic polymer films in waveguide stacks predicted by the theoretical developments.

  7. Infinite-impulse-response models of the head-related transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Abhijit; Colburn, H. Steven

    2004-04-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) measured from human subjects were approximated using infinite-impulse-response (IIR) filter models. Models were restricted to rational transfer functions (plus simple delays) so that specific models are characterized by the locations of poles and zeros in the complex plane. The all-pole case (with no nontrivial zeros) is treated first using the theory of linear prediction. Then the general pole-zero model is derived using a weighted-least-squares (WLS) formulation of the modified least-squares problem proposed by Kalman (1958). Both estimation algorithms are based on solutions of sets of linear equations and result in efficient computational schemes to find low-order model HRTFs. The validity of each of these two low-order models was assessed in psychophysical experiments. Specifically, a four-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice paradigm was used to test the discriminability of virtual stimuli constructed from empirical and model HRTFs for corresponding locations. For these experiments, the stimuli were 80 ms, noise tokens generated from a wideband noise generator. Results show that sounds synthesized through model HRTFs were indistinguishable from sounds synthesized from original HRTF measurements for the majority of positions tested. The advantages of the techniques described here are the computational efficiencies achieved for low-order IIR models. Properties of the all-pole and pole-zero estimators are discussed in the context of low-order HRTF representations, and implications for basic and applied contexts are considered.

  8. Using transfer functions as a method for predicting lightning effects on munitions storage bunkers

    SciTech Connect

    Struck, J.K.; Chiefa, M.A.; Grenert, J.E.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Measurements have recently been conducted and computer models constructed to determine the coupling of lightning energy into munition storage bunkers as detailed in companion conference papers. In this paper transfer functions from the incident current to the measured parameters are used to construct simple circuit models that explain much of the important observed quantitative and qualitative information and differences in transfer functions are used to identify nonlinearities in the response data. In particular, V{sub oc} -- the open-circuit voltage generated between metal objects in the structure, I{sub sc} -- the short-circuit current generated in a wire connecting metal objects in the structure, and a typical current measurement in the buried counterpoise system behave in a relatively simple manner explainable by one or several circuit elements. The circuit elements inferred from measured data are comparable in magnitude with those developed from simple analytical models for inductance and resistance. These analytical models are more useful in predicting bounding electromagnetic environment values rather than providing exact time domain waveforms. 2 refs.

  9. Using transfer functions as a method for predicting lightning effects on munitions storage bunkers

    SciTech Connect

    Struck, J.K.; Chiefa, M.A.; Grenert, J.E. ); Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Measurements have recently been conducted and computer models constructed to determine the coupling of lightning energy into munition storage bunkers as detailed in companion conference papers. In this paper transfer functions from the incident current to the measured parameters are used to construct simple circuit models that explain much of the important observed quantitative and qualitative information and differences in transfer functions are used to identify nonlinearities in the response data. In particular, V{sub oc} -- the open-circuit voltage generated between metal objects in the structure, I{sub sc} -- the short-circuit current generated in a wire connecting metal objects in the structure, and a typical current measurement in the buried counterpoise system behave in a relatively simple manner explainable by one or several circuit elements. The circuit elements inferred from measured data are comparable in magnitude with those developed from simple analytical models for inductance and resistance. These analytical models are more useful in predicting bounding electromagnetic environment values rather than providing exact time domain waveforms. 2 refs.

  10. Synthesizing Configurable Biochemical Implementation of Linear Systems from Their Transfer Function Specifications

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tai-Yin; Chiang, Hui-Ju K.; Huang, Ruei-Yang; Jiang, Jie-Hong R.; Fages, François

    2015-01-01

    The ability to engineer synthetic systems in the biochemical context is constantly being improved and has a profound societal impact. Linear system design is one of the most pervasive methods applied in control tasks, and its biochemical realization has been proposed by Oishi and Klavins and advanced further in recent years. However, several technical issues remain unsolved. Specifically, the design process is not fully automated from specification at the transfer function level, systems once designed often lack dynamic adaptivity to environmental changes, matching rate constants of reactions is not always possible, and implementation may be approximative and greatly deviate from the specifications. Building upon the work of Oishi and Klavins, this paper overcomes these issues by introducing a design flow that transforms a transfer-function specification of a linear system into a set of chemical reactions, whose input-output response precisely conforms to the specification. This system is implementable using the DNA strand displacement technique. The underlying configurability is embedded into primitive components and template modules, and thus the entire system is adaptive. Simulation of DNA strand displacement implementation confirmed the feasibility and superiority of the proposed synthesis flow. PMID:26352855

  11. Transfer function analysis for the assessment of cerebral autoregulation using spontaneous oscillations in blood pressure and cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S S; van Beek, Arenda H E A; Slump, Cornelis H; Panerai, Ronney B; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is a key mechanism to protect the brain against excessive fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) and maintain cerebral blood flow. Analyzing the relationship between spontaneous BP and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) using transfer function analysis is a widely used technique to quantify CA in a non-invasive way. The objective of this review was to provide an overview of transfer function techniques used in the assessment of CA. 113 publications were included. This literature showed that there is no gold standard for the execution and implementation of the transfer function. There is a high diversity in settings and criteria used for transfer function analysis. Notable is also the high number of studies which report little on the settings. This disparity makes it difficult to replicate or compare the results of the different studies and further hinders the opportunity to make a distinction between intact and impaired CA in different patient groups. More research on the effects of different implementation techniques on CA results and optimization of the transfer function analysis is urgently needed. Furthermore, international guidelines should be created to inform the minimal description of the applied technique and the interpretation of transfer function outcomes in scientific research.

  12. Tunable fluorescence in chromophore-functionalized nanodiamond induced by energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Urmimala; Jain, Ankit; George, Subi J.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2011-08-01

    Hybrid materials comprising diamond nanoparticles (ND) and oligo(phenylenevinylenes) (OPVs) have been synthesized by the covalent linking of acid-functionalized ND and OPV-amine. Chromophore-functionalized ND particles with long alkyl and π-conjugated groups are readily dispersed in various organic solvents without any precipitation after several hours. A careful study of the properties of the hybrid materials revealed an aggregation-induced energy transfer from the blue fluorescent nanodiamonds to green emitting OPVs. At very low concentrations the hybrid emits in the blue region, but as the concentration is increased a gradual transition from blue to green emission occurs. Competitive processes such as aggregation-induced enhanced emission and self-absorption have been ruled out and a molecular picture of the phenomenon is proposed. This strategy can open a plethora of new avenues for fluorescent nanodiamonds in optoelectronics and light harvesting apart from bio-imaging.Hybrid materials comprising diamond nanoparticles (ND) and oligo(phenylenevinylenes) (OPVs) have been synthesized by the covalent linking of acid-functionalized ND and OPV-amine. Chromophore-functionalized ND particles with long alkyl and π-conjugated groups are readily dispersed in various organic solvents without any precipitation after several hours. A careful study of the properties of the hybrid materials revealed an aggregation-induced energy transfer from the blue fluorescent nanodiamonds to green emitting OPVs. At very low concentrations the hybrid emits in the blue region, but as the concentration is increased a gradual transition from blue to green emission occurs. Competitive processes such as aggregation-induced enhanced emission and self-absorption have been ruled out and a molecular picture of the phenomenon is proposed. This strategy can open a plethora of new avenues for fluorescent nanodiamonds in optoelectronics and light harvesting apart from bio-imaging. Electronic

  13. Mitochondrial function and toxicity: role of B vitamins on the one-carbon transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Depeint, Flore; Bruce, W Robert; Shangari, Nandita; Mehta, Rhea; O'Brien, Peter J

    2006-10-27

    The B vitamins are water-soluble vitamins that are required as coenzymes for reactions essential for cellular function. This review focuses on the essential role of vitamins in maintaining the one-carbon transfer cycles. Folate and choline are believed to be central methyl donors required for mitochondrial protein and nucleic acid synthesis through their active forms, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and betaine, respectively. Cobalamin (B12) may assist methyltetrahydrofolate in the synthesis of methionine, a cysteine source for glutathione biosynthesis. Pyridoxal, pyridoxine and pyridoxamine (B6) seem to be involved in the regeneration of tetrahydrofolate into the active methyl-bearing form and in glutathione biosynthesis from homocysteine. Other roles of these vitamins that are relevant to mitochondrial functions will also be discussed. However these roles for B vitamins in cell function are mostly theoretically based and still require verification at the cellular level. For instance it is still not known what B vitamins are depleted by xenobiotic toxins or which cellular targets, metabolic pathways or molecular toxic mechanisms are prevented by B vitamins. This review covers the current state of knowledge and suggests where this research field is heading so as to better understand the role vitamin Bs play in cellular function and intermediary metabolism as well as molecular, cellular and clinical consequences of vitamin deficiency. The current experimental and clinical evidence that supplementation alleviates deficiency symptoms as well as the effectiveness of vitamins as antioxidants will also be reviewed.

  14. Functionalizing Arrays of Transferred Monolayer Graphene on Insulating Surfaces by Bipolar Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Koefoed, Line; Pedersen, Emil Bjerglund; Thyssen, Lena; Vinther, Jesper; Kristiansen, Thomas; Pedersen, Steen U; Daasbjerg, Kim

    2016-06-28

    Development of versatile methods for graphene functionalization is necessary before use in applications such as composites or as catalyst support. In this study, bipolar electrochemistry is used as a wireless functionalization method to graft 4-bromobenzenediazonium on large (10 × 10 mm(2)) monolayer graphene sheets supported on SiO2. Using this technique, transferred graphene can be electrochemically functionalized without the need of a metal support or the deposition of physical contacts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to map the chemical changes and modifications of graphene across the individual sheets. Interestingly, the defect density is similar between samples, independent of driving potential, whereas the grafting density is increased upon increasing the driving potential. It is observed that the 2D nature of the electrode influences the electrochemistry and stability of the electrode compared to conventional electrografting using a three-electrode setup. On one side, the graphene will be blocked by the attached organic film, but the conductivity is also altered upon functionalization, which makes the graphene electrode different from a normal metal electrode. Furthermore, it is shown that it is possible to simultaneously modify an array of many small graphene electrodes (1 × 1 mm(2)) on SiO2.

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  16. Empirical transfer functions for stations in the Central California seismological network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Dratler, Jay

    1976-01-01

    A sequence of calibration signals composed of a station identification code, a transient from the release of the seismometer mass at rest from a known displacement from the equilibrium position, and a transient from a known step in voltage to the amplifier input are generated by the automatic daily calibration system (ADCS) now operational in the U.S. Geological Survey central California seismographic network. Documentation of a sequence of interactive programs to compute, from the calibration data, the complex transfer functions for the seismographic system (ground motion through digitizer) the electronics (amplifier through digitizer), and the seismometer alone are presented. The analysis utilizes the Fourier transform technique originally suggested by Espinosa et al (1962). Section I is a general description of seismographic calibration. Section II contrasts the 'Fourier transform' and the 'least-squares' techniques for analyzing transient calibration signals. Theoretical consideration for the Fourier transform technique used here are described in Section III. Section IV is a detailed description of the sequence of calibration signals generated by the ADCS. Section V is a brief 'cookbook description' of the calibration programs; Section VI contains a detailed sample program execution. Section VII suggests the uses of the resultant empirical transfer functions. Supplemental interactive programs by which smooth response functions, suitable for reducing seismic data to ground motion, are also documented in Section VII. Appendices A and B contain complete listings of the Fortran source Codes while Appendix C is an update containing preliminary results obtained from an analysis of some of the calibration signals from stations in the seismographic network near Oroville, California.

  17. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, Shimon; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Manhart, Michael; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Mu, Wanmeng; Zhou, Jingwen; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90%) in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM), correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the intracellular

  18. Determining dynamic properties of a nanoscale aerogel via an advanced transfer function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashoff, Matthew

    A newly-published transfer function method is employed to determine dynamic properties of an aerogel. Termed the "dynamic mass method," it can be applied to any porous, elastic material and is thought to be superior to previous methods because it employs a mass as a function of frequency and produces data that is frequency-dependent in the complex regime, which is a more accurate representation of elastic materials. Moreover, losses are determined seamlessly as imaginary components of their associated properties, which eliminates the need to calculate additional loss factors. The properties of this aerogel with respect to vibrational loading in particular are of interest because it has been manufactured relatively inexpensively compared to other similar materials currently available. The specimen is tested by fixing it between two steel plates of known mass and attaching the system to a shaker. Impulse-response data is collected by driving the shaker with a log-sweep-sine signal. Transforming the data into the frequency domain allows for spectral analysis of multiple properties, including dynamic mass, density, impedance, Young's modulus, and speed of sound in the material. The resulting data suggests that the frequency range for valid data is wider than those of previous implementations of other transfer function methods. Additionally, the material that was tested appears to be a good candidate for use as a vibration isolator because of its low ratio of input force to bottom and top acceleration at low frequencies, and because it is ductile in the same frequency range. However, the material's behavior in shear dynamic loading situations needs to be studied before anything definitive can be said about its potential as a commercial noise and vibration isolator.

  19. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Manhart, Michael; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Mu, Wanmeng; Zhou, Jingwen; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10–90%) in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (k cat/KM), correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the intracellular

  20. Non-specific lipid transfer proteins in plants: presenting new advances and an integrated functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Xiaobo; Lu, Changming; Zeng, Xinhua; Li, Yunjing; Fu, Donghui; Wu, Gang

    2015-09-01

    Plant non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are small, basic proteins present in abundance in higher plants. They are involved in key processes of plant cytology, such as the stablization of membranes, cell wall organization, and signal transduction. nsLTPs are also known to play important roles in resistance to biotic and abiotic stress, and in plant growth and development, such as sexual reproduction, seed development and germination. The structures of plant nsLTPs contain an eight-cysteine residue conserved motif, linked by four disulfide bonds, and an internal hydrophobic cavity, which comprises the lipid-binding site. This structure endows stability and increases the ability to bind and/or carry hydrophobic molecules. There is growing interest in nsLTPs, due to their critical roles, resulting in the need for a comprehensive review of their form and function. Relevant topics include: nsLTP structure and biochemical features, their classification, identification, and characterization across species, sub-cellular localization, lipid binding and transfer ability, expression profiling, functionality, and evolution. We present advances, as well as limitations and trends, relating to the different topics of the nsLTP gene family. This review collates a large body of research pertaining to the role of nsLTPs across the plant kingdom, which has been integrated as an in depth functional analysis of this group of proteins as a whole, and their activities across multiple biochemical pathways, based on a large number of reports. This review will enhance our understanding of nsLTP activity in planta, prompting further work and insights into the roles of this multifaceted protein family in plants.