Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic travel times

  1. Ocean acoustic tomography - Travel time biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiesberger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The travel times of acoustic rays traced through a climatological sound-speed profile are compared with travel times computed through the same profile containing an eddy field. The accuracy of linearizing the relations between the travel time difference and the sound-speed deviation at long ranges is assessed using calculations made for two different eddy fields measured in the eastern Atlantic. Significant nonlinearities are found in some cases, and the relationships of the values of these nonlinearities to the range between source and receiver, to the anomaly size associated with the eddies, and to the positions of the eddies are studied. An analytical model of the nonlinearities is discussed.

  2. Effects of Horizontal Magnetic Fields on Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rekha

    2007-02-01

    Local helioseismology techniques seek to probe the subsurface magnetic fields and flows by observing waves that emerge at the solar surface after passing through these inhomogeneities. Active regions on the surface of the Sun are distinguished by their strong magnetic fields, and techniques such as time-distance helioseismology can provide a useful diagnostic for probing these structures. Above the active regions, the fields fan out to create a horizontal magnetic canopy. We investigate the effect of a uniform horizontal magnetic field on the travel time of acoustic waves by considering vertical velocity in a simple plane-parallel adiabatically stratified polytrope. It is shown that such fields can lower the upper turning point of p-modes and hence influence their travel time. It is found that acoustic waves reflected from magnetically active regions have travel times up to a minute less than for waves similarly reflected in quiet regions. It is also found that sound speeds are increased below the active regions. These findings are consistent with time-distance measurements.

  3. Ray travel times at long ranges in acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Virovlyansky, A L

    2003-05-01

    The Hamiltonian formalism in terms of the action-angle variables is applied to study ray travel times in a waveguide with a smooth sound speed profile perturbed by a weak range-dependent inhomogeneity. A simple approximate formula relating the differences in ray travel times to range variations of action variables is derived. This relation is applied to study range variations of the timefront (representing ray arrivals in the time-depth plane). Widening and bias of timefront segments in the presence of perturbations are considered. Qualitative and quantitative explanations are given to surprising stability of early portions of timefronts observed in both numerical simulations and field experiments. This phenomenon is interpreted from the viewpoint of Fermat's principle. By ray tracing in a realistic deep water environment with an internal-wave-induced perturbation it has been demonstrated that our approach can be used at ranges up to, at least, 3000 km. PMID:12765372

  4. Shallow-water acoustic tomography from angle measurements instead of travel-time measurements.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Florian; Nicolas, Barbara; Mars, Jérôme I; Roux, Philippe; Brossier, Romain

    2013-10-01

    For shallow-water waveguides and mid-frequency broadband acoustic signals, ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) is based on the multi-path aspect of wave propagation. Using arrays in emission and reception and advanced array processing, every acoustic arrival can be isolated and matched to an eigenray that is defined not only by its travel time but also by its launch and reception angles. Classically, OAT uses travel-time variations to retrieve sound-speed perturbations; this assumes very accurate source-to-receiver clock synchronization. This letter uses numerical simulations to demonstrate that launch-and-reception-angle tomography gives similar results to travel-time tomography without the same requirement for high-precision synchronization.

  5. An acoustic travel time method for continuous velocity monitoring in shallow tidal streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Nistor, Ioan; Sharifi, Soroosh

    2013-08-01

    Long-term variations of streamflow in a tidal channel were measured using a Fluvial Acoustic Tomography (FAT) system through one transmission path. FAT is an innovative acoustic technology that utilizes the time-of-travel method to determine velocity between two points from multiple ray paths that traverse the entire cross-section of stream. Due to high spatial variability of flow distribution stationary ADCP measurements were not likely to yield true section-averaged flow velocity and moving-boat ADCP method was therefore used to provide reference data. As such, two short-term moving boat ADCP campaigns were carried out by the authors. In the first campaign, a couple of acoustic stations were added to the FAT system in order to resolve flow angularity in addition to the mean velocity. Comparing the FAT results with corresponding ADCP section-averaged flow direction and velocity indicated remarkable consistency. Second campaign was designed to capture the influence of salt wedge intrusion on the sound propagation pattern. It was found that FAT velocity measurements bias high if acoustic stations lay inside the cooler freshwater layer. Ray-tracing hindcasts suggest that installing acoustic stations inside the salt wedge may significantly improve function of output of the system. Comparing salinities evaluated from long-term FAT travel time records with nodal salinity measurements provided by conductivity-temperature sensors reveals the potential ability of FAT in measuring salt flux.

  6. Ion acoustic traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Burrows, R. H.; Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-04-01

    Models for traveling waves in multi-fluid plasmas give essential insight into fully nonlinear wave structures in plasmas, not readily available from either numerical simulations or from weakly nonlinear wave theories. We illustrate these ideas using one of the simplest models of an electron-proton multi-fluid plasma for the case where there is no magnetic field or a constant normal magnetic field present. We show that the traveling waves can be reduced to a single first-order differential equation governing the dynamics. We also show that the equations admit a multi-symplectic Hamiltonian formulation in which both the space and time variables can act as the evolution variable. An integral equation useful for calculating adiabatic, electrostatic solitary wave signatures for multi-fluid plasmas with arbitrary mass ratios is presented. The integral equation arises naturally from a fluid dynamics approach for a two fluid plasma, with a given mass ratio of the two species (e.g. the plasma could be an electron-proton or an electron-positron plasma). Besides its intrinsic interest, the integral equation solution provides a useful analytical test for numerical codes that include a proton-electron mass ratio as a fundamental constant, such as for particle in cell (PIC) codes. The integral equation is used to delineate the physical characteristics of ion acoustic traveling waves consisting of hot electron and cold proton fluids.

  7. Improved tests for global warming trend extraction in ocean acoustic travel-time data. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bottone, S.; Gray, H.L.; Woodward, W.A.

    1996-04-01

    A possible indication of the existence of global climate warming is the presence of a trend in the travel time of an acoustic signal along several ocean paths over a period of many years. This report describes new, improved tests for testing for linear trend in time series data with correlated residuals. We introduce a bootstrap based procedure to test for trend in this setting which is better adapted to controlling the significance levels. The procedure is applied to acoustic travel time data generated by the MASIG ocean model. It is shown how to generalize the improved method to multivariate, or vector, time series, which, in the ocean acoustics setting, corresponds to travel time data on many ocean paths. An appendix describes the TRENDS software, which enables the user to perform these calculations using a graphical user interface (GUI).

  8. Using a numerical model to understand the connection between the ocean and acoustic travel-time measurements.

    PubMed

    Powell, Brian S; Kerry, Colette G; Cornuelle, Bruce D

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of acoustic ray travel-times in the ocean provide synoptic integrals of the ocean state between source and receiver. It is known that the ray travel-time is sensitive to variations in the ocean at the transmission time, but the sensitivity of the travel-time to spatial variations in the ocean prior to the acoustic transmission have not been quantified. This study examines the sensitivity of ray travel-time to the temporally and spatially evolving ocean state in the Philippine Sea using the adjoint of a numerical model. A one year series of five day backward integrations of the adjoint model quantify the sensitivity of travel-times to varying dynamics that can alter the travel-time of a 611 km ray by 200 ms. The early evolution of the sensitivities reveals high-mode internal waves that dissipate quickly, leaving the lowest three modes, providing a connection to variations in the internal tide generation prior to the sample time. They are also strongly sensitive to advective effects that alter density along the ray path. These sensitivities reveal how travel-time measurements are affected by both nearby and distant waters. Temporal nonlinearity of the sensitivities suggests that prior knowledge of the ocean state is necessary to exploit the travel-time observations.

  9. Crosswell acoustic surveying in gas sands: Travel-time pattern recognition, seismic Q and channel waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, J. N.; Johnson, P. A.

    The application of crosswell acoustic measurements to gas sands research has been explored through surveys conducted in the Mesa Verde formation at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) site near Rifle, Colorado. The borehole tools used in the survey are similar in concept to those used in commercial service for sonic logging, but they are especially adapted for the stringent requirements of crosswell shooting in hot gas wells. Important information about the geologic structure between wells can be extracted from crosswell scans without resorting to elaborate processing. A useful representation is a display of the travel time of P-waves in terms of the cylindrical coordinates of the transmitter referenced to the receiver. This is known as a gamma-depth ((GAMMA)-Z) plot. Such a representation may yield distinctive patterns, which can be interpreted based on the successful replication of the pattern through computer simulations.

  10. Use of acoustic wave travel-time measurements to probe the near-surface layers of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Osaki, Y.; Shibahashi, H.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The variation of solar p-mode travel times with cyclic frequency nu is shown to provide information on both the radial variation of the acoustic potential and the depth of the effective source of the oscillations. Observed travel-time data for waves with frequency lower than the acoustic cutoff frequency for the solar atmosphere (approximately equals 5.5 mHz) are inverted to yield the local acoustic cutoff frequency nu(sub c) as a function of depth in the outer convection zone and lower atmosphere of the Sun. The data for waves with nu greater than 5.5 mHz are used to show that the source of the p-mode oscillations lies approximately 100 km beneath the base of the photosphere. This depth is deeper than that determined using a standard mixing-length calculation.

  11. Crosswell acoustic surveying in gas sands: travel-time pattern recognition, seismic Q and channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J.N.; Johnson, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The application of crosswell acoustic measurements to gas sands research has been explored through surveys conducted in the Mesa Verde formation at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) site near Rifle, Colorado. The borehole tools used in the survey are similar in concept to those used in commercial service for sonic logging, but they are especially adapted for the stringent requirements of crosswell shooting in hot gas wells. Important information about the geologic structure between wells can be extracted from crosswell scans without resorting to elaborate processing. A useful representation is a display of the travel time of P-waves in terms of the cylindrical coordinates of the transmitter referenced to the receiver. This is known as a gamma-depth (..gamma..-Z) plot. Such a representation may yield distinctive patterns, which can be interpreted based on the successful replication of the pattern through computer simulations. The apparent seismic Q of P-waves transmitted through the sands at the MWX site is derived using two methods. The first applies to crosswell surveys in which signals can be acquired over a significant range of source-receiver distances. A Q of 15 between well pair MWX 1/2 is derived in this manner. The second method makes use of signals transmitted between wells in a three-well complex and provides an estimate of seismic Q for the rocks bounded by each well pair. Q estimates derived from this technique are 18, 30, and 28 for well bores MWX-1/2, MWX-2/3 and MWX-3/1, respectively. Channel waves propagate through the MWX coals. Evidence suggests that tube waves launched in the transmitter well give rise, under appropriate conditions, to channel waves, which in turn excite tube waves in nearby wells that penetrate the same channel. Although the sequence of conversions is weak, the resulting waveforms are coherent enough to resolve the channel waves through stacking. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  12. HELIOSEISMIC SIGNATURE OF CHROMOSPHERIC DOWNFLOWS IN ACOUSTIC TRAVEL-TIME MEASUREMENTS FROM HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Kaori; Sekii, Takashi; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Zhao Junwei; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2009-04-01

    We report on a signature of chromospheric downflows in two emerging flux regions detected by time-distance helioseismology analysis. We use both chromospheric intensity oscillation data in the Ca II H line and photospheric Dopplergrams in the Fe I 557.6 nm line obtained by Hinode/SOT for our analyses. By cross-correlating the Ca II oscillation signals, we have detected a travel-time anomaly in the plage regions; outward travel times are shorter than inward travel times by 0.5-1 minute. However, such an anomaly is absent in the Fe I data. These results can be interpreted as evidence of downflows in the lower chromosphere. The downflow speed is estimated to be below 10 km s{sup -1}. This result demonstrates a new possibility of studying chromospheric flows by time-distance analysis.

  13. Where the ocean influences the impulse response and its effect on synchronous changes of acoustic travel time.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2011-12-01

    In 1983, sounds at 133 Hz, 0.06 s resolution were transmitted in the Pacific for five days at 2 min intervals over 3709 km between bottom-mounted instruments maintained with atomic clocks. In 1989, a technique was developed to measure changes in acoustic travel time with an accuracy of 135 microseconds at 2 min intervals for selected windows of travel time within the impulse response. The data have short-lived 1 to 10 ms oscillations of travel time with periods less than a few days. Excluding tidal effects, different windows exhibited significant synchronized changes in travel time for periods shorter than 10 h. In the 1980s, this phenomenon was not understood because internal waves have correlation lengths of a few kilometers which are smaller than the way sound was thought to sample the ocean along well-separated and distinct rays corresponding to different windows. The paradox's resolution comes from modern theories that replace the ray-picture with finite wavelength representations that predict sound can be influenced in the upper ocean over horizontal scales such as 20 km or more. Thus, different windows are influenced by the same short-scale fluctuations of sound speed. This conclusion is supported by the data and numerical simulations of the impulse response.

  14. A matched-peak inversion approach for ocean acoustic travel-time tomography

    PubMed

    Skarsoulis

    2000-03-01

    A new approach for the inversion of travel-time data is proposed, based on the matching between model arrivals and observed peaks. Using the linearized model relations between sound-speed and arrival-time perturbations about a set of background states, arrival times and associated errors are calculated on a fine grid of model states discretizing the sound-speed parameter space. Each model state can explain (identify) a number of observed peaks in a particular reception lying within the uncertainty intervals of the corresponding predicted arrival times. The model states that explain the maximum number of observed peaks are considered as the more likely parametric descriptions of the reception; these model states can be described in terms of mean values and variances providing a statistical answer (matched-peak solution) to the inversion problem. A basic feature of the matched-peak inversion approach is that each reception can be treated independently, i.e., no constraints are posed from previous-reception identification or inversion results. Accordingly, there is no need for initialization of the inversion procedure and, furthermore, discontinuous travel-time data can be treated. The matched-peak inversion method is demonstrated by application to 9-month-long travel-time data from the Thetis-2 tomography experiment in the western Mediterranean sea.

  15. Acoustic travel time gauges for in-situ determination of pressure and temperature in multi-anvil apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng; Kung, Jennifer; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2015-08-14

    In this study, we developed a new method for in-situ pressure determination in multi-anvil, high-pressure apparatus using an acoustic travel time approach within the framework of acoustoelasticity. The ultrasonic travel times of polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were calibrated against NaCl pressure scale up to 15 GPa and 900 °C in a Kawai-type double-stage multi-anvil apparatus in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation, thereby providing a convenient and reliable gauge for pressure determination at ambient and high temperatures. The pressures derived from this new travel time method are in excellent agreement with those from the fixed-point methods. Application of this new pressure gauge in an offline experiment revealed a remarkable agreement of the densities of coesite with those from the previous single crystal compression studies under hydrostatic conditions, thus providing strong validation for the current travel time pressure scale. The travel time approach not only can be used for continuous in-situ pressure determination at room temperature, high temperatures, during compression and decompression, but also bears a unique capability that none of the previous scales can deliver, i.e., simultaneous pressure and temperature determination with a high accuracy (±0.16 GPa in pressure and ±17 °C in temperature). Therefore, the new in-situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} pressure gauge is expected to enable new and expanded opportunities for offline laboratory studies of solid and liquid materials under high pressure and high temperature in multi-anvil apparatus.

  16. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time-distance helioseismology pipeline has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time-distance helioseismology: a Gabor wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, 2004). Using Doppler velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference travel-time perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (1997) and Gizon and Birch (2002). We investigated the relationships among these three travel-time definitions, their sensitivities to fitting parameters, and estimated the random errors they produce

  17. Effect of Migration Pathway on Travel Time and Survival of Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Johnson, Gary E.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Hughes, Michael S.; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2012-02-01

    Off-channel areas (side channels, tidal flats, sand bars, and shallow-water bays) may serve as important migration corridors through estuarine environments for salmon and steelhead smolts. Relatively large percentages (21-33%) of acoustic-tagged yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts were detected migrating through off-channel areas of the Columbia River estuary in 2008. The probability of survival for off-channel migrants (0.78-0.94) was similar to or greater than the survival probability of main channel migrants (0.67-0.93). Median travel times were similar for all species or run types and migration pathways we examined, ranging from 1-2 d. The route used by smolts to migrate through the estuary may affect their vulnerability to predation. Acoustic-tagged steelhead that migrated nearest to avian predator nesting colonies experienced higher predation rates (24%) than those that migrated farthest from the colonies (10%). The use of multiple migration pathways may be advantageous to out-migrating smolts because it helps to buffer against high rates of mortality, which may occur in localized areas, and helps to minimize inter- and intraspecific competition.

  18. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Solar Dynamics Observatory-Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler-velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time - distance helioseismology pipeline (Zhao et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2010) has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross-covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time - distance helioseismology: a Gabor-wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004). Using Doppler-velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument onboard SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference traveltime perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet-Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997) and Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002). We investigated the relationships among

  19. Sensitivity of ray travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. P.; Virovlyansky, A. L.; Zaslavsky, G. M.

    2002-09-01

    Ray in a waveguide can be considered as a trajectory of the corresponding Hamiltonian system, which appears to be chaotic in a nonuniform environment. From the experimental and practical viewpoints, the ray travel time is an important characteristic that, in some way, involves an information about the waveguide condition. It is shown that the ray travel time as a function of the initial momentum and propagation range in the unperturbed waveguide displays a scaling law. Some properties of the ray travel time predicted by this law still persist in periodically nonuniform waveguides with chaotic ray trajectories. As examples we consider few models with special attention to the underwater acoustic waveguide. It is demonstrated for a deep ocean propagation model that even under conditions of ray chaos the ray travel time is determined, to a considerable extent, by the coordinates of the ray endpoints and the number of turning points, i.e., by a topology of the ray path. We show how the closeness of travel times for rays with equal numbers of turning points reveals itself in ray travel time dependencies on the starting momentum and on the depth of the observation point. It has been shown that the same effect is associated with the appearance of the gap between travel times of chaotic and regular rays. The manifestation of the stickiness (the presence of such parts in a chaotic trajectory where the latter exhibits an almost regular behavior) in ray travel times is discussed.

  20. Time travel paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnikov, S.

    2002-03-01

    We define the time travel paradox in physical terms and prove its existence by constructing an explicit example. We argue further that in theories-such as general relativity-where the spacetime geometry is subject to nothing but differential equations and initial data no paradoxes arise.

  1. Time - A Traveler's Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1999-09-01

    "Bucky Fuller thought big," Wired magazine recently noted, "Arthur C. Clarke thinks big, but Cliff Pickover outdoes them both." In his newest book, Cliff Pickover outdoes even himself, probing a mystery that has baffled mystics, philosophers, and scientists throughout history--What is the nature of time?In Time: A Traveler's Guide , Pickover takes readers to the forefront of science as he illuminates the most mysterious phenomenon in the universe--time itself. Is time travel possible? Is time real? Does it flow in one direction only? Does it have a beginning and an end? What is eternity? Pickover's book offers a stimulating blend of Chopin, philosophy, Einstein, and modern physics, spiced with diverting side-trips to such topics as the history of clocks, the nature of free will, and the reason gold glitters. Numerous diagrams ensure readers will have no trouble following along.By the time we finish this book, we understand a wide variety of scientific concepts pertaining to time. And most important, we will understand that time travel is, indeed, possible.

  2. Time, travel and infection.

    PubMed

    Cliff, Andrew; Haggett, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The collapse of geographical space over the last 200 years has had profound effects on the circulation of human populations and on the transfer of infectious diseases. Three examples are used to illustrate the process: (a) the impact of the switch from sail to steamships in importing measles into Fiji over a 40-year period; (b) changes in measles epidemic behaviour in Iceland over a 150-year period; and (c) changes in the spread of cholera within the United States over a 35-year period. In each case, the link between time, travel and disease has been an intimate one.

  3. Solar wind travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.

    A useful rule of thumb in solar terrestrial studies is that the solar wind travels 4 Earth radii (RE) per minute. Long-term studies of solar wind velocity [e.g., Luhmann et al., 1993; 1994] show that the median velocity is about 420 km/s, corresponding to 3.96 RE min-1. The quartiles are about 370 km/s and 495 km/s, corresponding to 3.48 Re min-1 and 4.66 Re min-1 respectively. This number helps estimate the delays expected when observing a discontinuity at a solar wind monitor; one example is ISEE-3 when it was at the forward libration point (about 60 min). It is also helpful for estimating how much time passes before the dayside magnetosphere is compressed as denser solar wind flows by (about 2.5 min).

  4. Analyses of sea surface height, bottom pressure and acoustic travel time in the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongsheng

    A two-dimensional array of pressure-gauge-equipped inverted echo sounders (PIESs) was deployed in the southwestern Japan/East Sea (JES) from June 1999 to July 2001, designed to observe variability in the barotropic and baroclinic circulation. The findings from these studies are reported here. A nearly uniform barotropic basin-scale sea level variation exists in the JES with amplitudes about 5 cm. They are energetic at time scales of 2-70 days, which are shorter than the ERS-2 and TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimetry Nyquist periods of 70 days and 20 days. The common mode produces a substantial alias in satellite observations; furthermore, the combined aliasing effects on multi-tracks can mimic mesoscale eddies and may qualitatively alter the synoptic mapping. Our alias can be suppressed by removing the common mode from satellite SSH. 78% of the common mode variance can be removed in the Japan/East Sea by averaging among coastal tide gauge records to estimate the common mode. High frequency oscillations with period around 7 hours are shown to be organized in a fundamental basin mode in the JES. The oscillation consists of a single amphidromic point around which the high water propagates counter-clockwise with along-coast wavelength equal to the circumference of the basin and largest amplitude at the narrow northeast region of the JES. The time series of basin oscillations is modulated in packets of time scales 2-16 days shown to coincide with synoptic scale forcing over the JES. The basin oscillations exhibit seasonal modulation and vary jointly with wind forcing. A coupled mode analysis confirms that bottom topography vertical coupling in the Japan/East Sea. In the first coupled mode, the deep response flows are largely confined on closed potential vorticity regions created by the Ulleung Basin depression or by the Korea Plateau, while the upper layer exhibits a migration of the Ulleung Warm Eddy. In the second mode, the upper and deep layer have similar spatial

  5. Time Travel in the Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Donna W.

    2005-01-01

    A Time Travel project in the library gives enthusiasm to students to connect with the past and reinforces their research skills while instilling respect for the past years. The librarian should choose one specific decade to highlight in the library and create an extravaganza that would allow memorabilia from that time period to be located without…

  6. Transition Matrices and Time Travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwee Kuan

    It has been proven by Lee [1] that the grandfather paradox and Deutsch's unproven paradox are precluded for twoand three-state graphical models. We prove that both paradoxes are also precluded for a general n-state model. In addition, we present a new time travel paradox in this paper.

  7. Time Travel: Deutsch vs. Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichny, George

    2011-12-01

    The quantum teleportation protocol can be used to probabilistically simulate a quantum circuit with backward-in-time connections. This allows us to analyze some conceptual problems of time travel in the context of physically realizable situations free of paradoxes. As an example one can perform encrypted measurements of future states for which the decryption key becomes available in the future. Likewise, the gauge-like freedom of locally changing the direction of time flow in quantum circuits can lead to conceptual and computational simplifications. I contrast this situation with Deutsch's treatment of quantum mechanics in the presence of closed time-like curves pointing out some of its deficiencies and problems.

  8. Treating time travel quantum mechanically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John-Mark A.

    2014-10-01

    The fact that closed timelike curves (CTCs) are permitted by general relativity raises the question as to how quantum systems behave when time travel to the past occurs. Research into answering this question by utilizing the quantum circuit formalism has given rise to two theories: Deutschian-CTCs (D-CTCs) and "postselected" CTCs (P-CTCs). In this paper the quantum circuit approach is thoroughly reviewed, and the strengths and shortcomings of D-CTCs and P-CTCs are presented in view of their nonlinearity and time-travel paradoxes. In particular, the "equivalent circuit model"—which aims to make equivalent predictions to D-CTCs, while avoiding some of the difficulties of the original theory—is shown to contain errors. The discussion of D-CTCs and P-CTCs is used to motivate an analysis of the features one might require of a theory of quantum time travel, following which two overlapping classes of alternate theories are identified. One such theory, the theory of "transition probability" CTCs (T-CTCs), is fully developed. The theory of T-CTCs is shown not to have certain undesirable features—such as time-travel paradoxes, the ability to distinguish nonorthogonal states with certainty, and the ability to clone or delete arbitrary pure states—that are present with D-CTCs and P-CTCs. The problems with nonlinear extensions to quantum mechanics are discussed in relation to the interpretation of these theories, and the physical motivations of all three theories are discussed and compared.

  9. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time...

  10. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time...

  11. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time...

  12. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time...

  13. 5 CFR 630.207 - Travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Travel time. 630.207 Section 630.207... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.207 Travel time. The travel time granted an employee under section 6303(d) of title 5, United States Code, is inclusive of the time...

  14. Network Structure and Travel Time Perception

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time. PMID:24204932

  15. Network structure and travel time perception.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time.

  16. Code for Calculating Regional Seismic Travel Time

    2009-07-10

    The RSTT software computes predictions of the travel time of seismic energy traveling from a source to a receiver through 2.5D models of the seismic velocity distribution within the Earth. The two primary applications for the RSTT library are tomographic inversion studies and seismic event location calculations. In tomographic inversions studies, a seismologist begins with number of source-receiver travel time observations and an initial starting model of the velocity distribution within the Earth. A forwardmore » travel time calculator, such as the RSTT library, is used to compute predictions of each observed travel time and all of the residuals (observed minus predicted travel time) are calculated. The Earth model is then modified in some systematic way with the goal of minimizing the residuals. The Earth model obtained in this way is assumed to be a better model than the starting model if it has lower residuals. The other major application for the RSTT library is seismic event location. Given an Earth model, an initial estimate of the location of a seismic event, and some number of observations of seismic travel time thought to have originated from that event, location codes systematically modify the estimate of the location of the event with the goal of minimizing the difference between the observed and predicted travel times. The second application, seismic event location, is routinely implemented by the military as part of its effort to monitor the Earth for nuclear tests conducted by foreign countries.« less

  17. Code for Calculating Regional Seismic Travel Time

    SciTech Connect

    BALLARD, SANFORD; HIPP, JAMES; & BARKER, GLENN

    2009-07-10

    The RSTT software computes predictions of the travel time of seismic energy traveling from a source to a receiver through 2.5D models of the seismic velocity distribution within the Earth. The two primary applications for the RSTT library are tomographic inversion studies and seismic event location calculations. In tomographic inversions studies, a seismologist begins with number of source-receiver travel time observations and an initial starting model of the velocity distribution within the Earth. A forward travel time calculator, such as the RSTT library, is used to compute predictions of each observed travel time and all of the residuals (observed minus predicted travel time) are calculated. The Earth model is then modified in some systematic way with the goal of minimizing the residuals. The Earth model obtained in this way is assumed to be a better model than the starting model if it has lower residuals. The other major application for the RSTT library is seismic event location. Given an Earth model, an initial estimate of the location of a seismic event, and some number of observations of seismic travel time thought to have originated from that event, location codes systematically modify the estimate of the location of the event with the goal of minimizing the difference between the observed and predicted travel times. The second application, seismic event location, is routinely implemented by the military as part of its effort to monitor the Earth for nuclear tests conducted by foreign countries.

  18. Nonlinear refraction and reflection travel time tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Jiahua; ten Brink, U.S.; Toksoz, M.N.

    1998-01-01

    We develop a rapid nonlinear travel time tomography method that simultaneously inverts refraction and reflection travel times on a regular velocity grid. For travel time and ray path calculations, we apply a wave front method employing graph theory. The first-arrival refraction travel times are calculated on the basis of cell velocities, and the later refraction and reflection travel times are computed using both cell velocities and given interfaces. We solve a regularized nonlinear inverse problem. A Laplacian operator is applied to regularize the model parameters (cell slownesses and reflector geometry) so that the inverse problem is valid for a continuum. The travel times are also regularized such that we invert travel time curves rather than travel time points. A conjugate gradient method is applied to minimize the nonlinear objective function. After obtaining a solution, we perform nonlinear Monte Carlo inversions for uncertainty analysis and compute the posterior model covariance. In numerical experiments, we demonstrate that combining the first arrival refraction travel times with later reflection travel times can better reconstruct the velocity field as well as the reflector geometry. This combination is particularly important for modeling crustal structures where large velocity variations occur in the upper crust. We apply this approach to model the crustal structure of the California Borderland using ocean bottom seismometer and land data collected during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment along two marine survey lines. Details of our image include a high-velocity zone under the Catalina Ridge, but a smooth gradient zone between. Catalina Ridge and San Clemente Ridge. The Moho depth is about 22 km with lateral variations. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Catchment mixing processes and travel time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, Gianluca

    2012-05-01

    This work focuses on the description and the use of the probability density functions (pdfs) of travel, residence and evapotranspiration times, which are comprehensive descriptors of the fate of rainfall water particles traveling through catchments, and provide key information on hydrologic flowpaths, partitioning of precipitation, circulation and turnover of pollutants. Exploiting some analytical solutions to the transport problem derived by Botter et al. (2011), this paper analyzes the features of travel, residence and evapotranspiration time pdfs resulting from different assumptions on the mixing processes occurring during streamflow formation and plant uptake (namely, complete mixing and translatory flow). The ensuing analytical solutions are analyzed through numerical Monte Carlo simulations of a stochastic model of soil moisture and streamflow dynamics. Travel and residence time pdfs are shown to be time-variant as they mirror the variability of the relevant hydrological fluxes. In particular, the temporal fluctuations of the mean residence time are shown to reflect rainfall dynamics, whereas the variability of the mean travel time is chiefly driven by streamflow dynamics, with lower frequency and higher amplitude fluctuations. Dry climates enhance the effect of the type of mixing on catchment transport features (e.g., mean travel times and seasonal dynamics of stream concentrations). The implications for the interpretation of tracer experiments are also discussed, showing through specific examples that models disregarding nonstationarity may significantly misestimate travel time pdfs.

  20. Submicron separation of microspheres via travelling surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byung Hang; Jung, Jin Ho; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2014-12-21

    Submicron separation is the segregation of particles having a diameter difference of less than one micrometre. We present an acoustofluidic particle separator with submicron separation resolution to study the continuous, label-free, and contactless separation of polystyrene (PS) particles based on their acoustofluidic parameters such as size, density, compressibility and shape. In this work, the submicron separation of PS microspheres, having a marginal size difference, is achieved inside a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel via travelling surface acoustic waves (TSAWs). The TSAWs of different frequencies (200, 192, 155, and 129 MHz), propagating normal to the fluid flow direction inside the PDMS microchannel, realized continuous separation of particles with a diameter difference as low as 200 nm. A theoretical framework based on the rigid and elastic theories is presented to support the experimental results.

  1. Five Paradoxes and a General Question on Time Traveling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2011-04-01

    We present five paradoxes about: traveling to the past, traveling to the future, time traveling of a pregnant woman, traveling in the past before the birth, and traveling in the future after death. And a general question about how long does the time traveling take by itself?

  2. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official...

  3. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official...

  4. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official...

  5. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official...

  6. 5 CFR 550.1404 - Creditable travel time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Creditable travel time. 550.1404 Section... ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1404 Creditable travel time. (a) General. Subject... off for time in a travel status if— (1) The employee is required to travel away from the official...

  7. NOTE ON TRAVEL TIME SHIFTS DUE TO AMPLITUDE MODULATION IN TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, R.; Kosovichev, A. G. E-mail: sasha@quake.stanford.ed

    2010-01-10

    Correct interpretation of acoustic travel times measured by time-distance helioseismology is essential to get an accurate understanding of the solar properties that are inferred from them. It has long been observed that sunspots suppress p-mode amplitude, but its implications on travel times have not been fully investigated so far. It has been found in test measurements using a 'masking' procedure, in which the solar Doppler signal in a localized quiet region of the Sun is artificially suppressed by a spatial function, and using numerical simulations that the amplitude modulations in combination with the phase-speed filtering may cause systematic shifts of acoustic travel times. To understand the properties of this procedure, we derive an analytical expression for the cross-covariance of a signal that has been modulated locally by a spatial function that has azimuthal symmetry and then filtered by a phase-speed filter typically used in time-distance helioseismology. Comparing this expression to the Gabor wavelet fitting formula without this effect, we find that there is a shift in the travel times that is introduced by the amplitude modulation. The analytical model presented in this paper can be useful also for interpretation of travel time measurements for the non-uniform distribution of oscillation amplitude due to observational effects.

  8. Regular transport dynamics produce chaotic travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Johnson, Neil F.; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In the hope of making passenger travel times shorter and more reliable, many cities are introducing dedicated bus lanes (e.g., Bogota, London, Miami). Here we show that chaotic travel times are actually a natural consequence of individual bus function, and hence of public transport systems more generally, i.e., chaotic dynamics emerge even when the route is empty and straight, stops and lights are equidistant and regular, and loading times are negligible. More generally, our findings provide a novel example of chaotic dynamics emerging from a single object following Newton's laws of motion in a regularized one-dimensional system.

  9. Regular transport dynamics produce chaotic travel times.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Johnson, Neil F; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In the hope of making passenger travel times shorter and more reliable, many cities are introducing dedicated bus lanes (e.g., Bogota, London, Miami). Here we show that chaotic travel times are actually a natural consequence of individual bus function, and hence of public transport systems more generally, i.e., chaotic dynamics emerge even when the route is empty and straight, stops and lights are equidistant and regular, and loading times are negligible. More generally, our findings provide a novel example of chaotic dynamics emerging from a single object following Newton's laws of motion in a regularized one-dimensional system.

  10. Predicting river travel time from hydraulic characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Predicting the effect of a pollutant spill on downstream water quality is primarily dependent on the water velocity, longitudinal mixing, and chemical/physical reactions. Of these, velocity is the most important and difficult to predict. This paper provides guidance on extrapolating travel-time information from one within bank discharge to another. In many cases, a time series of discharge (such as provided by a U.S. Geological Survey stream gauge) will provide an excellent basis for this extrapolation. Otherwise, the accuracy of a travel time extrapolation based on a resistance equation can be greatly improved by assuming the total flow area is composed of two parts, an active and an inactive area. For 60 reaches of 12 rivers with slopes greater than about 0.0002, travel times could be predicted to within about 10% by computing the active flow area using the Manning equation with n = 0.035 and assuming a constant inactive area for each reach. The predicted travel times were not very sensitive to the assumed values of bed slope or channel width.

  11. Self-motion perception compresses time experienced in return travel.

    PubMed

    Seno, Takeharu; Ito, Hiroyuki; Shoji, Sunaga

    2011-01-01

    It is often anecdotally reported that time experienced in return travel (back to the start point) seems shorter than time spent in outward travel (travel to a new destination). Here, we report the first experimental results showing that return travel time is experienced as shorter than the actual time. This discrepancy is induced by the existence of self-motion perception.

  12. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time spent traveling. 551.422 Section 551... Activities § 551.422 Time spent traveling. (a) Time spent traveling shall be considered hours of work if: (1... who is permitted to use an alternative mode of transportation, or an employee who travels at a...

  13. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Time spent traveling. 551.422 Section 551... Activities § 551.422 Time spent traveling. (a) Time spent traveling shall be considered hours of work if: (1... who is permitted to use an alternative mode of transportation, or an employee who travels at a...

  14. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Time spent traveling. 551.422 Section 551... Activities § 551.422 Time spent traveling. (a) Time spent traveling shall be considered hours of work if: (1... who is permitted to use an alternative mode of transportation, or an employee who travels at a...

  15. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Time spent traveling. 551.422 Section 551... Activities § 551.422 Time spent traveling. (a) Time spent traveling shall be considered hours of work if: (1... who is permitted to use an alternative mode of transportation, or an employee who travels at a...

  16. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Time spent traveling. 551.422 Section 551... Activities § 551.422 Time spent traveling. (a) Time spent traveling shall be considered hours of work if: (1... who is permitted to use an alternative mode of transportation, or an employee who travels at a...

  17. Bifurcations of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves in a multicomponent magnetoplasma with superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, M. M.; El-Depsy, A.; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    Properties of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves propagating in a three-dimensional multicomponent magnetoplasma system composed of positive ions, negative ions and superthermal electrons are considered. Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), the Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived. The bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems is applied to investigate the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic travelling wave solutions of the resulting ZK equation. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves strongly depend on the external magnetic field, the unperturbed positive-to-negative ions density ratio, the direction cosine of the wave propagation vector with the Cartesian coordinates, as well as the superthermal electron parameter. The present model may be useful for describing the formation of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling wave in certain astrophysical scenarios, such as the D and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere.

  18. Time domain scattering of travelling wave radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Henry; Rand, Robert S.

    2002-12-01

    I present, apparently, a new description of radiative transfer problems in the time domain. It appears that for the first time a simple physical picture emerges of the underlying essence of scattered radiance when dealing with isotropic axially-symmetric scattering in nonconservative linear media as attenuated travelling waves was by analogy. The method used a new differential equation approach. Initially its accuracy in the frequency domain was demonstrated by applying it to a solved problem, where in the literature it is dealt with using the conventional 95-year-old integro-differential equation description. Confidence in the differential equation method was bolstered by showing how this new method produces the same analytical answer. The new technique converts the integro-differential equation formulation of radiative transfer into a "pure" differential equation formulation, consisting here in a mixture of ordinary and partial derivatives, and solves that. This paper analyzes the situation in the time domain using the differential equation description and again yields a travelling wave description. However, this time it is not simply by analogy that such a description is obtained. It is exact. This result of attenuated travelling waves was demonstrated in a prior paper by solving the integro-differential equation for the classic problem of axially-symmetric scalar isotropic scattering in a nonconservative linear medium. In this paper we revisit the problem, this time solving it by the differential equation method and obtain the identical result, once again confirming the method.

  19. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kennita A.; Vormohr, Hannah R.; Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C. Wyatt; López, Gabriel P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid.

  20. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kennita A; Vormohr, Hannah R; Doinikov, Alexander A; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C Wyatt; López, Gabriel P; Dayton, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid. PMID:27300980

  1. Phase Time and Envelope Time in Time-Distance Analysis and Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Jimenez, Antonio; Rabello-Soares, Maria Cristina; Ai, Guoxiang; Wang, Gwo-Ping; Goode Philip; Marquette, William; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Landenkov, Oleg

    1999-01-01

    Time-distance analysis and acoustic imaging are two related techniques to probe the local properties of solar interior. In this study, we discuss the relation of phase time and envelope time between the two techniques. The location of the envelope peak of the cross correlation function in time-distance analysis is identified as the travel time of the wave packet formed by modes with the same w/l. The phase time of the cross correlation function provides information of the phase change accumulated along the wave path, including the phase change at the boundaries of the mode cavity. The acoustic signals constructed with the technique of acoustic imaging contain both phase and intensity information. The phase of constructed signals can be studied by computing the cross correlation function between time series constructed with ingoing and outgoing waves. In this study, we use the data taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) instrument and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument. The analysis is carried out for the quiet Sun. We use the relation of envelope time versus distance measured in time-distance analyses to construct the acoustic signals in acoustic imaging analyses. The phase time of the cross correlation function of constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is twice the difference between the phase time and envelope time in time-distance analyses as predicted. The envelope peak of the cross correlation function between constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is located at zero time as predicted for results of one-bounce at 3 mHz for all four data sets and two-bounce at 3 mHz for two TON data sets. But it is different from zero for other cases. The cause of the deviation of the envelope peak from zero is not known.

  2. Two women with multiple disabilities sharing an acoustic orientation system and traveling together to indoor destinations.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, G E; Mantini, M

    1998-12-01

    This study assessed whether two women with total blindness and profound intellectual disability could share an acoustic orientation system and travel together simultaneously to common indoor destinations to perform occupational and vocational activities. The orientation system provided acoustic cues which indicated the direction to the destinations. Analysis of data indicated that the women were successful in sharing the system and could reach the destinations independently. PMID:10052076

  3. Continuous monitoring of crosswell seismic travel time

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, Thomas M.; Silver, Paul G.; Niu, Fenglin; Majer, Ernest L.

    2006-04-14

    In two separate shallow field experiments, at two distancescales, we have used continuous monitoring to estimate the effect ofbarometric pressure on crosswell travel time and thereby calibrated thestress sensitivity of the rock volume between the wells. In a 3 mexperiment we found a stress sensitivity of 10-6/Pa while in a 30 mexperiment the sensitivity was 5 x 10-8 /Pa. Results from a deeper (1km), 2 month experiment at the San Andreas fault observation boreholeswill be presented if analysis is completed.

  4. Travel-time-based thermal tracer tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter; Brauchler, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    Active thermal tracer testing is a technique to get information about the flow and transport properties of an aquifer. In this paper we propose an innovative methodology using active thermal tracers in a tomographic setup to reconstruct cross-well hydraulic conductivity profiles. This is facilitated by assuming that the propagation of the injected thermal tracer is mainly controlled by advection. To reduce the effects of density and viscosity changes and thermal diffusion, early-time diagnostics are used and specific travel times of the tracer breakthrough curves are extracted. These travel times are inverted with an eikonal solver using the staggered grid method to reduce constraints from the pre-defined grid geometry and to improve the resolution. Finally, non-reliable pixels are removed from the derived hydraulic conductivity tomograms. The method is applied to successfully reconstruct cross-well profiles as well as a 3-D block of a high-resolution fluvio-aeolian aquifer analog data set. Sensitivity analysis reveals a negligible role of the injection temperature, but more attention has to be drawn to other technical parameters such as the injection rate. This is investigated in more detail through model-based testing using diverse hydraulic and thermal conditions in order to delineate the feasible range of applications for the new tomographic approach.

  5. Geometry of locating sounds from differences in travel time: isodiachrons.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2004-11-01

    Calling animals may be located from measurements of the differences in acoustic travel time at pairs of receivers. For inhomogeneous fields of speed, locations can be made with better accuracy when the location algorithm allows the speed to vary from path to path. A new geometrical shape, called an isodiachron, is described. It is the locus of points corresponding to a constant difference in travel time along straight paths between the animal and two receivers. Its properties allow an interpretation for locations when the speed differs from path to path. An algorithm has been developed for finding the location of calling animals by intersecting isodiachrons from data collected at pairs of receivers. When the sound speed field is spatially homogeneous, isodiachrons become hyperboloids. Unlike a hyperboloid that extends to infinity, an isodiachron is confined to a finite region of space when the speeds differ between the animal and each of two receivers. Its shape is significantly different than a hyperboloid for cases of practical interest. Isodiachrons can be used to better understand locations of calling animals and other sounds in the sea, Earth, and air.

  6. 5 CFR 610.123 - Travel on official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Travel on official time. 610.123 Section... DUTY Weekly and Daily Scheduling of Work Work Schedules § 610.123 Travel on official time. Insofar as practicable travel during nonduty hours shall not be required of an employee. When it is essential that...

  7. 5 CFR 610.123 - Travel on official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel on official time. 610.123 Section... DUTY Weekly and Daily Scheduling of Work Work Schedules § 610.123 Travel on official time. Insofar as practicable travel during nonduty hours shall not be required of an employee. When it is essential that...

  8. 5 CFR 610.123 - Travel on official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Travel on official time. 610.123 Section... DUTY Weekly and Daily Scheduling of Work Work Schedules § 610.123 Travel on official time. Insofar as practicable travel during nonduty hours shall not be required of an employee. When it is essential that...

  9. 5 CFR 610.123 - Travel on official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Travel on official time. 610.123 Section... DUTY Weekly and Daily Scheduling of Work Work Schedules § 610.123 Travel on official time. Insofar as practicable travel during nonduty hours shall not be required of an employee. When it is essential that...

  10. 5 CFR 610.123 - Travel on official time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Travel on official time. 610.123 Section... DUTY Weekly and Daily Scheduling of Work Work Schedules § 610.123 Travel on official time. Insofar as practicable travel during nonduty hours shall not be required of an employee. When it is essential that...

  11. An ultrasonic air pump using an acoustic traveling wave along a small air gap.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Yuji; Nakamura, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Masato; Nakagawa, Tatsuyuki; Kihara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic air pump that uses a traveling wave along a small air gap between a bending vibrator and a reflector is discussed. The authors investigate ultrasonic air pumps that make use of bending vibrators and reflectors and confirm that air can be induced to flow by generating an asymmetric acoustic standing wave along an air gap. In this paper, we proposed a novel ultrasonic air pump in which a traveling wave along an air gap induces acoustic streaming and achieves one-way airflow. Two new reflector configurations, stepped and tapered, were designed and used to generate traveling waves. To predict airflow generation, sound pressure distribution in the air gap was calculated by means of finite element analysis (FEA). As a preliminary step, 2 FEA models were compared: one piezoelectric-structure-acoustic model and one piezoelectric- structure-fluid model, which included the viscosity effect of the fluid. The sound pressure distribution in the air gap, including fluid viscosity, was calculated by the FEA because it is expected to be dominant and thus have a strong effect on the sound pressure field in such a thin fluid layer. Based on the FEA results of the stepped and the tapered reflectors, it was determined that acoustic traveling waves could propagate along the gaps. Experiments were carried out with the designed bending vibrator and the reflectors. The acoustic fields in the air gap were measured via a fiber optic probe, and it was determined that the sound pressure and the phase distribution tendencies corresponded well with the results computed by FEA. Through our experiments, one-way airflow generation, in the same direction of the traveling wave and with the maximum flow velocity of 5.6 cm/s, was achieved.

  12. Travel-time tomography in shallow water: experimental demonstration at an ultrasonic scale.

    PubMed

    Roux, Philippe; Iturbe, Ion; Nicolas, Barbara; Virieux, Jean; Mars, Jérôme I

    2011-09-01

    Acoustic tomography in a shallow ultrasonic waveguide is demonstrated at the laboratory scale between two source-receiver arrays. At a 1/1,000 scale, the waveguide represents a 1.1-km-long, 52-m-deep ocean acoustic channel in the kilohertz frequency range. Two coplanar arrays record the transfer matrix in the time domain of the waveguide between each pair of source-receiver transducers. A time-domain, double-beamforming algorithm is simultaneously performed on the source and receiver arrays that projects the multi-reflected acoustic echoes into an equivalent set of eigenrays, which are characterized by their travel times and their launch and arrival angles. Travel-time differences are measured for each eigenray every 0.1 s when a thermal plume is generated at a given location in the waveguide. Travel-time tomography inversion is then performed using two forward models based either on ray theory or on the diffraction-based sensitivity kernel. The spatially resolved range and depth inversion data confirm the feasibility of acoustic tomography in shallow water. Comparisons are made between inversion results at 1 and 3 MHz with the inversion procedure using ray theory or the finite-frequency approach. The influence of surface fluctuations at the air-water interface is shown and discussed in the framework of shallow-water ocean tomography.

  13. Real-time virtual room acoustic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneal, James P.; Johnson, Jan; Johnson, Troge; Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    A realistic virtual room acoustic simulation has been implemented on a PC-based computer in near real-time. Room acoustics are calculated by the image source method using realistic absorption coefficients for a variety of realistic surfaces and programmed in MATLAB. The resulting impulse response filters are then applied in near real-time using fast convolution DSP techniques using data being read from a CD-ROM. The system was implemented in a virtual acoustic room facility. Optimizations have been performed to retain the realistic virtual room effect while minimizing computations through limited psycho-acoustic testing. In general, realistic anechoic to reverberant virtual rooms have been re-created with six 8192 coefficient filters. To provide realistic simulations, special care must be taken to accurately reproduce the low frequency acoustics. Since the virtual room acoustic facility was not totally anechoic (as are most anechoic chambers), inverse filters were applied to compensate for over-amplified acoustics at frequencies below 350 Hz.

  14. Time Travel: Separating Science Fact from Science Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that the subject of time travel is the best topic to introduce ideas behind some of the most beautiful and fundamental theories about the nature of space and time. Explains the distinction between the two directions of time travel and how relativity theory forced the abandonment of Newtonian notions about the nature of time. (Author/KHR)

  15. Adjustable, rapidly switching microfluidic gradient generation using focused travelling surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Im, Sunghyuk; Hang Ha, Byung; Ho Jung, Jin; Ahmad Ansari, Mubashshir; Jin Sung, Hyung

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate a simple device to generate chemical concentration gradients in a microfluidic channel using focused travelling surface acoustic waves (F-TSAW). A pair of curved interdigitated metal electrodes deposited on the surface of a piezoelectric (LiNbO{sub 3}) substrate disseminate high frequency sound waves when actuated by an alternating current source. The F-TSAW produces chaotic acoustic streaming flow upon its interaction with the fluid inside a microfluidic channel, which mixes confluent streams of chemicals in a controlled fashion for an adjustable and rapidly switching gradient generation.

  16. Continuous separation of particles in a PDMS microfluidic channel via travelling surface acoustic waves (TSAW).

    PubMed

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Lee, Kyung Heon; Jung, Jin Ho; Alazzam, Anas; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient device for the continuous label-free separation of microparticles using travelling surface acoustic waves (TSAW). A focusing interdigitated unidirectional transducer released high frequency (133.3 MHz) TSAW normal to the fluid flow direction to segregate 3 μm particles from 10 μm particles with a separation efficiency of 100%. The TSAW based separator does not necessitate a tight alignment of the PDMS microchannel with the transducer.

  17. A nonlinear acoustic metamaterial: Realization of a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Qian, Feng; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2016-06-01

    An ordinary waveguide with periodic vibration plates and side holes can realize an acoustic metamaterial that simultaneously possesses a negative bulk modulus and a negative mass density. The study is further extended to a nonlinear case and it is predicted that a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave can be obtained through the nonlinear propagation of a sound wave in such a metamaterial.

  18. A nonlinear acoustic metamaterial: Realization of a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Qian, Feng; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2016-06-01

    An ordinary waveguide with periodic vibration plates and side holes can realize an acoustic metamaterial that simultaneously possesses a negative bulk modulus and a negative mass density. The study is further extended to a nonlinear case and it is predicted that a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave can be obtained through the nonlinear propagation of a sound wave in such a metamaterial. PMID:27369164

  19. The Role of Perspective in Mental Time Travel.

    PubMed

    Ansuini, Caterina; Cavallo, Andrea; Pia, Lorenzo; Becchio, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen accumulating evidence for the proposition that people process time by mapping it onto a linear spatial representation and automatically "project" themselves on an imagined mental time line. Here, we ask whether people can adopt the temporal perspective of another person when travelling through time. To elucidate similarities and differences between time travelling from one's own perspective or from the perspective of another person, we asked participants to mentally project themselves or someone else (i.e., a coexperimenter) to different time points. Three basic properties of mental time travel were manipulated: temporal location (i.e., where in time the travel originates: past, present, and future), motion direction (either backwards or forwards), and temporal duration (i.e., the distance to travel: one, three, or five years). We found that time travels originating in the present lasted longer in the self- than in the other-perspective. Moreover, for self-perspective, but not for other-perspective, time was differently scaled depending on where in time the travel originated. In contrast, when considering the direction and the duration of time travelling, no dissimilarities between the self- and the other-perspective emerged. These results suggest that self- and other-projection, despite some differences, share important similarities in structure.

  20. The Role of Perspective in Mental Time Travel

    PubMed Central

    Ansuini, Caterina; Cavallo, Andrea; Pia, Lorenzo; Becchio, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen accumulating evidence for the proposition that people process time by mapping it onto a linear spatial representation and automatically “project” themselves on an imagined mental time line. Here, we ask whether people can adopt the temporal perspective of another person when travelling through time. To elucidate similarities and differences between time travelling from one's own perspective or from the perspective of another person, we asked participants to mentally project themselves or someone else (i.e., a coexperimenter) to different time points. Three basic properties of mental time travel were manipulated: temporal location (i.e., where in time the travel originates: past, present, and future), motion direction (either backwards or forwards), and temporal duration (i.e., the distance to travel: one, three, or five years). We found that time travels originating in the present lasted longer in the self- than in the other-perspective. Moreover, for self-perspective, but not for other-perspective, time was differently scaled depending on where in time the travel originated. In contrast, when considering the direction and the duration of time travelling, no dissimilarities between the self- and the other-perspective emerged. These results suggest that self- and other-projection, despite some differences, share important similarities in structure. PMID:26881103

  1. Critical capacity, travel time delays and travel time distribution of rapid mass transit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legara, Erika Fille; Monterola, Christopher; Lee, Kee Khoon; Hung, Gih Guang

    2014-07-01

    We set up a mechanistic agent-based model of a rapid mass transit system. Using empirical data from Singapore’s unidentifiable smart fare card, we validate our model by reconstructing actual travel demand and duration of travel statistics. We subsequently use this model to investigate two phenomena that are known to significantly affect the dynamics within the RTS: (1) overloading in trains and (2) overcrowding in the RTS platform. We demonstrate that by varying the loading capacity of trains, a tipping point emerges at which an exponential increase in the duration of travel time delays is observed. We also probe the impact on the rail system dynamics of three types of passenger growth distribution across stations: (i) Dirac delta, (ii) uniform and (iii) geometric, which is reminiscent of the effect of land use on transport. Under the assumption of a fixed loading capacity, we demonstrate the dependence of a given origin-destination (OD) pair on the flow volume of commuters in station platforms.

  2. Backus-Gilbert inversion of travel time data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    Application of the Backus-Gilbert theory for geophysical inverse problems to the seismic body wave travel-time problem is described. In particular, it is shown how to generate earth models that fit travel-time data to within one standard error and having generated such models how to describe their degree of uniqueness. An example is given to illustrate the process.

  3. The travel-time ellipse: An approximate zone of transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendinger, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    A zone of transport for a well is defined as the area in the horizontal plane bounded by a contour of equal ground-water travel time to the well. For short distances and ground-water travel times near a well, the potentiometric surface may be simulated analytically as that for a fully penetrating well in a uniform flow field. The zone of transport for this configuration is nearly elliptical. A simple method is derived to calculate a travel-time ellipse that approximates the zone of transport for a well in a uniform flow field. The travel-time ellipse was nearly congruent with the exact solution for the theoretical zone of transport for ground-water travel times of at least 10 years and for aquifer property values appropriate for southeastern Minnesota. For distances and travel times approaching infinity, however, the ellipse becomes slightly wider at its midpoint and narrower near its upgradient boundary than the theoretical zone of transport. The travel-time ellipse also may be used to simulate the plume area surrounding an injection well. However, the travel-time ellipse is an approximation that does not account for the effect of dispersion in enlarging the true area of an injection plume or zone of transport; hence, caution is advised in the use and interpretation of this simple construction.

  4. Wandering tales: evolutionary origins of mental time travel and language

    PubMed Central

    Corballis, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    A central component of mind wandering is mental time travel, the calling to mind of remembered past events and of imagined future ones. Mental time travel may also be critical to the evolution of language, which enables us to communicate about the non-present, sharing memories, plans, and ideas. Mental time travel is indexed in humans by hippocampal activity, and studies also suggest that the hippocampus in rats is active when the animals replay or pre play activity in a spatial environment, such as a maze. Mental time travel may have ancient origins, contrary to the view that it is unique to humans. Since mental time travel is also thought to underlie language, these findings suggest that language evolved gradually from pre-existing cognitive capacities, contrary to the view of Chomsky and others that language and symbolic thought emerged abruptly, in a single step, within the past 100,000 years. PMID:23908641

  5. Wandering tales: evolutionary origins of mental time travel and language.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    A central component of mind wandering is mental time travel, the calling to mind of remembered past events and of imagined future ones. Mental time travel may also be critical to the evolution of language, which enables us to communicate about the non-present, sharing memories, plans, and ideas. Mental time travel is indexed in humans by hippocampal activity, and studies also suggest that the hippocampus in rats is active when the animals replay or pre play activity in a spatial environment, such as a maze. Mental time travel may have ancient origins, contrary to the view that it is unique to humans. Since mental time travel is also thought to underlie language, these findings suggest that language evolved gradually from pre-existing cognitive capacities, contrary to the view of Chomsky and others that language and symbolic thought emerged abruptly, in a single step, within the past 100,000 years.

  6. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  7. Prisms to travel in time: Investigation of time-space association through prismatic adaptation effect on mental time travel.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Filomena; Ciaramelli, Elisa; Arzy, Shahar; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that humans process time and space in similar veins. Humans represent time along a spatial continuum, and perception of temporal durations can be altered through manipulations of spatial attention by prismatic adaptation (PA). Here, we investigated whether PA-induced manipulations of spatial attention can also influence more conceptual aspects of time, such as humans' ability to travel mentally back and forward in time (mental time travel, MTT). Before and after leftward- and rightward-PA, participants projected themselves in the past, present or future time (i.e., self-projection), and, for each condition, determined whether a series of events were located in the past or the future with respect to that specific self-location in time (i.e., self-reference). The results demonstrated that leftward and rightward shifts of spatial attention facilitated recognition of past and future events, respectively. These findings suggest that spatial attention affects the temporal processing of the human self.

  8. Catchment residence and travel time distributions: The master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, Gianluca; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    The probability density functions (pdf's) of travel and residence times are key descriptors of the mechanisms through which catchments retain and release old and event water, transporting solutes to receiving water bodies. In this paper we analyze theoretically such pdf's, whose proper characterization reveals important conceptual and practical differences. A general stochastic framework applicable to arbitrary catchment control volumes is adopted, where time-variable precipitation, evapotranspiration and discharge are assumed to be the major hydrological drivers. The master equation for the residence time pdf is derived and solved analytically, providing expressions for travel and residence time pdf's as a function of input/output fluxes and of the relevant mixing. Our solutions suggest intrinsically time-variant travel and residence time pdf's through a direct dependence on hydrological forcings and soil-vegetation dynamics. The proposed framework integrates age-dating and tracer hydrology techniques, and provides a coherent framework for catchment transport models based on travel times.

  9. Predicting travel time and dispersion in rivers and streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, H.E.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of a contaminant being accidentally or intentionally spilled in a river is a constant concern to those using the water. Methods are developed to estimate: (1) the velocity of a contaminant in a river; (2) the rate of attenuation of the peak concentration of a conservative contaminant; and (3) the time required for a contaminant plume to pass a point. The methods are based on data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in almost a hundred different rivers representing a wide range of sizes, slopes, and geomorphic types. Although the accuracy of the predictions can be greatly increased by performing time-of-travel studies, the emphasis of this paper is on providing methods for making estimates where few data are available. It is shown that the unit-peak concentration is well correlated with travel time and that the travel time of the leading edge averages 89% of the travel time of the peak concentration.

  10. Artificial cochlea and acoustic black hole travelling waves observation: Model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaud, Simon; Michon, Guilhem; Gourinat, Yves; Pelat, Adrien; Gautier, François

    2014-07-01

    An inhomogeneous fluid structure waveguide reproducing passive behaviour of the inner ear is modelled with the help of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method. A physical setup is designed and built. Experimental results are compared with a good correlation to theoretical ones. The experimental setup is a varying width plate immersed in fluid and terminated with an acoustic black hole. The varying width plate provides a spatial repartition of the vibration depending on the excitation frequency. The acoustic black hole is made by decreasing the plate's thickness with a quadratic profile and by covering this region with a thin film of viscoelastic material. Such a termination attenuates the flexural wave reflection at the end of the waveguide, turning standing waves into travelling waves.

  11. A Search on the Internet for Evidence of Time Travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Wilson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Time travel has captured the public imagination for much of the past century, but few searches for evidence of time travel have ever been done. Here three searches on the Internet for evidence of time travel are described, all three seeking a prescient mention of information not available before a given date. The first investigation sought prescient content placed on the Internet, highlighted by a comprehensive search for specific terms in tweets on Twitter. The second investigation sought prescient inquiries submitted to a search engine, highlighted by a comprehensive search for specific search terms submitted to the Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) web site. The third investigation involved a request for a direct Internet communication, either by email or tweet, pre-dating to the time of the inquiry. Given practical verifiability concerns, only time travel from the future was investigated. The main terms searched for involved Comet ISON and Pope Francis, as they became popular during our search window -- between 2006 and 2013. No evidence for time travel was discovered. Although these negative results do not disprove time travel, given the great reach of the Internet, this search is perhaps the most comprehensive to date.

  12. Predicting travel time to limit congestion at a highway bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.

    2010-09-01

    A new method is proposed to predict the travel time on a highway route with a bottleneck caused by an on-ramp. The method takes advantage of the slow variation of the bottleneck throughput when congestion exists. The predicted travel time for a vehicle leaving the origin is given by the current number of vehicles on the route divided by the estimated throughput. The latter is an average of N/T recorded as each vehicle reaches the destination where N is the number of vehicles at the start of the trip and T is the time to complete the trip. Drivers divert to an off-ramp when the predicted travel time exceeds a target value. The target could be historical average travel times of alternative routes or chosen to limit the amount of congestion. Simulations employing three-phase traffic theory show that the travel time converges to the target value and remains close to or below it with the proposed prediction strategy. Strong oscillations in travel time obtained when other strategies are used for diversion do not develop with the new method because the inherent delay is effectively removed.

  13. Modeling highway travel time distribution with conditional probability models

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes; Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Han, Lee

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Under the sponsorship of the Federal Highway Administration's Office of Freight Management and Operations, the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) has developed performance measures through the Freight Performance Measures (FPM) initiative. Under this program, travel speed information is derived from data collected using wireless based global positioning systems. These telemetric data systems are subscribed and used by trucking industry as an operations management tool. More than one telemetric operator submits their data dumps to ATRI on a regular basis. Each data transmission contains truck location, its travel time, and a clock time/date stamp. Data from the FPM program provides a unique opportunity for studying the upstream-downstream speed distributions at different locations, as well as different time of the day and day of the week. This research is focused on the stochastic nature of successive link travel speed data on the continental United States Interstates network. Specifically, a method to estimate route probability distributions of travel time is proposed. This method uses the concepts of convolution of probability distributions and bivariate, link-to-link, conditional probability to estimate the expected distributions for the route travel time. Major contribution of this study is the consideration of speed correlation between upstream and downstream contiguous Interstate segments through conditional probability. The established conditional probability distributions, between successive segments, can be used to provide travel time reliability measures. This study also suggests an adaptive method for calculating and updating route travel time distribution as new data or information is added. This methodology can be useful to estimate performance measures as required by the recent Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP 21).

  14. Prisms to travel in time: Investigation of time-space association through prismatic adaptation effect on mental time travel.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Filomena; Ciaramelli, Elisa; Arzy, Shahar; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that humans process time and space in similar veins. Humans represent time along a spatial continuum, and perception of temporal durations can be altered through manipulations of spatial attention by prismatic adaptation (PA). Here, we investigated whether PA-induced manipulations of spatial attention can also influence more conceptual aspects of time, such as humans' ability to travel mentally back and forward in time (mental time travel, MTT). Before and after leftward- and rightward-PA, participants projected themselves in the past, present or future time (i.e., self-projection), and, for each condition, determined whether a series of events were located in the past or the future with respect to that specific self-location in time (i.e., self-reference). The results demonstrated that leftward and rightward shifts of spatial attention facilitated recognition of past and future events, respectively. These findings suggest that spatial attention affects the temporal processing of the human self. PMID:27467891

  15. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  16. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  17. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  18. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  19. 41 CFR 301-52.14 - What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim? 301-52.14 Section 301-52.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES... § 301-52.14 What must I do with any travel advance outstanding at the time I submit my travel claim?...

  20. Extended time-travelling objects in Misner space

    SciTech Connect

    Levanony, Dana; Ori, Amos

    2011-02-15

    Misner space is a two-dimensional (2D) locally flat spacetime which elegantly demonstrates the emergence of closed timelike curves from causally well-behaved initial conditions. Here we explore the motion of rigid extended objects in this time-machine spacetime. This kind of 2D time-travel is found to be risky due to inevitable self-collisions (i.e. collisions of the object with itself). However, in a straightforward four-dimensional generalization of Misner space (a physically more relevant spacetime obviously), we find a wide range of safe time-travel orbits free of any self-collisions.

  1. Travel the Globe: Multicultural Story Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Desiree; Corn, Dee Ann; Harrod, Elaine; Norvell, Donna; Shropshire, Sandy

    Designed for Grades PreK-3, the culture-based story times and extension activities provided in this book give educators the opportunity to share the diversity of global neighbors with young learners. The book covers Australia, Brazil, the Caribbean, China, Egypt, Ghana, Greece, India, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, the Commonwealth of Independent States…

  2. Extremal inversion of lunar travel time data. [seismic velocity structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, N.; Jackson, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The tau method, developed by Bessonova et al. (1974), of inversion of travel times is applied to lunar P-wave travel time data to find limits on the velocity structure of the moon. Tau is the singular solution to the Clairaut equation. Models with low-velocity zones, with low-velocity zones at differing depths, and without low-velocity zones, were found to be consistent with data and within the determined limits. Models with and without a discontinuity at about 25-km depth have been found which agree with all travel time data to within two standard deviations. In other words, the existence of the discontinuity and its size and location have not been uniquely resolved. Models with low-velocity channels are also possible.

  3. Time-averages for Plane Travelling Waves—The Effect of Attenuation: I, Adiabatic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, S. N.

    1993-05-01

    The analysis of the effect of attenuation on the time-averages for a plane travelling wave is presented. The barotropic equation of state is considered: i.e., acoustic heating is assumed to be negligible. The problem statement consists of calculating means in a finite region bounded by a transducer surface as well as by a perfectly absorbing surface, respectively. Although the simple wave approximation cannot be used throughout the field it is still valid near the perfect absorber. The result for radiation pressure is different from the conclusions given previously by Beyer and Livett, Emery and Leeman.

  4. Modeling chloride transport using travel time distributions at Plynlimon, Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettin, Paolo; Kirchner, James W.; Rinaldo, Andrea; Botter, Gianluca

    2015-05-01

    Here we present a theoretical interpretation of high-frequency, high-quality tracer time series from the Hafren catchment at Plynlimon in mid-Wales. We make use of the formulation of transport by travel time distributions to model chloride transport originating from atmospheric deposition and compute catchment-scale travel time distributions. The relevance of the approach lies in the explanatory power of the chosen tools, particularly to highlight hydrologic processes otherwise clouded by the integrated nature of the measured outflux signal. The analysis reveals the key role of residual storages that are poorly visible in the hydrological response, but are shown to strongly affect water quality dynamics. A significant accuracy in reproducing data is shown by our calibrated model. A detailed representation of catchment-scale travel time distributions has been derived, including the time evolution of the overall dispersion processes (which can be expressed in terms of time-varying storage sampling functions). Mean computed travel times span a broad range of values (from 80 to 800 days) depending on the catchment state. Results also suggest that, in the average, discharge waters are younger than storage water. The model proves able to capture high-frequency fluctuations in the measured chloride concentrations, which are broadly explained by the sharp transition between groundwaters and faster flows originating from topsoil layers. This article was corrected on 22 JUN 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  5. Does the self drive mental time travel?

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Yao, Xiang; Ceci, Stephen J; Wang, Qi

    2010-11-01

    Research on autobiographical remembering has shown the intertwined relationship between the self and memory. Very little is known about the role of the self in the anticipation of the future. To investigate the association, European American (N=61) and Chinese (N=60) college students each reported two past autobiographical events and anticipated two future events, and described themselves in the past, present, and future. The results from a content analysis found that, regardless of culture, the future self and events were more positive and socially oriented than the past self and events. In general, European Americans provided more positive events and self-descriptions than Chinese. Men showed more personal focus in both experiences and self-descriptions than women at all time epochs. Importantly, independent of culture and gender, the self rather than the past events predicted the valence and personal focus of future events. These findings offer new insights into the dynamic relations between the self and episodic thinking.

  6. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis: is travel time important?

    PubMed

    Henry, Kevin A; Boscoe, Francis P; Johnson, Christopher J; Goldberg, Daniel W; Sherman, Recinda; Cockburn, Myles

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have produced inconsistent results in their examination of the potential association between proximity to healthcare or mammography facilities and breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Using a multistate dataset, we re-examine this issue by investigating whether travel time to a patient's diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility impacts breast cancer stage at diagnosis. We studied 161,619 women 40 years and older diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from ten state population based cancer registries in the United States. For each woman, we calculated travel time to their diagnosing facility and nearest mammography facility. Logistic multilevel models of late versus early stage were fitted, and odds ratios were calculated for travel times, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, census tract poverty, rural/urban residence, health insurance, and state random effects. Seventy-six percent of women in the study lived less than 20 min from their diagnosing facility, and 93 percent lived less than 20 min from the nearest mammography facility. Late stage at diagnosis was not associated with increasing travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility. Diagnosis age under 50, Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, high census tract poverty, and no health insurance were all significantly associated with late stage at diagnosis. Travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility was not a determinant of late stage of breast cancer at diagnosis, and better geographic proximity did not assure more favorable stage distributions. Other factors beyond geographic proximity that can affect access should be evaluated more closely, including facility capacity, insurance acceptance, public transportation, and travel costs.

  7. Reducing employee travelling time through smart commuting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. N. N. A.; Yusoff, Z. M.; Aziz, I. S.; Omar, D.

    2014-02-01

    Extremely congested roads will definitely delay the arrival time of each trip.This certainly impacted the journey of employees. Tardiness at the workplace has become a perturbing issue for companies where traffic jams are the most common worker excuses. A depressing consequence on daily life and productivity of the employee occurs. The issues of commuting distance between workplace and resident area become the core point of this research. This research will emphasize the use of Geographical Information System (GIS) technique to explore the distance parameter to the employment area and will focus on the accessibility pattern of low-cost housing. The research methodology consists of interview sessions and a questionnaire to residents of low-cost housing areas in Melaka Tengah District in Malaysia. The combination of these processes will show the criteria from the selected parameter for each respondent from their resident area to the employment area. This will further help in the recommendation of several options for a better commute or improvement to the existing routes and public transportations system. Thus enhancing quality of life for employees and helping to reduce stress, decrease lateness, absenteeism and improving productivity in workplace.

  8. Experimental Study of Linear Compressor Driven Traveling-wave Thermo Acoustic Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Luo, E.; Dai, W.; Yu, G.

    2006-04-01

    The investigation on the performance of a traveling-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator driven by a self-made linear compressor is presented in this paper. The linear compressor is of moving-coil type, which has a moving coil, a piston with about 100 square centimeters cross section area, and a flexure bearing unit for piston support. The operating frequency can be adjusted to achieve a resonant status in order that the compressor can work with high electroacoustic efficiency. The thermoacoustic refrigerator operates on traveling-wave mode with acoustic power recovery. In the experiments, influence of different working frequencies on electroacoustic efficiency, lowest temperature, cooling power and COP is investigated. So far in the experiment with helium as working fluid, a lowest temperature of -29 °C is obtained, when the mean and oscillating pressures are 1.0MPa and 0.042MPa respectively and the temperature of room-temperature heat exchanger is kept around 15°C. And a maximum cooling power of about 28.5W@0°C is achieved under 1.5MPa mean pressure and 0.049MPa oscillating pressure. Besides, the performance of the linear compressor itself is also investigated, which is important for a reasonable evaluation of the refrigerator performance.

  9. X-ray diffraction effect from surface acoustic waves traveling on a deposited multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jun; Qi Jianxia; Miao Runcai

    2010-04-10

    We investigate the x-ray diffraction effects from surface acoustic waves (SAW) traveling along a multilayer. The diffraction intensity distribution depends on the incidence angle and the multilayer SAW (MLSAW) amplitude. Particularly, a small departure deviating from the Bragg incidence angle at a certain amplitude will produce a larger variation of the intensity distribution. This shows that the diffraction intensity from MLSAW has an extremely high sensitivity to the Bragg incidence angle, which is different from a SAW traveling along a solid surface without deposited layers. By carefully analyzing the relationship between the intensity distribution I and the incidence angle {theta}, the corresponding analytic expression of the intensity distribution is theoretically derived. Our theoretical prediction is in great agreement with the experimental results previously obtained. A theoretical model that can be applied to study the x-ray diffraction effect from MLSAW is developed. The extremely high sensitivity to the Bragg angle will help us in acousto-optic instrument research with MLSAW.

  10. Teleseismic travel times residuals across the Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, Rami; Dorbath, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    New findings of the structure of the Dead Sea sedimentary basin and its eastern and western bordering regions were obtained by applying P and PKP wave relative travel time residuals of 644 teleseisms, as recorded by the DESIRE portable seismic network in the Dead Sea basin and its outskirts. The Lisan is characterized by relatively small teleseismic travel time residuals of about 0.14 sec, in the latitude range of 31.220-31.370 and longitude of 35.500, slowly degrading towards west. The largest teleseismic travel time residuals are in the southern Dead Sea basin, south of the Lisan in the latitude range of 31.050-31.150 and along longitude 35.450 and continuing southward towards Amatzyahu Fault, reaching values of 0.3 to 0.4 sec. We get small positive residual in the Amatzyahu Fault and small negative residual south of it marking probably the southern end of the Dead Sea basin. East and west of the Dead Sea basin the mean teleseismic travel time residuals are negative having an over whole average of -0.35 sec and -0.45 sec, respectively. Using the teleseismic residuals we estimate the horizontal dimensions of the Lisan salt diapir to be 20 km X 12 km at its widest place and a maximal thickness of about 7.2 km. The thickness of the Mt. Sodom salt diapir is estimated as 6.2 km.

  11. Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travel time (GWTT-95)

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Ho, C.K.; McKenna, S.A.; Eaton, R.R.

    1996-09-01

    In 1983, high-level radioactive waste repository performance requirements related to groundwater travel time were defined by NRC subsystem regulation 10 CFR 60.113. Although DOE is not presently attempting to demonstrate compliance with that regulation, understanding of the prevalence of fast paths in the groundwater flow system remains a critical element of any safety analyses for a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Therefore, this analysis was performed to allow comparison of fast-path flow against the criteria set forth in the regulation. Models developed to describe the conditions for initiation, propagation, and sustainability of rapid groundwater movement in both the unsaturated and saturated zones will form part of the technical basis for total- system analyses to assess site viability and site licensability. One of the most significant findings is that the fastest travel times in both unsaturated and saturated zones are in the southern portion of the potential repository, so it is recommended that site characterization studies concentrate on this area. Results support the assumptions regarding the importance of an appropriate conceptual model of groundwater flow and the incorporation of heterogeneous material properties into the analyses. Groundwater travel times are sensitive to variation/uncertainty in hydrologic parameters and in infiltration flux at upper boundary of the problem domain. Simulated travel times are also sensitive to poorly constrained parameters of the interaction between flow in fractures and in the matrix.

  12. Time Reversal Acoustic in a flowing medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Trung Dung; Arora, Manish; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Claus-Dieter Ohl grou Team; DHI Water; Environment (S) Pte. Ltd. Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We explore the effect of flow on time reversal acoustics (TRA). Traditionally, TRA has been studied in static conditions, while a motion of the medium is expected to degrade the spatio-temporal focussing of the sound pulse. Here, we study the effect of the flow with a TRA system at 1MHz. A controlled flow is added between the emitter and receiver. Additional, a metallic plate is utilized to increases the numerical aperture of the emitting transducer. The impulse response of the non-flowing system, is recorded and time reversed. Then, the response of the hydrophone is recorded in presence and absence of the flow. It is found that the time reversed signal focuses on at the hydrophone in both the cases. In the absence of flow, the focus signal is observed to be shifted in the time domain. Furthermore, there is a drop in the peak-to-peak value of the focus signal in the presence of flow. For a flow rate of 3 cm/s (Re ~ 1000), a distinct shift in the time domain and a reduction of the peak is obtained. The results will be discussed and compared with numerical simulation of TRA under flow conditions.

  13. Regional Travel-Time Predictions, Uncertainty and Location Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M; Myers, S

    2004-07-15

    We investigate our ability to improve regional travel-time prediction and seismic event location using an a priori three-dimensional (3D) velocity model of Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA 1.0). Three principal results are presented. First, the 3D WENA 1.0 velocity model improves travel-time prediction over the IASPI91 model, as measured by variance reduction, for regional phases recorded at 22 stations throughout the modeled region, including aseismic areas. Second, a distance-dependent uncertainty model is developed and tested for the WENA 1.0 model. Third, relocation using WENA 1.0 and the associated uncertainty model provides an end-to-end validation test. Model validation is based on a comparison of approximately 10,000 Pg, Pn, and P travel-time predictions and empirical observations from ground truth (GT) events. Ray coverage for the validation dataset provides representative, regional-distances sampling across Eurasia and North Africa. The WENA 1.0 model markedly improves travel-time predictions for most stations with an average variance reduction of 14% for all ray paths. We find that improvement is station dependent, with some stations benefiting greatly from WENA predictions (25% at OBN, and 16% at BKR), some stations showing moderate improvement (12% at ARU, and 17% at NIL), and some stations benefiting only slightly (7% at AAE, and 8% at TOL). We further test WENA 1.0 by relocating five calibration events. Again, relocation of these events is dependent on ray paths that evenly sample WENA 1.0 and therefore provide an unbiased assessment of location performance. These results highlight the importance of accurate GT datasets in assessing regional travel-time models and demonstrate that an a priori 3D model can markedly improve our ability to locate small magnitude events in a regional monitoring context.

  14. Catchment travel time distributions and water flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Beven, K. J.; Bertuzzo, E.; Nicotina, L.; Davies, J.; Fiori, A.; Russo, D.; Botter, G.

    2011-07-01

    Many details about the flow of water in soils in a hillslope are unknowable given current technologies. One way of learning about the bulk effects of water velocity distributions on hillslopes is through the use of tracers. However, this paper will demonstrate that the interpretation of tracer information needs to become more sophisticated. The paper reviews, and complements with mathematical arguments and specific examples, theory and practice of the distribution(s) of the times water particles injected through rainfall spend traveling through a catchment up to a control section (i.e., "catchment" travel times). The relevance of the work is perceived to lie in the importance of the characterization of travel time distributions as fundamental descriptors of catchment water storage, flow pathway heterogeneity, sources of water in a catchment, and the chemistry of water flows through the control section. The paper aims to correct some common misconceptions used in analyses of travel time distributions. In particular, it stresses the conceptual and practical differences between the travel time distribution conditional on a given injection time (needed for rainfall-runoff transformations) and that conditional on a given sampling time at the outlet (as provided by isotopic dating techniques or tracer measurements), jointly with the differences of both with the residence time distributions of water particles in storage within the catchment at any time. These differences are defined precisely here, either through the results of different models or theoretically by using an extension of a classic theorem of dynamic controls. Specifically, we address different model results to highlight the features of travel times seen from different assumptions, in this case, exact solutions to a lumped model and numerical solutions of the 3-D flow and transport equations in variably saturated, physically heterogeneous catchment domains. Our results stress the individual characters of the

  15. Verification of the helioseismology travel-time measurement technique and the inversion procedure for sound speed using artificial data

    SciTech Connect

    Parchevsky, K. V.; Zhao, J.; Hartlep, T.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-04-10

    We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations of the solar surface acoustic wave field for the quiet Sun and for three models with different localized sound-speed perturbations in the interior with deep, shallow, and two-layer structures. We used the simulated data generated by two solar acoustics codes that employ the same standard solar model as a background model, but utilize different integration techniques and different models of stochastic wave excitation. Acoustic travel times were measured using a time-distance helioseismology technique, and compared with predictions from ray theory frequently used for helioseismic travel-time inversions. It is found that the measured travel-time shifts agree well with the helioseismic theory for sound-speed perturbations, and for the measurement procedure with and without phase-speed filtering of the oscillation signals. This testing verifies the whole measuring-filtering-inversion procedure for static sound-speed anomalies with small amplitude inside the Sun outside regions of strong magnetic field. It is shown that the phase-speed filtering, frequently used to extract specific wave packets and improve the signal-to-noise ratio, does not introduce significant systematic errors. Results of the sound-speed inversion procedure show good agreement with the perturbation models in all cases. Due to its smoothing nature, the inversion procedure may overestimate sound-speed variations in regions with sharp gradients of the sound-speed profile.

  16. Eye movements during mental time travel follow a diagonal line.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Matthias; Martarelli, Corinna S; Mast, Fred W; Stocker, Kurt

    2014-11-01

    Recent research showed that past events are associated with the back and left side, whereas future events are associated with the front and right side of space. These spatial-temporal associations have an impact on our sensorimotor system: thinking about one's past and future leads to subtle body sways in the sagittal dimension of space (Miles, Nind, & Macrae, 2010). In this study we investigated whether mental time travel leads to sensorimotor correlates in the horizontal dimension of space. Participants were asked to mentally displace themselves into the past or future while measuring their spontaneous eye movements on a blank screen. Eye gaze was directed more rightward and upward when thinking about the future than when thinking about the past. Our results provide further insight into the spatial nature of temporal thoughts, and show that not only body, but also eye movements follow a (diagonal) "time line" during mental time travel.

  17. The stability and the growth rate of the electron acoustic traveling wave under transverse perturbations in a magnetized quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dong-Ning; Wang, Cang-Long; Yang, Xue; Duan, Wen-Shan; Yang, Lei

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies are carried out for the stability of the electron acoustic waves under the transverse perturbation in a magnetized quantum plasma. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation of the electron-acoustic waves (EAWs) is given by using the reductive perturbation technique. The cut-off frequency is obtained by applying a transverse sinusoidal perturbation to the plane soliton solution of the ZK equation. The propagation velocity of solitary waves, the real cut-off frequency, as well as the growth rate of the higher order perturbation to the traveling solitary wave are obtained.

  18. The stability and the growth rate of the electron acoustic traveling wave under transverse perturbations in a magnetized quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Dongning; Wang Canglong; Yang Xue; Duan Wenshan; Yang Lei

    2012-12-15

    Theoretical and numerical studies are carried out for the stability of the electron acoustic waves under the transverse perturbation in a magnetized quantum plasma. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation of the electron-acoustic waves (EAWs) is given by using the reductive perturbation technique. The cut-off frequency is obtained by applying a transverse sinusoidal perturbation to the plane soliton solution of the ZK equation. The propagation velocity of solitary waves, the real cut-off frequency, as well as the growth rate of the higher order perturbation to the traveling solitary wave are obtained.

  19. Mental time travel and the shaping of the human mind.

    PubMed

    Suddendorf, Thomas; Addis, Donna Rose; Corballis, Michael C

    2009-05-12

    Episodic memory, enabling conscious recollection of past episodes, can be distinguished from semantic memory, which stores enduring facts about the world. Episodic memory shares a core neural network with the simulation of future episodes, enabling mental time travel into both the past and the future. The notion that there might be something distinctly human about mental time travel has provoked ingenious attempts to demonstrate episodic memory or future simulation in non-human animals, but we argue that they have not yet established a capacity comparable to the human faculty. The evolution of the capacity to simulate possible future events, based on episodic memory, enhanced fitness by enabling action in preparation of different possible scenarios that increased present or future survival and reproduction chances. Human language may have evolved in the first instance for the sharing of past and planned future events, and, indeed, fictional ones, further enhancing fitness in social settings. PMID:19528013

  20. Travel-time sensitivity kernels in long-range propagation.

    PubMed

    Skarsoulis, E K; Cornuelle, B D; Dzieciuch, M A

    2009-11-01

    Wave-theoretic travel-time sensitivity kernels (TSKs) are calculated in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environments and their behavior with increasing propagation range is studied and compared to that of ray-theoretic TSKs and corresponding Fresnel-volumes. The differences between the 2D and 3D TSKs average out when horizontal or cross-range marginals are considered, which indicates that they are not important in the case of range-independent sound-speed perturbations or perturbations of large scale compared to the lateral TSK extent. With increasing range, the wave-theoretic TSKs expand in the horizontal cross-range direction, their cross-range extent being comparable to that of the corresponding free-space Fresnel zone, whereas they remain bounded in the vertical. Vertical travel-time sensitivity kernels (VTSKs)-one-dimensional kernels describing the effect of horizontally uniform sound-speed changes on travel-times-are calculated analytically using a perturbation approach, and also numerically, as horizontal marginals of the corresponding TSKs. Good agreement between analytical and numerical VTSKs, as well as between 2D and 3D VTSKs, is found. As an alternative method to obtain wave-theoretic sensitivity kernels, the parabolic approximation is used; the resulting TSKs and VTSKs are in good agreement with normal-mode results. With increasing range, the wave-theoretic VTSKs approach the corresponding ray-theoretic sensitivity kernels.

  1. Experimental Results of Guided Wave Travel Time Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Bloom, Joost

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation matches very well with the objective to reduce cost while maintaining a high safety level. Guided waves are very attractive for permanent monitoring systems because they can travel over large distances and therefore provide the essential large area coverage. Making use of the dispersive behavior of the guided waves, a wall thickness map over a distance of several meters can be made using only two rings of guided wave transducers. Travel time tomography is used to translate transmission travel times into a wall thickness map. This method has been applied in the field for the first time to map the wall thickness under two clearly corroded pipe supports of a 8″ and 10″ gas pipe line. The tomographic inversion results clearly maps the corrosion under the supports. Independent reference measurements confirm the tomographic inversion results.

  2. Travel time and concurrent-schedule choice: retrospective versus prospective control.

    PubMed Central

    Davison, M; Elliffe, D

    2000-01-01

    Six pigeons were trained on concurrent variable-interval schedules in which two different travel times between alternatives, 4.5 and 0.5 s, were randomly arranged. In Part 1, the next travel time was signaled while the subjects were responding on each alternative. Generalized matching analyses of performance in the presence of the two travel-time signals showed significantly higher response and time sensitivity when the longer travel time was signaled compared to when the shorter time was signaled. When the data were analyzed as a function of the previous travel time, there were no differences in sensitivity. Dwell times on the alternatives were consistently longer in the presence of the stimulus that signaled the longer travel time than they were in the presence of the stimulus that signaled the shorter travel time. These results are in accord with a recent quantitative account of the effects of travel time. In Part 2, no signals indicating the next travel time were given. When these data were analyzed as a function of the previous travel time, time-allocation sensitivity after the 4.5-s travel time was significantly greater than that after the 0.5-s travel time, but no such difference was found for response allocation. Dwell times were also longer when the previous travel time had been longer. PMID:10682340

  3. Characterizing groundwater contribution to lowland streams using Travel Time Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus Kaandorp, Vincentius; Gerardus Bernardus de Louw, Petrus; Kuijper, Martina Johanna Maria; Broers, Hans Peter

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that European freshwaters will fail to meet the ecological guidelines set for 2015 by the Water Framework Directive. 55 % of European surface water bodies have been reported to have a less than good ecological status, while the goal for 2015 is to have a good status for all water bodies. The deterioration of freshwater aquatic ecosystems is a problem worldwide. The current study, part of the EU FP7 project Managing Aquatic ecosystems and water Resources under multiple Stress (MARS), addresses this issue by focusing on the effect of multiple stressors. Freshwater ecosystems are directly linked to the characteristics of catchments and streams they are located in as this determines the habitats present. One of these characteristics, the groundwater contribution to streams, is important for aquatic ecosystems as it influences (1) river discharge, (2) water quality and (3) temperature and (4) the riparian zone. Groundwater provides streams with sufficient base flow, good quality water and a stable temperature. Compared to hilly slope catchments, the lowland catchments of The Netherlands lack much topography and surface runoff, and as such, virtually all stream water originates from groundwater. Current approaches do not sufficiently address the contribution of groundwater to stream flow in lowland catchments, as existing hydrograph separation methods provide little informative value about the groundwater contribution itself. The amount and quality of groundwater input to streams depends on its flow path and travel time. Especially in lowland catchments the groundwater input in streams is composed of a wide range of travel times which vary in time and space and have different quantitative and qualitative characteristics. Thus in order to successfully manage lowland streams, it is critical to specify the input of groundwater in more detail and take in account the temporal and spatial variability in travel times. We will present an

  4. Time and timing in the acoustic recognition system of crickets

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, R. Matthias; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Clemens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The songs of many insects exhibit precise timing as the result of repetitive and stereotyped subunits on several time scales. As these signals encode the identity of a species, time and timing are important for the recognition system that analyzes these signals. Crickets are a prominent example as their songs are built from sound pulses that are broadcast in a long trill or as a chirped song. This pattern appears to be analyzed on two timescales, short and long. Recent evidence suggests that song recognition in crickets relies on two computations with respect to time; a short linear-nonlinear (LN) model that operates as a filter for pulse rate and a longer integration time window for monitoring song energy over time. Therefore, there is a twofold role for timing. A filter for pulse rate shows differentiating properties for which the specific timing of excitation and inhibition is important. For an integrator, however, the duration of the time window is more important than the precise timing of events. Here, we first review evidence for the role of LN-models and integration time windows for song recognition in crickets. We then parameterize the filter part by Gabor functions and explore the effects of duration, frequency, phase, and offset as these will correspond to differently timed patterns of excitation and inhibition. These filter properties were compared with known preference functions of crickets and katydids. In a comparative approach, the power for song discrimination by LN-models was tested with the songs of over 100 cricket species. It is demonstrated how the acoustic signals of crickets occupy a simple 2-dimensional space for song recognition that arises from timing, described by a Gabor function, and time, the integration window. Finally, we discuss the evolution of recognition systems in insects based on simple sensory computations. PMID:25161622

  5. MOHO ORIENTATION BENEATH CENTRAL CALIFORNIA FROM REGIONAL EARTHQUAKE TRAVEL TIMES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oppenheimer, David H.; Eaton, Jerry P.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines relative Pn arrival times, recorded by the U. S. Geological Survey seismic network in central and northern California from an azimuthally distributed set of regional earthquakes. Improved estimates are presented of upper mantle velocities in the Coast Ranges, Great Valley, and Sierra Nevada foothills and estimates of the orientation of the Moho throughout this region. Finally, the azimuthal distribution of apparent velocities, corrected for dip and individual station travel time effects, is then studied for evidence of upper mantle velocity anisotropy and for indications of lower crustal structure in central California.

  6. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  7. SAPS onset timing during substorms and the westward traveling surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny, V.

    2016-07-01

    We present multispacecraft observations in the magnetosphere and conjugate ionosphere of the onset time of subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) and tens of keV ring current injections on the duskside in three individual substorms. This is probably the first unequivocal determination of the substorm SAPS onset timing. The time lag between the SAPS and substorm onsets is much shorter than the gradient-curvature drift time of ˜10 keV ions in the plasmasphere. It seemingly depends on the propagation time of substorm-injected plasma from the dipolarization onset region to the plasmasphere, as well as on the SAPS position. These observations suggest that fast onset SAPS and ring current injections are causally related to the two-loop system of the westward traveling surge.

  8. Flow path and travel time dynamics in a lowland catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, Ype; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of time it takes water from the moment of precipitation to reach the catchment outlet is widely used as a characteristic for catchment flow path contributions, catchment vulnerability to pollution spreading and pollutant loads from catchments to downstream waters. However, this distribution tends to vary in time driven by variability in precipitation and evapotranspiration. Catchment scale mixing of water controls how dynamics in rainfall and evapotranspiration are translated into dynamics of travel time distributions. In this presentation we use the concept of StorAge selection (SAS) functions, that quantify catchment scale mixing of water, to describe chloride and nitrate flow. We will show how SAS functions relate to the topography and subsurface and how they are effective in describing nitrate and chloride transport. The presented analyses will combine unique datasets of high-frequency discharge and water quality concentrations with conceptual models of water flow and solute transport. Remarkable findings are the large contrasts in travel times between lowland and sloping catchments and the strong relationship between evapotranspiration and stream water nutrient concentration dynamics.

  9. Valuation of Travel Time Savings in Viewpoint of WTA

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chang-qiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao-ming

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the issues in measurement of value of travel time savings (VTTS), the willingness-to-accept (WTA) for the private car owner is studied by using surveyed data. It is convincing that trip purpose, trip length, time savings, cost savings, income, and allowance from employee have effects on the WTA. Moreover, influences of these variables are not the same for different trip purposes. For commuting trips, effects of income and allowance from employee are significant while time savings and cost savings are dominated for leisure and shopping trips. It is also found that WTA is much higher than expected which implies that there are a group of drivers who are not prone to switching to other trip modes other than passenger car. PMID:25530751

  10. Nonlinear time-dependent simulation of helix traveling wave tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei-Feng; Yang, Zhong-Hai; Hu, Yu-Lu; Li, Jian-Qing; Lu, Qi-Ru; Li, Bin

    2011-07-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear time-dependent theory for helix traveling wave tubes is studied. A generalized electromagnetic field is applied to the expression of the radio frequency field. To simulate the variations of the high frequency structure, such as the pitch taper and the effect of harmonics, the spatial average over a wavelength is substituted by a time average over a wave period in the equation of the radio frequency field. Under this assumption, the space charge field of the electron beam can be treated by a space charge wave model along with the space charge coefficient. The effects of the radio frequency and the space charge fields on the electrons are presented by the equations of the electron energy and the electron phase. The time-dependent simulation is compared with the frequency-domain simulation for a helix TWT, which validates the availability of this theory.

  11. Involuntary (spontaneous) mental time travel into the past and future.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Jacobsen, Anne Staerk

    2008-12-01

    Mental time travel (MTT) is the ability to mentally project oneself backward in time to relive past experiences and forward in time to pre-live possible future experiences. Previous work has focused on MTT in its voluntary (controlled) form. Here, we introduce the notion of involuntary (spontaneous) MTT. We examined involuntary versus voluntary and past versus future MTT in a diary study. We found that involuntary future event representations-defined as representations of possible personal future events that come to mind with no preceding search attempts-were as common as involuntary autobiographical memories and similar to them regarding cuing and subjective qualities. Future MTT involved more positive and idyllic representations than past MTT. MTT into the distant future/past involved more representations of cultural life script events than MTT into the immediate past/future. The findings are discussed in relation to cultural learning and MTT considered as a higher mental process.

  12. Valuation of travel time savings in viewpoint of WTA.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chang-Qiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the issues in measurement of value of travel time savings (VTTS), the willingness-to-accept (WTA) for the private car owner is studied by using surveyed data. It is convincing that trip purpose, trip length, time savings, cost savings, income, and allowance from employee have effects on the WTA. Moreover, influences of these variables are not the same for different trip purposes. For commuting trips, effects of income and allowance from employee are significant while time savings and cost savings are dominated for leisure and shopping trips. It is also found that WTA is much higher than expected which implies that there are a group of drivers who are not prone to switching to other trip modes other than passenger car.

  13. Measurement and Interpretation of Travel-Time Shifts in the context of Time-Distance Helioseismic Detection of Meridional Flows in the Solar Convection Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Hanasoge, S.; Hartlep, T.; Larson, T. P.; Kholikov, S.

    2014-12-01

    The role of meridional flow in maintaining the solar dynamo and differential rotation in the solar convection zone is not well understood and is currently under scrutiny. The traditional flux-transport dynamo models have posited the well known single-cell meridional flow with poleward flow at the photosphere and equatorward flow near the base of the convection zone. However, recent investigations seem to be revealing a different picture of meridional flow which is double celled in the radial direction with poleward flow at the photosphere and equatorward flow at a much shallower level in the convection zone. In this work time-distance helioseismology is used to probe the solar convection zone to accurately determine the structure of meridional circulation. Helioseismology uses the photospherically visible aspect of (acoustic, surface-gravity) waves, that propagate and interfere throughout the Sun to form standing oscillation modes, as probes to make inferences about the structure and flows on the solar surface and interior. Time-distance helioseismology is based on measuring the travel-times of wave-packets moving between distinct points on the solar surface. Travel-time shifts obtained by calculating the difference in the travel-times of counter-propagating waves between the same points on the solar surface yield information about flows throughout the solar convection zone. In this work time-distance techniques are applied on artificial and solar Doppler velocity images to detect travel-time shifts due to meridional flow. Modifications are suggested to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of travel-time shift measurements. The artificial data is constructed by embedding various meridional flow models in 3D acoustic simulators, which is then used to discuss the interpretation of travel-time shifts, so that in the future an inversion procedure may be designed to calculate meridional flow velocities with greater accuracy. The solar data is obtained from the Helioseismic

  14. Dissociating memory traces and scenario construction in mental time travel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sen; Werning, Markus; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    There has been a persistent debate about how to define episodic memory and whether it is a uniquely human capacity. On the one hand, many animal cognition studies employ content-based criteria, such as the what-where-when criterion, and argue that nonhuman animals possess episodic memory. On the other hand, many human cognition studies emphasize the subjective experience during retrieval as an essential property of episodic memory and the distinctly human foresight it purportedly enables. We propose that both perspectives may examine distinct but complementary aspects of episodic memory by drawing a conceptual distinction between episodic memory traces and mental time travel. Episodic memory traces are sequential mnemonic representations of particular, personally experienced episodes. Mental time travel draws on these traces, but requires other components to construct scenarios and embed them into larger narratives. Various nonhuman animals may store episodic memory traces, and yet it is possible that only humans are able to construct and reflect on narratives of their lives - and flexibly compare alternative scenarios of the remote future.

  15. Reflection Full Waveform Inversion in Migration Based Travel Time formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavent, Guy; Gadylshin, Kirill; Tcheverda, Vladimir; Charara, Marwan

    2015-04-01

    Building a smooth velocity model in the depth domain, which is responsible for correct travel-times of wave propagation, is the main challenge in the present technology of seismic data processing in areas with complex geology. Formally it seems be possible to achieve, along with the subsurface structure, by the Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) technique matching the observed and the synthetic seismograms (Tarantola, 1984). To minimize the misfit function and to find the elastic parameters of the subsurface, a variety of non-linear iterative descent methods are usually used. Such approach, proposed originally by Tarantola (1984), has been developed and studied in a great number of publications (Virieux and Operto, 2009, and the references therein). Nevertheless, its straightforward application to the data reconstructs reliably only the reflectivity component of the subsurface but fails to recover a smooth component of a velocity model (propagator). To overcome this hardship G.Chavent with colleagues introduced FWI in Migration Based Travel-Time (MBTT) formulation (2001). The main idea of this approach is to decompose model space into two orthogonal subspaces - smooth propagator and rough reflector with subsequent reformulation of the cost function. We apply this idea to formulate the Reflection FWI algorithm in frequency domain within the concept of MBTT. A series of numerical experiments demonstrates its advantages in reconstruction of macrovelocity using reflected input data with reasonable offsets and frequency ranges.

  16. Spirals in protoplanetary disks from photon travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Pinilla, P.; Heays, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    Spiral structures are a common feature in scattered-light images of protoplanetary disks, and of great interest as possible tracers of the presence of planets. However, other mechanisms have been put forward to explain them, including self-gravity, disk-envelope interactions, and dead zone boundaries. These mechanisms explain many spirals very well, but are unable to easily account for very loosely wound spirals and single spiral arms. We study the effect of light travel time on the shape of a shadow cast by a clump orbiting close (within ~ 1 au) of the central star, where there can be significant orbital motion during the light travel time from the clump to the outer disk and then to the sky plane. This delay in light rays reaching the sky plane gives rise to a variety of spiral- and arc-shaped shadows, which we describe with a general fitting formula for a flared, inclined disk. The three movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Helioseismic Holography of Simulated Sunspots: Magnetic and Thermal Contributions to Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipe, T.; Braun, D. C.; Crouch, A. D.; Birch, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level in the simulations) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it would suggest a path toward inversions for sunspot structure.

  18. Using travel times to simulate multi-dimensional bioreactive transport in time-periodic flows.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Finkel, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2016-04-01

    In travel-time models, the spatially explicit description of reactive transport is replaced by associating reactive-species concentrations with the travel time or groundwater age at all locations. These models have been shown adequate for reactive transport in river-bank filtration under steady-state flow conditions. Dynamic hydrological conditions, however, can lead to fluctuations of infiltration velocities, putting the validity of travel-time models into question. In transient flow, the local travel-time distributions change with time. We show that a modified version of travel-time based reactive transport models is valid if only the magnitude of the velocity fluctuates, whereas its spatial orientation remains constant. We simulate nonlinear, one-dimensional, bioreactive transport involving oxygen, nitrate, dissolved organic carbon, aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, considering periodic fluctuations of velocity. These fluctuations make the bioreactive system pulsate: The aerobic zone decreases at times of low velocity and increases at those of high velocity. For the case of diurnal fluctuations, the biomass concentrations cannot follow the hydrological fluctuations and a transition zone containing both aerobic and obligatory denitrifying bacteria is established, whereas a clear separation of the two types of bacteria prevails in the case of seasonal velocity fluctuations. We map the 1-D results to a heterogeneous, two-dimensional domain by means of the mean groundwater age for steady-state flow in both domains. The mapped results are compared to simulation results of spatially explicit, two-dimensional, advective-dispersive-bioreactive transport subject to the same relative fluctuations of velocity as in the one-dimensional model. The agreement between the mapped 1-D and the explicit 2-D results is excellent. We conclude that travel-time models of nonlinear bioreactive transport are adequate in systems of time-periodic flow if the flow direction does not change.

  19. Using travel times to simulate multi-dimensional bioreactive transport in time-periodic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Finkel, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2016-04-01

    In travel-time models, the spatially explicit description of reactive transport is replaced by associating reactive-species concentrations with the travel time or groundwater age at all locations. These models have been shown adequate for reactive transport in river-bank filtration under steady-state flow conditions. Dynamic hydrological conditions, however, can lead to fluctuations of infiltration velocities, putting the validity of travel-time models into question. In transient flow, the local travel-time distributions change with time. We show that a modified version of travel-time based reactive transport models is valid if only the magnitude of the velocity fluctuates, whereas its spatial orientation remains constant. We simulate nonlinear, one-dimensional, bioreactive transport involving oxygen, nitrate, dissolved organic carbon, aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, considering periodic fluctuations of velocity. These fluctuations make the bioreactive system pulsate: The aerobic zone decreases at times of low velocity and increases at those of high velocity. For the case of diurnal fluctuations, the biomass concentrations cannot follow the hydrological fluctuations and a transition zone containing both aerobic and obligatory denitrifying bacteria is established, whereas a clear separation of the two types of bacteria prevails in the case of seasonal velocity fluctuations. We map the 1-D results to a heterogeneous, two-dimensional domain by means of the mean groundwater age for steady-state flow in both domains. The mapped results are compared to simulation results of spatially explicit, two-dimensional, advective-dispersive-bioreactive transport subject to the same relative fluctuations of velocity as in the one-dimensional model. The agreement between the mapped 1-D and the explicit 2-D results is excellent. We conclude that travel-time models of nonlinear bioreactive transport are adequate in systems of time-periodic flow if the flow direction does not change.

  20. Travel time distribution in a hillslope: Insight from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, Aldo; Russo, David

    2008-12-01

    Solute transport in a three-dimensional, heterogeneous hillslope is analyzed through a series of detailed, three-dimensional numerical simulations. The investigation focuses on the transport of a pulse of a passive solute, taking into account realistic features of the relevant flow domain (i.e., the spatial heterogeneity of the soil hydraulic properties and records of the time-dependent meteorological data and evapotranspiration). The scope of the present work is to analyze a few issues regarding the travel time probability density function (pdf) f(τ) of solute, with particular reference to the following: (1) the suitability of the time invariance assumption and the circumstance under which it may represent a valid approximation, (2) the shape of the resulting travel time pdf f(τ), and (3) the difference between f(τ) and the instantaneous unit hydrograph. It is found that in many cases of practical interest the transport of contaminants in catchments can be analyzed by assuming the time-invariant approximation for f(τ), provided that the calendar time is replaced by a flow-corrected time. Here f(τ) is calculated through the analysis of the breakthrough curve represented in terms of flux-averaged concentration versus cumulate discharge. The rescaling of time with respect to the cumulated outflow takes care in an approximate way of the transient processes occurring in the porous medium. The derived f(τ) is weakly dependent on various attributes, like the level of heterogeneity, presence of evaporation or transpiration, and injection period. The main exception regards the cases in which plant transpiration is intense in the vicinity of the channel after relatively long periods of low rain. The impact of the parameters' heterogeneity on f(τ) is generally quite limited, the dispersion being ruled by the distribution of length paths within the hillslope. The derived f(τ) seems compatible with the Gamma distribution, being characterized by both fast and slow

  1. Groundwater travel time computation for two-layer islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketabchi, Hamed; Mahmoodzadeh, Davood; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad

    2016-06-01

    A closed-form analytical computation of groundwater travel time (GWTT) for two-layer oceanic small island aquifers is developed assuming steady-state and sharp-interface conditions. The two-layer geology impacts on the GWTT are investigated using the developed analytical solution to achieve a greater transparency of such conceptualizations. The results demonstrate that the inclusion of geologic layering leads to large changes in the GWTT. Sensitivity analyses, using specified dimensionless parameters, are employed to assess the influences of hydraulic conductivity, recharge rate, upper layer thickness, and seawater/freshwater density difference parameters, which influence the GWTT. These evaluations reveal that the GWTT is mainly influenced by the recharge rate and the upper layer thickness compared to the other influential parameters when the typical parameter ranges are considered.

  2. Time-averaged acoustic forces acting on a rigid sphere within a wide range of radii in an axisymmetric levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresti, Daniele; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic levitation is a physical phenomenon that arises when the acoustic radiation pressure is strong enough to overcome gravitational force. It is a nonlinear phenomenon which can be predicted only if higher order terms are included in the acoustic field calculation. The study of acoustic levitation is usually conducted by solving the linear acoustic equation and bridging the gap with an analytical solution. Only recently, the scientific community has shown interest in the full solution of the Navier-Stokes' equation with the aim of deeply investigating the acoustic radiation pressure. We present herein a numerical model based on Finite Volume Method (FVM) and Dynamic Mesh (DM) for the calculation of the acoustic radiation pressure acting on a rigid sphere inside an axisymmetric levitator which is the most widely used and investigated type of levitators. In this work, we focus on the third resonance mode. The use of DM is new in the field of acoustic levitation, allowing a more realistic simulation of the phenomenon, since no standing wave has to be necessarily imposed as boundary condition. The radiating plate is modeled as a rigid cylinder moving sinusoidally along the central axis. The time-averaged acoustic force exerting on the sphere is calculated for different radii Rs of the sphere (0.025 to 0.5 wavelengths). It is shown that the acoustic force increases proportional to Rs3 for small radii, then decreases when the standing wave condition is violated and finally rises again in the travelling wave radiation pressure configuration. The numerical model is validated for the inviscid case with a Finite Element Method model of the linear acoustic model based on King's approximation.

  3. Investigating the base of the mantle using differential travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, Michael E.; Valenzuela, Raul W.; Zhu, An-Ning; Bartkó, Lilla

    1995-11-01

    Several techniques using differential seismic travel times to map lateral structure in the lowermost mantle are discussed. Results are shown for recent studies involving the established techniques of core-reflected phases (ScS-S and PcP-P) and diffracted phase profiles (Sdiff), and new techniques involving the differential times of both core-transmitted and core-diffracted phases (PKP-Pdiff and Sdiff-SKS-SKKS) are described. The recent databases of digital seismograms have allowed for a study of D″ velocities in the Eastern Hemisphere using ScS-S and sScS-sS differential times from the many Western Pacific earthquakes. The result is an image at a resolution of a few hundred kilometers of a slow velocity anomaly of 2500 km width beneath Micronesia (-2% relative to the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM)) that is surrounded on three sides by fast D″ rock that is 3% faster than PREM. A study using the differential arrivals of core-diffracted S waves (Sdiff) from digital records is providing information about long-wavelength variations in D″ shear velocities, though the rigorous earthquake-station geometry requirements limit the study to particular regions of the globe. Another study is using over 40 000 PcP-P differential travel times as reported to the International Seismological Centre to map global P velocities at the base of the mantle, and it shows that global coverage of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is very poor. Though there are some regions (Northern Asia, Northern Pacific, Central America) with enough data sampling to allow a quantification of average D″ P velocities (with a total robust range of 4% lateral variation), they cover only a small portion of the total CMB. As a means of increasing our understanding of the long-wavelength variations of seismic velocities, a description is given of two techniques that will take advantage of totally different sets of earthquake-station geometries from the core-reflected phase studies. In the distance

  4. Cognitive mapping in mental time travel and mental space navigation.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Baptiste; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2016-09-01

    The ability to imagine ourselves in the past, in the future or in different spatial locations suggests that the brain can generate cognitive maps that are independent of the experiential self in the here and now. Using three experiments, we asked to which extent Mental Time Travel (MTT; imagining the self in time) and Mental Space Navigation (MSN; imagining the self in space) shared similar cognitive operations. For this, participants judged the ordinality of real historical events in time and in space with respect to different mental perspectives: for instance, participants mentally projected themselves in Paris in nine years, and judged whether an event occurred before or after, or, east or west, of where they mentally stood. In all three experiments, symbolic distance effects in time and space dimensions were quantified using Reaction Times (RT) and Error Rates (ER). When self-projected, participants were slower and were less accurate (absolute distance effects); participants were also faster and more accurate when the spatial and temporal distances were further away from their mental viewpoint (relative distance effects). These effects show that MTT and MSN require egocentric mapping and that self-projection requires map transformations. Additionally, participants' performance was affected when self-projection was made in one dimension but judgements in another, revealing a competition between temporal and spatial mapping (Experiment 2 & 3). Altogether, our findings suggest that MTT and MSN are separately mapped although they require comparable allo- to ego-centric map conversion.

  5. Cognitive mapping in mental time travel and mental space navigation.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Baptiste; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2016-09-01

    The ability to imagine ourselves in the past, in the future or in different spatial locations suggests that the brain can generate cognitive maps that are independent of the experiential self in the here and now. Using three experiments, we asked to which extent Mental Time Travel (MTT; imagining the self in time) and Mental Space Navigation (MSN; imagining the self in space) shared similar cognitive operations. For this, participants judged the ordinality of real historical events in time and in space with respect to different mental perspectives: for instance, participants mentally projected themselves in Paris in nine years, and judged whether an event occurred before or after, or, east or west, of where they mentally stood. In all three experiments, symbolic distance effects in time and space dimensions were quantified using Reaction Times (RT) and Error Rates (ER). When self-projected, participants were slower and were less accurate (absolute distance effects); participants were also faster and more accurate when the spatial and temporal distances were further away from their mental viewpoint (relative distance effects). These effects show that MTT and MSN require egocentric mapping and that self-projection requires map transformations. Additionally, participants' performance was affected when self-projection was made in one dimension but judgements in another, revealing a competition between temporal and spatial mapping (Experiment 2 & 3). Altogether, our findings suggest that MTT and MSN are separately mapped although they require comparable allo- to ego-centric map conversion. PMID:27239750

  6. Suburb-to-suburb intercity travel: Energy, time and dollar expenditures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fels, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of adding suburb to terminal and terminal to suburb travel is examined. The energy consumed in entire trips was estimated. The total energy costs are compared with total travel times, and dollar costs to the traveler. Trips between origins in seven suburbs of Newark, New Jersey and destinations in two Washington, D. C. suburbs are analyzed.

  7. Long-lived coherent traveling acoustic pulses induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jincheng; Guo, Chunlei

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we systematically study the generation and propagation of coherent acoustic pulses in a metal-dielectric system using a two-color femtosecond pump-probe technique at different probe angles. A long-lived acoustic oscillation is observed in a borosilicate glass coated with gold and shows different attenuations and amplitude at different probe wavelengths. Our study demonstrates that the two-color optical pump-probe technique can be used as a noninvasive tool to study acoustic properties of dielectric materials.

  8. An invisible acoustic sensor based on parity-time symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Romain; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alù, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Sensing an incoming signal is typically associated with absorbing a portion of its energy, inherently perturbing the measurement and creating reflections and shadows. Here, in contrast, we demonstrate a non-invasive, shadow-free, invisible sensor for airborne sound waves at audible frequencies, which fully absorbs the impinging signal, without at the same time perturbing its own measurement or creating a shadow. This unique sensing device is based on the unusual scattering properties of a parity-time (PT) symmetric metamaterial device formed by a pair of electro-acoustic resonators loaded with suitably tailored non-Foster electrical circuits, constituting the acoustic equivalent of a coherent perfect absorber coupled to a coherent laser. Beyond the specific application to non-invasive sensing, our work broadly demonstrates the unique relevance of PT-symmetric metamaterials for acoustics, loss compensation and extraordinary wave manipulation. PMID:25562746

  9. Linear and Nonlinear Time Reverse Acoustics in Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, A.; Johnson, P. A.; Tencate, J.

    2004-12-01

    Linear and Nonlinear Time Reverse Acoustics in Geomaterials P. A. Johnson, A.Sutin and J. TenCate Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) is one of the most interesting topics to have emerged in modern acoustics in the last 40 years. Much of the seminal research in this area has been carried out by the group at the Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique at the University of Paris 7, who have demonstrated the ability and robustness of TRA (using Time Reversal Mirrors) to provide spatial control and focusing of an ultrasonic beam (e.g. Fink, 1999). The ability to obtain highly focused signals with TRA has numerous applications, including lithotripsy, ultrasonic brain surgery, nondestructive evaluation and underwater acoustic communication. Notably, the study of time reversal in solids and in the earth is still relatively new. The problem is fundamentally different from the purely acoustic one due to the excitation and propagation of both compressional (bulk) and shear waves as well as the scattering and potentially high dissipation of the medium. We conducted series of TRA experiments in different solids using direct-coupled transducers on solids in tandem with a large bandwidth laser vibrometer detector. A typical time reversal experiment was carried out using the following steps (Sutin et al. 2004a). Laboratory experiments were conducted in different geomaterials of different shapes and sizes, including Carrera marble, granite and Berea sandstone. We observed that, in spite of potentially huge numbers of wave conversions (e.g., compressional to shear, shear to compressional, compressional/shear to surface waves, etc.) for each reflection at each free surface, time reversal still provides significant spatial and temporal focusing in these different geophysical materials. The typical size of the focal area is approximately equivalent to the shear wavelength and the focal area, but becomes larger with increasing wave attenuation (Sutin et al. 2004a; Delsanto et al., 2003)). The TR

  10. Acoustically trapped colloidal crystals that are reconfigurable in real time

    PubMed Central

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic and phononic crystals are metamaterials with repeating unit cells that result in internal resonances leading to a range of wave guiding and filtering properties and are opening up new applications such as hyperlenses and superabsorbers. Here we show the first, to our knowledge, 3D colloidal phononic crystal that is reconfigurable in real time and demonstrate its ability to rapidly alter its frequency filtering characteristics. Our reconfigurable material is assembled from microspheres in aqueous solution, trapped with acoustic radiation forces. The acoustic radiation force is governed by an energy landscape, determined by an applied high-amplitude acoustic standing wave field, in which particles move swiftly to energy minima. This creates a colloidal crystal of several milliliters in volume with spheres arranged in an orthorhombic lattice in which the acoustic wavelength is used to control the lattice spacing. Transmission acoustic spectroscopy shows that the new colloidal crystal behaves as a phononic metamaterial and exhibits clear band-pass and band-stop frequencies which are adjusted in real time. PMID:24706925

  11. Acoustic thermometry time series in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushaw, B. D.; Howe, B. M.; Mercer, J. A.; Worcester; Npal Group*, P. F.

    2002-12-01

    Acoustic measurements of large-scale, depth-averaged temperatures are continuing in the North Pacific as a follow on to the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) project. An acoustic source is located just north of Kauai. It transmits to six receivers to the east at 1-4-Mm ranges and one receiver to the northwest at about 4-Mm range. The transmission schedule is six times per day at four-day intervals. The time series were obtained from 1998 through 1999 and, after a two-year interruption because of permitting issues, began again in January 2002 to continue for at least another five years. The intense mesoscale thermal variability around Hawaii is evident in all time series; this variability is much greater than that observed near the California coast. The paths to the east, particularly those paths to the California coast, show cooling this year relative to the earlier data. The path to the northwest shows a modest warming. The acoustic rays sample depths below the mixed layer near Hawaii and to the surface as they near the California coast or extend north of the sub-arctic front. The temperatures measured acoustically are compared with those inferred from TOPEX altimetry, ARGO float data, and with ECCO (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean) model output. This on-going data collection effort, to be augmented over the next years with a more complete observing array, can be used for, e.g., separating whole-basin climate change from low-mode spatial variability such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). [*NPAL (North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory) Group: J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, B. M. Howe, J. A. Mercer, R. C. Spindel, and P. F. Worcester. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  12. Shaping and timing gradient pulses to reduce MRI acoustic noise.

    PubMed

    Segbers, Marcel; Rizzo Sierra, Carlos V; Duifhuis, Hendrikus; Hoogduin, Johannes M

    2010-08-01

    A method to reduce the acoustic noise generated by gradient systems in MRI has been recently proposed; such a method is based on the linear response theory. Since the physical cause of MRI acoustic noise is the time derivative of the gradient current, a common trapezoid current shape produces an acoustic gradient coil response mainly during the rising and falling edge. In the falling edge, the coil acoustic response presents a 180 degrees phase difference compared to the rising edge. Therefore, by varying the width of the trapezoid and keeping the ramps constant, it is possible to suppress one selected frequency and its higher harmonics. This value is matched to one of the prominent resonance frequencies of the gradient coil system. The idea of cancelling a single frequency is extended to a second frequency, using two successive trapezoid-shaped pulses presented at a selected interval. Overall sound pressure level reduction of 6 and 10 dB is found for the two trapezoid shapes and a single pulse shape, respectively. The acoustically optimized pulse shape proposed is additionally tested in a simulated echo planar imaging readout train, obtaining a sound pressure level reduction of 12 dB for the best case.

  13. Time-Reversal Acoustics and Maximum-Entropy Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2001-08-22

    Target location is a common problem in acoustical imaging using either passive or active data inversion. Time-reversal methods in acoustics have the important characteristic that they provide a means of determining the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the scattering operator for either of these problems. Each eigenfunction may often be approximately associated with an individual scatterer. The resulting decoupling of the scattered field from a collection of targets is a very useful aid to localizing the targets, and suggests a number of imaging and localization algorithms. Two of these are linear subspace methods and maximum-entropy imaging.

  14. Iterative Bayesian Estimation of Travel Times on Urban Arterials: Fusing Loop Detector and Probe Vehicle Data

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Meng-Ying; Cao, Peng; Wang, Jiang-Bo

    2016-01-01

    On urban arterials, travel time estimation is challenging especially from various data sources. Typically, fusing loop detector data and probe vehicle data to estimate travel time is a troublesome issue while considering the data issue of uncertain, imprecise and even conflicting. In this paper, we propose an improved data fusing methodology for link travel time estimation. Link travel times are simultaneously pre-estimated using loop detector data and probe vehicle data, based on which Bayesian fusion is then applied to fuse the estimated travel times. Next, Iterative Bayesian estimation is proposed to improve Bayesian fusion by incorporating two strategies: 1) substitution strategy which replaces the lower accurate travel time estimation from one sensor with the current fused travel time; and 2) specially-designed conditions for convergence which restrict the estimated travel time in a reasonable range. The estimation results show that, the proposed method outperforms probe vehicle data based method, loop detector based method and single Bayesian fusion, and the mean absolute percentage error is reduced to 4.8%. Additionally, iterative Bayesian estimation performs better for lighter traffic flows when the variability of travel time is practically higher than other periods. PMID:27362654

  15. Iterative Bayesian Estimation of Travel Times on Urban Arterials: Fusing Loop Detector and Probe Vehicle Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Cui, Meng-Ying; Cao, Peng; Wang, Jiang-Bo

    2016-01-01

    On urban arterials, travel time estimation is challenging especially from various data sources. Typically, fusing loop detector data and probe vehicle data to estimate travel time is a troublesome issue while considering the data issue of uncertain, imprecise and even conflicting. In this paper, we propose an improved data fusing methodology for link travel time estimation. Link travel times are simultaneously pre-estimated using loop detector data and probe vehicle data, based on which Bayesian fusion is then applied to fuse the estimated travel times. Next, Iterative Bayesian estimation is proposed to improve Bayesian fusion by incorporating two strategies: 1) substitution strategy which replaces the lower accurate travel time estimation from one sensor with the current fused travel time; and 2) specially-designed conditions for convergence which restrict the estimated travel time in a reasonable range. The estimation results show that, the proposed method outperforms probe vehicle data based method, loop detector based method and single Bayesian fusion, and the mean absolute percentage error is reduced to 4.8%. Additionally, iterative Bayesian estimation performs better for lighter traffic flows when the variability of travel time is practically higher than other periods. PMID:27362654

  16. Iterative Bayesian Estimation of Travel Times on Urban Arterials: Fusing Loop Detector and Probe Vehicle Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Cui, Meng-Ying; Cao, Peng; Wang, Jiang-Bo

    2016-01-01

    On urban arterials, travel time estimation is challenging especially from various data sources. Typically, fusing loop detector data and probe vehicle data to estimate travel time is a troublesome issue while considering the data issue of uncertain, imprecise and even conflicting. In this paper, we propose an improved data fusing methodology for link travel time estimation. Link travel times are simultaneously pre-estimated using loop detector data and probe vehicle data, based on which Bayesian fusion is then applied to fuse the estimated travel times. Next, Iterative Bayesian estimation is proposed to improve Bayesian fusion by incorporating two strategies: 1) substitution strategy which replaces the lower accurate travel time estimation from one sensor with the current fused travel time; and 2) specially-designed conditions for convergence which restrict the estimated travel time in a reasonable range. The estimation results show that, the proposed method outperforms probe vehicle data based method, loop detector based method and single Bayesian fusion, and the mean absolute percentage error is reduced to 4.8%. Additionally, iterative Bayesian estimation performs better for lighter traffic flows when the variability of travel time is practically higher than other periods.

  17. Recent developments in guided wave travel time tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zon, Tim van; Volker, Arno

    2014-02-18

    The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation is an interesting addition to the current method of periodic inspections. Guided wave tomography had been developed to create a map of the wall thickness using the travel times of guided waves. It can be used for both monitoring and for inspection of pipe-segments that are difficult to access, for instance at the location of pipe-supports. An important outcome of the tomography is the minimum remaining wall thickness, as this is critical in the scheduling of a replacement of the pipe-segment. In order to improve the sizing accuracy we have improved the tomography scheme. A number of major improvements have been realized allowing to extend the application envelope to pipes with a larger wall thickness and to larger distances between the transducer rings. Simulation results indicate that the sizing accuracy has improved and that is now possible to have a spacing of 8 meter between the source-ring and the receiver-ring. Additionally a reduction of the number of sensors required might be possible as well.

  18. Recent developments in guided wave travel time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zon, Tim; Volker, Arno

    2014-02-01

    The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation is an interesting addition to the current method of periodic inspections. Guided wave tomography had been developed to create a map of the wall thickness using the travel times of guided waves. It can be used for both monitoring and for inspection of pipe-segments that are difficult to access, for instance at the location of pipe-supports. An important outcome of the tomography is the minimum remaining wall thickness, as this is critical in the scheduling of a replacement of the pipe-segment. In order to improve the sizing accuracy we have improved the tomography scheme. A number of major improvements have been realized allowing to extend the application envelope to pipes with a larger wall thickness and to larger distances between the transducer rings. Simulation results indicate that the sizing accuracy has improved and that is now possible to have a spacing of 8 meter between the source-ring and the receiver-ring. Additionally a reduction of the number of sensors required might be possible as well.

  19. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  20. Travel time statistics under radially converging flow in single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Kekez, Toni; Malenica, Luka

    2015-04-01

    A stochastic methodology based on Adaptive Fup Monte Carlo Method is used to investigate transport of a conservative solute by steady flow to a single pumping well in two-dimensional randomly heterogeneous single fractures. The spatially variable hydraulic transmissivity is modeled as a stationary random function for three different correlation structures (multi-Gaussian, connected and disconnected fields with correlated mean, high and low lnT values, respectively, according to the Zinn and Harvey, 2003) and heterogeneity levels (lnT variance is 1 and 8). Initially, solute particles are injected at outer circle located at 32 correlation lengths from well according to the in flux and resident injection mode. Therefore, breakthrough curve (BTC) statistics in single well due to different spatial structures, heterogeneity levels, injection modes and dispersion influence is considered. For small heterogeneity, all considered effects have small influences on BTC and related moments. As expected in single fractures, high lnT variance is more usual case which considerably changes flow patterns including channelling effect and fact that only few narrow channels carry out most pumping flow rate. Channelling implies significant differences between different injection modes. Resident mode uniformly injects particles implying that most particles pass through "slower" zones that especially increase late arrivals and contribute to the non-Fickian behaviour of transport. Contrary, "in flux" mode drastically reduces first arrivals and mean values, especially for connected correlation fields. The results from two injection modes lie on different sides of homogeneous mean travel time solution and give complementary information for complete representation of conservative transport. For advection transport, correlation structure and especially lnT variance seems to have major influence on BTC characteristics. On the other side, influence of longitudinal and lateral local scale

  1. Multi-carrier Communications over Time-varying Acoustic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aval, Yashar M.

    Acoustic communication is an enabling technology for many autonomous undersea systems, such as those used for ocean monitoring, offshore oil and gas industry, aquaculture, or port security. There are three main challenges in achieving reliable high-rate underwater communication: the bandwidth of acoustic channels is extremely limited, the propagation delays are long, and the Doppler distortions are more pronounced than those found in wireless radio channels. In this dissertation we focus on assessing the fundamental limitations of acoustic communication, and designing efficient signal processing methods that cam overcome these limitations. We address the fundamental question of acoustic channel capacity (achievable rate) for single-input-multi-output (SIMO) acoustic channels using a per-path Rician fading model, and focusing on two scenarios: narrowband channels where the channel statistics can be approximated as frequency- independent, and wideband channels where the nominal path loss is frequency-dependent. In each scenario, we compare several candidate power allocation techniques, and show that assigning uniform power across all frequencies for the first scenario, and assigning uniform power across a selected frequency-band for the second scenario, are the best practical choices in most cases, because the long propagation delay renders the feedback information outdated for power allocation based on the estimated channel response. We quantify our results using the channel information extracted form the 2010 Mobile Acoustic Communications Experiment (MACE'10). Next, we focus on achieving reliable high-rate communication over underwater acoustic channels. Specifically, we investigate orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) as the state-of-the-art technique for dealing with frequency-selective multipath channels, and propose a class of methods that compensate for the time-variation of the underwater acoustic channel. These methods are based on multiple

  2. Use of an Acoustic Orientation System for Indoor Travel with a Spatially Disabled Blind Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, G. E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    An acoustic orientation system was developed that employed a portable remote control device keyed to trigger audio tones from modules placed at key locations throughout the user's home and work environments. Results found that the system helped a blind subject to move and work successfully in both settings, and the subject found it easy and…

  3. Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Mental Time Travel Ability: Uncovering a Hidden Relationship in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Altay

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was threefold: first, it was to explore the profiles of student teachers' mental time travel ability; second, it was to examine the relationship between student teachers' mental time travel ability and self-efficacy beliefs; and third, it was to investigate the role of self-efficacy beliefs in relationship between the past…

  4. Making Decisions with the Future in Mind: Developmental and Comparative Identification of Mental Time Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suddendorf, T.; Busby, J.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms that produce behavior which increase future survival chances provide an adaptive advantage. The flexibility of human behavior is at least partly the result of one such mechanism, our ability to travel mentally in time and entertain potential future scenarios. We can study mental time travel in children using language. Current results…

  5. Method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.

    2004-06-29

    A method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics. Time-reversal acoustics uses an iterative process to determine the optimum signal for locating a strongly reflecting target in a cluttered environment. An acoustic array sends a signal into a medium, and then receives the returned/reflected signal. This returned/reflected signal is then time-reversed and sent back into the medium again, and again, until the signal being sent and received is no longer changing. At that point, the array has isolated the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination and has effectively determined the location of a single target in the medium (the one that is most strongly reflecting). After the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination has been determined, to determine the location of other targets, instead of sending back the same signals, the method sends back these time reversed signals, but half of them will also be reversed in sign. There are various possibilities for choosing which half to do sign reversal. The most obvious choice is to reverse every other one in a linear array, or as in a checkerboard pattern in 2D. Then, a new send/receive, send-time reversed/receive iteration can proceed. Often, the first iteration in this sequence will be close to the desired signal from a second target. In some cases, orthogonalization procedures must be implemented to assure the returned signals are in fact orthogonal to the first eigenvector found.

  6. Acoustic FMRI noise: linear time-invariant system model.

    PubMed

    Rizzo Sierra, Carlos V; Versluis, Maarten J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Duifhuis, Hendrikus Diek

    2008-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For auditory system studies, however, the acoustic noise generated by the scanner tends to interfere with the assessments of this activation. Understanding and modeling fMRI acoustic noise is a useful step to its reduction. To study acoustic noise, the MR scanner is modeled as a linear electroacoustical system generating sound pressure signals proportional to the time derivative of the input gradient currents. The transfer function of one MR scanner is determined for two different input specifications: 1) by using the gradient waveform calculated by the scanner software and 2) by using a recording of the gradient current. Up to 4 kHz, the first method is shown as reliable as the second one, and its use is encouraged when direct measurements of gradient currents are not possible. Additionally, the linear order and average damping properties of the gradient coil system are determined by impulse response analysis. Since fMRI is often based on echo planar imaging (EPI) sequences, a useful validation of the transfer function prediction ability can be obtained by calculating the acoustic output for the EPI sequence. We found a predicted sound pressure level (SPL) for the EPI sequence of 104 dB SPL compared to a measured value of 102 dB SPL. As yet, the predicted EPI pressure waveform shows similarity as well as some differences with the directly measured EPI pressure waveform.

  7. Time Reversal Acoustic Communication Using Filtered Multitone Modulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Chen, Baowei; Li, Haisen; Zhou, Tian; Li, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    The multipath spread in underwater acoustic channels is severe and, therefore, when the symbol rate of the time reversal (TR) acoustic communication using single-carrier (SC) modulation is high, the large intersymbol interference (ISI) span caused by multipath reduces the performance of the TR process and needs to be removed using the long adaptive equalizer as the post-processor. In this paper, a TR acoustic communication method using filtered multitone (FMT) modulation is proposed in order to reduce the residual ISI in the processed signal using TR. In the proposed method, FMT modulation is exploited to modulate information symbols onto separate subcarriers with high spectral containment and TR technique, as well as adaptive equalization is adopted at the receiver to suppress ISI and noise. The performance of the proposed method is assessed through simulation and real data from a trial in an experimental pool. The proposed method was compared with the TR acoustic communication using SC modulation with the same spectral efficiency. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of the TR process and reduce the computational complexity of adaptive equalization for post-process.

  8. Time Reversal Acoustic Communication Using Filtered Multitone Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lin; Chen, Baowei; Li, Haisen; Zhou, Tian; Li, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    The multipath spread in underwater acoustic channels is severe and, therefore, when the symbol rate of the time reversal (TR) acoustic communication using single-carrier (SC) modulation is high, the large intersymbol interference (ISI) span caused by multipath reduces the performance of the TR process and needs to be removed using the long adaptive equalizer as the post-processor. In this paper, a TR acoustic communication method using filtered multitone (FMT) modulation is proposed in order to reduce the residual ISI in the processed signal using TR. In the proposed method, FMT modulation is exploited to modulate information symbols onto separate subcarriers with high spectral containment and TR technique, as well as adaptive equalization is adopted at the receiver to suppress ISI and noise. The performance of the proposed method is assessed through simulation and real data from a trial in an experimental pool. The proposed method was compared with the TR acoustic communication using SC modulation with the same spectral efficiency. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of the TR process and reduce the computational complexity of adaptive equalization for post-process. PMID:26393586

  9. Timing light treatment for eastward and westward travel preparation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Michel A; Miller, James C; Love, Ryan J; Lieberman, Harris; Blazeski, Sofi; Arendt, Josephine

    2009-07-01

    Jet lag degrades performance and operational readiness of recently deployed military personnel and other travelers. The objective of the studies reported here was to determine, using a narrow bandwidth light tower (500 nm), the optimum timing of light treatment to hasten adaptive circadian phase advance and delay. Three counterbalanced treatment order, repeated measures studies were conducted to compare melatonin suppression and phase shift across multiple light treatment timings. In Experiment 1, 14 normal healthy volunteers (8 men/6 women) aged 34.9+/-8.2 yrs (mean+/-SD) underwent light treatment at the following times: A) 06:00 to 07:00 h, B) 05:30 to 07:30 h, and C) 09:00 to 10:00 h (active control). In Experiment 2, 13 normal healthy subjects (7 men/6 women) aged 35.6+/-6.9 yrs, underwent light treatment at each of the following times: A) 06:00 to 07:00 h, B) 07:00 to 08:00 h, C) 08:00 to 09:00 h, and a no-light control session (D) from 07:00 to 08:00 h. In Experiment 3, 10 normal healthy subjects (6 men/4 women) aged 37.0+/-7.7 yrs underwent light treatment at the following times: A) 02:00 to 03:00 h, B) 02:30 to 03:30 h, and C) 03:00 to 04:00 h, with a no-light control (D) from 02:30 to 03:30 h. Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was established by two methods: when salivary melatonin levels exceeded a 1.0 pg/ml threshold, and when salivary melatonin levels exceeded three times the 0.9 pg/ml sensitivity of the radioimmunoasssy. Using the 1.0 pg/ml DLMO, significant phase advances were found in Experiment 1 for conditions A (p < .028) and B (p < 0.004). Experiment 2 showed significant phase advances in conditions A (p < 0.018) and B (p < 0.003) but not C (p < 0.23), relative to condition D. In Experiment 3, only condition B (p < 0.035) provided a significant phase delay relative to condition D. Similar but generally smaller phase shifts were found with the 2.7 pg/ml DLMO method. This threshold was used to analyze phase shifts against circadian time of the start

  10. Investigation of acoustic aerosol agglomeration mechanisms under traveling-wave condition. Period covered: 1 July-30 September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, D.T.

    1980-10-16

    Experimental investigations of acoustically induced turbulence and shock waves in a traveling-wave tube are performed with and without the introduction of an air flow through the system. Frequency (f) and intensity (I) effects of the acoustic field are studied using a hot-film anemometer and FFT data processing unit. The effect of the acoustically induced turbulence on a laminar flow is also investigated. Sampled data are first conditioned, then processed to estimate the characteristics of turbulence. It is found that for sound pressure level >158 dB turbulence appears. Furthermore, at slightly higher level (approx. 160 dB) shock waves appear over the range of all frequency. Turbulence measurements were performed over a frequency range of 500 to 2200 Hz, with intensity over a range of 0.6 to 4.0 W/cm/sup 2/. Below I = 0.6 W/cm/sup 2/ no turbulent bursts are found. The turbulent spectrum F and the wave number k are found to satisfy a power law F proportional to k/sup ..cap alpha../ with ..cap alpha.. approx. = 1.7 to -2.1. The rms turbulent velocity u/sub */ is found experimentally to have an I/sup 1/2/ dependence, yet is relatively insensitive to variation of f. Throughout the whole measuring range of f and I, the rate of energy dissipation per unit mass epsilon is estimated to be 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 7/ cm/sup 2//s/sup 3/. It is also found that superimposing a laminar air stream through the tube will suppress the turbulence.

  11. Radiation force produced by time reversal acoustic focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2003-10-01

    An ultrasonic induced radiation force is an efficient tool for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and evaluating tissue viscoelastic properties, which are closely related to tissue functional state and abnormalities. Time Reversal Acoustic Focusing System (TRA FS) can provide efficient ultrasound focusing in highly inhomogeneous media. Furthermore, numerous reflections from boundaries, which distort focusing in conventional ultrasound focusing systems and are viewed as a significant technical hurdle, lead to an improvement of the focusing ability of the TRA system. In this work the TRA FS field structure and radiation force in a transcranial phantom were investigated. A simple TRA FS comprising a plane piezoceramic transducer attached to an external resonator such as an aluminum block was acoustically coupled to the tested transcranial phantom. A custom-designed compact electronic unit for TRA FS provided receiving, digitizing, storing, time reversing and transmitting of acoustic signals in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz. The radiation force produced by ultrasonic pulses was investigated as a function of the transmitted ultrasound temporal parameters. The simplest TRA FS provided focusing of 500 kHz ultrasound pulses and the generation of a radiation force with an efficacy hardly achievable using conventional sophisticated phased array transmitters. [Work supported by NIH.

  12. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  13. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging.

  14. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging. PMID:27025443

  15. Accessing the exceptional points of parity-time symmetric acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengzhi; Dubois, Marc; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric systems experience phase transition between PT exact and broken phases at exceptional point. These PT phase transitions contribute significantly to the design of single mode lasers, coherent perfect absorbers, isolators, and diodes. However, such exceptional points are extremely difficult to access in practice because of the dispersive behaviour of most loss and gain materials required in PT symmetric systems. Here we introduce a method to systematically tame these exceptional points and control PT phases. Our experimental demonstration hinges on an active acoustic element that realizes a complex-valued potential and simultaneously controls the multiple interference in the structure. The manipulation of exceptional points offers new routes to broaden applications for PT symmetric physics in acoustics, optics, microwaves and electronics, which are essential for sensing, communication and imaging.

  16. Time-instant sampling based encoding of time-varying acoustic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neeraj Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The inner ear has been shown to characterize an acoustic stimuli by transducing fluid motion in the inner ear to mechanical bending of stereocilia on the inner hair cells (IHCs). The excitation motion/energy transferred to an IHC is dependent on the frequency spectrum of the acoustic stimuli, and the spatial location of the IHC along the length of the basilar membrane (BM). Subsequently, the afferent auditory nerve fiber (ANF) bundle samples the encoded waveform in the IHCs by synapsing with them. In this work we focus on sampling of information by afferent ANFs from the IHCs, and show computationally that sampling at specific time instants is sufficient for decoding of time-varying acoustic spectrum embedded in the acoustic stimuli. The approach is based on sampling the signal at its zero-crossings and higher-order derivative zero-crossings. We show results of the approach on time-varying acoustic spectrum estimation from cricket call signal recording. The framework gives a time-domain and non-spatial processing perspective to auditory signal processing. The approach works on the full band signal, and is devoid of modeling any bandpass filtering mimicking the BM action. Instead, we motivate the approach from the perspective of event-triggered sampling by afferent ANFs on the stimuli encoded in the IHCs. Though the approach gives acoustic spectrum estimation but it is shallow on its complete understanding for plausible bio-mechanical replication with current mammalian auditory mechanics insights.

  17. Estimating streambed travel times and respiration rates based on temperature and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen consumption is a common proxy for aerobic respiration and novel in situ measurement techniques with high spatial resolution enable an accurate determination of the oxygen distribution in the streambed. The oxygen concentration at a certain location in the streambed depends on the input concentration, the respiration rate, temperature, and the travel time of the infiltrating flowpath. While oxygen concentrations and temperature can directly be measured, respiration rate and travel time must be estimated from the data. We investigated the interplay of these factors using a 6 month long, 5-min resolution dataset collected in a 3rdorder gravel-bed stream. Our objective was twofold, to determine transient rates of hyporheic respiration and to estimate travel times in the streambed based solely on oxygen and temperature measurements. Our results show that temperature and travel time explains ~70% of the variation in oxygen concentration in the streambed. Independent travel times were obtained using natural variations in the electrical conductivity (EC) of the stream water as tracer (µ=4.1 h; σ=2.3 h). By combining these travel times with the oxygen consumption, we calculated a first order respiration rate (µ=9.7 d-1; σ=6.1 d-1). Variations in the calculated respiration rate are largely explained by variations in streambed temperature. An empirical relationship between our respiration rate and temperature agrees with the theoretical Boltzmann-Arrhenius equation. With this relationship, a temperature-based respiration rate can be estimated and used to re-estimate subsurface travel times. The resulting travel times distinctively resemble the EC-derived travel times (R20.47; Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient 0.32). Both calculations of travel time are correlated to stream water levels and increase during discharge events, enhancing the oxygen consumption for these periods. No other physical factors besides temperature were significantly correlated with the respiration

  18. Non-stationary nonparametric inference of river-to-groundwater travel-time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zijie; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2014-11-01

    The travel-time distribution between rivers and groundwater observation points and the mixing of freshly infiltrated river water with groundwater of other origin is of high relevance in riverbank filtration. These characteristics usually are inferred from the analysis of natural-tracer time series, typically relying on a stationary input-output relationship. However, non-stationarity is a significant feature of the riparian zone causing time-varying river-to-groundwater transfer functions. We present a non-stationary extension of nonparametric deconvolution by performing stationary deconvolution with windowed time series, enforcing smoothness of the determined transfer function in time and travel time. The nonparametric approach facilitates the identification of unconventional features in travel-time distributions, such as broad peaks, and the sliding-window approach is an easy way to accommodate the method to dynamic changes of the system under consideration. By this, we obtain time-varying signal-recovery rates and travel-time distributions, from which we derive the mean travel time and the spread of the distribution as function of time. We apply our method to electric-conductivity data collected at River Thur, Switzerland, and adjacent piezometers. The non-stationary approach reproduces the groundwater observations significantly better than the stationary one, both in terms of overall metrics and in matching individual peaks. We compare characteristics of the transient transfer function to base flow which indicates shorter travel times at higher river stages.

  19. The influence of travel time on breast cancer characteristics, receipt of primary therapy, and surveillance mammography.

    PubMed

    Onega, Tracy; Cook, Andrea; Kirlin, Beth; Shi, Xun; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Tuzzio, Leah; Buist, Diana S M

    2011-08-01

    Travel time has been shown to influence some aspects of cancer characteristics at diagnosis and care for women with breast cancer, but important gaps remain in our understanding of its impact. We examined the influence of travel time to the nearest radiology facility on breast cancer characteristics, treatment, and surveillance for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. We included 1,012 women with invasive breast cancer (stages I and II) who had access to care within an integrated health care delivery system in western Washington State. The travel times to the nearest radiology facility were calculated for all the U.S. Census blocks within the study area and assigned to women based on residence at diagnosis. We collected cancer characteristics, primary and adjuvant therapies, and surveillance mammography for at least 2.5 years post diagnosis and used multivariable analyses to test the associations of travel time. The majority of women (68.6%) lived within 20 min of the nearest radiology facility, had stage I disease (72.7%), received breast conserving therapy (68.7%), and had annual surveillance mammography the first 2 years after treatment (73.7%). The travel time was not significantly associated with the stage or surveillance mammography after adjusting for covariates. Primary therapy was significantly related to travel time, with greater travel time (>30 min vs. ≤ 10 min) associated with a higher likelihood of mastectomy compared to breast conserving surgery (RR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16-2.01). The travel time was not associated with the stage at diagnosis or surveillance mammography receipt. The travel time does seem to influence the type of primary therapy among women with breast cancer, suggesting that women may prefer low frequency services, such as mastectomy, if geographic access to a radiology facility is limited.

  20. Closing the gap between regional and global travel time tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bijwaard, H.; Spakman, W.; Engdahl, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent global travel time tomography studies by Zhou [1996] and van der Hilst et al. [1997] have been performed with cell parameterizations of the order of those frequently used in regional tomography studies (i.e., with cell sizes of 1??-2??). These new global models constitute a considerable improvement over previous results that were obtained with rather coarse parameterizations (5?? cells). The inferred structures are, however, of larger scale than is usually obtained in regional models, and it is not clear where and if individual cells are actually resolved. This study aims at resolving lateral heterogeneity on scales as small as 0.6?? in the upper mantle and 1.2??-3?? in the lower mantle. This allows for the adequate mapping of expected small-scale structures induced by, for example, lithosphere subduction, deep mantle upwellings, and mid-ocean ridges. There are three major contributions that allow for this advancement. First, we employ an irregular grid of nonoverlapping cells adapted to the heterogeneous sampling of the Earth's mantle by seismic waves [Spakman and Bijwaard, 1998]. Second, we exploit the global data set of Engdahl et al. [1998], which is a reprocessed version of the global data set of the International Seismological Centre. Their reprocessing included hypocenter redetermination and phase reidentification. Finally, we combine all data used (P, pP, and pwP phases) into nearly 5 million ray bundles with a limited spatial extent such that averaging over large mantle volumes is prevented while the signal-to-noise ratio is improved. In the approximate solution of the huge inverse problem we obtain a variance reduction of 57.1%. Synthetic sensitivity tests indicate horizontal resolution on the scale of the smallest cells (0.6?? or 1.2??) in the shallow parts of subduction zones decreasing to approximately 2??-3?? resolution in well-sampled regions in the lower mantle. Vertical resolution can be worse (up to several hundreds of kilometers) in

  1. Seismic model of Mars. 2. Free oscillations and travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkova, Tamara; Lognonne, Philippe; Raevskiy, Sergey; Zharkov, Vladimir

    When constructing an interior structure model of a planet, it is common used method to describe the model by a restricted set of parameters: the thickness of the crust, the location of phase transitions, the core radius. The variation of these parameters originates from the uncertainties in temperature profile, composition, elastic and anelastic properties of relevant minerals. Water content should also be considered as a compositional variable in the mantle. Olivine and its high pressure phases, wadsleyite and ringwoodite are particularly important as they constitute about 60 wt% of the Martian mantle and have probably large capacity for water in the Martian mantle (Zharkov and Gudkova, 2014). At present Mars’ internal density distribution is constrained by the recent estimates of the moment of inertia and the Love number k _{2} (Konoplive et al., 2011). Below we use the data from Earth studies and laboratory data (Mao et al., 2010, 2011, 2012,extrapolated for P-T conditions in Mars, and show how the admixture of water in the main Martian minerals influences velocity drops at phase transition boundaries in Martian interiors and study the effects of hydration on the periods of free oscillations and travel times for P, PcP, S, ScS waves , which could serve as additional constraints, if upcoming seismic experiments are successful, as they can potentially constrain mantle composition and make more precise the location of transition zones. It is of importance to determine the depth of the phase transitions in the mantle, as it will fix the temperature profile in Mars. Our analysis is based on a trial seismic model M14_3 from (Zharkov et al., 2009). The crust is 50 km thick (with density of 2.9 g/cm (3) ), the molar ratio Fe/(Fe+Mg) in the mantle is 0.20, the Fe-Ni core contains 70 mol % H in addition to 14 wt % S with radius of 1800 km. The bulk Fe/Si ratio is close to chondritic 1.7. The upper mantle extends down to 1590 km depth. Olivine-wadsleite transition zone

  2. A new aerodynamic integral equation based on an acoustic formula in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    1984-01-01

    An aerodynamic integral equation for bodies moving at transonic and supersonic speeds is presented. Based on a time-dependent acoustic formula for calculating the noise emanating from the outer portion of a propeller blade travelling at high speed (the Ffowcs Williams-Hawking formulation), the loading terms and a conventional thickness source terms are retained. Two surface and three line integrals are employed to solve an equation for the loading noise. The near-field term is regularized using the collapsing sphere approach to obtain semiconvergence on the blade surface. A singular integral equation is thereby derived for the unknown surface pressure, and is amenable to numerical solutions using Galerkin or collocation methods. The technique is useful for studying the nonuniform inflow to the propeller.

  3. Traveling waves in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics and the ion-acoustic shock structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrom, George I.; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2014-02-15

    Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD) is a mixed hyperbolic-parabolic partial differential equation that describes the dynamics of an ideal two fluid plasma with massless electrons. We study the only shock wave family that exists in this system (the other discontinuities being contact discontinuities and not shocks). We study planar traveling wave solutions and we find solutions with discontinuities in the hydrodynamic variables, which arise due to the presence of real characteristics in Hall-MHD. We introduce a small viscosity into the equations and use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to show that solutions with a discontinuity satisfying the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and also an entropy condition have continuous shock structures. The lowest order inner equations reduce to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, plus an equation which implies the constancy of the magnetic field inside the shock structure. We are able to show that the current is discontinuous across the shock, even as the magnetic field is continuous, and that the lowest order outer equations, which are the equations for traveling waves in inviscid Hall-MHD, are exactly integrable. We show that the inner and outer solutions match, which allows us to construct a family of uniformly valid continuous composite solutions that become discontinuous when the diffusivity vanishes.

  4. Application of time reversal acoustics focusing for nonlinear imaging ms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2001-05-01

    Time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing of ultrasound appears to be an effective tool for nonlinear imaging in industrial and medical applications because of its ability to efficiently concentrate ultrasonic energy (close to diffraction limit) in heterogeneous media. In this study, we used two TRA systems to focus ultrasonic beams with different frequencies in coinciding focal points, thus causing the generation of ultrasonic waves with combination frequencies. Measurements of the intensity of these combination frequency waves provide information on the nonlinear parameter of medium in the focal region. Synchronized stirring of two TRA focused beams enables obtaining 3-D acoustic nonlinearity images of the object. Each of the TRA systems employed an aluminum resonator with piezotransducers glued to its facet. One of the free facets of each resonator was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array capable of ultrasound focusing and beam steering. To mimic a medium with spatially varying acoustical nonlinearity a simplest model such as a microbubble column in water was used. Microbubbles were generated by electrolysis of water using a needle electrode. An order of magnitude increase of the sum frequency component was observed when the ultrasound beams were focused in the area with bubbles.

  5. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  6. Impact of degrading permafrost on subsurface solute transport pathways and travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-09-01

    Subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in the subsurface water and inert solute pathways and travel times are analyzed for different modeled geological configurations. For all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase nonlinearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The timing of the start of increase in travel time depends on heterogeneity structure, combined with the rate of permafrost degradation that also depends on material thermal and hydrogeological properties. The travel time changes depend on combined warming effects of: i) increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, ii) reduced transport velocities due to a shift from horizontal saturated groundwater flow near the surface to vertical water percolation deeper into the subsurface, and iii) pathway length increase and temporary immobilization caused by cryosuction-induced seasonal freeze cycles.

  7. Factors Associated with Distance and Time Traveled to Cleft and Craniofacial Care

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, Cynthia H.; Krohmer, Anne; Mendez, Dara D.; Lee, Kyung A.; Strauss, Ronald P.; Meyer, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Information on travel distance and time to care for children with birth defects is lacking. We examined factors associated with travel distance and time to cleft care among children with orofacial clefts. METHODS In 2006, a mail/phone survey was administered in English and Spanish to all resident mothers of children with orofacial clefts born 2001 to 2004 and identified by the North Carolina birth defects registry. We analyzed one-way travel distance and time and the extent to which taking a child to care was a problem. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine the association between selected sociodemographic factors and travel distance (≤60 miles and >60 miles) and time (≤60 min and >60 min) to cleft care. RESULTS Of 475 eligible participants, 51.6% (n = 245) responded. Of the respondents, 97.1% (n = 238) were the child’s biological mother. Approximately 83% (n = 204) of respondents were non-Hispanic White; 33.3% (n = 81) were college educated; and 50.0% (n = 115) had private health insurance. One-way mean and median travel distances were 80 and 50 miles, respectively (range, 0–1058 miles). One-way mean and median travel times were 92 and 60 min, respectively (range, 5 min to 8 hr). After adjusting for selected sociodemographics, travel distance varied significantly by maternal education, child’s age, and cleft type. Travel time varied significantly by child’s age. Approximately 67% (n = 162) reported taking their child to receive care was not a problem. CONCLUSION Approximately 48% of respondents traveled > 1 hr to receive cleft care. Increasing access to care may be important for improving health outcomes among this population. PMID:24039055

  8. Dynamic Bus Travel Time Prediction Models on Road with Multiple Bus Routes

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Cong; Peng, Zhong-Ren; Lu, Qing-Chang; Sun, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and real-time travel time information for buses can help passengers better plan their trips and minimize waiting times. A dynamic travel time prediction model for buses addressing the cases on road with multiple bus routes is proposed in this paper, based on support vector machines (SVMs) and Kalman filtering-based algorithm. In the proposed model, the well-trained SVM model predicts the baseline bus travel times from the historical bus trip data; the Kalman filtering-based dynamic algorithm can adjust bus travel times with the latest bus operation information and the estimated baseline travel times. The performance of the proposed dynamic model is validated with the real-world data on road with multiple bus routes in Shenzhen, China. The results show that the proposed dynamic model is feasible and applicable for bus travel time prediction and has the best prediction performance among all the five models proposed in the study in terms of prediction accuracy on road with multiple bus routes. PMID:26294903

  9. Dynamic Bus Travel Time Prediction Models on Road with Multiple Bus Routes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cong; Peng, Zhong-Ren; Lu, Qing-Chang; Sun, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and real-time travel time information for buses can help passengers better plan their trips and minimize waiting times. A dynamic travel time prediction model for buses addressing the cases on road with multiple bus routes is proposed in this paper, based on support vector machines (SVMs) and Kalman filtering-based algorithm. In the proposed model, the well-trained SVM model predicts the baseline bus travel times from the historical bus trip data; the Kalman filtering-based dynamic algorithm can adjust bus travel times with the latest bus operation information and the estimated baseline travel times. The performance of the proposed dynamic model is validated with the real-world data on road with multiple bus routes in Shenzhen, China. The results show that the proposed dynamic model is feasible and applicable for bus travel time prediction and has the best prediction performance among all the five models proposed in the study in terms of prediction accuracy on road with multiple bus routes.

  10. Bifurcations of nonlinear ion acoustic travelling waves in the frame of a Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in magnetized plasma with a kappa distributed electron

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Samanta, Utpal; Saha, Asit; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2013-05-15

    Bifurcations of nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) in a magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold ions and kappa distributed electron are investigated using a two component plasma model. The standard reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for IAWs. By using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems to this ZK equation, the existence of solitary wave solutions and periodic travelling wave solutions is established. All exact explicit solutions of these travelling waves are determined. The results may have relevance in dense space plasmas.

  11. Time of travel of water in the Ohio River, Pittsburgh to Cincinnati

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steacy, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    This report presents a procedure for estimating the time of travel of water in the Ohio River from Pittsburgh, Pa., to Cincinnati, Ohio, under various river stage conditions. This information is primarily for use by civil defense officials and by others concerned with problems involving travel time of river water. Tables and charts are presented to show, for a particular stage or discharge at Cincinnati, the average time it would take for water to travel through the entire reach from Pittsburgh, or through successive intermediate segments of the reach. For example, when the discharge at Cincinnati is 200,000 cfs, travel time from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati, a distance of 470 miles, averages about 7 days; and for discharges of more than 200,000 cfs, the travel time decreases very slowly with increasing discharge. When the discharge is 30,000 cfs, travel time is about 28 days; and for discharges of less than 30,000 cfs, the travel time increases very rapidly with decreasing discharge. Estimates of travel time at low discharge are subject to large errors. Statistical analysis of the possible variations of upstream discharge for a given discharge at Cincinnati indicates that the shortest probable travel time from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati ranges from 56 percent of that under average conditions when the discharge at Cincinnati is 15,000 cfs to 93 percent of that under average conditions when the discharge at Cincinnati is 894,000 cfs. A chart showing the time distribution of flow at Cincinnati is presented so that the probable travel time of Ohio River water can be determined for any time of the year. This chart provides information which, when applied to the time-of-travel chart, shows that the most probable travel time of water from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati ranges from 160 hours in February to 1,250 hours in September. Also presented is a flow-duration curve that can be used to predict future discharges and, subsequently, times of travel, for use in long-range planning

  12. IYL Blog: Astronomers travel in time and space with light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2015-01-01

    As an astronomer, I use light to travel through the universe, and to look back in time to when the universe was young. So do you! All of us see things as they were when the light was emitted, not as they are now. The farthest thing you can easily see without a telescope is the Andromeda Nebula, which is a galaxy like the Milky Way, about 2.5 million light years away. You see it as it was 2.5 million years ago, and we really don't know what it looks like today; the disk will have rotated a bit, new stars will have been born, there could have been all kinds of exploding stars, and the black hole in the middle could be lighting up. People may be skeptical of the Big Bang theory, even though we have a TV show named for it, but we (I should say Penzias and Wilson) measured its heat radiation 51 years ago at Bell Telephone Labs in New Jersey. Their discovery marks the beginning of the era of cosmology as a measurement science rather than speculation. Penzias and Wilson received the Nobel Prize in 1978 for their finding, which had been predicted in 1948 by Alpher and Herman. By the way, heat radiation is just another form of light - we call it radiation because we can't see it, but it's exactly the same phenomenon of electromagnetic waves, and the only difference is the wavelength. In the old days of analog television, if you tuned your TV in between channels, about 1% of the snow that you could see came from the Big Bang. So when we look at the heat radiation of the early universe, we really are gazing right at what seems to us a cosmic fireball, which surrounds us completely. It's a bit of an illusion; if you can imagine what astronomers in other galaxies would see, they would also feel surrounded by the fireball, and they would also think they were in the middle. So from a mathematical version of imagination, we conclude that there is no observable center and no edge of our universe, and that the heat of the fireball fills the entire universe uniformly. Astronomers are

  13. APPLICATION OF TRAVEL TIME RELIABILITY FOR PERFORMANCE ORIENTED OPERATIONAL PLANNING OF EXPRESSWAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehran, Babak; Nakamura, Hideki

    Evaluation of impacts of congestion improvement scheme s on travel time reliability is very significant for road authorities since travel time reliability repr esents operational performance of expressway segments. In this paper, a methodology is presented to estimate travel tim e reliability prior to implementation of congestion relief schemes based on travel time variation modeling as a function of demand, capacity, weather conditions and road accident s. For subject expressway segmen ts, traffic conditions are modeled over a whole year considering demand and capacity as random variables. Patterns of demand and capacity are generated for each five minute interval by appl ying Monte-Carlo simulation technique, and accidents are randomly generated based on a model that links acci dent rate to traffic conditions. A whole year analysis is performed by comparing de mand and available capacity for each scenario and queue length is estimated through shockwave analysis for each time in terval. Travel times are estimated from refined speed-flow relationships developed for intercity expressways and buffer time index is estimated consequently as a measure of travel time reliability. For validation, estimated reliability indices are compared with measured values from empirical data, and it is shown that the proposed method is suitable for operational evaluation and planning purposes.

  14. Time-of-travel data for Nebraska streams, 1968 to 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petri, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    This report documents the results of 10 time-of-travel studies, using ' dye-tracer ' methods, conducted on five streams in Nebraska during the period 1968 to 1977. Streams involved in the studies were the North Platte, North Loup, Elkhorn, and Big Blue Rivers and Salt Creek. Rhodamine WT dye in a 20 percent solution was used as the tracer for all 10 time-of-travel studies. Water samples were collected at several points below each injection site. Concentrations of dye in the samples were measured by determining fluorescence of the sample and comparing that value to fluorescence-concentration curves. Stream discharges were measured before and during each study. Results of each time-by-travel study are shown on two tables and on graph. The first table shows water discharge at injection and sampling sites, distance between sites, and time and rate of travel of the dye between sites. The second table provides descriptions of study sites, amounts of dye injected in the streams, actual sampling times, and actual concentrations of dye detected. The graphs for each time-of-travel study provide indications of changing travel rates between sampling sites, information on length of dye clouds, and times for dye passage past given points. (USGS)

  15. A simple method to assess unsaturated zone time lag in the travel time from ground surface to receptor.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marcelo R; Jones, Jon P; Frind, Emil O; Rudolph, David L

    2013-01-01

    In contaminant travel from ground surface to groundwater receptors, the time taken in travelling through the unsaturated zone is known as the unsaturated zone time lag. Depending on the situation, this time lag may or may not be significant within the context of the overall problem. A method is presented for assessing the importance of the unsaturated zone in the travel time from source to receptor in terms of estimates of both the absolute and the relative advective times. A choice of different techniques for both unsaturated and saturated travel time estimation is provided. This method may be useful for practitioners to decide whether to incorporate unsaturated processes in conceptual and numerical models and can also be used to roughly estimate the total travel time between points near ground surface and a groundwater receptor. This method was applied to a field site located in a glacial aquifer system in Ontario, Canada. Advective travel times were estimated using techniques with different levels of sophistication. The application of the proposed method indicates that the time lag in the unsaturated zone is significant at this field site and should be taken into account. For this case, sophisticated and simplified techniques lead to similar assessments when the same knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity field is assumed. When there is significant uncertainty regarding the hydraulic conductivity, simplified calculations did not lead to a conclusive decision. PMID:23274409

  16. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment.

  17. Acoustic thermometric reconstruction of a time-varying temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Sharakshane, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The time-varying temperature profiles were reconstructed in an experiment using a thermal acoustic radiation receiving array containing 14 sensors. The temperature was recovered by performing similar experiments using plasticine, as well as in vivo with a human hand. Plasticine preliminarily heated up to 36.5°C and a human hand were placed into water for 50 s at a temperature of 20°C. The core temperature of the plasticine was independently measured using thermocouples. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction in the lateral direction was determined by the distance between neighboring sensors and was equal to10 mm; the averaging time was 10 s. The error in reconstructing the core temperature determined in the experiment with plasticine was 0.5 K. The core temperature of the hand changed with time (in 50 s it decreased from 35 to 34°C) and space (the mean square deviation was 1.5 K). The experiment with the hand revealed that multichannel detection of thermal acoustic radiation using a compact 45 × 36 mm array to reconstruct the temperature profile could be performed during medical procedures.

  18. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  19. Nonlinear acoustic time reversal imaging using the scaling subtraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Bruno, C. L. E.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    2008-11-01

    Lab experiments have shown that the imaging of nonlinear scatterers using time reversal acoustics can be a very promising tool for early stage damage detection. The potential applications are however limited by the need for an extremely accurate acquisition system. In order to let nonlinear features emerge from the background noise it is necessary to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio as much as possible. A comprehensive analysis to determine the nonlinear components in a recorded time signal, an alternative to those usually adopted (e.g. fast Fourier), is proposed here. The method is based on the nonlinear physical properties of the solution of the wave equation and takes advantage of the deficient system response scalability with the excitation amplitude. In this contribution, we outline the adopted procedure and apply it to a nonlinear time reversal imaging simulation to highlight the advantages with respect to traditional imaging based on a fast Fourier analysis of the recorded signals.

  20. Generation and Propagation of a Picosecond Acoustic Pulse at a Buried Interface: Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Cavalieri, A.L.; Fritz, D.M.; Swan, M.C.; Reis, D.A.; Hegde, R.S.; Reason, M.; Goldman, R.S.

    2005-12-09

    We report on the propagation of coherent acoustic wave packets in (001) surface oriented Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs heterostructure, generated through localized femtosecond photoexcitation of the GaAs. Transient structural changes in both the substrate and film are measured with picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The data indicate an elastic response consisting of unipolar compression pulses of a few hundred picosecond duration traveling along [001] and [001] directions that are produced by predominately impulsive stress. The transmission and reflection of the strain pulses are in agreement with an acoustic mismatch model of the heterostructure and free-space interfaces.

  1. Time-travelling and mind-travelling: examining individual differences in self-projection.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Jayne; Buda, Marie; Darby, Gabrielle; Simons, Jon S

    2011-09-01

    It has recently been suggested that memory and theory of mind may share the characteristic of mentally projecting oneself into another time or place to imagine alternative perspectives. This study examines this possible relationship by investigating individual differences in performance on a reality monitoring task and two mentalising tasks: the faux pas task and the reading the mind in the eyes test. Consistent with recent functional neuroimaging studies that have observed activity during reality monitoring tasks in the same region of prefrontal cortex that was activated in previous mentalising studies, a significant positive correlation in performance was observed between memory for agency and faux-pas recognition. No correlation between memory and performance on the reading the mind in the eyes test was observed. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to the suggestion that memory and theory of mind rely on a common set of processes.

  2. Application of Time Reversed Acoustics for Seismic Source Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.; Toksöz, M.

    2005-05-01

    Traditionally an earthquake is located and the source mechanism is determined by using P and S phases. This uses only a limited portion of the information contained in a seismogram. A large part of the information carried by the waveform is not used. In this study we investigate the applicability of the Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) technique, and thus the whole waveform of the recorded signal, for earthquake locations and source characterization. The basic concept involved in TRA is the fundamental symmetry of time reversal invariance. Injecting the recorded signal, with time running backwards, can focus the wave field to the source. TRA has emerged as an important technique in acoustics with applications to medicine, underwater sound, and many other disciplines. Numerical simulations show that the TRA technique can successfully locate a seismic source inside a layered earth model and can also recover the source time function. Finite difference modeling results show that TRA can determine the fault dip, rupture direction, and rupture length. The method is especially advantageous when data are available only from a sparse station network. Full seismograms contain source information from both waves radiated along the source-station ray path and from waves that radiated in all other directions but scattered toward the receivers. Application of the TRA technique to seismic source characterization requires the Green's function, which can be obtained in two ways. If the earth structure is known then the Green's function can be calculated numerically. To improve the efficiency, the method of constructing a medium response library is developed. This improves computation time significantly. The second approach uses small events (e.g., aftershocks) as an empirical Green's function. The performance of the TRA technique is demonstrated with data from real earthquakes.

  3. Pickup and Delivery Problem with Stochastic Travel Times for Semiconductor Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Mei

    2011-11-01

    As the supply chain has been constructed comprehensively, the pickup and delivery activities between supply-chain members are very complicated. In semiconductor factories, highly capacity utilization and efficiently production scheduling are essential due to the intensive capital investment. Because of travel time uncertainty, requests may fail to arrive within time window and may result in capacity idle and even deferral delivery when ignoring randomness of travel times. Therefore, taking the travel time uncertainty and time windows into account is of great importance when planning vehicle routes and schedules. Furthermore, in the fleet, some vehicles are with special facilities dedicated to carry 8" wafers, some are dedicated for 12" wafers, while other vehicles are open for carrying all products. When assigning requests to vehicles, the product/vehicle compatibility must be taken into account. In this study, we consider the pickup and delivery problem for semiconductor supply chains (PDPSSC), which involves constraints on stochastic travel times, time windows, product/vehicle compatibility, pickup and delivery, and vehicle capacity constraints. We describe the PDPSSC and formulate a chance constrained programming model to minimize total travel distances under two kinds of chance constraints, time windows and driver duration, hold with prescribed probabilities. By the implementation of the proposed model, the vehicle routing problem in semiconductor supply chain can be more integrated and applicable for the real-world applications.

  4. Quantifying groundwater travel time near managed recharge operations using 35S as an intrinsic tracer

    DOE PAGES

    Urióstegui, Stephanie H.; Bibby, Richard K.; Esser, Bradley K.; Clark, Jordan F.

    2016-04-23

    By identifying groundwater retention times near managed aquifer recharge (MAR) facilities is a high priority for managing water quality, especially for operations that incorporate recycled wastewater. In order to protect public health, California guidelines for Groundwater Replenishment Reuse Projects require a minimum 2–6 month subsurface retention time for recycled water depending on the level of disinfection, which highlights the importance of quantifying groundwater travel times on short time scales. This study developed and evaluated a new intrinsic tracer method using the naturally occurring radioisotope sulfur-35 (35S). The 87.5 day half-life of 35S is ideal for investigating groundwater travel times onmore » the <1 year timescale of interest to MAR managers. Natural concentrations of 35S found in water as dissolved sulfate (35SO4) were measured in source waters and groundwater at the Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds in Los Angeles County, CA, and Orange County Groundwater Recharge Facilities in Orange County, CA. 35SO4 travel times are comparable to travel times determined by well-established deliberate tracer studies. The study also revealed that 35SO4 in MAR source water can vary seasonally and therefore careful characterization of 35SO4 is needed to accurately quantify groundwater travel time. But, more data is needed to fully assess whether or not this tracer could become a valuable tool for managers.« less

  5. Viruses as groundwater tracers: using ecohydrology to characterize short travel times in aquifers.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Randall J; Borchardt, Mark A; Bradbury, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are attractive tracers of short (<3 year) travel times in aquifers because they have unique genetic signatures, are detectable in trace quantities, and are mobile in groundwater. Virus "snaphots" result from infection and disappearance in a population over time; therefore, the virus snapshot shed in the fecal wastes of an infected population at a specific point in time can serve as a marker for tracking virus and groundwater movement. The virus tracing approach and an example application are described to illustrate their ability to characterize travel times in high-groundwater velocity settings, and provide insight unavailable from standard hydrogeologic approaches. Although characterization of preferential flowpaths does not usually characterize the majority of other travel times occurring in the groundwater system (e.g., center of plume mass; tail of the breakthrough curve), virus approaches can trace very short times of transport, and thus can fill an important gap in our current hydrogeology toolbox.

  6. Viruses as groundwater tracers: using ecohydrology to characterize short travel times in aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Bradbury, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are attractive tracers of short (<3 year) travel times in aquifers because they have unique genetic signatures, are detectable in trace quantities, and are mobile in groundwater. Virus “snaphots” result from infection and disappearance in a population over time; therefore, the virus snapshot shed in the fecal wastes of an infected population at a specific point in time can serve as a marker for tracking virus and groundwater movement. The virus tracing approach and an example application are described to illustrate their ability to characterize travel times in high-groundwater velocity settings, and provide insight unavailable from standard hydrogeologic approaches. Although characterization of preferential flowpaths does not usually characterize the majority of other travel times occurring in the groundwater system (e.g., center of plume mass; tail of the breakthrough curve), virus approaches can trace very short times of transport, and thus can fill an important gap in our current hydrogeology toolbox.

  7. Advantages of time reversal acoustic focusing system in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2005-09-01

    The development and biomedical applications of time reversal acoustics (TRA) systems for focusing and manipulating ultrasound beams are reviewed. The TRA focusing system (TRA FS) is capable to deliver ultrasound energy to the chosen region in highly inhomogeneous medium (including soft tissues and bones) with focusing efficacy hardly achievable using conventional phased array transmitters. TRA FS is able to focus and stir ultrasound beams in a 3-D volume using just a few piezoceramic transducers glued to the facets an aluminum block. Another advantage of TRA FS is its ability to produce pulses with arbitrary waveforms in a wide frequency band. A custom-designed compact multichannel TRA system operating in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz has been developed. Measurements of TRA field structure were conducted in a large variety of inhomogeneous tissue phantoms and ex vivo bones and soft tissues. Principles of TRA focusing optimization based on acoustical properties of the resonator material, parameters of the sonicated medium, and the coupling of the TRA resonator with the medium were developed and applied in the tested TRA systems. [Work was supported by NIH.

  8. Timing substorm onsets via travel-time magnetoseismology: A case for the outside-in model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Ohtani, Shin

    The time history of events during substorms is an important, outstanding problem in magnetospheric physics. The sequence has been described either by the "outside-in" model, in which the fast plasma flow ejected by reconnection in the mid-tail moves Earthward, or by the "inside-out" model, in which the onset starts with the cross-tail current sheet collapse at 8 to 12 RE in the tail that later initiates reconnection further downtail. In this study we examined the Pi 2 pulsations observed by ground magnetometers and the observations of auroral brightening to lay out the time history of events during a substorm on July 22, 1998. The arrival time of Pi 2, which refers to the first peak in Pi 2 amplitude, observed by IGPP-LANL and CARISMA magnetometers presents a strong function of latitude. Using the Tamao travel time as the forward model, the inversion from the observed Pi 2 arrival time infers that the onset in the magnetotail started at X = -22 RE at 0653:40 UT, or approximately one minute earlier than the Pi 2 onset time identified in ground data. The CARISMA photometer data at Fort Smith and Gillam show that the auroral brightening started at approximately 0656 UT, or more than two minutes after the estimated onset time in the magnetotail. The comparison between the impulse start time in the tail and the onset time of auroral brightening presents a clear case where the time history of events follows the outside-in model. The model identification is made more confidently by using the magnetoseismic method that can time substorm onsets in the magnetotail.

  9. St. Augustine's Reflections on Memory and Time and the Current Concept of Subjective Time in Mental Time Travel.

    PubMed

    Manning, Liliann; Cassel, Daniel; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Reconstructing the past and anticipating the future, i.e., the ability of travelling in mental time, is thought to be at the heart of consciousness and, by the same token, at the center of human cognition. This extraordinary mental activity is possible thanks to the ability of being aware of 'subjective time'. In the present study, we attempt to trace back the first recorded reflections on the relations between time and memory, to the end of the fourth century's work, the Confessions, by the theologian and philosopher, St. Augustine. We concentrate on Book 11, where he extensively developed a series of articulated and detailed observations on memory and time. On the bases of selected paragraphs, we endeavor to highlight some concepts that may be considered as the product of the first or, at least, very early reflections related to our current notions of subjective time in mental time travel. We also draw a fundamental difference inherent to the frameworks within which the questions were raised. The contribution of St. Augustine on time and memory remains significant, notwithstanding the 16 centuries elapsed since it was made, likely because of the universality of its contents.

  10. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1991-1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Maule, Alec G.; Beeman, John W.; Schrock, Robin M.

    1994-05-01

    Regression techniques were used to determine the effects of several biotic and abiotic variables on the migration rates of juvenile spring chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Comparisons of the effects of river flow and smoltification, assessed using gill Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase activity, were of primary interest. Day of the year, water temperature, change in flow, condition factor, and fork length were also considered as independent variables. Groups of fish were sampled to assess smoltification 2-3 times per week during the spring outmigrations during 1989-1992. These groups were assumed to be representative of other fish which were PIT-tagged and released as a part of the Smolt Monitoring Program in the Columbia Basin. River flow, gill ATPase activity, condition factor, water temperature, and change in flow were significant variables in regressions predicting the time for juvenile spring chinook salmon to travel between specific points (travel time), whereas river flow was the only significant contributor to models describing travel times of steelhead. Predicted travel times of wild steelhead were shorter than those of hatchery steelhead. River flow was the only variable common to all regression equations. Based on the characteristic, changes in river flow would be the most logical means to decrease travel times of both juvenile spring chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

  11. The time-variant nature of catchment travel time pdf's: implications for the intepretation of hydro-chemical signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettin, P.; Botter, G.; Bertuzzo, E.; Rinaldo, A.

    2012-12-01

    Catchments are highly dynamical systems forced by stochastic precipitation, and characterized by time-variable transpiration rates and discharges. Despite this, streamflow hydrochemical signals have been frequently interpreted through stationary convolutions between rainfall concentrations and time-invariant transfer functions, on the basis of which the properties of the travel time pdf were inferred. In this contribution we define the intrinsic dynamical nature of travel and residence time distributions, which explains the variability of the mechanisms through which catchments retain and release old and event water, transporting solutes and pollutants to receiving water bodies. General expressions for travel and residence time pdf's are derived as a function of the underlying rainfall-soil-vegetation dynamics and the mixing processes occurring along streamflow production and plant uptake. The work highlights the dependence of water/solute travel times on key eco-hydrological processes (especially transpiration and uptake), and investigates the impact of the time variance in terms of the identification of travel time pdfs and catchment functioning. This is done by means of numerical experiments, and through real-world applications based on the analysis of stream concentrations of chlorides/pesticides in agricultural catchments.

  12. St. Augustine’s Reflections on Memory and Time and the Current Concept of Subjective Time in Mental Time Travel

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Liliann; Cassel, Daniel; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the past and anticipating the future, i.e., the ability of travelling in mental time, is thought to be at the heart of consciousness and, by the same token, at the center of human cognition. This extraordinary mental activity is possible thanks to the ability of being aware of ‘subjective time’. In the present study, we attempt to trace back the first recorded reflections on the relations between time and memory, to the end of the fourth century’s work, the Confessions, by the theologian and philosopher, St. Augustine. We concentrate on Book 11, where he extensively developed a series of articulated and detailed observations on memory and time. On the bases of selected paragraphs, we endeavor to highlight some concepts that may be considered as the product of the first or, at least, very early reflections related to our current notions of subjective time in mental time travel. We also draw a fundamental difference inherent to the frameworks within which the questions were raised. The contribution of St. Augustine on time and memory remains significant, notwithstanding the 16 centuries elapsed since it was made, likely because of the universality of its contents. PMID:25379236

  13. Dye Tracer Tests to Determine Time-of-Travel in Iowa Streams, 1990-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    Dye-tracing tests have been used by the U.S. Geological Survey, Iowa Water Science Center to determine the time-of-travel in selected Iowa streams from 1990-2006. Time-of-travel data are tabulated for 309 miles of stream reaches in four Iowa drainage basins: the Des Moines, Raccoon, Cedar, and Turkey Rivers. Time-of-travel was estimated in the Des Moines River, Fourmile Creek, North Raccoon River, Raccoon River, Cedar River, and Roberts Creek. Estimation of time-of-travel is important for environmental studies and in determining fate of agricultural constituents and chemical movement through a waterway. The stream reaches range in length from slightly more than 5 miles on Fourmile Creek, to more than 137 miles on the North Raccoon River. The travel times during the dye-tracer tests ranged from 7.5 hours on Fourmile Creek to as long as 200 hours on Roberts Creek; velocities ranged from less than 4.50 feet per minute on Roberts Creek to more than 113 feet per minute on the Cedar River.

  14. Taming the Exceptional Points of Parity-Time Symmetric Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Marc; Shi, Chengzhi; Chen, Yun; Cheng, Lei; Ramezani, Hamidreza; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric concept and development lead to a wide range of applications including coherent perfect absorbers, single mode lasers, unidirectional cloaking and sensing, and optical isolators. These new applications and devices emerge from the existence of a phase transition in PT symmetric complex-valued potential obtained by balancing gain and loss materials. However, the systematic extension of such devices is adjourned by the key challenge in the management of the complex scattering process within the structure in order to engineer PT phase and exceptional points. Here, based on active acoustic elements, we experimentally demonstrate the simultaneous control of complex-valued potentials and multiple interference inside the structure at any given frequency. This method broadens the scope of applications for PT symmetric devices in many fields including optics, microwaves, electronics, which are crucial for sensing, imaging, cloaking, lasing, absorbing, etc.

  15. Effective Time Management: Surgery, Research, Service, Travel, Fitness, and Family

    PubMed Central

    Porta, C. Rees; Anderson, Michael R.; Steele, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1,500 years ago, the St. Benedictine Monks used planning and strict schedules to increase their productivity. Since then, surgeons have developed several different strategies to manage our time effectively. Finding a balance among career, family, and hobbies is essential for maintaining satisfaction and optimizing productivity. Several recurring themes throughout the medical literature offer potential solutions to help maximize the little time surgeons possess. In this article, we will explore some of the methods and strategies available to help surgeons minimize waste and make the most of the most precious commodity we have—our time. PMID:24436684

  16. Tomography and Methods of Travel-Time Calculation for Regional Seismic Location

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S; Ballard, S; Rowe, C; Wagoner, G; Antolik, M; Phillips, S; Ramirez, A; Begnaud, M; Pasyanos, M E; Dodge, D A; Flanagan, M P; Hutchenson, K; Barker, G; Dwyer, J; Russell, D

    2007-07-02

    We are developing a laterally variable velocity model of the crust and upper mantle across Eurasia and North Africa to reduce event location error by improving regional travel-time prediction accuracy. The model includes both P and S velocities and we describe methods to compute travel-times for Pn, Sn, Pg, and Lg phases. For crustal phases Pg and Lg we assume that the waves travel laterally at mid-crustal depths, with added ray segments from the event and station to the mid crustal layer. Our work on Pn and Sn travel-times extends the methods described by Zhao and Xie (1993). With consideration for a continent scale model and application to seismic location, we extend the model parameterization of Zhao and Xie (1993) by allowing the upper-mantle velocity gradient to vary laterally. This extension is needed to accommodate the large variation in gradient that is known to exist across Eurasia and North African. Further, we extend the linear travel-time calculation method to mantle-depth events, which is needed for seismic locators that test many epicenters and depths. Using these methods, regional travel times are computed on-the-fly from the velocity model in milliseconds, forming the basis of a flexible travel time facility that may be implemented in an interactive locator. We use a tomographic technique to improve upon a laterally variable starting velocity model that is based on Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratory model compilation efforts. Our tomographic data set consists of approximately 50 million regional arrivals from events that meet the ground truth (GT) criteria of Bondar et al. (2004) and other non-seismic constraints. Each datum is tested to meet strict quality control standards that include comparison with established distance-dependent travel-time residual populations relative to the IASPIE91 model. In addition to bulletin measurements, nearly 50 thousand arrival measurements were made at the national laboratories. The tomographic

  17. Measurement of time of travel and dispersion in streams by dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, E.F.; Kilpatrick, F.A.; Martens, L.A.; Wilson, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The use of fluorescent dyes and tracing techniques provides a means for measuring the time-of-travel and dispersion characteristics of steady and gradually varied flow in streams. Measurements of the dispersion and concentration of dyes give insight into the behavior of soluble contaminants that may be introduced into a stream. This manual describes methods of measuring time of travel of water and waterborne solutes by dye tracing. The fluorescent dyes, measuring equipment used, and the field and laboratory procedures are also described. Methods of analysis and presentation to illustrate time-oftravel and dispersion characteristics of streams are provided.

  18. Relocation of earthquakes recorded by SIL network (Iceland) using empirical travel-time tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril Lopez, C.; Gudmundsson, O.

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional empirical travel time tables (ETT) are estimated for each station of the South Iceland Lowlands network (SIL) by interpolating travel-time observations mapped to the hypocenter of each event. ETT are used to relocate SIL database earthquakes using P- and S- arrival times. Results are compared with the initial locations from the SIL database and locations from local sub-networks in Iceland. The SIL database locations are estimated using 5 different 1-D velocity models for different regions. The arrival times were re-referenced to one single model (the SIL model). Minor discrepancies in archived travel-time reduction were identified and removed together with outliers. Travel times are decomposed into 1) the prediction of a 1-D reference velocity model; 2) deterministic variation of residuals from that 1-D model constructed by smoothing over a regional scale; and 3) a smaller-scale, stochastic component. The stochastic component is separated into a spatially incoherent part (noise) and a spatially coherent part assumed to correspond to remaining structural signal. The stochastic structural component is interpolated and summed to the other two travel time components in order to construct the ETTs. Relocation is computed with a non-linear grid-search algorithm. The resulting ETTs are useful for improving earthquake location where 1-D velocity models are frequently used and a fast secondary relocation process is required. Moreover, ETTs are "cleaned" travel times that can be used as input into 3D tomography, where the error estimation (incoherent component of residuals) serves as a useful guideline for data weighting.

  19. Interpretation of Helioseismic Travel Times. Sensitivity to Sound Speed, Pressure, Density, and Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent; Birch, Aaron C.

    2015-12-01

    Time-distance helioseismology uses cross-covariances of wave motions on the solar surface to determine the travel times of wave packets moving from one surface location to another. We review the methodology to interpret travel-time measurements in terms of small, localised perturbations to a horizontally homogeneous reference solar model. Using the first Born approximation, we derive and compute 3D travel-time sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels for perturbations in sound-speed, density, pressure, and vector flows. While kernels for sound speed and flows had been computed previously, here we extend the calculation to kernels for density and pressure, hence providing a complete description of the effects of solar dynamics and structure on travel times. We treat three thermodynamic quantities as independent and do not assume hydrostatic equilibrium. We present a convenient approach to computing damped Green's functions using a normal-mode summation. The Green's function must be computed on a wavenumber grid that has sufficient resolution to resolve the longest lived modes. The typical kernel calculations used in this paper are computer intensive and require on the order of 600 CPU hours per kernel. Kernels are validated by computing the travel-time perturbation that results from horizontally-invariant perturbations using two independent approaches. At fixed sound-speed, the density and pressure kernels are approximately related through a negative multiplicative factor, therefore implying that perturbations in density and pressure are difficult to disentangle. Mean travel-times are not only sensitive to sound-speed, density and pressure perturbations, but also to flows, especially vertical flows. Accurate sensitivity kernels are needed to interpret complex flow patterns such as convection.

  20. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis Project, 1987-1997 Project Review.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrock, Robin M.; Hans, Karen M.; Beeman, John W.

    1997-12-01

    The assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis Project (Bonneville Power Administration Project 87-401) monitored attributes of salmonid smolt physiology in the Columbia and Snake River basins from 1987 to 1997, under the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, in cooperation with the Smolt Monitoring Program of the Fish Passage Center. The primary goal of the project was to investigate the physiological development of juvenile salmonids related to migration rates. The assumption was made that the level of smolt development, interacting with environmental factos such as flow, would be reflected in travel times. The Fish Passage Center applied the physiological measurements of smolt condition to Water Budget management, to regulate flows so as to decrease travel time and increase survival.

  1. Dynamic acoustics for the STAR-100. [computer algorithms for time dependent sound waves in jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    An algorithm is described to compute time dependent acoustic waves in a jet. The method differs from previous methods in that no harmonic time dependence is assumed, thus permitting the study of nonharmonic acoustical behavior. Large grids are required to resolve the acoustic waves. Since the problem is nonstiff, explicit high order schemes can be used. These have been adapted to the STAR-100 with great efficiencies and permitted the efficient solution of problems which would not be feasible on a scalar machine.

  2. Travel with a Time Lord: Using Media to Enhance Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrett, Jacqueline; Benjamin, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a UKLA-funded project in which a group of 10 teachers in South Wales were involved. The televised science fiction drama "Doctor Who" was chosen as the theme as it was based on popular culture as well as being of local and national interest. The main character in this television drama is an alien who can fly through time and…

  3. Particle creation for time travel through a wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Won

    1992-09-01

    A time machine can be constructed by the relative motion of one mouth of a wormhole. The model has some remaining problems to be solved. Among the problems, the stability problem arises from the forming of the Cauchy horizon, where rays of early times will accumulate and diverge. This stability problem can be solved at the classical level. For quantum stability, Kim and Thorne recently tried to calculate the vacuum fluctuation of quantized fields by the point-splitting method. It was shown that the vacuum fluctuations produce a renormalized stress-energy tensor that diverges as one approaches the Cauchy horizon, which might be cut off by quantum gravity. However, there is a controversy. Hawking conjectures an observer-independent location for the breakdown in the semiclassical theory. In this paper, we deal with this quantum stability problem using another method: ``particle production by an arbitrary gravitational field.'' When the wormhole forms in the infinite past, the result is finite, while it is divergent near the Cauchy horizon when the wormhole forms at a finite time. If we adopt the Kim-Thorne conjecture, then the divergence might be cut off by quantum gravity; therefore, the total energy cannot prevent the formation of the closed timelike curves when one is within a Planck length.

  4. Viruses as groundwater tracers: using ecohydrology to characterize short travel times in aquifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viruses are attractive tracers of short (<3 yr) travel times in aquifers because they have unique genetic signatures, are detectable in trace quantities, and are mobile and stable in groundwater. Virus “snaphots” result from infection and disappearance over time as a community develops resistance. T...

  5. Time of travel of water in the Potomac River, Cumberland to Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James K.; Davis, Luther C.

    1961-01-01

    This report introduces a graphical procedure for estimating the time required for water to travel down the Potomac River in the reach extending from Cumberland, Md., to Washington, D.C. The time of travel varies with the flow of the river; so the stage of the river at the lower end of the reach--the gaging station on the Potomac River near Washington, D.C.--is used as an index of flow. To develop the procedure, the reach between Cumberland and Washington was divided into five subreaches, delineated by six gaging stations. The average of the mean velocities of the river at adjacent gaging stations was used as the mean velocity in .the intervening subreach, and a unit mass of water was assumed to travel at a rate equal to the mean velocity of the river. A statistical analysis of possible variations in travel time between Cumberland and Washington indicated that the shortest travel time corresponding to a given stage near Washington would be about 80 percent of the most probable travel time. The report includes a flow-duration curve and a flow-frequency chart for use in estimating discharge at the gaging station near Washington and subsequently the travel time of Potomac River water without knowledge of stage. The flow-duration curve shows the percentage of time during which specified discharges were equaled or exceeded in the past, and it can be used to predict future flow in connection with long-range planning. The flow-frequency chart shows the time distribution of flow by months and can be used to make a more nearly accurate estimate of discharge in any given month than could be made from the flow-duration curve. The method used to develop the time-of-travel charts is described in sufficient detail to make it usable as a guide for similar studies on other rivers, where the velocity of flow is relatively unaffected by dams and pools in the reach being studied.

  6. Computational methods for inverse problems in geophysics: inversion of travel time observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereyra, V.; Keller, H.B.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1980-01-01

    General ways of solving various inverse problems are studied for given travel time observations between sources and receivers. These problems are separated into three components: (a) the representation of the unknown quantities appearing in the model; (b) the nonlinear least-squares problem; (c) the direct, two-point ray-tracing problem used to compute travel time once the model parameters are given. Novel software is described for (b) and (c), and some ideas given on (a). Numerical results obtained with artificial data and an implementation of the algorithm are also presented. ?? 1980.

  7. Black Holes Traveling Exhibition: This Time, It's Personal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussault, Mary E.; Braswell, E. L.; Sunbury, S.; Wasser, M.; Gould, R. R.

    2012-01-01

    How can you make a topic as abstract as black holes seem relevant to the life of the average museum visitor? In 2009, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics developed a 2500 square foot interactive museum exhibition, "Black Holes: Space Warps & Time Twists,” with funding from the National Science Foundation and NASA. The exhibition has been visited by more than a quarter million museum-goers, and is about to open in its sixth venue at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego, California. We have found that encouraging visitors to adopt a custom black hole explorer's identity can help to make the science of black holes more accessible and meaningful. The Black Holes exhibition uses networked exhibit technology that serves to personalize the visitor experience, to support learning over time including beyond the gallery, and to provide a rich quantitative source of embedded evaluation data. Visitors entering the exhibition create their own bar-coded "Black Holes Explorer's Card” which they use throughout the exhibition to collect and record images, movies, their own predictions and conclusions, and other black hole artifacts. This digital database of personal discoveries grows as visitors navigate through the gallery, and an automated web-content authoring system creates a personalized online journal of their experience that they can access once they get home. We report here on new intriguing results gathered from data generated by 112,000 visitors across five different venues. For example, an initial review of the data reveals correlations between visitors’ black hole explorer identity choices and their engagement with the exhibition. We will also discuss correlations between learning gains and personalization.

  8. Development and testing of a new storm runoff routing approach based on time variant spatially distributed travel time method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinkang; Xie, Hua; Hu, Yujun; Xu, Youpeng; Xu, Chong-Yu

    2009-05-01

    SummaryIn this study, a GIS based simple and easily performed runoff routing approach based on travel time was developed to simulate storm runoff response process with consideration of spatial and temporal variability of runoff generation and flow routing through hillslope and river network. The watershed was discretized into grid cells, which were then classified into overland cells and channel cells through river network delineation from the DEM by use of GIS. The overland flow travel time of each overland cell was estimated by combining a steady state kinematic wave approximation with Manning's equation, the channel flow travel time of each channel cell was estimated using Manning's equation and the steady state continuity equation. The travel time from each grid cell to the watershed outlet is the sum of travel times of cells along the flow path. The direct runoff flow was determined by the sum of the volumetric flow rates from all contributing cells at each respective travel time for all time intervals. The approach was calibrated and verified to simulate eight storm runoff processes of Jiaokou Reservoir watershed, a sub-catchment of the Yongjiang River basin in southeast China using available topography, soil and land use data for the catchment. An average efficiency of 0.88 was obtained for the verification storms. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of the area threshold of delineating river networks and parameter K relating channel velocity calculation on the predicted hydrograph at the basin outlet. The effects of different levels of grid size on the results were also studied, which showed that good results could be attained with a grid size of less than 200 m in this study.

  9. Comparison study of time reversal OFDM acoustic communication with vector and scalar sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongkang; Zhang, Hongtao; Xie, Zhe

    2012-11-01

    To compare the performance of time reversal orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) acoustic communication on vector and scalar sensors, the vector and scalar acoustic fields were modeled. Time reversal OFDM acoustic communication was then simulated for each sensor type. These results are compared with data from the CAPEx'09 experiment. The abilityof particle velocity channels to achieve reliable acoustic communication, as predicted by the model, is confirmed with the experiment data. Experimental results show that vector receivers can reduce the required array size, in comparisonto hydrophone arrays, whileproviding comparable communication performance.

  10. Applicability of Travel- and Exposure-Time Concepts to Nonlinear Bioreactive Transport in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arie Cirpka, Olaf; Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Loschko, Matthias; Finkel, Michael; Lu, Chuanhe

    2016-04-01

    Travel-time based concepts of modeling subsurface transport have been established as computationally efficient alternatives to spatially explicit simulation methods. The spatial coordinates are replaced by travel time, resulting in one-dimensional transport with a constant „velocity" of unity. The concept is straight forward in linear transport applications, and under these conditions the results are exact provided that the coefficients of linear transport don't vary in space. In nonlinear transport, mixing can jeopardize the validity of the approach. This holds particularly true for transverse mixing, exchanging solute mass between streamtubes. We have performed systematic analyses of nonlinear bioreactive transport, involving oxygen, nitrate, organic carbon, as well as aerobic and denitrifying bacteria to analyzed under which conditions the errors introduced by travel-time and similar formulations are negligible. In steady-state flows with uniform reactive parameters, an excellent agreement between multi-dimensional reactive transport results, affected by transverse dispersion and flow heterogeneity, and one-dimensional travel-time results could be achieved by mapping the reactive-species concentrations to the multi-dimensional domain according to the local mean groundwater age. Aliasing of local transverse dispersion to macroscopically longitudinal mixing can be addressed by using a distance-dependent longitudinal dispersion coefficient. The approach also works for transient flows as long as the direction of flow remains constant and only the magnitude varies. Under these conditions, the groundwater age for the time-averaged velocity field is an adequate mapping variable, provided that flow transients are accounted for in the one- and multi-dimensional simulations. If the reaction takes place only in specific regions, the time of exposure to the according conditions is a better predictor of reactive transport than the overall travel time. Spatially variable

  11. Real-time vehicle noise cancellation techniques for gunshot acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Antonio L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald

    2012-06-01

    Acoustical sniper positioning systems rely on the detection and direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast in order to provide an estimate of a potential snipers location. Field tests have shown that detecting and estimating the DOA of the muzzle blast is a rather difficult task in the presence of background noise sources, e.g., vehicle noise, especially in long range detection and absorbing terrains. In our previous work presented in the 2011 edition of this conference we highlight the importance of improving the SNR of the gunshot signals prior to the detection and recognition stages, aiming at lowering the false alarm and miss-detection rates and, thereby, increasing the reliability of the system. This paper reports on real-time noise cancellation techniques, like Spectral Subtraction and Adaptive Filtering, applied to gunshot signals. Our model assumes the background noise as being short-time stationary and uncorrelated to the impulsive gunshot signals. In practice, relatively long periods without signal occur and can be used to estimate the noise spectrum and its first and second order statistics as required in the spectral subtraction and adaptive filtering techniques, respectively. The results presented in this work are supported with extensive simulations based on real data.

  12. Perception of acoustically presented time series with varied intervals.

    PubMed

    Wackermann, Jiří; Pacer, Jakob; Wittmann, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Data from three experiments on serial perception of temporal intervals in the supra-second domain are reported. Sequences of short acoustic signals ("pips") separated by periods of silence were presented to the observers. Two types of time series, geometric or alternating, were used, where the modulus 1+δ of the inter-pip series and the base duration Tb (range from 1.1 to 6s) were varied as independent parameters. The observers had to judge whether the series were accelerating, decelerating, or uniform (3 paradigm), or to distinguish regular from irregular sequences (2 paradigm). "Intervals of subjective uniformity" (isus) were obtained by fitting Gaussian psychometric functions to individual subjects' responses. Progression towards longer base durations (Tb=4.4 or 6s) shifts the isus towards negative δs, i.e., accelerating series. This finding is compatible with the phenomenon of "subjective shortening" of past temporal intervals, which is naturally accounted for by the lossy integration model of internal time representation. The opposite effect observed for short durations (Tb=1.1 or 1.5s) remains unexplained by the lossy integration model, and presents a challenge for further research.

  13. Wave-equation-based travel-time seismic tomography - Part 1: Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, P.; Zhao, D.; Yang, D.; Yang, X.; Chen, J.; Liu, Q.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a wave-equation-based travel-time seismic tomography method with a detailed description of its step-by-step process. First, a linear relationship between the travel-time residual Δt = Tobs-Tsyn and the relative velocity perturbation δ c(x)/c(x) connected by a finite-frequency travel-time sensitivity kernel K(x) is theoretically derived using the adjoint method. To accurately calculate the travel-time residual Δt, two automatic arrival-time picking techniques including the envelop energy ratio method and the combined ray and cross-correlation method are then developed to compute the arrival times Tsyn for synthetic seismograms. The arrival times Tobs of observed seismograms are usually determined by manual hand picking in real applications. Travel-time sensitivity kernel K(x) is constructed by convolving a~forward wavefield u(t,x) with an adjoint wavefield q(t,x). The calculations of synthetic seismograms and sensitivity kernels rely on forward modeling. To make it computationally feasible for tomographic problems involving a large number of seismic records, the forward problem is solved in the two-dimensional (2-D) vertical plane passing through the source and the receiver by a high-order central difference method. The final model is parameterized on 3-D regular grid (inversion) nodes with variable spacings, while model values on each 2-D forward modeling node are linearly interpolated by the values at its eight surrounding 3-D inversion grid nodes. Finally, the tomographic inverse problem is formulated as a regularized optimization problem, which can be iteratively solved by either the LSQR solver or a~nonlinear conjugate-gradient method. To provide some insights into future 3-D tomographic inversions, Fréchet kernels for different seismic phases are also demonstrated in this study.

  14. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  15. Dispersion and Travel Time of Dissolved and Floating Tracers in Urban Sewers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istók, Balázs; Kristóf, Gergely

    2014-03-01

    Environmental impacts of oil spills affecting urban sewage networks can be eliminated if timely intervention is taken. The design of such actions requires knowledge of the transport of surface pollutants in open channels. In this study we investigated the travel time and dispersion of pollutants by means of tracer experiments in sewage networks and a creek. The travel time of surface tracers has been found to be significantly shorter than that of a bulk flow tracer. The ratio of the travel times of a bulk flow tracer and surface tracers agreed with the known correlations obtained for rivers. An increasing tendency in the ratio of travel times has been observed for increasing bulk flow velocity. A segment-wise dispersion model was implemented in the existing hydraulic model of a sewer system. The simulation results were compared with the experimental observations. The dispersion rate of the bulk flow tracer has been found to obey Taylor's mixing theory for long channels and was more intensive than that of surface tracers in community sewage channels.

  16. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method. PMID:27176428

  17. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  18. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  19. Travel medicine

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  20. An alternative to the traveling-wave approach for use in two-port descriptions of acoustic bores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducasse, Eric

    2002-12-01

    For more than a decade, the digital waveguide model for musical instruments has been improved through the simulation of cylindrical and conical bores. But several difficulties remain, such as instabilities due to growing exponentials which appear when two conical bores are connected with decreasing taper. In this paper, an alternative overcoming these difficulties is proposed and can be extended to shapes other than cylinders, cones, and hyperbolic horns. A two-port model with more general state variables than usual traveling waves works efficiently for any shape without discontinuities in cross section. The equations for connecting separate elements at discontinuities make this two-port model appropriate for use in time domain simulation of the physical behavior of the wind instrument and its interactions with the player. The potential of this new approach is illustrated by several detailed examples.

  1. Travel time for solutes, upper Sabine River basin, Texas, April 16-30, 1972

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, Willard B.

    1972-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sabine River Compact Administration, conducted time-of-travel studies in the Sabine River Basin on April 16-30, 1972. One study was made on the main stem of the Sabine River in four reaches from Lake Tawakoni to Toledo Bend Reservoir, a distance of 219 miles. Two other studies were made on reaches of Lake Fork Creek and Big Sandy Creek. The purpose of these studies was to provide travel-rate data to be used by the Sabine River Authority of Texas in constructing a hydrologic model of the basin.

  2. Involuntary Mental Time Travel and Its Effect on Prospective Teachers' Situational Intrinsic Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Altay

    2010-01-01

    Recent cognitive psychological research has argued that involuntary mental time travel is an important individual difference variable that has the potential to affect an individual's motivation. However, this issue has not been empirically investigated in educational settings such as teacher education. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the…

  3. Backward location and travel time probabilities for a decaying contaminant in an aquifer.

    PubMed

    Neupauer, Roseanna M; Wilson, John L

    2003-10-01

    Backward location and travel time probabilities can be used to determine the prior position of contamination in an aquifer. These probabilities, which are related to adjoint states of concentration, can be used to improve characterization of known sources of groundwater contamination, to identify previously unknown contamination sources, and to delineate capture zones. The first contribution of this paper is to extend the adjoint model to the case of a decaying solute (first-order decay), and to describe two different interpretations of backward probabilities. The conventional interpretation accounts for the probability that a contaminant particle could decay before reaching the detection location. The other interpretation is conditioned on the fact that the detected contaminant particle actually reached the detection location, despite this possibility of decay. In either case, travel time probabilities are skewed toward earlier travel times, relative to a conservative solute. The second contribution of this paper is to verify the load term for a monitoring well observation. We provide examples using one-dimensional models and hypothetical aquifers. We employ an infinite domain in order to verify the monitoring well load. This new but simple one-dimensional adjoint solution can also be used to verify higher-dimensional numerical models of backward location and travel time probabilities. We employ a semi-infinite domain to illustrate the effect of decay on backward models of pumping well probabilistic capture zones. Decay causes the capture zones to fall closer to the well.

  4. Compensation for the distortion in satellite laser range predictions due to varying pulse travel times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A method for compensating for the effect of the varying travel time of a transmitted laser pulse to a satellite is described. The 'observed minus predicted' range differences then appear to be linear, which makes data screening or use in range gating more effective.

  5. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1993-1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrock, Robin M; Beeman, John W; VanderKooi, Scott P

    1999-02-01

    The assessment of smolt condition for travel time analysis (ASCTTA) project provided information on the level of smoltification in Columbia River hatchery and wild salmonid stocks to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), for the primary purpose of in-river management of flows.

  6. Estimating Reaction Rate Coefficients Within a Travel-Time Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, R; Lu, C; Luo, Jian; Wu, Wei-min; Cheng, H.; Criddle, Craig; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Brooks, Scott C

    2011-03-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  7. Estimating reaction rate coefficients within a travel-time modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Gong, R; Lu, C; Wu, W-M; Cheng, H; Gu, B; Watson, D; Jardine, P M; Brooks, S C; Criddle, C S; Kitanidis, P K; Luo, J

    2011-01-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  8. Seasonal tracer cycles, mean travel time, and young water in heterogeneous and nonstationary catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, James

    2015-04-01

    Many environmental systems are nonstationary and heterogeneous, but we often analyze them using theoretical frameworks that assume stationarity and homogeneity, resulting in aggregation errors that are rarely explored and almost never quantified. Here I explore this general problem in one specific context: the use of seasonal cycles in chemical or isotopic tracers, such as Cl-, δ18O, or δ18H to estimate catchment mean travel times. Seasonal tracer cycles are widely used to quantify time scales of transport and mixing in catchments. Any system that transports and mixes fluids will damp sinusoidal cycles of tracers that those fluids carry. If the system is homogeneous and stationary, one can compare the amplitudes of the input and output cycles, using simple algebraic formulas, to calculate the tracer's (and thus the fluid's) mean travel time. Here I show that these calculations will often be wrong by several hundred percent, when applied to catchments with realistic degrees of heterogeneity and nonstationarity. This aggregation error arises from the strong nonlinearity in the relationship between tracer cycle amplitude and mean travel time. One can show, however, that seasonal tracer cycles reliably estimate the "young water fraction" in stream flow, defined as the fraction of runoff with travel times of less than roughly 0.2 years. Numerical experiments show that this young water fraction (not to be confused with the event-based "new water" in hydrograph separations) is predicted by seasonal tracer cycle amplitudes within a precision of a few percent, across the entire range of mean travel times from nearly zero to near infinity. Most importantly, this relationship is virtually free of aggregation error; that is, the same relationship also holds (again within a few percent) for runoff from highly heterogeneous mixtures of strongly contrasting subcatchments, and for runoff from catchments exhibiting strong nonstationarity. Some implications of these results will

  9. Contaminant Travel Times From the Nevada Test Site to Yucca Mountain: Sensitivity to Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmann, K. F.; Zhu, J.; Chapman, J. B.; Russell, C. E.; Carroll, R. W.; Shafer, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. In this study, we investigate the potential for groundwater advective pathways from underground nuclear testing areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the YM area by estimating the time frame for advective travel and its uncertainty resulting from porosity value uncertainty for hydrogeologic units (HGUs) in the region. We perform sensitivity analysis to determine the most influential HGUs on advective radionuclide travel times from the NTS to the YM area. Groundwater pathways and advective travel times are obtained using the particle tracking package MODPATH and flow results from the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model by the U.S. Geological Survey. Values and uncertainties of HGU porosities are quantified through evaluation of existing site porosity data and expert professional judgment and are incorporated through Monte Carlo simulations to estimate mean travel times and uncertainties. We base our simulations on two steady state flow scenarios for the purpose of long term prediction and monitoring. The first represents pre-pumping conditions prior to groundwater development in the area in 1912 (the initial stress period of the DVRFS model). The second simulates 1998 pumping (assuming steady state conditions resulting from pumping in the last stress period of the DVRFS model). Considering underground tests in a clustered region around Pahute Mesa on the NTS as initial particle positions, we track these particles forward using MODPATH to identify hydraulically downgradient groundwater discharge zones and to determine which flowpaths will intercept the YM area. Out of the 71 tests in the saturated zone, flowpaths of 23 intercept the YM area under the pre-pumping scenario. For the 1998 pumping scenario, flowpaths from 55 of the 71 tests intercept the YM area. The results illustrate that mean

  10. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  11. Acoustically coupled gas bubbles in fluids: time-domain phenomena.

    PubMed

    Feuillade, C

    2001-06-01

    In previous work [C. Feuillade, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 1178-1190 (1995)] a coupled oscillator formalism was introduced for describing collective resonances, scattering, and superresonances, of multiple gas bubbles in a fluid. Subsequently, time-domain investigations of the impulse response of coupled systems have disclosed the exact conditions which determine whether the ensemble scattering behavior should be described using: either (a), a multiple scattering; or (b), a self-consistent methodology. The determining factor is the Q of the individual scatterers, and their typical spatial separations in the medium. For highly damped or sparse systems, e.g., scattering from loose schools of swimbladder fish, or from a gassy seabed containing entrained bubbles, the multiple scatter counting approach should be applicable. For more strongly coupled systems, e.g., a dense cloud of resonating bubbles in the water column, energy exchange may be due primarily to radiative cycling rather than scattering, in which case a self-consistent approach is indicated. The result has implications for both volume and bottom scattering applications.

  12. Broadband time reversed acoustic focusing and steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen; Montaldo, Gabriel; Palacio, Delphine; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2001-05-01

    We present results of experimental testing and theoretical modeling of a time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing system based on a multifaceted aluminum resonator with 15 piezoceramic transducers glued to the resonator facets. One of the facets of the resonator, a pentagon with characteristic dimension of about 30 mm, was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array which provided ultrasound focusing and beam steering in a wide frequency band (0.7-3 MHz). Ultrasonic pulses with different carrier frequencies and various complex waveforms were focused; the focal length was varied in the range of 10-55 mm and the focused beam was steered in a range of angles of +/-60 deg. The amplitude of the signal in the focal region reached 40 MPa. A theoretical model was based on an assumption that the radiating part of the resonator works as a phase conjugation screen for a spherical wave radiated from the focal point. Theoretical dependencies of the field structure on the position of the focus point and ultrasound frequency are in a good agreement with experimental results. TRA based focusing of ultrasound has numerous applications in medical diagnostics, surgery and therapy. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  13. Coded acoustic wave sensors and system using time diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for distinguishing between sensors that are to be wirelessly detected is provided. An interrogator device uses different, distinct time delays in the sensing signals when interrogating the sensors. The sensors are provided with different distinct pedestal delays. Sensors that have the same pedestal delay as the delay selected by the interrogator are detected by the interrogator whereas other sensors with different pedestal delays are not sensed. Multiple sensors with a given pedestal delay are provided with different codes so as to be distinguished from one another by the interrogator. The interrogator uses a signal that is transmitted to the sensor and returned by the sensor for combination and integration with the reference signal that has been processed by a function. The sensor may be a surface acoustic wave device having a differential impulse response with a power spectral density consisting of lobes. The power spectral density of the differential response is used to determine the value of the sensed parameter or parameters.

  14. ABSTRACT: CONTAMINANT TRAVEL TIMES FROM THE NEVADA TEST SITE TO YUCCA MOUNTAIN: SENSITIVITY TO POROSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Karl F. Pohlmann; Jianting Zhu; Jenny B. Chapman; Charles E. Russell; Rosemary W. H. Carroll; David S. Shafer

    2008-09-05

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. In this study, we investigate the potential for groundwater advective pathways from underground nuclear testing areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the YM area by estimating the timeframe for advective travel and its uncertainty resulting from porosity value uncertainty for hydrogeologic units (HGUs) in the region. We perform sensitivity analysis to determine the most influential HGUs on advective radionuclide travel times from the NTS to the YM area. Groundwater pathways and advective travel times are obtained using the particle tracking package MODPATH and flow results from the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model by the U.S. Geological Survey. Values and uncertainties of HGU porosities are quantified through evaluation of existing site porosity data and expert professional judgment and are incorporated through Monte Carlo simulations to estimate mean travel times and uncertainties. We base our simulations on two steady state flow scenarios for the purpose of long term prediction and monitoring. The first represents pre-pumping conditions prior to groundwater development in the area in 1912 (the initial stress period of the DVRFS model). The second simulates 1998 pumping (assuming steady state conditions resulting from pumping in the last stress period of the DVRFS model). Considering underground tests in a clustered region around Pahute Mesa on the NTS as initial particle positions, we track these particles forward using MODPATH to identify hydraulically downgradient groundwater discharge zones and to determine which flowpaths will intercept the YM area. Out of the 71 tests in the saturated zone, flowpaths of 23 intercept the YM area under the pre-pumping scenario. For the 1998 pumping scenario, flowpaths from 55 of the 71 tests intercept the YM area. The results illustrate that mean

  15. A crust and upper mantle model of Eurasia and North Africa for Pn travel time calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S; Begnaud, M; Ballard, S; Pasyanos, M; Phillips, W S; Ramirez, A; Antolik, M; Hutchenson, K; Dwyer, J; Rowe, C; Wagner, G

    2009-03-19

    We develop a Regional Seismic Travel Time (RSTT) model and methods to account for the first-order effect of the three-dimensional crust and upper mantle on travel times. The model parameterization is a global tessellation of nodes with a velocity profile at each node. Interpolation of the velocity profiles generates a 3-dimensional crust and laterally variable upper mantle velocity. The upper mantle velocity profile at each node is represented as a linear velocity gradient, which enables travel time computation in approximately 1 millisecond. This computational speed allows the model to be used in routine analyses in operational monitoring systems. We refine the model using a tomographic formulation that adjusts the average crustal velocity, mantle velocity at the Moho, and the mantle velocity gradient at each node. While the RSTT model is inherently global and our ultimate goal is to produce a model that provides accurate travel time predictions over the globe, our first RSTT tomography effort covers Eurasia and North Africa, where we have compiled a data set of approximately 600,000 Pn arrivals that provide path coverage over this vast area. Ten percent of the tomography data are randomly selected and set aside for testing purposes. Travel time residual variance for the validation data is reduced by 32%. Based on a geographically distributed set of validation events with epicenter accuracy of 5 km or better, epicenter error using 16 Pn arrivals is reduced by 46% from 17.3 km (ak135 model) to 9.3 km after tomography. Relative to the ak135 model, the median uncertainty ellipse area is reduced by 68% from 3070 km{sup 2} to 994 km{sup 2}, and the number of ellipses with area less than 1000 km{sup 2}, which is the area allowed for onsite inspection under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, is increased from 0% to 51%.

  16. Analytic solutions for seismic travel time and ray path geometry through simple velocity models.

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sanford

    2007-12-01

    The geometry of ray paths through realistic Earth models can be extremely complex due to the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of the velocity distribution within the models. Calculation of high fidelity ray paths and travel times through these models generally involves sophisticated algorithms that require significant assumptions and approximations. To test such algorithms it is desirable to have available analytic solutions for the geometry and travel time of rays through simpler velocity distributions against which the more complex algorithms can be compared. Also, in situations where computational performance requirements prohibit implementation of full 3D algorithms, it may be necessary to accept the accuracy limitations of analytic solutions in order to compute solutions that satisfy those requirements. Analytic solutions are described for the geometry and travel time of infinite frequency rays through radially symmetric 1D Earth models characterized by an inner sphere where the velocity distribution is given by the function V (r) = A-Br{sup 2}, optionally surrounded by some number of spherical shells of constant velocity. The mathematical basis of the calculations is described, sample calculations are presented, and results are compared to the Taup Toolkit of Crotwell et al. (1999). These solutions are useful for evaluating the fidelity of sophisticated 3D travel time calculators and in situations where performance requirements preclude the use of more computationally intensive calculators. It should be noted that most of the solutions presented are only quasi-analytic. Exact, closed form equations are derived but computation of solutions to specific problems generally require application of numerical integration or root finding techniques, which, while approximations, can be calculated to very high accuracy. Tolerances are set in the numerical algorithms such that computed travel time accuracies are better than 1 microsecond.

  17. Impulse Travel Time from the Magnetotail to the Aurora Region during substorm: OpenGGCM Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdousi, Banafsheh; Raeder, Jimmy

    2016-07-01

    The onset of substorms is an unsolved problem in Space Physics although there are many models explaining the substorm process. Studying the processes that occur during first 2 minutes of substorm depends critically on the correct timing between different signals in the plasma sheet and the ionosphere. This has been difficult to accomplish with data alone, since signals are sometimes ambiguous, or they have not been observed in the right locations. To investigate signal propagation paths and signal travel times, we use Magnetohydrodynamic global simulations of the Earth magnetosphere: OpenGGCM. The waves are created at different locations in the magnetotail by perturbing plasma pressure in the plasma sheet. Thus, we can study wave path in the magnetotail and determine its travel time to the ionosphere. Contrary to previous studies, we find that wave travel reach the ionosphere from the midtail around 60 seconds. We also find that waves travel faster through the lobes, and the Tamao path is not generally the preferred path for waves originating in the plasma sheet. Furthermore, we find that the impulses that are generated closer to earth lead to dispersed ionosphere signatures, whereas the impulses originated in midtail region lead to more localized signatures.

  18. Delivery and application of precise timing for a traveling wave powerline fault locator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has successfully operated an in-house developed powerline fault locator system since 1986. The BPA fault locator system consists of remotes installed at cardinal power transmission line system nodes and a central master which polls the remotes for traveling wave time-of-arrival data. A power line fault produces a fast rise-time traveling wave which emanates from the fault point and propagates throughout the power grid. The remotes time-tag the traveling wave leading edge as it passes through the power system cardinal substation nodes. A synchronizing pulse transmitted via the BPA analog microwave system on a wideband channel sychronizes the time-tagging counters in the remote units to a different accuracy of better than one microsecond. The remote units correct the raw time tags for synchronizing pulse propagation delay and return these corrected values to the fault locator master. The master then calculates the power system disturbance source using the collected time tags. The system design objective is a fault location accuracy of 300 meters. BPA's fault locator system operation, error producing phenomena, and method of distributing precise timing are described.

  19. Validation of Travel-Time based Nonlinear Bioreactive Transport Models under Flow and Transport Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz Prat, A.; Lu, C.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Travel-time based models are presented as an alternative to traditional spatially explicit models to solve nonlinear reactive-transport problems. The main advantage of the travel-time approach is that it does not require multi-dimensional characterization of physical and chemical parameters, and transport is one-dimensional. Spatial dimensions are replaced by groundwater travel time, defined as the time required by a water particle to reach an observation point or the outflow boundary, respectively. The fundamental hypothesis is that locations of the same groundwater age exhibit the same reactive-species concentrations. This is true in strictly advective-reactive transport in steady-state flows if the coefficients of reactions are uniform and the concentration is uniform over the inflow boundary. We hypothesize that the assumption still holds when adding some dispersion in coupled flow and transport dynamics. We compare a two-dimensional, spatially explicit, bioreactive, advective-dispersive transport model, considered as "virtual truth", with three 1-D travel-time based models which differ by the conceptualization of longitudinal dispersion: (i) neglecting dispersive mixing altogether, (ii) introducing a local-scale longitudinal dispersivity constant in time and space, and (iii) using an effective longitudinal dispersivity that increases linearly with distance. We consider biodegradation of organic matter catalyzed by non-competitive inhibitive microbial populations. The simulated inflow contains oxygen, nitrate, and DOC. The domain contains growing aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, the latter being inhibited by oxygen. This system is computed in 1-D, and in 2-D heterogeneous domains. We conclude that the conceptualization of nonlinear bioreactive transport in complex multi-dimensional domains by quasi 1-D travel-time models is valid for steady-state flow if the reactants are introduced over a wide cross-section, flow is at quasi-steady state, and dispersive

  20. Time domain analysis of a gyrotron traveling wave amplifier with misaligned electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiushi Peng, Shuyuan; Luo, Jirun

    2014-08-15

    This article develops a time-domain theory to study the beam-wave interaction in gyrotron traveling wave amplifier (gyro-TWA) with a misaligned electron beam. The effects of beam misalignment on the TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWA operating at the fundamental are discussed. Numerical results show that the effect of misalignment is less obvious when the input power is larger, and the influences of misalignment on the stable gain and the stable time are basically opposite.

  1. The roles of non-extensivity and dust concentration as bifurcation parameters in dust-ion acoustic traveling waves in magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan Ghosh, Uday; Kumar Mandal, Pankaj Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2014-03-15

    Dust ion-acoustic traveling waves are studied in a magnetized dusty plasma in presence of static dust and non-extensive distributed electrons in the framework of Zakharov-Kuznesstov-Burgers (ZKB) equation. System of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations is derived from ZKB equation, and equilibrium points are obtained. Nonlinear wave phenomena are studied numerically using fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The change from unstable to stable solution and consequently to asymptotic stable of dust ion acoustic traveling waves is studied through dynamical system approach. It is found that some dramatical features emerge when the non-extensive parameter and the dust concentration parameters are varied. Behavior of the solution of the system changes from unstable to stable and stable to asymptotic stable depending on the value of the non-extensive parameter. It is also observed that when the dust concentration is increased the solution pattern is changed from oscillatory shocks to periodic solution. Thus, non-extensive and dust concentration parameters play crucial roles in determining the nature of the stability behavior of the system. Thus, the non-extensive parameter and the dust concentration parameters can be treated as bifurcation parameters.

  2. Time of travel and dispersion in a selected reach of Roberts Creek, Clayton County, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Kalkhoff, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Time of travel was determined by dye tracing, using rhodamine WT as the tracer. One dyeinjection site and three sampling sites were used to measure time of travel. Two dye-tracing tests were conducted at discharges having flow-duration values of 48 and 80 percent. The discharges at the time of the two dye-tracing tests approximated medium- and low-flow conditions. The average stream velocity in the study area was 0.23 foot per second during medium-flow conditions, March 20 to 22,1990, and 0.07 foot per second during low-flow conditions, April 30 to May 12, 1990. The injected dye dispersed in a plume that lasted about 18 hours during medium flow and about 64 hours during low flow at the downstream site.

  3. The framing of drivers' route choices when travel time information is provided under varying degrees of cognitive load.

    PubMed

    Katsikopoulos, K V; Duse-Anthony, Y; Fisher, D L; Duffy, S A

    2000-01-01

    In two experiments, participants chose between staying on a main route with a certain travel time and diverting to an alternative route that could take a range of travel times. In the first experiment, travel time information was displayed on a sheet of paper to participants seated at a desk. In the second experiment, the same information was displayed in a virtual environment through which participants drove. Overall, participants were risk-averse when the average travel time along the alternative route was shorter than the certain travel time of the main route but risk-seeking when the average travel time of the alternative route was longer than the certain travel time along the main route. In the second experiment, in which cognitive load was higher, participants simplified their decision-making strategies. A simple probabilistic model describes the risk-taking behavior and the load effects. Actual or potential applications of this research include the development of efficient travel time information systems for drivers.

  4. Efficient constraint handling in electromagnetism-like algorithm for traveling salesman problem with time windows.

    PubMed

    Yurtkuran, Alkın; Emel, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem with time windows (TSPTW) is a variant of the traveling salesman problem in which each customer should be visited within a given time window. In this paper, we propose an electromagnetism-like algorithm (EMA) that uses a new constraint handling technique to minimize the travel cost in TSPTW problems. The EMA utilizes the attraction-repulsion mechanism between charged particles in a multidimensional space for global optimization. This paper investigates the problem-specific constraint handling capability of the EMA framework using a new variable bounding strategy, in which real-coded particle's boundary constraints associated with the corresponding time windows of customers, is introduced and combined with the penalty approach to eliminate infeasibilities regarding time window violations. The performance of the proposed algorithm and the effectiveness of the constraint handling technique have been studied extensively, comparing it to that of state-of-the-art metaheuristics using several sets of benchmark problems reported in the literature. The results of the numerical experiments show that the EMA generates feasible and near-optimal results within shorter computational times compared to the test algorithms.

  5. Efficient Constraint Handling in Electromagnetism-Like Algorithm for Traveling Salesman Problem with Time Windows

    PubMed Central

    Yurtkuran, Alkın

    2014-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem with time windows (TSPTW) is a variant of the traveling salesman problem in which each customer should be visited within a given time window. In this paper, we propose an electromagnetism-like algorithm (EMA) that uses a new constraint handling technique to minimize the travel cost in TSPTW problems. The EMA utilizes the attraction-repulsion mechanism between charged particles in a multidimensional space for global optimization. This paper investigates the problem-specific constraint handling capability of the EMA framework using a new variable bounding strategy, in which real-coded particle's boundary constraints associated with the corresponding time windows of customers, is introduced and combined with the penalty approach to eliminate infeasibilities regarding time window violations. The performance of the proposed algorithm and the effectiveness of the constraint handling technique have been studied extensively, comparing it to that of state-of-the-art metaheuristics using several sets of benchmark problems reported in the literature. The results of the numerical experiments show that the EMA generates feasible and near-optimal results within shorter computational times compared to the test algorithms. PMID:24723834

  6. Novel S-35 Intrinsic Tracer Method for Determining Groundwater Travel Time near Managed Aquifer Recharge Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urióstegui, S. H.; Bibby, R. K.; Esser, B. K.; Clark, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying groundwater travel times near managed aquifer recharge (MAR) facilities is a high priority for protecting public and environmental health. For MAR facilities in California that incorporate tertiary wastewater into their surface-spreading recharge practices, the target subsurface residence time is >9 months to allow for the natural inactivation and degradation of potential contaminants (less time is needed for full advanced treated water). Established intrinsic groundwater tracer techniques such as tritium/helium-3 dating are unable to resolve timescales of <1 year. These limitations provide the motivation for evaluating a novel groundwater tracer method using a naturally occurring radioisotope of sulfur, sulfur-35 (S-35). After its production in the atmosphere by cosmic ray interaction with argon, S-35 enters the hydrologic cycle as dissolved sulfate through precipitation The short half-life of S-35 (3 months) is ideal for investigating recharge and transport of MAR groundwater on the <1 year timescale of interest to MAR managers. The method, however, has not been applied to MAR operations because of the difficulty in measuring S-35 with sufficient sensitivity in high-sulfate waters. We have developed a new method and have applied it at two southern California MAR facilities where groundwater travel times have previously been characterized using deliberate tracers: 1) Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds in Los Angeles County, and 2) Orange County Groundwater Recharge Facilities in Orange County. Reasonable S-35 travel times of <1 year were identified at both study sites. This method also identified seasonal patterns in subsurface travel times, which may not be revealed by a deliberate tracer study that is dependent on the hydrologic conditions during the tracer injection period.

  7. Estimating the Value of Life, Injury, and Travel Time Saved Using a Stated Preference Framework.

    PubMed

    Niroomand, Naghmeh; Jenkins, Glenn P

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of fatality over the period 2010-2014 from automobile accidents in North Cyprus is 2.75 times greater than the average for the EU. With the prospect of North Cyprus entering the EU, many investments will need to be undertaken to improve road safety in order to reach EU benchmarks. The objective of this study is to provide local estimates of the value of a statistical life and injury along with the value of time savings. These are among the parameter values needed for the evaluation of the change in the expected incidence of automotive accidents and time savings brought about by such projects. In this study we conducted a stated choice experiment to identify the preferences and tradeoffs of automobile drivers in North Cyprus for improved travel times, travel costs, and safety. The choice of route was examined using mixed logit models to obtain the marginal utilities associated with each attribute of the routes that consumers choose. These estimates were used to assess the individuals' willingness to pay (WTP) to avoid fatalities and injuries and to save travel time. We then used the results to obtain community-wide estimates of the value of a statistical life (VSL) saved, the value of injury (VI) prevented, and the value per hour of travel time saved. The estimates for the VSL range from €315,293 to €1,117,856 and the estimates of VI from € 5,603 to € 28,186. These values are consistent, after adjusting for differences in incomes, with the median results of similar studies done for EU countries.

  8. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the Syracuse Athena Temple: Scale Invariance in the Timing of Ruptures

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolini, G.; Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Manuello, A.

    2011-03-11

    We perform a comparative statistical analysis between the acoustic-emission time series from the ancient Greek Athena temple in Syracuse and the sequence of nearby earthquakes. We find an apparent association between acoustic-emission bursts and the earthquake occurrence. The waiting-time distributions for acoustic-emission and earthquake time series are described by a unique scaling law indicating self-similarity over a wide range of magnitude scales. This evidence suggests a correlation between the aging process of the temple and the local seismic activity.

  9. The Short Time Scale Events of Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph L.

    2012-11-01

    The conversion of a liquid microdroplets to gas bubbles initiated by an acoustic pulse, known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), has been proposed as a method to selectively generate gas emboli for therapeutic purposes (gas embolotherapy), specifically for vascularized tumors. In this study we focused on the first 10 microseconds of the ADV process, namely the gas nucleation site formation and bubble evolution. BSA encapsulated dodecafluoropentane (CAS: 678-26-2) microdroplets were isolated at the bottom of a degassed water bath held at 37°C. Microdroplets, diameters ranging from 5-65 microns, were vaporized using a single pulse (4-16 cycles) from a 7.5 MHz focused single element transducer ranging from 2-5 MPa peak negative pressure and images of the vaporization process were recorded using an ultra-high speed camera (SIM802, Specialised Imaging Ltd). It was observed that typically two gas nuclei were formed in series with one another on axis with ultrasound pulse. However, relative positioning of the nucleation sites within the droplet depended on droplet diameter. Additionally, depending on acoustic parameters the bubble could deform into a toroidal shape. Such dynamics could suggest acoustic parameters that may result in tissue damage. This work is supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  10. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  11. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  12. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  13. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  14. 41 CFR 301-71.306 - Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel claim? 301-71.306 Section 301-71.306 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES...-71.306 Are there exceptions to collecting an advance at the time the employee files a travel...

  15. Time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries, Houston, Texas, August 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Schaer, Jasper D.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a time-of-travel study in the Buffalo Bayou watershed during low flow in August 1999. The study was done as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking (EMPACT) program. The EMPACT program was designed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to work with communities to “make timely, accurate, and understandable environmental information available to millions of people in the largest metropolitan areas across the country.” (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000). Buffalo Bayou, located in Houston, Texas, was chosen as a pilot project because it is a frequently used recreational water source, it has many water-treatment facilities located along its stream segments, and it has a history of water-quality problems (Houston-Galveston Area Council, 2000). One component of the pilot project is to develop a water-quality simulation model that can be used to assess the effects of noncompliance events on Buffalo Bayou. Because accurate estimates of time of travel during low flow are required to develop the model, the time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries was determined using dye tracing methods. The study was conducted during low flow in a 38.7-mile reach of Buffalo Bayou, a 9.6-mile reach of Whiteoak Bayou, a 5.9-mile reach of Mason Creek, and a 6.6-mile reach of Bear Creek. Efforts to determine the time of travel in a 7.5-mile reach of Horsepen Creek were unsuccessful. This report explains the approach used to conduct the study and presents the results of the study

  16. An empirical method for estimating travel times for wet volcanic mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Travel times for wet volcanic mass flows (debris avalanches and lahars) can be forecast as a function of distance from source when the approximate flow rate (peak discharge near the source) can be estimated beforehand. The near-source flow rate is primarily a function of initial flow volume, which should be possible to estimate to an order of magnitude on the basis of geologic, geomorphic, and hydrologic factors at a particular volcano. Least-squares best fits to plots of flow-front travel time as a function of distance from source provide predictive second-degree polynomial equations with high coefficients of determination for four broad size classes of flow based on near-source flow rate: extremely large flows (>1 000 000 m3/s), very large flows (10 000–1 000 000 m3/s), large flows (1000–10 000 m3/s), and moderate flows (100–1000 m3/s). A strong nonlinear correlation that exists between initial total flow volume and flow rate for "instantaneously" generated debris flows can be used to estimate near-source flow rates in advance. Differences in geomorphic controlling factors among different flows in the data sets have relatively little effect on the strong nonlinear correlations between travel time and distance from source. Differences in flow type may be important, especially for extremely large flows, but this could not be evaluated here. At a given distance away from a volcano, travel times can vary by approximately an order of magnitude depending on flow rate. The method can provide emergency-management officials a means for estimating time windows for evacuation of communities located in hazard zones downstream from potentially hazardous volcanoes.

  17. Adjoint Tomography of Taiwan Region: From Travel-Time Toward Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. H.; Lee, S. J.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The complicated tectonic environment such as Taiwan region can modulate the seismic waveform severely and hamper the discrimination and the utilization of later phases. Restricted to the use of only first arrivals of P- and S-wave, the travel-time tomographic models of Taiwan can simulate the seismic waveform barely to a frequency of 0.2 Hz to date. While it has been sufficient for long-period studies, e.g. source inversion, this frequency band is still far from the applications to the community and high-resolution studies. To achieve a higher-frequency simulation, more data and the considerations of off-path and finite-frequency effects are necessary. Based on the spectral-element and the adjoint method recently developed, we prepared 94 MW 3.5-6.0 earthquakes with well-defined location and focal mechanism solutions from Real-Time Moment Tensor Monitoring System (RMT), and preformed an iterative gradient-based inversion employing waveform modeling and finite-frequency measurements of adjoint method. By which the 3-D sensitivity kernels are taken into account realistically and the full waveform information are naturally sought, without a need of any phase pick. A preliminary model m003 using 10-50 sec data was demonstrated and compared with previous travel-time models. The primary difference appears in the mountainous area, where the previous travel-time model may underestimate the S-wave speed in the upper crust, but overestimates in the lower crust.

  18. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beeman, John W.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Faler, Joyce C.

    1991-12-01

    As a part of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program, the Fish Passage Center collects information on the migrational characteristics of juvenile salmon and steelhead (Oncorhynchus sp.) in the Columbia River basin. This information is collected through the Smolt Monitoring Program, and is used as a tool in the management and evaluation of the Water Budget. The Water Budget is a volume of water used to enhance environmental conditions (flows) to aid in the seaward migration of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Implicit in the Water Budget concept is that by augmenting flows, travel time of juvenile salmonids will be decreased, thereby increasing survival via reductions in delayed migration and exposure to predators. This study was initiated to (1) provide physiological information about the juvenile salmonids used for these travel time estimates, (2) to analyze the physiological data, and (3) to determine if an ``index`` of smolt condition could be developed to aid in management of the Water Budget.

  19. Time-domain theory of gyrotron traveling wave amplifiers operating at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Zheleznov, I. V.

    2015-01-15

    Time-domain theory of the gyrotron traveling wave tube (gyro-TWT) operating at grazing incidence has been developed. The theory is based on a description of wave propagation by a parabolic equation. The results of the simulations are compared with experimental results of the observation of subnanosecond pulse amplification in a gyro-TWT consisting of three gain sections separated by severs. The theory developed can also be used successfully for a description of amplification of monochromatic signals.

  20. Planning times during traveling salesman's problem: differences between closed head injury and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Basso, D; Bisiacchi, P S; Cotelli, M; Farinello, C

    2001-01-01

    We studied planning behavior in a group of normal subjects and a group of closed head injury patients (CHI). A computerized version of the traveling salesman's problem was used as a visuospatial planning ability task. The program collected measurements of partial times, number of moves, and number of skipped subgoals. These measures allow us to calculate a "planning index" of subjects' planning ability. Results show that CHI patients present limitations in the planning process due to the lack of ongoing planning.

  1. Automating adjoint wave-equation travel-time tomography using scientific workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Po; Pullammanappallil, Satish

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in commodity high-performance computing technology have dramatically reduced the computational cost for solving the seismic wave equation in complex earth structure models. As a consequence, wave-equation-based seismic tomography techniques are being actively developed and gradually adopted in routine subsurface seismic imaging practices. Wave-equation travel-time tomography is a seismic tomography technique that inverts cross-correlation travel-time misfits using full-wave Fréchet kernels computed by solving the wave equation. This technique can be implemented very efficiently using the adjoint method, in which the misfits are back-propagated from the receivers (i.e., seismometers) to produce the adjoint wave-field and the interaction between the adjoint wave-field and the forward wave-field from the seismic source gives the gradient of the objective function. Once the gradient is available, a gradient-based optimization algorithm can then be adopted to produce an optimal earth structure model that minimizes the objective function. This methodology is conceptually straightforward, but its implementation in practical situations is highly complex, error-prone and computationally demanding. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of automating wave-equation travel-time tomography based on the adjoint method using Kepler, an open-source software package for designing, managing and executing scientific workflows. The workflow technology allows us to abstract away much of the complexity involved in the implementation in a manner that is both robust and scalable. Our automated adjoint wave-equation travel-time tomography package has been successfully applied on a real active-source seismic dataset.

  2. Hyporheic Temperature Dynamics: Predicting Hyporheic Temperatures Based on Travel Time Assuming Instantaneous Water-Sediment Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraseski, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently developed conceptual frameworks and new observations have improved our understanding of hyporheic temperature dynamics and their effects on channel temperatures. However, hyporheic temperature models that are both simple and useful remain elusive. As water moves through hyporheic pathways, it exchanges heat with hyporheic sediment through conduction, and this process dampens the diurnal temperature wave of the water entering from the channel. This study examined the mechanisms underlying this behavior, and utilized those findings to create two simple models that predict temperatures of water reentering the channel after traveling through hyporheic pathways for different lengths of time. First, we developed a laboratory experiment to represent this process and determine conduction rates for various sediment size classes (sand, fine gravel, coarse gravel, and a proportional mix of the three) by observing the time series of temperature changes between sediment and water of different initial temperatures. Results indicated that conductions rates were near-instantaneous, with heat transfer being completed on the scale of seconds to a few minutes of the initial interaction. Heat conduction rates between the sediment and water were therefore much faster than hyporheic flux rates, rendering reasonable an assumption of instantaneous conduction. Then, we developed two simple models to predict time series of hyporheic water based on the initial diurnal temperature wave and hyporheic travel distance. The first model estimates a damping coefficient based on the total water-sediment heat exchange through each diurnal cycle. The second model solves the heat transfer equation assuming instantaneous conduction using a simple finite difference algorithm. Both models demonstrated nearly complete damping of the sine wave over the distance traveled in four days. If hyporheic exchange is substantial and travel times are long, then hyporheic damping may have large effects on

  3. Travel time to maternity care and its effect on utilization in rural Ghana: a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Masters, Samuel H; Burstein, Roy; Amofah, George; Abaogye, Patrick; Kumar, Santosh; Hanlon, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Rates of neonatal and maternal mortality are high in Ghana. In-facility delivery and other maternal services could reduce this burden, yet utilization rates of key maternal services are relatively low, especially in rural areas. We tested a theoretical implication that travel time negatively affects the use of in-facility delivery and other maternal services. Empirically, we used geospatial techniques to estimate travel times between populations and health facilities. To account for uncertainty in Ghana Demographic and Health Survey cluster locations, we adopted a novel approach of treating the location selection as an imputation problem. We estimated a multilevel random-intercept logistic regression model. For rural households, we found that travel time had a significant effect on the likelihood of in-facility delivery and antenatal care visits, holding constant education, wealth, maternal age, facility capacity, female autonomy, and the season of birth. In contrast, a facility's capacity to provide sophisticated maternity care had no detectable effect on utilization. As the Ghanaian health network expands, our results suggest that increasing the availability of basic obstetric services and improving transport infrastructure may be important interventions. PMID:23906132

  4. Time of travel of solutes in the Sabine River basin, Texas, August-November 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, Timothy H.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Sabine River Authority, did a time-of-travel study in the Sabine River Basin during low flow from August to November 1996. The study was done to provide accurate estimates of the time-of-travel and dispersion characteristics for solutes during low flow in a 1.8-mile (mi) reach of Grace Creek, a 23.9-mi reach of the mainstem Sabine River, a 3.4-mi reach of Hawkins Creek, and a 1.9-mi reach of Rocky Creek. This report explains the approach and documents the results of the study. The results of the study will be used by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission in a water-quality model to determine waste-load allocation in Segment 0505 of the Sabine River Basin. The time-of-travel and dispersion characteristics also provide useful information on the probable behavior of soluble contaminants that might be introduced into the streams measured in this study.

  5. Travel-time source-specific station correction improves location accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, Alessandra; Materni, Valerio; Chiappini, Stefano; Carluccio, Roberto; Console, Rodolfo; Chiappini, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Accurate earthquake locations are crucial for investigating seismogenic processes, as well as for applications like verifying compliance to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Earthquake location accuracy is related to the degree of knowledge about the 3-D structure of seismic wave velocity in the Earth. It is well known that modeling errors of calculated travel times may have the effect of shifting the computed epicenters far from the real locations by a distance even larger than the size of the statistical error ellipses, regardless of the accuracy in picking seismic phase arrivals. The consequences of large mislocations of seismic events in the context of the CTBT verification is particularly critical in order to trigger a possible On Site Inspection (OSI). In fact, the Treaty establishes that an OSI area cannot be larger than 1000 km2, and its larger linear dimension cannot be larger than 50 km. Moreover, depth accuracy is crucial for the application of the depth event screening criterion. In the present study, we develop a method of source-specific travel times corrections based on a set of well located events recorded by dense national seismic networks in seismically active regions. The applications concern seismic sequences recorded in Japan, Iran and Italy. We show that mislocations of the order of 10-20 km affecting the epicenters, as well as larger mislocations in hypocentral depths, calculated from a global seismic network and using the standard IASPEI91 travel times can be effectively removed by applying source-specific station corrections.

  6. [What about the mental time travel and age-related effects?].

    PubMed

    Coste, Cécile; Navarro, Béatrice; Abram, Maria; Duval, Céline; Picard, Laurence; Piolino, Pascale

    2012-03-01

    According to Tulving, episodic memory allows humans to travel mentally through subjective time into either the past or the future, this ability being at the origin of adaptation, organization and planning of future behavior. The main aim of this review is to present a state of art of episodic mental time travel and a lifespan perspective from children to elderly people. We examine the numerous similarities between remembering the past and envisioning the future which have been highlighted in cognitive, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological studies. We also present studies that have given evidence that remembering the past and imagining the future differ somewhat. We focus on demonstrating that hippocampal dysfunction is associated with disturbances in the recall of episodic autobiographical details in past memories, but also in the imagining of episodic detailed future events. More specifically, we discuss that the future seems to involve higher semantic processes mediated by the inferior frontal and lateral temporal gyri. We propose that the study of mental travel in personal time could be undertaken in line with the distinction between the memory of (episodic) experiences and (semantic) personal knowledge of one's life, which constitutes a major part of the self and constraints what we have been, what we are now, and what we might yet become. PMID:22414404

  7. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beeman, John W.; Wagner, Eric J.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    1989-03-01

    Estimates of migration rates and travel times of juvenile salmonids within index reaches of the Columbia River basin are collected through the Smolt Monitoring Program for use by the Fish Passage Center. With increased reliance upon travel time estimates in 1988 by the Fish Passage Center, this study was implemented to monitor the biological attributes of juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss used for the travel time estimates. The physiological ability of fish to respond to stress was assessed by measuring levels of plasma cortisol, glucose, and chloride before and after a stress-challenge test. The development of smoltification was evaluated by measuring gill Na{sup +}K{sup +}-ATPase, plasma thyroxine, purines, and body morphology. Most groups were similar at the hatcheries but differed as the migration to McNary Dam proceeded. The prevalence of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in spring chinook salmon was evaluated using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluorescent antibody technique (FAT). Prevalence of BKD in groups tested using the ELISA method was as high as 99% at some downstream locations. A review of indices is presented as a guide to the development of an index of smolt condition and preliminary data are presented. An index could be used as a tool to synthesize information on fish condition to assist with management and evaluation of the Water Budget.

  8. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP).

  9. Chinese and Australians showed difference in mental time travel in emotion and content but not specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing-Jie; Liu, Lu-Lu; Cui, Ji-Fang; Wang, Ya; Shum, David H. K.; Chan, Raymond C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Mental time travel refers to the ability to recall episodic past and imagine future events. The present study aimed to investigate cultural differences in mental time travel between Chinese and Australian university students. A total of 231 students (108 Chinese and 123 Australians) participated in the study. Their mental time travel abilities were measured by the Sentence Completion for Events from the Past Test (SCEPT) and the Sentence Completion for Events in the Future Test (SCEFT). Results showed that there were no cultural differences in the number of specific events generated for the past or future. Significant differences between the Chinese and Australian participants were found mainly in the emotional valence and content of the events generated. Both Chinese and Australian participants generated more specific positive events compared to negative events when thinking about the future and Chinese participants were more positive about their past than Australian participants when recalling specific events. For content, Chinese participants recalled more events about their interpersonal relationships, while Australian participants imagined more about personal future achievements. These findings shed some lights on cultural differences in episodic past and future thinking. PMID:26167154

  10. Travel time to maternity care and its effect on utilization in rural Ghana: a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Masters, Samuel H; Burstein, Roy; Amofah, George; Abaogye, Patrick; Kumar, Santosh; Hanlon, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Rates of neonatal and maternal mortality are high in Ghana. In-facility delivery and other maternal services could reduce this burden, yet utilization rates of key maternal services are relatively low, especially in rural areas. We tested a theoretical implication that travel time negatively affects the use of in-facility delivery and other maternal services. Empirically, we used geospatial techniques to estimate travel times between populations and health facilities. To account for uncertainty in Ghana Demographic and Health Survey cluster locations, we adopted a novel approach of treating the location selection as an imputation problem. We estimated a multilevel random-intercept logistic regression model. For rural households, we found that travel time had a significant effect on the likelihood of in-facility delivery and antenatal care visits, holding constant education, wealth, maternal age, facility capacity, female autonomy, and the season of birth. In contrast, a facility's capacity to provide sophisticated maternity care had no detectable effect on utilization. As the Ghanaian health network expands, our results suggest that increasing the availability of basic obstetric services and improving transport infrastructure may be important interventions.

  11. Reconstructed imaging of acoustic cloak using time-lapse reversal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Jian-yi; Li, Bo; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2014-08-01

    We proposed and investigated a solution to the inverse acoustic cloak problem, an anti-stealth technology to make cloaks visible, using the time-lapse reversal (TLR) method. The TLR method reconstructs the image of an unknown acoustic cloak by utilizing scattered acoustic waves. Compared to previous anti-stealth methods, the TLR method can determine not only the existence of a cloak but also its exact geometric information like definite shape, size, and position. Here, we present the process for TLR reconstruction based on time reversal invariance. This technology may have potential applications in detecting various types of cloaks with different geometric parameters.

  12. Estimation of travel times for seven tributaries of the Mississippi River, St. Cloud to Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arntson, A.D.; Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Travel times for seven streams tributary to the Mississippi River from St. Cloud to Minneapolis, Minnesota, were estimated for three flow conditions; low, median, and high. Travel times were estimated for Sauk, Elk, Crow, and Rum Rivers, and Elm, Coon, and Rice Creeks. Regression equations based on watershed characteristics of drainage area, river slope, mean annual discharge, and instantaneous discharge at the time of measurement from more than 900 streams across the nation were used to estimate travel times. Travel times were estimated for the leading edge, peak concentration, and trailing edge of tracer-response curves. To test the validity of these equations, a time of travel study, using a luminescent dye, was conducted on the Sauk River, from Rockville, to the confluence with the Mississippi River on June 16, 2003, at a discharge of 457 ft3/s at Rockville. Dye was injected in the Sauk River at Rockville, and time and concentrations were measured at three sampling sections downstream; at County Road 121, Veterans Drive, and County Road 1 near the mouth. The estimated travel times for the leading edge, peak concentration, and trailing edge at County Road 1 were 10.6 hrs, 11.9 hrs, and 14.6 hrs, respectively. The measured travel times for the leading edge, peak concentration, and trailing edge were 13.4 hrs, 15.5 hrs, and 20.5 hrs, respectively for the 15.7 mile reach.

  13. Organic compounds in the environment: Determining travel time and stream mixing using tracers and empirical equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Soenksen, P.J.; Engel, G.B.; Miller, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Water-supply managers need adequate warning to protect water supplies if a contaminant is spilled in an upgradient tributary. The city of Lincoln draws water from alluvium associated with the Platte River near Ashland, eastern Nebraska. Using constant-rate injection methods and a conservative tracer, travel time and degree of mixing of contaminants in the Elkhorn and Platte Rivers were evaluated in 1995 and 1996. The results indicate that, for flows of 584 to 162 m3/s in the Platte River at Ashland with 13 to 28% of its flow contributed by the Elkhorn River, 8.2 to 13.2 h are required for the leading edge of a chemical plume to travel from the Elkhorn River at Waterloo to the Platte River at Ashland. The peak concentration of a chemical spilled as a slug in the Elkhorn River near Waterloo would pass the well field after 11.3 to 16.1 h. Existing empirical equations for calculation of travel time were shown to apply to reaches of streams studied, but underestimated the leading edge up to 14% and overestimated the plateau concentration up to 11% at Site 5. However, time of travel may be influenced by the relative contribution of a tributary. The plateau concentration of the chemical in the Platte River at Ashland was 45 to 60% of its concentration in the Elkhorn River. The degree of mixing of the tracer in the Platte River at Ashland increased from 53 to 65% as the relative contribution of the Elkhorn River increased.

  14. Real-time observation of coherent acoustic phonons generated by an acoustically mismatched optoacoustic transducer using x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A. I. H.; Andreasson, B. P.; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2015-11-14

    The spectrum of laser-generated acoustic phonons in indium antimonide coated with a thin nickel film has been studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction. Strain pulses that can be considered to be built up from coherent phonons were generated in the nickel film by absorption of short laser pulses. Acoustic reflections at the Ni–InSb interface leads to interference that strongly modifies the resulting phonon spectrum. The study was performed with high momentum transfer resolution together with high time resolution. This was achieved by using a third-generation synchrotron radiation source that provided a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast x-ray streak camera to obtain a temporal resolution of 10 ps. We also carried out simulations, using commercial finite element software packages and on-line dynamic diffraction tools. Using these tools, it is possible to calculate the time-resolved x-ray reflectivity from these complicated strain shapes. The acoustic pulses have a peak strain amplitude close to 1%, and we investigated the possibility to use this device as an x-ray switch. At a bright source optimized for hard x-ray generation, the low reflectivity may be an acceptable trade-off to obtain a pulse duration that is more than an order of magnitude shorter.

  15. Time evolution of ion-acoustic double layers in an unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bharuthram, R.; Momoniat, E.; Mahomed, F.; Singh, S. V.; Islam, M. K.

    2008-08-15

    Ion-acoustic double layers are examined in an unmagnetized, three-component plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature electrons. Both of the electrons are considered to be Boltzmann distributed and the ions follow the usual fluid dynamical equations. Using the method of characteristics, a time-dependent solution for ion-acoustic double layers is obtained. Results of the findings may have important consequences for the real time satellite observations in the space environment.

  16. Existence, Uniqueness and Asymptotic Stability of Time Periodic Traveling Waves for a Periodic Lotka-Volterra Competition System with Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Ruan, Shigui

    2011-06-01

    We study the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic stability of time periodic traveling wave solutions to a periodic diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition system. Under certain conditions, we prove that there exists a maximal wave speed c(*) such that for each wave speed c ≤ c(*), there is a time periodic traveling wave connecting two semi-trivial periodic solutions of the corresponding kinetic system. It is shown that such a traveling wave is unique modulo translation and is monotone with respect to its co-moving frame coordinate. We also show that the traveling wave solutions with wave speed c < c(*) are asymptotically stable in certain sense. In addition, we establish the nonexistence of time periodic traveling waves for nonzero speed c > c(*).

  17. Existence, Uniqueness and Asymptotic Stability of Time Periodic Traveling Waves for a Periodic Lotka-Volterra Competition System with Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Ruan, Shigui

    2011-06-01

    We study the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic stability of time periodic traveling wave solutions to a periodic diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition system. Under certain conditions, we prove that there exists a maximal wave speed c(*) such that for each wave speed c ≤ c(*), there is a time periodic traveling wave connecting two semi-trivial periodic solutions of the corresponding kinetic system. It is shown that such a traveling wave is unique modulo translation and is monotone with respect to its co-moving frame coordinate. We also show that the traveling wave solutions with wave speed c < c(*) are asymptotically stable in certain sense. In addition, we establish the nonexistence of time periodic traveling waves for nonzero speed c > c(*). PMID:21572575

  18. 41 CFR 302-3.512 - How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel? 302-3.512 Section 302-3.512 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES...

  19. 41 CFR 302-3.512 - How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel? 302-3.512 Section 302-3.512 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES...

  20. 41 CFR 302-3.512 - How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel? 302-3.512 Section 302-3.512 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES...

  1. 41 CFR 302-3.512 - How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel? 302-3.512 Section 302-3.512 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES...

  2. 41 CFR 302-3.512 - How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How many times are we required to pay for an employee's return travel? 302-3.512 Section 302-3.512 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES...

  3. Body wave travel times and amplitudes for present-day seismic model of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raevskiy, Sergey; Gudkova, Tamara

    At the moment Martian interior structure models are constrained by the satellite observational data (the mass, the moment of inertia factor, the Love number k _{2}) (Konopliv et al., 2011) and high pressure experimental data (Bertka and Fei, 1997). Seismological observations could provide unparalleled capability for studying Martian interiors. Future missions include seismic experiments on Mars (Lognonné et al., 2012). The main instrument for these seismic experiments is a broadband seismometer (Robert et al., 2012). When seismic measurements are not yet available, physically consistent interior models, characterized by properties of relevant minerals, make possible to study of the seismic response of the planet. \\To estimate travel times for direct P, S, core reflected PcP, ScS and core refracted PKP body waves as a function of epicentral distance and hypocentral depth, as well as their amplitudes at the surface for a given marsquake, software product was developed in MatLab, as it encompasses many plotting routines that plot resulting travel times and ray paths. The computational results have been compared with the program TTBox (Knapmeyer, 2004). The code computes seismic ray paths and travel times for a one-dimentional spherical interior model (density and seismic velocities are functions of a radius only). Calculations of travel times tables for direct P, S, core reflected PcP, ScS and core refracted PKP waves and their amplitudes are carried out for a trial seismic model of Mars M14_3 from (Zharkov et al., 2009): the core radius is 1800 km, the thickness of the crust is 50 km. Direct and core reflected P and S waves are recorded to a maximum epicentral distance equal to about 100(°) , and PKP arrivals can be detected for epicental distances larger than 150(°) . The shadow zone is getting wider in comparison with previous results (Knapmeyer, 2010), as the liquid core radius of the seismic model under consideration is larger. Based on the estimates of

  4. Predicting Flow Breakdown Probability and Duration in Stochastic Network Models: Impact on Travel Time Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jing; Mahmassani, Hani S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to produce random flow breakdown endogenously in a mesoscopic operational model, by capturing breakdown probability and duration. Based on previous research findings that probability of flow breakdown can be represented as a function of flow rate and the duration can be characterized by a hazard model. By generating random flow breakdown at various levels and capturing the traffic characteristics at the onset of the breakdown, the stochastic network simulation model provides a tool for evaluating travel time variability. The proposed model can be used for (1) providing reliability related traveler information; (2) designing ITS (intelligent transportation systems) strategies to improve reliability; and (3) evaluating reliability-related performance measures of the system.

  5. Travel time and attrition from VHA care among women Veterans: How far is too far?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Sarah A.; Frayne, Susan M.; Berg, Eric; Hamilton, Alison B.; Washington, Donna L.; Saechao, Fay; Maisel, Natalya C.; Lin, Julia; Hoggatt, Katherine J.; Phibbs, Ciaran S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Travel time, an access barrier, may contribute to attrition of women veterans from Veterans Health Administration (VHA) care. Objective We examined whether travel time influences attrition a) among women veterans overall, b) among new vs. established patients, and c) among rural versus urban patients. Research Design This retrospective cohort study used logistic regression to estimate the association between drive time and attrition, overall and for new/established and rural/urban patients. Subjects 266,301 women veteran VHA outpatients in Fiscal year 2009. Measures An “attriter” did not return for VHA care during the 2nd through 3rd years after her first 2009 visit (T0). Drive time (log minutes) was between the patient’s residence and her regular source of VHA care. “New” patients had no VHA visits within three years before T0. Models included age, service-connected disability, health status and utilization as covariates. Results Overall, longer drive times were associated with higher odds of attrition: drive time Adjusted Odds Ratio=1.11 (99% CI 1.09-1.14). The relationship between drive time and attrition was stronger among new patients but was not modified by rurality. Conclusion Attrition among women veterans is sensitive to longer drive time. Linking new patients to VHA services designed to reduce distance barriers (telemedicine, community-based clinics, mobile clinics) may reduce attrition among women new to VHA. PMID:25767970

  6. Evaluation of analytical and numerical approaches for the estimation of groundwater travel time distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Nandita B.; Jindal, Priyanka; Schilling, Keith E.; Wolter, Calvin F.; Takle, Eugene S.

    2012-12-01

    SummaryIt is critical that stakeholders are aware of the lag time necessary for conservation practices to demonstrate a positive impact on surface water quality. For solutes like nitrate that are transported primarily by the groundwater pathway, the lag time is a function of the groundwater travel time distribution (TTD). We used three models of varying levels of complexity to estimate the steady-state TTD of a shallow, unconfined aquifer in a small Iowa watershed: (a) analytic model, (b) GIS approach, and (c) MODFLOW model. The analytic model was the least input-intensive, whereas the GIS and MODFLOW approach required detailed data for model development. The resulting TTDs displayed an exponential distribution with good agreement among all the three methods (mean travel times ranging from 16.2 years in the analytic model, 19.6 years in GIS model and 20.5 years in MODFLOW model). The greater deviation in the analytic model was attributed to the difficulty in estimation of a representative saturated thickness in an unconfined aquifer. The correspondence between the spatial travel time distributions generated by GIS and MODFLOW was a function of the landscape position, with greater correspondence in uplands compared to floodplains. In the floodplains the land surface slope is a poor approximation of the water table gradient that is captured by the MODFLOW model but not the GIS that uses the land surface as a surrogate for the water table. Study results indicate that except for cases where there are marked differences between water table surface and land surface, simpler approaches (analytic and GIS) can be used to estimate TTDs required for the design and optimal placement of conservation practices and communicating lag times issues to the public.

  7. Quality of water and time of travel in Hobolochitto Creek, Pearl River County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bednar, Gene A.

    1980-01-01

    In Mississippi, an intensive study of Hobolochitto Creek, including the lower parts of East and West Hobolochitto Creeks, was conducted on September 12-14, 1978. The quality-of-water data were collected during a period of generally low streamflow and seasonally high air temperatures. These data show that the quality of water in Hobolochitto Creek was generally good. The dissolved-solids concentrations were less than 50 milligrams per liter, and the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus species were low. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand generally was minimal, and dissolved-oxygen concentrations were at levels that could support aquatic life. Several water samples contained high fecal bacteria densities and there was evidence of the presence of wastes of human origin, particularly at the downstream sites on Hobolochitto Creek. It was determined from a time-of-travel study that the rate of solute travel is very slow at low streamflow. A peak dye concentration traveled through a 3.7-mile reach of Hobolochitto Creek in 23.5 hours. (USGS)

  8. Experimental studies of applications of time-reversal acoustics to noncoherent underwater communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, M.; Larraza, A.; Smith, K. B.

    2003-06-01

    The most difficult problem in shallow underwater acoustic communications is considered to be the time-varying multipath propagation because it impacts negatively on data rates. At high data rates the intersymbol interference requires adaptive algorithms on the receiver side that lead to computationally intensive and complex signal processing. A novel technique called time-reversal acoustics (TRA) can environmentally adapt the acoustic propagation effects of a complex medium in order to focus energy at a particular target range and depth. Using TRA, the multipath structure is reduced because all the propagation paths add coherently at the intended target location. This property of time-reversal acoustics suggests a potential application in the field of noncoherent acoustic communications. This work presents results of a tank scale experiment using an algorithm for rapid transmission of binary data in a complex underwater environment with the TRA approach. A simple 15-symbol code provides an example of the simplicity and feasibility of the approach. Covert coding due to the inherent scrambling induced by the environment at points other than the intended receiver is also investigated. The experiments described suggest a high potential in data rate for the time-reversal approach in underwater acoustic communications while keeping the computational complexity low.

  9. Time-Reversal Acoustic Focusing with Liquid Resonator for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor D.; Sutin, Alexandre Y.; Sarvazyan, Armen P.

    2007-05-01

    Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) focusing system based on the use of liquid filled resonators with single or few transducers is demonstrated to effectively converge acoustic energy in space and time. Because the wavelength in liquid is typically smaller than in solids, liquid based TRA focusing resonators can have smaller dimensions than solid resonators. The efficiency of liquid-based TRA focusing resonators to transmit acoustic power to soft tissues is improved by impedance matching of the acoustic transducer assembly to the surrounding liquid. Experiments were conducted to understand the properties of TRA focusing with the liquid-filled resonators and possible application of the TRA systems for biomedical applications. The factors defining the efficiency of liquid based TRA focusing resonators were explored. In media with high attenuation, the binary mode of ultrasound delivery yielded noticeably narrower focusing of ultrasound than conventional analog focusing.

  10. Probabilistic Health Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures: Importance of Travel Times and Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; de Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface contamination cases giving rise to groundwater pollutions are extensively found in all industrialized countries. Under this pressure, risk assessment methods play an important role in population protection by (1) quantifying the potential impact on human health of an aquifer contamination and (2) helping and driving decisions of groundwater-resource managers. Many reactive components such as chlorinated solvents or nitrates potentially experience attenuation processes under common geochemical conditions. This represents an attractive and extensively used remediation solution but leads often to the production of by-products before to reach a harmless chemical form. This renders mixtures of contaminants a common issue for groundwater resources managers. In this case, the threat posed by these contaminants to human health at a given sensitive location greatly depends on the competition between reactive and advective-dispersive characteristic times. However, hydraulic properties of the aquifer are known to be spatially variable, which can lead to the formation of preferential flow channels and fast contamination pathways. Therefore, the uncertainty on the spatial distribution of the aquifer properties controlling the plume travel time may then play a particular role in the human health risk assessment of chemical mixtures. We investigate here the risk related to a multispecies system in response to different degrees of heterogeneity of the hydraulic conductivity (K or Y =ln(K)). This work focuses on a Perchloroethylene (PCE) contamination problem followed by the sequential first-order production/biodegradation of its daughter species Trichloroethylene (TCE), Dichloroethylene (DCE) and Vinyl Chlorine (VC). For this specific case, VC is known to be a highly toxic contaminant. By performing numerical experiments, we evaluate transport through three-dimensional mildly (σY 2=1.0) and highly (σY 2=4.0) heterogeneous aquifers. Uncertainty on the hydraulic

  11. Full-Field Imaging of Acoustic Motion at Nanosecond Time and Micron Length Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Cottle, David Lynn; Larson III, John D.

    2002-10-01

    A full-field view laser ultrasonic imaging method has been developed that measures acoustic motion at a surface without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates by employing dynamic holography using photorefractive interferometric detection. By extending the approach to ultra high frequencies, an acoustic microscope has been developed capable of operation on the nanosecond time and micron length scales. Both acoustic amplitude and phase are recorded allowing full calibration and determination of phases to within a single arbitrary constant. Results are presented of measurements at frequencies at 800-900 MHz illustrating a multitude of normal mode behavior in electrically driven thin film acoustic resonators. Coupled with microwave electrical impedance measurements, this imaging mode provides an exceptionally fast method for evaluation of electric to acoustic coupling and performance of these devices. Images of 256x240 pixels are recorded at 18Hz rates synchronized to obtain both in-phase and quadrature detection of the acoustic motion. Simple averaging provides sensitivity to the subnanometer level calibrated over the image using interferometry. Identification of specific acoustic modes and their relationship to electrical impedance characteristics show the advantages and overall high speed of the technique.

  12. Travel time of impulsive signals in the magnetosphere: Modeling and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, P. J.; Russell, C. T.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2007-12-01

    The calculation of travel time for impulsive signals has many uses in magneotspheric physics, such as understanding the propagation of sudden impulses, helping identify the causes of substorm onsets, and inferring the global plasma density and temperature from inverting the signal arrival time at multiple locations. Because impulsive signals can propagate rapidly as MHD waves, it is necessary for calculations and observations to have a time resolution of the order of one sec to yield useful results. To avoid time-consuming global simulations at this high cadence, we have developed a numerical model that focuses on wavefront construction to compute the travel time of impulsive signals. Following the Huygens principle, the algorithm allows the user to define the shape of the initial impulse and tracks the first arrival of wavefront in two dimensions. We will demonstrate, in both equatorial and meridian planes, how the wavefront of sudden impulses propagates tailward from the dayside magnetopause and how the wavefront of substorm onsets in the magnetotail evolves as it propagates earthward. We compare our calculations with the magnetic field observations from the armada of satellites, including Polar and THEMIS, in orbit, as well as the data from various ground magnetometer networks such as McMAC, THEMIS-GBO/EPO, and CARISMA.

  13. Non-stationarity of solute travel time distribution observed in a controlled hydrologic transport volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queloz, P.; Bertuzzo, E.; Carraro, L.; Botter, G.; Miglietta, F.; Rao, P. S.; Rinaldo, A.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental data were collected over a year-long period in a transport experiment carried out within a controlled transport volume (represented by a 2m-deep, 1m-diameter lysimeter fitted with bottom drainage). The soil surface was shielded from natural rainfall, replaced by an artificial injection (Poisson process) at the daily timescale. Bottom drainage out-flows were continuously monitored with leakage tipping bucket and evapotranspiration (prompted by a willow tree growing within the system) was measured trough precision load cells, which also allow an accurate and continuous reading of the total water storage. Five artificial soluble tracers (species of fluorobenzoic acid, FBAs, mutually passive) were selected based on low-reactivity and low-retardation in our specific soil and used to individually mark five rainfall inputs of different amplitudes and occurring at various initial soil moisture conditions. Tracer discharge concentration and hydrologic fluxes measurements provide a direct method for the assessment of the bulk effects of transport on the (backward and forward) travel time distributions in the hydrological setting. The large discrepancies observed in terms of mass recovery in the discharge (supported by ex post FBAs quantification in the soil and in the vegetation) and tracer out-fluxes dynamics emphasized the dependence of the forward travel time on the various injection times and the stages experienced by the system during the migration of the pulse. Rescaling the measured travel time distribution by using the cumulative drainage volume as an independent variable instead of the time elapsed since the injection also fails to yield to stationary distributions, as it was argued by Niemi (1997). Our experimental results support earlier theoretical speculations centered on the key role of non-stationarity on the characterization of the properties of hydrologic flow and transport phenomena. A travel time based model, with all in- and out- hydrological

  14. Finite-difference, time-domain analysis of a folded acoustic transmission line.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charles M

    2005-03-01

    Recently designed, modern versions of renais sance woodwind instruments such as the recorder and serpent use square cross sections and a folded acoustic transmission line. Conventional microwave techniques would expect that this bend would cause unwanted reflections and impedance discontinuities. This paper analyses the folded acoustic transmission line using finite-difference, time-domain techniques and shows that the discontinuity can be compensated with by the use of a manufacturable method. PMID:15857045

  15. Nonlinear response - A time domain approach. [with applications to acoustic fatigue, spacecraft and composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper reviews the basic concepts of nonlinear response of panels to surface flow and acoustic pressures, simulation of random processes, time domain solutions and the Monte Carlo Method. Applications of this procedure to the orbit-on-demand space vehicles, acoustic fatigue and composite materials are discussed. Numerical examples are included for a variety of nonlinear problems to illustrate the applicability of this method.

  16. Time of travel of the Flint River, Utah Dam to highway M-13, Michigan, August 4-8, 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummings, T. Ray; Miller, John B.

    1982-01-01

    The tracing of Rhodamine WT dye has provided time-of-travel data for waste-load allocation studies of a 42.8-mile reach of the Flint River at low flow. Dye was injected at two locations in Flint--at Utah Dam and at Grand Traverse Street. From Utah Dam to Grand Traverse Street the mean velocity of flow was 0.1 foot per second; time-of-travel was 35.3 hours. From Grand Traverse Street to Highway M-13, mean velocity was 0.7 foot per second; time-of-travel was 78.8 hours. Time-of-travel for the reach between Utah Dam and Highway M-13 was thus 114 hours. A discharge of equaled or exceeded about 90% of the time was measured at Grand Traverse Street in Flint before dye injection. (USGS)

  17. Time of travel of the Flint River, Utah Dam to highway M-13, Michigan, August 4-8, 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummings, T. Ray; Miller, John B.

    1982-01-01

    Tracing of rhodamine WT dye has provided time-of-travel data for waste-load allocation studies of a 42.8-mile reach of the Flint River at low flow. A discharge equaled or exceeded about 90 percent of the time was measured at Grand Traverse Street in Flint before dye injection. Dye was injected at two locations in Flint--at Utah Dam and at Grand Traverse Street, From Utah Dam to Grand Traverse Street, the mean velocity of flow was about 0.1 foot per second; time-of-travel was 35.3 hours. From Grand Traverse Street to Highway M-13, mean velocity was about 0.7 foot per second; time-of-travel was 78.8 hours. Time-of-travel for the reach between Utah Dam and Highway M-13 was thus 114 hours.

  18. A method for generating an illusion of backwards time travel using immersive virtual reality-an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Doron; Pizarro, Rodrigo; Or-Berkers, Keren; Neyret, Solène; Pan, Xueni; Slater, Mel

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new method, based on immersive virtual reality (IVR), to give people the illusion of having traveled backwards through time to relive a sequence of events in which they can intervene and change history. The participant had played an important part in events with a tragic outcome-deaths of strangers-by having to choose between saving 5 people or 1. We consider whether the ability to go back through time, and intervene, to possibly avoid all deaths, has an impact on how the participant views such moral dilemmas, and also whether this experience leads to a re-evaluation of past unfortunate events in their own lives. We carried out an exploratory study where in the "Time Travel" condition 16 participants relived these events three times, seeing incarnations of their past selves carrying out the actions that they had previously carried out. In a "Repetition" condition another 16 participants replayed the same situation three times, without any notion of time travel. Our results suggest that those in the Time Travel condition did achieve an illusion of "time travel" provided that they also experienced an illusion of presence in the virtual environment, body ownership, and agency over the virtual body that substituted their own. Time travel produced an increase in guilt feelings about the events that had occurred, and an increase in support of utilitarian behavior as the solution to the moral dilemma. Time travel also produced an increase in implicit morality as judged by an implicit association test. The time travel illusion was associated with a reduction of regret associated with bad decisions in their own lives. The results show that when participants have a third action that they can take to solve the moral dilemma (that does not immediately involve choosing between the 1 and the 5) then they tend to take this option, even though it is useless in solving the dilemma, and actually results in the deaths of a greater number.

  19. Acoustical Measurement Of Furnace Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Simple probes withstand severe conditions, yet give spatially-resolved temperature readings. Prototype acoustical system developed to measure temperatures from ambient to 1,800 degree F in such structures as large industrial lime kilns and recovery-boiler furnaces. Pulses of sound reflected from obstructions in sensing tube. Speed of sound and temperature in each segment deduced from travel times of pulses.

  20. Real Time Monitoring of Containerless Microreactions in Acoustically Levitated Droplets via Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Esen, Cemal; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-09-01

    Direct in-droplet (in stillo) microreaction monitoring using acoustically levitated micro droplets has been achieved by combining acoustic (ultrasonic) levitation for the first time with real time ambient tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acoustic levitation and inherent mixing of microliter volumes of reactants (3 μL droplets), yielding total reaction volumes of 6 μL, supported monitoring the acid-catalyzed degradation reaction of erythromycin A. This reaction was chosen to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of directly monitoring in stillo microreactions via hyphenated acoustic levitation and ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The microreactions took place completely in stillo over 30, 60, and 120 s within the containerless stable central pressure node of an acoustic levitator, thus readily promoting reaction miniaturization. For the evaluation of the miniaturized in stillo reactions, the degradation reactions were also carried out in vials (in vitro) with a total reaction volume of 400 μL. The reacted in vitro mixtures (6 μL total) were similarly introduced into the acoustic levitator prior to ambient ionization MS/MS analysis. The in stillo miniaturized reactions provided immediate real-time snap-shots of the degradation process for more accurate reaction monitoring and used a fraction of the reactants, while the larger scale in vitro reactions only yielded general reaction information. PMID:27505037

  1. Comparison of VLBI, TV and traveling clock techniques for time transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. H.; Waltman, E. B.; Johnston, K. J.; Santini, N. J.; Klepczynski, W. J.; Matsakis, D. N.; Angerhofer, P. E.; Kaplan, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A three part experiment was conducted to develop and compare time transfer techniques. The experiment consisted of (1) a very long baseline interferometer (VLBI), (2) a high precision portable clock time transfer system between the two sites, and (3) a television time transfer. A comparison of the VLBI and traveling clock shows each technique can perform satisfactorily at the five nsec level. There was a systematic offset of 59 nsec between the two methods, which we attributed to a difference in epochs between VLBI formatter and station clock. The VLBI method had an internal random error of one nsec at the three sigma level for a two day period. Thus, the Mark II system performed well, and VLBI shows promise of being an accurate method of time transfer. The TV system, which had technical problems during the experiment, transferred time with a random error of about 50 nsec.

  2. Detection of nonlinear picosecond acoustic pulses by time-resolved Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2014-08-14

    In time-resolved Brillouin scattering (also called picosecond ultrasonic interferometry), the time evolution of the spatial Fourier component of an optically excited acoustic strain distribution is monitored. The wave number is determined by the momentum conservation in photon-phonon interaction. For linear acoustic waves propagating in a homogeneous medium, the detected time-domain signal of the optical probe transient reflectivity shows a sinusoidal oscillation at a constant frequency known as the Brillouin frequency. This oscillation is a result of heterodyning the constant reflection from the sample surface with the Brillouin-scattered field. Here, we present an analytical theory for the nonlinear reshaping of a propagating, finite amplitude picosecond acoustic pulse, which results in a time-dependence of the observed frequency. In particular, we examine the conditions under which this information can be used to study the time-evolution of the weak-shock front speed. Depending on the initial strain pulse parameters and the time interval of its nonlinear transformation, our theory predicts the detected frequency to either be monotonically decreasing or oscillating in time. We support these theoretical predictions by comparison with available experimental data. In general, we find that picosecond ultrasonic interferometry of nonlinear acoustic pulses provides access to the nonlinear acoustic properties of a medium spanning most of the GHz frequency range.

  3. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP). PMID:26829639

  4. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP). PMID:26829639

  5. Improving Horizontal Resolution of High-frequency Surface-wave Methods Using Travel-time Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, X.; Xia, J.; Sun, S.; Shen, C.

    2015-12-01

    In surface-wave methods, horizontal resolution can be defined as the ability to distinguish anomalous objects that are laterally displaced from each other. And the horizontal length of a recognizable geological anomalous body is measured by the lateral variation of S-wave velocity. Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to determine near-surface shear-wave velocities. The acquisition of the MASW method involves the same source-receiver configuration moved successively by a fixed distance interval (a few to several stations) along a linear survey line, which is called a roll-along acquisition geometry. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section is constructed by aligning 1D models, and each inverted 1D S-wave velocity model reflects the vertical S-wave velocity variation at the midpoint of each geophone spread. Although the MASW method can improve the horizontal resolution of S-wave velocity sections to some degree, the amount of fieldwork is increased by the roll-along acquisition geometry. We propose surface-wave tomography method to investigate horizontal resolution of surface-wave exploration. Phase-velocity dispersion curves are calculated by a pair of traces within a multichannel record through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. Then with the utilization of travel-time tomography, we can obtain high resolution pure-path dispersion curves with diverse sizes of grids at different frequencies. Finally, the pseudo-2D S-wave velocity structure is reconstructed by inverting the pure-path dispersion curves. Travel-time tomography of surface waves can extract accurate dispersion curves from a record with a short receiver spacing, and it can effectively enhance the ability of random noise immunity. Synthetic tests and a real-world example have indicated that travel-time tomography has a great potential for improving the horizontal resolution of surface waves. Keywords: Travel-time tomography of surface waves

  6. Prediction of Probabilistic Sleep Distributions Following Travel Across Multiple Time Zones

    PubMed Central

    Darwent, David; Dawson, Drew; Roach, Greg D.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To parameterize and validate a model to estimate average sleep times for long-haul aviation pilots during layovers following travel across multiple time zones. The model equations were based on a weighted distribution of domicile- and local-time sleepers, and included algorithms to account for sleep loss and circadian re-synchronization. Design: Sleep times were collected from participants under normal commercial operating conditions using diaries and wrist activity monitors. Participants: Participants included a total of 306 long-haul pilots (113 captains, 120 first officers, and 73 second officers). Measurement and Results: The model was parameterized based on the average sleep/wake times observed during international flight patterns from Australia to London and Los Angeles (global R2 = 0.72). The parameterized model was validated against the average sleep/wake times observed during flight patterns from Australia to London (r2 = 0.85), Los Angeles (r2 = 0.79), New York (r2 = 0.80), and Johannesburg (r2 = 0.73). Goodness-of-fit was poorer when the parameterized model equations were used to predict the variance across the sleep/wake cycles of individual pilots (R2 = 0.42, 0.35, 0.31, and 0.28 for the validation flight patterns, respectively), in part because of substantial inter-individual variability in sleep timing and duration. Conclusions: It is possible to estimate average sleep times during layovers in international patterns with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Models of this type could form the basis of a stand-alone application to estimate the likelihood that a given duty schedule provides pilots, on average, with an adequate opportunity to sleep. Citation: Darwent D; Dawson D; Roach GD. Prediction of probabilistic sleep distributions following travel across multiple time zones. SLEEP 2010;33(2):185-195. PMID:20175402

  7. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts. PMID:26764815

  8. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q , the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v1≪cs for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v1≪cs/Q . Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  9. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  10. Quantifying the Effect of Compression Hearing Aid Release Time on Speech Acoustics and Intelligibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenstad, Lorienne M.; Souza, Pamela E.

    2005-01-01

    Compression hearing aids have the inherent, and often adjustable, feature of release time from compression. Research to date does not provide a consensus on how to choose or set release time. The current study had 2 purposes: (a) a comprehensive evaluation of the acoustic effects of release time for a single-channel compression system in quiet and…

  11. Travel time source-specific station corrections related to lithospheric structures in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, A.; Materni, V.; Console, R.; Chiappini, S.; Chiappini, M.

    2016-02-01

    We compare the locations obtained from arrival times collected by the International Seismological Centre from a network of regional and teleseismic stations for a cluster of Italian earthquakes with the locations of the same events obtained by the dense national seismic network operated by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. We find mislocations on the order of 15 km for epicentral coordinates and on the order of 25 km for depths calculated from the regional and teleseismic network and using the standard IASP91 travel times. These mislocations are generally larger than the sizes of the respective error ellipse semi-axes. We then show that systematic shifts of hypocentral coordinates can be substantially reduced by applying source-specific station corrections. Moreover, we find that the size of error ellipses characterizing the teleseismic locations is significantly reduced by the application of such corrections. Our travel time corrections are compared and found fairly consistent with information available in the literature on tomographic studies on the crust and upper mantle in the European-Mediterranean region.

  12. Chloride circulation in a lowland catchment and the formulation of transport by travel time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettin, Paolo; Velde, Ype; Zee, Sjoerd E. A. T. M.; Rinaldo, Andrea; Botter, Gianluca

    2013-08-01

    Travel times are fundamental catchment descriptors that blend key information about storage, geochemistry, flow pathways and sources of water into a coherent mathematical framework. Here we analyze travel time distributions (TTDs) (and related attributes) estimated on the basis of the extensive hydrochemical information available for the Hupsel Brook lowland catchment in the Netherlands. The relevance of the work is perceived to lie in the general importance of characterizing nonstationary TTDs to capture catchment transport properties, here chloride flux concentrations at the basin outlet. The relative roles of evapotranspiration, water storage dynamics, hydrologic pathways and mass sources/sinks are discussed. Different hydrochemical models are tested and ranked, providing compelling examples of the improved process understanding achieved through coupled calibration of flow and transport processes. The ability of the model to reproduce measured flux concentrations is shown to lie mostly in the description of nonstationarities of TTDs at multiple time scales, including short-term fluctuations induced by soil moisture dynamics in the root zone and long-term seasonal dynamics. Our results prove reliable and suggest, for instance, that drastically reducing fertilization loads for one or more years would not result in significant permanent decreases in average solute concentrations in the Hupsel runoff because of the long memory shown by the system. Through comparison of field and theoretical evidence, our results highlight, unambiguously, the basic transport mechanisms operating in the catchment at hand, with a view to general applications.

  13. 41 CFR 301-11.10 - Am I required to record departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim? 301-11.10 Section 301-11.10 Public Contracts and... dates and times on my travel claim? You must record the date of departure from, and arrival at, the... visited. You do not have to record departure/arrival times, but you must annotate your travel claim...

  14. 41 CFR 301-11.10 - Am I required to record departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim? 301-11.10 Section 301-11.10 Public Contracts and... dates and times on my travel claim? You must record the date of departure from, and arrival at, the... visited. You do not have to record departure/arrival times, but you must annotate your travel claim...

  15. 41 CFR 301-11.10 - Am I required to record departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim? 301-11.10 Section 301-11.10 Public Contracts and... dates and times on my travel claim? You must record the date of departure from, and arrival at, the... visited. You do not have to record departure/arrival times, but you must annotate your travel claim...

  16. 41 CFR 301-11.10 - Am I required to record departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim? 301-11.10 Section 301-11.10 Public Contracts and... dates and times on my travel claim? You must record the date of departure from, and arrival at, the... visited. You do not have to record departure/arrival times, but you must annotate your travel claim...

  17. 41 CFR 301-11.10 - Am I required to record departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim? 301-11.10 Section 301-11.10 Public Contracts and... dates and times on my travel claim? You must record the date of departure from, and arrival at, the... visited. You do not have to record departure/arrival times, but you must annotate your travel claim...

  18. The TimeGeo modeling framework for urban motility without travel surveys.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Yang, Yingxiang; Gupta, Siddharth; Veneziano, Daniele; Athavale, Shounak; González, Marta C

    2016-09-13

    Well-established fine-scale urban mobility models today depend on detailed but cumbersome and expensive travel surveys for their calibration. Not much is known, however, about the set of mechanisms needed to generate complete mobility profiles if only using passive datasets with mostly sparse traces of individuals. In this study, we present a mechanistic modeling framework (TimeGeo) that effectively generates urban mobility patterns with resolution of 10 min and hundreds of meters. It ties together the inference of home and work activity locations from data, with the modeling of flexible activities (e.g., other) in space and time. The temporal choices are captured by only three features: the weekly home-based tour number, the dwell rate, and the burst rate. These combined generate for each individual: (i) stay duration of activities, (ii) number of visited locations per day, and (iii) daily mobility networks. These parameters capture how an individual deviates from the circadian rhythm of the population, and generate the wide spectrum of empirically observed mobility behaviors. The spatial choices of visited locations are modeled by a rank-based exploration and preferential return (r-EPR) mechanism that incorporates space in the EPR model. Finally, we show that a hierarchical multiplicative cascade method can measure the interaction between land use and generation of trips. In this way, urban structure is directly related to the observed distance of travels. This framework allows us to fully embrace the massive amount of individual data generated by information and communication technologies (ICTs) worldwide to comprehensively model urban mobility without travel surveys.

  19. The TimeGeo modeling framework for urban motility without travel surveys.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Yang, Yingxiang; Gupta, Siddharth; Veneziano, Daniele; Athavale, Shounak; González, Marta C

    2016-09-13

    Well-established fine-scale urban mobility models today depend on detailed but cumbersome and expensive travel surveys for their calibration. Not much is known, however, about the set of mechanisms needed to generate complete mobility profiles if only using passive datasets with mostly sparse traces of individuals. In this study, we present a mechanistic modeling framework (TimeGeo) that effectively generates urban mobility patterns with resolution of 10 min and hundreds of meters. It ties together the inference of home and work activity locations from data, with the modeling of flexible activities (e.g., other) in space and time. The temporal choices are captured by only three features: the weekly home-based tour number, the dwell rate, and the burst rate. These combined generate for each individual: (i) stay duration of activities, (ii) number of visited locations per day, and (iii) daily mobility networks. These parameters capture how an individual deviates from the circadian rhythm of the population, and generate the wide spectrum of empirically observed mobility behaviors. The spatial choices of visited locations are modeled by a rank-based exploration and preferential return (r-EPR) mechanism that incorporates space in the EPR model. Finally, we show that a hierarchical multiplicative cascade method can measure the interaction between land use and generation of trips. In this way, urban structure is directly related to the observed distance of travels. This framework allows us to fully embrace the massive amount of individual data generated by information and communication technologies (ICTs) worldwide to comprehensively model urban mobility without travel surveys. PMID:27573826

  20. Transient nearfield acoustic holography based on an interpolated time-domain equivalent source method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Zhang, Yong-Bin; Xu, Liang

    2011-09-01

    Transient nearfield acoustic holography based on an interpolated time-domain equivalent source method (ESM) is proposed to reconstruct transient acoustic fields directly in the time domain. Since the equivalent source strengths solved by the traditional time-domain ESM formulation cannot be used to reconstruct the pressure on the source surface directly, an interpolation function is introduced to develop an interpolated time-domain ESM formulation which permits one to deduce an iterative reconstruction process. As the reconstruction process is ill-conditioned and especially there exists a cumulative effect of errors, the Tikhonov regularization is used to stabilize the process. Numerical examples of reconstructing transient acoustic fields from a baffled planar piston, an impulsively accelerating sphere and a cube box, respectively, demonstrate that the proposed method not only can effectively reconstruct transient acoustic fields in the time domain, but also can visualize acoustic fields in the space domain. And, in the first numerical example, the cumulative effect of errors and the validity of using the Tikhonov regularization to suppress the errors are described.

  1. The DOE Model for Improving Seismic Event Locations Using Travel Time Corrections: Description and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hipp, J.R.; Moore, S.G.; Shepherd, E.; Young, C.J.

    1998-10-20

    The U.S. National Laboratories, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, have been tasked with improv- ing the capability of the United States National Data Center (USNDC) to monitor compliance with the Comprehen- sive Test Ban Trea~ (CTBT). One of the most important services which the USNDC must provide is to locate suspicious events, preferably as accurately as possible to help identify their origin and to insure the success of on-site inspections if they are deemed necessary. The seismic location algorithm used by the USNDC has the capability to generate accurate locations by applying geographically dependent travel time corrections, but to date, none of the means, proposed for generating and representing these corrections has proven to be entirely satisfactory. In this presentation, we detail the complete DOE model for how regional calibration travel time information gathered by the National Labs will be used to improve event locations and provide more realistic location error esti- mates. We begin with residual data and error estimates from ground truth events. Our model consists of three parts: data processing, data storage, and data retrieval. The former two are effectively one-time processes, executed in advance before the system is made operational. The last step is required every time an accurate event location is needed. Data processing involves applying non-stationary Bayesian kriging to the residwd data to densifi them, and iterating to find the optimal tessellation representation for the fast interpolation in the data retrieval task. Both the kriging and the iterative re-tessellation are slow, computationally-expensive processes but this is acceptable because they are performed off-line, before any events are to be located. In the data storage task, the densified data set is stored in a database and spatially indexed. Spatial indexing improves the access efficiency of the geographically-ori- ented data requests associated with event location

  2. Quantifying uncertainties in travel time tomography using the null space shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, R. W.; Trampert, J.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2010-12-01

    Due to the underdetermined nature of large tomographic inverse problems, a sizable nullspace exists. It is therefore important to investigate the uncertainty of tomographic models produced by inverse problems with multiple solutions. The nullspace shuttle (Deal and Nolet, 1996) has been designed to exploit components of the nullspace, along with a priori information or a physical model, in order to improve or enhance the original minimum-norm solution. We generalize the null space shuttle technique to quantify uncertainties in a classical study of travel time tomography (Li et al.,2008) and examine a range of models that are consistent with the travel time data. The family of resulting tomographic model is used to quantify the uncertainties in the original tomographic image, a global P-wave speed perturbation mantle model. We further show what is and what is not resolved in the aforementioned tomographic image. With the null space shuttle we are able to alter or remove structures (e.g. slabs, plumes) in the original tomographic image. We suggest that this technique should be routinely applied before physical interpretations of tomographic images are made.

  3. How accessible are coral reefs to people? A global assessment based on travel time.

    PubMed

    Maire, Eva; Cinner, Joshua; Velez, Laure; Huchery, Cindy; Mora, Camilo; Dagata, Stephanie; Vigliola, Laurent; Wantiez, Laurent; Kulbicki, Michel; Mouillot, David

    2016-04-01

    The depletion of natural resources has become a major issue in many parts of the world, with the most accessible resources being most at risk. In the terrestrial realm, resource depletion has classically been related to accessibility through road networks. In contrast, in the marine realm, the impact on living resources is often framed into the Malthusian theory of human density around ecosystems. Here, we develop a new framework to estimate the accessibility of global coral reefs using potential travel time from the nearest human settlement or market. We show that 58% of coral reefs are located < 30 min from the nearest human settlement. We use a case study from New Caledonia to demonstrate that travel time from the market is a strong predictor of fish biomass on coral reefs. We also highlight a relative deficit of protection on coral reef areas near people, with disproportional protection on reefs far from people. This suggests that conservation efforts are targeting low-conflict reefs or places that may already be receiving de facto protection due to their isolation. Our global assessment of accessibility in the marine realm is a critical step to better understand the interplay between humans and resources. PMID:26879898

  4. Crustal Structure Beneath Pleasant Valley, Nevada from Local and Regional Earthquake Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, L. B.; Nabelek, J.; Braunmiller, J.

    2011-12-01

    In 1915 the Pleasant Valley fault in the Basin and Range Province of northern Nevada ruptured in a Mw~7 earthquake, one of the largest normal faulting earthquakes in U.S. history. We are currently operating a densely spaced linear array of broadband three-component seismometers across the Pleasant Valley fault to investigate the structure and the geometry of the fault zone. Here, we present a local crustal velocity model derived from P and S wave travel times of local and regional earthquakes recorded by the Pleasant Valley array. Regional events in northern California, eastern Nevada and Utah that occurred in line with the array are well recorded and provide constraints on upper mantle velocities. Many local seismic events were also observed. Only a few of these events were detected by the ANSS network, reflecting the limited detection capability in sparsely instrumented northern Nevada. The local event set includes earthquakes, mining blasts and sonic booms from nearby jet airplane flights. A subset of these events was located using Hypoinverse. Their travel time curves are used to estimate crustal structure and velocity in the Pleasant Valley region. This is an EarthScope FlexArray project.

  5. Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Show Reduced Specificity and Less Positive Events in Mental Time Travel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing-jie; Liu, Lu-lu; Cui, Ji-fang; Wang, Ya; Chen, An-tao; Li, Feng-hua; Wang, Wei-hong; Zheng, Han-feng; Gan, Ming-yuan; Li, Chun-qiu; Shum, David H. K.; Chan, Raymond C. K.

    2016-01-01

    Mental time travel refers to the ability to recall past events and to imagine possible future events. Schizophrenia (SCZ) patients have problems in remembering specific personal experiences in the past and imagining what will happen in the future. This study aimed to examine episodic past and future thinking in SCZ spectrum disorders including SCZ patients and individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) proneness who are at risk for developing SCZ. Thirty-two SCZ patients, 30 SPD proneness individuals, and 33 healthy controls participated in the study. The Sentence Completion for Events from the Past Test (SCEPT) and the Sentence Completion for Events in the Future Test were used to measure past and future thinking abilities. Results showed that SCZ patients showed significantly reduced specificity in recalling past and imagining future events, they generated less proportion of specific and extended events compared to healthy controls. SPD proneness individuals only generated less extended events compared to healthy controls. The reduced specificity was mainly manifested in imagining future events. Both SCZ patients and SPD proneness individuals generated less positive events than controls. These results suggest that mental time travel impairments in SCZ spectrum disorders and have implications for understanding their cognitive and emotional deficits. PMID:27507958

  6. Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Show Reduced Specificity and Less Positive Events in Mental Time Travel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing-Jie; Liu, Lu-Lu; Cui, Ji-Fang; Wang, Ya; Chen, An-Tao; Li, Feng-Hua; Wang, Wei-Hong; Zheng, Han-Feng; Gan, Ming-Yuan; Li, Chun-Qiu; Shum, David H K; Chan, Raymond C K

    2016-01-01

    Mental time travel refers to the ability to recall past events and to imagine possible future events. Schizophrenia (SCZ) patients have problems in remembering specific personal experiences in the past and imagining what will happen in the future. This study aimed to examine episodic past and future thinking in SCZ spectrum disorders including SCZ patients and individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) proneness who are at risk for developing SCZ. Thirty-two SCZ patients, 30 SPD proneness individuals, and 33 healthy controls participated in the study. The Sentence Completion for Events from the Past Test (SCEPT) and the Sentence Completion for Events in the Future Test were used to measure past and future thinking abilities. Results showed that SCZ patients showed significantly reduced specificity in recalling past and imagining future events, they generated less proportion of specific and extended events compared to healthy controls. SPD proneness individuals only generated less extended events compared to healthy controls. The reduced specificity was mainly manifested in imagining future events. Both SCZ patients and SPD proneness individuals generated less positive events than controls. These results suggest that mental time travel impairments in SCZ spectrum disorders and have implications for understanding their cognitive and emotional deficits. PMID:27507958

  7. Human travel and time spent at destination: impact on the epidemic invasion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Chiara; Tizzoni, Michele; Colizza, Vittoria

    2012-02-01

    Human mobility has a strong impact on the spatial spread of infectious diseases. Analyses of metapopulation models, that consider the epidemic spreading on a network of populations, show that topological and traffic fluctuations favor the global epidemic invasion. These studies consider markovian mobility (i.e. the memory of the origin of traveling individuals is lost) or non-markovian mobility with homogeneous timescales (i.e. individuals travel to a destination and come back with a homogenous rate). However, the time spent at destination is found to exhibit wide fluctuations. Such varying length of stay crucially affects the mixing among individuals and hence the disease transmission dynamics. In order to explore this aspect, we present a modeling framework that, by using a time-scale separation technique, allows analyzing the behavior of spreading processes on a complex metapopulation network with non-markovian mobility characterized by heterogeneously distributed timescales. Analytical and numerical results show how the degree of heterogeneity of the length of stay is able, alone, to drive a phase transition between local outbreak and global invasion. This highlights the importance of the interplay between mobility and disease timescales in the propagation of an epidemic.

  8. How accessible are coral reefs to people? A global assessment based on travel time.

    PubMed

    Maire, Eva; Cinner, Joshua; Velez, Laure; Huchery, Cindy; Mora, Camilo; Dagata, Stephanie; Vigliola, Laurent; Wantiez, Laurent; Kulbicki, Michel; Mouillot, David

    2016-04-01

    The depletion of natural resources has become a major issue in many parts of the world, with the most accessible resources being most at risk. In the terrestrial realm, resource depletion has classically been related to accessibility through road networks. In contrast, in the marine realm, the impact on living resources is often framed into the Malthusian theory of human density around ecosystems. Here, we develop a new framework to estimate the accessibility of global coral reefs using potential travel time from the nearest human settlement or market. We show that 58% of coral reefs are located < 30 min from the nearest human settlement. We use a case study from New Caledonia to demonstrate that travel time from the market is a strong predictor of fish biomass on coral reefs. We also highlight a relative deficit of protection on coral reef areas near people, with disproportional protection on reefs far from people. This suggests that conservation efforts are targeting low-conflict reefs or places that may already be receiving de facto protection due to their isolation. Our global assessment of accessibility in the marine realm is a critical step to better understand the interplay between humans and resources.

  9. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beeman, John W.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Faler, Joyce C.

    1990-11-01

    The Water Budget is a volume of water used to enhance environmental conditions (flows) in the Columbia and Snake rivers for juvenile salmonids during their seaward migration. To manage the Water Budget, the Fish Passage Center estimates travel times of juvenile salmonids in index reaches of the main-stem rivers, using information on river flows and the migrational characteristics of the juvenile salmonids. This study was initiated to provide physiological information on the juvenile salmonids used for these travel time estimates. The physiological ability to respond to stressors was evaluated by measuring concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and chlorides before and after a 30-s handling-stress challenge test. The development of smoltification was assessed by measuring gill Na{sup +}--K{sup +} ATPase activity and plasma thyroxine concentrations. Prevalence of bacterial kidney disease in spring chinook salmon was generally higher than in 1988, ranging from 81--100{percent} using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Fish from Snake River hatcheries had more severe infections than those from mid-Columbia hatcheries. 42 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Modelling pedestrian travel time and the design of facilities: a queuing approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Khalidur; Ghani, Noraida Abdul; Kamil, Anton Abdulbasah; Mustafa, Adli; Kabir Chowdhury, Md Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Pedestrian movements are the consequence of several complex and stochastic facts. The modelling of pedestrian movements and the ability to predict the travel time are useful for evaluating the performance of a pedestrian facility. However, only a few studies can be found that incorporate the design of the facility, local pedestrian body dimensions, the delay experienced by the pedestrians, and level of service to the pedestrian movements. In this paper, a queuing based analytical model is developed as a function of relevant determinants and functional factors to predict the travel time on pedestrian facilities. The model can be used to assess the overall serving rate or performance of a facility layout and correlate it to the level of service that is possible to provide the pedestrians. It has also the ability to provide a clear suggestion on the designing and sizing of pedestrian facilities. The model is empirically validated and is found to be a robust tool to understand how well a particular walking facility makes possible comfort and convenient pedestrian movements. The sensitivity analysis is also performed to see the impact of some crucial parameters of the developed model on the performance of pedestrian facilities.

  11. Magnetic and Thermal Contributions to Helioseismic Travel times in Simulated Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Douglas; Felipe, Tobias; Birch, Aaron; Crouch, Ashley D.

    2016-05-01

    The interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge, since waves propagating through sunspots are potentially affected by both mode conversion and changes in the thermal structure of the spots. We carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through a variety of models which alternately isolate either the thermal or magnetic structure of the sunspot or include both of these. We find that helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. Using insight from ray theory, we find that travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level of the measurements) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it suggests a path towards inversions for sunspot structure. This research has been funded by the Spanish MINECO through grant AYA2014-55078-P, by the NASA Heliophysics Division through NNX14AD42G and NNH12CF23C, and the NSF Solar Terrestrial program through AGS-1127327.

  12. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound. PMID:27587311

  13. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound. PMID:27587311

  14. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound.

  15. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-08-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a "smart needle" to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time-reversal acoustics-focused ultrasound on the spatial distribution of infused low- and high-molecular weight tracer molecules are examined in live, anesthetized rats. Results show that exposing the rat brain to focused ultrasound significantly increases the penetration of infused compounds into the brain. The addition of stabilized microbubbles enhances the effect of ultrasound exposure.

  16. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-08-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a "smart needle" to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time-reversal acoustics-focused ultrasound on the spatial distribution of infused low- and high-molecular weight tracer molecules are examined in live, anesthetized rats. Results show that exposing the rat brain to focused ultrasound significantly increases the penetration of infused compounds into the brain. The addition of stabilized microbubbles enhances the effect of ultrasound exposure. PMID:23927197

  17. New theory on the reverberation of rooms. [considering sound wave travel time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujolle, J.

    1974-01-01

    The inadequacy of the various theories which have been proposed for finding the reverberation time of rooms can be explained by an attempt to examine what might occur at a listening point when image sources of determined acoustic power are added to the actual source. The number and locations of the image sources are stipulated. The intensity of sound at the listening point can be calculated by means of approximations whose conditions for validity are given. This leads to the proposal of a new expression for the reverberation time, yielding results which fall between those obtained through use of the Eyring and Millington formulae; these results are made to depend on the shape of the room by means of a new definition of the mean free path.

  18. Changes in Wisconsin English over 110 Years: A Real-Time Acoustic Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delahanty, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The growing set of studies on American regional dialects have to date focused heavily on vowels while few examine consonant features and none provide acoustic analysis of both vowel and consonant features. This dissertation uses real-time data on both vowels and consonants to show how Wisconsin English has changed over time. Together, the…

  19. 41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate will he/she receive? 302-4.204 Section 302-4.204 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System... my spouse does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem...

  20. 41 CFR 302-3.219 - Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? 302-3.219 Section 302-3.219 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION....219 Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? (a) If...

  1. 41 CFR 302-3.219 - Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? 302-3.219 Section 302-3.219 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION....219 Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? (a) If...

  2. 41 CFR 302-3.219 - Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? 302-3.219 Section 302-3.219 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION....219 Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? (a) If...

  3. 41 CFR 302-3.315 - May I be granted an extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel? 302-3.315 Section 302-3.315 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES 3... be granted an extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel? Yes, your agency...

  4. 41 CFR 302-3.315 - May I be granted an extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel? 302-3.315 Section 302-3.315 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES 3... be granted an extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel? Yes, your agency...

  5. 41 CFR 302-3.315 - May I be granted an extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel? 302-3.315 Section 302-3.315 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES 3... be granted an extension to the time limit for beginning my separation travel? Yes, your agency...

  6. 41 CFR 302-3.219 - Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? 302-3.219 Section 302-3.219 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION....219 Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? (a) If...

  7. 41 CFR 302-3.219 - Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? 302-3.219 Section 302-3.219 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION....219 Is there a limit on how many times I may receive reimbursement for tour renewal travel? (a) If...

  8. High-Resolution Mapping of Flows in the Solar Interior: Fully Consistent OLA Inversion of Helioseismic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiewicz, J.; Gizon, L.; Birch, A. C.

    2008-09-01

    To recover the flow information encoded in travel-time data of time distance helioseismology, accurate forward modeling and a robust inversion of the travel times are required. We accomplish this using three-dimensional finite-frequency travel-time sensitivity kernels for flows along with a (2+1)-dimensional (2+1D) optimally localized averaging (OLA) inversion scheme. Travel times are measured by ridge filtering MDI full-disk Doppler data and the corresponding Born sensitivity kernels are computed for these particular travel times. We also utilize the full noise-covariance properties of the travel times, which allow us to accurately estimate the errors for all inversions. The whole procedure is thus fully consistent. Because of ridge filtering, the kernel functions separate in the horizontal and vertical directions, motivating our choice of a 2+1D inversion implementation. The inversion procedure also minimizes cross-talk effects among the three flow components, and the averaging kernels resulting from the inversion show very small amounts of cross-talk. We obtain three-dimensional maps of vector solar flows in the quiet Sun at horizontal spatial resolutions of 7-10 Mm using generally 24 hours of data. For all of the flow maps we provide averaging kernels and the noise estimates. We present examples to test the inferred flows, such as a comparison with Doppler data, in which we find a correlation of 0.9. We also present results for quiet-Sun supergranular flows at different depths in the upper convection zone. Our estimation of the vertical velocity shows good qualitative agreement with the horizontal vector flows. We also show vertical flows measured solely from f-mode travel times. In addition, we demonstrate how to directly invert for the horizontal divergence and flow vorticity. Finally we study inferred flow-map correlations at different depths and find a rapid decrease in this correlation with depth, consistent with other recent local helioseismic analyses.

  9. Travel Times of Later Phases for Transmitting Waves through a Fracturing Westerly Granite Sample under a Triaxial Compressive Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imahori, A.; Kawakata, H.; Hirano, S.; Yoshimitsu, N.; Takahashi, N.

    2015-12-01

    In laboratory, it is well-known that the elastic wave speed varies prior to compression fracture of the rock (e.g., Lockner et al., 1977, JGR). Using an enough number of travel times of elastic wave paths in a sample, we can estimate internal structure of the sample. However, the number of the elastic wave transducers is limited, and only the travel times of the first arrival are available in most experiments. Employing broadband transducers (Yoshimitsu et al., 2014, GRL), later phases become available to be analyzed. In the present study, we conduct a triaxial compressive test at room temperature under a dry condition and a confining pressure of 50 MPa, using a cylindrical Westerly granite sample of 100 mm long by 50 mm in diameter. Eight transducers are attached on the sample surface. One of the transducers is used as a wave source and voltage steps are repeatedly applied to it. The elastic waves passing through the sample are sensed by the other broadband transducers, and recorded at a sampling rate of 20 Msps. P-wave speed is estimated from the travel time of the direct P, and Vp/Vs value is assumed to be the √3 to give S-wave speed. We assume that all wave paths never bend except at the top and bottom surface of the sample. We calculate the travel times of later phases reflected at the top and/or bottom surfaces within 3 times. We collate the calculated travel times with observed waveforms. We can identify the travel time of two phases: single reflection from both top and bottom of the sample. On the other hand, some other observed and calculated phase arrivals do not match with each other. Then, we try to identify some remarkable phases using the calculated travel times of PS and SP converted waves and interfacial waves, taking into consideration of wave speed anisotropy.

  10. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  11. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  12. Distributed acoustic mapping based on interferometry of phase optical time-domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chang; Wang, Chen; Shang, Ying; Liu, Xiaohui; Peng, Gangding

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the design and characterization of a distributed optical fiber sensing system based on Michelson interferometer of the phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometer (φ-OTDR) for acoustic measurement. Phase, amplitude, frequency response and location information can be directly obtained at the same time by using the passive 3×3 coupler demodulation. In order to simulate sound profiles of seismic or hydroacoustic imaging, experiments on detection of multiple piezoelectric transducers (PZT) are carried out. The result shows that our system can well demodulate different acoustic sources with different intensities.

  13. Three-dimensional structure of inner core anisotropy from PKP differential travel times and waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.

    2003-12-01

    Discussion with Prof. Don Anderson was one of the most inspiring and stimulating experiences in my science career when we were searching for evidence for inner core anisotropy a little over ten years ago. At the time, the hypothesis of inner core anisotropy was not fully accepted. Now models of 3D inner core anisotropy have been proposed. Recent studies suggest that the uppermost inner core is nearly isotropic and western and eastern hemispheres of the inner core are different in both velocity and anisotropy. Yet differential PKP travel times at near antipodal distances show convincingly that significant anisotropy exists in the bulk of the inner core at both hemispheres. Recently Xinlei Sun and I assemble differential PKP travel-time measurements at distances of 145 to 180o, obtained by us and others over the years, to investigate the 3-D structure of the inner core anisotropy. These differential times reduces the biases from earthquake mislocations and heterogeneous upper mantle. We invert for 3D inner core anisotropy by dividing the inner core into four layers in radius and six sectors in longitudes. The top 100 km of the inner core is assumed to be isotropic. Our inversion suggests that at depth of 100-500 km below the inner core boundary, the quasi-eastern hemisphere (40 to 160oE) is nearly isotropic (less than 1% of anisotropy) while the western hemisphere is strongly anisotropic (3 to 5% anisotropy). However, at depth of 500-900 km, both hemispheres are anisotropic (about 3% anisotropy). At the innermost 300 km of the inner core, the form of anisotropy seems distinctly different. One of the most dramatic manifestations of changes in anisotropy is the observation of seismic triplication of inner core waves; a type of multipathing effect due to heterogeneity that Don challenged to think about even in the early days. The best example is the seismic triplication observed from South Sandwich Islands earthquakes recorded at stations in Canada and Alaska.

  14. Nonlinear teleseismic tomography at Long Valley caldera, using three-dimensional minimum travel time ray tracing

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, C.M.; Steck, L.K.; Dawson, P.B.

    1995-10-10

    The authors explore the impact of three-dimensional minimum travel time ray tracing on nonlinear teleseismic inversion. This problem has particular significance when trying to image strongly contrasting low-velocity bodies, such as magma chambers, because strongly refracted/and/or diffracted rays may precede the direct P wave arrival traditionally used in straight-ray seismic tomography. They use a simplex-based ray tracer to compute the three-dimensional, minimum travel time ray paths and employ an interative technique to cope with nonlinearity. Results from synthetic data show that their algorithm results in better model reconstructions compared with traditional straight-ray inversions. The authors reexamine the teleseismic data collected at Long Valley caldera by the U.S. Geological Survey. The most prominent feature of their result is a 25-30% low-velocity zone centered at 11.5 km depth beneath the northwestern quandrant of the caldera. Beneath this at a depth of 24.5 km is a more diffuse 15% low-velocity zone. In general, the low velocities tend to deepen to the south and east. The authors interpret the shallow feature to be the residual Long Valley caldera magma chamber, while the deeper feature may represent basaltic magmas ponded in the midcrust. The deeper position of the prominent low-velocity region in comparison to earlier tomographic images is a result of using three-dimensional rays rather than straight rays in the ray tracing. The magnitude of the low-velocity anomaly is a factor of {approximately}3 times larger than earlier models from linear arrival time inversions and is consistent with models based on observations of ray bending at sites within the caldera. These results imply the presence of anywhere from 7 to 100% partial melt beneath the caldera. 40 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Rapid Adjustment of Circadian Clocks to Simulated Travel to Time Zones across the Globe.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth M; Gorman, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Daily rhythms in mammalian physiology and behavior are generated by a central pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the timing of which is set by light from the environment. When the ambient light-dark cycle is shifted, as occurs with travel across time zones, the SCN and its output rhythms must reset or re-entrain their phases to match the new schedule-a sluggish process requiring about 1 day per hour shift. Using a global assay of circadian resetting to 6 equidistant time-zone meridians, we document this characteristically slow and distance-dependent resetting of Syrian hamsters under typical laboratory lighting conditions, which mimic summer day lengths. The circadian pacemaker, however, is additionally entrainable with respect to its waveform (i.e., the shape of the 24-h oscillation) allowing for tracking of seasonally varying day lengths. We here demonstrate an unprecedented, light exposure-based acceleration in phase resetting following 2 manipulations of circadian waveform. Adaptation of circadian waveforms to long winter nights (8 h light, 16 h dark) doubled the shift response in the first 3 days after the shift. Moreover, a bifurcated waveform induced by exposure to a novel 24-h light-dark-light-dark cycle permitted nearly instant resetting to phase shifts from 4 to 12 h in magnitude, representing a 71% reduction in the mismatch between the activity rhythm and the new photocycle. Thus, a marked enhancement of phase shifting can be induced via nonpharmacological, noninvasive manipulation of the circadian pacemaker waveform in a model species for mammalian circadian rhythmicity. Given the evidence of conserved flexibility in the human pacemaker waveform, these findings raise the promise of flexible resetting applicable to circadian disruption in shift workers, frequent time-zone travelers, and any individual forced to adjust to challenging schedules.

  16. Separation of Main and Tail Rotor Noise Sources from Ground-Based Acoustic Measurements Using Time-Domain De-Dopplerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of separating the contributions of helicopter main and tail rotor noise sources is presented, making use of ground-based acoustic measurements. The method employs time-domain de-Dopplerization to transform the acoustic pressure time-history data collected from an array of ground-based microphones to the equivalent time-history signals observed by an array of virtual inflight microphones traveling with the helicopter. The now-stationary signals observed by the virtual microphones are then periodically averaged with the main and tail rotor once per revolution triggers. The averaging process suppresses noise which is not periodic with the respective rotor, allowing for the separation of main and tail rotor pressure time-histories. The averaged measurements are then interpolated across the range of directivity angles captured by the microphone array in order to generate separate acoustic hemispheres for the main and tail rotor noise sources. The new method is successfully applied to ground-based microphone measurements of a Bell 206B3 helicopter and demonstrates the strong directivity characteristics of harmonic noise radiation from both the main and tail rotors of that helicopter.

  17. Groundwater vulnerability assessment for the karst aquifer of Tanour and Rasoun spring using EPIK, COP, and travel time methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Sauter, Martin; Margane, Armin; Ptak, Thomas; Wiegand, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Key words: Karst, groundwater vulnerability, EPIK, COP, travel time, Jordan. Karst aquifers are especially sensitive to short-lived contaminants because of fast water travel times and a low storage capacity in the conduit system. Tanour and Rasoun karst springs located around 75 km northwest of the city of Amman in Jordan represent the main domestic water supply for the surrounding villages. Both springs suffer from pollution events especially during the winter season, either by microbiological contamination due to wastewater leakage from septic tanks or by wastewater discharge from local olive oil presses. To assess the vulnerability of the karst aquifer of Tanour and Rasoun spring and its sensitivity for pollution, two different intrinsic groundwater vulnerability methods were applied: EPIK and COP. In addition, a travel time vulnerability method was applied to determine the time water travels from different points in the catchment to the streams, as a function of land surface gradients and presumed lateral flow within the epikarst. For the application of the COP and EPIK, a detailed geological survey was carried out to determine karst features and the karst network development within the catchment area. In addition, parameters, such as soil data, long term daily precipitation data, land use and topographical data were collected. For the application of the travel time vulnerability method, flow length, hydraulic conductivity, effective porosity, and slope gradient was used in order to determining the travel time in days. ArcGIS software was used for map preparation. The results of the combined vulnerability methods (COP, EPIK and travel time) show a high percentage of "very high" to "moderate" vulnerable areas within the catchment area of Tanour and Rasoun karst springs. Therefore, protection of the catchment area of Tanour and Rasoun springs from pollution and proper management of land use types is urgently needed to maintain the quality of drinking water in the

  18. Acoustic Imaging in Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Sun, Ming-Tsung; LaBonte, Barry; Chen, Huei-Ru; Yeh, Sheng-Jen; Team, The TON

    1999-04-01

    The time-variant acoustic signal at a point in the solar interior can be constructed from observations at the surface, based on the knowledge of how acoustic waves travel in the Sun: the time-distance relation of the p-modes. The basic principle and properties of this imaging technique are discussed in detail. The helioseismic data used in this study were taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON). The time series of observed acoustic signals on the solar surface is treated as a phased array. The time-distance relation provides the phase information among the phased array elements. The signal at any location at any time can be reconstructed by summing the observed signal at array elements in phase and with a proper normalization. The time series of the constructed acoustic signal contains information on frequency, phase, and intensity. We use the constructed intensity to obtain three-dimensional acoustic absorption images. The features in the absorption images correlate with the magnetic field in the active region. The vertical extension of absorption features in the active region is smaller in images constructed with shorter wavelengths. This indicates that the vertical resolution of the three-dimensional images depends on the range of modes used in constructing the signal. The actual depths of the absorption features in the active region may be smaller than those shown in the three-dimensional images.

  19. Travelling diabetics.

    PubMed

    Chełmińska, Katarzyna; Jaremin, Bogdan

    2002-01-01

    During the past several decades, the number of both business and tourist travels has greatly increased. Among them are persons suffering from chronic diseases, including diabetics for whom travels pose the additional health-hazard. Irrespective of better education, self-control and constantly improving quality of specialistic equipment available, diabetics still are the group of patients requiring particular attention. In the case of travelling diabetics, problems may occur concerning the transport and storage of insulin, as well as control of glycaemia, all caused by irregularity of meals, variable diet, physical activity, stress, kinetosis (sea voyages), and the change of time zones. The travel may as well evoke ailments caused by the change of climate and concomitant diseases such as traveller's diarrhoea, malaria, etc. Apart from avoiding glycaemia fluctuations, important for retaining health of diabetics is the prevention of other diseases and carrying the necessary drugs.

  20. Estimation of ground-water travel time at the Hanford Site: Description, past work, and future needs

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M. D.; Graham, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The time for a contaminant to travel from a source to the biosphere is only one component of evaluating the consequences of ground-water contamination in the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site. The three components necessary for evaluating consequences of contamination are the location of contaminant outflow to the biosphere, the time of contaminant arrival at the outflow location, and the quantity of contaminants reaching the outflow location. This report focuses on one component, the contaminant arrival time or travel time, because variations in estimates of this parameter at the Hanford Site have generated considerable interest. 58 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Petri Net Decomposition Approach for Bi-Objective Routing for AGV Systems Minimizing Total Traveling Time and Equalizing Delivery Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Shuhei; Nishi, Tatsushi; Mariyama, Toshisada; Kataoka, Satomi; Shoda, Kazuya; Matsumura, Katsuhiko

    In this paper, we propose Petri net decomposition approach for bi-objective optimization of conflict-free routing for AGV systems. The objective is minimizing total traveling time and equalizing delivery time simultaneously. The dispatching and conflict-free routing problem for AGVs is represented as a bi-objective optimal firing sequence problem for Petri Net. A Petri net decomposition approach is proposed to solve the bi-objective optimization problem efficiently. The convergence of the proposed algorithm is improved reducing search region by the proposed coordination method. The effectiveness of the proposed method is compared with that of a nearest neighborhood dispatching method. Computational results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Travel time analysis for a subsurface drained sub-watershed in Upper Big Walnut Creek Watershed, Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Runoff travel time, which is a function of watershed and storm characteristics, is an important parameter affecting the prediction accuracy of hydrologic models. Although, time of concentration (tc) is a most widely used time parameter, it has multiple conceptual and computational definitions. Most ...

  3. Real-time GMAW quality classification using an artificial neural network with airborne acoustic signals as inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Matteson, A.; Morris, R.; Tate, R.

    1993-12-31

    The acoustic signal produced by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) arc contains information about the behavior of the arc column, the molten pool and droplet transfer. It is possible to detect some defect producing conditions from the acoustic signal from the GMAW arc. An intelligent sensor, called the Weld Acoustic Monitor (WAM) has been developed to take advantage of this acoustic information in order to provide real-time quality assessment information for process control. The WAM makes use of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to classify the characteristic arc acoustic signals of acceptable and unacceptable welds. The ANN used in the Weld Acoustic Monitor developed its own set of rules for this classification problem by learning a data base of known GMAW acoustic signals.

  4. The time travelling self: comparing self and other in narratives of past and future events.

    PubMed

    Grysman, Azriel; Prabhakar, Janani; Anglin, Stephanie M; Hudson, Judith A

    2013-09-01

    Mental time travel research emphasizes the connection between past and future thinking, whereas autobiographical memory research emphasizes the interrelationship of self and memory. This study explored the relationship between self and memory when thinking about both past and future events. Participants reported events from the near and distant past and future, for themselves, a close friend, or an acquaintance. Past events were rated higher in phenomenological quality than future events, and near self events were rated higher in quality than those about friends. Although future events were more positive than past events, only valence ratings for self and close friend showed a linear increase in positivity from distant past to future. Content analysis showed that this increase in positivity could not be ascribed to choosing events from the cultural life script. These findings provide evidence for the role of personal goals in imagining the future.

  5. Personality and mental time travel: a differential approach to autonoetic consciousness.

    PubMed

    Quoidbach, Jordi; Hansenne, Michel; Mottet, Caroline

    2008-12-01

    Recent research on autonoetic consciousness indicates that the ability to remember the past and the ability to project oneself into the future are closely related. The purpose of the present study was to confirm this proposition by examining whether the relationship observed between personality and episodic memory could be extended to episodic future thinking and, more generally, to investigate the influence of personality traits on self-information processing in the past and in the future. Results show that Neuroticism and Harm Avoidance predict more negative past memories and future projections. Other personality dimensions exhibit a more limited influence on mental time travel (MTT). Therefore, our study provide an additional evidence to the idea that MTT into the past and into the future rely on a common set of processes by which past experiences are used to envision the future. PMID:18508283

  6. A New Non-Hausdorff Spacetime Model for Resolution of the Time Travel Paradoxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharlow, Mark F.

    1998-03-01

    Physicists interested in chronology-violating spacetimes have considered various strategies for avoiding the time travel paradoxes which can arise in those spacetimes. One such strategy is the adoption of a branching (non-Hausdorff) topology for spacetime. Branching spacetime models also arise in other physical contexts, such as the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. A known objection to the idea of branching spacetime stems from the fact that an observer in such a spacetime may have multiple futures or pasts. In this paper I describe a new non-Hausdorff spacetime model in which each observer has a unique history. This model differs topologically from previous non-Hausdorff spacetime models in that is not aT1-space.

  7. Inverting travel times with a triplication. [spline fitting technique applied to lunar seismic data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarosch, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    A method based on the use of constrained spline fits is used to overcome the difficulties arising when body-wave data in the form of T-delta are reduced to the tau-p form in the presence of cusps. In comparison with unconstrained spline fits, the method proposed here tends to produce much smoother models which lie approximately in the middle of the bounds produced by the extremal method. The method is noniterative and, therefore, computationally efficient. The method is applied to the lunar seismic data, where at least one triplication is presumed to occur in the P-wave travel-time curve. It is shown, however, that because of an insufficient number of data points for events close to the antipode of the center of the lunar network, the present analysis is not accurate enough to resolve the problem of a possible lunar core.

  8. Solute travel time in the vadose zone under RWMC at INEL

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, J.C.P.; Tian, J.

    1995-02-27

    Solute transport in the vadose zone under the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is considered. The objective is to assess the relative importance of variables involved in modeling the travel time of a conservative solute from ground surface to water table. The vadose zone under RWMC is composed of several layers of basalt flows interceded with sediment layers. The thickness of the layers varies with location. The hydraulic properties also vary. The extents of the variations are large, with standard deviations exceed mean in some instances. The vadose zone is idealized as composed of horizontal layers. Solute transport starts at the ground surface and moves vertically downwards to the water table. The perceived process is one-dimensional. This study used VS2DT, a computer code developed by the US Geological Survey, for simulating solute transport in variably saturated porous media.

  9. Integrating stochastic time-dependent travel speed in solution methods for the dynamic dial-a-ride problem

    PubMed Central

    Schilde, M.; Doerner, K.F.; Hartl, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    In urban areas, logistic transportation operations often run into problems because travel speeds change, depending on the current traffic situation. If not accounted for, time-dependent and stochastic travel speeds frequently lead to missed time windows and thus poorer service. Especially in the case of passenger transportation, it often leads to excessive passenger ride times as well. Therefore, time-dependent and stochastic influences on travel speeds are relevant for finding feasible and reliable solutions. This study considers the effect of exploiting statistical information available about historical accidents, using stochastic solution approaches for the dynamic dial-a-ride problem (dynamic DARP). The authors propose two pairs of metaheuristic solution approaches, each consisting of a deterministic method (average time-dependent travel speeds for planning) and its corresponding stochastic version (exploiting stochastic information while planning). The results, using test instances with up to 762 requests based on a real-world road network, show that in certain conditions, exploiting stochastic information about travel speeds leads to significant improvements over deterministic approaches. PMID:25844013

  10. Spatially Distributed Characterization of Catchment Dynamics Using Travel-Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heße, F.; Zink, M.; Attinger, S.

    2015-12-01

    The description of storage and transport of both water and solved contaminants in catchments is very difficult due to the high heterogeneity of the subsurface properties that govern their fate. This heterogeneity, combined with a generally limited knowledge about the subsurface, results in high degrees of uncertainty. As a result, stochastic methods are increasingly applied, where the relevant processes are modeled as being random. Within these methods, quantities like the catchment travel or residence time of a water parcel are described using probability density functions (PDF). The derivation of these PDF's is typically done by using the water fluxes and states of the catchment. A successful application of such frameworks is therefore contingent on a good quantification of these fluxes and states across the different spatial scales. The objective of this study is to use travel times for the characterization of an ca. 1000 square kilometer, humid catchment in Central Germany. To determine the states and fluxes, we apply the mesoscale Hydrological Model mHM, a spatially distributed hydrological model to the catchment. Using detailed data of precipitation, land cover, morphology and soil type as inputs, mHM is able to determine fluxes like recharge and evapotranspiration and states like soil moisture as outputs. Using these data, we apply the above theoretical framework to our catchment. By virtue of the aforementioned properties of mHM, we are able to describe the storage and release of water with a high spatial resolution. This allows for a comprehensive description of the flow and transport dynamics taking place in the catchment. The spatial distribution of such dynamics is then compared with land cover and soil moisture maps as well as driving forces like precipitation and temperature to determine the most predictive factors. In addition, we investigate how non-local data like the age distribution of discharge flows are impacted by, and therefore allow to infer

  11. Spatially Distributed Characterization of Soil Dynamics Using Travel-Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, Falk; Zink, Matthias; Attinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    The description of storage and transport of both water and solved contaminants in catchments is very difficult due to the high heterogeneity of the subsurface properties that govern their fate. This heterogeneity, combined with a generally limited knowledge about the subsurface, results in high degrees of uncertainty. As a result, stochastic methods are increasingly applied, where the relevant processes are modeled as being random. Within these methods, quantities like the catchment travel or residence time of a water parcel are described using probability density functions (PDF). The derivation of these PDF's is typically done by using the water fluxes and states of the catchment. A successful application of such frameworks is therefore contingent on a good quantification of these fluxes and states across the different spatial scales. The objective of this study is to use travel times for the characterization of an ca. 1000 square kilometer, humid catchment in Central Germany. To determine the states and fluxes, we apply the mesoscale Hydrological Model mHM, a spatially distributed hydrological model to the catchment. Using detailed data of precipitation, land cover, morphology and soil type as inputs, mHM is able to determine fluxes like recharge and evapotranspiration and states like soil moisture as outputs. Using these data, we apply the above theoretical framework to our catchment. By virtue of the aforementioned properties of mHM, we are able to describe the storage and release of water with a high spatial resolution. This allows for a comprehensive description of the flow and transport dynamics taking place in the catchment. The spatial distribution of such dynamics is then compared with land cover and soil moisture maps as well as driving forces like precipitation and potential evapotranspiration to determine the most predictive factors. In addition, we investigate how non-local data like the age distribution of discharge flows are impacted by, and

  12. Modeling the light-travel-time effect on the far-infrared size of IRC +10216

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    1995-01-01

    Models of the far-infrared emission from the large circumstellar dust envelope surrounding the carbon star IRC +10216 are used to assess the importance of the light-travel-time effect (LTTE) on the observed size of the source. The central star is a long-period variable with an average period of 644 +/- 17 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of two magnituds, so a large light-travel-time effect is seen at 1 min radius. An attempt is made to use the LTTE to reconcile the discrepancy between the observations of Fazio et al. and Lester et al. regarding the far-infrared source size. This discrepancy is reviewed in light of recent, high-spatial-resolution observations at 11 microns by Danchi et al. We conclude that IRC +10216 has been resolved on the arcminute scale by Fazio et al. Convolution of the model intensity profile at 61 microns with the 60 sec x 90 sec Gaussian beam of Fazio et al. yields an observed source size full width at half maximum (FWHM) that ranges from approximately 67 sec to 75 sec depending on the phase of the star and the assumed distance to the source. Using a simple r(exp -2) dust distribution and the 106 deg phase of the Fazio et al. observations, the LTTE model reaches a peak size of 74.3 sec at a distance of 300 pc. This agrees favorably with the 78 sec x 6 sec size measured by Fazio et al. Finally, a method is outlined for using the LTTE as a distance indicator to IRC +10216 and other stars with extended mass outflows.

  13. Examination of time-reversal acoustics in shallow water and applications to noncoherent underwater communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kevin B.; Abrantes, Antonio A. M.; Larraza, Andres

    2003-06-01

    The shallow water acoustic communication channel is characterized by strong signal degradation caused by multipath propagation and high spatial and temporal variability of the channel conditions. At the receiver, multipath propagation causes intersymbol interference and is considered the most important of the channel distortions. This paper examines the application of time-reversal acoustic (TRA) arrays, i.e., phase-conjugated arrays (PCAs), that generate a spatio-temporal focus of acoustic energy at the receiver location, eliminating distortions introduced by channel propagation. This technique is self-adaptive and automatically compensates for environmental effects and array imperfections without the need to explicitly characterize the environment. An attempt is made to characterize the influences of a PCA design on its focusing properties with particular attention given to applications in noncoherent underwater acoustic communication systems. Due to the PCA spatial diversity focusing properties, PC arrays may have an important role in an acoustic local area network. Each array is able to simultaneously transmit different messages that will focus only at the destination receiver node.

  14. Time dependent inflow-outflow boundary conditions for 2D acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Myers, Michael K.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the number and form of the required inflow-outflow boundary conditions for the full two-dimensional time-dependent nonlinear acoustic system in subsonic mean flow is performed. The explicit predictor-corrector method of MacCormack (1969) is used. The methodology is tested on both uniform and sheared mean flows with plane and nonplanar sources. Results show that the acoustic system requires three physical boundary conditions on the inflow and one on the outflow boundary. The most natural choice for the inflow boundary conditions is judged to be a specification of the vorticity, the normal acoustic impedance, and a pressure gradient-density gradient relationship normal to the boundary. Specification of the acoustic pressure at the outflow boundary along with these inflow boundary conditions is found to give consistent reliable results. A set of boundary conditions developed earlier, which were intended to be nonreflecting is tested using the current method and is shown to yield unstable results for nonplanar acoustic waves.

  15. Acoustic sensor for real-time control for the inductive heating process

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, John Bruce; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-09-30

    Disclosed is a system and method for providing closed-loop control of the heating of a workpiece by an induction heating machine, including generating an acoustic wave in the workpiece with a pulsed laser; optically measuring displacements of the surface of the workpiece in response to the acoustic wave; calculating a sub-surface material property by analyzing the measured surface displacements; creating an error signal by comparing an attribute of the calculated sub-surface material properties with a desired attribute; and reducing the error signal below an acceptable limit by adjusting, in real-time, as often as necessary, the operation of the inductive heating machine.

  16. Apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of Rayleigh-Benard convection.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Kerry; Polfer, Jonathan; Furno, Joanna; Finke, Nathan

    2007-11-01

    We have designed and built an apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of convective flow patterns in optically opaque fluids. This apparatus takes advantage of recent advances in two-dimensional ultrasound transducer array technology; it employs a modified version of a commercially available ultrasound camera, similar to those employed in nondestructive testing of solids. Images of convection patterns are generated by observing the lateral variation of the temperature dependent speed of sound via refraction of acoustic plane waves passing vertically through the fluid layer. The apparatus has been validated by observing convection rolls in both silicone oil and ferrofluid. PMID:18052477

  17. Inversion of band-limited, downward continued multichannel seismic data by combination of travel-time and full waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras Andreu, Claudia; Estela Jiménez Tejero, Clara; Dagnino Vázquez, Daniel; Meléndez Catalán, Adrià; Sallarès Casas, Valentí; Rodríguez Ranero, César

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography methods and in particular full waveform inversion (FWI) of controlled source data are powerful tools to obtain accurate information of the physical properties of the subsurface. One of their main drawbacks is however the strong non-linearity of the problem, which makes the solution strongly dependent on the initial model and on the low frequency content of the data set. A common strategy to mitigate these issues is to combine the robustness of Travel Time Tomography (TTT) to obtain an appropriate reference model that is subsequently refined by FWI. This combined technique is often used for long-offset acquisition geometries, where refracted waves are present as first arrivals. Conversely, its application to streamer-type multichannel seismic (MCS) data is rare, because these data are intrinsically short offset so the presence of refractions is very limited. In this work we use synthetic data to show how the downward continuation (DC) or redatuming of the MCS data prior to TTT allows obtaining velocity models that can be then used as initial models for FWI even if data lack frequencies below 4 Hz. In summary, the proposed strategy consists of the following steps: 1) We compute the downward continued wavefield using a finite difference solution of the acoustic wave equation in time domain. The solver used for the propagation was developed by the Barcelona Centre for Subsurface Imaging (BCSI) and incorporates a mutli-shooting strategy necessary to back-propagate the wavefield and reduce the computational time. Our new datum level chosen corresponds to the bathymetry of the model. 2) We use the resultant DC MCS wavefield to identify the refracted phases (first arrivals) highlighted by the redatuming process and we invert them applying TTT. The resulting model, which has the low wavenumber information needed to reduce the non-linearity problems of the FWI, is then used as initial model to perform multi-scale FWI of the original MCS data starting at

  18. Xylem cavitation resistance can be estimated based on time-dependent rate of acoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Nolf, Markus; Beikircher, Barbara; Rosner, Sabine; Nolf, Anton; Mayr, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) analysis allows nondestructive monitoring of embolism formation in plant xylem, but signal interpretation and agreement of acoustically measured hydraulic vulnerability with reference hydraulic techniques remain under debate. We compared the hydraulic vulnerability of 16 species and three crop tree cultivars using hydraulic flow measurements and acoustic emission monitoring, proposing the use of time-dependent AE rates as a novel parameter for AE analysis. There was a linear correlation between the water potential (Ψ) at 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50 ) and the Ψ at maximum AE activity (Pmaxrate ), where species with lower P50 also had lower Pmaxrate (P < 0.001, R(2)  = 0.76). Using AE rates instead of cumulative counts for AE analysis allows more efficient estimation of P50 , while excluding problematic AE at late stages of dehydration.

  19. Computer Evaluation Of Real-Time X-Ray And Acoustic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, M. H.; Loe, R. S.; Dondes, P. A.

    1983-03-01

    The weakest link in the inspection process is the subjective interpretation of data by inspectors. To overcome this troublesome fact computer based analysis systems have been developed. In the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) there is a large class of inspections that can benefit from computer analysis. X-ray images (both film and fluoroscopic) and acoustic images lend themselves to automatic analysis as do the one-dimensional signals associated with ultrasonic, eddy current and acoustic emission testing. Computer analysis can enhance and evaluate subtle details. Flaws can be located and measured, and accept-ance decisions made by computer in a consistent and objective manner. This paper describes the interactive, computer-based analysis of real-time x-ray images and acoustic images of graphite/epoxy adhesively bonded structures.

  20. Reaction time to changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. P.; Warm, J. S.; Westendorf, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of human observers to detect accelerations and decelerations in the rate of presentation of pulsed stimuli, i.e., changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains. Response times to accelerations in tempo were faster than to decelerations. Overall speed of response was inversely related to the pulse repetition rate.

  1. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal's method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth's ionosphere.

  2. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  3. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  4. Comparison between psycho-acoustics and physio-acoustic measurement to determine optimum reverberation time of pentatonic angklung music concert hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarsono, Anugrah S.; Merthayasa, I. G. N.; Suprijanto

    2015-09-01

    This research tried to compare psycho-acoustics and Physio-acoustic measurement to find the optimum reverberation time of soundfield from angklung music. Psycho-acoustic measurement was conducted using a paired comparison method and Physio-acoustic measurement was conducted with EEG Measurement on T3, T4, FP1, and FP2 measurement points. EEG measurement was conducted with 5 persons. Pentatonic angklung music was used as a stimulus with reverberation time variation. The variation was between 0.8 s - 1.6 s with 0.2 s step. EEG signal was analysed using a Power Spectral Density method on Alpha Wave, High Alpha Wave, and Theta Wave. Psycho-acoustic measurement on 50 persons showed that reverberation time preference of pentatonic angklung music was 1.2 second. The result was similar to Theta Wave measurement on FP2 measurement point. High Alpha wave on T4 measurement gave different results, but had similar patterns with psycho-acoustic measurement

  5. Basic Research on Time-Reversal Waves in Deep Ocean for Long Acoustic Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takuya; Watanabe, Yoshitaka; Ochi, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the focusing property of time-reversal waves and its application to acoustic communication in shallow water. In this study, this focusing property in the deep ocean and its application to long horizontal acoustic communication are discussed. The results are as follows. Even if a time-reversal array (TRA) does not expand from the sea surface to the seabed, time-reversal signals converge, and the focusing property is not significantly affected by the depths of the focus and TRA. Then, it is revealed that by using time reversal, it is possible to enssure communication channel over a long range, through the simulation. In phase modulation, time reversal can demodulate almost only by itself, while in amplitude and phase modulation, an adaptive filter to compensates further.

  6. Periodic Time-Domain Nonlocal Nonreflecting Boundary Conditions for Duct Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Zorumski, William E.

    1996-01-01

    Periodic time-domain boundary conditions are formulated for direct numerical simulation of acoustic waves in ducts without flow. Well-developed frequency-domain boundary conditions are transformed into the time domain. The formulation is presented here in one space dimension and time; however, this formulation has an advantage in that its extension to variable-area, higher dimensional, and acoustically treated ducts is rigorous and straightforward. The boundary condition simulates a nonreflecting wave field in an infinite uniform duct and is implemented by impulse-response operators that are applied at the boundary of the computational domain. These operators are generated by convolution integrals of the corresponding frequency-domain operators. The acoustic solution is obtained by advancing the Euler equations to a periodic state with the MacCormack scheme. The MacCormack scheme utilizes the boundary condition to limit the computational space and preserve the radiation boundary condition. The success of the boundary condition is attributed to the fact that it is nonreflecting to periodic acoustic waves. In addition, transient waves can pass rapidly out of the solution domain. The boundary condition is tested for a pure tone and a multitone source in a linear setting. The effects of various initial conditions are assessed. Computational solutions with the boundary condition are consistent with the known solutions for nonreflecting wave fields in an infinite uniform duct.

  7. Does Involuntary Mental Time Travel Make Sense in Prospective Teachers' Feelings and Behaviors during Lessons?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Altay; Yesilbursa, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of involuntary mental time travel into the past and into the future on prospective teachers' feelings and behaviors during the period of a class hour. A total of 110 prospective teachers participated voluntarily in the study. The results of the present study showed that (a) the involuntary mental time travel…

  8. Acoustic imaging with time reversal methods: From medicine to NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    This talk will present an overview of the research conducted on ultrasonic time-reversal methods applied to biomedical imaging and to non-destructive testing. We will first describe iterative time-reversal techniques that allow both focusing ultrasonic waves on reflectors in tissues (kidney stones, micro-calcifications, contrast agents) or on flaws in solid materials. We will also show that time-reversal focusing does not need the presence of bright reflectors but it can be achieved only from the speckle noise generated by random distributions of non-resolved scatterers. We will describe the applications of this concept to correct distortions and aberrations in ultrasonic imaging and in NDT. In the second part of the talk we will describe the concept of time-reversal processors to get ultrafast ultrasonic images with typical frame rates of order of 10.000 F/s. It is the field of ultrafast ultrasonic imaging that has plenty medical applications and can be of great interest in NDT. We will describe some applications in the biomedical domain: Quantitative Elasticity imaging of tissues by following shear wave propagation to improve cancer detection and Ultrafast Doppler imaging that allows ultrasonic functional imaging.

  9. Wireless acoustic modules for real-time data fusion using asynchronous sniper localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; De Mezzo, S.; Duffner, P.; Naz, P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) has been conducting studies in the domain of acoustic localization of shots. Mobile antennas mounted on the soldier's helmet were initially used for real-time detection, classification and localization of sniper shots. It showed good performances in land scenarios, but also in urban scenarios if the array was in the shot corridor, meaning that the microphones first detect the direct wave and then the reflections of the Mach and muzzle waves (15% distance estimation error compared to the actual shooter array distance). Fusing data sent by multiple sensor nodes distributed on the field showed some of the limitations of the technologies that have been implemented in ISL's demonstrators. Among others, the determination of the arrays' orientation was not accurate enough, thereby degrading the performance of data fusion. Some new solutions have been developed in the past year in order to obtain better performance for data fusion. Asynchronous localization algorithms have been developed and post-processed on data measured in both free-field and urban environments with acoustic modules on the line of sight of the shooter. These results are presented in the first part of the paper. The impact of GPS position estimation error is also discussed in the article in order to evaluate the possible use of those algorithms for real-time processing using mobile acoustic nodes. In the frame of ISL's transverse project IMOTEP (IMprovement Of optical and acoustical TEchnologies for the Protection), some demonstrators are developed that will allow real-time asynchronous localization of sniper shots. An embedded detection and classification algorithm is implemented on wireless acoustic modules that send the relevant information to a central PC. Data fusion is then processed and the

  10. A Novel View of Space-Time Permitting Faster-Than-Light Travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meholic, Gregory

    2000-04-01

    The mathematically symmetrical nature of general relativity suggests that for a given absolute energy state, a particle of real mass must be moving either slower or faster than the speed of light. Relativistic symmetry implies that the sub and superluminal realms can therefore be construed as separate space-times with a common, unattainable boundary condition (the luminal plane), and both can contain particles with real and quantifiable properties. Although mass energy can only exist in one space-time and distort the luminal plane to create gravity, the disturbance can be observed in the other space as an equal gravitational distortion with no associated mass. The postulated characteristics of superluminal space, its resident particles, and their similarity to entities in subluminal space reveal a possible connection between the space-times which lies deep within the quantum-mechanical events observed thus far. Quarks may hold the key to these events and seem capable of existing and jumping between sub and superluminal spaces. If a subluminal mass were converted at the quark-level of matter to exist in superluminal space, traveling faster than light would be possible without violating causality and relativity.

  11. SENSITIVITY OF HELIOSEISMIC TRAVEL TIMES TO THE IMPOSITION OF A LORENTZ FORCE LIMITER IN COMPUTATIONAL HELIOSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Hamed; Cally, Paul S.

    2014-02-20

    The rapid exponential increase in the Alfvén wave speed with height above the solar surface presents a serious challenge to physical modeling of the effects of magnetic fields on solar oscillations, as it introduces a significant Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy time-step constraint for explicit numerical codes. A common approach adopted in computational helioseismology, where long simulations in excess of 10 hr (hundreds of wave periods) are often required, is to cap the Alfvén wave speed by artificially modifying the momentum equation when the ratio between the Lorentz and hydrodynamic forces becomes too large. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Alfvén wave speed plays a critical role in the MHD mode conversion process, particularly in determining the reflection height of the upwardly propagating helioseismic fast wave. Using numerical simulations of helioseismic wave propagation in constant inclined (relative to the vertical) magnetic fields we demonstrate that the imposition of such artificial limiters significantly affects time-distance travel times unless the Alfvén wave-speed cap is chosen comfortably in excess of the horizontal phase speeds under investigation.

  12. A field assessment of high resolution aquifer characterization: Coupling of hydraulic travel time and hydraulic attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauchler, R.; Hu, R.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variations in hydraulic properties plays an important role controlling solute movement in saturated flow systems. Traditional hydrogeological approaches appear to have difficulties providing high resolution parameter estimates. Thus, we have decided to develop an approach coupling hydraulic travel time and attenuation tomography. Hydraulic travel time tomography is based on the transformation of the transient ground water flow equation into the eikonal equation using an asymptotic approach. The eikonal equation can be solved with ray tracing techniques, which allow the calculation of pressure propagation along trajectories. As the travel time of a hydraulic signal depends on the diffusivity of the investigated media, it is difficult to separate it into its components hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. In order to overcome this problem we perform next to the travel time inversion an inversion which is based on the relationship between attenuation of a hydraulic signal travelling between source and receiver, and the specific storage of the investigated media. Both inversion techniques are based on ray tracing, which allows the inversion of large data sets in a short time on a common PC. The attenuation and travel time based inversion approaches are naturally complementary: Hydraulic travel times are determined by the hydraulic diffusivity, a combination of hydraulic conductivity and specific storage, whereas the attenuation is determined solely by specific storage. Thus, combining these two approaches will allow the independent identification of hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. The potential of our hydraulic tomographical approach was investigated at a well-characterized sand and gravel aquifer located in the Leine River valley near Goettingen, Germany. The data base for the hydraulic inversion consists of 400 pressure cross-hole slug tests performed between five wells in which the positions of the sources (injection

  13. Timing and classifying brief acoustic stimuli by songbirds and humans.

    PubMed

    Weisman, R; Brownlie, L; Olthof, A; Njegovan, M; Sturdy, C; Mewhort, D

    1999-04-01

    The durations of animals' brief vocalizations provide conspecifics with important recognition cues. In the present experiments, zebra finches and humans (trained musicians) were rewarded for responding after S+ (standard) auditory signals from 56 to 663 ms and not for responding after shorter or longer S- (comparison) durations from 10 to 3684 ms. With either a single standard (Experiment 1) or multiple standards (Experiment 2), both zebra finches and humans timed brief signals to about the same level of accuracy. The results were in qualitative agreement with predictions from scalar timing theory and its connectionist implementation in both experiments. The connectionist model provides a good quantitative account of temporal gradients with a single standard (Experiment 1) but not with multiple standards (Experiment 2). PMID:10331915

  14. Travel Times, Streamflow Velocities, and Dispersion Rates in the Yellowstone River, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    The Yellowstone River is a vital natural resource to the residents of southeastern Montana and is a primary source of water for irrigation and recreation and the primary source of municipal water for several cities. The Yellowstone River valley is the primary east-west transportation corridor through southern Montana. This complex of infrastructure makes the Yellowstone River especially vulnerable to accidental spills from various sources such as tanker cars and trucks. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, initiated a dye-tracer study to determine instream travel times, streamflow velocities, and dispersion rates for the Yellowstone River from Lockwood to Glendive, Montana. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of this study and summarize data collected at each of the measurement sites between Lockwood and Glendive. This report also compares the results of this study to estimated travel times from a transport model developed by the USGS for a previous study. For this study, Rhodamine WT dye was injected at four locations in late September and early October 2008 during reasonably steady streamflow conditions. Streamflows ranged from 3,490 to 3,770 cubic feet per second upstream from the confluence of the Bighorn River and ranged from 6,520 to 7,570 cubic feet per second downstream from the confluence of the Bighorn River. Mean velocities were calculated for each subreach between measurement sites for the leading edge, peak concentration, centroid, and trailing edge at 10 percent of the peak concentration. Calculated velocities for the centroid of the dye plume for subreaches that were completely laterally mixed ranged from 1.83 to 3.18 ft/s within the study reach from Lockwood Bridge to Glendive Bridge. The mean of the completely mixed centroid velocity for the entire study reach, excluding the subreach between Forsyth Bridge and Cartersville Dam, was 2.80 ft/s. Longitudinal

  15. TRAVEL FORECASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Business travel planning within an organization is often a time-consuming task. Travel Forecaster is a menu-driven, easy-to-use program which plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost for business-related travel of a division or branch of an organization and compiles this information into a database to aid the travel planner. The program's ability to handle multiple trip entries makes it a valuable time-saving device. Travel Forecaster takes full advantage of relational data base properties so that information that remains constant, such as per diem rates and airline fares (which are unique for each city), needs entering only once. A typical entry would include selection with the mouse of the traveler's name and destination city from pop-up lists, and typed entries for number of travel days and purpose of the trip. Multiple persons can be selected from the pop-up lists and multiple trips are accommodated by entering the number of days by each appropriate month on the entry form. An estimated travel cost is not required of the user as it is calculated by a Fourth Dimension formula. With this information, the program can produce output of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for either organization or sub-entity of an organization; or produce outputs of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for international-only travel. It will also provide monthly and cumulative formats of planned vs. actual outputs in data or graph form. Travel Forecaster users can do custom queries to search and sort information in the database, and it can create custom reports with the user-friendly report generator. Travel Forecaster 1.1 is a database program for use with Fourth Dimension Runtime 2.1.1. It requires a Macintosh Plus running System 6.0.3 or later, 2Mb of RAM and a hard disk. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Travel Forecaster was developed in 1991. Macintosh is a registered trademark of

  16. Gradual time reversal in thermo- and photo-acoustic tomography within a resonant cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, B.; Kunyansky, L.

    2015-03-01

    Thermo- and photo-acoustic tomography require reconstructing initial acoustic pressure in a body from time series of pressure measured on a surface surrounding the body. For the classical case of free space wave propagation, various reconstruction techniques are well known. However, some novel measurement schemes place the object of interest between reflecting walls that form a de facto resonant cavity. In this case, known methods (including the popular time reversal algorithm) cannot be used. The inverse problem involving reflecting walls can be solved by the gradual time reversal method we propose here. It consists in solving back in time on the interval [0,T] the initial/boundary value problem for the wave equation, with the Dirichlet boundary data multiplied by a smooth cutoff function. If T is sufficiently large one obtains a good approximation to the initial pressure; in the limit of large T such an approximation converges (under certain conditions) to the exact solution.

  17. [Research on Time-frequency Characteristics of Magneto-acoustic Signal of Different Thickness Medium Based on Wave Summing Method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Ma, Ren; Liu, Zhipeng

    2015-08-01

    Functional imaging method of biological electrical characteristics based on magneto-acoustic effect gives valuable information of tissue in early tumor diagnosis, therein time and frequency characteristics analysis of magneto-acoustic signal is important in image reconstruction. This paper proposes wave summing method based on Green function solution for acoustic source of magneto-acoustic effect. Simulations and analysis under quasi 1D transmission condition are carried out to time and frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal of models with different thickness. Simulation results of magneto-acoustic signal were verified through experiments. Results of the simulation with different thickness showed that time-frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal reflected thickness of sample. Thin sample, which is less than one wavelength of pulse, and thick sample, which is larger than one wavelength, showed different summed waveform and frequency characteristics, due to difference of summing thickness. Experimental results verified theoretical analysis and simulation results. This research has laid a foundation for acoustic source and conductivity reconstruction to the medium with different thickness in magneto-acoustic imaging.

  18. Measurement of the space-time correlation function of thermal acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passechnik, V. I.; Anosov, A. A.; Barabanenkov, Yu. N.; Sel'Sky, A. G.

    2003-09-01

    The space-time correlation function of thermal acoustic radiation pressure is measured for a stationary heated source (a narrow plasticine plate). The correlation dependence is obtained by the multiplication of two signals shifted in time with respect to each other and measured by two receivers. The dependence exhibits an oscillating behavior and changes sign when the source is displaced by half the spatial period of the correlation function.

  19. Simulation of Runoff Hydrograph on Soil Surfaces with Different Microtopography Using a Travel Time Method at the Plot Scale.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Longshan; Wu, Faqi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple travel time-based runoff model was proposed to simulate a runoff hydrograph on soil surfaces with different microtopographies. Three main parameters, i.e., rainfall intensity (I), mean flow velocity (vm) and ponding time of depression (tp), were inputted into this model. The soil surface was divided into numerous grid cells, and the flow length of each grid cell (li) was then calculated from a digital elevation model (DEM). The flow velocity in each grid cell (vi) was derived from the upstream flow accumulation area using vm. The total flow travel time through each grid cell to the surface outlet was the sum of the sum of flow travel times along the flow path (i.e., the sum of li/vi) and tp. The runoff rate at the slope outlet for each respective travel time was estimated by finding the sum of the rain rate from all contributing cells for all time intervals. The results show positive agreement between the measured and predicted runoff hydrographs.

  20. Simulation of Runoff Hydrograph on Soil Surfaces with Different Microtopography Using a Travel Time Method at the Plot Scale

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Longshan; Wu, Faqi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple travel time-based runoff model was proposed to simulate a runoff hydrograph on soil surfaces with different microtopographies. Three main parameters, i.e., rainfall intensity (I), mean flow velocity (vm) and ponding time of depression (tp), were inputted into this model. The soil surface was divided into numerous grid cells, and the flow length of each grid cell (li) was then calculated from a digital elevation model (DEM). The flow velocity in each grid cell (vi) was derived from the upstream flow accumulation area using vm. The total flow travel time through each grid cell to the surface outlet was the sum of the sum of flow travel times along the flow path (i.e., the sum of li/vi) and tp. The runoff rate at the slope outlet for each respective travel time was estimated by finding the sum of the rain rate from all contributing cells for all time intervals. The results show positive agreement between the measured and predicted runoff hydrographs. PMID:26103635

  1. Mental time travel for self and other in three- and four-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Payne, Grace; Taylor, Rosanne; Hayne, Harlene; Scarf, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Humans possess the unique ability to mentally travel backward in time to re-experience past events (i.e., episodic memory) and forward in time to pre-experience future events (i.e., episodic foresight). Although originally viewed as different cognitive skills, they are now both viewed as components of the episodic memory system. Recently, it has been suggested that the episodic system may allow us to not only pre-experience and predict our own future but also that of another person. In the current study, we investigate this possibility by examining the ability of three- and four-year-old children to plan for their own future and for that of another person. We found that both three- and four-year-old children performed equally, when planning for their own future or when planning for the experimenter's future. These data are consistent with the finding that planning for someone else's future recruits the same neural structures that are used when planning for one's own future.

  2. Intersymbol Interference Investigations Using a 3D Time-Dependent Traveling Wave Tube Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty; Downey, Alan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the first time, a physics based computational model has been used to provide a direct description of the effects of the TWT (Traveling Wave Tube) on modulated digital signals. The TWT model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent AM/AM and AM/PM conversion; gain and phase ripple; drive-induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves. Thus, signal integrity can be investigated in the presence of these sources of potential distortion as a function of the physical geometry of the high power amplifier and the operational digital signal. This method promises superior predictive fidelity compared to methods using TWT models based on swept amplitude and/or swept frequency data. The fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, TWT interaction model using the electromagnetic code MAFIA is presented. This model is used to investigate assumptions made in TWT black box models used in communication system level simulations. In addition, digital signal performance, including intersymbol interference (ISI), is compared using direct data input into the MAFIA model and using the system level analysis tool, SPW (Signal Processing Worksystem).

  3. Time-Dependent Traveling Wave Tube Model for Intersymbol Interference Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty; Downey, Alan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the first time, a computational model has been used to provide a direct description of the effects of the traveling wave tube (TWT) on modulated digital signals. The TWT model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent AM/AM and AM/PM conversion, gain and phase ripple; drive-induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves. Thus, signal integrity can be investigated in the presence of these sources of potential distortion as a function of the physical geometry of the high power amplifier and the operational digital signal. This method promises superior predictive fidelity compared to methods using TWT models based on swept-amplitude and/or swept-frequency data. The fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, TWT interaction model using the electromagnetic code MAFIA is presented. This model is used to investigate assumptions made in TWT black-box models used in communication system level simulations. In addition, digital signal performance, including intersymbol interference (ISI), is compared using direct data input into the MAFIA model and using the system level analysis tool, SPW.

  4. Intersymbol Interference Investigations Using a 3D Time-Dependent Traveling Wave Tube Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty

    2002-01-01

    For the first time, a time-dependent, physics-based computational model has been used to provide a direct description of the effects of the traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) on modulated digital signals. The TWT model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent AM/AM and AM/PM conversion; gain and phase ripple; drive-induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves. Thus, signal integrity can be investigated in the presence of these sources of potential distortion as a function of the physical geometry and operating characteristics of the high power amplifier and the operational digital signal. This method promises superior predictive fidelity compared to methods using TWT models based on swept- amplitude and/or swept-frequency data. First, the TWT model using the three dimensional (3D) electromagnetic code MAFIA is presented. Then, this comprehensive model is used to investigate approximations made in conventional TWT black-box models used in communication system level simulations. To quantitatively demonstrate the effects these approximations have on digital signal performance predictions, including intersymbol interference (ISI), the MAFIA results are compared to the system level analysis tool, Signal Processing Workstation (SPW), using high order modulation schemes including 16 and 64-QAM.

  5. The Abysmal State of Abyssal Time Series: An Acoustic Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, W. H.; Worcester, P. F.; Dushaw, B. D.; Howe, B. M.; Spindel, R. C.

    2001-12-01

    The 20th century rise in global sea level by 18 cm has not been explained. The rise has been continuous and linear since the previous century. It cannot be predominantly the result of thermal expansion. Global ocean warming (as recently compiled by Levitus and his collaborators) started too late, is too non-linear and too weak to account for the recorded rise. It is not impossible that the global warming has been underestimated for lack of adequate observations in the southern hemisphere, and at abyssal depths. Time series of abyssal temperatures are badly lacking. Tomographic methods have the required precision, vertical resolution and horizontal integration to accomplish this task. A more likely explanation is to attribute most of the sea level rise to melting of polar ice sheets. There are two difficulties: the required melting is considerably larger than has generally been estimated, and there are serious restrictions imposed by astronomic measurements of the Earth?s rotation.

  6. Chronic stroke and aging: the impact of acoustic stimulus intensity on fractionated reaction time.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Stephen A; Janelle, Christopher M; Cauraugh, James H

    2009-03-13

    In control samples, intense acoustic "go" stimuli accelerate the central and peripheral motor processes that compose simple reaction time movements. The goal of the current study was to determine whether movements that are initiated to intense acoustic cues facilitate simple reaction times in (1) adults with chronic stroke as compared to age matched controls and (2) in older as compared to younger adults. EMG and force data were collected from three groups (stroke, older adults, and younger adults) during a ballistic wrist and finger extension task. Movements were made to the onset of 80 dB and 107 dB acoustic cues and simple reaction times were fractionated into premotor and motor components. The present findings offer two important contributions to the literature. First, increases in stimulus intensity led to faster motor times in the impaired limb of stroke subjects. Second, increased stimulus intensity led to faster premotor reaction times across all groups, although an age rather than a stroke-specific motor deficit was evidenced, with the younger control group displaying significantly faster premotor times. Findings are integrated with previous evidence concerning post stroke corticospinal tract integrity and are interpreted via mechanisms which address stroke and age-related changes in motoneurons and activity in motor units.

  7. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part I: Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    In a set of two papers we study the inverse problem of refraction travel times. The purpose of this work is to use the study as a basis for development of more sophisticated methods for finding more reliable solutions to the inverse problem of refraction travel times, which is known to be nonunique. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," emphasizes the existence of different forms of nonuniqueness in the realm of inverse geophysical problems. Each type of nonuniqueness requires a different type and amount of a priori information to acquire a reliable solution. Based on such coupling, a nonuniqueness classification is designed. Therefore, since most inverse geophysical problems are nonunique, each inverse problem must be studied to define what type of nonuniqueness it belongs to and thus determine what type of a priori information is necessary to find a realistic solution. The second paper, "Quantifying Refraction Nonuniqueness Using a Three-layer Model," serves as an example of such an approach. However, its main purpose is to provide a better understanding of the inverse refraction problem by studying the type of nonuniqueness it possesses. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is planned to be offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The main goal of this paper is to redefine the existing generalized notion of nonuniqueness and a priori information by offering a classified, discriminate structure. Nonuniqueness is often encountered when trying to solve inverse problems. However, possible nonuniqueness diversity is typically neglected and nonuniqueness is regarded as a whole, as an unpleasant "black box" and is approached in the same manner by applying smoothing constraints, damping constraints with respect to the solution increment and, rarely, damping constraints with respect to some sparse reference information about the true parameters. In practice, when solving geophysical

  8. Active source monitoring of crosswell seismic travel time forstress induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, P.G.; Daley, T.M.; Niu, F.; Majer, E.L.

    2006-11-11

    We have conducted a series of cross-well experiments tocontinuously measure in situ temporal variations in seismic velocity attwo test sites: building 64 (B64) and Richmond Field Station (RFS) of theLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. A piezoelectricsource was used to generate highly repeatable signals, and a string of 24hydrophones was used to record the signals. The B64 experiment wasconducted utilizing two boreholes 17 m deep and 3 m apart for 160 h. AtRFS, we collected a 36-day continuous record in a cross-borehole facilityusing two 70-m-deep holes separated by 30 m. With signal enhancementtechniques we were able to achieve a precision of 6.0 nsec and 10 nsec indelay-time estimation from stacking of 1-hr records during the ?7- and?35-day observation periods at the B64 and RFS sites, which correspond to3 and 0.5 ppm of their travel times, respectively. Delay time measured atB64 has a variation of ?2 lsec in the 160-hr period and shows a strongand positive correlation with the barometric pressure change at the site.At RFS, after removal of a linear trend, we find a delay-time variationof 2.5 lsec, which exhibits a significant negative correlation withbarometric pressure. We attribute the observed correlations to stresssensitivity of seismic velocity known from laboratory studies. Thepositive and negative sign observed in the correlation is likely relatedto the expected near- and far-field effects of this stress dependence ina poroelastic medium. The stress sensitivity is estimated to be 10 6/Paand 10 7/Pa at the B64 and RFS site, respectively.

  9. Bound states in one-dimensional acoustic parity-time-symmetric lattices for perfect sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Degang; Shen, Yaxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Xuefeng; Yi, Lin

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we study the propagation of acoustic waves through a one-dimensional multilayer structure composed of a thin defect layer sandwiched by two phononic crystals. Two kinds of defect states will generate in band gaps and both of them cause unitary transmission. However, they have very unlike field distributions due to the different contrasted acoustic impedances between the defect layer and its neighboring layers. Spectral positions of transmission peaks can be exactly determined by the resonant phase condition. In a non-dissipative system, these resonant states correspond to single crossing point of two eigenvalues of scattering matrix. When gain and loss are introduced to judiciously construct an acoustic parity-time-symmetric lattice, the crossing point will split into a pair of exceptional points (EPs). Interestingly, the EPs correspond to unidirectional zero reflection that is very sensitive to the thickness of defect layer. Taking advantage of this virtue, a very sensitive acoustic sensor can be designed, which has potentially applications in ultrasonic inspection, noise detection, ultrasonic medicine, etc.

  10. Acoustical power amplification and damping by temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Komatsu, Ryo; Yazaki, Taichi

    2011-01-01

    Ceperley proposed a concept of a traveling wave heat engine ["A pistonless Stirling engine-The traveling wave heat engine," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1508-1513 (1979).] that provided a starting point of thermoacoustics today. This paper verifies experimentally his idea through observation of amplification and strong damping of a plane acoustic traveling wave as it passes through axial temperature gradients. The acoustic power gain is shown to obey a universal curve specified by a dimensionless parameter ωτα; ω is the angular frequency and τα is the relaxation time for the gas to thermally equilibrate with channel walls. As an application of his idea, a three-stage acoustic power amplifier is developed, which attains the gain up to 10 with a moderate temperature ratio of 2.3. PMID:21302995

  11. Acoustical power amplification and damping by temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Komatsu, Ryo; Yazaki, Taichi

    2011-01-01

    Ceperley proposed a concept of a traveling wave heat engine ["A pistonless Stirling engine-The traveling wave heat engine," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1508-1513 (1979).] that provided a starting point of thermoacoustics today. This paper verifies experimentally his idea through observation of amplification and strong damping of a plane acoustic traveling wave as it passes through axial temperature gradients. The acoustic power gain is shown to obey a universal curve specified by a dimensionless parameter ωτα; ω is the angular frequency and τα is the relaxation time for the gas to thermally equilibrate with channel walls. As an application of his idea, a three-stage acoustic power amplifier is developed, which attains the gain up to 10 with a moderate temperature ratio of 2.3.

  12. Improvements of Travel-time Tomography Models from Joint Inversion of Multi-channel and Wide-angle Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begović, Slaven; Ranero, César; Sallarès, Valentí; Meléndez, Adrià; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Commonly multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) and wide-angle seismic (WAS) data are modeled and interpreted with different approaches. Conventional travel-time tomography models using solely WAS data lack the resolution to define the model properties and, particularly, the geometry of geologic boundaries (reflectors) with the required accuracy, specially in the shallow complex upper geological layers. We plan to mitigate this issue by combining these two different data sets, specifically taking advantage of the high redundancy of multichannel seismic (MCS) data, integrated with wide-angle seismic (WAS) data into a common inversion scheme to obtain higher-resolution velocity models (Vp), decrease Vp uncertainty and improve the geometry of reflectors. To do so, we have adapted the tomo2d and tomo3d joint refraction and reflection travel time tomography codes (Korenaga et al, 2000; Meléndez et al, 2015) to deal with streamer data and MCS acquisition geometries. The scheme results in a joint travel-time tomographic inversion based on integrated travel-time information from refracted and reflected phases from WAS data and reflected identified in the MCS common depth point (CDP) or shot gathers. To illustrate the advantages of a common inversion approach we have compared the modeling results for synthetic data sets using two different travel-time inversion strategies: We have produced seismic velocity models and reflector geometries following typical refraction and reflection travel-time tomographic strategy modeling just WAS data with a typical acquisition geometry (one OBS each 10 km). Second, we performed joint inversion of two types of seismic data sets, integrating two coincident data sets consisting of MCS data collected with a 8 km-long streamer and the WAS data into a common inversion scheme. Our synthetic results of the joint inversion indicate a 5-10 times smaller ray travel-time misfit in the deeper parts of the model, compared to models obtained using just

  13. Identification of Damaged Wheat Kernels and Cracked-Shell Hazelnuts with Impact Acoustics Time-Frequency Patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new adaptive time-frequency (t-f) analysis and classification procedure is applied to impact acoustic signals for detecting hazelnuts with cracked shells and three types of damaged wheat kernels. Kernels were dropped onto a steel plate, and the resulting impact acoustic signals were recorded with ...

  14. Mental Time Travel into the Past and the Future in Healthy Aged Adults: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viard, Armelle; Chetelat, Gael; Lebreton, Karine; Desgranges, Beatrice; Landeau, Brigitte; de La Sayette, Vincent; Eustache, Francis; Piolino, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Remembering the past and envisioning the future rely on episodic memory which enables mental time travel. Studies in young adults indicate that past and future thinking share common cognitive and neural underpinnings. No imaging data is yet available in healthy aged subjects. Using fMRI, we scanned older subjects while they remembered personal…

  15. Travel-time correction surface generation for the DOE Knowledge Base

    SciTech Connect

    Hipp, J.; Young, C.; Keyser, R.

    1997-08-01

    The DOE Knowledge Base data storage and access model consists of three parts: raw data processing, intermediate surface generation, and final output surface interpolation. The paper concentrates on the second step, surface generation, specifically applied to travel-time correction data. The surface generation for the intermediate step is accomplished using a modified kriging solution that provides robust error estimates for each for each interpolated point and satisfies many important physical requirements including differing quality data points, user-definable range of influence for each point, blend to background values for both interpolated values and error estimates beyond the ranges, and the ability to account for the effects of geologic region boundaries. These requirements are outlined and discussed and are linked to requirements specified for the final output model in the DOE Knowledge Base. Future work will focus on testing the entire Knowledge Base model using the regional calibration data sets which are being gathered by researchers at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories.

  16. Data-driven aggregative schemes for multisource estimation fusion: a road travel time application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Faouzi, Nour-Eddin

    2004-04-01

    The principal motivation for combining estimators has been to avoid the a priori choice of which estimation method to use, by attempting to aggregate all the information which each estimation model embodies. In selecting the "best" model, one is often discarding useful independent evidence in those models which are rejected. This paper deals with estimation fusion; that is, data fusion for the purpose of estimation. More specifically, estimation fusion is studied under heterogeneous data source configurations. Two estimation fusion schemes could be considered: projective and aggregative. An unified linear model and general framework for later schemes are established. Explicit optimal fusion strategies in the sense of the best linear estimation and weighted least squares are presented. The evaluation of the effectiveness of the proposed schemes was conducted on the traffic application, namely, travel time estimation in a given path of a road network. In this problem, data comes from sensors and other sources of information geographically distributed where communication limitations and other considerations often eliminate the possibility of transmitting the observations into a central node processing where computation is performed.

  17. Causes of intraplate seismicity in central Brazil from travel time seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Marcelo Peres; Azevedo, Paulo Araújo de; Marotta, Giuliano Sant'Anna; Schimmel, Martin; Fuck, Reinhardt

    2016-06-01

    New results of travel time seismic tomography in central Brazil provide evidence that the relatively high seismicity in this region is related to the thinner lithosphere at the limit between the Amazonian and São Francisco paleocontinents. The transition between these paleocontinents is marked by low velocity anomalies, spatially well correlated with the high seismicity region, which are interpreted as related to the lithospheric thinning and consequent rise of the asthenosphere, which have increased the temperature in this region. The low-velocity anomalies suggest a weakness region, favorable to the build-up of stress. The effective elastic thickness and the strain/stress regime for the study area are in agreement with tomographic results. A high-velocity trend is observed beneath the Parnaíba Basin, where low seismicity is observed, indicating the presence of a cratonic core. Our results support the idea that the intraplate seismicity in central Brazil is related to the thin lithosphere underlying parts of the Tocantins Province between the neighboring large cratonic blocks.

  18. Pinsker estimators for local helioseismology: inversion of travel times for mass-conserving flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Damien; Gizon, Laurent; Holzke, Martin; Hohage, Thorsten

    2016-10-01

    A major goal of helioseismology is the three-dimensional reconstruction of the three velocity components of convective flows in the solar interior from sets of wave travel-time measurements. For small amplitude flows, the forward problem is described in good approximation by a large system of convolution equations. The input observations are highly noisy random vectors with a known dense covariance matrix. This leads to a large statistical linear inverse problem. Whereas for deterministic linear inverse problems several computationally efficient minimax optimal regularization methods exist, only one minimax-optimal linear estimator exists for statistical linear inverse problems: the Pinsker estimator. However, it is often computationally inefficient because it requires a singular value decomposition of the forward operator or it is not applicable because of an unknown noise covariance matrix, so it is rarely used for real-world problems. These limitations do not apply in helioseismology. We present a simplified proof of the optimality properties of the Pinsker estimator and show that it yields significantly better reconstructions than traditional inversion methods used in helioseismology, i.e. regularized least squares (Tikhonov regularization) and SOLA (approximate inverse) methods. Moreover, we discuss the incorporation of the mass conservation constraint in the Pinsker scheme using staggered grids. With this improvement we can reconstruct not only horizontal, but also vertical velocity components that are much smaller in amplitude.

  19. A model of episodic memory: mental time travel along encoded trajectories using grid cells.

    PubMed

    Hasselmo, Michael E

    2009-11-01

    The definition of episodic memory includes the concept of mental time travel: the ability to re-experience a previously experienced trajectory through continuous dimensions of space and time, and to recall specific events or stimuli along this trajectory. Lesions of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex impair human episodic memory function and impair rat performance in tasks that could be solved by retrieval of trajectories. Recent physiological data suggests a novel model for encoding and retrieval of trajectories, and for associating specific stimuli with specific positions along the trajectory. During encoding in the model, external input drives the activity of head direction cells. Entorhinal grid cells integrate the head direction input to update an internal representation of location, and drive hippocampal place cells. Trajectories are encoded by Hebbian modification of excitatory synaptic connections between hippocampal place cells and head direction cells driven by external action. Associations are also formed between hippocampal cells and sensory stimuli. During retrieval, a sensory input cue activates hippocampal cells that drive head direction activity via previously modified synapses. Persistent spiking of head direction cells maintains the direction and speed of the action, updating the activity of entorhinal grid cells that thereby further update place cell activity. Additional cells, termed arc length cells, provide coding of trajectory segments based on the one-dimensional arc length from the context of prior actions or states, overcoming ambiguity where the overlap of trajectory segments causes multiple head directions to be associated with one place. These mechanisms allow retrieval of complex, self-crossing trajectories as continuous curves through space and time. PMID:19615456

  20. A model of episodic memory: mental time travel along encoded trajectories using grid cells.

    PubMed

    Hasselmo, Michael E

    2009-11-01

    The definition of episodic memory includes the concept of mental time travel: the ability to re-experience a previously experienced trajectory through continuous dimensions of space and time, and to recall specific events or stimuli along this trajectory. Lesions of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex impair human episodic memory function and impair rat performance in tasks that could be solved by retrieval of trajectories. Recent physiological data suggests a novel model for encoding and retrieval of trajectories, and for associating specific stimuli with specific positions along the trajectory. During encoding in the model, external input drives the activity of head direction cells. Entorhinal grid cells integrate the head direction input to update an internal representation of location, and drive hippocampal place cells. Trajectories are encoded by Hebbian modification of excitatory synaptic connections between hippocampal place cells and head direction cells driven by external action. Associations are also formed between hippocampal cells and sensory stimuli. During retrieval, a sensory input cue activates hippocampal cells that drive head direction activity via previously modified synapses. Persistent spiking of head direction cells maintains the direction and speed of the action, updating the activity of entorhinal grid cells that thereby further update place cell activity. Additional cells, termed arc length cells, provide coding of trajectory segments based on the one-dimensional arc length from the context of prior actions or states, overcoming ambiguity where the overlap of trajectory segments causes multiple head directions to be associated with one place. These mechanisms allow retrieval of complex, self-crossing trajectories as continuous curves through space and time.

  1. Global teleseismic earthquake relocation with improved travel times and procedures for depth determination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robert, Engdah E.; Van Hilst, R. D.; Buland, Raymond P.

    1998-01-01

    We relocate nearly 100, 000 events that occurred during the period 1964 to 1995 and are well-constrained teleseismically by arrival-time data reported to the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and to the U. S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC). Hypocenter determination is significantly improved by using, in addition to regional and teleseismic P and S phases, the arrival times of PKiKP, PKPdf, and the teleseismic depth phases pP, pwP, and sP in the relocation procedure. A global probability model developed for later-arriving phases is used to independently identify the depth phases. The relocations are compared to hypocenters reported in the ISC and NEIC catalogs and by other sources. Differences in our epicenters with respect to ISC and NEIC estimates are generally small and regionally systematic due to the combined effects of the observing station network and plate geometry regionally, differences in upper mantle travel times between the reference earth models used, and the use of later-arriving phases. Focal depths are improved substantially over most other independent estimates, demonstrating (for example) how regional structures such as downgoing slabs can severely bias depth estimation when only regional and teleseismic P arrivals are used to determine the hypocenter. The new data base, which is complete to about Mw 5. 2 and includes all events for which moment-tensor solutions are available, has immediate application to high-resolution definition of Wadati-Benioff Zones (WBZs) worldwide, regional and global tomographic imaging, and other studies of earth structure.

  2. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    PubMed

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M; Luby, James C; Jump, William A; Shilling, Geoffrey B; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S; Schorr, Gregory S; Baird, Robin W

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  3. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    PubMed

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M; Luby, James C; Jump, William A; Shilling, Geoffrey B; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S; Schorr, Gregory S; Baird, Robin W

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  4. Near-Real-Time Acoustic Monitoring of Beaked Whales and Other Cetaceans Using a Seaglider™

    PubMed Central

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K.; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M.; Luby, James C.; Jump, William A.; Shilling, Geoffrey B.; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S.; Schorr, Gregory S.; Baird, Robin W.

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle – a glider – equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  5. Control of inertial acoustic cavitation in pulsed sonication using a real-time feedback loop system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, Cyril; Poizat, Adrien; Gilles, Bruno; Inserra, Claude; Bera, Jean-Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Owing to the complex behavior of ultrasound-induced bubble clouds (nucleation, linear and nonlinear oscillations, collapse), acoustic cavitation remains a hardly controllable phenomenon, leading to poorly reproducible ultrasound-based therapies. A better control of the various aspects of cavitation phenomena for in vivo applications is a key requirement to improve emerging ultrasound therapies. Previous publications have reported on systems performing regulation of acoustic cavitation in continuous sonication when applied in vitro, but the main challenge today is to achieve real-time control of cavitation activity in pulsed sonication when used in vivo. The present work aims at developing a system to control acoustic cavitation in a pulsed wave condition using a real-time feedback loop. The experimental setup consists of a water bath in which is submerged a focused transducer (pulsed waves, frequency 550 kHz) used for sonication and a hydrophone used to listen to inertial cavitation. The designed regulation process allows the cavitation activity to be controlled through a 300 μs feedback loop. Without regulation, cavitation exhibits numerous bursts of intense activity and large variations of inertial cavitation level over time. In a regulated regime, the control of inertial cavitation activity within a pulse leads to consistent cavitation levels over time with an enhancement of the reproducibility.

  6. Performance of an underwater acoustic volume array using time-reversal focusing.

    PubMed

    Root, Joseph A; Rogers, Peter H

    2002-11-01

    Time reversal permits acoustic focusing and beam forming in inhomogeneous and/or high-scattering environments. A volumetric array geometry can suppress back lobes and can fit a large, powerful array of elements into small spaces, like the free-water spaces on submarines. This research investigates applying the time-reversal method to an underwater acoustic volume array. The experiments evaluate the focusing performance of a 27-element volume array when different scattering structures are present within the volume of the array. The array is arranged in a 3x3x3 cubic matrix configuration with 18.75-cm vertical and horizontal element spacing. The system utilizes second-derivative Gaussian pulses to focus on a point 30 cm from the array. Results include a comparison between time-reversal focusing and standard focusing, an evaluation of the volume array's ability to suppress back lobes, and an analysis of how different scattering environments affect focal region size. Potential underwater applications for a volume array using time reversal include acoustic imaging, naval mine hunting, sonar, and underwater communications.

  7. A particle filtering approach for spatial arrival time tracking in ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rashi; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni

    2011-06-01

    The focus of this work is on arrival time and amplitude estimation from acoustic signals recorded at spatially separated hydrophones in the ocean. A particle filtering approach is developed that treats arrival times as "targets" and tracks their "location" across receivers, also modeling arrival time gradient. The method is evaluated via Monte Carlo simulations and is compared to a maximum likelihood estimator, which does not relate arrivals at neighboring receivers. The comparison demonstrates a significant advantage in using the particle filter. It is also shown that posterior probability density functions of times and amplitudes become readily available with particle filtering. PMID:21682358

  8. A particle filtering approach for spatial arrival time tracking in ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rashi; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni

    2011-06-01

    The focus of this work is on arrival time and amplitude estimation from acoustic signals recorded at spatially separated hydrophones in the ocean. A particle filtering approach is developed that treats arrival times as "targets" and tracks their "location" across receivers, also modeling arrival time gradient. The method is evaluated via Monte Carlo simulations and is compared to a maximum likelihood estimator, which does not relate arrivals at neighboring receivers. The comparison demonstrates a significant advantage in using the particle filter. It is also shown that posterior probability density functions of times and amplitudes become readily available with particle filtering.

  9. Time delay and Doppler estimation for wideband acoustic signals in multipath environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Zeng, Wen-Jun; Li, Xi-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Estimation of the parameters of a multipath underwater acoustic channel is of great interest for a variety of applications. This paper proposes a high-resolution method for jointly estimating the multipath time delays, Doppler scales, and attenuation amplitudes of a time-varying acoustical channel. The proposed method formulates the estimation of channel parameters into a sparse representation problem. With the [script-l](1)-norm as the measure of sparsity, the proposed method makes use of the basis pursuit (BP) criterion to find the sparse solution. The ill-conditioning can be effectively reduced by the [script-l](1)-norm regularization. Unlike many existing methods that are only applicable to narrowband signals, the proposed method can handle both narrowband and wideband signals. Simulation results are provided to verify the performance and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, indicating that it has a super-resolution in both delay and Doppler domain, and it is robust to noise.

  10. Gust Acoustics Computation with a Space-Time CE/SE Parallel 3D Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Himansu, A.; Chang, S. C.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The benchmark Problem 2 in Category 3 of the Third Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA) Workshop is solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. This problem concerns the unsteady response of an isolated finite-span swept flat-plate airfoil bounded by two parallel walls to an incident gust. The acoustic field generated by the interaction of the gust with the flat-plate airfoil is computed by solving the 3D (three-dimensional) Euler equations in the time domain using a parallel version of a 3D CE/SE solver. The effect of the gust orientation on the far-field directivity is studied. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, showing a reasonable agreement.

  11. Combined spatial diversity and time equalization for broadband multiple channel underwater acoustic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoro Kaskarovska, Violeta

    High data rate acoustic communications become feasible with the use of communication systems that operate at high frequency. The high frequency acoustic transmission in shallow water endures severe distortion as a result of the extensive intersymbol interference and Doppler shift, caused by the time variable multipath nature of the channel. In this research a Single Input Multiple Output (SIMO) acoustic communication system is developed to improve the reliability of the high data rate communications at short range in the shallow water acoustic channel. The proposed SIMO communication system operates at very high frequency and combines spatial diversity and decision feedback equalizer in a multilevel adaptive configuration. The first configuration performs selective combining on the equalized signals from multiple receivers and generates quality feedback parameter for the next level of combining. The second configuration implements a form of turbo equalization to evaluate the individual receivers using the feedback parameters as decision symbols. The improved signals from individual receivers are used in the next iteration of selective combining. Multiple iterations are used to achieve optimal estimate of the received signal. The multilevel adaptive configuration is evaluated on experimental and simulated data using SIMO system with three, four and five receivers. The simulation channel model developed for this research is based on experimental channel and Rician fading channel model. The performance of the channel is evaluated in terms of Bit Error Rate (BER) and Signal-to-Noise-and-Interference Ratio (SNIR). Using experimental data with non-zero BER, multilevel adaptive spatial diversity can achieve BER of 0 % and SNIR gain of 3 dB. The simulation results show that the average BER and SNIR after multilevel combining improve dramatically compared to the single receiver, even in case of extremely high BER of individual received signals. The results demonstrate the

  12. A method for generating an illusion of backwards time travel using immersive virtual reality—an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Doron; Pizarro, Rodrigo; Or-Berkers, Keren; Neyret, Solène; Pan, Xueni; Slater, Mel

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new method, based on immersive virtual reality (IVR), to give people the illusion of having traveled backwards through time to relive a sequence of events in which they can intervene and change history. The participant had played an important part in events with a tragic outcome—deaths of strangers—by having to choose between saving 5 people or 1. We consider whether the ability to go back through time, and intervene, to possibly avoid all deaths, has an impact on how the participant views such moral dilemmas, and also whether this experience leads to a re-evaluation of past unfortunate events in their own lives. We carried out an exploratory study where in the “Time Travel” condition 16 participants relived these events three times, seeing incarnations of their past selves carrying out the actions that they had previously carried out. In a “Repetition” condition another 16 participants replayed the same situation three times, without any notion of time travel. Our results suggest that those in the Time Travel condition did achieve an illusion of “time travel” provided that they also experienced an illusion of presence in the virtual environment, body ownership, and agency over the virtual body that substituted their own. Time travel produced an increase in guilt feelings about the events that had occurred, and an increase in support of utilitarian behavior as the solution to the moral dilemma. Time travel also produced an increase in implicit morality as judged by an implicit association test. The time travel illusion was associated with a reduction of regret associated with bad decisions in their own lives. The results show that when participants have a third action that they can take to solve the moral dilemma (that does not immediately involve choosing between the 1 and the 5) then they tend to take this option, even though it is useless in solving the dilemma, and actually results in the deaths of a greater number. PMID:25228889

  13. LISA simulations of time-reversed acoustic and elastic wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Johnson, P. A.; Scalerandi, M.; Ten Cate, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    Several experiments in the last decade have demonstrated the enormous potential of time-reversed acoustic (TRA) and elastic (TRE) waves for applications in many fields, such as medicine, materials characterization and oceanography. In the present contribution, we demonstrate the applicability of the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) to simulate, by means of virtual experiments, both TRA and TRE and to reproduce the relevant features of both techniques.

  14. Spatial gradients of protein-level time delays set the pace of the traveling segmentation clock waves

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Ahmet; Holland, Jack; Sperlea, Adriana; Devakanmalai, Gnanapackiam Sheela; Knierer, Stephan; Sangervasi, Sebastian; Stevenson, Angel; Özbudak, Ertuğrul M.

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate segmentation clock is a gene expression oscillator controlling rhythmic segmentation of the vertebral column during embryonic development. The period of oscillations becomes longer as cells are displaced along the posterior to anterior axis, which results in traveling waves of clock gene expression sweeping in the unsegmented tissue. Although various hypotheses necessitating the inclusion of additional regulatory genes into the core clock network at different spatial locations have been proposed, the mechanism underlying traveling waves has remained elusive. Here, we combined molecular-level computational modeling and quantitative experimentation to solve this puzzle. Our model predicts the existence of an increasing gradient of gene expression time delays along the posterior to anterior direction to recapitulate spatiotemporal profiles of the traveling segmentation clock waves in different genetic backgrounds in zebrafish. We validated this prediction by measuring an increased time delay of oscillatory Her1 protein production along the unsegmented tissue. Our results refuted the need for spatial expansion of the core feedback loop to explain the occurrence of traveling waves. Spatial regulation of gene expression time delays is a novel way of creating dynamic patterns; this is the first report demonstrating such a control mechanism in any tissue and future investigations will explore the presence of analogous examples in other biological systems. PMID:25336742

  15. Spatial gradients of protein-level time delays set the pace of the traveling segmentation clock waves.

    PubMed

    Ay, Ahmet; Holland, Jack; Sperlea, Adriana; Devakanmalai, Gnanapackiam Sheela; Knierer, Stephan; Sangervasi, Sebastian; Stevenson, Angel; Ozbudak, Ertuğrul M

    2014-11-01

    The vertebrate segmentation clock is a gene expression oscillator controlling rhythmic segmentation of the vertebral column during embryonic development. The period of oscillations becomes longer as cells are displaced along the posterior to anterior axis, which results in traveling waves of clock gene expression sweeping in the unsegmented tissue. Although various hypotheses necessitating the inclusion of additional regulatory genes into the core clock network at different spatial locations have been proposed, the mechanism underlying traveling waves has remained elusive. Here, we combined molecular-level computational modeling and quantitative experimentation to solve this puzzle. Our model predicts the existence of an increasing gradient of gene expression time delays along the posterior to anterior direction to recapitulate spatiotemporal profiles of the traveling segmentation clock waves in different genetic backgrounds in zebrafish. We validated this prediction by measuring an increased time delay of oscillatory Her1 protein production along the unsegmented tissue. Our results refuted the need for spatial expansion of the core feedback loop to explain the occurrence of traveling waves. Spatial regulation of gene expression time delays is a novel way of creating dynamic patterns; this is the first report demonstrating such a control mechanism in any tissue and future investigations will explore the presence of analogous examples in other biological systems.

  16. Numerical evaluation of the PERTH (PERiodic Tracer Hierarchy) method for estimating time-variable travel time distribution in variably saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Harman, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The distribution of water travel times is one of the crucial hydrologic characteristics of the catchment. Recently, it has been argued that a rigorous treatment of travel time distributions should allow for their variability in time because of the variable fluxes and partitioning of water in the water balance, and the consequent variable storage of a catchment. We would like to be able to observe the structure of the temporal variations in travel time distributions under controlled conditions, such as in a soil column or under irrigation experiments. However, time-variable travel time distributions are difficult to observe using typical active and passive tracer approaches. Time-variability implies that tracers introduced at different times will have different travel time distributions. The distribution may also vary during injection periods. Moreover, repeat application of a single tracer in a system with significant memory leads to overprinting of break-through curves, which makes it difficult to extract the original break-through curves, and the number of ideal tracers that can be applied is usually limited. Recognizing these difficulties, the PERTH (PERiodic Tracer Hierarchy) method has been developed. The method provides a way to estimate time-variable travel time distributions by tracer experiments under controlled conditions by employing a multi-tracer hierarchy under periodical hydrologic forcing inputs. The key assumption of the PERTH method is that as time gets sufficiently large relative to injection time, the average travel time distribution of two distinct ideal tracers injected during overlapping periods become approximately equal. Thus one can be used as a proxy for the other, and the breakthrough curves of tracers applied at different times in a periodic forcing condition can be separated from one another. In this study, we tested the PERTH method numerically for the case of infiltration at the plot scale using HYDRUS-1D and a particle

  17. 20 CFR 404.1008 - Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling or city salesman. 404.1008 Section 404.1008... commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling or city salesman. (a) General...) Full-time life insurance salesman. A full-time life insurance salesman's main activity is selling...

  18. The first study of the light-travel time effect in massive LMC eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Vraštil, J.; Pilarčík, L.; Juryšek, J.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: New CCD observations for semidetached and detached eclipsing binaries from the Large Magellanic Cloud were carried out using the Danish 1.54-m telescope located at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. The selected systems were monitored for their times of minima, which were required to be able to study the period changes taking place in them. In addition, many new times of minima were derived from the photometric surveys OGLE-II, OGLE-III, and MACHO. Methods: The O-C diagrams of minima timings were analysed using the hypothesis of the light-travel time effect, i.e. assuming the orbital motion around a common barycenter with the distant component. Moreover, the light curves of these systems were also analysed using the program PHOEBE, which provided the physical parameters of the stars. Results: For the first time, in this study we derived the relatively short periods of modulation in these systems, which relates to third bodies. The orbital periods resulted from 3.6 to 11.3 yr and the eccentricities were found to be up to 0.64. This is the first time that this kind of analysis for the set of extragalactic sources has been performed. The Wolf-Rayet system OGLE-LMC-ECL-08823 is the most mysterious one, owing to the resultant high mass function. Another system, OGLE-LMC-ECL-19996, was found to contain a third body with a very high mass (M3,min = 26M⊙). One system (OGLE-LMC-ECL-09971) is suspicious because of its eccentricity, and another one (OGLE-LMC-ECL-20162) shows some light curve variability, with a possible flare-like or microlensing-like event. Conclusions: All of these results came only from the photometric observations of the systems and can be considered as a good starting point for future dedicated observations. Based on data collected with the Danish 1.54-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory.Full Table 4 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  19. Source implementation to eliminate low-frequency artifacts in finite difference time domain room acoustic simulation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyok; Lam, Yiu Wai

    2012-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is a numerical technique that is straight forward to implement for the simulation of acoustic propagation. For room acoustics applications, the implementation of efficient source excitation and frequency dependent boundary conditions on arbitrary geometry can be seen as two of the most significant problems. This paper deals with the source implementation problem. Among existing source implementation methods, the hard source implementation is the simplest and computationally most efficient. Unfortunately, it generates a large low-frequency modulation in the measured time response. This paper presents a detailed investigation into these side effects. Surprisingly, some of these side effects are found to exist even if a transparent source implementation is used. By combing a time limited approach with a class of more natural source pulse function, this paper develops a source implementation method in FDTD that is as simple and computationally as efficient as a hard source implementation and yet capable of producing results that are virtually the same as a true transparent source. It is believed that the source implementation method developed in this paper will provide an improvement to the practical usability of the FDTD method for room acoustic simulation. PMID:22280589

  20. Path-Dependent Travel Time Prediction Variance and Covariance for a Global Tomographic P- and S-Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipp, J. R.; Ballard, S.; Begnaud, M. L.; Encarnacao, A. V.; Young, C. J.; Phillips, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recently our combined SNL-LANL research team has succeeded in developing a global, seamless 3D tomographic P- and S-velocity model (SALSA3D) that provides superior first P and first S travel time predictions at both regional and teleseismic distances. However, given the variable data quality and uneven data sampling associated with this type of model, it is essential that there be a means to calculate high-quality estimates of the path-dependent variance and covariance associated with the predicted travel times of ray paths through the model. In this paper, we describe a methodology for accomplishing this by exploiting the full model covariance matrix and show examples of path-dependent travel time prediction uncertainty computed from our latest tomographic model. Typical global 3D SALSA3D models have on the order of 1/2 million nodes, so the challenge in calculating the covariance matrix is formidable: 0.9 TB storage for 1/2 of a symmetric matrix, necessitating an Out-Of-Core (OOC) blocked matrix solution technique. With our approach the tomography matrix (G which includes a prior model covariance constraint) is multiplied by its transpose (GTG) and written in a blocked sub-matrix fashion. We employ a distributed parallel solution paradigm that solves for (GTG)-1 by assigning blocks to individual processing nodes for matrix decomposition update and scaling operations. We first find the Cholesky decomposition of GTG which is subsequently inverted. Next, we employ OOC matrix multiplication methods to calculate the model covariance matrix from (GTG)-1 and an assumed data covariance matrix. Given the model covariance matrix, we solve for the travel-time covariance associated with arbitrary ray-paths by summing the model covariance along both ray paths. Setting the paths equal and taking the square root yields the travel prediction uncertainty for the single path.

  1. Time lag estimates for nitrate travel through the vadose zone in Southland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Scott; Chanut, Pierre; Ledgard, George; Rissmann, Clint

    2014-05-01

    A regional-scale study was carried out to calculate the travel time of a nitrate particle from the ground surface into shallow groundwater. The aim of the study was to obtain preliminary answers to two questions. Firstly, if leaching limits are set, how long would it take to see an improvement in shallow groundwater quality? Secondly, have groundwater nitrate concentrations reached equilibrium from recent dairy expansion in the region, or could we expect future increases? We applied a methodology that provides a balance between the detail and generalisation that is required for a regional-scale study. Steady-state advective transport through the vadose zone was modelled with water retention curves. These curves enable an estimate of the average volumetric water content of the vadose zone. The percentage saturation can then be used to calculate the vadose zone transit time if effective porosity, depth to the water table and annual average soil drainage are known. A time for mixing in the uppermost part of the aquifer has also been calculated. Two different vadose zone water retention curve models were used for comparison, the Brooks-Corey (1964), and the Van Genuchten (1980) methods. The water retention curves were parameterised by sediment texture via the Rawls and Brakensiek (1985) pedotransfer functions. Hydraulic properties were derived by positioning sediment textural descriptions on the Folk textural triangle, estimates of effective porosity from literature, and hydraulic conductivity values from aquifer tests. Uncertainty of parameter estimates was included by assigning standard deviations and appropriate probability distributions. Vadose zone saturation was modelled at 6,450 sites across the region with a Monte Carlo simulation involving 10,000 realisations. This generated a probability distribution of saturation for each site. Average volumetric water content of the vadose zone ranged from 8.5 to 40.7 % for the Brooks-Corey model and 12.9 to 36.3% for the

  2. Time-frequency-aspect analysis and visualization of acoustic scattering from elastic shells submerged in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Timothy J.

    2000-05-01

    The solutions for acoustic scattering from objects in separable geometries along with the associated fluid- structure interactions are well established. Closed-form solutions to these problems have either interpretations such as resonance scattering theory, or some limiting situations that provide insight into the physical processes that occur. In contrast, most acoustical scattering problems do not have closed-form solutions. Numerical solutions, like finite and boundary element methods, allow researchers to obtain solutions from scattering problems with more complicated geometries; unfortunately, these methods of solution are limited in that they lack the kind of interpretation that provides insight into the physical processes that occur. It is only through the systematic analysis of the large volume of data produced by numerical solutions that this insight is gained. One way to gain this insight is to analyze the monostatic dependence of echoes in the time-frequency domain. However, traditional three-dimensional graphical analysis of time-frequency signals that vary as a function of a third parameter (the monostatic dependence) does not display all of the signals' information content because two marginals, of this distribution (the time and frequency representations) contain information that is lost in the visual representation of the time-frequency domain. This information is lost because the uncertainty principal prevents simultaneous display of the time and frequency information via a time-frequency transform, and because humans do not possess the innate ability to perform the transforms that extract the information. The problem of how to systematically analyze monostatic scattering data in the time-frequency domain and how to visually display all of the data's information content is overcome by introducing a time-frequency-parameter graphical analysis technique. This technique is applied to farfield acoustic scattering from finite, elastic, cylindrical

  3. Tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The longwave phenomenological model is used to make simple and precise calculations of various physical quantities such as the vibrational energy density, the vibrational energy, the relative mechanical displacement, and the one-dimensional stress tensor of a porous silicon distributed Bragg reflector. From general principles such as invariance under time reversal, invariance under space reflection, and conservation of energy density flux, the equivalence of the tunneling times for both transmission and reflection is demonstrated. Here, we study the tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector in porous silicon multilayer structures, and we report the possibility that a phenomenon called Hartman effect appears in these structures. PMID:25237288

  4. A computer program for estimating instream travel times and concentrations of a potential contaminant in the Yellowstone River, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    The Yellowstone River is very important in a variety of ways to the residents of southeastern Montana; however, it is especially vulnerable to spilled contaminants. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Montana Department of Environmental Quality, initiated a study to develop a computer program to rapidly estimate instream travel times and concentrations of a potential contaminant in the Yellowstone River using regression equations developed in 1999 by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to describe these equations and their limitations, describe the development of a computer program to apply the equations to the Yellowstone River, and provide detailed instructions on how to use the program. This program is available online at [http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/sir2006-5057/includes/ytot.xls]. The regression equations provide estimates of instream travel times and concentrations in rivers where little or no contaminant-transport data are available. Equations were developed and presented for the most probable flow velocity and the maximum probable flow velocity. These velocity estimates can then be used to calculate instream travel times and concentrations of a potential contaminant. The computer program was developed so estimation equations for instream travel times and concentrations can be solved quickly for sites along the Yellowstone River between Corwin Springs and Sidney, Montana. The basic types of data needed to run the program are spill data, streamflow data, and data for locations of interest along the Yellowstone River. Data output from the program includes spill location, river mileage at specified locations, instantaneous discharge, mean-annual discharge, drainage area, and channel slope. Travel times and concentrations are provided for estimates of the most probable velocity of the peak concentration and the maximum probable velocity of the peak concentration. Verification of estimates of instream travel times and

  5. Predictions of narrow-band acoustic time reversal in the shallow ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Michael Robert

    2000-10-01

    A time-reversing array (TRA) can retrofocus acoustic energy, in both time and space, to the original sound- source location without any environmental information. This unique capability may be degraded in time-dependent, lossy, or noisy acoustic environments. A broad computational and analytical investigation into narrow- band acoustic time reversal in the shallow ocean has been undertaken. This includes investigating (1)variability in the water column due to dynamic linear internal waves, (2)roughness in the ocean bottom, and (3)limiting orientations of TRAs. TRA retrofocusing performance predictions are primarily determined via monochromatic propagation simulations using the wide-angle parabolic equation code RAM (Collins 1993, 1994, and 1998). Results for the influence of source-array range, source depth, channel depth, acoustic frequency, bottom absorption, bottom roughness, internal wave strength, roundtrip time delay, and array orientation and spacing are presented. For a fixed channel geometry, higher frequencies, deeper sources, and lower bottom absorption improve TRA performance and allow retrofocusing at longer ranges. After several minutes in a dynamic shallow-water channel containing a random superposition of linear internal waves, there is significant TRA retrofocus amplitude decay, and the decay rate increases with increasing internal wave activity and acoustic frequency. Randomness in the environment, either from bottom roughness or random linear internal waves, reduces the predicted azimuthal angular width of the vertical-TRA retrofocus to as little as a fraction of a degree (compared to 360° for uniform environments) for source-array ranges from 2.5 to 20 km at frequencies from 250 Hz to 2 kHz. In a sound channel with bottom roughness, the azimuthal size of the retrofocus is predicted to be proportional to the roughness correlation length divided by the wavenumber, source-array range, and roughness RMS-height all raised to the three-halves power

  6. Differential Influence of Frequency, Timing, and Intensity Cues in a Complex Acoustic Categorization Task

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Katherine I.; McLendon, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Songbirds, which, like humans, learn complex vocalizations, provide an excellent model for the study of acoustic pattern recognition. Here we examined the role of three basic acoustic parameters in an ethologically relevant categorization task. Female zebra finches were first trained to classify songs as belonging to one of two males and then asked whether they could generalize this knowledge to songs systematically altered with respect to frequency, timing, or intensity. Birds' performance on song categorization fell off rapidly when songs were altered in frequency or intensity, but they generalized well to songs that were changed in duration by >25%. Birds were not deaf to timing changes, however; they detected these tempo alterations when asked to discriminate between the same song played back at two different speeds. In addition, when birds were retrained with songs at many intensities, they could correctly categorize songs over a wide range of volumes. Thus although they can detect all these cues, birds attend less to tempo than to frequency or intensity cues during song categorization. These results are unexpected for several reasons: zebra finches normally encounter a wide range of song volumes but most failed to generalize across volumes in this task; males produce only slight variations in tempo, but females generalized widely over changes in song duration; and all three acoustic parameters are critical for auditory neurons. Thus behavioral data place surprising constraints on the relationship between previous experience, behavioral task, neural responses, and perception. We discuss implications for models of auditory pattern recognition. PMID:20610781

  7. Symmetry analysis for nonlinear time reversal methods applied to nonlinear acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Serge; Chaline, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Using symmetry invariance, nonlinear Time Reversal (TR) and reciprocity properties, the classical NEWS methods are supplemented and improved by new excitations having the intrinsic property of enlarging frequency analysis bandwidth and time domain scales, with now both medical acoustics and electromagnetic applications. The analysis of invariant quantities is a well-known tool which is often used in nonlinear acoustics in order to simplify complex equations. Based on a fundamental physical principle known as symmetry analysis, this approach consists in finding judicious variables, intrinsically scale dependant, and able to describe all stages of behaviour on the same theoretical foundation. Based on previously published results within the nonlinear acoustic areas, some practical implementation will be proposed as a new way to define TR-NEWS based methods applied to NDT and medical bubble based non-destructive imaging. This paper tends to show how symmetry analysis can help us to define new methodologies and new experimental set-up involving modern signal processing tools. Some example of practical realizations will be proposed in the context of biomedical non-destructive imaging using Ultrasound Contrast Agents (ACUs) where symmetry and invariance properties allow us to define a microscopic scale-invariant experimental set-up describing intrinsic symmetries of the microscopic complex system.

  8. Generation of ultrasound radiation force with the use of time reversal acoustics principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    There are numerous medical applications of ultrasound radiation force (RF) which could be made more effective using the time reversal acoustics (TRA) principles. This paper gives an overview of research into physical and technical bases of RF generation in heterogeneous biological media using TRA focusing systems. A custom-designed compact multichannel TRA system for receiving, digitizing, storing, time reversing, and transmitting acoustic signals in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz has been developed and extensively tested in model systems and ex vivo tissues and bones. Shear strain and shear waves remotely induced in soft tissues and bones by radiation force were detected using various acoustical and optical means. Experimental studies fully confirmed the feasibility of TRA generation of RF and demonstrated several advantages over conventional means of remotely inducing shear stress in biological media. These advantages include a possibility to create highly localized (close to diffraction limit) shear stress in heterogeneous media stir focused ultrasound beam in 3-D volume using very simple hardware. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  9. Time-sliced perturbation theory II: baryon acoustic oscillations and infrared resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    We use time-sliced perturbation theory (TSPT) to give an accurate description of the infrared non-linear effects affecting the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) present in the distribution of matter at very large scales. In TSPT this can be done via a systematic resummation that has a simple diagrammatic representation and does not involve uncontrollable approximations. We discuss the power counting rules and derive explicit expressions for the resummed matter power spectrum up to next-to leading order and the bispectrum at the leading order. The two-point correlation function agrees well with N-body data at BAO scales. The systematic approach also allows to reliably assess the shift of the baryon acoustic peak due to non-linear effects.

  10. Finite Difference Time Domain Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Lens System for Ambient Noise Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Miyazaki, Ayano; Ogasawara, Hanako; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2006-05-01

    Much attention has been paid to the new idea of detecting objects using ocean ambient noise. This concept is called ambient noise imaging (ANI). In this study, sound fields focused by an acoustic lens system constructed with a single biconcave lens were analyzed using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for realizing an ANI system. The size of the lens aperture that would have sufficient resolution—for example, the beam width is 1° at 60 kHz—was roughly determined by comparing the image points and -3 dB areas of sound pressure fields generated by lenses with various apertures. Then, in another FDTD analysis, we successfully used a lens with a determined aperture to detect rigid target objects in an acoustic noise field generated by a large number of point sources.

  11. Nonlinear Elastic Wave NDE II. Nonlinear Wave Modulation Spectroscopy and Nonlinear Time Reversed Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, A. M.; Johnson, P. A.

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents the second part of the review of Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) in NDE, and describe two different methods of nonlinear NDE that provide not only damage detection but location as well. Nonlinear Wave Modulation Spectroscopy is based on the application of an ultrasonic probe signal modulated by a low frequency vibration. Damage location can be obtained by application of Impulse Modulation Techniques that exploit the modulation of a short pulse reflected from a damage feature (e.g. crack) by low frequency vibration. Nonlinear Time Reversed Acoustic methods provide the means to focus acoustic energy to any point in a solid. In combination, we are applying the focusing properties of TRA and the nonlinear properties of cracks to locate them.

  12. Acoustical Klein-Gordon equation: a time-independent perturbation analysis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy

    2004-07-30

    The perturbation analysis of an ideal acoustical duct was first made by Rayleigh in 1878 and the result has since stood in the literature. However, the analysis is based on the assumption of potential and kinetic energy densities that remain constant as a change in cross section occurs, whereas, in fact, they may fluctuate significantly in comparison to the slowly varying "wave function," Psi(x,t), of the acoustical Klein-Gordon equation. The square of the time-independent eigenfunction, psi(2)(x), is directly proportional to the potential energy per unit length of fluid, and it is shown that it is precisely the perturbation in potential energy that defines correctly the eigenvalue shifts.

  13. Non Linear Travel Time Tomography With The Use of Sobolev Norms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondi, R.; de Franco, R.

    We present a method for the determination of 3-D velocity crustal structure and in- terface geometry, by inversion of seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection trav- eltimes. To minimize the deviation between the synthetic and exact wavefields we consider the minimization of a nonlinear objective function which considers: 1. the Euclidean norm of the misfit between observed and calculated data; 2. the L_2 norm of the misfit between the value of the parameter in the model been sought and the value of the parameter in the "a priori" mean model; 3. the minimization of the inaccuracies and costs of ray tracing in complex models, expressed in terms of the Sobolev norms of the relative parameters. In particular two Sobolev norms are relevant to ray tracing: as the complicated behaviour of rays depends on the second velocity derivatives, it may be restricted by minimizing the Sobolev norm of the velocity function in the H^2 space; as the second order travel-time perturbations depend on the perturbation of the first velocity derivatives, it may be useful to limit the velocity model updates, within individual iterations of the linearized inversion, by means of the minimization of the Sobolev norm in the H^1 space (Klimes, "PAGEOPH", 2002). Through the use of 3-D synthetic tests recovered from real models, we show that including the minimization of Sobolev norm is necessary, when modelling with ray methods. The initial model to be inverted is chosen in order to satisfy mathematical stability and, in analysing final solution reliability, estimate of the misfit or chi squared and "a posteriori" model covariance is given. Calculations were performed with the use of programs developed by the Consortium for Seismic Waves in Complex 3-D Structures (CW3D) at Charles University in Prague. Application of the method to field data collected in the framework of TOMOVES (TOMOgraphy of Mt.VESuvius) experiment is a check on the validity of the inversion scheme.

  14. Testing & Validating: 3D Seismic Travel Time Tomography (Detailed Shallow Subsurface Imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, David; Marzan, Ignacio; Alvarez-Marron, Joaquina; Carbonell, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    A detailed full 3 dimensional P wave seismic velocity model was constrained by a high-resolution seismic tomography experiment. A regular and dense grid of shots and receivers was use to image a 500x500x200 m volume of the shallow subsurface. 10 GEODE's resulting in a 240 channels recording system and a 250 kg weight drop were used for the acquisition. The recording geometry consisted in 10x20m geophone grid spacing, and a 20x20 m stagered source spacing. A total of 1200 receivers and 676 source points. The study area is located within the Iberian Meseta, in Villar de Cañas (Cuenca, Spain). The lithological/geological target consisted in a Neogen sedimentary sequence formed from bottom to top by a transition from gyspum to silstones. The main objectives consisted in resolving the underground structure: contacts/discontinuities; constrain the 3D geometry of the lithology (possible cavities, faults/fractures). These targets were achieved by mapping the 3D distribution of the physical properties (P-wave velocity). The regularly space dense acquisition grid forced to acquire the survey in different stages and with a variety of weather conditions. Therefore, a careful quality control was required. More than a half million first arrivals were inverted to provide a 3D Vp velocity model that reached depths of 120 m in the areas with the highest ray coverage. An extended borehole campaign, that included borehole geophysical measurements in some wells provided unique tight constraints on the lithology an a validation scheme for the tomographic results. The final image reveals a laterally variable structure consisting of four different lithological units. In this methodological validation test travel-time tomography features a high capacity of imaging in detail the lithological contrasts for complex structures located at very shallow depths.

  15. Applying petrophysical models to radar travel time and electrical resistivity tomograms: Resolution-dependent limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Binley, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Geophysical imaging has traditionally provided qualitative information about geologic structure; however, there is increasing interest in using petrophysical models to convert tomograms to quantitative estimates of hydrogeologic, mechanical, or geochemical parameters of interest (e.g., permeability, porosity, water content, and salinity). Unfortunately, petrophysical estimation based on tomograms is complicated by limited and variable image resolution, which depends on (1) measurement physics (e.g., electrical conduction or electromagnetic wave propagation), (2) parameterization and regularization, (3) measurement error, and (4) spatial variability. We present a framework to predict how core-scale relations between geophysical properties and hydrologic parameters are altered by the inversion, which produces smoothly varying pixel-scale estimates. We refer to this loss of information as "correlation loss." Our approach upscales the core-scale relation to the pixel scale using the model resolution matrix from the inversion, random field averaging, and spatial statistics of the geophysical property. Synthetic examples evaluate the utility of radar travel time tomography (RTT) and electrical-resistivity tomography (ERT) for estimating water content. This work provides (1) a framework to assess tomograms for geologic parameter estimation and (2) insights into the different patterns of correlation loss for ERT and RTT. Whereas ERT generally performs better near boreholes, RTT performs better in the interwell region. Application of petrophysical models to the tomograms in our examples would yield misleading estimates of water content. Although the examples presented illustrate the problem of correlation loss in the context of near-surface geophysical imaging, our results have clear implications for quantitative analysis of tomograms for diverse geoscience applications. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Deriving Sensitivity Kernels of Coda-Wave Travel Times to Velocity Changes Based on the Three-Dimensional Single Isotropic Scattering Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Hisashi; Emoto, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Recently, coda-wave interferometry has been used to monitor temporal changes in subsurface structures. Seismic velocity changes have been detected by coda-wave interferometry in association with large earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. To constrain the spatial extent of the velocity changes, spatial homogeneity is often assumed. However, it is important to locate the region of the velocity changes correctly to understand physical mechanisms causing them. In this paper, we are concerned with the sensitivity kernels relating travel times of coda waves to velocity changes. In previous studies, sensitivity kernels have been formulated for two-dimensional single scattering and multiple scattering, three-dimensional multiple scattering, and diffusion. In this paper, we formulate and derive analytical expressions of the sensitivity kernels for three-dimensional single-scattering case. These sensitivity kernels show two peaks at both source and receiver locations, which is similar to the previous studies using different scattering models. The two peaks are more pronounced for later lapse time. We validate our formulation by comparing it with finite-difference simulations of acoustic wave propagation. Our formulation enables us to evaluate the sensitivity kernels analytically, which is particularly useful for the analysis of body waves from deeper earthquakes.

  17. A passive acoustic device for real-time monitoring of the efficacy of shockwave lithotripsy treatment.

    PubMed

    Leighton, T G; Fedele, F; Coleman, A J; McCarthy, C; Ryves, S; Hurrell, A M; De Stefano, A; White, P R

    2008-10-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the preferred modality for the treatment of renal and ureteric stone disease. Currently X-ray or ultrasound B-scan imaging are used to locate the stone and to check that it remains targeted at the focus of the lithotripter during treatment. Neither imaging modality is particularly effective in allowing the efficacy of treatment to be judged during the treatment session. A new device is described that, when placed on the patient's skin, can passively monitor the acoustic signals that propagate through the body after each lithotripter shock, and which can provide useful information on the effectiveness of targeting. These acoustic time histories are analyzed in real time to extract the two main characteristic peak amplitudes (m(1) and m(2)) and the time between these peaks (t(c)). A set of rules based on the acoustic parameters was developed during a clinical study in which a complete set of acoustic and clinical data was obtained for 30 of the 118 subjects recruited. The rules, which complied with earlier computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and in vitro tests, allow each shock to be classified as "effective" or "ineffective." These clinically-derived rules were then applied in a second clinical study in which complete datasets were obtained for 49 of the 85 subjects recruited. This second clinical study demonstrated almost perfect agreement (kappa = 0.94) between the number of successful treatments, defined as >50% fragmentation as determined by X-ray at the follow-up appointment, and a device-derived global treatment score, TS(0), a figure derived from the total number of effective shocks in any treatment. The acoustic system is shown to provide a test of the success of the treatment that has a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 100%. In addition to the predictive capability, the device provides valuable real-time feedback to the lithotripter operator by indicating the effectiveness of each shock, plus

  18. Linear stability analysis for travelling waves of second order in time PDE's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavova, Milena; Stefanov, Atanas

    2012-09-01

    We study travelling waves φc of second order in time PDE's u_{tt}+{ L} u+N(u)=0 . The linear stability analysis for these models is reduced to the question of the stability of quadratic pencils in the form \\lambda^2Id+2c\\lambda \\partial_x+{ H}_c , where { H}_c=c^2 \\partial_{xx}+{ L}+N'(\\varphi_c) . If { H}_c is a self-adjoint operator, with a simple negative eigenvalue and a simple eigenvalue at zero, then we completely characterize the linear stability of φc. More precisely, we introduce an explicitly computable index \\omega^*({ H}_c)\\in (0, \\infty] , so that the wave φc is stable if and only if |c|\\geq \\omega^*({ H}_c) . The results are applicable both in the periodic case and in the whole line case. The method of proof involves a delicate analysis of a function { G} , associated with { H} , whose positive zeros are exactly the positive (unstable) eigenvalues of the pencil \\lambda^2Id+2c\\lambda \\partial_x+{ H} . We would like to emphasize that the function { G} is not the Evans function for the problem, but rather a new object that we define herein, which fits the situation rather well. As an application, we consider three classical models—the ‘good’ Boussinesq equation, the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov (KGZ) system and the fourth order beam equation. In the whole line case, for the Boussinesq case and the KGZ system (and as a direct application of the main results), we compute explicitly the set of speeds which give rise to linearly stable travelling waves (and for all powers of p in the case of Boussinesq). This result is new for the KGZ system, while it generalizes the results of Alexander et al (2012, personal communication) and Alexander and Sachs (1995 Nonlinear World 2 471-507), which apply to the case p = 2. For the beam equation, we provide an implicit formula (depending only on the function \\|\\varphi_c'\\|_{L^2}) , which works for all p and for both the periodic and the whole line cases. Our results complement (and exactly match

  19. 41 CFR 302-3.314 - Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-3.314 Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? Yes, all... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? 302-3.314 Section 302-3.314...

  20. 41 CFR 302-3.314 - Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-3.314 Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? Yes, all... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? 302-3.314 Section 302-3.314...

  1. 41 CFR 302-3.314 - Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-3.314 Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? Yes, all... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? 302-3.314 Section 302-3.314...

  2. 41 CFR 302-3.314 - Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-3.314 Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? Yes, all... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? 302-3.314 Section 302-3.314...

  3. 41 CFR 302-3.314 - Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-3.314 Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? Yes, all... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Is there a time limit when I must begin my travel and transportation upon separation? 302-3.314 Section 302-3.314...

  4. Marginal Groups in Marginal Times: Gypsy and Traveller Parents and Home Education in England, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhopal, Kalwant; Myers, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of home education for Gypsy and Traveller groups in England, UK. We argue that home education is perceived in a particular historical "moment" characterised in the media and more generally throughout society by "risk". Against this backdrop this article considers Gypsy and Traveller…

  5. Effect of fare and travel time on the demand for domestic air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, S. E.; Liu, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    An econometric travel demand model was presented. The model was used for analyzing long haul domestic passenger markets in the United States. The results showed the sensitivities of demand to changes in fares and speed reflecting technology through more efficient aircraft designs.

  6. A comparison of time domain boundary conditions for acoustic waves in wave guides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Propst, G.; Silcox, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers consider several types of boundary conditions in the context of time domain models for acoustic waves. Experiments with four different duct terminations (hard wall, free radiation, foam, and wedge) were carried out in a wave duct from which reflection coefficients over a wide frequency range were measured. These reflection coefficients were used to estimate parameters in the time domain boundary conditions. A comparison of the relative merits of the models in describing the data is presented. Boundary conditions which yield a good fit of the model to the experimental data were found for all duct terminations except the wedge.

  7. Direct observation of low frequency confined acoustic phonons in silver nanoparticles: Terahertz time domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Kamaraju, N; Karthikeyan, B; Tondusson, M; Freysz, E; Sood, A K

    2010-07-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy has been used to study low frequency confined acoustic phonons of silver nanoparticles embedded in poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix in the spectral range of 0.1-2.5 THz. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function show two bands at 0.60 and 2.12 THz attributed to the spheroidal and toroidal modes of silver nanoparticles, thus demonstrating the usefulness of terahertz time domain spectroscopy as a complementary technique to Raman spectroscopy in characterizing the nanoparticles.

  8. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images.

  9. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images. PMID:26518525

  10. The Eclipsing System V404 LYR: Light-travel Times and γ Doradus Pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Koo, Jae-Rim

    2014-08-01

    We present the physical properties of V404 Lyr exhibiting eclipse timing variations and multiperiodic pulsations from all historical data including the Kepler and SuperWASP observations. Detailed analyses of 2922 minimum epochs showed that the orbital period has varied through a combination of an upward-opening parabola and two sinusoidal variations, with periods of P 3 = 649 days and P 4 = 2154 days and semi-amplitudes of K 3 = 193 s and K 4 = 49 s, respectively. The secular period increase at a rate of +1.41 × 10-7 days yr-1 could be interpreted as a combination of the secondary to primary mass transfer and angular momentum loss. The most reasonable explanation for both sinusoids is a pair of light-travel-time effects due to two circumbinary objects with projected masses of M 3 = 0.47 M ⊙ and M 4 = 0.047 M ⊙. The third-body parameters are consistent with those calculated using the Wilson-Devinney binary code. For the orbital inclinations i 4 >~ 43°, the fourth component has a mass within the hydrogen-burning limit of ~0.07 M ⊙, which implies that it is a brown dwarf. A satisfactory model for the Kepler light curves was obtained by applying a cool spot to the secondary component. The results demonstrate that the close eclipsing pair is in a semi-detached, but near-contact, configuration; the primary fills approximately 93% of its limiting lobe and is larger than the lobe-filling secondary. Multiple frequency analyses were applied to the light residuals after subtracting the synthetic eclipsing curve from the Kepler data. This revealed that the primary component of V404 Lyr is a γ Dor type pulsating star, exhibiting seven pulsation frequencies in the range of 1.85-2.11 day-1 with amplitudes of 1.38-5.72 mmag and pulsation constants of 0.24-0.27 days. The seven frequencies were clearly identified as high-order low-degree gravity-mode oscillations which might be excited through tidal interaction. Only eight eclipsing binaries have been known to contain

  11. The eclipsing system V404 Lyr: Light-travel times and γ Doradus pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Koo, Jae-Rim E-mail: slkim@kasi.re.kr E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2014-08-01

    We present the physical properties of V404 Lyr exhibiting eclipse timing variations and multiperiodic pulsations from all historical data including the Kepler and SuperWASP observations. Detailed analyses of 2922 minimum epochs showed that the orbital period has varied through a combination of an upward-opening parabola and two sinusoidal variations, with periods of P {sub 3} = 649 days and P {sub 4} = 2154 days and semi-amplitudes of K {sub 3} = 193 s and K {sub 4} = 49 s, respectively. The secular period increase at a rate of +1.41 × 10{sup –7} days yr{sup –1} could be interpreted as a combination of the secondary to primary mass transfer and angular momentum loss. The most reasonable explanation for both sinusoids is a pair of light-travel-time effects due to two circumbinary objects with projected masses of M {sub 3} = 0.47 M {sub ☉} and M {sub 4} = 0.047 M {sub ☉}. The third-body parameters are consistent with those calculated using the Wilson-Devinney binary code. For the orbital inclinations i {sub 4} ≳ 43°, the fourth component has a mass within the hydrogen-burning limit of ∼0.07 M {sub ☉}, which implies that it is a brown dwarf. A satisfactory model for the Kepler light curves was obtained by applying a cool spot to the secondary component. The results demonstrate that the close eclipsing pair is in a semi-detached, but near-contact, configuration; the primary fills approximately 93% of its limiting lobe and is larger than the lobe-filling secondary. Multiple frequency analyses were applied to the light residuals after subtracting the synthetic eclipsing curve from the Kepler data. This revealed that the primary component of V404 Lyr is a γ Dor type pulsating star, exhibiting seven pulsation frequencies in the range of 1.85-2.11 day{sup –1} with amplitudes of 1.38-5.72 mmag and pulsation constants of 0.24-0.27 days. The seven frequencies were clearly identified as high-order low-degree gravity-mode oscillations which might be excited

  12. From time-to space-traveller -tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis (Crustacea: Notostraca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierold, Thorid

    The Notostraca is a small ancient crustacean order dating back to the Carboniferous and possibly up to the Devonian period. In fact, there are Upper Triassic Triops fossils from Germany which are almost indistinguishable from the present Triops cancriformis and thus Triops is considered to be one of the best examples of evolutionary stasis or `living fossil'. Fossil records have shown that the occurrence of Triops is linked to strata resulting from inland freshwater bodies with alternating phases of flooding and drying out. Still today Notostraca species are known from ephemeral ponds and puddles throughout the world. Several Large Branchiopod species such as the European T. cancriformis present adaptations to desiccation, the main one being the production of thick-walled resting cysts. A high number of resting cysts is laid during the flooded period into the pond sediment or is fixed on plants during the adulthood. The drought resistant portion of cysts undergoes an extreme form of diapause. During this resting time the embryo is protected by different (cement)-layers against desiccation, UV-radiation and pressure. Thus their life cycle is perfectly adapted to extreme environments which resulted in the survival of more than 200 Million years. Among the Notostraca a wide range of reproductive modes are present including bisexual -the putatively ancestral state -, androdioecious and hermaphrodite populations. As hermaphroditism and androdioecy confer a colonisation advantage, Triops are suitable for populating experiments whatsoever. Triops is an ideal model organism due to their easy culture and breeding in the lab. Without any impact on the hatching success the resting cysts can easily be extracted from the soil and prepared for controlled experiments. Furthermore their biology has been studied in depth and optimal breeding conditions are known. The ancient group "travelled" successfully through time and is now ready for experiments in the outer space. At the

  13. Magma acoustics and time-varying melt properties at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés, Milton A.; Hagerty, Michael T.; Schwartz, Susan Y.

    The similarity of acoustic and seismic spectra recorded during Strombolian activity of Arenal Volcano provides conclusive evidence that pressure waves are generated and propagated within the magma-gas mixture inside volcanic conduits. These pressure waves are sensitive to the flow velocity and to small changes in the gas content of the magma-gas mixture, and thus can provide useful indicators of the time-varying properties of the unsteady flow regime and the chemical composition of the melt. The dominant features of the observed explosion and tremor signals are attributed to the source excitation functions and the acoustic resonance of a magma-gas mixture inside the volcanic conduit. We postulate that explosions are triggered in the shallow parts of the magma conduit, where a drastic pressure drop with depth creates a region where violent degassing can occur. Tremor may be sustained by unsteady flow fluctuations at depth. Equilibrium degassing of the melt creates a stable, stratified magma column where the void fraction increases with decreasing depth. Disruption of this equilibrium stratification is thought to be responsible for observed variations in the seismic efficiency of explosions and enhanced acoustic transmission from the interior of the conduit to the atmosphere.

  14. Time-Accurate Simulations and Acoustic Analysis of Slat Free-Shear-Layer. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Singer, Bart A.; Lockard, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Unsteady computational simulations of a multi-element, high-lift configuration are performed. Emphasis is placed on accurate spatiotemporal resolution of the free shear layer in the slat-cove region. The excessive dissipative effects of the turbulence model, so prevalent in previous simulations, are circumvented by switching off the turbulence-production term in the slat cove region. The justifications and physical arguments for taking such a step are explained in detail. The removal of this excess damping allows the shear layer to amplify large-scale structures, to achieve a proper non-linear saturation state, and to permit vortex merging. The large-scale disturbances are self-excited, and unlike our prior fully turbulent simulations, no external forcing of the shear layer is required. To obtain the farfield acoustics, the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is evaluated numerically using the simulated time-accurate flow data. The present comparison between the computed and measured farfield acoustic spectra shows much better agreement for the amplitude and frequency content than past calculations. The effect of the angle-of-attack on the slat's flow features radiated acoustic field are also simulated presented.

  15. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for Aircraft Acoustic Nacelle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  16. Technology for Real-Time Acoustic Communications and Navigation Under Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, L. E.; Ball, K.; Singh, S.; Koski, P.; Partan, J.; Morozov, A.

    2013-12-01

    The use of gliders, floats and powered autonomous underwater vehicles beneath Arctic ice is challenging because surfacing for GPS fixes is risky and also subject to potentially long delays when the ice cover is very dense. For synoptic studies that involve sensors both on the ice and beneath the ice, it is not possible to use fixed transponders on the sea floor, and instead, acoustic sources that are ice-tethered are the best option. However, ice drifts and every transmission is from a different location, and thus the position of the acoustic source must be broadcast as well. We have developed and are preparing to demonstrate a real-time ice-tethered acoustic positioning system that operates at ranges to approximately 100 km using signals at 900 Hz. The system incorporates digital acoustic communication for sending source location and control information, which may be used to re-task the autonomous systems. While the current version is one-way because the mobile platforms are small, larger AUVs (0.3 m dia. or greater) are capable of carrying low-frequency sources and can utilize the system for bidirectional communication. Progress to-date includes a test north of Alaska in 2010 at ranges to 75 km, and in 2011, in the Fram Strait to ranges of 90 km. In both cases data rates at the maximum ranges were low, several bits per second, though at shorter ranges (30-50 km) data rates of 10-40 bps were possible. However, these low data rates are sufficient to transmit 8-12 bytes of location information plus commands to specific units. Next steps in the development and validation of the system include September 2013, again in the Fram Strait, followed by deployment north of Alaska for the ONR Marginal Ice Zone 2014 field campaign.

  17. Investigation of an acoustical holography system for real-time imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecht, Barbara A.; Andre, Michael P.; Garlick, George F.; Shelby, Ronald L.; Shelby, Jerod O.; Lehman, Constance D.

    1998-07-01

    A new prototype imaging system based on ultrasound transmission through the object of interest -- acoustical holography -- was developed which incorporates significant improvements in acoustical and optical design. This system is being evaluated for potential clinical application in the musculoskeletal system, interventional radiology, pediatrics, monitoring of tumor ablation, vascular imaging and breast imaging. System limiting resolution was estimated using a line-pair target with decreasing line thickness and equal separation. For a swept frequency beam from 2.6 - 3.0 MHz, the minimum resolution was 0.5 lp/mm. Apatite crystals were suspended in castor oil to approximate breast microcalcifications. Crystals from 0.425 - 1.18 mm in diameter were well resolved in the acoustic zoom mode. Needle visibility was examined with both a 14-gauge biopsy needle and a 0.6 mm needle. The needle tip was clearly visible throughout the dynamic imaging sequence as it was slowly inserted into a RMI tissue-equivalent breast biopsy phantom. A selection of human images was acquired in several volunteers: a 25 year-old female volunteer with normal breast tissue, a lateral view of the elbow joint showing muscle fascia and tendon insertions, and the superficial vessels in the forearm. Real-time video images of these studies will be presented. In all of these studies, conventional sonography was used for comparison. These preliminary investigations with the new prototype acoustical holography system showed favorable results in comparison to state-of-the-art pulse-echo ultrasound and demonstrate it to be suitable for further clinical study. The new patient interfaces will facilitate orthopedic soft tissue evaluation, study of superficial vascular structures and potentially breast imaging.

  18. Joint 3D seismic travel time and full channel electrical resistivity inversion with cross gradient structure constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Near surface geophysical exploration for the purpose of engineering design or construction For this reason, geophysical imaging demands a higher resolution and a better quantitative interpretation. Seismic travel time tomography and direct current resistivity tomography are two main methods for the near surface survey. Because of the limited coverage of observation system and the complex physical relationship between physical parameters and observations, individual geophysical method suffers issues of non-uniqueness and resolution limitation to some degree. We have developed a joint inversion method to combine seismic travel time tomography and full channel resistivity tomography. For the full channel resistivity survey, it uses two electrodes for power supply and all the other electrodes for recording. Compared with the traditional resistivity method, it collects more data and has a better model converge. Our joint inversion strategy relies on the structure constraint enforced through minimizing cross gradients between seismic velocity and resistivity models (Gallardo, 2003). For resistivity tomography, sensitivity kernels are obtained through the adjoint method by solving the electrostatic field equation with the finite-difference method. For seismic travel time tomography, ray paths and travel times are calculated using the fast marching method. We have tested our joint inversion method for a 2D cross-hole problem where two small zones with high and low velocity/resistivity anomalies. Seismic/electrical sources/receivers are installed in two boreholes. For separate seismic inversion, the smearing effect is evident and two anomaly zones are distorted and misplaced. For separate electric resistivity inversion, although two anomaly zones are positioned correctly their values are not accurate. By joint inversion, two velocity anomaly zones are clearly imaged and the smearing effect is greatly reduced. In comparison, for the resistivity model, the two anomaly zones

  19. Evaluation of Groundwater Pathways and Travel Times From the Nevada Test Site to the Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmann, K. F.; Zhu, J.; Ye, M.; Carroll, R. W.; Chapman, J. B.; Russell, C. E.; Shafer, D. S.

    2006-12-01

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada has been recommended as a deep geological repository for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If YM is licensed as a repository by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, it will be important to identify the potential for radionuclides to migrate from underground nuclear testing areas located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the hydraulically downgradient repository area to ensure that monitoring does not incorrectly attribute repository failure to radionuclides originating from other sources. In this study, we use the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to investigate potential groundwater migration pathways and associated travel times from the NTS to the proposed YM repository area. Using results from the calibrated DVRFS model and the particle tracking post-processing package MODPATH we modeled three-dimensional groundwater advective pathways in the NTS and YM region. Our study focuses on evaluating the potential for groundwater pathways between the NTS and YM withdrawal area and whether travel times for advective flow along these pathways coincide with the prospective monitoring time frame at the proposed repository. We include uncertainty in effective porosity as this is a critical variable in the determination of time for radionuclides to travel from the NTS region to the YM withdrawal area. Uncertainty in porosity is quantified through evaluation of existing site data and expert judgment and is incorporated in the model through Monte Carlo simulation. Since porosity information is limited for this region, the uncertainty is quite large and this is reflected in the results as a large range in simulated groundwater travel times.

  20. Spark-Timing Control Based on Correlation of Maximum-Economy Spark Timing, Flame-front Travel, and Cylinder-Pressure Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Harvey A; Heinicke, Orville H; Haynie, William H

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a full-scale air-cooled cylinder in order to establish an effective means of maintaining maximum-economy spark timing with varying engine operating conditions. Variable fuel-air-ratio runs were conducted in which relations were determined between the spark travel, and cylinder-pressure rise. An instrument for controlling spark timing was developed that automatically maintained maximum-economy spark timing with varying engine operating conditions. The instrument also indicated the occurrence of preignition.