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Sample records for acoustic velocities density

  1. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations.

  2. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  3. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  4. Link Between Resistivity and Acoustic Velocity Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacikoylu, P.; Dvorkin, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic modeling at a well is essential to many impedance inversion methods as well as quality control for real seismic data. The three main inputs for seismic modeling are the P- and S-wave velocity and density. A common problem is poor quality of sonic, dipole, and density logs, or an absence of these curves in parts of a well or in older well data sets. As a result, attempts have been made to reconstruct these curves from more reliable measurements, such as resistivity. The earliest attempt is by Faust (1953) where both the velocity and resistivity are empirically related to the geologic age, depth, and lithology. From these two relations an equation follows that links the sonic velocity to the depth and formation factor, where the formation factor is the ratio of the resistivity of water-saturated rock to the resistivity of water. This relation between the resistivity and velocity does not have any apparent physical basis simply because the velocity depends on the elasticity of a material while the resistivity describes its electrical charge transport capability. The observed link is most likely due to the dependence of both material properties on porosity. We analyze this link by using recent rock physics transforms between the velocity, porosity, and mineralogy together with existing empirical (e.g., Archie) and theoretical (Hashin-Shtrikman bounds) resistivity-porosity models. We also use a number of high-quality lab and well data sets to verify the results. We find that Faust's equation is applicable to consolidated cemented sandstones with low clay content with porosity between 5 and 20 percent. It should not be used in shale or unconsolidated and/or uncemented rock. By using rock physics theory we derive a family of new resistivity-velocity equations appropriate for various textures of clastic sediment. Specifically, an analytical solution applicable to unconsolidated shale is a combination of the lower Hashin-Strikman bound for resistivity and the soft

  5. Density-dependent acoustic properties of PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; Deluca, Racci; Hartline, Ernest L; Hagelberg, Stephanie I

    2009-07-31

    We have measured the longitudinal and shear acoustic velocities of PBX 9502 as a function of density for die-pressed samples over the range 1.795 g/cc to 1.888 g/cc. The density dependence of the velocities is linear. Thermal cycling of PBX 9502 is known to induce irreversible volume growth. We have measured this volume growth dependence on density for a subset of the pressed parts and find that the most growth occurs for the samples with lowest initial density. The acoustic velocity changes due to the volume growth are significant and reflect damage in the samples.

  6. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  7. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas T.; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  8. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  9. Coupling liquids acoustic velocity effects on elastic metallic bioglass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metiri, W.; Hadjoub, F.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of surface acoustic wave, SAW, velocities of coupling liquids on acoustical properties of several bulk metallic glasses, BMG, has been investigated using simulation program based on acoustic microscopy. Thus, we determined variations of critical angles at which the excitation of longitudinal mode, θL and Rayleigh mode, θR occurs as a function of wave velocities in different coupling liquids, Vliq. Linear relations of the form θi =ai0 +βiVliq were deduced. The importance of such formula, used with Snell's law, lies in the direct determination of SAW velocities and consequently mechanical properties of BMGs.

  10. Diffraction correction for precision surface acoustic wave velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz M., Alberto; Nagy, Peter B.

    2002-09-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements can be used to nondestructively characterize shot-peened, laser shock-peened, burnished, and otherwise surface-treated specimens. In recent years, there have been numerous efforts to separate the contribution of surface roughness from those of near-surface material variations, such as residual stress, texture, and increased dislocation density. As the accuracy of the dispersion measurements was gradually increased using state-of-the-art laser-ultrasonic scanning and sophisticated digital signal processing methods, it was recognized that a perceivable dispersive effect, similar to the one found on rough shot-peened specimens, is exhibited by untreated smooth surfaces as well. This dispersion effect is on the order of 0.1%, that is significantly higher than the experimental error associated with the measurements and comparable to the expected velocity change produced by near-surface compressive residual stresses in metals below their yield point. This paper demonstrates that the cause of this apparent dispersion is the diffraction of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) as it travels over the surface of the specimen. The results suggest that a diffraction correction may be introduced to increase the accuracy of surface wave dispersion measurements. A simple diffraction correction model was developed for surface waves and this correction was subsequently validated by laser-interferometric velocity measurements on aluminum specimens. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  11. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    PubMed

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  12. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  13. Estimating animal population density using passive acoustics.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Martin, Stephen W; Mellinger, David K; Ward, Jessica A; Moretti, David J; Harris, Danielle; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-05-01

    Reliable estimation of the size or density of wild animal populations is very important for effective wildlife management, conservation and ecology. Currently, the most widely used methods for obtaining such estimates involve either sighting animals from transect lines or some form of capture-recapture on marked or uniquely identifiable individuals. However, many species are difficult to sight, and cannot be easily marked or recaptured. Some of these species produce readily identifiable sounds, providing an opportunity to use passive acoustic data to estimate animal density. In addition, even for species for which other visually based methods are feasible, passive acoustic methods offer the potential for greater detection ranges in some environments (e.g. underwater or in dense forest), and hence potentially better precision. Automated data collection means that surveys can take place at times and in places where it would be too expensive or dangerous to send human observers. Here, we present an overview of animal density estimation using passive acoustic data, a relatively new and fast-developing field. We review the types of data and methodological approaches currently available to researchers and we provide a framework for acoustics-based density estimation, illustrated with examples from real-world case studies. We mention moving sensor platforms (e.g. towed acoustics), but then focus on methods involving sensors at fixed locations, particularly hydrophones to survey marine mammals, as acoustic-based density estimation research to date has been concentrated in this area. Primary among these are methods based on distance sampling and spatially explicit capture-recapture. The methods are also applicable to other aquatic and terrestrial sound-producing taxa. We conclude that, despite being in its infancy, density estimation based on passive acoustic data likely will become an important method for surveying a number of diverse taxa, such as sea mammals, fish, birds

  14. Estimating animal population density using passive acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Martin, Stephen W; Mellinger, David K; Ward, Jessica A; Moretti, David J; Harris, Danielle; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Reliable estimation of the size or density of wild animal populations is very important for effective wildlife management, conservation and ecology. Currently, the most widely used methods for obtaining such estimates involve either sighting animals from transect lines or some form of capture-recapture on marked or uniquely identifiable individuals. However, many species are difficult to sight, and cannot be easily marked or recaptured. Some of these species produce readily identifiable sounds, providing an opportunity to use passive acoustic data to estimate animal density. In addition, even for species for which other visually based methods are feasible, passive acoustic methods offer the potential for greater detection ranges in some environments (e.g. underwater or in dense forest), and hence potentially better precision. Automated data collection means that surveys can take place at times and in places where it would be too expensive or dangerous to send human observers. Here, we present an overview of animal density estimation using passive acoustic data, a relatively new and fast-developing field. We review the types of data and methodological approaches currently available to researchers and we provide a framework for acoustics-based density estimation, illustrated with examples from real-world case studies. We mention moving sensor platforms (e.g. towed acoustics), but then focus on methods involving sensors at fixed locations, particularly hydrophones to survey marine mammals, as acoustic-based density estimation research to date has been concentrated in this area. Primary among these are methods based on distance sampling and spatially explicit capture-recapture. The methods are also applicable to other aquatic and terrestrial sound-producing taxa. We conclude that, despite being in its infancy, density estimation based on passive acoustic data likely will become an important method for surveying a number of diverse taxa, such as sea mammals, fish, birds

  15. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  16. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  17. Composite acoustic medium with simultaneously negative density and modulus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sam Hyeon; Park, Choon Mahn; Seo, Yong Mun; Wang, Zhi Guo; Kim, Chul Koo

    2010-02-05

    We fabricated an acoustic composite structure consisting of a periodic array of interspaced membranes and side holes. Experimental data on the transmission, effective density, and phase velocity are presented. The system exhibits two critical frequencies, omega{SH} and omega{c}. Our metamaterial is double negative and transparent for frequencies lower than omega{SH}. For the frequencies omega{SH}density is negative. For the frequencies above omega{c}, the system is double positive and transparent. The present medium exhibits a very wide double negative spectral range that opens the possibility of the application of metamaterials for "white lights."

  18. Acoustic velocities of two-phase mixtures of cryogenic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, E. I.; Winter, E. R. F.; Schoenhals, R. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculated values of the acoustic velocity are presented for single-component and two-component, two-phase mixtures. Three different analytic models were employed. For purposes of comparison, all three models were used in making acoustic-velocity calculations for single-component, equivalent bubbly two-phase mixtures (with insoluble gas) of oxygen and helium and hydrogen and helium. In all cases the results are shown graphically so that the effects of variation in quality or void fraction, temperature and pressure are illustrated.

  19. Bird population density estimated from acoustic signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, D.K.; Efford, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Many animal species are detected primarily by sound. Although songs, calls and other sounds are often used for population assessment, as in bird point counts and hydrophone surveys of cetaceans, there are few rigorous methods for estimating population density from acoustic data. 2. The problem has several parts - distinguishing individuals, adjusting for individuals that are missed, and adjusting for the area sampled. Spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) is a statistical methodology that addresses jointly the second and third parts of the problem. We have extended SECR to use uncalibrated information from acoustic signals on the distance to each source. 3. We applied this extension of SECR to data from an acoustic survey of ovenbird Seiurus aurocapilla density in an eastern US deciduous forest with multiple four-microphone arrays. We modelled average power from spectrograms of ovenbird songs measured within a window of 0??7 s duration and frequencies between 4200 and 5200 Hz. 4. The resulting estimates of the density of singing males (0??19 ha -1 SE 0??03 ha-1) were consistent with estimates of the adult male population density from mist-netting (0??36 ha-1 SE 0??12 ha-1). The fitted model predicts sound attenuation of 0??11 dB m-1 (SE 0??01 dB m-1) in excess of losses from spherical spreading. 5.Synthesis and applications. Our method for estimating animal population density from acoustic signals fills a gap in the census methods available for visually cryptic but vocal taxa, including many species of bird and cetacean. The necessary equipment is simple and readily available; as few as two microphones may provide adequate estimates, given spatial replication. The method requires that individuals detected at the same place are acoustically distinguishable and all individuals vocalize during the recording interval, or that the per capita rate of vocalization is known. We believe these requirements can be met, with suitable field methods, for a significant

  20. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  1. Acoustic wave velocity behavior for some Jurassic carbonate samples, north Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed, Nahla A.; Abuseda, Hesham; Kassab, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    Seismic data of reservoir rocks use for understand of risk reduction. Acoustic laboratory measurements have been carried out for 75 carbonate rock samples for both dry and fully saturated collected from Jurassic deposits exposed in the north Sinai at Gebel El-Maghara. This study has been carried out to know more about the behavior of compression wave velocity and shear wave velocity in carbonate rock samples for both dry and fully saturated conditions and to investigate the effect of porosity, permeability and density on both dry and fully saturated acoustic velocities. The compressional wave velocities at dry and fully saturated carbonate rock samples increased with increasing the bulk density and decreasing the porosity, while the porosity decreasing with increasing bulk density, the relationships between the porosity as well as shear wave velocity in dry and fully saturated are in cloud points, with no clear relationships. The relationships between the permeability and both the compressional wave and the shear wave velocities at dry and fully saturated cases could not be identified. The statistical analyses indicate that the compressional wave in the fully saturated is higher than the compressional wave in dry case. The compressional wave velocity of the fully saturated carbonate rock samples were strongly correlated with the compressional wave velocity of the dry rock samples and the derived equation can be used for prediction of the compressional wave velocity of fully saturated rock from the compressional wave velocity of dry rock. The shear wave of the fully saturated carbonate rock samples is a fair correlated with the shear wave of the dry rock samples.

  2. Acoustic equations of state for simple lattice Boltzmann velocity sets.

    PubMed

    Viggen, Erlend Magnus

    2014-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method typically uses an isothermal equation of state. This is not sufficient to simulate a number of acoustic phenomena where the equation of state cannot be approximated as linear and constant. However, it is possible to implement variable equations of state by altering the LB equilibrium distribution. For simple velocity sets with velocity components ξ(iα)∈(-1,0,1) for all i, these equilibria necessarily cause error terms in the momentum equation. These error terms are shown to be either correctable or negligible at the cost of further weakening the compressibility. For the D1Q3 velocity set, such an equilibrium distribution is found and shown to be unique. Its sound propagation properties are found for both forced and free waves, with some generality beyond D1Q3. Finally, this equilibrium distribution is applied to a nonlinear acoustics simulation where both mechanisms of nonlinearity are simulated with good results. This represents an improvement on previous such simulations and proves that the compressibility of the method is still sufficiently strong even for nonlinear acoustics.

  3. Experimental Acoustic Velocity Measurements in a Tidally Affected Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storm, J.B.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) constructed a continuous steamgaging station on the tidally affected Escatawpa River at Interstate 10 near Orange Grove, Mississippi, in August 2001. The gage collects water quantity parameters of stage and stream velocity, and water quality parameters of water temperature, specific conductance, and salinity. Data are transmitted to the local USGS office via the GOES satellite and are presented on a near real-time web page. Due to tidal effects, the stream has multiple flow regimes which include downstream, bi-directional, and reverse flows. Advances in acoustic technology have made it possible to gage streams of this nature where conventional methods have been unsuccessful. An experimental mount was designed in an attempt to recognize, describe, and quantify these flow regimes by using acoustic Doppler equipment.

  4. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  5. Density-near-zero using the acoustically induced transparency of a Fano acoustic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elayouch, A.; Addouche, M.; Farhat, M.; Amin, M.; Bağcı, H.; Khelif, A.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental results of near-zero mass density involving an acoustic metamaterial supporting Fano resonance. For this, we designed and fabricated an acoustic resonator with two closely coupled modes and measured its transmission properties. Our study reveals that the phenomenon of acoustically induced transparency is accompanied by an effect of near-zero density. Indeed, the dynamic effective parameters obtained from experimental data show the presence of a frequency band where the effective mass density is close to zero, with high transmission levels reaching 0.7. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such effective parameters lead to wave guiding in a 90-degrees-bent channel. This kind of acoustic metamaterial can, therefore, give rise to acoustic functions like controlling the wavefront, which may lead to very promising applications in acoustic cloacking or imaging.

  6. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  7. Statistics of Velocity Centroids: Effects of Correlations of Density and Velocity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horibe, S.; Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.

    2005-05-01

    Centroids of velocity from spectroscopic observations have been widely used to study the properties of the underlying turbulent field, however, it was not clear until recently how density fluctuations affect the results. In a previous work, Lazarian and Esquivel provided an analytical description of velocity centroids. In that work the structure function of centroids was decomposed into four contributions: column density, integrated velocity, ``cross-terms'', and density-velocity ``cross-correlations''. From the second term (integrated velocity) we can retrieve the spectral index of velocity. At the same time, the contribution of column density, entirely attainable from observations, can in principle be removed. In this poster, we present an in-depth analysis of the remaining terms. It is found that the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean of density correlates with the ``cross-term''. We also introduce artificial density-velocity ``cross-correlations''. And, for a reasonable level of those, it is found that when velocity centroid fails to trace velocity the ``cross-term'' contaminates the velocity statistics well before the ``cross-correlation'' term. Our results suggest that limitations of the use of centroids to study the scaling properties of velocity will arise primarily from the ``cross-terms''.

  8. An Analysis of Consolidation Grouting Effect of Bedrock Based on its Acoustic Velocity Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Lu, Wen-bo; Zhang, Wen-ju; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the mechanical properties of fractured rock masses. Based on the in situ acoustic velocity measurement data of ~20 hydropower stations in China, we assessed the acoustic velocity increase of rock masses as a result of consolidation grouting in different geological conditions, such as fault sites, weathered areas and excavation-induced damage zones. We established an empirical relationship between the acoustic velocity of rock masses before and after consolidation grouting, and examined the correlation between acoustic velocity and deformation modulus. A case study is presented about a foundation consolidation grouting project for an intake tower of Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that different types of rock masses possess distinct ranges for resultant acoustic velocity increase by consolidation grouting. Under a confidence interval of 95 %, the ranges of the increasing rate of acoustic velocity in a faulted zone, weathered zone, and excavation-induced damage zone are observed to be 12.7-43.1, 12.3-31.2, and 6.9-14.5 %, respectively. The acoustic velocity before grouting and its increasing rate can be used to predict the effectiveness of consolidation grouting.

  9. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular plug nozzles. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Blozy, J. T.; Staid, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of model scale parametric static and wind tunnel aerodynamic performance tests on unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle configurations with inverted velocity profile are discussed. The nozzle configurations are high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles applicable to dual-stream exhaust systems typical of a variable cycle engine for Advanced Supersonic Transport application. In all, seven acoustic models and eight aerodynamic performance models were tested. The nozzle geometric variables included outer stream radius ratio, inner stream to outer stream ratio, and inner stream plug shape. When compared to a conical nozzle at the same specific thrust, the results of the static acoustic tests with the coannular nozzles showed noise reductions of up to 7 PNdB. Extensive data analysis showed that the overall acoustic results can be well correlated using the mixed stream velocity and the mixed stream density. Results also showed that suppression levels are geometry and flow regulation dependent with the outer stream radius ratio, inner stream-to-outer stream velocity ratio and inner stream velocity ratio and inner stream plug shape, as the primary suppression parameters. In addition, high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzles were found to yield shock associated noise level reductions relative to a conical nozzle. The wind tunnel aerodynamic tests showed that static and simulated flight thrust coefficient at typical takeoff conditions are quite good - up to 0.98 at static conditions and 0.974 at a takeoff Mach number of 0.36. At low inner stream flow conditions significant thrust loss was observed. Using an inner stream conical plug resulted in 1% to 2% higher performance levels than nozzle geometries using a bent inner plug.

  10. Acoustic metamaterials with circular sector cavities and programmable densities.

    PubMed

    Akl, W; Elsabbagh, A; Baz, A

    2012-10-01

    Considerable interest has been devoted to the development of various classes of acoustic metamaterials that can control the propagation of acoustical wave energy throughout fluid domains. However, all the currently exerted efforts are focused on studying passive metamaterials with fixed material properties. In this paper, the emphasis is placed on the development of a class of composite one-dimensional acoustic metamaterials with effective densities that are programmed to adapt to any prescribed pattern along the metamaterial. The proposed acoustic metamaterial is composed of a periodic arrangement of cell structures, in which each cell consists of a circular sector cavity bounded by actively controlled flexible panels to provide the capability for manipulating the overall effective dynamic density. The theoretical analysis of this class of multilayered composite active acoustic metamaterials (CAAMM) is presented and the theoretical predictions are determined for a cascading array of fluid cavities coupled to flexible piezoelectric active boundaries forming the metamaterial domain with programmable dynamic density. The stiffness of the piezoelectric boundaries is electrically manipulated to control the overall density of the individual cells utilizing the strong coupling with the fluid domain and using direct acoustic pressure feedback. The interaction between the neighboring cells of the composite metamaterial is modeled using a lumped-parameter approach. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance characteristics of the proposed CAAMM and its potential for generating prescribed spatial and spectral patterns of density variation.

  11. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  12. a Renormalization Group Calculation of the Velocity - and Density-Density Correlation Functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Mark Timothy

    The velocity-velocity correlation function of a free field theory is obtained. The renormalization group, along with a 4-varepsilon expansion, is then used to find the leading order behavior of the velocity-velocity correlation function for an interacting field theory in the high temperature phase near the critical point. The details of the calculation of the density-density correlation function for Hedgehogs, in the context of a free field theory, is presented next. Finally the renormalization group, along with a 4-varepsilon expansion, is used to find the leading order behavior of the density-density correlation function for Hedgehogs in an interacting field theory near the critical point.

  13. DECAF - Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Passive Acoustic Fixed Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    DECAF – Density Estimation for Cetaceans from passive Acoustic Fixed sensors Len Thomas CREEM, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland...REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DECAF - Density Estimation for Cetaceans from...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 LONG-TERM GOALS Determining the spatial density and distribution of cetacean (whale and dolphin) species is fundamental to

  14. Measured acoustic properties of variable and low density bulk absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Rice, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data were taken to determine the acoustic absorbing properties of uniform low density and layered variable density samples using a bulk absober with a perforated plate facing to hold the material in place. In the layered variable density case, the bulk absorber was packed such that the lowest density layer began at the surface of the sample and progressed to higher density layers deeper inside. The samples were placed in a rectangular duct and measurements were taken using the two microphone method. The data were used to calculate specific acoustic impedances and normal incidence absorption coefficients. Results showed that for uniform density samples the absorption coefficient at low frequencies decreased with increasing density and resonances occurred in the absorption coefficient curve at lower densities. These results were confirmed by a model for uniform density bulk absorbers. Results from layered variable density samples showed that low frequency absorption was the highest when the lowest density possible was packed in the first layer near the exposed surface. The layers of increasing density within the sample had the effect of damping the resonances.

  15. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  16. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  17. Feasibility of using acoustic velocity meters for estimating highly organic suspended-solids concentrations in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Levee 4 canal site below control structure G-88 in the Everglades agricultural area in northwestern Broward County, Florida, to study the relation of acoustic attenuation to suspended-solids concentrations. Acoustic velocity meter and temperature data were obtained with concurrent water samples analyzed for suspended-solids concentrations. Two separate acoustic velocity meter frequencies were used, 200 and 500 kilohertz, to determine the sensitivity of acoustic attenuation to frequency for the measured suspended-solids concentration range. Suspended-solids concentrations for water samples collected at the Levee 4 canal site from July 1993 to September 1994 ranged from 22 to 1,058 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from about 30 to 93 percent. Regression analyses showed that attenuation data from the acoustic velocity meter (automatic gain control) and temperature data alone do not provide enough information to adequately describe the concentrations of suspended solids. However, if velocity is also included as one of the independent variables in the regression model, a satisfactory correlation can be obtained. Thus, it is feasible to use acoustic velocity meter instrumentation to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in streams, even when suspended solids are primarily composed of organic material. Using the most comprehensive data set available for the study (500 kiloherz data), the best fit regression model produces a standard error of 69.7 milligrams per liter, with actual errors ranging from 2 to 128 milligrams per liter. Both acoustic velocity meter transmission frequencies of 200 and 500 hilohertz produced similar results, suggesting that transducers of either frequency could be used to collect attenuation data at the study site. Results indicate that calibration will be required for each acoustic velocity meter system to the unique suspended-solids regime existing at each site. More robust solutions may

  18. Estimation of spatiotemporal variation of acoustic velocity in ocean and its modeling for GPS/Acoustic seafloor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, S.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Okuda, T.; Sayanagi, K.; Miyata, K.; Nagao, T.

    2009-12-01

    We have been developing an observation system with the GPS/Acoustic combination technique for monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation. We installed two sets of triangular array of acoustic transponders as geodetic reference sites on the Suruga trough, central Japan, where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate at a rate of 2 cm/yr. In our campaign observation, we measured ranges to acoustic transponders from an on-board acoustic transducer whose position was determined by kinematic GPS. Repeated our campaign observations can reveal directly seafloor crustal deformation in focal area of subduction zone. Present analysis method simultaneously estimates temporal variation of acoustic velocity and positions of acoustic transponders assuming the horizontally-layered structure of acoustic velocity. However, actual structure might have stable spatial variation due to oceanic current and internal wave. The stable spatial variation causes bias error on the positioning. For reduction of the bias error and shortening observation time, we should measure and/or estimate the spatial variation of acoustic velocity. In this presentation, for an investigation of horizontal scales of the spatial variation of acoustic velocity, we estimated spectrum of oceanic internal wave using by continuous measurements of temperature and pressure in ocean. In addition, we evaluate a new seafloor positioning method which simultaneously estimates spatiotemporal variation of acoustic velocity through numerical experiments. The continuous measurements in parallel with acoustic ranging were conducted by mooring temperature and pressure sensors attached rope with an interval of 50 m. The continuous measurements were made for five hours with a sampling interval of three seconds in each day in August and October 2008. For reduction of measurement noise, we carried out two-dimensional B-spline fitting of temperature and pressure with ABIC minimization. By the fitting, we

  19. Velocity analysis with local event slopes related probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lu, Wenkai; Zhang, Yingqiang

    2015-12-01

    Macro velocity model plays a key role in seismic imaging and inversion. The performance of traditional velocity analysis methods is degraded by multiples and amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) anomalies. Local event slopes, containing the subsurface velocity information, have been widely used to accomplish common time-domain seismic processing, imaging and velocity estimation. In this paper, we propose a method for velocity analysis with probability density function (PDF) related to local event slopes. We first estimate local event slopes with phase information in the Fourier domain. An adaptive filter is applied to improve the performance of slopes estimator in the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situation. Second, the PDF is approximated with the histogram function, which is related to attributes derived from local event slopes. As a graphical representation of the data distribution, the histogram function can be computed efficiently. By locating the ray path of the first arrival on the semblance image with straight-ray segments assumption, automatic velocity picking is carried out to establish velocity model. Unlike local event slopes based velocity estimation strategies such as averaging filters and image warping, the proposed method does not make the assumption that the errors of mapped velocity values are symmetrically distributed or that the variation of amplitude along the offset is slight. Extension of the method to prestack time-domain migration velocity estimation is also given. With synthetic and field examples, we demonstrate that our method can achieve high resolution, even in the presence of multiples, strong amplitude variations and polarity reversals.

  20. Reconstruction of the forehead acoustic properties in an Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis), with investigation on the responses of soft tissue sound velocity to temperature.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchang; Zhang, Yu; Berggren, Per; Wei, Chong

    2017-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging and ultrasound experimental measurements were combined to reconstruct the acoustic properties (density, velocity, and impedance) of the head from a deceased Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis). The authors extracted 42 soft forehead tissue samples to estimate the sound velocity and density properties at room temperature, 25.0  °C. Hounsfield Units (HUs) of the samples were read from CT scans. Linear relationships between the tissues' HUs and velocity, and HUs and density were revealed through regression analyses. The distributions of the head acoustic properties at axial, coronal, and sagittal cross sections were reconstructed, suggesting that the forehead soft tissues were characterized by low-velocity in the melon, high-velocity in the muscle and connective tissues. Further, the sound velocities of melon, muscle, and connective tissue pieces were measured under different temperatures to investigate tissues' velocity response to temperature. The results demonstrated nonlinear relationships between tissues' sound velocity and temperature. This study represents a first attempt to provide general information on acoustic properties of this species. The results could provide meaningful information for understanding the species' bioacoustic characteristics and for further investigation on sound beam formation of the dolphin.

  1. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  2. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  3. Acoustic reconstruction of the velocity field in a furnace using a characteristic flow model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqin; Zhou, Huaichun; Chen, Shiying; Zhang, Yindi; Wei, Xinli; Zhao, Jinhui

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic method can provide a noninvasive, efficient and full-field reconstruction of aerodynamic fields in a furnace. A simple yet reasonable model is devised for reconstruction of a velocity field in a cross section of a tangential furnace from acoustic measurements based on typical physical characteristics of the field. The solenoidal component of the velocity field is modeled by a curved surface, derived by rotating a curve of Gaussian distribution, determined by six characteristic parameters, while the nonrotational component is governed by a priori knowledge. Thus the inverse problem is translated into determination of the characteristic parameters using a set of acoustic projection data. First numerical experiments were undertaken to simulate the acoustic measurement, so as to preliminarily validate the effectiveness of the model. Based on this, physical experiments under different operating conditions were performed in a pilot-scale setup to provide a further test. Hot-wire anemometry and strip floating were applied to compare with acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements provided satisfactory consistency with both of these approaches. Nevertheless, for a field with a relatively large magnitude of air velocities, the acoustic measurement can give more reliable reconstructions. Extension of the model to measurements of hot tangential furnaces is also discussed.

  4. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOEpatents

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  5. Origin of negative density and modulus in acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and fundamental physical interpretation for the effective densities and moduli of acoustic metamaterials. We introduce the terminology of hidden force and hidden source of volume: the effective density or modulus is negative when the hidden force or source of volume is larger than, and operates in antiphase to, respectively, the force or volume change that would be obtained in their absence. We demonstrate this ansatz for some established acoustic metamaterials with elements based on membranes, Helmholtz resonators, springs, and masses. The hidden force for membrane-based acoustic metamaterials, for instance, is the force from the membrane tension. The hidden source for a Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterial is the extra air volume injected from the resonator cavity. We also explain the analogous concepts for pure mass-and-spring systems, in which case, hidden forces can arise from masses and springs fixed inside other masses, whereas hidden sources—more aptly termed hidden expanders of displacement in this case—can arise from light rigid trusses coupled to extra degrees of freedom for mechanical motion such as the case of coupling to masses that move at right angles to the wave-propagation direction. This overall picture provides a powerful tool for conceptual understanding and design of new acoustic metamaterials, and avoids common pitfalls involved in determining the effective parameters of such materials.

  6. An acoustic travel time method for continuous velocity monitoring in shallow tidal streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Nistor, Ioan; Sharifi, Soroosh

    2013-08-01

    Long-term variations of streamflow in a tidal channel were measured using a Fluvial Acoustic Tomography (FAT) system through one transmission path. FAT is an innovative acoustic technology that utilizes the time-of-travel method to determine velocity between two points from multiple ray paths that traverse the entire cross-section of stream. Due to high spatial variability of flow distribution stationary ADCP measurements were not likely to yield true section-averaged flow velocity and moving-boat ADCP method was therefore used to provide reference data. As such, two short-term moving boat ADCP campaigns were carried out by the authors. In the first campaign, a couple of acoustic stations were added to the FAT system in order to resolve flow angularity in addition to the mean velocity. Comparing the FAT results with corresponding ADCP section-averaged flow direction and velocity indicated remarkable consistency. Second campaign was designed to capture the influence of salt wedge intrusion on the sound propagation pattern. It was found that FAT velocity measurements bias high if acoustic stations lay inside the cooler freshwater layer. Ray-tracing hindcasts suggest that installing acoustic stations inside the salt wedge may significantly improve function of output of the system. Comparing salinities evaluated from long-term FAT travel time records with nodal salinity measurements provided by conductivity-temperature sensors reveals the potential ability of FAT in measuring salt flux.

  7. Compact transformable acoustic logic gates for broadband complex Boolean operations based on density-near-zero metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Cheng, Ying; Yuan, Bao-Guo; Guo, Jian-Zhong; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    The extraordinary transmission in density-near-zero (DNZ) acoustic metamaterials (AMs) provides possibilities to manipulate acoustic signals with extremely large effective phase velocity and wavelength. Here, we report compact transformable acoustic logic gates with a subwavelength size as small as 0.82λ based on DNZ AMs. The basic acoustic logic gates, composed of a tri-port structure filled with space-coiling DNZ AMs, enable precise direct linear interference of input signals with considerably small phase lag and wavefront distortion. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally the basic Boolean logic operations such as OR, AND, XOR, and NOT with wide operational frequency ranges and controllability, by adjusting the phase difference between two input signals. More complex logic calculus, such as "I1 + I2 × I3," are also realized by cascading of the basic logic gates. Our proposal provides diverse routes to construct devices for acoustic signal computing and manipulations.

  8. Density can be misleading for low-density species: benefits of passive acoustic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Tracey L; Ciaglia, Michaela B; Klinck, Holger; Southwell, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced changes may be more substantial within the marine environment, where following ecological change is logistically difficult, and typically expensive. As marine animals tend to produce stereotyped, long-range signals, they are ideal for repeatable surveying. In this study we illustrate the potential for calling rates to be used as a tool for determining habitat quality by using an Antarctic pack-ice seal, the leopard seal, as a model.With an understanding of the vocal behavior of a species, their seasonal and diurnal patterns, sex and age-related differences, an underwater passive-acoustic survey conducted alongside a visual survey in an arc of 4,225 km across the Davis Sea, Eastern Antarctica, showed that while acoustic and visual surveys identified similar regions as having high densities, the acoustic surveys surprisingly identified the opposite regions as being 'critical' habitats. Density surveys of species that cannot be differentiated into population classes may be misleading because overall density can be a negative indicator of habitat quality.Under special circumstances acoustics can offer enormous advantage over traditional techniques and open up monitoring to regions that are remote, difficult and expensive to work within, no longer restricting long-term community assessment to resource-wealthy communities. As climatic change affects a broad range of organisms across geographic boundaries we propose that capitalizing on the significant advances in passive acoustic technology, alongside physical acoustics and population modeling, can help in addressing ecological questions more broadly.

  9. On the correlation of plume centerline velocity decay of turbulent acoustically excited jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, Uwe H.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic excitation was shown to alter the velocity decay and spreading characteristics of jet plumes by modifying the large-scale structures in the plume shear layer. The present work consists of reviewing and analyzing available published and unpublished experimental data in order to determine the importance and magnitude of the several variables that contribute to plume modification by acoustic excitation. Included in the study were consideration of the effects of internal and external acoustic excitation, excitation Strouhal number, acoustic excitation level, nozzle size, and flow conditions. The last include jet Mach number and jet temperature. The effects of these factors on the plume centerline velocity decay are then summarized in an overall empirical correlation.

  10. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  11. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  12. Velocity measurements in a boundary layer with a density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P.; Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    A number of experiments were performed at the EMI shock tube facility on shock waves propagating in a stratified atmosphere with density gradient modelled by air layered above Freon (C Cl{sub 2} F{sub 2}). This report presents streamwise velocity data for the flow behind the shock front. Additional information from measurements of overpressure history and shadowgraphs of the flow will be presented in a future EMI-report.

  13. Precise tailoring of acoustic velocity in optical fibers by hydrogenation and UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanting; Dong, Liang

    2012-12-03

    Tailoring of acoustic properties in solids has many potential applications in both acoustics, i.e. acoustic gratings and waveguides, and photon-phonon interactions, i.e. stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). One immediate application is in the area of SBS suppression in optical fibers. We demonstrate, for the first time, a post-processing technique where hydrogen is diffused in to a fiber core and then locally and permanently bonded to core glass by a subsequent UV exposure. It is discovered that local acoustic velocity can be altered by as much as ~2% this way, with strong potential for much further improvements with an increased hydrogen pressure. It is also found that the large change in acoustic velocity is primarily due to a reduction in bulk modulus, possibly as a result of network bonds being broken up by the addition of OH bonds. It is possible to use this technique to precisely tailor acoustic velocity along a fiber for more optimized SBS suppression in a fiber amplifier. Change in Brillouin Stokes frequency of ~320MHz at 1.064μm was observed.

  14. A Void Fraction Characterisation by Low Frequency Acoustic Velocity Measurements in Microbubble Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaro, Matthieu

    Low frequency acoustic velocity measurements have been applied for the characterization of microbubble clouds generated in water. This method, based on the Wood's model (1941) links the acoustic velocity throughout a two-phase medium to its void fraction value. Low frequency means below resonance frequencies of the bubbles inside the cloud. An original bench was developed to allow the qualification of this method. The experiments conducted allowed us to characterize void fraction values between 10-3 and 10-7. The radii of the studied microbubbles are between a few micrometers and a hundred micrometers.

  15. Reflection and transmission of acoustical waves from a layer with space-dependent velocity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, G. G.; Singh, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The refraction of acoustical waves by a moving medium layer is theoretically treated and the reflection and transmission coefficients are determined. The moving-medium-layer velocity is uniform but with a space dependence in one direction. A partitioning of the moving medium layer into constant-velocity sublayers is introduced and numerical results for a three-sublayer approximation of Poiseuille flow are presented. The degenerate case of a single constant-velocity layer is also treated theoretically and numerically. The numerical results show the reflection and transmission coefficients as functions of the peak moving-medium-layer normalized velocity for several angles of incidence.

  16. Acoustic Velocity Of The Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Liu, C.; Huang, P.

    2004-12-01

    Along the Manila Trench south of 21øXN, deep-sea sediments are being underthrusted beneath the Taiwan accretionary prism which is composed of the Kaoping Slope and Hengchun Ridge. Offshore southwestern Taiwan, foreland sediments and Late Miocene strata of the Tainan Basin are being accreted onto the fold-and thrust belt of the syn-collision accretionary wedge of the Kaoping Slope. The Kaoping Slope consists of thick Neogene to Recent siliciclastics deformed by fold-and-thrust structures and mud diapers. These Pliocene-Quaternary sediments deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and upper slope area are considered to be paleo-channel deposits confined by NNE-SSW trend mud diapiric structure. Seismic P-wave velocities of the sediment deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and Kaoping Slope area are derived from mutichannel seismic reflection data and wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles collected by sonobuoys. Sediment velocity structures constrained from mutichannel seismic reflection data using velocity spectrum analysis method and that derived from sonobuoy data using tau-sum inversion method are compared, and they both provide consistent velocity structures. Seismic velocities were analyzed along the seismic profile from the surface to maximum depths of about 2.0 km below the seafloor. Our model features a sediment layer1 with 400 ms in thickness and a sediment layer2 with 600 ms in thickness. For the shelf sediments, we observe a linear interval velocity trend of V=1.53+1.91T in layer1, and V=1.86+0.87T in layer2, where T is the one way travel time within the layer. For the slop sediment, the trend of V=1.47+1.93T in layer1, and V=1.70+1.55T in layer2. The layer1¡¦s velocities gradients are similar between the shelf (1.91 km/sec2) and the slope(1.93 km/sec2). It means layer1 distributes over the slope and shelf widely. The result of the sediment velocity gradients in this area are in good agreement with that reported for the south Atlantic continental margins.

  17. Acoustic and vibration performance evaluations of a velocity sensing hull array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Christman, Russell A.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic and vibration measurements were conducted at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Seneca Lake Facility to investigate the in situ signal response of a linear array of velocity sensors (sensors that measure either acoustic particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement have generically been denoted as velocity sensors) on a coating. The coating used at Seneca Lake consisted of air-voided elastomeric tiles with an overall coating thickness of approximately 3 inches. The accelerometer array and coating were mounted on the Seneca Lake Hull Fixture, which measures 33 feet lengthwise with an arc length of 20 feet. The fixture weighs approximately 30 tons. Specifically, measurements of in situ sensitivity, velocity reduction, reflection gain, array beam response, and equivalent planewave self-noise levels are presented.

  18. Accurate group velocity estimation for unmanned aerial vehicle-based acoustic atmospheric tomography.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kevin J; Finn, Anthony

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic atmospheric tomography calculates temperature and wind velocity fields in a slice or volume of atmosphere based on travel time estimates between strategically located sources and receivers. The technique discussed in this paper uses the natural acoustic signature of an unmanned aerial vehicle as it overflies an array of microphones on the ground. The sound emitted by the aircraft is recorded on-board and by the ground microphones. The group velocities of the intersecting sound rays are then derived by comparing these measurements. Tomographic inversion is used to estimate the temperature and wind fields from the group velocity measurements. This paper describes a technique for deriving travel time (and hence group velocity) with an accuracy of 0.1% using these assets. This is shown to be sufficient to obtain highly plausible tomographic inversion results that correlate well with independent SODAR measurements.

  19. Acoustic methods to monitor sliver linear density and yarn strength

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for monitoring sliver and yarn characteristics. Transverse waves are generated relative to the sliver or yarn. At least one acoustic sensor is in contact with the sliver or yarn for detecting waves coupled to the sliver or yarn and for generating a signal. The generated signal is processed to identify the predefined characteristics including sliver or yarn linear density. The transverse waves can be generated with a high-powered acoustic transmitter spaced relative to the sliver or yarn with large amplitude pulses having a central frequency in a range between 20 KHz and 40 KHz applied to the transmitter. The transverse waves can be generated by mechanically agitating the sliver or yarn with a tapping member.

  20. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  1. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  2. Full bandwidth calibration procedure for acoustic probes containing a pressure and particle velocity sensor.

    PubMed

    Basten, Tom G H; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of acoustic particle velocity sensors is still difficult due to the lack of standardized sensors to compare with. Recently it is shown by Jacobsen and Jaud [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 830-837 (2006)] that it is possible to calibrate a sound pressure and particle velocity sensor in free field conditions at higher frequencies. This is done by using the known acoustic impedance at a certain distance of a spherical loudspeaker. When the sound pressure is measured with a calibrated reference microphone, the particle velocity can be calculated from the known impedance and the measured pressure. At lower frequencies, this approach gives unreliable results. The method is now extended to lower frequencies by measuring the acoustic pressure inside the spherical source. At lower frequencies, the sound pressure inside the sphere is proportional to the movement of the loudspeaker membrane. If the movement is known, the particle velocity in front of the loudspeaker can be derived. This low frequency approach is combined with the high frequency approach giving a full bandwidth calibration procedure which can be used in free field conditions using a single calibration setup. The calibration results are compared with results obtained with a standing wave tube.

  3. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  4. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  5. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  6. Phase velocity limit of high-frequency photon density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, Richard C.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Madsen, Sten; Rojas, Fabio E.; Feng, T.-C.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    In frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM), two factors make high modulation frequencies desirable. First, with frequencies as high as a few GHz, the phase lag versus frequency plot has sufficient curvature to yield both the scattering and absorption coefficients of the tissue under examination. Second, because of increased attenuation, high frequency photon density waves probe smaller volumes, an asset in small volume in vivo or in vitro studies. This trend toward higher modulation frequencies has led us to re-examine the derivation of the standard diffusion equation (SDE) from the Boltzman transport equation. We find that a second-order time-derivative term, ordinarily neglected in the derivation, can be significant above 1 GHz for some biological tissue. The revised diffusion equation, including the second-order time-derivative, is often termed the P1 equation. We compare the dispersion relation of the P1 equation with that of the SDE. The P1 phase velocity is slower than that predicted by the SDE; in fact, the SDE phase velocity is unbounded with increasing modulation frequency, while the P1 phase velocity approaches c/sqrt(3) is attained only at modulation frequencies with periods shorter than the mean time between scatterings of a photon, a frequency regime that probes the medium beyond the applicability of diffusion theory. Finally we caution that values for optical properties deduced from FDPM data at high frequencies using the SDE can be in error by 30% or more.

  7. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  8. Acoustic metamaterial with negative mass density in water

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaijun; Zhai, Shilong; Ding, Changlin; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-09-07

    A two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial (AM) with negative effective mass density in water is designed by periodically arranging hollow tube “meta-atoms.” Experimental and simulated results demonstrate that transmission dips accompanied with inverse phases are presented in the transmission spectra of the 2D AM at the ultrasonic frequency band. Effective parameters extracted from the experimental measured transmission and reflection coefficients of the 2D AM show that the effective mass density and refractive index are negative near the dip frequency range of 35.31–35.94 kHz. The simulation also shows the negative response in the 2D AM. Due to the excellent properties, the 2D AM is appealing for the potential applications in areas such as subwavelength imaging, ultrasonic cloaking in water, and so on.

  9. Texture in steel plates revealed by laser ultrasonic surface acoustic waves velocity dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Anmin; Wang, Xiaochen; Glorieux, Christ; Yang, Quan; Dong, Feng; He, Fei; Wang, Yanlong; Sermeus, Jan; Van der Donck, Tom; Shu, Xuedao

    2017-02-24

    A photoacoustic, laser ultrasonics based approach in an Impulsive Stimulated Scattering (ISS) implementation was used to investigate the texture in polycrystalline metal plates. The angular dependence of the 'polycrystalline' surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity measured along regions containing many grains was experimentally determined and compared with simulated results that were based on the angular dependence of the 'single grain' SAW velocity within single grains and the grain orientation distribution. The polycrystalline SAW velocities turn out to vary with texture. The SAW velocities and their angular variations for {110} texture were found to be larger than that the ones for {111} texture or the strong γ fiber texture. The SAW velocities for {001} texture were larger than for {111} texture, but with almost the same angular dependence. The results infer the feasibility to apply angular SAW angular dispersion measurements by laser ultrasonics for on-line texture monitoring.

  10. DIASCoPE: Directly integrated acoustic system combined with pressure experiments—A new method for fast acoustic velocity measurements at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Matthew L.; Baldwin, Kenneth J.; Huebsch, William R.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental system to measure elastic wave velocities in samples in situ under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature in a multi-anvil apparatus has been installed at Beamline 6-BM-B of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This system allows for measurement of acoustic velocities via ultrasonic interferometry, and makes use of the synchrotron beam to measure sample densities via X-ray diffraction and sample lengths using X-radiographic imaging. This system is fully integrated into the automated software controls of the beamline and is capable of collecting robust data on elastic wave travel times in less than 1 s, which is an improvement of more than one to two orders of magnitude over existing systems. Moreover, this fast data collection time has been shown to have no effect on the obtained travel time results. This allows for more careful study of time-dependent phenomena with tighter snapshots in time of processes that would otherwise be lost or averaged out in other acoustic measurement systems.

  11. Poisson's ratio from polarization of acoustic zero-group velocity Lamb mode.

    PubMed

    Baggens, Oskar; Ryden, Nils

    2015-07-01

    Poisson's ratio of an isotropic and free elastic plate is estimated from the polarization of the first symmetric acoustic zero-group velocity Lamb mode. This polarization is interpreted as the ratio of the absolute amplitudes of the surface normal and surface in-plane components of the acoustic mode. Results from the evaluation of simulated datasets indicate that the presented relation, which links the polarization and Poisson's ratio, can be extended to incorporate plates with material damping. Furthermore, the proposed application of the polarization is demonstrated in a practical field case, where an increased accuracy of estimated nominal thickness is obtained.

  12. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  14. Liquid mercury sound velocity measurements under high pressure and high temperature by picosecond acoustics in a diamond anvils cell.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Belliard, L; Couzinet, B; Vincent, S; Munsch, P; Le Marchand, G; Perrin, B

    2009-07-01

    Recent improvements to measure ultrasonic sound velocities of liquids under extreme conditions are described. Principle and feasibility of picosecond acoustics in liquids embedded in a diamond anvils cell are given. To illustrate the capability of these advances in the sound velocity measurement technique, original high pressure and high temperature results on the sound velocity of liquid mercury up to 5 GPa and 575 K are given. This high pressure technique will certainly be useful in several fundamental and applied problems in physics and many other fields such as geophysics, nonlinear acoustics, underwater sound, petrology or physical acoustics.

  15. Visualizing flow fields using acoustic Doppler current profilers and the Velocity Mapping Toolbox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide examples of how the U.S. Geological Survey is using acoustic Doppler current profilers for much more than routine discharge measurements. These instruments are capable of mapping complex three-dimensional flow fields within rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Using the Velocity Mapping Toolbox to process the ADCP data allows detailed visualization of the data, providing valuable information for a range of studies and applications.

  16. Underwater patch near-field acoustical holography based on particle velocity and vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, DeSen; Li, SiChun; Sun, Yu; Mo, ShiQi; Shi, ShengGuo

    2012-11-01

    One-step patch near-field acoustical holography (PNAH) is a powerful tool for identifying noise sources from the partially known sound pressure field. The acoustical property to be reconstructed on the surface of interest is related to the partially measured pressure on the hologram surface in terms of sampling and bandlimiting matrices, which cost more in computation. A one-step procedure based on measuring of the normal component of the particle velocity is described, including the mathematical formulation. The numerical simulation shows that one-step PNAH based on particle velocity can obtain more accurately reconstructed results and it is also less sensitive to noise than the method based on pressure. These findings are confirmed by an underwater near-field acoustical holography experiment conducted with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results have illustrated the high performance of one-step PNAH based on particle velocity in the reconstruction of sound field and the advantages of a vector hydrophone array in an underwater near-field measurement.

  17. The acoustic velocity, refractive index, and equation of state of liquid ammonia dihydrate under high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunli; Wu, Xiaoxin; Huang, Fengxian; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Fangfei; Cui, Qiliang

    2012-09-14

    High-pressure and high-temperature Brillouin scattering studies have been performed on liquid of composition corresponding to the ammonia dihydrate stoichiometry (NH(3)·2H(2)O) in a diamond anvil cell. Using the measured Brillouin frequency shifts from 180° back- and 60° platelet-scattering geometries, the acoustic velocity, refractive index, density, and adiabatic bulk modulus have been determined under pressure up to freezing point along the 296, 338, 376, and 407 K isotherms. Along these four isotherms, the acoustic velocities increase smoothly with increasing pressure but decrease with the increased temperature. However, the pressure dependence of the refractive indexes on the four isotherms exhibits a change in slope around 1.5 GPa. The bulk modulus increases linearly with pressure and its slope, dB/dP, decreases from 6.83 at 296 K to 4.41 at 407 K. These new datasets improve our understanding of the pressure- and temperature-induced molecular structure changes in the ammonia-water binary system.

  18. Workshop on the Detection, Classification, Localization and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics - 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics - 2015 John A. Hildebrand Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD La Jolla...classification, localization and density estimation of marine mammals using passive acoustics , and by doing so advance the state of the art in this field...Passive Acoustics was organized and held at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) in July 2015. The objective of ONR support for the

  19. Cheap DECAF: Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Acoustic Fixed Sensors Using Separate, Non-Linked Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    whale (Balaenoptera physalus) from a sparse array of ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) will be the dataset used to develop and test a variety of density...T. Marques. 2009. Taming the Jez monster : Estimating fin whale spatial density using acoustic propagation modeling. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126(4):2229

  20. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  1. Linearized acoustic perturbation equations for low Mach number flow with variable density and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munz, Claus-Dieter; Dumbser, Michael; Roller, Sabine

    2007-05-01

    When the Mach number tends to zero the compressible Navier-Stokes equations converge to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, under the restrictions of constant density, constant temperature and no compression from the boundary. This is a singular limit in which the pressure of the compressible equations converges at leading order to a constant thermodynamic background pressure, while a hydrodynamic pressure term appears in the incompressible equations as a Lagrangian multiplier to establish the divergence-free condition for the velocity. In this paper we consider the more general case in which variable density, variable temperature and heat transfer are present, while the Mach number is small. We discuss first the limit equations for this case, when the Mach number tends to zero. The introduction of a pressure splitting into a thermodynamic and a hydrodynamic part allows the extension of numerical methods to the zero Mach number equations in these non-standard situations. The solution of these equations is then used as the state of expansion extending the expansion about incompressible flow proposed by Hardin and Pope [J.C. Hardin, D.S. Pope, An acoustic/viscous splitting technique for computational aeroacoustics, Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 6 (1995) 323-340]. The resulting linearized equations state a mathematical model for the generation and propagation of acoustic waves in this more general low Mach number regime and may be used within a hybrid aeroacoustic approach.

  2. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  3. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2010-09-30

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

  4. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  5. Acoustic study of a linear low-density polyethylene film after modification of the crystalline structure by heating.

    PubMed

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2014-02-01

    We report on a hybrid microscopy technique that enables us to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film together with an optical microscope image of the corresponding area. Linear low-density polyethylene films are heated to various temperatures and examined by the technique. Density of the film is increased by heating and its sound velocity is decreased compared with a film without heating. Also, spherulites can clearly be seen in the optical microscope image, supporting the thermal shrinkage of the film which can be detected by the present technique.

  6. Acoustic planar hyperlens based on anisotropic density-near-zero metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Yuan; Cheng, Ying Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-09-28

    Based on anisotropic density-near-zero metamaterials, we demonstrate a planar hyperlens with resolution beyond the diffraction limit in both one and two lateral dimensions. In contrast to the cylindrical hyperlens with elliptical dispersions of finite anisotropy, the proposed planar hyperlens is designed with flat near-zero dispersion that supports wave tunneling with extremely high phase velocity for infinite large transverse wave vectors. Therefore, the acoustic evanescent waves immediately concentrate into the designed oblique path till the output surface, leading to a subwavelength resolution. Prototype hyperlens is constructed with a membrane-network by means of equivalent lumped-circuit model, and the subwavelength magnifying performance for a pair of one-dimensional line objects as well as the complex two-dimensional structure is demonstrated. This method provides diverse routes to construct hyperlens operating without the limitation on imaging region in practical applications.

  7. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  8. Application of acoustic tomography to reconstruct the horizontal flow velocity field in a shallow river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Kaneko, Arata; Nistor, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    A novel acoustic tomographic measurement system capable of resolving sound travel time in extremely shallow rivers is introduced and the results of an extensive field measurements campaign are presented and further discussed. Acoustic pulses were transmitted over a wide frequency band of 20-35 kHz between eight transducers for about a week in a meandering reach of theBāsen River, Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the field experiment was validating the concept of acoustic tomography in rivers for visualizing current fields. The particular novelty of the experiment resides in its unusual tomographic features: subbasin scale (100 m × 270 m) and shallowness (0.5-3.0 m) of the physical domain, frequency of the transmitted acoustic signals (central frequency of 30 kHz), and the use of small sampling intervals (105 s). Inverse techniques with no a priori statistical information were used to estimate the depth-average current velocity components from differential travel times. Zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization, in conjunction with L-curve method deployed to stabilize the solution and to determine the weighting factor appearing in the inverse analysis. Concurrent direct environmental measurements were provided in the form of ADCP readings close to the right and left bank. Very good agreement found between along-channel velocities larger than 0.2 m/s obtained from the two techniques. Inverted quantities were, however, underestimated, perhaps due to vicinity of the ADCPs to the banks and strong effect of river geometry on the readings. In general, comparing the visualized currents with direct nodal measurements illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures.

  9. On the statistical errors in the estimate of acoustical energy density by using two microphones in a one dimensional field.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Jean-Claude; Thomas, Jean-Hugh; Li, Jing-Fang

    2008-10-01

    It was recently shown that the statistical errors of the measurement in the acoustic energy density by the two microphone method in waveguide have little variation when the losses of coherence between microphones increase. To explain these intervals of uncertainty, the variance of the measurement is expressed in this paper as a function of the various energy quantities of the acoustic fields--energy densities and sound intensities. The necessary conditions to reach the lower bound are clarified. The results obtained are illustrated by an example of a one-dimensional partially coherent field, which allows one to specify the relationship between the coherence functions of the pressure and particle velocity and those of the two microphone signals.

  10. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  11. Recovering the full velocity and density fields from large-scale redshift-distance samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund; Dekel, Avishai

    1989-01-01

    A new method for extracting the large-scale three-dimensional velocity and mass density fields from measurements of the radial peculiar velocities is presented. Galaxies are assumed to trace the velocity field rather than the mass. The key assumption made is that the Lagrangian velocity field has negligible vorticity, as might be expected from perturbations that grew by gravitational instability. By applying the method to cosmological N-body simulations, it is demonstrated that it accurately reconstructs the velocity field. This technique promises a direct determination of the mass density field and the initial conditions for the formation of large-scale structure from galaxy peculiar velocity surveys.

  12. Nonlinear effects in an acoustic metamaterial with simultaneous negative modulus and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifeng; Lan, Jun; Li, Baoshun; Liu, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Jiashu

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear effects in an acoustic metamaterial with simultaneous negative modulus and density based on Helmholtz resonators and membranes periodically distributed along a pipe are studied theoretically. Analyses of the transmission coefficient and dispersion relation of the composite system are realized using the acoustic transmission line method and Bloch theory, respectively. Due to the nonlinearities of the Helmholtz resonators and membranes, the acoustic wave propagation properties vary with the different incident acoustic intensities, and the frequency band gaps of the transmission coefficient are amplitude dependent. The nonlinearities shift the double negative pass band into the adjacent modulus negative forbidden band and transform the metamaterial from an acoustic insulator into an acoustic conductor, leading to some new potential acoustic applications.

  13. Acoustic wave velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on acousto-optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'neva, P. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Sound velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on isotropic and anisotropic acousto-optical crystals have been determined by numerical simulations. The isotropic materials are represented by fused quartz (SiO2) and flint glass, while anisotropic materials include tetragonal crystals of paratellurite (TeO2) and rutile (TiO2) and a trigonal crystal of tellurium (Te). It is established that the acoustic anisotropy of periodic composite structures strongly depends on both the chemical composition and geometric parameters of components.

  14. Acoustic oscillation phenomena in low-velocity steady flow with heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liburdy, J. A.; Wofford, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Thermally driven acoustic oscillations in low-velocity mean flows are investigated. A criterion is developed for marginal stability with respect to a fluid temperature increase; a cylindrical geometry is chosen for flow in a constant-area tube where any circumferential variation is neglected. The range of parameters of concern is limited to conditions resembling cryogenic storage designs proposed for long-term space missions; helium was chosen as the fluid in order to allow comparison with zero flow rate results in half-open tubes.

  15. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  16. Particle velocity gradient based acoustic mode beamforming for short linear vector sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Gur, Berke

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a subtractive beamforming algorithm for short linear arrays of two-dimensional particle velocity sensors is described. The proposed method extracts the highly directional acoustic modes from the spatial gradients of the particle velocity field measured at closely spaced sensors along the array. The number of sensors in the array limits the highest order of modes that can be extracted. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that the acoustic mode beamformer achieves directivity comparable to the maximum directivity that can be obtained with differential microphone arrays of equivalent aperture. When compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamformers for pressure sensor arrays, the proposed method achieves comparable directivity with 70%-85% shorter apertures. Moreover, the proposed method has additional capabilities such as high front-back (port-starboard) discrimination, frequency and steer direction independent response, and robustness to correlated ambient noise. Small inter-sensor spacing that results in very compact apertures makes the proposed beamformer suitable for space constrained applications such as hearing aids and short towed arrays for autonomous underwater platforms.

  17. Ultrasonic database development for the acoustic inspection device: the velocity-attenuation measurement system (VAMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Burghard, Brion J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Samuel, Todd J.; Doctor, S. R.

    2004-08-01

    The inspection of sealed containers is a critical task for personnel charged with enforcing government policies, maintaining public safety, and ensuring national security. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, handheld acoustic inspection device (AID) that provides non-invasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities. The AID technology has been deployed worldwide and user's are providing feedback and requesting additional capabilities and functionality. Recently, PNNL has developed a laboratory-based system for automated, ultrasonic characterization of fluids to support database development for the AID. Using pulse-echo ultrasound, ultrasonic pulses are launched into a container or bulk-solid commodity. The return echoes from these pulses are analyzed in terms of time-of-flight and frequency content (as a function of temperature) to extract physical property measurements (acoustic velocity and attenuation) of the material under test. These measured values are then compared to a tailored database of materials and fluids property data acquired using the Velocity-Attenuation Measurement System (VAMS). This bench-top platform acquires key ultrasonic property measurements as a function of temperature and frequency. This paper describes the technical basis for operation of the VAMS, recent enhancements to the measurement algorithms for both the VAMS and AID technologies, and new measurement data from laboratory testing and performance demonstration activities. Applications for homeland security and counter terrorism, law enforcement, drug-interdiction and fuel transportation compliance activities will be discussed.

  18. Measurement of surface acoustic wave velocity using a variable-line-focus polyurea thin-film ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Takahiro; Nakazawa, Marie; Tabaru, Masaya; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the novel measurement method of the surface acoustic wave velocity by the variable-line- focus transducer using a polyurea piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer. First, a multiresonant polyurea thin-film ultrasonic transducer is fabricated by the vapor deposition polymerization process using 2 monomers. Second, the measurement system of surface acoustic wave velocity modified from the V(z) curve method is established. The system uses the fabricated polyurea thin film as a variable-line-focus transducer at the 30-MHz resonance frequency. The focal length is changed by varying the radius of curvature of the film transducer. To estimate the surface acoustic wave velocities from the measured data theoretically, the photographs of the transducer bent shapes are taken by using a digital microscope, and the bent transducer curvature is modeled by the 7th-order polynomial. To examine the performances of the variable-line-focus transducer, the surface acoustic wave velocities of an aluminum and a synthesized silica glass specimen have been measured. The measured surface acoustic velocities showed good agreement with the reference values.

  19. Acoustic velocity and attenuation of unconsolidated sands: An experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuping

    I have developed a sonic frequency apparatus (1--10 kHz) that utilizes resonance to measure the acoustic velocities and attenuation of both extensional and torsional waves in unconsolidated materials (e.g., sands, clays and sediments) under hydrostatic confinement. The basic equations and methodology for correcting these effects are given and applied to a dry Monterey sand to determine the shear and Young's moduli and attenuation over an effective pressure range of 0--9 MPa. Comparison of my measured data with theoretical granular contact models gives insight into the seismic wave propagation in unconsolidated sands. The effects of water saturation and pressure on the velocity and attenuation of seismic waves in unconsolidated sands are investigated using the newly-designed apparatus and methodology in the laboratory. Two kinds of pore fluid distribution are achieved with water injection and de-gassing methods, and an X-ray CT scanner is used to obtain the images of pore fluid distribution. There is not significant difference in velocities for the different pore fluid distributions. Measured velocities are in favorable agreement with theoretical predictions based on Gassmann's equations. At all effective pressures, V P of the fully-water-saturated sand is larger than that of the dry sand, implying that water in pore space stiffens the rock, causing an increase in the rock's bulk modulus. For the partially-saturated sand, the attenuation of compressional wave is larger than that of torsional wave, and both of them increase with water saturation. The effects of pore fluid saturation and distribution on seismic velocities are further studied based on numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. The calculated results indicate that numerical modeling based on Biot theory gives the same compressional velocity VP as Gassmann's equations if the pore fluids are mixed in such a fine scale that the induced pore pressure increments can

  20. River habitat quality from river velocities measured using acoustic Doppler current profiler.

    PubMed

    Shields, F Douglas; Rigby, J R

    2005-10-01

    Prior research has demonstrated the utility of metrics based on spatial velocity gradients to characterize and describe stream habitat, with higher gradients generally indicative of higher levels of physical heterogeneity and thus habitat quality. However, detailed velocity data needed to compute these metrics are difficult to obtain. Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) may be used to rapidly collect detailed representations of river velocity fields. Herein we demonstrate use of ADCP to obtain ecologically relevant data and compute associated metrics. Data were collected from four reaches of the Little Tallahatchie River in northern Mississippi. Sampled reaches were selected to observe velocity regimes associated with three distinctly different conditions: downstream from a major flow obstruction (a low weir), downstream from the apices of each of two bends, and within an extremely long, straight reach created by channelization. Three-dimensional velocity data sets from each site were used to compute metrics of habitat quality proposed by others. A habitat metric based on the presence of rotational flow in the vertical plane proved to be the best discriminator among conditions within the sampled reaches. Two of four habitat quality metrics computed from these measured velocities were greatest for the sharpest meander bend. ADCP hold great potential for study of riverine physical aquatic habitats, particularly at the reach scale. Additional work is needed to develop generally applicable field protocols and data reduction tools. Specifically, guidelines for ADCP settings and configuration appropriate for a range of riverine site conditions must be developed. Advances in instrumentation are needed to allow collection of information in closer proximity to the free surface and solid boundaries.

  1. Two-dimensional time resolved measurements of toroidal velocity correlated with density blobs in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Labit, B.; Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Podesta, M.

    2008-08-15

    A new method for toroidal velocity measurements with Mach probes is presented. This technique is based on the conditional sampling technique, the triggering events being density blobs. A reconstruction of the time resolved two-dimensional profile of electron density, electron temperature, plasma potential, and toroidal velocity is possible with a single point measurement on a shot-to-shot basis.

  2. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program was developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions showed significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. The velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation, since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field, as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provided a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  3. The relationships between large-scale variations in shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2016-04-01

    A large data set of surface wave phase anomalies, body wave travel times, normal-mode splitting functions, and long-period waveforms is used to investigate the scaling between shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in the Earth's mantle. We introduce a methodology that allows construction of joint models with various levels of scaling complexity (ϱ = dlnρ/dlnvS, ν = dlnvS/dlnvP), in order to detect seismological signatures of chemical heterogeneity. We demonstrate that the data sets considered cannot be fit concurrently with a uniform ν or a positive and uniform ϱ throughout the mantle. The variance reductions to P wave travel times and vP-sensitive modes are up to 40% higher with our preferred model of anisotropic shear and compressional velocity than the recent anisotropic shear velocity model S362ANI+M, which was constructed assuming a uniform ν throughout the mantle. Several features reported in earlier tomographic studies persist after the inclusion of new and larger data sets; anticorrelation between bulk sound and shear velocities in the lowermost mantle as well as an increase in ν with depth in the lower mantle are largely independent of the regularization scheme. When correlations between density and shear velocity variations are imposed in the lowermost mantle, variance reductions of several spheroidal and toroidal modes deteriorate by as much as 40%. Recent measurements of the splitting of 0S2, in particular, are largely incompatible with perfectly correlated shear velocity and density heterogeneity throughout the mantle. A way to significantly improve the fits to various data sets is by allowing independent density perturbations in the lowermost mantle. Our preferred joint model consists of denser-than-average anomalies (˜1% peak to peak) at the base of the mantle roughly coincident with the low-velocity superplumes. The relative variation of shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in our study disfavors a purely thermal

  4. Measuring mass density and ultrasonic wave velocity: A wavelet-based method applied in ultrasonic reflection mode.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Khaled; Lefevre, Emmanuelle; Baron, Cécile; Zheng, Rui; Pithioux, Martine; Lasaygues, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    When assessing ultrasonic measurements of material parameters, the signal processing is an important part of the inverse problem. Measurements of thickness, ultrasonic wave velocity and mass density are required for such assessments. This study investigates the feasibility and the robustness of a wavelet-based processing (WBP) method based on a Jaffard-Meyer algorithm for calculating these parameters simultaneously and independently, using one single ultrasonic signal in the reflection mode. The appropriate transmitted incident wave, correlated with the mathematical properties of the wavelet decomposition, was determined using a adapted identification procedure to build a mathematically equivalent model for the electro-acoustic system. The method was tested on three groups of samples (polyurethane resin, bone and wood) using one 1-MHz transducer. For thickness and velocity measurements, the WBP method gave a relative error lower than 1.5%. The relative errors in the mass density measurements ranged between 0.70% and 2.59%. Despite discrepancies between manufactured and biological samples, the results obtained on the three groups of samples using the WBP method in the reflection mode were remarkably consistent, indicating that it is a reliable and efficient means of simultaneously assessing the thickness and the velocity of the ultrasonic wave propagating in the medium, and the apparent mass density of material.

  5. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO2 coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sermeus, J.; Sinha, R.; Vanstreels, K.; Vereecken, P. M.; Glorieux, C.

    2014-07-01

    MnO2 is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO2. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (ψ) of a 500 nm thick MnO2 coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E = 25 ± 1 GPa and ψ = 42 ± 1 %, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  6. Application of acoustic velocity meters for gaging discharge of three low-velocity tidal streams in the St. Johns River basin, northeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloat, J.V.; Gain, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    Index-velocity data collected with acoustic velocity meters, stage data, and cross-sectional area data were used to calculate discharge at three low-velocity, tidal streamflow stations in north-east Florida. Discharge at three streamflow stations was computed as the product of the channel cross-sectional area and the mean velocity as determined from an index velocity measured in the stream using an acoustic velocity meter. The tidal streamlflow stations used in the study were: Six Mile Creek near Picolata, Fla.; Dunns Creek near Satsuma, Fla.; and the St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Cross-sectional areas at the measurement sections ranged from about 3,000 square feet at Six Mile Creek to about 18,500 square feet at St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Physical characteristics for all three streams were similar except for drainage area. The topography primarily is low-relief, swampy terrain; stream velocities ranged from about -2 to 2 feet per second; and the average change in stage was about 1 foot. Instantaneous discharge was measured using a portable acoustic current meter at each of the three streams to develop a relation between the mean velocity in the stream and the index velocity measured by the acoustic velocity meter. Using least-squares linear regression, a simple linear relation between mean velocity and index velocity was determined. Index velocity was the only significant linear predictor of mean velocity for Six Mile Creek and St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. For Dunns Creek, both index velocity and stage were used to develop a multiple-linear predictor of mean velocity. Stage-area curves for each stream were developed from bathymetric data. Instantaneous discharge was computed by multiplying results of relations developed for cross-sectional area and mean velocity. Principal sources of error in the estimated discharge are identified as: (1) instrument errors associated with measurement of stage and index velocity, (2) errors in the representation of

  7. Measurements of acoustic particle velocity in a coaxial duct and its application to a traveling-wave thermoacoustic heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, Jun; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2014-09-01

    We present theoretical solutions, based on linear acoustic theory, for axial acoustic particle velocity in an annular region of a coaxial duct. The solutions are expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters h/δν and R; h and δν, respectively, represent the half of the spacing between two concentric ducts and the characteristic length given by kinematic viscosity of the gas and angular frequency of acoustic oscillations, and R is the radius ratio of the ducts. The validity of the solutions was verified by direct measurements using a laser Doppler velocimeter. The present results are applied to measurements of the acoustic power distribution in a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine with a coaxial duct, which provides experimental evidence for acoustic power feedback in the coaxial duct.

  8. Measurements of acoustic particle velocity in a coaxial duct and its application to a traveling-wave thermoacoustic heat engine.

    PubMed

    Morii, Jun; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2014-09-01

    We present theoretical solutions, based on linear acoustic theory, for axial acoustic particle velocity in an annular region of a coaxial duct. The solutions are expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters h/δ(ν) and R; h and δ(ν), respectively, represent the half of the spacing between two concentric ducts and the characteristic length given by kinematic viscosity of the gas and angular frequency of acoustic oscillations, and R is the radius ratio of the ducts. The validity of the solutions was verified by direct measurements using a laser Doppler velocimeter. The present results are applied to measurements of the acoustic power distribution in a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine with a coaxial duct, which provides experimental evidence for acoustic power feedback in the coaxial duct.

  9. Anomalous wave propagation in a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial having simultaneously negative mass density and Young's modulus.

    PubMed

    Huang, H H; Sun, C T

    2012-10-01

    A mechanical model representing an acoustic metamaterial that exhibits simultaneously negative mass density and negative Young's modulus was proposed. Wave propagation was studied in the frequency range of double negativity. In view of positive energy flow, it was found that the phase velocity in this range is negative. This phenomenon was also observed using transient wave propagation finite-element analyses of a transient sinusoidal wave and a transient wave packet. In contrast to wave propagation in the region of positive mass and modulus, the peculiar backward wave motion in the region of double negativity was clearly displayed.

  10. Density and Shape Effects in the Acoustic Propulsion of Bimetallic Nanorod Motors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Suzanne; Wang, Wei; Bai, Lanjun; Gentekos, Dillon T; Hoyos, Mauricio; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2016-04-26

    Bimetallic nanorods are propelled without chemical fuels in megahertz (MHz) acoustic fields, and exhibit similar behaviors to single-metal rods, including autonomous axial propulsion and organization into spinning chains. Shape asymmetry determines the direction of axial movement of bimetallic rods when there is a small difference in density between the two metals. Movement toward the concave end of these rods is inconsistent with a scattering mechanism that we proposed earlier for acoustic propulsion, but is consistent with an acoustic streaming model developed more recently by Nadal and Lauga ( Phys. Fluids 2014 , 26 , 082001 ). Longer rods were slower at constant power, and their speed was proportional to the square of the power density, in agreement with the acoustic streaming model. The streaming model was further supported by a correlation between the disassembly of spinning chains of rods and a sharp decrease in the axial speed of autonomously moving motors within the levitation plane of the cylindrical acoustic cell. However, with bimetallic rods containing metals of different densities, a consistent polarity of motion was observed with the lighter metal end leading. Speed comparisons between single-metal rods of different densities showed that those of lower density are propelled faster. So far, these density effects are not explained in the streaming model. The directionality of bimetallic rods in acoustic fields is intriguing and offers some new possibilities for designing motors in which shape, material, and chemical asymmetry might be combined for enhanced functionality.

  11. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  12. Studying the impact of air/brine displacement on acoustic velocities in carbonates. El Amin Mokhtar and Sandra Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, E.; Vega, D.

    2012-12-01

    The impact of air/brine displacement on acoustic velocities of carbonate rocks is not fully comprehended yet. In order to improve our understanding of this effect, we conducted laboratory measurements of porosity and acoustic velocities (Vp and Vs) under both dry and brine saturated conditions at ambient pressure and temperature. The core plug samples in this study were collected from a hydrocarbon reservoir in the Middle East. A petrographic analysis was also performed on thin sections taken from the core plugs using a microscope and a digital camera. The aim of this analysis was to study depositional facies and the extent of diagenetic overprint that caused the observed variations in rock fabrics. Cross-plots were generated to analyze the trends of behavior between acoustic velocities and porosities taking into account the influence of different rock fabrics, in both dry and brine saturated samples. Acoustic velocities of brine saturated samples were higher than velocities of dry samples, as expected. However, their differences also respond to both, total porosity and carbonate rock fabrics. This result can be attributed to the different carbonate pore structures and rock frames formed during deposition and diagenesis. Similarly, the Vp/Vs ratio cross-plots display an increase in Vp/Vs ratios for the brine saturated samples compared to the dry ones. In conclusion, differences in acoustic velocities between dry and brine saturated carbonate rocks seem to be highly effected by porosity, rock fabric, and fluid content. This information can help to better understand the differences in acoustic response between gas and brine saturated zones in well logs and seismic.

  13. Low-frequency acoustic pressure, velocity, and intensity thresholds in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Carder, Donald A; Ridgway, Sam H

    2002-01-01

    The relative contributions of acoustic pressure and particle velocity to the low-frequency, underwater hearing abilities of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) were investigated by measuring (masked) hearing thresholds while manipulating the relationship between the pressure and velocity. This was accomplished by varying the distance within the near field of a single underwater sound projector (experiment I) and using two underwater sound projectors and an active sound control system (experiment II). The results of experiment I showed no significant change in pressure thresholds as the distance between the subject and the sound source was changed. In contrast, velocity thresholds tended to increase and intensity thresholds tended to decrease as the source distance decreased. These data suggest that acoustic pressure is a better indicator of threshold, compared to particle velocity or mean active intensity, in the subjects tested. Interpretation of the results of experiment II (the active sound control system) was difficult because of complex acoustic conditions and the unknown effects of the subject on the generated acoustic field; however, these data also tend to support the results of experiment I and suggest that odontocete thresholds should be reported in units of acoustic pressure, rather than intensity.

  14. Low-frequency acoustic pressure, velocity, and intensity thresholds in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, James J.; Carder, Donald A.; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2002-01-01

    The relative contributions of acoustic pressure and particle velocity to the low-frequency, underwater hearing abilities of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) were investigated by measuring (masked) hearing thresholds while manipulating the relationship between the pressure and velocity. This was accomplished by varying the distance within the near field of a single underwater sound projector (experiment I) and using two underwater sound projectors and an active sound control system (experiment II). The results of experiment I showed no significant change in pressure thresholds as the distance between the subject and the sound source was changed. In contrast, velocity thresholds tended to increase and intensity thresholds tended to decrease as the source distance decreased. These data suggest that acoustic pressure is a better indicator of threshold, compared to particle velocity or mean active intensity, in the subjects tested. Interpretation of the results of experiment II (the active sound control system) was difficult because of complex acoustic conditions and the unknown effects of the subject on the generated acoustic field; however, these data also tend to support the results of experiment I and suggest that odontocete thresholds should be reported in units of acoustic pressure, rather than intensity.

  15. Non-Gaussian velocity distributions in vibrated granular matter at low densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Arshad; Henry, J.

    2000-03-01

    Velocity distribution of 100-500 steel and brass spheres rolling inside a rectangular two dimensional flat surface are obtained by high speed imaging. The particles are excited by periodic forcing of one of the confining walls and the surface can be also inclined to introduce gravitation. Rolling leads to an significantly lower effective coefficient of restitution during collisions thus amplifying its effect on the velocity and density distributions. The position and velocity of individual particles are accurately measured, and good statistical information of the distribution of the velocity components is obtained as a function of position by averaging over at least 10^6 data points. Recent experiments and numerical work have shown that clustering of particles are observed due to inelasticity which leads to non-gaussian velocity distributions at high densities. Our data suggests that strongly non-gaussian velocity distributions can occur in excited granular materials even in the absence of significant density correlations or clustering.

  16. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic-velocity methods used to characterise the excavation disturbance associated with deep tunnels in hard rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Stephen D.; Young, R. Paul

    1998-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic-velocity monitoring studies have been undertaken at both the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) and at the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Company (SKB) Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). At both locations the excavations were tunnels in granitic material at approximately 420 m depth. However, the stress regime was more severe at the URL Mine-by tunnel site than the HRL ZEDEX tunnel. Different parts of the ZEDEX tunnel were created using different excavation techniques. Using AE and ultrasonic techniques to study these tunnels we have been able to examine the nature of the excavation-disturbed zone around the tunnel, as well as examining the effects of different stress regimes and excavation techniques. Studies were undertaken both during and after the Mine-by tunnel excavation and during excavation in the ZEDEX tunnel. AE monitoring in the wall of the Mine-by tunnel during excavation showed that some activity occurred in the sidewall regions, but the spatial density of AE hypocentres increased toward the regions in the floor and roof of the tunnel where breakout notches formed. This sidewall activity was clustered primarily within 0.5 m of the tunnel wall. AE monitoring in the floor of the tunnel showed that small numbers of AE continued to occur in the notch region in the floor of the tunnel over 2 years after excavation was completed. This activity became more acute as the rock was heated, imposing thermally induced stresses on the volume. Ultrasonic-velocity studies both in the floor and the wall of the tunnel showed that the velocity is strongly anisotropic with the direction of slowest velocity orthogonal to the tunnel surface. The velocity increased with distance into the rock from the tunnel surface. In the floor, this effect was seen up to 2 m from the tunnel surface. Most of the change occurred within the first 0.5 m from the tunnel perimeter. At the lower-stress HRL, most of

  17. Surface acoustic wave velocity of gold films deposited on silicon substrates at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, E.; Jimenez Rioboo, R. J.; Prieto, C.; Every, A. G.

    2011-07-15

    Au thin films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on Si (001) substrates at different substrate temperatures, ranging from 200 K to 450 K. With increasing temperature, the expected crystallinity and morphology of the Au thin film are clearly improved, as shown by x ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy experiments. Parallel to this, the surface acoustic wave propagation velocity shows a clear enhancement toward the ideal values obtained from numerical simulations of a Au thin film on Si (001) substrate. Moreover, a very thin and slightly rough interlayer between the Si (001) substrate and the Au thin film is developed for temperatures above 350 K. The composition and nature of this interlayer is not known. This interlayer may be responsible for the steep change in the structural and elastic properties of the Au thin films at the higher temperatures and possibly also for an improvement of the adhesion properties of the Au on the Si (001) substrate.

  18. The relation between velocity dispersion and central galaxy density in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    A correlation between cluster velocity dispersion and average central galaxy density is reported. The correlation covers the range from rich clusters to small groups of galaxies, or, in terms of velocity dispersion, from v sub r approximately 1500 to approximately 100 km/s. This result is useful for estimating unknown velocity dispersions in clusters with the aid of the relatively easily determined 0.5 Mpc central galaxy density parameter. When combined with the virial theorem, the above relation also suggests that the mass-to-light ratio of galaxy systems increases with the system's velocity dispersion.

  19. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  20. Frequency Scaling for Evaluation of Shale and Mudstone Properties from Acoustic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Rivera, R.; Willson, S. M.; Nakagawa, S.; Magnar-Ness, O.

    2001-12-01

    In subsurface oil and gas exploration, seismic wave (stress wave) measurement is one of the most important tools for determining the properties of overburden and predicting reservoir conditions such as pore pressure, fracture gradient, and stress distribution. To achieve detailed and reliable knowledge of the reservoir, an integrated analysis can be performed on the seismic properties of rocks measured at different scales ranging from laboratory core, boreholes (well logging) and reservoir itself (surface seismic). However, particularly for sedimentary rocks containing a large amount of clay minerals, such integration is not a straightforward task because of velocity dispersion that makes waves of different frequencies travel at different velocities. The ultimate goal of this study is to devise a methodology for frequency scaling based on laboratory measurements of wave propagation at different frequency ranges. To this end, we have examined the mechanical and acoustic (seismic) properties of strongly dispersive sedimentary rocks. Shales were selected as principal rocks of interest for their predominance in the overburden and the direct impact on the well construction cost. Two types of shales were cored from outcrops(Pierre I and Mancos) and tested under varying conditions of loading (hydrostatic versus uniaxial-strain), orientation to bedding (parallel, perpendicular and oblique). Wave measurements were conducted under four ranges of frequency: Static and quasi-static (seismic frequency, approximately 7 Hz) data was obtained from high-accuracy, low-speed stress-strain measurements, and sonic data (0.4 kHz-9 kHz) was obtained from gas-confined resonant bar tests. For ultrasonic data (150 kHz-1 MHz), a frequency-domain phase analysis was applied to compute frequency-dependent phase and group velocities. Over these ranges, both Pierre and Mancos shales showed a smooth and monotonic increase in compressional and shear wave velocities with frequency. Strong velocity

  1. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Velocity and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2002-04-01

    A new molecular Rayleigh scattering based flow diagnostic is used for the first time to measure the power spectrum of gas density and radial velocity component in the plumes of high speed jets. The technique is based on analyzing the Rayleigh scattered light with a Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the static, imaging mode. The PC based data acquisition system is capable of simultaneous sampling of velocity and density at rates to 100 kHz and data record lengths to 10 million. Velocity and density power spectra and velocity-density cross spectra are presented for a subsonic jet, an underexpanded screeching jet, and for Mach 1.4 and Mach 1.8 supersonic jets. Software and hardware interfaces were developed to allow computer control of all aspects of the experiment and data acquisition.

  2. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Velocity and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2002-01-01

    A new molecular Rayleigh scattering based flow diagnostic is used for the first time to measure the power spectrum of gas density and radial velocity component in the plumes of high speed jets. The technique is based on analyzing the Rayleigh scattered light with a Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the static, imaging mode. The PC based data acquisition system is capable of simultaneous sampling of velocity and density at rates to 100 kHz and data record lengths to 10 million. Velocity and density power spectra and velocity-density cross spectra are presented for a subsonic jet, an underexpanded screeching jet, and for Mach 1.4 and Mach 1.8 supersonic jets. Software and hardware interfaces were developed to allow computer control of all aspects of the experiment and data acquisition.

  3. SUMER: Temperatures, densities, and velocities in the outer solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaire, Philippe; Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, Stuart D.; Kuehne, M.; Marsch, Eckart

    1992-01-01

    The SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation) instrumentation that will be mounted on the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) spacecraft is in development. It has some capability of improving the solar angular resolution and the spectral resolution already obtained in the far UV to the extreme UV, corresponding to the temperature range between 10,000 and a few 1,000,000 K. Some insights into the SUMER spectrometer, developed to study the dynamics and to infer temperatures and densities of the low corona and the chromosphere-corona transition zone in using the 50 to 160 nm wavelength range, are given. The SUMER scientific goals and the techniques used are outlined. The instrumentation and the expected performances are described. The way the observations can be conducted is emphasized and the operation of SUMER in coordination with other SOHO instrumentations and in cooperation with ground based observations is explained.

  4. Density, Velocity and Ionization Structure in Accretion-Disc Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Long, Knox

    2004-01-01

    This was a project to exploit the unique capabilities of FUSE to monitor variations in the wind- formed spectral lines of the luminous, low-inclination, cataclysmic variables(CV) -- RW Sex. (The original proposal contained two additional objects but these were not approved.) These observations were intended to allow us to determine the relative roles of density and ionization state changes in the outflow and to search for spectroscopic signatures of stochastic small-scale structure and shocked gas. By monitoring the temporal behavior of blue-ward extended absorption lines with a wide range of ionization potentials and excitation energies, we proposed to track the changing physical conditions in the outflow. We planned to use a new Monte Carlo code to calculate the ionization structure of and radiative transfer through the CV wind. The analysis therefore was intended to establish the wind geometry, kinematics and ionization state, both in a time-averaged sense and as a function of time.

  5. Density, Velocity and Ionization Structure in Accretion-disc Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox

    We propose to exploit the unique capabilities of it FUSE to monitor variations in the wind-formed spectral lines of 3 luminous, low-inclination, cataclysmic variables (CVs). Our principal goal is to improve our understanding of the dynamics of accretion-disc winds. We have previously used HST to investigate substantial and rapid (sim hours to minutes) variability in our target stars, BZ Cam, RW Sex and V603 Aql, and have demonstrated that their disc-outflows are highly structured. We aim here to follow up our discoveries by securing FUSE time-series data. These observations will allow us to determine the relative roles of density and ionization state changes in the outflow and to search for spectroscopic signatures of stochastic small-scale structure and shocked gas. By monitoring the temporal behavior of blue-ward extended absorption lines with a wide range of ionization potentials and excitation energies, we will track the changing physical conditions in the outflow. A new sophisticated Monte Carlo code will be used to calculate the ionization structure of and radiative transfer through CV winds. This will allow us to establish the wind geometry, kinematics and ionization state, both in a time-averaged sense and as a function of time. Our FUSE observations will provide a legacy that will be fundamental to the development of dynamical models of accretion-disc-driven winds, permitting critical tests of recent hydrodynamic simulations of unstable, line-driven disc winds.

  6. An Efficient Acoustic Density Estimation Method with Human Detectors Applied to Gibbons in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kidney, Darren; Rawson, Benjamin M.; Borchers, David L.; Stevenson, Ben C.; Marques, Tiago A.; Thomas, Len

    2016-01-01

    Some animal species are hard to see but easy to hear. Standard visual methods for estimating population density for such species are often ineffective or inefficient, but methods based on passive acoustics show more promise. We develop spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) methods for territorial vocalising species, in which humans act as an acoustic detector array. We use SECR and estimated bearing data from a single-occasion acoustic survey of a gibbon population in northeastern Cambodia to estimate the density of calling groups. The properties of the estimator are assessed using a simulation study, in which a variety of survey designs are also investigated. We then present a new form of the SECR likelihood for multi-occasion data which accounts for the stochastic availability of animals. In the context of gibbon surveys this allows model-based estimation of the proportion of groups that produce territorial vocalisations on a given day, thereby enabling the density of groups, instead of the density of calling groups, to be estimated. We illustrate the performance of this new estimator by simulation. We show that it is possible to estimate density reliably from human acoustic detections of visually cryptic species using SECR methods. For gibbon surveys we also show that incorporating observers’ estimates of bearings to detected groups substantially improves estimator performance. Using the new form of the SECR likelihood we demonstrate that estimates of availability, in addition to population density and detection function parameters, can be obtained from multi-occasion data, and that the detection function parameters are not confounded with the availability parameter. This acoustic SECR method provides a means of obtaining reliable density estimates for territorial vocalising species. It is also efficient in terms of data requirements since since it only requires routine survey data. We anticipate that the low-tech field requirements will make this method

  7. Effect of density on traffic and velocity on trunk trails of Formica pratensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönicke, C.; Bliss, P.; Moritz, R. F. A.

    2015-04-01

    The allocation of large numbers of workers facilitates the swift intake of locally available resources which is essential for ant colony survival. To organise the traffic between nest and food source, the black-meadow ant Formica pratensis establishes permanent trunk trails, which are maintained by the ants. To unravel the ant organisation and potential traffic rules on these trails, we analysed velocity and lane segregation under various densities by experimentally changing feeding regimes. Even under the highest ant densities achieved, we never observed any traffic jams. On the contrary, velocity increased after supplementary feeding despite an enhanced density. Furthermore, inbound ants returning to the nest had a higher velocity than those leaving the colony. Whilst at low and medium density the ants used the centre of the trail, they used the full width of the trail at high density. Outbound ants also showed some degree of lane segregation which contributes to traffic organisation.

  8. Reliability of Phase Velocity Measurements of Flexural Acoustic Waves in the Human Tibia In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Axial-transmission acoustics have shown to be a promising technique to measure individual bone properties and detect bone pathologies. With the ultimate goal being the in-vivo application of such systems, quantification of the key aspects governing the reliability is crucial to bring this method towards clinical use. Materials and Methods This work presents a systematic reliability study quantifying the sources of variability and their magnitudes of in-vivo measurements using axial-transmission acoustics. 42 healthy subjects were measured by an experienced operator twice per week, over a four-month period, resulting in over 150000 wave measurements. In a complementary study to assess the influence of different operators performing the measurements, 10 novice operators were trained, and each measured 5 subjects on a single occasion, using the same measurement protocol as in the first part of the study. Results The estimated standard error for the measurement protocol used to collect the study data was ∼ 17 m/s (∼ 4% of the grand mean) and the index of dependability, as a measure of reliability, was Φ = 0.81. It was shown that the method is suitable for multi-operator use and that the reliability can be improved efficiently by additional measurements with device repositioning, while additional measurements without repositioning cannot improve the reliability substantially. Phase velocity values were found to be significantly higher in males than in females (p < 10−5) and an intra-class correlation coefficient of r = 0.70 was found between the legs of each subject. Conclusions The high reliability of this non-invasive approach and its intrinsic sensitivity to mechanical properties opens perspectives for the rapid and inexpensive clinical assessment of bone pathologies, as well as for monitoring programmes without any radiation exposure for the patient. PMID:27015093

  9. Second-order solution for determining density and velocity fields of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramann, Mirt

    1993-01-01

    In this Letter, I use second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory to calculate an analytical expression relating density to velocity in a gravitating system. This solution can be used to compare peculiar velocity field measurements with observations of large-scale structure. The predictions of both linear theory and second-order theory are compared with the results of N-body simulations. While linear theory systematically overestimates the velocity flows in high-density regions, the second-order corrections calculated herein remove this systematic error.

  10. Spatio-temporal linear stability analysis of stratified planar wakes: Velocity and density asymmetry effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Benjamin; Jagtap, Swapnil; Quinlan, J. Mathew; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.; Lieuwen, Tim

    2016-04-01

    This paper explores the hydrodynamic stability of bluff body wakes with non-uniform mean density, asymmetric mean density, and velocity profiles. This work is motivated by experiments [S. Tuttle et al., "Lean blow off behavior of asymmetrically-fueled bluff body-stabilized flames," Combust. Flame 160, 1677 (2013)], which investigated reacting wakes with equivalence ratio stratification and, hence, asymmetry in the base flow density profiles. They showed that highly stratified cases exhibited strong, narrowband oscillations, suggestive of global hydrodynamic instability. In this paper, we present a local hydrodynamic stability analysis for non-uniform density wakes that includes base flow asymmetry. The results show that increasing the degree of base density asymmetry generally has a destabilizing effect and that increasing base velocity asymmetry tends to be stabilizing. Furthermore, we show that increasing base density asymmetry slightly decreases the absolute frequency and that increasing the base velocity asymmetry slightly increases the absolute frequency. In addition, we show that increasing the degree of base density asymmetry distorts the most absolutely unstable hydrodynamic mode from its nominally sinuous structure. This distorted mode exhibits higher amplitude pressure and velocity oscillations near the interface with the smaller density jump than near the one with the bigger density jump. This would then be anticipated to lead to strongly non-symmetric amplitudes of flame flapping, with much stronger flame flapping on the side with lower density ratio. These predictions are shown to be consistent with experimental data. These comparisons support the analytical predictions that increased base density asymmetry are destabilizing and that hydrodynamic velocity fluctuation amplitudes should be greatest at the flame with the lowest density jump.

  11. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  12. DECAF - Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Passive Acoustic Fixed Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    whale density at AUTEC using single hydrophone data; • if time allows, estimation of humpback whale density at PMRF. Project investigators and...classifier for minke and humpback whales; he is also taking the lead on developing methods for estimating density from single fixed sensors, together...this was presented as a poster paper (Marques and Thomas 2008) at the International Statistical Ecology Conference in July 2008. The humpback whale

  13. Acoustic Emission and Velocity Measurements using a Modular Borehole Prototype Tool to Provide Real Time Rock Mass Characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. S.; Pettitt, W. S.; Young, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    Permanent changes to rock mass properties can occur due to the application of excavation or thermal induced stresses. This project involves the design of hardware and software for the long term monitoring of a rock volume, and the real time analysis and interpretation of induced microcracks and their properties. A set of borehole sondes have been designed with each sonde containing up to 6 sensor modules. Each piezoelectric sensor is dual mode allowing it to either transmit an ultrasonic pulse through a rock mass, or receive ultrasonic waveform data. Good coupling of the sensors with the borehole wall is achieved through a motorized clamping mechanism. The borehole sondes are connected to a surface interface box and digital acquisition system and controlled by a laptop computer. The system allows acoustic emission (AE) data to be recorded at all times using programmable trigger logic. The AE data is processed in real time for 3D source location and magnitude, with further analysis such as mechanism type available offline. Additionally the system allows velocity surveys to be automatically performed at pre-defined times. A modelling component of the project, using a 3D dynamic finite difference code, is investigating the effect that different microcrack distributions have on velocity waveform data in terms of time and frequency amplitude. The modelling codes will be validated using data recorded from laboratory tests on rocks with known crack fabrics, and then used in insitu experimental tests. This modelling information will be used to help interpret, in real time, microcrack characteristics such as crack density, size, and fluid content. The technology has applications in a number of branches of geotechnical and civil engineering including radioactive waste storage, mining, dams, bridges, and oil reservoir monitoring.

  14. A simple approach for determining detonation velocity of high explosive at any loading density.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2005-05-20

    A simple empirical relationship is introduced between detonation velocity at any loading density and chemical composition of high explosive as well as its gas phase heat of formation, which is calculated by group additivity rules. The present work may be applied to any explosive that contains the elements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen with no difficulties. The new correlation can easily be applied for determining detonation velocity of explosives with loading densities less than 1g/cm3 as well as greater than 1g/cm3. Calculated detonation velocities by this procedure for both pure and explosive formulations show good agreement with respect to measured detonation velocity over a wide range of loading density.

  15. Site-Specific Velocity and Density Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, Alan C.; Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-06-27

    This report documents the work conducted under the SBP to develop a shear wave and compressional wave velocity and density model specific to the WTP site. Section 2 provides detailed background information on the WTP site and its underlying geology as well as on the Seismic Boreholes Project activities leading up to the Vs and Vp measurements. In Section 3, methods employed and results obtained are documented for measurements of Vs and Vp velocities in basalts and interbeds. Section 4 provides details on velocity measurements in the sediments underlying the WTP. Borehole gravity measurements of density of the subsurface basalt and sediments are described in Section 5. Section 6 describes the analysis of data presented in section 3-5, and presents the overall velocity and density model for the WTP site.

  16. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arévalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ˜10-30 kpc within radii of 30-220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km s-1 on ˜20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km s-1 on smaller scales ˜7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7-8 per cent for radii ˜30-220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3-4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density-velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  17. Ultrahigh-pressure acoustic wave velocities of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses up to 200 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Itaru; Murakami, Motohiko; Kohara, Shinji; Ohara, Koji; Ohtani, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    Extensive experimental studies on the structure and density of silicate glasses as laboratory analogs of natural silicate melts have attempted to address the nature of dense silicate melts that may be present at the base of the mantle. Previous ultrahigh-pressure experiments, however, have been performed on simple systems such as SiO2 or MgSiO3, and experiments in more complex system have been conducted under relatively low-pressure conditions below 60 GPa. The effect of other metal cations on structural changes that occur in dense silicate glasses under ultrahigh pressures has been poorly understood. Here, we used a Brillouin scattering spectroscopic method up to pressures of 196.9 GPa to conduct in situ high-pressure acoustic wave velocity measurements of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses in order to understand the effect of Al2O3 on pressure-induced structural changes in the glasses as analogs of aluminosilicate melts. From 10 to 40 GPa, the transverse acoustic wave velocity ( V S ) of Al2O3-rich glass (SiO2 + 20.5 mol% Al2O3) was greater than that of Al2O3-poor glass (SiO2 + 3.9 mol% Al2O3). This result suggests that SiO2-Al2O3 glasses with higher proportions of Al ions with large oxygen coordination numbers (5 and 6) become elastically stiffer up to 40 GPa, depending on the Al2O3 content, but then soften above 40 GPa. At pressures from 40 to ~100 GPa, the increase in V S with increasing pressure became less steep than below 40 GPa. Above ~100 GPa, there were abrupt increases in the P-V S gradients ( dV S /dP) at 130 GPa in Al2O3-poor glass and at 116 GPa in Al2O3-rich glass. These changes resemble previous experimental results on SiO2 glass and MgSiO3 glass. Given that changes of dV S / dP have commonly been related to changes in the Si-O coordination states in the glasses, our results, therefore, may indicate a drastic structural transformation in SiO2-Al2O3 glasses above 116 GPa, possibly associated with an average Si-O coordination number change to higher than 6. Compared

  18. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring of low velocity impact damage in graphite/epoxy laminates during tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) system was set up in a linear location data acquisition mode to monitor the tensile loading of eight-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy specimens containing low velocity impact damage. The impact damage was induced using an instrumented drop weight tower. During impact, specimens were supported by either an aluminum plate or a membrane configuration. Cross-sectional examinations revealed that the aluminum plate configuration resulted in primarily matrix cracking and back surface fiber failure. The membrane support resulted in only matrix cracking and delamination damage. Penetrant enhanced radiography and immersion ultrasonics were used in order to assess the amount of impact damage in each tensile specimen. During tensile loading, AE reliably detected and located the damage sites which included fiber failure. All specimens with areas of fiber breakage ultimately failed at the impact site. AE did not reliably locate damage which consisted of only delaminations and matrix cracking. Specimens with this type of damage did not ultimately fail at the impact site. In summary, AE demonstrated the ability to increase the reliability of structural proof tests; however, the successful use of this technique requires extensive baseline testing.

  20. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  1. Loss-induced Enhanced Transmission in Anisotropic Density-near-zero Acoustic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chen; Jing, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic density-near-zero (ADNZ) acoustic metamaterials are investigated theoretically and numerically in this paper and are shown to exhibit extraordinary transmission enhancement when material loss is induced. The enhanced transmission is due to the enhanced propagating and evanescent wave modes inside the ADNZ medium thanks to the interplay of near-zero density, material loss, and high wave impedance matching in the propagation direction. The equi-frequency contour (EFC) is used to reveal whether the propagating wave mode is allowed in ADNZ metamaterials. Numerical simulations based on plate-type acoustic metamaterials with different material losses were performed to demonstrate collimation and subwavelength imaging enabled by the induced loss in ADNZ media. This work provides a different way for manipulating acoustic waves. PMID:27885268

  2. Loss-induced Enhanced Transmission in Anisotropic Density-near-zero Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chen; Jing, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Anisotropic density-near-zero (ADNZ) acoustic metamaterials are investigated theoretically and numerically in this paper and are shown to exhibit extraordinary transmission enhancement when material loss is induced. The enhanced transmission is due to the enhanced propagating and evanescent wave modes inside the ADNZ medium thanks to the interplay of near-zero density, material loss, and high wave impedance matching in the propagation direction. The equi-frequency contour (EFC) is used to reveal whether the propagating wave mode is allowed in ADNZ metamaterials. Numerical simulations based on plate-type acoustic metamaterials with different material losses were performed to demonstrate collimation and subwavelength imaging enabled by the induced loss in ADNZ media. This work provides a different way for manipulating acoustic waves.

  3. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  4. Experimental characterization of active acoustic metamaterial cell with controllable dynamic density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Wael; Baz, Amr

    2012-10-01

    Controlling wave propagation pattern within acoustic fluid domains has been the motivation for the acoustic metamaterials developments to target applications ranging from acoustic cloaking to passive noise control techniques. Currently, various numerical and analytical approaches exist to predict the fluid domain material properties necessary for specific propagation pattern. Physical attempts to realize such material properties have revealed engineered material constructions that are focused on predefined wave propagation patterns. In the current paper, coupled fluid-structure one-dimensional metamaterial cell, in which piezoelectric active ingredient has been introduced, is manufactured to achieve controllable dynamic density. The density-controllable cell has been manufactured by coupling a water-filled cavity with piezoelectric elements in a cell of 4.5 cm length and 4.1 cm diameter subject to impulse excitation. A finite element model of the cell has been developed and its predictions are validated against the experimental results. The validated model is utilized to predict the changes in the pressure gradient inside the developed cell which is a direct measure of the changes introduced to the dynamic density of the acoustic metamaterial domain. With such predictions, it is demonstrated that densities as high as 3.2 gm/cm3 and as low as 0.72 gm/cm3 can be achieved experimentally for excitation frequencies ranging between 100 Hz and 500 Hz.

  5. Estimating cetacean population density using fixed passive acoustic sensors: an example with Blainville's beaked whales.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Ward, Jessica; DiMarzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter L

    2009-04-01

    Methods are developed for estimating the size/density of cetacean populations using data from a set of fixed passive acoustic sensors. The methods convert the number of detected acoustic cues into animal density by accounting for (i) the probability of detecting cues, (ii) the rate at which animals produce cues, and (iii) the proportion of false positive detections. Additional information is often required for estimation of these quantities, for example, from an acoustic tag applied to a sample of animals. Methods are illustrated with a case study: estimation of Blainville's beaked whale density over a 6 day period in spring 2005, using an 82 hydrophone wide-baseline array located in the Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas. To estimate the required quantities, additional data are used from digital acoustic tags, attached to five whales over 21 deep dives, where cues recorded on some of the dives are associated with those received on the fixed hydrophones. Estimated density was 25.3 or 22.5 animals/1000 km(2), depending on assumptions about false positive detections, with 95% confidence intervals 17.3-36.9 and 15.4-32.9. These methods are potentially applicable to a wide variety of marine and terrestrial species that are hard to survey using conventional visual methods.

  6. Comments on inferring the properties of the solar acoustic sources by modeling the velocity and/or intensity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferies, Stuart M.; Moretti, Pier-Francesco; Oliviero, Maurizio; Giebink, Cynthia

    2003-02-01

    We model the observed velocity and intensity power spectra and the intensity-velocity cross-spectrum using an updated version of the Severino et al. (2001) model that includes the effects of the acoustic source. We find that in order to accurately describe the data it is necessary to include a correlated background component in both the V and I signals at low frequencies, and in the I signal at high frequencies. Preliminary results show that even using the new model we can not uniquely determine the phase that is related to the acoustic source depth at low frequencies, or the amplitudes and phases of the individual correlated background signals. It appears that further physical or observational constraints are needed before we can obtain this information.

  7. The Velocity and Attenuation of Acoustic Emission Waves in SiC/SiC Composites Loaded in Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of acoustic waves produced by microfracture events and from pencil lead breaks was studied for two different silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites. The two composite systems both consisted of Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers and carbon interfaces but had different matrix compositions that led to considerable differences in damage accumulation and acoustic response. This behavior was primarily due to an order of magnitude difference in the interfacial shear stress for the two composite systems. Load/unload/reload tensile tests were performed and measurements were made over the entire stress range in order to determine the stress-dependence of acoustic activity for increasing damage states. It was found that using the extensional wave velocities from acoustic emission (AE) events produced from pencil lead breaks performed outside of the transducers enabled accurate measurements of the stiffness of the composite. The extensional wave velocities changed as a function of the damage state and the stress where the measurement was taken. Attenuation for AE waveforms from the pencil lead breaks occurred only for the composite possessing the lower interfacial shear stress and only at significantly high stresses. At zero stress after unloading from a peak stress, no attenuation occurred for this composite because of crack closure. For the high interfacial stress composite no attenuation was discernable at peak or zero stress over the entire stress-range of the composite. From these observations, it is believed that attenuation of AE waveforms is dependent on the magnitude of matrix crack opening.

  8. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  9. Cheap DECAF: Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Acoustic Fixed Sensors Using Separate, Non-Linked Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-29

    Andrews have begun a new research effort with Penn State University, "Large Scale Density Estimation of Blue and Fin Whales ", funded by ONR. This...research groups that hold acoustic tag data for blue and fin whales and assist them in estimating cue rates that could be used in appropriate density...ABSTRACT Recordings of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) from a sparse array of Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) have been used to (1) demonstrate the use

  10. Measurement of Correlation Between Flow Density, Velocity, and Density*velocity(sup 2) with Far Field Noise in High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2002-01-01

    To locate noise sources in high-speed jets, the sound pressure fluctuations p', measured at far field locations, were correlated with each of radial velocity v, density rho, and phov(exp 2) fluctuations measured from various points in jet plumes. The experiments follow the cause-and-effect method of sound source identification, where correlation is related to the first, and correlation to the second source terms of Lighthill's equation. Three fully expanded, unheated plumes of Mach number 0.95, 1.4 and 1.8 were studied for this purpose. The velocity and density fluctuations were measured simultaneously using a recently developed, non-intrusive, point measurement technique based on molecular Rayleigh scattering. It was observed that along the jet centerline the density fluctuation spectra S(sub rho) have different shapes than the radial velocity spectra S(sub v), while data obtained from the peripheral shear layer show similarity between the two spectra. Density fluctuations in the jet showed significantly higher correlation, than either rhov(sub 2) or v fluctuations. It is found that a single point correlation from the peak sound emitting region at the end of the potential core can account for nearly 10% of all noise at 30 to the jet axis. The correlation, representing the effectiveness of a longitudinal quadrupole in generating noise 90 to the jet axis, is found to be zero within experimental uncertainty. In contrast rhov(exp 2) fluctuations were better correlated with sound pressure fluctuation at the 30 location. The strongest source of sound is found to lie at the centerline and beyond the end of potential core.

  11. AWESoMe: A code for the calculation of phase and group velocities of acoustic waves in homogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso; Soto, Juan I.

    2015-07-01

    We present AWESoMe, an implementation of a method for the evaluation of acoustic wave velocities in homogeneous solid media. The code computes the phase and group velocities for all the possible propagation directions, as well as some related parameters such as the polarization vectors, the power flow angle and the enhancement factor. The code is conveniently interfaced with GNUPLOT, thus offering immediate visualization of the results. AWESoMe is open-source software, available under the GNU General Public License v3.

  12. Acoustic logging on ultralow density cement bonded quality evaluation in cased hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Shang, X.; Chen, T.; Tao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Cementing operation after drilling boreholes ensures oil and gas to be extracted effectively and avoids oil spill events such as BP Mexico oil leakage events. However, the loss of cement in deep formation due to its high density happens and raises issues. In order to overcome this problem, ultralow density cement or gas-based cements are used more and more commonly in recent years. Current acoustic evaluation tools, used to determine the cement bond quality, are designed for conventional high density cement. Therefore, they are not capable to image the ultralow density cement, whose acoustic properties are similar to borehole drilling mud. In this paper, a new acoustic technique is developed to image the ultralow density cement behind case. Finite difference method and analytical methods are used to simulate the wave-field of cased borehole which ultralow density cement bonded on. Based on the simulations, the optimal parameters of the evaluation tool design are proposed including spacing (from source to the nearest receiver and between the two neighboring receiver), frequency of source.

  13. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  14. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 10 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in a heated air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature, velocity, and density of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 10 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. Power spectral density calculations of temperature, velocity, and density fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are demonstrated for various radial locations in the jet flow at a fixed axial distance from the jet exit plane. Results are compared with constant current anemometry and pitot probe measurements at the same locations.

  15. Hot-pressing and characterization of polycrystals of. beta. -Mg sub 2 SiO sub 4 for acoustic velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gwanmesia, G.D.; Liebermann, R.C.; Guyot, F. )

    1990-08-01

    Hot-pressing techniques have been developed for a 2,000-ton uniaxial split-sphere apparatus (USSA 2000) to fabricate polycrystalline specimens of high-pressure phases of mantle minerals at pressures up to 18 GPa and temperatures up to 1,400C. Cylindrical specimens (3 mm in diameter and 2-3 mm long) of the beta-phase of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} were synthesized using a NaCl cell and recovered at ambient conditions by simultaneously decompressing and cooling along a computer-controlled P-T path designed to preserve the high-pressure phase and anneal strains in the polycrystalline aggregates. These specimens are single-phased, fine-grained ({le} 5 micron), free of microcracks and preferred orientation and have bulk densities greater than 99% of x-ray density. Ultrasonic interferometry measurements of the P-wave and S-wave velocities demonstrate that the polycrystals are isotropic and exhibit velocities within 2% of the Hashin-Shtrikman averages calculated from the single-crystal elastic moduli. The successful fabrication of these high-quality polycrystalline specimens makes feasible experiments to determine the pressure dependence of the acoustic velocities for high-pressure phase of mantle minerals.

  16. The effects of pressure and temperature on sound velocity and density of Ni-S liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H. G.; Nishida, K.; Urakawa, S.; Uesugi, K.; Kuwabara, S.; Takubo, Y.; Shimoyama, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Kono, Y.; Higo, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2013-12-01

    Sound velocity and density of the core material are indispensable properties to estimate a composition in the terrestrial core comparing with the observed seismic data. Here, we report these properties of Ni-S, which corresponds to the end-member of possible core composition Fe-Ni-S, at high pressure and temperature. These properties were measured based on simultaneous measurement of sound velocity and density combined with X-ray tomography technique. The experiments were carried out at X-ray computed micro-tomography (CT) beamlines (BL20XU, BL20B2), SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. Monochromatized X-ray of 51 keV passed through the sample cell and detected as a radiography image using CCD camera. X-ray radiography images from 0 to 180o were measured for CT measurement by rotating the press. An 80-ton uni-axial press was used to generate high pressure with using opposed-type cupped anvils (Urakawa et al. 2010). Density was determined by using X-ray absorption method obtained from the X-ray radiograph image. The sample thickness for the X-ray path can be directly obtained from the CT data. The sample density was also determined from the volume of the sample at high pressure and temperature. P-wave sound velocity was measured using pulse-echo overlapping ultrasonic method using LiNbO3 transducer attached backside of the anvil. We have successfully measured the sound velocity and density of Ni-S up to 1.5 GPa. Comparing with the previous results of liquid Fe-S, the effect of Ni on the sound velocity is minor but that on the density can not be negligible.

  17. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in St. Clair River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure flow velocities in St. Clair River during a survey in May and June of 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. The survey provides 2.7 million point velocity measurements at 104 cross sections. Sections are spaced about 1,630 ft apart along the river from Port Huron to Algonac, Michigan, a distance of 28.6 miles. Two transects were obtained at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were obtained 2-4 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved through the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  18. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in Detroit River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to survey flow velocities in Detroit River from July 8-19, 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. More than 3.5 million point velocities were measured at 130 cross sections. Cross sections were generally spaced about 1,800 ft apart along the river from the head of Detroit River at the outlet of Lake St. Clair to the mouth of Detroit River on Lake Erie. Two transects were surveyed at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were generally obtained 0.8-2.2 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved though the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  19. Specific target determination by planting anomalous densities applied to seismic migration-velocity improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Henrique; Macedo, Daniel; Santos, Edgar; Schleicher, Joerg; Novais, Amélia

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, time and depth migration has been regularly applied to seismic imaging, where good starting velocity models are expected. However, automatic and/or efficient velocity model construction tools are still a challenge. Most present-day model-building techniques are iterative procedures that improve a starting model based on intermediate results. We present a new tool for initial seismic migration-velocity model building based on a new gravity inversion method. This inversion process consists of an iterative algorithm that provides a 3D density-contrast distribution on a grid of prisms, being the starting point an user-specified prismatic elements called "seed". By this planting anomalous densities technique, we are able to interpret multiple bodies with different density contrasts. Therefore, the present method does not require the solution of a large equation system, which greatly reduces the computational demand. In this work, we discuss the application of the estimated density-contrast distribution, i.e., the geometry of the body, as a first guess for the velocity model. Our suggestion is to extract the skeleton of the inverted body and fill each prism with a velocity consistent with the presumed geology. This is an alternative way to improve the knowledge of complex structures, for example, salt structures and sub-salt sediments, regions where the seismic imaging is limited by the effects of wavefield transmission, scattering and absorption. To evaluate the capability of this tool, we modeled the gravimetric effect of several 3D bodies with different geometries and different densities while jointly producing similar 2D seismic models that simulate slices of the three-dimensional model. By means of these models we performed the robust gravity inversion and 2D depth- and time-migration for the seismic data using the velocity models constructed as previously described. Our results show the capacity of the proposed velocity-model-building algorithm to

  20. Double electrostatic probe for measuring density, temperature, and velocity of a flowing plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A method for obtaining plasma electron temperature and density, as well as the Mach number and flow velocity from the current-voltage characteristic of a flat-faced double probe, is presented. Calculated momentum fluxes of a flowing argon plasma obtained with this probe are compared with experimentally determined momentum fluxes. Reasonable agreement is obtained.

  1. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Simultaneous Measurements of Dynamic Density and Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, J.

    2000-01-01

    A flow diagnostic technique based on the molecular Rayleigh scattering of laser light is used to obtain dynamic density and velocity data in turbulent flows. The technique is based on analyzing the Rayleigh scattered light with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and recording information about the interference pattern with a multiple anode photomultiplier tube (PMT). An artificial neural network is used to process the signals from the PMT to recover the velocity time history, which is then used to calculate the velocity power spectrum. The technique is illustrated using simulated data. The results of an experiment to measure the velocity power spectrum in a low speed (100 rn/sec) flow are also presented.

  2. Prediction of crack density in porous-cracked rocks from elastic wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Ji-Hwan; Lee, Jong-Sub; Park, Keunbo; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2015-04-01

    The stability of structures that are built over rock is affected by cracks in the rock that result from weathering, thawing and freezing processes. This study investigates a new method for determining rock crack densities using elastic wave velocities. The Biot-Gassmann model, which consists of several elastic moduli and Poisson's ratio, was used to determine a theoretical equation to predict the crack density of rocks. Ten representative specimens were extracted from ten boreholes to highlight the spatial variability. Each specimen was characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The specimens were carved into cylinders measuring 50 mm in diameter and 30 mm in height using an abrasion process. A laboratory test was performed to obtain the elastic wave velocity using transducers that can transmit and receive compressional and shear waves. The measured compressional wave and shear wave velocities were approximately 2955 m/s-5209 m/s and 1652 m/s-2845 m/s, respectively. From the measured elastic wave velocities, the analyzed crack density and crack porosity were approximately 0.051-0.185 and 0.03%-0.14%, respectively. The calculated values were compared with the results of previous studies, and they exhibit similar values and trends. The sensitivity of the suggested theoretical equation was analyzed using the error norm technique. The results show that the compressional wave velocity and the shear modulus of a particle are the most influential factors in this equation. The study demonstrates that rock crack density can be estimated using the elastic wave velocities, which may be useful for investigating the stability of structures that are built over rock.

  3. Shear wave velocity and attenuation in the upper layer of ocean bottoms from long-range acoustic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Xun; Zhang, Xue-Zhen

    2012-12-01

    Several physics-based seabed geoacoustic models (including the Biot theory) predict that compressional wave attenuation α(2) in sandy marine sediments approximately follows quadratic frequency dependence at low frequencies, i.e., α(2)≈kf(n) (dB/m), n=2. A recent paper on broadband geoacoustic inversions from low frequency (LF) field measurements, made at 20 locations around the world, has indicated that the frequency exponent of the effective sound attenuation n≈1.80 in a frequency band of 50-1000 Hz [Zhou et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2847-2866 (2009)]. Carey and Pierce hypothesize that the discrepancy is due to the inversion models' neglect of shear wave effects [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, EL271-EL277 (2008)]. The broadband geoacoustic inversions assume that the seabottom is an equivalent fluid and sound waves interact with the bottom at small grazing angles. The shear wave velocity and attenuation in the upper layer of ocean bottoms are estimated from the LF field-inverted effective bottom attenuations using a near-grazing bottom reflection expression for the equivalent fluid model, derived by Zhang and Tindle [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 3391-3396 (1995)]. The resultant shear wave velocity and attenuation are consistent with the SAX99 measurement at 25 Hz and 1000 Hz. The results are helpful for the analysis of shear wave effects on long-range sound propagation in shallow water.

  4. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets by Acoustic Propagation Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    not observed in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins and beluga whales for example. The beams were observed to be directed forward between 0˚ and -5˚ in the...data set, collected by a single hydrophone, to estimate the population density of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) off of the Kona coast of...incorporate accurate modeling of sound propagation due to the complexities of its environment. Moreover, the target species chosen for the proposed

  5. Cetacean Density Estimation from Novel Acoustic Datasets by Acoustic Propagation Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    hydrophone, to estimate the population density of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) off of the Kona coast of the Island of Hawai’i... killer whale, suffers from interaction with the fisheries industry and its population has been reported to have declined in the past 20 years. Studies...of abundance estimate of false killer whales in Hawai’i through mark recapture methods will provide comparable results to the ones obtained by this

  6. Stratified shear flow in an inclined duct: near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Jamie; Lefauve, Adrien; Dalziel, Stuart; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a new experimental setup to study the exchange flow in an inclined square duct between two reservoirs containing fluids of different densities. This system can exhibit stratified shear wave motions, and has a distinct parameter threshold above which turbulence is triggered and progressively fills a larger fraction of the duct. To probe these intrinsically 3D flows, we introduce a new setup in which a traversing laser sheet allows us to obtain near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density fields. Three components of velocity are measured on successive 2D planes using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) with density information obtained simultaneously using laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled "Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence".

  7. The power associated with density fluctuations and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Direct observations from Pioneer 6 of solar-wind-proton fluctuations have been used to obtain the power spectra associated with solar-wind-proton number density and velocity fluctuations in the frequency range of 0.001 to 0.01 Hz, extending previous analyses by an order of magnitude at the higher frequencies. The slopes of the power spectra associated with the density fluctuations and the velocity fluctuations are similar and are in agreement with the shape of the power spectra found at the lower frequencies. The power spectra indicate that the power-law density spectrum observed at lower frequencies extends to at least 0.01 Hz. This smooth variation in the spectrum at these frequencies is consistent with previous extrapolations of both spacecraft and interplanetary scintillation observations.

  8. On Density and Velocity Fields and beta from the IRAS PSCZ Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoldt, Inga M.; Saar, Veikko; Saha, Prasenjit; Branchini, E.; Efstathiou, G. P.; Frenk, C. S.; Keeble, O.; Maddox, S.; McMahon, R.; Oliver, S.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saunders, W.; Sutherland, W. J.; Tadros, H.; White, S. D. M.

    1999-09-01

    We present a version of the Fourier-Bessel method first introduced by Fisher and coworkers and Zaroubi and coworkers with two extensions: (1) we amend the formalism to allow a generic galaxy weight that can be constant, rather than the more conventional overweighting of galaxies at high distances, and (2) we correct for the masked zones by extrapolation of Fourier-Bessel modes rather than by cloning from the galaxy distribution in neighboring regions. We test the procedure extensively on N-body simulations and find that it gives generally unbiased results but that the reconstructed velocities tend to be overpredicted in high-density regions. Applying the formalism to the PSCz redshift catalog, we find that beta=0.7+/-0.5 from a comparison of the reconstructed Local Group velocity to the cosmic microwave background dipole. From an anisotropy test of the velocity field, we find that beta=1 cold dark matter models normalized to the current cluster abundance can be excluded with 90% confidence. The density and velocity fields reconstructed agree with the fields found by Branchini and coworkers on most points. We find a back infall into the Great Attractor region (Hydra-Centaurus region), but tests suggest that this may be an artifact. We identify all the major clusters in our density field and confirm the existence of some previously identified possible ones.

  9. Density of states and dynamical crossover in a dense fluid revealed by exponential mode analysis of the velocity autocorrelation function.

    PubMed

    Bellissima, S; Neumann, M; Guarini, E; Bafile, U; Barocchi, F

    2017-01-01

    Extending a preceding study of the velocity autocorrelation function (VAF) in a simulated Lennard-Jones fluid [Phys. Rev. E 92, 042166 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.042166] to cover higher-density and lower-temperature states, we show that the recently demonstrated multiexponential expansion method allows for a full account and understanding of the basic dynamical processes encompassed by a fundamental quantity as the VAF. In particular, besides obtaining evidence of a persisting long-time tail, we assign specific and unambiguous physical meanings to groups of exponential modes related to the longitudinal and transverse collective dynamics, respectively. We have made this possible by consistently introducing the interpretation of the VAF frequency spectrum as a global density of states in fluids, generalizing a solid-state concept, and by giving to specific spectral components, obtained through the VAF exponential expansion, the corresponding meaning of partial densities of states relative to specific dynamical processes. The clear identification of a high-frequency oscillation of the VAF with the near-top excitation frequency in the dispersion curve of acoustic waves is a neat example of the power of the method. As for the transverse mode contribution, its analysis turns out to be particularly important, because the multiexponential expansion reveals a transition marking the onset of propagating excitations when the density is increased beyond a threshold value. While this finding agrees with the recent literature debating the issue of dynamical crossover boundaries, such as the one identified with the Frenkel line, we can add detailed information on the modes involved in this specific process in the domains of both time and frequency. This will help obtain a still missing full account of transverse dynamics, in both its nonpropagating and propagating aspects which are linked through dynamical transitions depending on both the thermodynamic states and

  10. Density of states and dynamical crossover in a dense fluid revealed by exponential mode analysis of the velocity autocorrelation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissima, S.; Neumann, M.; Guarini, E.; Bafile, U.; Barocchi, F.

    2017-01-01

    Extending a preceding study of the velocity autocorrelation function (VAF) in a simulated Lennard-Jones fluid [Phys. Rev. E 92, 042166 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.042166] to cover higher-density and lower-temperature states, we show that the recently demonstrated multiexponential expansion method allows for a full account and understanding of the basic dynamical processes encompassed by a fundamental quantity as the VAF. In particular, besides obtaining evidence of a persisting long-time tail, we assign specific and unambiguous physical meanings to groups of exponential modes related to the longitudinal and transverse collective dynamics, respectively. We have made this possible by consistently introducing the interpretation of the VAF frequency spectrum as a global density of states in fluids, generalizing a solid-state concept, and by giving to specific spectral components, obtained through the VAF exponential expansion, the corresponding meaning of partial densities of states relative to specific dynamical processes. The clear identification of a high-frequency oscillation of the VAF with the near-top excitation frequency in the dispersion curve of acoustic waves is a neat example of the power of the method. As for the transverse mode contribution, its analysis turns out to be particularly important, because the multiexponential expansion reveals a transition marking the onset of propagating excitations when the density is increased beyond a threshold value. While this finding agrees with the recent literature debating the issue of dynamical crossover boundaries, such as the one identified with the Frenkel line, we can add detailed information on the modes involved in this specific process in the domains of both time and frequency. This will help obtain a still missing full account of transverse dynamics, in both its nonpropagating and propagating aspects which are linked through dynamical transitions depending on both the thermodynamic states and the excitation

  11. A Large-Aperture Acoustic Array to Observe Oceanic Density Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    Subtitle) ._,,, , , : A ^ARGE-APERTURb ^ COUSTIC ARRAY TO ^OBSERVE OCEANIC DENSITY STRUCTURE t 7. AUTHORfj; G. Thomas/Kaye READ INSTRUCTIONS...o CO (M MARINE PHYSICAL LABORATORY of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography San Diego, California 92132 A LARGE APERTURE ACOUSTIC ARRAY TO...Contracts Contract Effective Date: Contract Expiration Date; Amount of Contract: Layered Inhomogeneities N00014-69- A -0200-6038 \\ 1 April 1972 Jiß

  12. On the variations of acoustic absorption peak with particle velocity in micro-perforated panels at high level of excitation.

    PubMed

    Tayong, Rostand; Dupont, Thomas; Leclaire, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The acoustic behavior of micro-perforated panels (MPP) is studied theoretically and experimentally at high level of pressure excitation. A model based on Forchheimer's regime of flow velocity in the perforations is proposed. This model is valid at relatively high Reynolds numbers and low Mach numbers. The experimental method consists in measuring the acoustical pressure at three different positions in an impedance tube, the two measurement positions usually considered in an impedance tube and one measurement in the vicinity of the rear surface of the MPP. The impedance tube is equipped with a pressure driver instead of the usual loudspeaker and capable of delivering a high sound pressure level up to 160 dB. MPP specimens made out of steel, dural and polypropylene were tested. Measurements using random noise or sinusoidal excitation in a frequency range between 200 and 1600 Hz were carried out on MPPs backed by air cavities. It was observed that the maximum of absorption can be a positive or a negative function of the flow velocity in the perforations. This suggests the existence of a maximum of absorption as a function of flow velocity. This behavior was predicted by the model and confirmed experimentally.

  13. Dynamic Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density in Hot Jets Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2009-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is utilized to measure gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 10 kHz, providing fluctuation information up to 5 kHz based on the Nyquist theorem. A high-power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high-frequency sampling of the total signal level and the circular interference pattern to provide dynamic density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Mean and root mean square velocity, temperature, and density, as well as power spectral density calculations, are presented for measurements in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The Rayleigh measurements are compared with particle image velocimetry data and computational fluid dynamics predictions. This technique is aimed at aeronautics research related to identifying noise sources in free jets, as well as applications in supersonic and hypersonic flows where measurement of flow properties, including mass flux, is required in the presence of shocks and ionization occurrence.

  14. Density and sound velocity of Fe-S liquids at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Sakamaki, T.; Yu, T.; Kono, Y.; Wang, Y.; Park, C.; Shen, G.

    2011-12-01

    Liquid iron is the dominant component in the Earth's outer core and possibly the cores (or outer cores) of other terrestrial planets like Moon, Mars, and Mercury. Seismological and geochemical observations suggest that light elements such as S, C, O, Si, H, etc may be present in the liquid cores. In order to constrain the abundances of light elements and understand their effects on the structure, dynamics, and evolution of planetary cores, it is crucial to determine the equation of state for Fe-light element alloying liquids under core conditions. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited and no sound velocity or bulk modulus data are available for these liquids at high pressures. This makes it difficult to extrapolate the equation of state to core pressures. As a result, density data on solid Fe alloys are often used in the literature to compare with seismological observations by making corrections for the volume of melting. In this study, we extend the density dataset for Fe-S liquids by measuring the density of liquid iron with 19wt% sulfur and 27wt% sulfur using the X-ray absorption technique in a DIA-type multianvil apparatus up to 7 GPa and 2173 K. Ion chambers and 2D X-ray radiographic images were used to measure intensities of the incident and transmitted monochromatic X-rays, with the photon energy optimized at 40 keV. The density was then determined from the Beer-Lambert law using the mass absorption coefficients. We have also developed techniques to directly measure the ultrasonic sound velocities in these liquids up to 5 GPa and 1773 K using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. The sound velocity was determined by measuring the travel time difference between the sample echo and the buffer rod echo using a waveform generator and a digital oscilloscope and by measuring the sample thickness using X-ray radiographic images. The combination of density and sound velocity data can provide tight constraints on the equation of

  15. Lattice Boltzmann study on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: roles of velocity and density gradients.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yanbiao; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Li, Yingjun

    2011-05-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model with 19 discrete velocities for compressible fluids is proposed. The fifth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (5th-WENO) finite difference scheme is employed to calculate the convection term of the lattice Boltzmann equation. The validity of the model is verified by comparing simulation results of the Sod shock tube with its corresponding analytical solutions [G. A. Sod, J. Comput. Phys. 27, 1 (1978).]. The velocity and density gradient effects on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are investigated using the proposed model. Sharp density contours are obtained in our simulations. It is found that the linear growth rate γ for the KHI decreases by increasing the width of velocity transition layer D(v) but increases by increasing the width of density transition layer D(ρ). After the initial transient period and before the vortex has been well formed, the linear growth rates γ(v) and γ(ρ), vary with D(v) and D(ρ) approximately in the following way, lnγ(v)=a-bD(v) and γ(ρ)=c+elnD(ρ)(D(ρ)density transition layer. When D(ρ)>D(ρ)(E) the linear growth rate γ(ρ) does not vary significantly any more. One can use the hybrid effects of velocity and density transition layers to stabilize the KHI. Our numerical simulation results are in general agreement with the analytical results [L. F. Wang et al., Phys. Plasma 17, 042103 (2010)].

  16. Effect of ion temperature and plasma density on an ion-acoustic soliton in a collisionless relativistic plasma: An application to radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.; Dahiya, R.P. )

    1990-05-01

    The effect of ion temperature and plasma density on the behavior of an ion-acoustic soliton in a collisionless relativistic plasma is studied. Based on an appropriate set of coordinate transformations, a reductive perturbation analysis is carried out to obtain the Korteweg--de Vries (KdV) equation for the one-dimensional soliton motion. By solving this equation for a single soliton, simple expressions for the soliton phase velocity, soliton amplitude, soliton width, peak soliton ion density, and peak soliton potential are derived. These results are applied to the plasma parameters of the radiation belts. The soliton phase velocity {lambda}{sub 0} increases with an increase in the relativistic effect. The effect of the ion temperature on {lambda}{sub 0} is, however, negligible. It is shown that for the constant ion temperature and plasma density, the soliton amplitude, soliton phase velocity, peak soliton ion density, and peak soliton potential increase, and the soliton width decreases as the relativistic effect increases. With the increasing ion temperature, however, the soliton behaves in an entirely different way. It is further shown that for a constant value of the ion temperature, the amplitude and peak ion density increase and the width decreases, whereas the peak potential remains unchanged as the plasma density increases.

  17. Performance study of Lagrangian methods: reconstruction of large scale peculiar velocities and baryonic acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keselman, J. A.; Nusser, A.

    2017-01-01

    NoAM for "No Action Method" is a framework for reconstructing the past orbits of observed tracers of the large scale mass density field. It seeks exact solutions of the equations of motion (EoM), satisfying initial homogeneity and the final observed particle (tracer) positions. The solutions are found iteratively reaching a specified tolerance defined as the RMS of the distance between reconstructed and observed positions. Starting from a guess for the initial conditions, NoAM advances particles using standard N-body techniques for solving the EoM. Alternatively, the EoM can be replaced by any approximation such as Zel'dovich and second order perturbation theory (2LPT). NoAM is suitable for billions of particles and can easily handle non-regular volumes, redshift space, and other constraints. We implement NoAM to systematically compare Zel'dovich, 2LPT, and N-body dynamics over diverse configurations ranging from idealized high-res periodic simulation box to realistic galaxy mocks. Our findings are (i) Non-linear reconstructions with Zel'dovich, 2LPT, and full dynamics perform better than linear theory only for idealized catalogs in real space. For realistic catalogs, linear theory is the optimal choice for reconstructing velocity fields smoothed on scales {buildrel > over {˜}} 5 h^{-1}{Mpc}.(ii) all non-linear back-in-time reconstructions tested here, produce comparable enhancement of the baryonic oscillation signal in the correlation function.

  18. Theoretical surface velocity distributions on acoustic splitter geometries for an engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Breunlin, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The potential-flow velocity distributions on several splitter geometries in an engine inlet and their variation with different splitter leading-edge shapes and distances from the inlet highlight were analyzed. The velocity distributions on the inner and outer surfaces of the splitters are presented for low-speed and cruise conditions. At zero incidence angle, the splitter with the 4-to-1 elliptical leading edge had lower peak velocities and velocity gradients than the splitter with the 2-to-1 elliptical leading edge. The velocity gradients decreased as the distance from the inlet highlight to the splitter leading edge was increased. For a given distance, the peak velocity on the splitter inner surface increased with increasing inlet incidence angle. At an incidence angle of 50 deg, the velocity level and gradients on the inner surface of the splitter in the forward position were sufficiently severe to suggest local separation.

  19. Potential, velocity, and density fields from sparse and noisy redshift-distance samples - Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekel, Avishai; Bertschinger, Edmund; Faber, Sandra M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for recovering the three-dimensional potential, velocity, and density fields from large-scale redshift-distance samples is described. Galaxies are taken as tracers of the velocity field, not of the mass. The density field and the initial conditions are calculated using an iterative procedure that applies the no-vorticity assumption at an initial time and uses the Zel'dovich approximation to relate initial and final positions of particles on a grid. The method is tested using a cosmological N-body simulation 'observed' at the positions of real galaxies in a redshift-distance sample, taking into account their distance measurement errors. Malmquist bias and other systematic and statistical errors are extensively explored using both analytical techniques and Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Measuring densities of high-velocity metallic sprays using piezoelectric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C. E.; Proud, W. G.

    2007-12-12

    Recent research efforts in large-scale hydrodynamic experiments have concentrated on the possibility of using piezoelectric sensors to study the evolution of ejecta. Ejecta are small (<100 m diameter) particulates that are ejected at high velocity (>1 km s{sup -1}) from a shocked surface. This paper investigates whether Dynasen PZT piezoelectric sensors are reliable and robust enough to measure accurate time-resolved stresses and densities in high-velocity metallic sprays. The sprays are assumed to have similar characteristics to ejecta sprays, and are generated by a gas gun and in a safe and reproducible manner. A complimentary diagnostic technique, utilising high-speed photography and fast x-radiography, measures the densities of the sprays independently, allowing the accuracy of the sensors to be assessed. The Dynasen sensors have been shown to perform relatively well in spray environments. Their accuracy can be improved by taking their mechanical impedance characteristics into account.

  1. Shock initiation studies of low density HMX using electromagnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R.; Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U.

    1993-09-01

    Magnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress rate gauges have been used to measure the shock response of low density octotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) (1.24 &/cm{sup 3}). In experiments done at LANL, magnetic particle velocity gauges were located on both sides of the explosive. In nearly identical experiments done at SNL, PVDF stress rate gauges were located at the same positions so both particle velocity and stress histories were obtained for a particular experimental condition. Unreacted Hugoniot data were obtained and an EOS was developed by combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model. Using this technique, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. Loading and reaction paths were established in the stress-particle velocity plane for some experimental conditions. This information was used to determine a global reaction rate of {approx} 0.13 {mu}s{sup {minus}1} for porous HMX shocked to 0.8 GPa. At low input stresses the transmitted wave profiles had long rise times (up to 1 {mu}s) due to the compaction processes.

  2. Hole boring velocity measurements in near critical density plasmas by a CO2 laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of plasma dynamics during the interaction of a high-power laser pulse with an above critical density plasma is important for understanding absorption, transport and particle acceleration mechanisms. An important process that affects these mechanisms is hole boring occurring at the critical density because of the radiation pressure of the laser pulse. Yet, no systematic measurements of the hole boring velocity's (vhb) dependence on laser intensity (I) have been made. In this talk, we present experimental results of vhb in near critical density plasmas produced by CO2 laser as a function of I in the range of 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. A novel four frame Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a 1 ps, 532 nm probe laser pulse was developed to record the evolution of the plasma density profile and the motion of the near critical density layer. Using this diagnostic, we observed the motion of the steepened plasma profile due to the incident, time-structured CO2 laser pulse. Experimental results show the hole boring velocity increases from 0.004c to 0.007c as the laser intensity is increased from 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-92-ER40727, NSF grant PHY-0936266 at UCLA.

  3. The impact of stellar feedback on the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisdale, Kearn; Agertz, Oscar; Romeo, Alessandro B.; Renaud, Florent; Read, Justin I.

    2017-04-01

    We study the impact of stellar feedback in shaping the density and velocity structure of neutral hydrogen (H I) in disc galaxies. For our analysis, we carry out ∼4.6 pc resolution N-body+adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies, set up to mimic a Milky Way and a Large and Small Magellanic Cloud. We quantify the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium using power spectra and compare the simulated galaxies to observed H I in local spiral galaxies from THINGS (The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey). Our models with stellar feedback give an excellent match to the observed THINGS H I density power spectra. We find that kinetic energy power spectra in feedback-regulated galaxies, regardless of galaxy mass and size, show scalings in excellent agreement with supersonic turbulence (E(k) ∝ k-2) on scales below the thickness of the H I layer. We show that feedback influences the gas density field, and drives gas turbulence, up to large (kpc) scales. This is in stark contrast to density fields generated by large-scale gravity-only driven turbulence. We conclude that the neutral gas content of galaxies carries signatures of stellar feedback on all scales.

  4. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic Used to Measure Velocity and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2003-01-01

    A new, molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based flow diagnostic developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been used for the first time to measure the power spectrum of both gas density and radial velocity components in the plumes of high-speed jets. The objective of the work is to develop an unseeded, nonintrusive dynamic measurement technique for studying turbulent flows in NASA test facilities. This technique provides aerothermodynamic data not previously obtainable. It is particularly important for supersonic flows, where hot wire and pitot probes are difficult to use and disturb the flow under study. The effort is part of the nonintrusive instrumentation development program supporting propulsion research at the NASA Glenn Research Center. In particular, this work is measuring fluctuations in flow velocity, density, and temperature for jet noise studies. These data are valuable to researchers studying the correlation of flow fluctuations with far-field noise. One of the main objectives in jet noise research is to identify noise sources in the jet and to determine their contribution to noise generation. The technique is based on analyzing light scattered from molecules within the jet using a Fabry-Perot interferometer operating in a static imaging mode. The PC-based data acquisition system can simultaneously sample velocity and density data at rates to about 100 kHz and can handle up to 10 million data records. We used this system to interrogate three different jet nozzle designs in a Glenn free-jet facility. Each nozzle had a 25.4-mm exit diameter. One was convergent, used for subsonic flow measurements and to produce a screeching underexpanded jet with a fully expanded Mach number of 1.42. The other nozzles (Mach 1.4 and 1.8) were convergent-divergent types. The radial component of velocity and gas density were simultaneously measured in this work.

  5. Development for sound velocity and density measurements of liquid metal at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H.; Nishida, K.; Urakawa, S.; Uesugi, K.; Takubo, Y.; Kuwabara, S.; Nakatsuka, A.; Hoshino, M.; Kono, Y.; Higo, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2012-12-01

    Sound velocity and density of liquid Fe-alloys under high pressure is quite important physical property to estimate the amount of light elements in the terrestrial core from the seismic data. Here, we have developed the system for simultaneous measurement of sound velocity and density combined with X-ray tomography technique at high pressure and temperature. High pressure experiments were performed using 80-ton uni-axial press (Urakawa et al. 2010) installed at X-ray computed micro-tomography (CT) beamline (BL20B2), SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. High pressure was generated using opposed-type cupped anvils. We measured the sound velocity and density of solid FeSi at room temperature and those of solid and liquid Ni-S at high temperature. Experimental pressure was obtained from the volume of h-BN. CT measurement was carried out by rotating the press from 0 to 180o with 0.2-0.3o steps. Monochromatized X-ray of 51 keV was used. Density was determined by using X-ray absorption method based on the X-ray radiograph image. The sample thickness for the X-ray path can be directly obtained from the CT data. This is a big advantage for CT measurement. Sound velocity was measured using pulse-echo overlapping ultrasonic method. P-wave signals were generated and detected by LiNbO3 transducer attached backside of the anvil. We have successfully observed both P-wave and S-wave signals up to 1.5 GPa and 1673 K. We detected change of signal intensity and shape corresponding to melting of Ni-S sample.

  6. Evidence for a low-density universe from the relative velocities of galaxies

    PubMed

    Juszkiewicz; Ferreira; Feldman; Jaffe; Davis

    2000-01-07

    The motions of galaxies can be used to constrain the cosmological density parameter Omega and the clustering amplitude of matter on large scales. The mean relative velocity of galaxy pairs, estimated from the Mark III survey, indicates that Omega = 0.35(-0.25)(+0.35). If the clustering of galaxies is unbiased on large scales, Omega = 0. 35 +/- 0.15, so that an unbiased Einstein-de Sitter model (Omega = 1) is inconsistent with the data.

  7. The density, compressibility and seismic velocity of hydrous melts at crustal and upper mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, K.; Iwamori, H.

    2015-12-01

    Various processes of subduction zone magmatism, such as upward migration of partial melts and fractional crystallization depend on the density of the hydrous silicate melt. The density and the compressibility of the hydrous melt are key factors for the thermodynamic calculation of phase relation of the hydrous melt, and the geophysical inversion to predict physicochemical conditions of the melting region based on the seismic velocity. This study presents a new model for the calculations of the density of the hydrous silicate melts as a function of T, P, H2O content and melt composition. The Birch-Murnaghan equation is used for the equation of state. We compile the experimentally determined densities of various hydrous melts, and optimize the partial molar volume, compressibility, thermal expansibility and its pressure derivative, and K' of the H2O component in the silicate melt. P-T ranges of the calibration database are 0.48-4.29 GPa and 1033-2073 K. As such, this model covers the P-T ranges of the entire melting region of the subduction zone. Parameter set provided by Lange and Carmichael [1990] is used for the partial molar volume and KT value of the anhydrous silicate melt. K' of anhydrous melt is newly parameterized as a function of SiO2 content. The new model accurately reproduces the experimentally determined density variations of various hydrous melts from basalt to rhyolite. Our result shows that the hydrous melt is more compressive and less dense than the anhydrous melt; with the 5 wt% of H2O in melt, density and KT decrease by ~10% and ~30% from those of the anhydrous melt, respectively. For the application of the model, we calculated the P-wave velocity of the hydrous melt. With the 5 wt% of H2O, P-wave velocity of the silicate melt decreases by >10%. Based on the melt P-wave velocity, we demonstrate the effect of the melt H2O content on the seismic velocity of the partially molten zone of the subduction zone.

  8. Dynamic Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density in Hot Jets Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2008-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique was utilized to measure time-resolved gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 10 kHz. A high power continuous-wave (cw) laser beam was focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light was collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis. Photomultipler tubes operated in the photon counting mode allowed high frequency sampling of the total signal level and the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Mean and rms velocity and temperature, as well as power spectral density calculations, are presented for measurements in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Rayleigh measurements are compared with particle image velocimetry data and CFD predictions. This technique is aimed at aeronautics research related to identifying noise sources in free jets, as well as applications in supersonic and hypersonic flows where measurement of flow properties, including mass flux, is required in the presence of shocks and ionization occurrence.

  9. Coronal Temperature, Density and Nonthermal Velocity Derived from SERTS EUV Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Yong-Jae; Yun, Hong Sik; Davila, J. M.; Park, Young Deuk

    1996-10-01

    To derive coronal temperature, electron density and nonthermal velocity, we have analyzed high resolution spectra (e.g., Fe XII 338.3, Fe XII 352.1, Fe XIV 334.2, Fe XIV 353.8, Fe XV 284.2, Fe XV 321.8, Fe XV 327.0, Fe XVI 335.4, and Fe XVI 360.8) taken from AR 6615 by SERTS (Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph). Important findings emerging from the present study are as follows: (1) Temperature estimated from Fe XVI 335.4 and Fe XIV 334.2 is about 2.4 times 10E6 K and no systematic difference in temperature is found between the active region and its adjacent quiet region; (2) Mean electron density estimated from Fe XV is about 3*10E9/cm3 and about 10E10/cm3 from Fe XII and Fe XIV; (3) Mean density of the active region is found to be higher than that of the quiet region by a factor of 2; (4) Nonthermal velocity estimated from Fe XV and Fe XVI is 20-25 km/s which decreases with increasing ionization temperatures. This supports the notion that the nonthermal velocity declines outwards above the transition region.

  10. The electron drift velocity, ion acoustic speed and irregularity drifts in high-latitude E-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, M. V.; Pellinen, R. J.; Janhunen, P.

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the STARE irregularity drift velocity dependence on the EISCAT line-of-sight (los or l-o-s) electron drift velocity magnitude, VE×Blos, and the flow angle ΘN,F (superscript N and/or F refer to the STARE Norway and Finland radar). In the noon-evening sector the flow angle dependence of Doppler velocities, VirrN,F, inside and outside the Farley-Buneman (FB) instability cone (|VE×Blos|>Cs and |VE×Blos|acoustic speed), is found to be similar and much weaker than suggested earlier. In a band of flow angles 45°<ΘN,F<85° it can be reasonably described by |VirrN,F|∝AN,FCscosnΘN,F, where AN,F≍1.2 1.3 are monotonically increasing functions of VE×B and the index n is ~0.2 or even smaller. This study (a) does not support the conclusion by Nielsen and Schlegel (1985), Nielsen et al. (2002, their #[18]) that at flow angles larger than ~60° (or |VirrN,F|≤300 m/s) the STARE Doppler velocities are equal to the component of the electron drift velocity. We found (b) that if the data points are averages over 100 m/s intervals (bins) of l-o-s electron velocities and 10 deg intervals (bins) of flow angles, then the largest STARE Doppler velocities always reside inside the bin with the largest flow angle. In the flow angle bin 80° the STARE Doppler velocity is larger than its driver term, i.e. the EISCAT l-o-s electron drift velocity component, |VirrN,F|>|VE×Blos|. Both features (a and b) as well as the weak flow angle velocity dependence indicate that the l-o-s electron drift velocity cannot be the sole factor which controls the motion of the backscatter ~1-m irregularities at large flow angles. Importantly, the backscatter was collected at aspect angle ~1° and flow angle Θ>60°, where linear fluid and kinetic theories invariably predict negative growth rates. At least qualitatively, all the facts can be reasonably explained by nonlinear wave-wave coupling found and

  11. Cetacean population density estimation from single fixed sensors using passive acoustics.

    PubMed

    Küsel, Elizabeth T; Mellinger, David K; Thomas, Len; Marques, Tiago A; Moretti, David; Ward, Jessica

    2011-06-01

    Passive acoustic methods are increasingly being used to estimate animal population density. Most density estimation methods are based on estimates of the probability of detecting calls as functions of distance. Typically these are obtained using receivers capable of localizing calls or from studies of tagged animals. However, both approaches are expensive to implement. The approach described here uses a MonteCarlo model to estimate the probability of detecting calls from single sensors. The passive sonar equation is used to predict signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of received clicks, which are then combined with a detector characterization that predicts probability of detection as a function of SNR. Input distributions for source level, beam pattern, and whale depth are obtained from the literature. Acoustic propagation modeling is used to estimate transmission loss. Other inputs for density estimation are call rate, obtained from the literature, and false positive rate, obtained from manual analysis of a data sample. The method is applied to estimate density of Blainville's beaked whales over a 6-day period around a single hydrophone located in the Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas. Results are consistent with those from previous analyses, which use additional tag data.

  12. Mass, velocity anisotropy, and pseudo phase-space density profiles of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Biviano, A.; Mamon, G. A.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: We aim to compute the mass and velocity anisotropy profiles of Abell 2142 and, from there, the pseudo phase-space density profile Q(r) and the density slope - velocity anisotropy β - γ relation, and then to compare them with theoretical expectations. Methods: The mass profiles were obtained by using three techniques based on member galaxy kinematics, namely the caustic method, the method of dispersion-kurtosis, and MAMPOSSt. Through the inversion of the Jeans equation, it was possible to compute the velocity anisotropy profiles. Results: The mass profiles, as well as the virial values of mass and radius, computed with the different techniques agree with one another and with the estimates coming from X-ray and weak lensing studies. A combined mass profile is obtained by averaging the lensing, X-ray, and kinematics determinations. The cluster mass profile is well fitted by an NFW profile with c = 4.0 ± 0.5. The population of red and blue galaxies appear to have a different velocity anisotropy configuration, since red galaxies are almost isotropic, while blue galaxies are radially anisotropic, with a weak dependence on radius. The Q(r) profile for the red galaxy population agrees with the theoretical results found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that any bias, relative to the dark matter particles, in velocity dispersion of the red component is independent of radius. The β - γ relation for red galaxies matches the theoretical relation only in the inner region. The deviations might be due to the use of galaxies as tracers of the gravitational potential, unlike the non-collisional tracer used in the theoretical relation.

  13. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  14. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  15. Comparison of auditory responses determined by acoustic stimulation and by mechanical round window stimulation at equivalent stapes velocities.

    PubMed

    Lee, JangWoo; Seong, KiWoong; Lee, Sang-Heun; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Active middle ear implants (AMEIs) have been studied to overcome the limitations of conventional hearing aids such as howling, occlusion, and social discrimination. AMEIs usually drive the oval window (OW) by means of transmitting vibrational force through the ossicles and the vibrational force corresponding to sound is generated from a mechanical actuator. Recently, round window (RW) stimulation using an AMEI such as a floating mass transducer (FMT) to deliver sound to the cochlea has been introduced and hearing improvement in clinical use has been reported. Although previous studies demonstrated that the auditory response to RW stimulation was comparable to a sound-evoked auditory response, few studies have investigated the quantification of the physiologic performance of an AMEI through RW stimulation on the inner ear in vivo. There is no established relationship between the cochlear responses and mechanical stimulation to RW. The aim of this study is to assess the physiologic response in RW stimulation by an AMEI. The transferred energy through the RW to the inner ear could estimate the response corresponding to acoustic stimulation in order to quantify the AMEI output in the ossicular chain or OW stimulation. The parameters of the auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were measured and compared based on stapes velocities similar enough to be regarded as the same for acoustic stimulation to the external auditory canal (EAC) and mechanical stimulation to the RW in an in vivo system. In conclusion, this study showed that the amplitudes and latencies of the ABRs of acoustic and RW stimulation showed significant differences at comparable stapes velocities in an in vivo system. These differences in the ABR amplitudes and latencies reflect different output functions of the cochlea in response to different stimulation pathways. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new method for quantifying the output of the cochlea in the case of RW stimulation.

  16. Cosmological parameters from the comparison of peculiar velocities with predictions from the 2M++ density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrick, Jonathan; Turnbull, Stephen J.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Hudson, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    Peculiar velocity measurements are the only tool available in the low-redshift Universe for mapping the large-scale distribution of matter and can thus be used to constrain cosmology. Using redshifts from the 2M++ redshift compilation, we reconstruct the density of galaxies within 200 h-1 Mpc, allowing for the first time good sampling of important superclusters such as the Shapley Concentration. We compare the predicted peculiar velocities from 2M++ to Tully-Fisher and SNe peculiar velocities. We find a value of β* ≡ Ω m^{0.55}/b^* = 0.431 ± 0.021, suggesting Ω m^{0.55}σ _{8,lin} = 0.401 ± 0.024, in good agreement with other probes. The predicted peculiar velocity of the Local Group arising from the 2M++ volume alone is 540 ± 40 km s-1, towards l = 268° ± 4°, b = 38° ± 6°, only 10° out of alignment with the cosmic microwave background dipole. To account for velocity contributions arising from sources outside the 2M++ volume, we fit simultaneously for β* and an external bulk flow in our analysis. We find that an external bulk flow is preferred at the 5.1σ level, and the best fit has a velocity of 159 ± 23 km s- 1 towards l = 304° ± 11°, b = 6° ± 13°. Finally, the predicted bulk flow of a 50 h-1 Mpc Gaussian-weighted volume centred on the Local Group is 230 ± 30 km s-1, in the direction l = 293° ± 8°, b = 14° ± 10°, in agreement with predictions from Λ cold dark matter.

  17. The Surface Density Profile of the Galactic Disk from the Terminal Velocity Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.

    2016-01-01

    The mass distribution of the Galactic disk is constructed from the terminal velocity curve and the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation. Mass models numerically quantifying the detailed surface density profiles are tabulated. For R0 = 8 kpc, the models have stellar mass 5 < M* < 6 × 1010 {M}⊙ , scale length 2.0 ≤ Rd ≤ 2.9 kpc, LSR circular velocity 222 ≤ Θ0 ≤ 233 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and solar circle stellar surface density 34 ≤ Σd(R0) ≤ 61 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2. The present interarm location of the solar neighborhood may have a somewhat lower stellar surface density than average for the solar circle. The Milky Way appears to be a normal spiral galaxy that obeys scaling relations like the Tully-Fisher relation, the size-mass relation, and the disk maximality-surface brightness relation. The stellar disk is maximal, and the spiral arms are massive. The bumps and wiggles in the terminal velocity curve correspond to known spiral features (e.g., the Centaurus arm is a ˜50% overdensity). The rotation curve switches between positive and negative over scales of hundreds of parsecs. The rms amplitude {< {| {dV}/{dR}| }2> }1/2≈ 14 {km} {{{s}}}-1 {{kpc}}-1, implying that commonly neglected terms in the Jeans equations may be nonnegligible. The spherically averaged local dark matter density is ρ0,DM ≈ 0.009 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-3 (0.34 {GeV} {{cm}}-3). Adiabatic compression of the dark matter halo may help reconcile the Milky Way with the c-V200 relation expected in ΛCDM while also helping to mitigate the too-big-to-fail problem, but it remains difficult to reconcile the inner bulge/bar-dominated region with a cuspy halo. We note that NGC 3521 is a near twin to the Milky Way, having a similar luminosity, scale length, and rotation curve.

  18. Density and seismic velocity of hydrous melts under crustal and upper mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Kenta; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2016-05-01

    We present a new model for calculating the density of hydrous silicate melts as a function of P, T, H2O concentration, and melt composition. We optimize VPr,Tr, ∂V/∂T, ∂V/∂P, ∂V2/∂T∂P, and K' of H2O end-member components in hydrous silicate melts, as well as K' of anhydrous silicate melts, using previously reported experimental results. The parameter set for H2O end-member component in silicate melt optimized in this study is internally consistent with the parameter values for the properties of anhydrous silicate melt reported by Lange and Carmichael (1987, 1990). The model calculation developed in this study reproduces the experimentally determined densities of various hydrous melts, and can be used to calculate the relationships between pressures, temperatures, and H2O concentrations of various hydrous melts from ultramafic to felsic compositions at pressures of 0-4.29 GPa. Using the new parameter set, we investigate the effects of H2O content on the seismic velocity of hydrous melts, as well as seismic velocities in partially molten regions of subduction zones. The results show that water content in silicate melt plays a key role in determining seismic velocity structure, and therefore must be taken into account when interpreting seismic tomography.

  19. Cosmological parameters from the comparison of peculiar velocities with predictions from the 2M++ density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Michael J.; Carrick, Jonathan; Turnbull, Stephen J.; Lavaux, Guilhem

    2016-10-01

    Using redshifts from the 2M++ redshift compilation, we reconstruct the density of galaxies within 200 h -1 Mpc, and compare the predicted peculiar velocities Tully-Fisher and SNe peculiar velocities. The comparison yields a best-fit value of β ≡ Ωm 0.55/b* = 0.431 +/- 0.021, suggesting Ωm 0.55σ8,lin = 0.401 +/- 0.024, in good agreement with other probes. The predicted peculiar velocity of the Local Group from sources within the 2M++ volume is 540 +/- 40 km s-1, towards l = 268° +/- 4°, b = 38° +/- 6°, which is misaligned by only 10° with the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole. To account for sources outside the 2M++ volume, we fit simultaneously for β* and an external bulk flow in our analysis. The external bulk flow has a velocity of 159 +/- 23 km s-1 towards l = 304° +/- 11°, b6° +/- 13°.

  20. Triblock copolymer P104 detailed behavior through a density, sound velocity and DLS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Anaya, L. M.; Fierro-Castro, C.; Rharbi, Y.; Martínez, J. F. A. Soltero

    2014-05-01

    Pluronic triblock copolymers usually present complex phase behavior depending on the number of PEO and PPO blocks contained in the polymer. They have a great dependence to temperature and concentration, both considered as key factors in the pluronic phase behavior. The evaluation of physicochemical properties such as densimetry and sound velocity, as well as the determination of the size distribution profile of particles of P-104/water in solution allow obtaining a detailed temperature-concentration behavior of the system. In this work we present a study of P104/water behavior through density, ultrasound velocity and dynamic slight scattering (DLS) measurements in a wide range of temperatures. The critical micellar temperature (CMT) and the sphere-to-rod micelle transition temperature (GMT) were determinate as a function of concentration.

  1. Phase Velocity and Full-Waveform Analysis of Co-located Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Channels and Geophone Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L.; Mellors, R. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A 762-meter Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) array with a channel spacing of one meter was deployed at the Garner Valley Downhole Array in Southern California. The array was approximately rectangular with dimensions of 180 meters by 80 meters. The array also included two subdiagonals within the rectangle along which three-component geophones were co-located. Several active sources were deployed, including a 45-kN, swept-frequency, shear-mass shaker, which produced strong Rayleigh waves across the array. Both DAS and geophone traces were filtered in 2-Hz steps between 4 and 20 Hz to obtain phase velocities as a function of frequency from fitting the moveout of travel times over distances of 35 meters or longer. As an alternative to this traditional means of finding phase velocity, it is theoretically possible to find the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity at each point of co-location as the ratio of DAS and geophone responses, because DAS is sensitive to ground strain and geophones are sensitive to ground velocity, after suitable corrections for instrument response (Mikumo & Aki, 1964). The concept was tested in WPP, a seismic wave propagation program, by first validating and then using a 3D synthetic, full-waveform seismic model to simulate the effect of increased levels of noise and uncertainty as data go from ideal to more realistic. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the DAS response and its potential for being combined with traditional seismometers for obtaining phase velocity at a single location. This analysis is part of the PoroTomo project (Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology, http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  2. Passive acoustic monitoring of beaked whale densities in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, John A; Baumann-Pickering, Simone; Frasier, Kaitlin E; Trickey, Jennifer S; Merkens, Karlina P; Wiggins, Sean M; McDonald, Mark A; Garrison, Lance P; Harris, Danielle; Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len

    2015-11-12

    Beaked whales are deep diving elusive animals, difficult to census with conventional visual surveys. Methods are presented for the density estimation of beaked whales, using passive acoustic monitoring data collected at sites in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) from the period during and following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010-2013). Beaked whale species detected include: Gervais' (Mesoplodon europaeus), Cuvier's (Ziphius cavirostris), Blainville's (Mesoplodon densirostris) and an unknown species of Mesoplodon sp. (designated as Beaked Whale Gulf - BWG). For Gervais' and Cuvier's beaked whales, we estimated weekly animal density using two methods, one based on the number of echolocation clicks, and another based on the detection of animal groups during 5 min time-bins. Density estimates derived from these two methods were in good general agreement. At two sites in the western GOM, Gervais' beaked whales were present throughout the monitoring period, but Cuvier's beaked whales were present only seasonally, with periods of low density during the summer and higher density in the winter. At an eastern GOM site, both Gervais' and Cuvier's beaked whales had a high density throughout the monitoring period.

  3. Passive acoustic monitoring of beaked whale densities in the Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, John A.; Baumann-Pickering, Simone; Frasier, Kaitlin E.; Trickey, Jennifer S.; Merkens, Karlina P.; Wiggins, Sean M.; McDonald, Mark A.; Garrison, Lance P.; Harris, Danielle; Marques, Tiago A.; Thomas, Len

    2015-01-01

    Beaked whales are deep diving elusive animals, difficult to census with conventional visual surveys. Methods are presented for the density estimation of beaked whales, using passive acoustic monitoring data collected at sites in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) from the period during and following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010–2013). Beaked whale species detected include: Gervais’ (Mesoplodon europaeus), Cuvier’s (Ziphius cavirostris), Blainville’s (Mesoplodon densirostris) and an unknown species of Mesoplodon sp. (designated as Beaked Whale Gulf — BWG). For Gervais’ and Cuvier’s beaked whales, we estimated weekly animal density using two methods, one based on the number of echolocation clicks, and another based on the detection of animal groups during 5 min time-bins. Density estimates derived from these two methods were in good general agreement. At two sites in the western GOM, Gervais’ beaked whales were present throughout the monitoring period, but Cuvier’s beaked whales were present only seasonally, with periods of low density during the summer and higher density in the winter. At an eastern GOM site, both Gervais’ and Cuvier’s beaked whales had a high density throughout the monitoring period. PMID:26559743

  4. Flow velocity profiling using acoustic time of flight flow metering based on wide band signals and adaptive beam-forming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgan, I.; Candel, I.; Ioana, C.; Digulescu, A.; Bunea, F.; Ciocan, G. D.; Anghel, A.; Vasile, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to non-intrusive flow velocity profiling technique using multi-element sensor array and wide-band signal's processing methods. Conventional techniques for the measurements of the flow velocity profiles are usually based on intrusive instruments (current meters, acoustic Doppler profilers, Pitot tubes, etc.) that take punctual velocity readings. Although very efficient, these choices are limited in terms of practical cases of applications especially when non-intrusive measurements techniques are required and/or a spatial accuracy of the velocity profiling is required This is due to factors related to hydraulic machinery down time, the often long time duration needed to explore the entire section area, the frequent cumbersome number of devices that needs to be handled simultaneously, or the impossibility to perform intrusive tests. In the case of non-intrusive flow profiling methods based on acoustic techniques, previous methods concentrated on using a large number of acoustic transducers placed around the measured section. Although feasible, this approach presents several major drawbacks such as a complicated signal timing, transmission, acquisition and recording system, resulting in a relative high cost of operation. In addition, because of the geometrical constraints, a desired number of sensors may not be installed. Recent results in acoustic flow metering based on wide band signals and adaptive beamforming proved that it is possible to achieve flow velocity profiles using less acoustic transducers. In a normal acoustic time of flight path the transducers are both emitters and receivers, sequentially changing their roles. In the new configuration, proposed in this paper, two new receivers are added on each side. Since the beam angles of each acoustic transducer are wide enough the newly added transducers can receive the transmitted signals and additional time of flight estimation can be done. Thus, several flow

  5. CONSTRAINTS ON VELOCITY ANISOTROPY OF SPHERICAL SYSTEMS WITH SEPARABLE AUGMENTED DENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    An, Jin H.

    2011-08-01

    If the augmented density of a spherical anisotropic system is assumed to be multiplicatively separable into functions of the potential and the radius, the radial function, which can be completely specified by the behavior of the anisotropy parameter alone, also fixes the anisotropic ratios of every higher order velocity moment. It is inferred from this that the non-negativity of the distribution function necessarily limits the allowed behaviors of the radial function. This restriction is translated into the constraints on the behavior of the anisotropy parameter. We find that not all radial variations of the anisotropy parameter satisfy these constraints and thus anisotropy profiles exist that are not consistent with any separable augmented density.

  6. Time-Averaged Velocity, Temperature and Density Surveys of Supersonic Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Mielke, Amy F.

    2005-01-01

    A spectrally resolved molecular Rayleigh scattering technique was used to simultaneously measure axial component of velocity U, static temperature T, and density p in unheated free jets at Mach numbers M = 0.6,0.95, 1.4 and 1.8. The latter two conditions were achieved using contoured convergent-divergent nozzles. A narrow line-width continuous wave laser was passed through the jet plumes and molecular scattered light from a small region on the beam was collected and analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The optical spectrum analysis air density at the probe volume was determined by monitoring the intensity variation of the scattered light using photo-multiplier tubes. The Fabry-Perot interferometer was operated in the imaging mode, whereby the fringe formed at the image plane was captured by a cooled CCD camera. Special attention was given to remove dust particles from the plume and to provide adequate vibration isolation to the optical components. The velocity profiles from various operating conditions were compared with that measured by a Pitot tube. An excellent comparison within 5m's demonstrated the maturity of the technique. Temperature was measured least accurately, within 10K, while density was measured within 1% uncertainty. The survey data consisted of centerline variations and radial profiles of time-averaged U, T and p. The static temperature and density values were used to determine static pressure variations inside the jet. The data provided a comparative study of jet growth rates with increasing Mach number. The current work is part of a data-base development project for Computational Fluid Dynamics and Aeroacoustics codes that endeavor to predict noise characteristics of high speed jets. A limited amount of far field noise spectra from the same jets are also presented. Finally, a direct experimental validation was obtained for the Crocco-Busemann equation which is commonly used to predict temperature and density profiles from known velocity

  7. Comparison of Numerical Models for Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of Structural Panels in Low Modal Density Range Engaging Air Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimeno-Manguan, M.; Martinz-Calvo, B.; Roibas-Millan, E.; Fajardo, P.; Simon, F.; Lopez-Diez, J.

    2012-07-01

    During launch, satellite and their equipment are subjected to loads of random nature and with a wide frequency range. Their vibro-acoustic response is an important issue to be analysed, for example for folded solar arrays and antennas. The main issue at low modal density is the modelling combinations engaging air layers, structures and external fluid. Depending on the modal density different methodologies, as FEM, BEM and SEA should be considered. This work focuses on the analysis of different combinations of the methodologies previously stated used in order to characterise the vibro-acoustic response of two rectangular sandwich structure panels isolated and engaging an air layer between them under a diffuse acoustic field. Focusing on the modelling of air layers, different models are proposed. To illustrate the phenomenology described and studied, experimental results from an acoustic test on an ARA-MKIII solar array in folded configuration are presented along with numerical results.

  8. Meta-atom cluster acoustic metamaterial with broadband negative effective mass density

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaijun; Zhai, Shilong; Ding, Changlin; Liu, Song; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2014-02-07

    We design a resonant meta-atom cluster, via which a two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial (AM) with broadband negative effective mass density from 1560 Hz to 5580 Hz is fabricated. Experimental results confirm that there is only weak interaction among the meta-atoms in the cluster. And then the meta-atoms in the cluster independently resonate, resulting in the cluster becoming equivalent to a broadband resonance unit. Extracted effective refractive indices from reflection and transmission measurements of the 2D AM appear to be negative from 1500 Hz to 5480 Hz. The broadband negative refraction has also been demonstrated by our further experiments. We expect that this meta-atom cluster AM will significantly contribute to the design of broadband negative effective mass density AM.

  9. 3D Velocity and Density Model of the Los Angeles Basin and Spectral Element Method Earthquake Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, P.; Shaw, J. H.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2001-12-01

    We present a 3D velocity model and a 3D density model of the LA basin. The LA basin velocity model was constructed using sonic log and stacking velocity information, provided by oil industry sources and not previously incorporated into southern California velocity models. The density model is based upon a new database of approximately 300 oil industry density logs from across the Los Angeles basin. These logs use gamma ray emissions to determine formation density at samples of about one meter. We have developed an empirical relation between sonic velocity and density by comparing data from approximately 30 wells in which we have both sonic and density logs. For the remaining wells, we have derived relationships between depth and density, and characterized this relationship for the three main stratigraphic sub-divisions of the SCEC Phase 2 model (Quaternary to base Pico Fm., top Repetto Fm. to top Mohnian, and top Mohnian to basement). The density-depth and density-velocity relations will provide independent rules that can be employed to define density and velocity structure in areas where data does not exist, or in other areas with similar lithology to the Los Angeles basin. We use a spectral element method (SEM) for simulation of seismic wave propagation which is currently being implemented on a 156-node Pentium PC cluster at Cal Tech. Preliminary work shows that SEM results using a 1D velocity model for southern California compare very well to discrete-wavenumber results. Both the density structure and velocity structure must be defined in a 3D model for its use in simulations of seismic wave propagation with a spectral element method, to predict the distribution of hazardous ground shaking during large events. Previous work has typically used density values which were predicted by the sonic velocity values; use of our measured density values should provide more accurate ground shaking predictions, and comparison to previous results will provide a useful

  10. Simulated flight acoustic investigation of treated ejector effectiveness on advanced mechanical suppresors for high velocity jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brausch, J. F.; Motsinger, R. E.; Hoerst, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Ten scale-model nozzles were tested in an anechoic free-jet facility to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of a mechanically suppressed inverted-velocity-profile coannular nozzle with an accoustically treated ejector system. The nozzle system used was developed from aerodynamic flow lines evolved in a previous contract, defined to incorporate the restraints imposed by the aerodynamic performance requirements of an Advanced Supersonic Technology/Variable Cycle Engine system through all its mission phases. Accoustic data of 188 test points were obtained, 87 under static and 101 under simulated flight conditions. The tests investigated variables of hardwall ejector application to a coannular nozzle with 20-chute outer annular suppressor, ejector axial positioning, treatment application to ejector and plug surfaces, and treatment design. Laser velocimeter, shadowgraph photograph, aerodynamic static pressure, and temperature measurement were acquired on select models to yield diagnositc information regarding the flow field and aerodynamic performance characteristics of the nozzles.

  11. Comment on "Anomalous wave propagation in a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial having simultaneously negative mass density and Young's modulus" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)].

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L

    2014-03-01

    The phase and group velocities of elastic guided waves are important in the physical interpretation of high frequency scattering by fluid-loaded elastic shells. Outside the context of scattering, those properties are also important for understanding the energy flow in acoustic metamaterials. In a recent investigation of acoustic metamaterials exhibiting anomalous wave propagation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)] criticism of negative group velocity terminology was generalized to elastic waves guided on ordinary materials. Some context and justification for retaining the identification of negative group velocities associated with a type of backscattering enhancement for shells are explained here. The phase evolution direction is determined by the boundary conditions.

  12. Time-Average Measurement of Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence Using Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Krisie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of time-averaged velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence in gas flows using a nonintrusive, point-wise measurement technique based on molecular Rayleigh scattering is discussed. Subsonic and supersonic flows in a 25.4-mm diameter free jet facility were studied. The developed instrumentation utilizes a Fabry-Perot interferometer to spectrally resolve molecularly scattered light from a laser beam passed through a gas flow. The spectrum of the scattered light contains information about velocity, density, and temperature of the gas. The technique uses a slow scan, low noise 16-bit depth CCD camera to record images of the fringes formed by Rayleigh scattered light passing through the interferometer. A kinetic theory model of the Rayleigh scattered light is used in a nonlinear least squares fitting routine to estimate the unknown parameters from the fringe images. The ability to extract turbulence information from the fringe image data proved to be a challenge since the fringe is broadened by not only turbulence, but also thermal fluctuations and aperture effects from collecting light over a range of scattering angles. Figure 1 illustrates broadening of a Rayleigh spectrum typical of flow conditions observed in this work due to aperture effects and turbulence for a scattering angle, chi(sub s), of 90 degrees, f/3.67 collection optics, mean flow velocity, u(sub k), of 300 m/s, and turbulent velocity fluctuations, sigma (sub uk), of 55 m/s. The greatest difficulty in processing the image data was decoupling the thermal and turbulence broadening in the spectrum. To aid in this endeavor, it was necessary to seed the ambient air with smoke and dust particulates; taking advantage of the turbulence broadening in the Mie scattering component of the spectrum of the collected light (not shown in the figure). The primary jet flow was not seeded due to the difficulty of the task. For measurement points lacking particles, velocity, density, and temperature

  13. A high speed data acquisition and analysis system for transonic velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    The high speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. The data acquisition and data reduction process has been combined within DDAS. DDAS receives input from hot wires and anemometers, amplifies and filters the signals with computer controlled modules, and converts the analog signals to digital with real-time simultaneous digitization followed by digital recording on disk or tape. Automatic acquisition (either from a computer link to an existing wind tunnel acquisition system, or from data acquisition facilities within DDAS) collects necessary calibration and environment data. The generation of hot wire sensitivities is done in DDAS, as is the application of sensitivities to the hot wire data to generate turbulence quantities. The presentation of the raw and processed data, in terms of root mean square values of velocity, density and temperature, and the processing of the spectral data is accomplished on demand in near-real-time- with DDAS. A comprehensive description of the interface to the DDAS and of the internal mechanisms will be prosented. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAS will be provided.

  14. Evolution of density and velocity profiles of dark matter and dark energy in spherical voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Tsizh, Maksym; Kulinich, Yurij

    2017-02-01

    We analyse the evolution of cosmological perturbations which leads to the formation of large isolated voids in the Universe. We assume that initial perturbations are spherical and all components of the Universe (radiation, matter and dark energy) are continuous media with ideal fluid energy-momentum tensors, which interact only gravitationally. Equations of the evolution of perturbations for every component in the comoving to cosmological background reference frame are obtained from equations of energy and momentum conservation and Einstein's ones and are integrated numerically. Initial conditions are set at the early stage of evolution in the radiation-dominated epoch, when the scale of perturbation is much larger than the particle horizon. Results show how the profiles of density and velocity of matter and dark energy are formed and how they depend on parameters of dark energy and initial conditions. In particular, it is shown that final matter density and velocity amplitudes change within range ˜4-7 per cent when the value of equation-of-state parameter of dark energy w vary in the range from -0.8 to -1.2, and change within ˜1 per cent only when the value of effective sound speed of dark energy vary over all allowable range of its values.

  15. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  16. Primordial inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. I - Density and velocity distributions of galaxies in the vicinities of rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Wilson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The density profiles and Hubble flow deviations in the vicinities of rich galaxy clusters are derived for a variety of models of initial density and velocity perturbations at the recombination epoch. The galaxy correlation function, measured with respect to the Abell clusters, is used to normalize the theoretical models. The angular scales of the required primordial inhomogeneities are calculated. It is found that the resulting density profiles around rich clusters are surprisingly insensitive to the shape of the initial perturbations and also to the cosmological density parameter, Omega. However, it is shown that the distribution of galaxy radial velocities can provide a possible means of deriving Omega.

  17. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  18. [Estimation of age-related features of acoustic density and biometric relations of lens based on combined ultrasound scanning].

    PubMed

    Avetisov, K S; Markosian, A G

    2013-01-01

    Results of combined ultrasound scanning for estimation of acoustic lens density and biometric relations of lens and other eye structures are presented. A group of 124 patients (189 eyes) was studied; they were subdivided depending on age and length of anteroposterior axis of the eye. Examination algorithm was developed that allows selective estimation of acoustic density of different lens zones and biometric measurements including volumetric. Age-related increase of acoustic density of different lens zones was revealed that indirectly shows method efficiency. Biometric studies showed almost concurring volumetric lens measurements in "normal" and "short" eyes in spite of significantly thicker central zone of the latter. Significantly lower correlation between anterior chamber volume and width of its angle was revealed in "short" eyes and "normal" and "long" eyes (correlation coefficients 0.37, 0.68 and 0.63 respectively).

  19. Skeletal muscle fiber atrophy: altered thin filament density changes slow fiber force and shortening velocity.

    PubMed

    Riley, D A; Bain, J L W; Romatowski, J G; Fitts, R H

    2005-02-01

    Single skinned fibers from soleus and adductor longus (AL) muscles of weight-bearing control rats and rats after 14-day hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU) were studied physiologically and ultrastructurally to investigate how slow fibers increase shortening velocity (V0) without fast myosin. We hypothesized that unloading and shortening of soleus during HSU reduces densities of thin filaments, generating wider myofilament separations that increase V0 and decrease specific tension (kN/m2). During HSU, plantarflexion shortened soleus working length 23%. AL length was unchanged. Both muscles atrophied as shown by reductions in fiber cross-sectional area. For AL, the 60% atrophy accounted fully for the 58% decrease in absolute tension (mN). In the soleus, the 67% decline in absolute tension resulted from 58% atrophy plus a 17% reduction in specific tension. Soleus fibers exhibited a 25% reduction in thin filaments, whereas there was no change in AL thin filament density. Loss of thin filaments is consistent with reduced cross bridge formation, explaining the fall in specific tension. V0 increased 27% in soleus but was unchanged in AL. The V0 of control and HSU fibers was inversely correlated (R = -0.83) with thin filament density and directly correlated (R = 0.78) with thick-to-thin filament spacing distance in a nonlinear fashion. These data indicate that reduction in thin filament density contributes to an increased V0 in slow fibers. Osmotically compacting myofilaments with 5% dextran returned density, spacing, and specific tension and slowed V0 to near-control levels and provided evidence for myofilament spacing modulating tension and V0.

  20. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  1. Nature and velocity of pyroclastic density currents inferred from models of entrainment of substrate lithic clasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    Deposits of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) often contain accidental lithic clasts of typical size of 0.1-1 m captured from an underlying substrate by the parent flows at distances up to several tens of kilometers from the eruptive vent. In order to gain insights into the nature of PDCs, this study investigates the conditions required for entrainment of particles from a granular substrate by a gas-particle density current, with special emphasis to ignimbrite-forming currents whose dynamics are controversial. The two types of physics of emplacement of PDCs proposed in literature are considered. The first model deals with a hydraulically rough, dilute turbulent PDC of bulk density of ∼1-10 kg/m3 and considers that entrainment through both traction and saltation is controlled by a Shield criterion at high (>104) particle Reynolds number. The second model considers entrainment by a PDC consisting of a dense basal flow of bulk density of the order of 103 kg /m3 and with high interstitial gas pore pressure. This model involves uplift of substrate particles, caused by an upward pressure gradient at the flow-substrate interface, and then transport and deposition on the aggrading basal deposit of the flow as demonstrated by recent laboratory experiments. Results show that a dilute PDC can entrain blocks of maximum size of ∼10-15 cm (for a block density of 2000-3000 kg/m3) if maximum current velocities up to ∼100 m/s are taken into account. This, in turn, suggests that larger (heavier) blocks found in deposits were captured by PDCs if these had a dense basal flow. The dense flow model predicts that PDCs have the potential to entrain metric blocks, whose maximum size (up to ∼2-5 m) decreases with decreasing atmospheric pressure (i.e. increasing altitude). Application of the model considering published data on the characteristics of accidental blocks in several well-studied ignimbrites indicates that the velocity of the parent dense PDCs was up to ∼25-30 m/s.

  2. A Holographic Interferometer System for Measuring Density Profiles in High-Velocity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes a holographic interferometric technique for obtaining density measurements across a test gas that is traveling at a velocity of over 5500 meters per second in an expansion tube facility. Interferometric data describing the flow in the test section are obtained using a long coherence length cw argon laser in a holographic system and a rotating drum camera recorder. The object beam, which passes through the test section, intersects the reference beam at a small angle (5 degrees) to form an interference pattern of about 170 lines per millimeter, and is recorded as a hologram. Before a test, this hologram is placed in its original position and rotated slightly so that an interference pattern is generated by the intersection of the reconstructed and real-time object beams. This interference pattern is adjusted to a series of bright, horizontal fringes having a spatial frequency of about 5 fringes per centimeter. During the few milliseconds it takes the test gas to pass through the test section, variations in the gas density across the 8.4-centimeter test section produce phase variations in the object beam and result in a varying interference pattern. A rotating drum camera with a 0.15-millimeter slit aligned perpendicular to the fringes is used to record the varying fringe shifts with a time resolution of about 3 microseconds. The average gas density across the test section is determined by measuring these fringe shifts.

  3. The density and velocity of plasma bullets propagating along one dielectric tube

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Longfei; Xia, Yang; Bi, Zhenhua; Niu, Jinhai; Liu, Dongping

    2015-08-15

    This study shows that the propagation of plasma bullets along one dielectric tube is strongly affected by many discharge parameters, such as the waveform of applied voltage (AC or pulsed DC), peak voltage, He flow rate, and the frequency of AC voltage. Analysis indicates that the density and velocity of plasma bullets are mainly determined by the electric field at the front of plasma bullets. These discharge parameters may significantly influence the distribution of plasma potential along the tube, thus control the electric field at the front of plasma bullets and their propagation. An increase in the pulsed DC voltage with its rise time of <40-50 ns can lead to an obvious improvement in the electric field at the front of plasma bullets, resulting in generation of a plasma in the high density gas and a fast propagation of plasma bullets. He flowing through the tube can contribute to the surface diffusion of charged species, and greatly increase the electric field at the front of plasma bullets. During the propagation of plasma bullets, their density is decreased due to the surface recombination of charged species, such as electrons and ions.

  4. An acoustic bending waveguide designed by anisotropic density-near-zero metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang-Yang; Ding, Er-Liang; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2016-12-01

    Anisotropic metamaterial with only one component of the mass density tensor near zero (ADNZ) is proposed to control the sound wave propagation. We find that such an anisotropic metamaterial can be used to realize perfect bending waveguides. According to a coordinate transformation, the surface waves on the input and output interfaces of the ADNZ metamaterial induces the sound energy flow to be redistributed and match smoothly with the propagating modes inside the metamaterial waveguide. According to the theory of bending waveguide, we realize the “T”-type sound shunting and convergence, as well as acoustic channel selection by embedding small-sized defects. Numerical calculations are performed to confirm the above effects. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474160), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 020414380001), the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLA201609), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institution, China.

  5. A redshift survey of IRAS galaxies. III - Reconstruction of the velocity and density fields in N-body model universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Marc; Strauss, Michael A.; Yahil, Amos

    1991-01-01

    N-body simulations of a 'cold dark matter' universe are presently used to calibrate the accuracy, and assess the limitations, of the procedure previously employed to predict the velocity field within 8000 km/sec of the Local Group through the application of linear gravitational theory to a full-sky, flux-limited sample of IRAS galaxies. The rms difference between the one-dimensional acceleration and velocity of field particles is an increasing function of local density; linear theory can in this way account for all but one-sixth of kinetic energy. A series of artificial IRAS catalogs closely matching the real sample in space density and clustering amplitude is constructed. Velocity correlation functions are used to demonstrate that the predicted velocity fields are in good agreement with the true velocity fields on large scales.

  6. Probe for measurement of velocity and density of vapor in vapor plume

    DOEpatents

    Berzins, Leon V.; Bratton, Bradford A.; Fuhrman, Paul W.

    1997-01-01

    A probe which directs a light beam through a vapor plume in a first direction at a first angle ranging from greater than 0.degree. to less than 90.degree., reflecting the light beam back through the vapor plume at a 90.degree. angle, and then reflecting the light beam through the vapor plume a third time at a second angle equal to the first angle, using a series of mirrors to deflect the light beam while protecting the mirrors from the vapor plume with shields. The velocity, density, temperature and flow direction of the vapor plume may be determined by a comparison of the energy from a reference portion of the beam with the energy of the beam after it has passed through the vapor plume.

  7. Evolution of density and velocity profiles of matter in large voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsizh, M.; Novosyadlyj, B.

    2016-09-01

    We analyse the evolution of cosmological perturbations which leads to the formation of large voids in the distribution of galaxies. We assume that perturbations are spherical and all components of the Universe - radiation, matter and dark energy - are continuous media with ideal fluid energy-momentum tensors, which interact only gravitationally. Equations of the evolution of perturbations in the comoving to cosmological background reference frame for every component are obtained from equations of conservation and Einstein's ones and are integrated by modified Euler method. Initial conditions are set at the early stage of evolution in the radiation-dominated epoch, when the scale of perturbation is mush larger than the particle horizon. Results show how the profiles of density and velocity of matter in spherical voids with different overdensity shells are formed.

  8. Phonon Density of States and Sound Velocities of Magnesiow?stite in Earth's Lower Mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J; Jacosben, S D; Sturhahn, W; Jackson, J; Zhao, J; Yoo, C

    2006-01-20

    The partial phonon densities of states of iron in magnesiowuestite [(Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O] have been measured by nuclear inelastic X-ray scattering up to 109 GPa. Compressional and shear wave velocities, shear moduli, and their pressure derivatives increase significantly across the spin-pairing transition of iron in (Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O at approximately 50 GPa. The effects of the transition on the elastic properties of (Mg,Fe)O at lower-mantle pressures are in contrast to what was predicted by studying MgO and high-spin magnesiowuestite, and need to be considered in future geophysical modeling of the lower mantle. The transition also affects other thermodynamic properties of magnesiowuestite under high pressures.

  9. Probe for measurement of velocity and density of vapor in vapor plume

    DOEpatents

    Berzins, L.V.; Bratton, B.A.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    1997-03-11

    A probe is disclosed which directs a light beam through a vapor plume in a first direction at a first angle ranging from greater than 0{degree} to less than 90{degree}, reflecting the light beam back through the vapor plume at a 90{degree} angle, and then reflecting the light beam through the vapor plume a third time at a second angle equal to the first angle, using a series of mirrors to deflect the light beam while protecting the mirrors from the vapor plume with shields. The velocity, density, temperature and flow direction of the vapor plume may be determined by a comparison of the energy from a reference portion of the beam with the energy of the beam after it has passed through the vapor plume. 10 figs.

  10. Acoustic Velocities and Elastic Properties of Pyrite (FeS2) to 9.6 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    M Whitaker; W Liu; L Wang; B Li

    2011-12-31

    Ultrasonic interferometry was utilized in conjunction with synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction and X-radiographic imaging to determine the compressional and shear wave velocities and unit-cell volumes of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) at room temperature and pressures up to 9.6 GPa. Fitting all of the experimental volume and velocity data to third-order finite-strain equations yielded the adiabatic zero-pressure bulk and shear moduli and their first pressure derivatives: K{sub S0}=138.9(7) GPa, G{sub 0}=112.3(3) GPa, ({partial_derivative} K{sub S0}/{partial_derivative} P){sub T} =K{sub S0'}=6.0(1), ({partial_derivative}G{sub 0}/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} =G{sub 0'}=3.0(<1), where the numbers in parentheses represent the 1{sigma} uncertainty in the last significant digit. These results are in good agreement with several previous static compression studies on this material but differ quite strongly from the results obtained via first principles calculations. This study presents the first direct measurement of the bulk shear properties of this material.

  11. Mixing properties of coaxial jets with large velocity ratios and large inverse density ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander Schumaker, S.; Driscoll, James F.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the mixing properties of coaxial jets as several parameters were systematically varied, including the velocity ratio, density ratio, and the Reynolds number. Diameters of the inner and outer jet were also varied. Coaxial jets are commonly used to mix fluids due to the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing that they provide. A measure of the overall mixing efficiency is the stoichiometric mixing length (Ls), which is the distance along the jet centerline where the two fluids have mixed to some desired concentration, which was selected to be the stoichiometric concentration for H2/O2 and CH4/O2 in this case. For 56 cases, the profiles of mean mixture fraction, rms mixture fraction fluctuations (unmixedness), and Ls were measured using acetone planar laser induced fluorescence diagnostics. Results were compared to three mixing models. The entrainment model of Villermaux and Rehab showed good agreement with the data, indicating that the proper non-dimensional scaling parameter is the momentum flux ratio M. The work extends the existing database of coaxial jet scalar mixing properties because it considers the specific regime of large values of both the velocity ratio and the inverse density ratio, which is the regime in which rocket injectors operate. Also the work focuses on the mixing up to Ls where previous work focused on the mixing up to the end of the inner core. The Reynolds numbers achieved for a number of cases were considerably larger than previous gas mixing studies, which insures that the jet exit boundary conditions are fully turbulent.

  12. Structures in Ionospheric Number Density and Velocity Associated with Polar Cap Ionization Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivanc, O.; Heelis, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of polar cap F region irregularities on large density gradients associated with polar ionization patches are studied using in situ measurements made by the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) spacecraft. The 18 patches studied in this paper were identified by the algorithm introduced by Coley and Heelis, and they were encountered during midnight-noon passes of the spacecraft. Density and velocity spectra associated with these antisunward convecting patches are analyzed in detail. Observations indicate the presence of structure on most patches regardless of the distance between the patch and the cusp where they are believed to develop. Existence of structure on both leading and trailing edges is established when such edges exist. Results, which show no large dependence of Delta N/N power on the sign of the edge gradient del N, do not allow the identification of leading and trailing edges of the patch. The Delta N/N is an increasing function of gradient del N regardless of the sign of the gradient. The correlation between Delta N/N and Delta V is generally poor, but for a given intensity in Delta V, Delta N/N maximizes in regions of large gradients in N. There is evidence for the presence of unstructured patches that seem to co-exist with unstructured horizontal velocities. Slightly smaller spectral indices for trailing edges support the presence of the E X B drift instability. Although this instability is found to be operating in some cases, results suggest that stirring may be a significant contributor to kilometer-size structures in the polar cap.

  13. Site specific passive acoustic detection and densities of humpback whale calls off the coast of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helble, Tyler Adam

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. Automated methods are needed to aid in the analyses of the recorded data. When a mammal vocalizes in the marine environment, the received signal is a filtered version of the original waveform emitted by the marine mammal. The waveform is reduced in amplitude and distorted due to propagation effects that are influenced by the bathymetry and environment. It is important to account for these effects to determine a site-specific probability of detection for marine mammal calls in a given study area. A knowledge of that probability function over a range of environmental and ocean noise conditions allows vocalization statistics from recordings of single, fixed, omnidirectional sensors to be compared across sensors and at the same sensor over time with less bias and uncertainty in the results than direct comparison of the raw statistics. This dissertation focuses on both the development of new tools needed to automatically detect humpback whale vocalizations from single-fixed omnidirectional sensors as well as the determination of the site-specific probability of detection for monitoring sites off the coast of California. Using these tools, detected humpback calls are "calibrated" for environmental properties using the site-specific probability of detection values, and presented as call densities (calls per square kilometer per time). A two-year monitoring effort using these calibrated call densities reveals important biological and ecological information on migrating humpback whales off the coast of California. Call density trends are compared between the monitoring sites and at the same monitoring site over time. Call densities also are compared to several natural and human-influenced variables including season, time of day, lunar illumination, and ocean noise. The results reveal substantial differences in call densities

  14. Shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave phononic device with high density filling material for ultra-low power sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Bhethanabotla, V. R.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.

    2014-06-23

    Finite element simulations of a phononic shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor based on ST 90°-X Quartz reveal a dramatic reduction in power consumption. The phononic sensor is realized by artificially structuring the delay path to form an acoustic meta-material comprised of a periodic microcavity array incorporating high-density materials such as tantalum or tungsten. Constructive interference of the scattered and secondary reflected waves at every microcavity interface leads to acoustic energy confinement in the high-density regions translating into reduced power loss. Tantalum filled cavities show the best performance while tungsten inclusions create a phononic bandgap. Based on our simulation results, SAW devices with tantalum filled microcavities were fabricated and shown to significantly decrease insertion loss. Our findings offer encouraging prospects for designing low power, highly sensitive portable biosensors.

  15. THE RELATION BETWEEN GAS DENSITY AND VELOCITY POWER SPECTRA IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: QUALITATIVE TREATMENT AND COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, I.; Allen, S. W.; Churazov, E. M.; Gaspari, M.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Lau, E. T.; Nagai, D.; Nelson, K.; Parrish, I. J.

    2014-06-10

    We address the problem of evaluating the power spectrum of the velocity field of the intracluster medium using only information on the plasma density fluctuations, which can be measured today by Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. We argue that for relaxed clusters there is a linear relation between the rms density and velocity fluctuations across a range of scales, from the largest ones, where motions are dominated by buoyancy, down to small, turbulent scales: (δρ{sub k}/ρ){sup 2}=η{sub 1}{sup 2}(V{sub 1,k}/c{sub s}){sup 2}, where δρ {sub k}/ρ is the spectral amplitude of the density perturbations at wavenumber k, V{sub 1,k}{sup 2}=V{sub k}{sup 2}/3 is the mean square component of the velocity field, c{sub s} is the sound speed, and η{sub 1} is a dimensionless constant of the order of unity. Using cosmological simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters, we calibrate this relation and find η{sub 1} ≈ 1 ± 0.3. We argue that this value is set at large scales by buoyancy physics, while at small scales the density and velocity power spectra are proportional because the former are a passive scalar advected by the latter. This opens an interesting possibility to use gas density power spectra as a proxy for the velocity power spectra in relaxed clusters across a wide range of scales.

  16. Modeling and design of two-dimensional membrane-type active acoustic metamaterials with tunable anisotropic density.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ahmed; Elsabbagh, Adel; Akl, Wael

    2016-11-01

    A two-dimensional active acoustic metamaterial with controllable anisotropic density is introduced. The material consists of composite lead-lead zirconate titanate plates clamped to an aluminum structure with air as the background fluid. The effective anisotropic density of the material is controlled, independently for two orthogonal directions, by means of an external static electric voltage signal. The material is used in the construction of a reconfigurable waveguide capable of controlling the direction of the acoustic waves propagating through it. An analytic model based on the acoustic two-port theory, the theory of piezoelectricity, the laminated pre-stressed plate theory, and the S-parameters retrieval method is developed to predict the behavior of the material. The results are verified using the finite element method. Excellent agreement is found between both models for the studied frequency and voltage ranges. The results show that, below 1600 Hz, the density is controllable within orders of magnitude relative to the uncontrolled case. The results also suggest that simple controllers could be used to program the material density toward full control of the directivity and dispersion characteristics of acoustic waves.

  17. Lift-off compensation for improved accuracy in ultrasonic lamb wave velocity measurements using electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs).

    PubMed

    Morrison, J P; Dixon, S; Potter, M D G; Jian, X

    2006-12-22

    The crystalline texture of a sheet metal strongly affects its formability, so having knowledge of this texture is of great industrial relevance. The texture of rolled sheet metals, such as aluminium and steel, may be determined by ultrasonic measurement of the velocity of the zero order symmetric (S(0)) Lamb wave as a function of angle to the rolling direction. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) may perform this measurement without contacting the sample, therefore reducing perturbation to the plate wave system, as they are electromagnetically coupled to the sheet. The EMAT system measurements are non-destructive and may be made in real time, therefore offering advantages over the conventional techniques such as X-ray and neutron diffraction. It has been noticed that in the two EMAT pitch-catch system, the apparent arrival times of the ultrasonic waves change with variation in lift-off (distance between sample and transducer) due to impedance and aperture effects. For precise and accurate texture parameters to be obtained, accurate absolute ultrasonic velocity measurement is required and hence lift-off must be compensated for. This is of particular importance to online inspection systems where constant lift-off may be difficult to maintain. The impedance behaviour of various coil geometries has been investigated as a function of lift-off and frequency and compared to the received ultrasonic signal and the drive current pulse profile. Theoretical models have been used to explain the observed behaviour, and hence a scheme has been proposed for the compensation of lift-off effects in real time.

  18. Velocity and Density Models Incorporating the Cascadia Subduction Zone for 3D Earthquake Ground Motion Simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies in the Pacific Northwest, three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity (3D Vp and Vs) and density (3D rho) models incorporating the Cascadia subduction zone have been developed for the region encompassed from about 40.2?N to 50?N latitude, and from about -122?W to -129?W longitude. The model volume includes elevations from 0 km to 60 km (elevation is opposite of depth in model coordinates). Stephenson and Frankel (2003) presented preliminary ground motion simulations valid up to 0.1 Hz using an earlier version of these models. The version of the model volume described here includes more structural and geophysical detail, particularly in the Puget Lowland as required for scenario earthquake simulations in the development of the Seattle Urban Hazards Maps (Frankel and others, 2007). Olsen and others (in press) used the model volume discussed here to perform a Cascadia simulation up to 0.5 Hz using a Sumatra-Andaman Islands rupture history. As research from the EarthScope Program (http://www.earthscope.org) is published, a wealth of important detail can be added to these model volumes, particularly to depths of the upper-mantle. However, at the time of development for this model version, no EarthScope-specific results were incorporated. This report is intended to be a reference for colleagues and associates who have used or are planning to use this preliminary model in their research. To this end, it is intended that these models will be considered a beginning template for a community velocity model of the Cascadia region as more data and results become available.

  19. Evaluation of the Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter for Computation of Discharge Records at Three Sites in Colorado, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Diaz, Paul; Smits, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted a study in 2004-2005 at three sites in Colorado: Bear Creek at Morrison, Clear Creek near Empire, and Redlands Canal near Grand Junction. The study was done to evaluate acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADVM) technology in different hydrologic settings that are characteristic of many Colorado streamflow-gaging sites. ADVMs have been tested and used extensively in many parts of the United States by USGS but not in Colorado where relatively small, shallow, clear, coarse-bed streams that ice up in the winter may affect the ADVM suitability. In this study, ADVM instrumentation was successfully used and discharge computations compared favorably, generally within 5 to 10 percent, with conventional USGS stage/discharge methods at the three Colorado sites. However, two factors, encountered in this study, may adversely affect the use of ADVM technology in Colorado. First, for some streams, the depth required (about 1.5 feet for a side-looking instrument) cannot be met during low-flow periods of the year. Second, cold temperatures and freezing-thawing cycles can produce ice effects that could prevent collection of usable ADVM (and stage) data.

  20. Simultaneous estimation of cortical bone thickness and acoustic wave velocity using a multivariable optimization approach: Bone phantom and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Podhajecki, Jerzy; Falińska, Katarzyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents a method that allows the thickness of a compact bone layer and longitudinal wave velocity in the bone to be determined simultaneously with the use of reflected waves, with particular emphasis on the case of layers when the propagation time through the layer is shorter than the time duration of the interrogating pulse. The proposed method estimates simultaneously the thickness of the cortical bone layer and acoustic wave velocity by fitting the temporal spectrum of the simulated reflected wave to the spectrum of the reflected wave measured experimentally. For the purpose of echo-simulations the model of "soft tissue - compact bone layer - cancellous bone" was developed. Next, the cost function was defined as the least square error between the measured and simulated temporal spectra. Minimization of the cost function allowed us to determine the values of the parameters of the cortical bone layer which best fitted the measurements. To solve the optimization problem a simulated annealing algorithm was used. The method was tested using acoustic data obtained at the frequency of 0.6 MHz and 1 MHz respectively for a custom designed bone mimicking phantom and a calf femur. For the cortical shell of the calf femur whose thickness varies from 2.1 mm to 2.4 mm and velocity of 2910 m/s, the relative errors of the thickness estimation ranged from 0.4% to 5.5%. The corresponding error of the acoustic wave velocity estimation in the layer was 3.1%. In the case of artificial bone the thickness of the cortical layer was equal to 1.05 and 1.2 mm and acoustic wave velocity was 2900 m/s. These parameters were determined with the errors ranging from 1.9% to 10.8% and from 3.9% to 4.5% respectively.

  1. Evaluation of acoustic doppler velocity meters to quantify flow from Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal

  2. Development of critical surface diagnostic based on the ion acoustic decay instability in laser produced high density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    We have developed a large angle, UV collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic for high density, hot plasma relevant to laser fusion. The CTS measured the basic parameters of the plasma waves (frequency, wave number), or the spectral density function for selected wave vectors of plasma waves, which were excited by the IADI (ion acoustic parametric decay instability). It is a good diagnostic tool for a local electron temperature measurement. The electron temperature was estimated by measuring either ion acoustic wave or electron plasma wave in the laser intensity window of 1density plasma.

  3. Control of high velocity lithosphere roots on crustal scale density variations seen in Gondwana reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braitenberg, C. F.; Mariani, P.

    2015-12-01

    The GOCE gravity field is globally homogeneous at the resolution of about 80km or better allowing for the first time to identify tectonic structures at continental scale. The large scale structures are presumably controlled by the rheology of the underlying crust down to the base of the lithosphere. Seismic tomography identifies the presence of the deep lithosphere roots by increased velocity. The joint analysis of the tomography results and the GOCE gravity reveals that at global scale the two data have some common patterns. The correlations are enhanced by applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field and to the tomography models which places today's observed fields at the Gondwana pre-breakup position. There are several examples for which it is found that the deep lithospheric roots, as those found below cratons, control the position of the positive gravity values outboard of the deep roots. This could be explained by the deep lithospheric roots focusing asthenospheric upwelling outboard of the root protecting the overlying craton from magmatic intrusions. Over several of the deep roots the gravity is systematically negative, which could be due to a compositional effect, with deep roots of increased velocity having reduced density. The study is carried out globally, with focus on the African and South American continents. The background for the study can be found in the following publications where the techniques which have been used are described: Braitenberg, C., Mariani, P. and De Min, A. (2013). The European Alps and nearby orogenic belts sensed by GOCE, Boll. Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 54(4), 321-334. doi:10.4430/bgta0105 Braitenberg, C. and Mariani, P. (2015). Geological implications from complete Gondwana GOCE-products reconstructions and link to lithospheric roots. Proceedings of 5th International GOCE User Workshop, 25 - 28 November 2014. Braitenberg, C. (2015). Exploration of tectonic structures with GOCE in

  4. Comment on 'Nonplanar dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitons in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution' [Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mannan, A.; Tanjia, F.; Yasmin, S.

    2013-04-15

    The basic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitary waves in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution have been represented by Ghosh et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)]. In this manuscript, they use the double layer stationary solution of the standard Gardner equation but they explain the whole article in terms of Gardner solitons which is completely incorrect.

  5. Neurotrophin-3 regulates ribbon synapse density in the cochlea and induces synapse regeneration after acoustic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guoqiang; Gómez-Casati, Maria E; Gigliello, Angelica R; Liberman, M Charles; Corfas, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (Ntf3) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) are critical for sensory neuron survival and establishment of neuronal projections to sensory epithelia in the embryonic inner ear, but their postnatal functions remain poorly understood. Using cell-specific inducible gene recombination in mice we found that, in the postnatal inner ear, Bbnf and Ntf3 are required for the formation and maintenance of hair cell ribbon synapses in the vestibular and cochlear epithelia, respectively. We also show that supporting cells in these epithelia are the key endogenous source of the neurotrophins. Using a new hair cell CreERT line with mosaic expression, we also found that Ntf3's effect on cochlear synaptogenesis is highly localized. Moreover, supporting cell-derived Ntf3, but not Bbnf, promoted recovery of cochlear function and ribbon synapse regeneration after acoustic trauma. These results indicate that glial-derived neurotrophins play critical roles in inner ear synapse density and synaptic regeneration after injury. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03564.001 PMID:25329343

  6. Ultrasound tomography for simultaneous reconstruction of acoustic density, attenuation, and compressibility profiles.

    PubMed

    Mojabi, Pedram; LoVetri, Joe

    2015-04-01

    A fast and efficient forward scattering solver is developed for use in ultrasound tomography. The solver is formulated so as to enable the calculation of scattering from large and relatively high-contrast objects with inhomogeneous physical properties that vary simultaneously in acoustic attenuation, compressibility, and density. It is based on the method of moments in conjunction with a novel implementation of the conjugate gradient algorithm which requires the use of the adjoints of the scattering operators. The solver takes advantage of the symmetric block Toeplitz matrix with symmetric Toeplitz blocks property of the Green's function matrix to increase efficiency and only stores the first row of this matrix to reduce memory requirements. This row is then used for the matrix-vector multiplication using the fast Fourier transform technique, thus, resulting in the computational complexity of O(n log n). The marching-on-source technique is also used to provide a good initial guess which allows the conjugate gradient technique to converge faster than initializing with an arbitrary guess. This feature is important in tomographic inversion algorithms which require that the object to be imaged be interrogated via several incident fields. Forward scattering and inversion examples, based on the Conjugate Gradient Least Squares regularized Born Iterative Method, are shown, in two-dimensions, for objects varying in all three physical properties.

  7. Fracture mechanics of bone--the effects of density, specimen thickness and crack velocity on longitudinal fracture.

    PubMed

    Behiri, J C; Bonfield, W

    1984-01-01

    The fracture mechanics parameters of critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and critical strain energy release rate (Gc) for longitudinal fracture of bovine tibia cortical bone were determined by the compact tension method. It was demonstrated that, for a given bone density, Kc and Gc depended on the loading rate, and resultant crack velocity, with a maximum in fracture toughness (Kc approximately 6.3 MNm-3/2, Gc approximately 2900 Jm-2) at a crack velocity approximately 10(-3) ms-1. For a given loading rate, or crack velocity, an increase in bone density, in the range from 1.92 to 2.02 Mgm-3, produced increases in Kc and Gc, but a variation in specimen thickness (from 0.5 to 2 mm) had no effect on the measured fracture mechanics parameters.

  8. Calculation of poloidal velocity in the tokamak plasma with allowance for density inhomogeneity and diamagnetic drift of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Shurygin, R. V.

    2012-02-15

    A one-dimensional evolution equation for the angle-averaged poloidal momentum of the tokamak plasma is derived in the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics with allowance for density inhomogeneity and diamagnetic drift of ions. In addition to fluctuations of the E Multiplication-Sign B drift velocity, the resulting turbulent Reynolds stress tensor includes fluctuations of the ion density and ion pressure, as well as turbulent radial fluxes of particles and heat. It is demonstrated numerically by using a particular example that the poloidal velocity calculated using the refined one-dimensional evolution equation differs substantially from that provided by the simplified model. When passing to the new model, both the turbulent Reynolds force and the Stringer-Winsor force increase, which leads to an increase in the amplitude of the ion poloidal velocity. This, in turn, leads to a decrease in turbulent fluxes of particles and heat due to the effect of shear decorrelation.

  9. Characterization of intense ion beam energy density and beam induced pressure on the target with acoustic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Yu. I.; Khailov, I. P.; Yu, Xiao

    2013-08-15

    We have developed the acoustic diagnostics based on a piezoelectric transducer for characterization of high-intensity pulsed ion beams. The diagnostics was tested using the TEMP-4M accelerator (150 ns, 250–300 kV). The beam is composed of C{sup +} ions (85%) and protons, the beam energy density is 0.5–5 J/cm{sup 2} (depending on diode geometry). A calibration dependence of the signal from a piezoelectric transducer on the ion beam energy density is obtained using thermal imaging diagnostics. It is shown that the acoustic diagnostics allows for measurement of the beam energy density in the range of 0.1–2 J/cm{sup 2}. The dependence of the beam generated pressure on the input energy density is also determined and compared with the data from literature. The developed acoustic diagnostics do not require sophisticated equipment and can be used for operational control of pulsed ion beam parameters with a repetition rate of 10{sup 3} pulses/s.

  10. Density and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Paraná Magmatic Province: Refertilization of an ancient lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Carlos; Ussami, Naomi; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    We estimate density and P-wave velocity perturbations in the mantle beneath the southeastern South America plate from geoid anomalies and P-wave traveltime residuals to constrain the structure of the lithosphere underneath the Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP) and conterminous geological provinces. Our analysis shows a consistent correlation between density and velocity anomalies. The P-wave speed and density are 1% and 15 kg/m3 lower, respectively, in the upper mantle under the Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic alkaline provinces, except beneath the Goiás Alkaline Province (GAP), where density (+20 kg/m3) and velocity (+0.5%) are relatively high. Underneath the PMP, the density is higher by about 50 kg/m3 in the north and 25 kg/m3 in the south, to a depth of 250 - 300 km. These values correlate with high-velocity perturbations of +0.5% and +0.3%, respectively. Profiles of density perturbation versus depth in the upper mantle are different for the PMP and the adjacent Archean São Francisco (SFC) and Amazonian (AC) cratons. The Paleoproterozoic PMP basement has a high-density root. The density is relatively low in the SFC and AC lithospheres. A reduction of density is a typical characteristic of chemically depleted Archean cratons. A more fertile Proterozoic and Phanerozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle has a higher density, as deduced from density estimates of mantle xenoliths of different ages and composition. In conjunction with Re-Os isotopic studies of the PMP basalts, chemical and isotopic analyses of peridodite xenoliths from the GAP in the northern PMP, and electromagnetic induction experiments of the PMP lithosphere, our density and P-wave speed models suggest that the densification of the PMP lithosphere and flood basalt generation are related to mantle refertilization. Metasomatic refertilization resulted from the introduction of asthenospheric components from the mantle wedge above Proterozoic subduction zones, which surrounded the Paraná lithosphere

  11. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  12. Split Hopkinson resonant bar test for sonic-frequency acoustic velocity and attenuation measurements of small, isotropic geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver—the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 °C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described split Hopkinson resonant bar test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples, and a natural rock sample.

  13. Fifth International Workshop on Detection, Classification, Localization and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals using Passive Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    spring 2011 in Seattle) • The Fourth International Conference on Detection and Classification of Marine Mammals using Passive Acoustics ( Pavia ...Italy, 2009) • The International BioAcoustic Congress ( Pavia , Italy, 2009) Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting

  14. Sound velocities of bridgmanite from density of states determined by nuclear inelastic scattering and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, Catherine; Caracas, Razvan; Glazyrin, Konstantin; Potapkin, Vasily; Kantor, Anastasia; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Prescher, Clemens; Kupenko, Ilya; Chumakov, Aleksandr; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-12-01

    Sound velocities of bridgmanite measured in the laboratory are a key to deciphering the composition of the lower mantle. Here, we report Debye sound velocities determined using nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) for one majorite composition (Mg0.82Fe0.18SiO3) and five bridgmanite compositions (Mg0.82Fe0.18SiO3, Mg0.86Fe0.14Si0.98Al0.02O3, Mg0.88Fe0.12SiO3, Mg0.6Fe0.4Si0.63Al0.37O3, Mg0.83Fe0.15Si0.98Al0.04O3) measured in a diamond anvil cell at pressures up to 89 GPa at room temperature. Debye sound velocities for majorite determined from NIS are consistent with literature data from Brillouin scattering and ultrasonics, while Debye sound velocities for bridgmanite are significantly lower than literature values from the same methods. We calculated partial and total density of states (DOS) for MgSiO3 and FeSiO3 bridgmanite using density functional theory and demonstrate that Debye sound velocities calculated from the reduced DOS using the same approach as for the experimental data (i.e., the limit of D(E)/E2 as energy goes to zero) give the same sound velocities for each phase irrespective of which partial DOS is used. In addition, we show that Debye sound velocities calculated using this approach are consistent with values obtained from the calculation of the full elastic tensor. Comparison of the calculated DOS with the one obtained from NIS indicates that the experimental DOS has enhanced intensity at low energies that leads to a different slope of the DOS and hence a lower sound velocity. This effect is present in all of the bridgmanite samples examined in this study.

  15. How the Density Environment Changes the Influence of the Dark Matter-Baryon Streaming Velocity on Cosmological Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamical effect of the relative velocity between dark matter and baryonic fluids, which remained supersonic after the epoch of recombination. The impact of this supersonic motion on the formation of cosmological structures was first formulated by Tseliakhovich & Hirata, in terms of the linear theory of small-scale fluctuations coupled to large-scale, relative velocities in mean-density regions. In their formalism, they limited the large-scale density environment to be that of the global mean density. We improve on their formulation by allowing variation in the density environment as well as the relative velocities. This leads to a new type of coupling between large-scale and small-scale modes. We find that the small-scale fluctuation grows in a biased way: faster in the overdense environment and slower in the underdense environment. We also find that the net effect on the global power spectrum of the density fluctuation is to boost its overall amplitude from the prediction by Tseliakhovich & Hirata. Correspondingly, the conditional mass function of cosmological halos and the halo bias parameter are both affected in a similar way. The discrepancy between our prediction and that of Tseliakhovich & Hirata is significant, and therefore, the related cosmology and high-redshift astrophysics should be revisited. The mathematical formalism of this study can be used for generating cosmological initial conditions of small-scale perturbations in generic, overdense (underdense) background patches.

  16. Density and velocity relationships for digital sonic and density logs from coastal Washington and laboratory measurements of Olympic Peninsula mafic rocks and greywackes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Christensen, Nikolas I.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional velocity models for the basins along the coast of Washington and in Puget Lowland provide a means for better understanding the lateral variations in strong ground motions recorded there. We have compiled 16 sonic and 18 density logs from 22 oil test wells to help us determine the geometry and physical properties of the Cenozoic basins along coastal Washington. The depth ranges sampled by the test-well logs fall between 0.3 and 2.1 km. These well logs sample Quaternary to middle Eocene sedimentary rocks of the Quinault Formation, Montesano Formation, and Hoh rock assemblage. Most (18 or 82%) of the wells are from Grays Harbor County, and many of these are from the Ocean City area. These Grays Harbor County wells sample the Quinault Formation, Montesano Formation, and frequently bottom in the Hoh rock assemblage. These wells show that the sonic velocity and density normally increase significantly across the contacts between the Quinault or the Montesano Formations and the Hoh rock assemblage. Reflection coefficients calculated for vertically traveling compressional waves from the average velocities and densities for these units suggest that the top of the Hoh rock assemblage is a strong reflector of downward-propagating seismic waves: these reflection coefficients lie between 11 and 20%. Thus, this boundary may reflect seismic energy upward and trap a substantial portion of the seismic energy generated by future earthquakes within the Miocene and younger sedimentary basins found along the Washington coast. Three wells from Jefferson County provide data for the Hoh rock assemblage for the entire length of the logs. One well (Eastern Petroleum Sniffer Forks #1), from the Forks area in Clallam County, also exclusively samples the Hoh rock assemblage. This report presents the locations, elevations, depths, stratigraphic, and other information for all the oil test wells, and provides plots showing the density and sonic velocities as a function of depth

  17. Velocity of detonation at any initial density without using heat of formation of explosives.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Mofrad, Reza Teimuri; Alamdari, Reza Fareghi; Moghadas, Mohammad Hassan; Mostofizadeh, Ali Reza; Sadeghi, Hossein

    2006-10-11

    The simplest method is introduced for reliable estimating the detonation velocity of large class of CHNO explosives based elemental composition and specific structural groups. There is no need to use heat of formation and the other experimental data for calculation of detonation velocity in the new procedure. Only elemental composition and the number of special structural groups without using heat of formation of explosive is sufficient for reliable desk calculation of detonation velocity. The results show good agreement with experimental values with respect to computed results obtained by complex computer code using BKWS and BKWR equations of state. Predicted velocities of detonation have root-mean-square (rms) percent deviation of 2.2, 5.9 and 5.3 from experimental data for new method, BKWS and BKWR equations of state, respectively.

  18. Feasibility of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters for the Production of Discharge Records from U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Ross, Jerry H.

    2002-01-01

    It is feasible to use acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVM's) installed at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations to compute records of river discharge. ADVM's are small acoustic current meters that use the Doppler principle to measure water velocities in a two-dimensional plane. Records of river discharge can be computed from stage and ADVM velocity data using the 'index velocity' method. The ADVM-measured velocities are used as an estimator or 'index' of the mean velocity in the channel. In evaluations of ADVM's for the computation of records of river discharge, the USGS installed ADVM's at three streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana: Kankakee River at Davis, Fall Creek at Millersville, and Iroquois River near Foresman. The ADVM evaluation study period was from June 1999 to February 2001. Discharge records were computed, using ADVM data from each station. Discharge records also were computed using conventional stage-discharge methods of the USGS. The records produced from ADVM and conventional methods were compared with discharge record hydrographs and statistics. Overall, the records compared closely from the Kankakee River and Fall Creek stations. For the Iroquois River station, variable backwater was present and affected the comparison; because the ADVM record compensates for backwater, the ADVM record may be superior to the conventional record. For the three stations, the ADVM records were judged to be of a quality acceptable to USGS standards for publications and near realtime ADVM-computed discharges are served on USGS real-time data World Wide Web pages.

  19. Liquid density analysis of sucrose and alcoholic beverages using polyimide guided Love-mode acoustic wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turton, Andrew; Bhattacharyya, Debabrata; Wood, David

    2006-02-01

    A liquid density sensor using Love-mode acoustic waves has been developed which is suitable for use in the food and drinks industries. The sensor has an open flat surface allowing immersion into a sample and simple cleaning. A polyimide waveguide layer allows cheap and simple fabrication combined with a robust chemically resistant surface. The low shear modulus of polyimide allows thin guiding layers giving a high sensitivity. A dual structure with a smooth reference device exhibiting viscous coupling with the wave, and a patterned sense area to trap the liquid causing mass loading, allows discrimination of the liquid density from the square root of the density-viscosity product (ρη)0.5. Frequency shift and insertion loss change were proportional to (ρη)0.5 with a non-linear response due to the non-Newtonian nature of viscous liquids at high frequencies. Measurements were made with sucrose solutions up to 50% and different alcoholic drinks. A maximum sensitivity of 0.13 µg cm-3 Hz-1 was achieved, with a linear frequency response to density. This is the highest liquid density sensitivity obtained for acoustic mode sensors to the best of our knowledge.

  20. Acoustic Metamaterials Through a Microfluidic, Bottom-up Approach: Toward Highly Attenuating, Negative Effective Density Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    material obtained through a microfluidic approach is shown on figure 1. In this approach, one can vary the average size and droplets volume fraction in the...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2012-0049 Acoustic metamaterials through a microfluidic , bottom-up approach: Toward highly attenuating, negative...2012 Final Report 26 Apr 2011 - 26 Sep 2012 Acoustic metamaterials through a microfluidic , bottom-up approach: Toward highly attenuating, negative

  1. Angular spectrum approach for the computation of group and phase velocity surfaces of acoustic waves in anisotropic materials

    PubMed

    Pluta; Schubert; Jahny; Grill

    2000-03-01

    The decomposition of an acoustic wave into its angular spectrum representation creates an effective base for the calculation of wave propagation effects in anisotropic media. In this method, the distribution of acoustic fields is calculated in arbitrary planes from the superposition of the planar components with proper phase shifts. These phase shifts depend on the ratio of the distance between the planes to the normal component of the phase slowness vector. In anisotropic media, the phase shifts depend additionally on the changes of the slowness with respect to the direction of the propagation vector and the polarization. Those relations are obtained from the Christoffel equation. The method employing the fast Fourier transformation algorithm is especially suited for volume imaging in anisotropic media, based on holographic detection in transmission of acoustic waves generated by a point source. This technique is compared with measurements on crystals performed by phase-sensitive scanning acoustic microscopy.

  2. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Himpel, Michael Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André; Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander; Ole Menzel, Kristoffer

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  3. Measurements of drift-wave-induced density and velocity fluctuations using high-speed passive impurity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Takashi; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Passive impurity spectroscopy is used to study high frequency ( 100 kHz) electron density and ion velocity fluctuations in the edge of MST reversed field pinch plasmas. When tearing modes are suppressed, stochastic transport is greatly reduced and microturbulence is anticipated to become important. Gyrokinetic simulations predict unstable trapped electron modes (TEM) in the edge region of these improved-confinement MST plasmas. Interferometry measurements reveal electron density fluctuations with wavenumbers, propagation direction, and a density-gradient threshold in good agreement with predictions for TEMs. These density fluctuations are also observed as emission fluctuations using a recently upgraded Ion Dynamics Spectrometer (IDS II) through edge passive C +2 measurements. The particle transport associated with TEMs will be evaluated directly by correlating the IDS-measured ion velocity and density fluctuations. The measurement is localized to the C +2 emission shell in the edge of the plasma, which is determined by a coronal charge-state balance model using ADAS. We used a large-throughput spectrometer originally developed for fast CHERS measurements and PMTs for light detection to achieve high time resolution. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  4. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  5. Multi-cavity coupling acoustic metamaterials with low-frequency broad band gaps based on negative mass density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuanhui; Wu, Jiu Hui; Cao, Songhua; Jing, Li

    2016-08-01

    This paper studies a novel kind of low-frequency broadband acoustic metamaterials with small size based on the mechanisms of negative mass density and multi-cavity coupling. The structure consists of a closed resonant cavity and an open resonant cavity, which can be equivalent to a homogeneous medium with effective negative mass density in a certain frequency range by using the parameter inversion method. The negative mass density makes the anti-resonance area increased, which results in broadened band gaps greatly. Owing to the multi-cavity coupling mechanism, the local resonances of the lower frequency mainly occur in the closed cavity, while the local resonances of the higher frequency mainly in the open cavity. Upon the interaction between the negative mass density and the multi-cavity coupling, there exists two broad band gaps in the range of 0-1800 Hz, i.e. the first-order band gap from 195 Hz to 660 Hz with the bandwidth of 465 Hz and the second-order band gap from 1157 Hz to 1663 Hz with the bandwidth of 506 Hz. The acoustic metamaterials with small size presented in this paper could provide a new approach to reduce the low-frequency broadband noises.

  6. Penetration of magnetosheath plasma into dayside magnetosphere: 1. Density, velocity, and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Pollock, Craig; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lyatskaya, Sonya; Avanov, Levon

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we examine a large number of plasma structures (filaments), observed with the Cluster spacecraft during 2 years (2007-2008) in the dayside magnetosphere but consisting of magnetosheath plasma. To reduce the effects observed in the cusp regions and on magnetosphere flanks, we consider these events predominantly inside the narrow cone ≤30° about the subsolar point. Two important features of these filaments are (i) their stable antisunward (earthward) motion inside the magnetosphere, whereas the ambient magnetospheric plasma moves usually in the opposite direction (sunward), and (ii) between these filaments and the magnetopause, there is a region of magnetospheric plasma, which separates these filaments from the magnetosheath. The stable earthward motion of these filaments and the presence of a region of magnetospheric plasma between these filaments and the magnetopause show the possible disconnection of these filaments from the magnetosheath, as suggested earlier by many researchers. The results also show that these events cannot be a result of back-and-forth motions of magnetopause position or surface waves propagating on the magnetopause. Another important feature of these filaments is their rotation about the filament axis, which might be a result of their passage through the velocity shear on magnetopause boundary. After crossing the velocity shear, the filaments get a rotational velocity, which has opposite directions in the noon-dusk and noon-dawn sectors. This rotation velocity may be an important factor, supporting the stability of these filaments and providing their motion into the magnetosphere.

  7. Penetration of Magnetosheath Plasma into Dayside Magnetosphere: 1. Density, Velocity, and Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Pollock, Craig; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lyatsky, Sonya; Avanov, Levon Albert

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine a large number of plasma structures (filaments), observed with the Cluster spacecraft during 2 years (2007-2008) in the dayside magnetosphere but consisting of magnetosheath plasma. To reduce the effects observed in the cusp regions and on magnetosphere flanks, we consider these events predominantly inside the narrow cone less than 30 about the subsolar point. Two important features of these filaments are (i) their stable antisunward (earthward) motion inside the magnetosphere, whereas the ambient magnetospheric plasma moves usually in the opposite direction (sunward), and (ii) between these filaments and the magnetopause, there is a region of magnetospheric plasma, which separates these filaments from the magnetosheath. The stable earthward motion of these magnetopause show the possible disconnection of these filaments from the magnetosheath, as suggested earlier by many researchers. The results also show that these events cannot be a result of back-and-forth motions of magnetopause position or surface waves propagating on the magnetopause. Another important feature of these filaments is their rotation about the filament axis, which might be a result of their passage through the velocity shear on magnetopause boundary. After crossing the velocity shear, the filaments get a rotational velocity, which has opposite directions in the noon-dusk and noon-dawn sectors. This rotation velocity may be an important factor, supporting the stability of these filaments and providing their motion into the magnetosphere.

  8. Pre-sheath density drop induced by ion-neutral friction along plasma blobs and implications for blob velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Furno, I.; Chabloz, V.; Fasoli, A.; Loizu, J.; Theiler, C.

    2014-01-15

    The pre-sheath density drop along the magnetic field in field-aligned, radially propagating plasma blobs is investigated in the TORPEX toroidal experiment [Fasoli et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 52, 124020 (2010)]. Using Langmuir probes precisely aligned along the magnetic field, we measure the density n{sub se} at a poloidal limiter, where blobs are connected, and the upstream density n{sub 0} at a location half way to the other end of the blobs. The pre-sheath density drop n{sub se}/n{sub 0} is then computed and its dependence upon the neutral background gas pressure is studied. At low neutral gas pressures, the pre-sheath density drop is ≈0.4, close to the value of 0.5 expected in the collisionless case. In qualitative agreement with a simple model, this value decreases with increasing gas pressure. No significant dependence of the density drop upon the radial distance into the limiter shadow is observed. The effect of reduced blob density near the limiter on the blob radial velocity is measured and compared with predictions from a blob speed-versus-size scaling law [Theiler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 065001 (2009)].

  9. Pre-sheath density drop induced by ion-neutral friction along plasma blobs and implications for blob velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furno, I.; Theiler, C.; Chabloz, V.; Fasoli, A.; Loizu, J.

    2014-01-01

    The pre-sheath density drop along the magnetic field in field-aligned, radially propagating plasma blobs is investigated in the TORPEX toroidal experiment [Fasoli et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 52, 124020 (2010)]. Using Langmuir probes precisely aligned along the magnetic field, we measure the density nse at a poloidal limiter, where blobs are connected, and the upstream density n0 at a location half way to the other end of the blobs. The pre-sheath density drop nse/n0 is then computed and its dependence upon the neutral background gas pressure is studied. At low neutral gas pressures, the pre-sheath density drop is ≈0.4, close to the value of 0.5 expected in the collisionless case. In qualitative agreement with a simple model, this value decreases with increasing gas pressure. No significant dependence of the density drop upon the radial distance into the limiter shadow is observed. The effect of reduced blob density near the limiter on the blob radial velocity is measured and compared with predictions from a blob speed-versus-size scaling law [Theiler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 065001 (2009)].

  10. Graphene, a material for high temperature devices – intrinsic carrier density, carrier drift velocity, and lattice energy

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yan; Cheng, Zengguang; Wang, Li; Jin, Kuijuan; Wang, Wenzhong

    2014-01-01

    Heat has always been a killing matter for traditional semiconductor machines. The underlining physical reason is that the intrinsic carrier density of a device made from a traditional semiconductor material increases very fast with a rising temperature. Once reaching a temperature, the density surpasses the chemical doping or gating effect, any p-n junction or transistor made from the semiconductor will fail to function. Here, we measure the intrinsic Fermi level (|EF| = 2.93 kBT) or intrinsic carrier density (nin = 3.87 × 106 cm−2K−2·T2), carrier drift velocity, and G mode phonon energy of graphene devices and their temperature dependencies up to 2400 K. Our results show intrinsic carrier density of graphene is an order of magnitude less sensitive to temperature than those of Si or Ge, and reveal the great potentials of graphene as a material for high temperature devices. We also observe a linear decline of saturation drift velocity with increasing temperature, and identify the temperature coefficients of the intrinsic G mode phonon energy. Above knowledge is vital in understanding the physical phenomena of graphene under high power or high temperature. PMID:25044003

  11. Use of acoustic velocity methodology and remote sensing techniques to measure unsteady flow on the lower Yazoo River in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cooper, Lance M.; Davis, Angela A.

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for computing continuous discharge during varied, non-uniform low and medium flows on the Yazoo River at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, using acoustic signal processing and conventional streamgaging techniques. Procedures were also developed to compute locations of discharges during future high flow events when the stream reach is subject to hi-directional and reverse flow caused by rising stages on the Mississippi River using a combination of acoustic equipment and remote sensing technology. A description of the study area is presented. Selected results of these methods are presented for the period from March through September 1997.

  12. The nearby spiral density-wave structure of the Galaxy: line-of-sight and longitudinal velocities of 223 Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Hou, Li-Gang; Jiang, Ing-Guey; Ngeow, Chow-Choong

    2017-02-01

    The data of 223 stars within 4 kpc from the Sun and 400 pc from the plane are collected from Melnik et al., who listed photometric distances and velocities of 674 long-period Cepheids in the disc of our Galaxy. Both line-of-sight and transverse along the Galactic longitude velocities of the selected stars are analysed on the assumption that the system is the subject to Lin-Shu-type moderately unstable, low-amplitude, tightly wound and rigidly rotating density waves. Minimization of the least-squares estimator S of measured and modelled velocities of stars was performed in the geometrical parameters of waves. The wave structures defined from the two independent samples of velocities are nearly similar. Different radial scales (wavelengths) of velocity inhomogeneity of about 1, 2 and 4 kpc, which do not depend on the number of spiral arms m, were found. But for now it is unclear if one can identify these scales as fully independent global modes of collective oscillations or they are Fourier harmonics of a single wave, or they just reveal the segments of large-scale Orion, Sagittarius and Perseus arms. The dominant mode is the one-armed wave for the main minimum of all S considered. However, because the S values for fits with m = 1-4 are almost equal the latter conclusion must be regarded as tentative until more extensive data are available. High-precision Gaia observations could reveal in the near future whether the wave-like velocity fluctuations near the Sun reported here do indeed exist.

  13. Using Passive and Active Acoustics to Examine Relationships of Cetacean and Prey Densities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    mounted on a glider running on two California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) lines and passive as well as active acoustic...Southwest Fisheries Science Center. WORK COMPLETED A preliminary experiment was carried out (see section Results) that documented sound production

  14. The Role of Riparian Vegetation Density, Channel Orientation and Water Velocity in Determining River Water Temperature Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, G.; Malcolm, I.; Sadler, J. P.; Hannah, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    There is substantial scientific and practical interest in the potential of riparian shading to mitigate climate change impacts on river temperature extremes. However, there is limited process-based evidence to determine the density and spatial extent of riparian tree planting required to obtain temperature targets under differing environmental conditions. A simulation experiment was used to understand the importance of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and flow velocity for stream energy budgets and river temperature dynamics. Water temperature and meteorological observations were obtained in addition to hemispherical photographs along a ~1 km reach of the Girnock Burn, a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland. Nine hemispherical images (representing different uniform canopy density scenarios) were used to parameterise a deterministic net radiation model and simulate radiative fluxes. For each vegetation scenario, the effects of eight channel orientations were investigated by changing the position of north at 45° intervals in each hemispheric image. Simulated radiative fluxes and observed turbulent fluxes drove a high-resolution water temperature model for the reach. Simulations were performed under low and high water velocity scenarios. Both velocity scenarios yielded decreases in mean (≥ 1.7 °C) and maximum (≥ 3.0 °C) temperature as canopy density increased. Slow-flowing water resided longer within the reach, which enhanced heat accumulation and dissipation and drove higher maximum and lower minimum temperatures. Intermediate levels of shade produced highly variable energy flux and water temperature dynamics depending on the channel orientation and thus the time of day when the channel was shaded. We demonstrate that in many reaches relatively sparse but strategically located vegetation could produce substantial reductions in maximum temperature and suggest that these criteria are used to inform future river management.

  15. Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high-velocity atmospheric entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, T.; Kallonen, A.; Suuronen, J.-P.; Rochette, P.; Hutzler, A.; Gattacceca, J.; Badjukov, D. D.; SkáLa, R.; BöHmová, V.; ČUda, J.

    2014-07-01

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at μm resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous), and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher entry velocities, complete melting follows the scoriaceous phase. Complete melting is accompanied by metal oxidation and redistribution, loss of porosity (1 ± 1%), and narrowing of the bulk (3.2 ± 0.5 g cm-3) and grain (3.3 ± 0.5 g cm-3) density range. Melted cosmic spherules with a barred olivine structure show an oriented crystallographic structure, whereas other subtypes do not.

  16. Potential, velocity, and density fields from redshift-distance samples: Application - Cosmography within 6000 kilometers per second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund; Dekel, Avishai; Faber, Sandra M.; Dressler, Alan; Burstein, David

    1990-01-01

    A potential flow reconstruction algorithm has been applied to the real universe to reconstruct the three-dimensional potential, velocity, and mass density fields smoothed on large scales. The results are shown as maps of these fields, revealing the three-dimensional structure within 6000 km/s distance from the Local Group. The dominant structure is an extended deep potential well in the Hydra-Centaurus region, stretching across the Galactic plane toward Pavo, broadly confirming the Great Attractor (GA) model of Lynden-Bell et al. (1988). The Local Supercluster appears to be an extended ridge on the near flank of the GA, proceeding through the Virgo Southern Extension to the Virgo and Ursa Major clusters. The Virgo cluster and the Local Group are both falling toward the bottom of the GA potential well with peculiar velocities of 658 + or - 121 km/s and 565 + or - 125 km/s, respectively.

  17. Linear relation between H I circular velocity and stellar velocity dispersion in early-type galaxies, and slope of the density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Oosterloo, Tom; Cappellari, Michele; den Heijer, Milan; Józsa, Gyula I. G.

    2016-08-01

    We report a tight linear relation between the H I circular velocity measured at 6 Re and the stellar velocity dispersion measured within 1 Re for a sample of 16 early-type galaxies with stellar mass between 1010 and 1011 M⊙. The key difference from previous studies is that we only use spatially resolved vcirc(H I) measurements obtained at large radius for a sizeable sample of objects. We can therefore link a kinematical tracer of the gravitational potential in the dark-matter dominated outer regions of galaxies with one in the inner regions, where baryons control the distribution of mass. We find that vcirc(H I)= 1.33 σe with an observed scatter of just 12 per cent. This indicates a strong coupling between luminous and dark matter from the inner- to the outer regions of early-type galaxies, analogous to the situation in spirals and dwarf irregulars. The vcirc(H I)-σe relation is shallower than those based on vcirc measurements obtained from stellar kinematics and modelling at smaller radius, implying that vcirc declines with radius - as in bulge-dominated spirals. Indeed, the value of vcirc(H I) is typically 25 per cent lower than the maximum vcirc derived at ˜0.2 Re from dynamical models. Under the assumption of power-law total density profiles ρ ∝ r-γ, our data imply an average logarithmic slope <γ> = 2.18 ± 0.03 across the sample, with a scatter of 0.11 around this value. The average slope and scatter agree with recent results obtained from stellar kinematics alone for a different sample of early-type galaxies.

  18. Effects of Lewis number, density ratio and gravity on burning velocity and conditional statistics in stagnating turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jaesung; Huh, Kang Y.

    2014-09-01

    DNS is performed to analyse the effects of Lewis number (Le), density ratio and gravity in stagnating turbulent premixed flames. The results show good agreement with those of Lee and Huh (Combustion and Flame, Vol. 159, 2012, pp. 1576-1591) with respect to the turbulent burning velocity, ST, in terms of turbulent diffusivity, flamelet thickness, mean curvature and displacement speed at the leading edge. In all four stagnating flames studied, a mean tangential strain rate resulting in a mean flamelet thickness smaller than the unstretched laminar flame thickness leads to an increase in ST. A flame cusp of positive curvature involves a superadiabatic burned gas temperature due to diffusive-thermal instability for an Le less than unity. Wrinkling tends to be suppressed at a larger density ratio, not enhanced by hydrodynamic instability, in the stagnating flow configuration. Turbulence is produced, resulting in highly anisotropic turbulence with heavier unburned gas accelerating through a flame brush by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results are also provided on brush thickness, flame surface density and conditional velocities in burned and unburned gas and on flame surfaces to represent the internal brush structures for all four test flames.

  19. Density and Sound Velocity of Iron-Sulfur Alloying Liquids at High Pressures and Implications to Planetary Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Z.; Wang, Y.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Kono, Y.; Park, C.

    2012-04-30

    Liquid Fe-light element alloys are likely present in the Earth's outer core and the cores (or outer cores) of other terrestrial planets such as Moon, Mercury, and Mars, suggested by geophysical and geochemical observations. In order to determine the abundances of light elements and their effects on the structure, dynamics, and evolution of planetary cores, it is crucial to determine the equation of state for Fe-light element alloying liquids under core conditions. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited and no sound velocity or bulk modulus data are available for these liquids at high pressures. This makes it difficult to extrapolate the equation of state to core pressures. As a result, density data on solid Fe alloys are often used in the literature to compare with seismological observations by making rough corrections for the volume of melting. In this study, we determine the density and sound velocity for Fe-S liquids with different sulfur contents at high pressure and temperature conditions up to 8 GPa and 2173 K using synchrotron X-ray techniques.

  20. The effect of baryons on redshift space distortions and cosmic density and velocity fields in the EAGLE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Frenk, Carlos S.; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.

    2016-09-01

    We use the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) galaxy formation simulation to study the effects of baryons on the power spectrum of the total matter and dark matter distributions and on the velocity fields of dark matter and galaxies. On scales k ≳ 4 h Mpc-1 the effect of baryons on the amplitude of the total matter power spectrum is greater than 1 per cent. The back-reaction of baryons affects the density field of the dark matter at the level of ˜3 per cent on scales of 1 ≤ k/( h Mpc-1) ≤ 5. The dark matter velocity divergence power spectrum at k ≲ 0.5 h Mpc-1 is changed by less than 1 per cent. The 2D redshift space power spectrum is affected at the level of ˜6 per cent at |k|≳ 1 h Mpc^{-1} (for μ > 0.5), but for |k|≤ 0.4 h Mpc^{-1} it differs by less than 1 per cent. We report vanishingly small baryonic velocity bias for haloes: the peculiar velocities of haloes with M200 > 3 × 1011 M⊙ (hosting galaxies with M* > 109 M⊙) are affected at the level of at most 1 km s-1, which is negligible for 1 per cent-precision cosmology. We caution that since EAGLE overestimates cluster gas fractions it may also underestimate the impact of baryons, particularly for the total matter power spectrum. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that for theoretical modelling of redshift space distortions and galaxy velocity-based statistics, baryons and their back-reaction can be safely ignored at the current level of observational accuracy. However, we confirm that the modelling of the total matter power spectrum in weak lensing studies needs to include realistic galaxy formation physics in order to achieve the accuracy required in the precision cosmology era.

  1. Tissue-Mimicking Materials Using Segmented Polyurethane Gel and Their Acoustic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tomoji; Tanaka, Kouhei; Kondo, Toshio; Yasukawa, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Shikinami, Yasuo

    2012-07-01

    Accurate testing of an instrument by phantoms requires a tissue-mimicking material that has the acoustic velocity and density defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard, and furthermore the tissue-mimicking material must be stable over time. To achieve the tissue-mimicking materials with the desired acoustic velocity and density defined in the IEC standard, new materials have been developed. The form of tissue-mimicking materials reported comprised polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles dispersed in segmented polyurethane gel. They were stable over a period of 40 days and the changes in weight and acoustic velocity did not exceed 0.5%.

  2. Some influences of approximate values for velocity, density and total temperature sensitivities on hot wire anemometer results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.

    1986-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in hot wire anemometry at transonic speeds. Recent results were published which indicate that at transonic speeds a heated wire is sensitive only to mass flow and total temperature, results similar to those obtained for supersonic flows. Other results were obtained to show that the sensitivity is a function of velocity, density, and total temperature, results in agreement with many of those obtained in the 1950s. An analysis of anemometry results was made to evaluate possible errors when various assumptions were made concerning the sensitivity of a heated wire to fluid flow variables.

  3. Acceleration of a solid-density plasma projectile to ultrahigh velocities by a short-pulse ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.

    2011-08-15

    It is shown by means of particle-in-cell simulations that a high-fluence ({>=}1 GJ/cm{sup 2}) solid-density plasma projectile can be accelerated up to sub-relativistic velocities by radiation pressure of an ultraviolet (UV) picosecond laser pulse of moderate values of dimensionless laser amplitude a{sub 0}{approx}10. The efficiency of acceleration by the UV laser is significantly higher than in the case of long-wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 1 {mu}m) driver of a comparable value of a{sub 0}, and the motion of the projectile is fairly well described by the ''Light Sail'' acceleration model.

  4. Acoustic velocity log numerical simulation and saturation estimation of gas hydrate reservoir in Shenhu area, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method.

  5. Acoustic Velocity Log Numerical Simulation and Saturation Estimation of Gas Hydrate Reservoir in Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method. PMID:23935407

  6. Measurement of inflight shell areal density perturbations in NIF capsule implosions near peak velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, B. A.; Pickworth, L.; Smalyuk, V.; Macphee, A.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H.; Barrios, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative measurements of shell-RhoR perturbations in capsules near peak implosion velocity (PV) are challenging. An external backlighter samples both sides of the shell, unless a re-entrant cone is used (potentially perturbing implosion). Emission from the hot core, after shock-stagnation and prior to PV, has been used as a self-backlighter, providing a means to sample one side of the capsule. Adding high-Z gas (~ 1% Ar) to the capsule fill in Symcaps (4He), has produced a continuum backlighter with significant increase in emission at photon energies ~ 8 keV over nominal fills. From images of the transmitted self-emission, above and below the K-edge of an internally doped Cu layer, we infer the growth at PV of imposed perturbations (100 nm amplitude, mode 40). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Method and apparatus for simultaneous determination of fluid mass flow rate, mean velocity and density

    DOEpatents

    Hamel, William R.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to a new method and new apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrate and density. In one aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through a straight cantilevered tube in which transient oscillation has been induced, thus generating Coriolis damping forces on the tube. The decay rate and frequency of the resulting damped oscillation are measured, and the fluid mass flowrate and density are determined therefrom. In another aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through the cantilevered tube while an electrically powered device imparts steady-state harmonic excitation to the tube. This generates Coriolis tube-damping forces which are dependent on the mass flowrate of the fluid. Means are provided to respond to incipient flow-induced changes in the amplitude of vibration by changing the power input to the excitation device as required to sustain the original amplitude of vibration. The fluid mass flowrate and density are determined from the required change in power input. The invention provides stable, rapid, and accurate measurements. It does not require bending of the fluid flow.

  8. Two Point Space-Time Correlation of Density Fluctuations Measured in High Velocity Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    Two-point space-time correlations of air density fluctuations in unheated, fully-expanded free jets at Mach numbers M(sub j) = 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8 were measured using a Rayleigh scattering based diagnostic technique. The molecular scattered light from two small probe volumes of 1.03 mm length was measured for a completely non-intrusive means of determining the turbulent density fluctuations. The time series of density fluctuations were analyzed to estimate the integral length scale L in a moving frame of reference and the convective Mach number M(sub c) at different narrow Strouhal frequency (St) bands. It was observed that M(sub c) and the normalized moving frame length scale L*St/D, where D is the jet diameter, increased with Strouhal frequency before leveling off at the highest resolved frequency. Significant differences were observed between data obtained from the lip shear layer and the centerline of the jet. The wave number frequency transform of the correlation data demonstrated progressive increase in the radiative part of turbulence fluctuations with increasing jet Mach number.

  9. Correlations between acoustic properties and bone density in bovine cancellous bone from 0.5 to 2 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il; Roh, Heui-Seol; Yoon, Suk Wang

    2003-05-01

    Correlations between acoustic properties and bone density were investigated in the 12 defatted bovine cancellous bone specimens in vitro. Speed of sound (SOS) and broadband ultrasonic attenuation (BUA) were measured in three different frequency bandwidths from 0.5 to 2 MHz using three matched pairs of transducers with the center frequencies of 1, 2.25, and 3.5 MHz. The relative orientation between ultrasonic beam and bone specimen was the mediolateral (ML) direction of the bovine tibia. SOS shows significant linear positive correlation with apparent density for all three pairs of transducers. However, BUA shows relatively weak correlation with apparent density. SOS and BUA are only weakly correlated with each other. The linear combination of SOS and BUA in a multiple regression model leads to a significant improvement in predicting apparent density. The correlations among SOS, BUA, and bone density can be effectively and clearly represented in the three-dimensional space by the multiple regression model. These results suggest that the frequency range up to 1.5 MHz and the multiple regression model in the three-dimensional space can be useful in the osteoporosis diagnosis.

  10. Ejecta velocity distribution of impact craters formed on quartz sand: Effect of projectile density on crater scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujido, Sayaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayako I.; Yasui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the effects of projectile density on ejecta velocity distributions for a granular target, impact cratering experiments on a quartz sand target were conducted by using eight types of projectiles with different densities ranging from 11 g cm-3 to 1.1 g cm-3, which were launched at about 200 m s-1 from a vertical gas gun at Kobe University. The scaling law of crater size, the ejection angle of ejecta grains, and the angle of the ejecta curtain were also investigated. The ejecta velocity distribution obtained from each projectile was well described by the π-scaling theory of v0/√{gR} =k2(x0/R)-1/μ , where v0, g, R and x0 are the ejection velocity, gravitational acceleration, crater radius and ejection position, respectively, and k2 and μ are constants mostly depending on target material properties (Housen, K.R., Holsapple, K.A. [2011]. Icarus 211, 856-875). The value of k2 was found to be almost constant at 0.7 for all projectiles except for the nylon projectile, while μ increased with the projectile density, from 0.43 for the low-density projectile to 0.6-0.7 for the high-density projectile. On the other hand, the π-scaling theory for crater size gave a μ value of 0.57, which was close to the average of the μ values obtained from ejecta velocity distributions. The ejection angle, θ, of each grain decreased slightly with distance, from higher than 45° near the impact point to 30-40° at 0.6 R. The ejecta curtain angle is controlled by the two elementary processes of ejecta velocity distribution and ejection angle; it gradually increased from 52° to 63° with the increase of the projectile density. The comparison of our experimental results with the theoretical model of the crater excavation flow known as the Z-model revealed that the relationship between μ and θ obtained by our experiments could not be described by the Z-model (Maxwell, D.E. [1977]. In: Roddy, D.J., Pepin, R.O., Merrill, R.B. (Eds.), Impact and Explosion Cratering

  11. Theoretical position-velocity diagrams of flux, electron density, and electron temperature in Herbig-Haro objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indebetouw, Remy; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    Many features of Herbig-Haro objects can be reproduced using a kinematical bow shock model. We use the model to generate position-velocity (PV) diagrams of flux in H-alpha (O I) lambda lambda 6300+63, (S II) lambda lambda 6716+31, (O III) lambda lambda 4959+5007, and (C I) lambda lambda 9823+50, line ratios of (O I)/H-alpha, (O I)/(S II), (S II)/H-alpha, H-alpha(S II), and (O III)/H-alpha, electron density N(sub e), and electron temperature T(sub e). We show how position-velocity diagrams of N(sub e) and flux vary with shock velocity. By matching the diagrams from single lines, the line ratios, and N(sub e) with observations, we determined a narrow range of shock parameters for HH 1F, 2(A' + H), and 43 (B + C). We model the N(sub e) features of HH 2(A' + H) as a superposition of two bowshocks. We also show that the effects of slight misalignments of the two diagrams to be divided can produce artifacts in the line ratios and N(sub e) which obliterate the physical features. We show that N(sub e) in HH 1 can only be explained using the kinematical model by taking these misalignments into account.

  12. Global Well-posedness of Incompressible Inhomogeneous Fluid Systems with Bounded Density or Non-Lipschitz Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingchi; Paicu, Marius; Zhang, Ping

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we first prove the global existence of weak solutions to the d-dimensional incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with initial data {a_0 in L^infty ({R}^d), u_0 = (u_0^h, u_0^d) in dot{B}^{-1+d/p}_{p, r} ({R}^d)}, which satisfy {(μ \\| a_0 \\|_{L^infty} + \\|u_0^h\\|_{dot{B}^{-1+d/p}_{p, r}}) exp(C_r{μ^{-2r}}\\|u_0^d\\|_{dot{B}^{-1+d/p}_{p,r}}^{2r}) ≤q c_0μ} for some positive constants c 0, C r and 1 < p < d, 1 < r < ∞. The regularity of the initial velocity is critical to the scaling of this system and is general enough to generate non-Lipschitz velocity fields. Furthermore, with additional regularity assumptions on the initial velocity or on the initial density, we can also prove the uniqueness of such a solution. We should mention that the classical maximal L p ( L q ) regularity theorem for the heat kernel plays an essential role in this context.

  13. Parameters of the Galactic density-wave spiral structure: Line-of-sight velocities of 156 star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Jiang, Ing-Guey; Russeil, Delphine

    2015-02-01

    This paper is the third in a series of articles devoted to the determination of the Milky Way's spiral density-wave structure from the kinematics of the Galactic objects, using the ordinary Oort equation. The minor effects caused by the Lin-Shu type two-dimensional density waves are also taken into account. The results obtained allow us to conclude that (a) several low-m spiral patterns with different number of spiral arms m and amplitudes of the perturbed gravitational potential may coexist in the Galaxy. (b) the single-armed m=1 spiral mode dominates the pattern. The distribution of stars and gas in outer parts of the system is thus asymmetric (“lopsided”), (c) the phase velocity of spiral waves (or the pattern rotation speed) does not depend on m and therefore each Fourier component of a gravity perturbation rotates with the same angular velocity, (d) the Sun lies between the main trailing spiral-arm segments in Carina-Sagittarius and Perseus, closer to the inner Carina-Sagittarius one. The local Cygnus-Orion arm in which the Sun is located is thus not a part of the main spiral pattern, and finally (e) the Galaxy seems to be more homogeneous and rotating more like a solid body than in the standard m=0 model (i.e. spiral arms not included in the model).

  14. The Lin-Shu type density wave structure of our Galaxy: line-of-sight velocities of 396 HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, E.; Hou, L.-G.; Jiang, I.-G.

    2015-11-01

    In this fifth paper in a series, we check again the Lin-Shu idea of small-amplitude density waves in our Galaxy. The updated catalogue of Galactic objects of Hou and Han (Hou and Han in Astron Astrophys 569:125-146, 2014), available in the literature, is used. The line-of-sight velocity field of 396 HII regions with known trigonometric or photometric distances and their uncertainties within 4 kpc from the Sun is investigated in terms of a wave perturbation. Our previous study is enlarged by examining the secondary minima of the residual sum of squares of the predicted and measured velocities of a sample of objects in a considerable region surrounding the Sun. Both the geometrical and physical parameters of the wave pattern are evaluated. Here we show, for the first time, that the local Cygnus-Orion spiral arm, where the Sun is located, does form a part of the major density wave structure of the system under the question but is not a spur originating at the inner Carina-Sagittarius arm or at the outer Perseus arm.

  15. Visualizing density perturbations in the capsule shell in NIF implosions near peak velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickworth, L. A.; Hammel, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Macphee, A.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H. F.; Field, J.; Barrios, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Engineering features on the capsule (surface roughness, support structures, etc.) can introduce outer surface perturbations that are ultimately detrimental to the performance of the capsule. Recent experiments have assessed minimal support structures and alternate pulse shapes using a re-entrant cone and back lighter that is perturbing to the implosion below radii of 500 μ m. Emission from the hot core, after shock-stagnation and prior to peak velocity (PV), has been used as a self-backlighter, providing a means to sample one side of the capsule at smaller radii. Adding high-Z gas ( 1 % Ar) to the capsule fill in Symcaps (4He), has produced a continuum backlighter with significant increase in emission at hv 8 keV over nominal fills. High-resolution imaging diagnostics with photon energy selectivity form 2D images of the transmitted self-emission, above and below the K-edge of an internally doped Cu layer. We can infer from these images the growth at PV of outer surface perturbations. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-697620.

  16. Sputtered SiO2 as low acoustic impedance material for Bragg mirror fabrication in BAW resonators.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Jimena; Wegmann, Enrique; Capilla, José; Iborra, Enrique; Clement, Marta; Vergara, Lucía; Aigner, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe the procedure to sputter low acoustic impedance SiO(2) films to be used as a low acoustic impedance layer in Bragg mirrors for BAW resonators. The composition and structure of the material are assessed through infrared absorption spectroscopy. The acoustic properties of the films (mass density and sound velocity) are assessed through X-ray reflectometry and picosecond acoustic spectroscopy. A second measurement of the sound velocity is achieved through the analysis of the longitudinal lambda/2 resonance that appears in these silicon oxide films when used as uppermost layer of an acoustic reflector placed under an AlN-based resonator.

  17. Acoustical Detection of High-Density Krill Demersal Layers in the Submarine Canyons off Georges Bank.

    PubMed

    Greene, C H; Wiebe, P H; Burczynski, J; Youngbluth, M J

    1988-07-15

    High-density demersal layers of krill have been detected in the submarine canyons off Georges Bank by means of a high-frequency, dual-beam bioacoustical technique. Krill densities in these demersal layers were observed to be two to three orders of magnitude greater than the highest densities observed in water-column scattering layers. Such abundances may help explain the unusually high squid and demersal fish production estimates attributed to the Georges Bank ecosystem.

  18. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes II: simulation for Spallation Neutron Sources and planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Baik, Kyungmin; Leighton, Timothy G

    2011-08-01

    This paper uses a finite element method (FEM) to compare predictions of the attenuation and sound speeds of acoustic modes in a fluid-filled pipe with those of the analytical model presented in the first paper in this series. It explains why, when the predictions of the earlier paper were compared with experimental data from a water-filled PMMA pipe, the uncertainties and agreement for attenuation data were worse than those for sound speed data. Having validated the FEM approach in this way, the versatility of FEM is thereafter demonstrated by modeling two practical applications which are beyond the analysis of the earlier paper. These applications model propagation in the mercury-filled steel pipework of the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee), and in a long-standing design for acoustic sensors for use on planetary probes. The results show that strong coupling between the fluid and the solid walls means that erroneous interpretations are made of the data if they assume that the sound speed and attenuation in the fluid in the pipe are the same as those that would be measured in an infinite volume of identical fluid, assumptions which are common when such data have previously been interpreted.

  19. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles, volume 1. [jet engine noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken to: (1) define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; (3) and to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan nozzle convergence angle, core extention length to annulus height ratio, and flow Mach number and temperatures were studied. The results are presented as normalized directivity plots.

  20. Ultramassive dense early-type galaxies: Velocity dispersions and number density evolution since z = 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, A.; Saracco, P.; Tamburri, S.; Lonoce, I.; Ciocca, F.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the stellar mass assembly history of ultramassive (M⋆ ≳ 1011M⊙) dense (Σ = M⋆/2πRe2> 2500M⊙ pc-2) early-type galaxies (ETGs, elliptical and spheroidal galaxies) selected on basis of visual classification over the last 9 Gyr. Methods: We traced the evolution of the comoving number density ρ of ultramassive dense ETGs and compared their structural (effective radius Re and stellar mass M⋆) and dynamical (velocity dispersion σe) parameters over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.6. We derived the number density ρ at 1.6 density of ultramassive dense local ETGs from the SDSS sample taking all of the selection bias affecting the spectroscopic sample into account. To compare the dynamical and structural parameters, we collected a sample of 11 ultramassive dense ETGs at 1.2 < z < 1.6 for which velocity dispersion measurements are available. For four of these ETGs (plus one at z = 1.91), we present previously unpublished estimates of velocity dispersion, based on optical VLT-FORS2 spectra. We probe the intermediate redshift range (0.2 ≲ z ≲ 0.9) and the local Universe with different ETGs samples. Results: We find that the comoving number density of ultramassive dense ETGs evolves with z as ρ(z) ∝ (1 + z)0.3 ± 0.8 implying a decrease of ~25% of the population of ultramassive dense ETGs since z = 1.6. By comparing the structural and dynamical properties of high-z ultramassive dense ETGs over the range 0 ≲ z < 1.6 in the [Re, M⋆, σe] plane, we find that all of the ETGs of the high-z sample have counterparts with similar properties in the local Universe. This implies either that the majority (~70%) of ultramassive dense ETGs already completed the assembly and shaping at ⟨ z ⟩ = 1.4, or that, if a significant portion of dense ETGs evolves in size, new

  1. A novel multi-segment path analysis based on a heterogeneous velocity model for the localization of acoustic emission sources in complex propagation media.

    PubMed

    Gollob, Stephan; Kocur, Georg Karl; Schumacher, Thomas; Mhamdi, Lassaad; Vogel, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    In acoustic emission analysis, common source location algorithms assume, independently of the nature of the propagation medium, a straight (shortest) wave path between the source and the sensors. For heterogeneous media such as concrete, the wave travels in complex paths due to the interaction with the dissimilar material contents and with the possible geometrical and material irregularities present in these media. For instance, cracks and large air voids present in concrete influence significantly the way the wave travels, by causing wave path deviations. Neglecting these deviations by assuming straight paths can introduce significant errors to the source location results. In this paper, a novel source localization method called FastWay is proposed. It accounts, contrary to most available shortest path-based methods, for the different effects of material discontinuities (cracks and voids). FastWay, based on a heterogeneous velocity model, uses the fastest rather than the shortest travel paths between the source and each sensor. The method was evaluated both numerically and experimentally and the results from both evaluation tests show that, in general, FastWay was able to locate sources of acoustic emissions more accurately and reliably than the traditional source localization methods.

  2. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  3. Nonlinear coupling of acoustic and shear mode in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with a density dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low frequency waves, in a collisionless, strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) with a density dependent viscosity, has been studied with a proper Galilean invariant generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. The well known reductive perturbation technique (RPT) has been employed in obtaining the solutions of the longitudinal and transverse perturbations. It has been found that the nonlinear propagation of the acoustic perturbations govern with the modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and are decoupled from the sheared fluctuations. In the regions, where transversal gradients of the flow exists, coupling between the longitudinal and transverse perturbations occurs due to convective nonlinearity which is true for the homogeneous case also. The results, obtained here, can have relative significance to astrophysical context as well as in laboratory plasmas.

  4. Anharmonic damping of terahertz acoustic waves in a network glass and its effect on the density of vibrational states.

    PubMed

    Baldi, G; Giordano, V M; Ruta, B; Dal Maschio, R; Fontana, A; Monaco, G

    2014-03-28

    We report the observation, by means of high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering, of an unusually large temperature dependence of the sound attenuation of a network glass at terahertz frequency, an unprecedentedly observed phenomenon. The anharmonicity can be ascribed to the interaction between the propagating acoustic wave and the bath of thermal vibrations. At low temperatures the sound attenuation follows a Rayleigh-Gans scattering law. As the temperature is increased the anharmonic process sets in, resulting in an almost quadratic frequency dependence of the damping in the entire frequency range. We show that the temperature variation of the sound damping accounts quantitatively for the temperature dependence of the density of vibrational states.

  5. Propagation of Electron Acoustic Soliton, Periodic and Shock Waves in Dissipative Plasma with a q-Nonextensive Electron Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hanbaly, A. M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Elgarayhi, A.; Kassem, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear properties of small amplitude electron-acoustic (EA) solitary and shock waves in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma with nonextensive distribution for hot electrons have been investigated. A reductive perturbation method used to obtain the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation. Bifurcation analysis has been discussed for non-dissipative system in the absence of Burgers term and reveals different classes of the traveling wave solutions. The obtained solutions are related to periodic and soliton waves and their behavior are shown graphically. In the presence of the Burgers term, the EXP-function method is used to solve the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation and the obtained solution is related to shock wave. The obtained results may be helpful in better conception of waves propagation in various space plasma environments as well as in inertial confinement fusion laboratory plasmas.

  6. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar Tribeche, Mouloud E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz; Bains, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  7. Dust ion-acoustic shock waves in charge varying dusty plasmas with electrons having vortexlike velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Tribeche, M.

    2010-12-15

    A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to investigate the properties of dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with vortexlike electron distribution. We use the ionization model, hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a trapped electron charging current derived from the well-known orbit limited motion theory. A new modified Burger equation is derived. Besides nonlinear trapping, this equation involves two kinds of dissipation (the anomalous one inherent to nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and the one due to the particle loss and ionization). These two kinds of dissipation can act concurrently. The traveling wave solution has been acquired by employing the modified extended tanh-function method. The shocklike solution is numerically analyzed based on the typical numerical data from laboratory dusty plasma devices. It is found that ion temperature, trapped particles, and weak dissipations significantly modify the shock structures.

  8. Cheap DECAF: Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Acoustic Fixed Sensors Using Separate, Non-Linked Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    was repeated every 5 days throughout the year, and a video was produced showing fin whale density over the course of the year. RESULTS Fin...whale density was estimated across the area of the hydrophone array over the course of the year and a video was produced. This video , and the methods...America (Mellinger et al. 2014). Figure 4 shows a frame from this video . A paper about this work is also in preparation for submission to J

  9. High density continuous production of murine pluripotent cells in an acoustic perfused bioreactor at different oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Ricardo P; Fluri, David A; Zandstra, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Strategies for the production of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) rely on serially dissociated adherent or aggregate-based culture, consequently limiting robust scale-up of cell production, on-line control and optimization of culture conditions. We recently developed a method that enables continuous (non-serially dissociated) suspension culture-mediated reprogramming to pluripotency. Herein, we use this method to demonstrate the scalable production of PSCs and early derivatives using acoustic filter technology to enable continuous oxygen-controlled perfusion culture. Cell densities of greater than 1 × 10⁷  cells/mL were achieved after 7 days of expansion at a specific growth rate (µ) of 0.61 ± 0.1 day⁻¹ with a perfusion rate (D) of 5.0 day⁻¹. A twofold increase in maximum cell density (to greater than 2.5 × 10⁷  cells/mL) was achieved when the medium dissolved oxygen was reduced (5% DO). Cell densities and viabilities >80% were maintained for extended production periods during which maintenance of pluripotency was confirmed by stable expression of pluripotency factors (SSEA-1 and Nanog), as well as the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. This work establishes a versatile biotechnological platform for the production of pluripotent cells and derivatives in an integrated, scalable and intensified stirred suspension culture.

  10. A Redshift Survey of IRAS Galaxies. II. Methods for Determining Self-consistent Velocity and Density Fields: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahil, Amos; Strauss, Michael A.; Davis, Marc; Huchra, John P.

    1991-11-01

    In the paper, "A Redshift Survey of IRAS Galaxies. II. Methods for Determining Self-consistent Velocity and Density Fields" by Amos Yahil, Michael A. Strauss, Marc Davis, and John P. Huchra (ApJ, 372,380 [1991]), Figures 14 and 15 were presented out of order, with their legends reversed. Thus, the figure at the bottom of page 391 is Figure 15, and should have the legend: "Fig. 15.-As in Fig. 13, for the method 3 results." The figure at the top of page 392 is Figure 14, and should have the legend: "Fig. 14.-Plot in Galactic coordinates of the quantity V_diff_ for galaxies within 3000 km s^-1^ of the LG. The symbol size is proportional to V_diff_ - 400 km s^-1^, which measures the deviation of the redshift- distance relation along the line of sight to that galaxy from pure Hubble flow."

  11. Rapid tuning CW laser technique for measurements of gas velocity, temperature, pressure, density, and mass flux using NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Albert Y.; Dirosa, Michael D.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1991-01-01

    An intracavity-doubled rapid-tuning CW ring dye laser was used to acquire fully resolved absorption profiles of NO line pairs in the A-X band at 225 nm at a rate of 4 kHz. These profiles were utilized for simultaneous measurements of flow parameters in the high-speed 1D flows generated in a shock tube. Velocity was determined from the Doppler shift, measured using a pair of profiles simultaneously acquired at different angles with respect to the flow direction. Temperature was determined from the intensity ratio of the adjacent lines. Pressure and density were found both from the collisional broadening and the fractional absorption. From this information the mass flux was determined. The results compare well to 1D shock calculations.

  12. A real time dynamic data acquisition and processing system for velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    The real time Dynamic Data Acquisition and Processing System (DDAPS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAPS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. DDAPS receives input from hot wire anemometers. Amplifiers and filters condition the signals with computer controlled modules. The analog signals are simultaneously digitized and digitally recorded on disk. Automatic acquisition collects necessary calibration and environment data. Hot wire sensitivities are generated and applied to the hot wire data to compute fluctuations. The presentation of the raw and processed data is accomplished on demand. The interface to DDAPS is described along with the internal mechanisms of DDAPS. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAPS is also provided.

  13. Acoustic tomography. Laboratory technique Implementation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvis, Jorge; Carvajal, Jenny

    2010-05-01

    From geomechanical tests carried out on rocks it is possible to determine its physico-mechanical properties, which relate the strain and applied stress; even so, conventional tests do not allow to identify how stress is distributed and how it has affected porous media. Today, techniques like acoustic tomography widely used in medicine, geophysics and others sciences, generates images by sections of the interior of a body. Acoustic tomography allows inferring the stress state within porous media; since wave velocities are closely related to media density, if a stress is applied to a rock, it will generate grains compaction and this will be showed by an increase of wave velocity. Implementation was conducted on rock plugs under diverse stress fields, simultaneously recording P-wave velocities (Compressional) on perpendicular planes to sample vertical axis. Transmission and reception of acoustic waves through porous media were done by piezoelectric crystals (PZT) used as sensors. A transmitting crystal excited by a voltage pulse causes a mechanical vibration, which travels across media; this is known as inverse piezoelectric effect. This vibration is recorded by a receiving crystal in which the direct piezoelectric effect appears; which dictates that if a piezoelectric is disturbed mechanically, an electrical signal between its terminals will appear. This electrical signal is used to obtain the wave velocity. Nevertheless, acoustic tomography corresponds to one of those called inverse Problems that arise when from observed data the model parameters must be obtained; in this way, tomography involves iterative reconstruction techniques (ART or SIRT) which are projections of observed data and its later inversion. Obtained results are cross-sectional images of velocity within the rock. In these images it is possible to identify where stress has a greater concentration observing the color map generated; thus, a greater velocity density area corresponding to a greater

  14. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  15. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  16. Characterizing spatial variability in velocity and turbulence intensity using 3-D acoustic Doppler velocimeter data in a plane-bed reach of East St. Louis Creek, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Gabrielle C. L.; Legleiter, Carl J.; Wohl, Ellen; Yochum, Steven E.

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the influence on flow resistance of flow structure and turbulence at the reach scale in a mountain channel using 3-D velocity measurements and geostatistical analysis to understand the complexity of the flow structure in a reach with limited bed irregularities. The increase in flow resistance at low flows in a plane-bed reach was not fully explained by grain resistance, therefore detailed 3-D velocity measurements were made to investigate spatial variability in velocity and turbulence components and potential controls on flow resistance. One plane-bed reach was surveyed over two stages in Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado, using a combination of a total station, LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), and a SonTek Flowtracker handheld ADV (acoustic Doppler velocimeter). LiDAR was used to capture bank and channel geometry at low flows, whereas the water surface and bed data were collected with the total station at all flows. We used the standard deviation of bed elevation (σb) within a moving window as an index of roughness height (ks) and calculated the relative submergence of the bed at different stages as h/ks, where h is the local flow depth. ADV measurements were collected on a grid with a 0.3 m to 0.5 m spacing. Geostatistical analysis of the velocity data indicated that the flow was highly three-dimensional and varied based on stage, demonstrating that even small irregularities in the bed have a significant influence on the flow characteristics. The streamwise component was the largest at both low and high flow, but varied more throughout the reach at low flow. At high flow, the greatest streamwise velocities were located within the thalweg. Areas of upwelling and downwelling also varied based on stage, with this component being strongly influenced by small changes in the morphology at high flow, and by protuberant grains at low flows. The cross-stream velocity and turbulence components were controlled by the flow structure and less by the

  17. International Workshop on Detection, Classification and Localization of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics (4th). International Workshop on Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics (1st)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-13

    Mars 55 Characterisation of sound subunits for humpback whale song analysis. F. Pace, P.R. White, O. Adam 56 Passive acoustic detection of Minke...International Monitoring System. Samaran Flore, Adam Olivier, Guinet Christophe 58 Detection of Minke whale sounds in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine...September 8.40 Characterisation of sound subunits for humpback whale song analysis. F. Pace, P.R. White, O. Adam 9.00 Passive acoustic detection of

  18. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  19. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  20. Thermoelastic properties of liquid Fe-C revealed by sound velocity and density measurements at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, Yuta; Terasaki, Hidenori; Urakawa, Satoru; Takubo, Yusaku; Kuwabara, Soma; Kishimoto, Shunpachi; Watanuki, Tetsu; Machida, Akihiko; Katayama, Yoshinori; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    Carbon is one of the possible light elements in the cores of the terrestrial planets. The P wave velocity (VP) and density (ρ) are important factors for estimating the chemical composition and physical properties of the core. We simultaneously measured the VP and ρ of Fe-3.5 wt % C up to 3.4 GPa and 1850 K by using ultrasonic pulse-echo method and X-ray absorption methods. The VP of liquid Fe-3.5 wt % C decreased linearly with increasing temperature at constant pressure. The addition of carbon decreased the VP of liquid Fe by about 2% at 3 GPa and 1700 K and decreased the Fe density by about 2% at 2 GPa and 1700 K. The bulk modulus of liquid Fe-C and its pressure (P) and temperature (T) effects were precisely determined from directly measured ρ and VP data to be K0,1700 K = 83.9 GPa, dKT/dP = 5.9(2), and dKT/dT = -0.063 GPa/K. The addition of carbon did not affect the isothermal bulk modulus (KT) of liquid Fe, but it decreased the dK/dT of liquid Fe. In the ρ-VP relationship, VP increases linearly with ρ and can be approximated as VP (m/s) = -6786(506) + 1537(71) × ρ (g/cm3), suggesting that Birch's law is valid for liquid Fe-C at the present P-T conditions. Our results imply that at the conditions of the lunar core, the elastic properties of an Fe-C core are more affected by temperature than those of Fe-S core.

  1. Valveless micropump driven by acoustic streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Youngki; Sok Kim, Eun

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes two valveless micropumps built on a 260 µm thick PZT with 20 µm thick parylene acoustic Fresnel lenses with air cavities. The micropumps produce in-plane body force through acoustic streaming effect of high-intensity acoustic beam that is generated by acoustic wave interference. The fabricated micropumps were shown to move microspheres, which have a diameter of 70-90 µm and a density of 0.99 g cm-3, on the water surface to form U-shape streams of microspheres with a drift velocity of 7.3 cm s-1 when the micropumps were located 4 mm below the water surface and driven by 160 Vpeak-to-peak pulsed sinusoidal waves. The driven microspheres formed U-shape streaming even without any fluidic channel according to the serial connection of the pie-shaped lenses and top electrodes. A micropump with a straight-lined fluidic channel was also fabricated and tested to show a 9.2 cm s-1 microspheres' drift velocity and a 9.5 mL min-1 volume pumping rate when combined with the acrylic acoustic wave reflector. Both the Fresnel lens and top electrode were patterned in a pie-shape with its apex angle of 90° to form asymmetric acoustic pressure distribution at the focal plane of the acoustic Fresnel lenses in order to push water in one direction.

  2. REVEALING VELOCITY DISPERSION AS THE BEST INDICATOR OF A GALAXY's COLOR, COMPARED TO STELLAR MASS, SURFACE MASS DENSITY, OR MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Wake, David A.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Franx, Marijn

    2012-06-01

    Using data of nearby galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we investigate whether stellar mass (M{sub star}), central velocity dispersion ({sigma}), surface mass density ({Sigma}), or the Sersic n parameter is best correlated with a galaxy's rest-frame color. Specifically, we determine how the mean color of galaxies varies with one parameter when another is fixed. When M{sub star} is fixed we see that strong trends remain with all other parameters, whereas residual trends are weaker when {Sigma}, n, or {sigma} is fixed. Overall {sigma} is the best indicator of a galaxy's typical color, showing the largest residual color dependence when any of the other three parameters are fixed, and M{sub star} is the poorest. Other studies have indicated that both the central black hole mass and possibly host dark matter halo properties (mass or concentration) are also better correlated with {sigma} than with M{sub star}, {Sigma}, or n. Therefore, it could be the case that the strong correlation between color and {sigma} reflects an underlying relationship between a galaxy's star formation history and/or present star formation rate and the properties of its dark matter halo and/or the feedback from its central supermassive black hole.

  3. Measuring Masses and Densities of Small Planets found by NASA's Kepler Spacecraft with Radial Velocity Measurements from Keck/HIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, G.; Rowe, J.; Kepler Team

    2013-06-01

    We use the Keck telescope and HIRES spectrometer to measure the masses of Kepler planet candidates. Analysis of 22 Kepler-identified planetary systems, holding 42 transiting planets (candidates) and 8 newly discovered non-transiting planets are presented herein. Combining the planet radius measurements from Kepler with mass measurements from Keck, we constrain the bulk density of short period planets that range in size from 1.0 to 3.0 Earth radii. Extensive ground based observations made by the Kepler Follow-up Program (KFOP) have provided extensive details about each KOI. Reconnaissance spectroscopy was used to refine the stellar and planet properties of each KOI at an early stage. SME spectral analysis and asteroseismology, when available, are used to obtain the final stellar properties. Adaptive Optics and speckle imaging constrain the presence of background eclipsing binaries that could masquerade as transiting planets. By combining ground based follow-up observations with Kepler photometry, a false positive probability is calculated for each KOI. An MCMC analysis that combines both Kepler photometry and Keck radial velocity measurements determines the final orbital parameters and planet properties for each system. The resulting mass vs. radius diagram for the planets reveals that radii increase with mass monotonically, well represented by a power law for the smallest planets. This M-R relationship offers key insights about the internal composition of the planets and the division between rocky and gaseous planets.

  4. Modeling and prediction of density distribution and microstructure in particleboards from acoustic properties by correlation of non-contact high-resolution pulsed air-coupled ultrasound and X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Sergio J; Hilbers, Ulrich; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Niemz, Peter; Sennhauser, Urs; Thömen, Heiko; Wenker, Jan L

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive density and microstructure quality control testing in particleboards (PBs) is necessary in production lines. A pulsed air-coupled ultrasound (ACU) high-resolution normal transmission system, together with a first wave tracking algorithm, were developed to image amplitude transmission G(p) and velocity c(p) distributions at 120kHz for PBs of specific nominal densities and five particle geometries, which were then correlated to X-ray in-plane density images ρ(s). Test PBs with a homogeneous vertical density profile were manufactured in a laboratory environment and conditioned in a standard climate (T=20°C, RH=65%) before the measurements. Continuous trends (R(2)>0.97) were obtained by matching the lateral resolution of X-ray images with the ACU sound field radius (σ(w)(o)=21mm) and by clustering the scatter plots. ρ(s)↦c(p) was described with a three-parameter non-linear model for each particle geometry, allowing for ACU density prediction with 3% uncertainty and PB testing according to EN312. ρ(s)↦G(p) was modeled by calculating ACU coupling gain and by fitting inverse power laws with offset of ρ(s) and c(p) to material attenuation, which scaled with particle volume. G(p) and c(p) variations with the frequency were examined, showing thickness resonances and scattering attenuation. The combination of ACU and X-ray data enabled successful particle geometry classification. The observed trends were interpreted in terms of multi-scale porosity and grain scattering with finite-difference time-domain simulations, which modeled arbitrarily complex stiffness and density distributions. The proposed method allows for non-contact determination of relations between acoustic properties and in-plane density distribution in plate materials. In future work, commercial PBs with non-uniform vertical density profiles should be investigated.

  5. Broadband Metamaterial for Nonresonant Matching of Acoustic Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    transmission (EOT)5–8. Lately, it has been extended to acoustic waves, as extraordinary acoustic transmission ( EAT )9–11. Usually these phenomena are achieved... EAT limitations. To this goal, we show a way to manipulate the effective constitutive properties (density reff and sound velocity ceff) of an...obtained. Most EAT phenomena rely on resonance effects that are inherently narrow-band, and for which large transmission is usually hindered by

  6. Comparison, analysis, and estimation of discharge data from two acoustic velocity meters on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melching, Charles S.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM) on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (the Canal) at Romeoville, Ill., provides vital information for the accounting of the diversion of water from Lake Michigan. A detailed analysis of the discharge record on the Canal at Romeoville was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to establish the most accurate estimates of discharge for water years 1986-91. The analysis involved (1) checking the consistency of the discharges estimated by two different AVM's installed at Romeoville for consecutive time periods by statistical and regression analyses, (2) adjusting the discharge record to account for corrections to the width and depth of the Canal determined by field measurements, and (3) development of equations for estimating discharge on days when the AVM was inoperative using discharge estimates made by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago at the lock, powerhouse, and controlling works at Lockport, Ill. No signi- ficant difference in the discharge estimates made by the two AVM's could be documented. The estimation equations combined regression analysis with physical principles of the outlet-works operation. The estimation equations simulated the verification period of October 1, 1991, to May 31, 1992, within 0.22, 5.15, and 0.66 percent for the mean, standard deviation, and skewness coefficient, respectively. Discharges were recalculated for the corrected width and depth, estimated for the periods of AVM inoperation, and entered into the discharge record for the station.

  7. Gravimetric and density profiling using the combination of surface acoustic waves and neutron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Toolan, Daniel T W; Barker, Robert; Gough, Tim; Topham, Paul D; Howse, Jonathan R; Glidle, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    A new approach is described herein, where neutron reflectivity measurements that probe changes in the density profile of thin films as they absorb material from the gas phase have been combined with a Love wave based gravimetric assay that measures the mass of absorbed material. This combination of techniques not only determines the spatial distribution of absorbed molecules, but also reveals the amount of void space within the thin film (a quantity that can be difficult to assess using neutron reflectivity measurements alone). The uptake of organic solvent vapours into spun cast films of polystyrene has been used as a model system with a view to this method having the potential for extension to the study of other systems. These could include, for example, humidity sensors, hydrogel swelling, biomolecule adsorption or transformations of electroactive and chemically reactive thin films. This is the first ever demonstration of combined neutron reflectivity and Love wave-based gravimetry and the experimental caveats, limitations and scope of the method are explored and discussed in detail.

  8. Joint Inversion of Geoid Anomaly and Teleseismic P-Wave Delay Times: Modeling Density and Velocity Perturbations Beneath the Parana Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, C. A. M.; Ussami, N.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Parana Magmatic Province (PMP) is one of the largest continental igneous provinces (LIP) on Earth. It is well dated at 133 Ma preceding the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, but the causative geodynamic processes are still poorly understood. Although a low-velocity anomaly has been imaged by seismic tomography in the northeast region of the PMP and interpreted as a fossil conduct of a mantle plume that is related to the flood basalt eruptions, geochemical data indicate that such magmatism is caused by the melting of a heterogeneous and enriched lithospheric mantle with no deep plume participation. Models of density perturbations in the upper mantle estimated from joint inversion of geoid anomalies and P-wave delay times will offer important constraints on mantle dynamics. A new generation of accurate global geopotential models derived from satellite-missions (e.g. GRACE, GOCE) allows us to estimate density distribution within the Earth from geoid inversion. In order to obtain the residual geoid anomaly related to the density structure of the mantle, we use the EGM2008 model removing estimated geoid perturbations owing to variations in crustal structure (i.e., topographical masses, Moho depth, thickness of sediments and basalts). Using a spherical-Earth approximation, the density model space is represented by a set of tesseroids and the velocity model is parameterized in nodes of a spherical grid where cubic B-splines are utilized as an interpolation function. To constrain the density inversion, we add more than 10,000 manually picked teleseismic P-wave delay times. During the inversion procedure, density and P-wave velocity are linked through the optimization of a constant linear factor correlating density and velocity perturbation. Such optimization will be performed using a probability density function (PDF) [Tarantola, 2005]. We will present the preliminary results of this joint inversion scheme and hypothesize on the geodynamic processes responsible for

  9. A regional view of urban sedimentary basins in Northern California based on oil industry compressional-wave velocity and density logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    Compressional-wave (sonic) and density logs from 119 oil test wells provide knowledge of the physical properties and impedance contrasts within urban sedimentary basins in northern California, which is needed to better understand basin amplification. These wire-line logs provide estimates of sonic velocities and densities for primarily Upper Cretaceous to Pliocene clastic rocks between 0.1 - and 5.6-km depth to an average depth of 1.8 km. Regional differences in the sonic velocities and densities in these basins largely 1reflect variations in the lithology, depth of burial, porosity, and grain size of the strata, but not necessarily formation age. For example, Miocene basin filling strata west of the Calaveras Fault exhibit higher sonic velocities and densities than older but finer-grained and/or higher-porosity rocks of the Upper Cretaceous Great Valley Sequence. As another example, hard Eocene sandstones west of the San Andreas Fault have much higher impedances than Eocene strata, mainly higher-porosity sandstones and shales, located to the east of this fault, and approach those expected for Franciscan Complex basement rocks. Basement penetrations define large impedence contrasts at the sediment/basement contact along the margins of several basins, where Quaternary, Pliocene, and even Miocene deposits directly overlie Franciscan or Salinian basement rocks at depths as much as 1.7 km. In contrast, in the deepest, geographic centers of the basins, such logs exhibit only a modest impedance contrast at the sediment/basement contact at depths exceeding 2 km. Prominent (up to 1 km/sec) and thick (up to several hundred meters) velocity and density reversals in the logs refute the common assumption that velocities and densities increase monotonically with depth.

  10. Determining generic velocity and density models for crustal amplification calculations, with an update of the Boore and Joyner (1997) Generic Site Amplification for Graphic Site Amplification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David

    2016-01-01

    This short note contains two contributions related to deriving depth‐dependent velocity and density models for use in computing generic crustal amplifications. The first contribution is a method for interpolating two velocity profiles to obtain a third profile with a time‐averaged velocity  to depth Z that is equal to a specified value (e.g., for shear‐wave velocity VS,  for Z=30  m, in which the subscript S has been added to indicate that the average is for shear‐wave velocities). The second contribution is a procedure for obtaining densities from VS. The first contribution is used to extend and revise the Boore and Joyner (1997) generic rock VS model, for which , to a model with the more common . This new model is then used with the densities from the second contribution to compute crustal amplifications for a generic site with .

  11. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: High-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and the role of conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Churazov, E.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E. T.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2014-09-01

    Exploring the power spectrum of fluctuations and velocities in the intracluster medium (ICM) can help us to probe the gas physics of galaxy clusters. Using high-resolution 3D plasma simulations, we study the statistics of the velocity field and its intimate relation with the ICM thermodynamic perturbations. The normalization of the ICM spectrum (related to density, entropy, or pressure fluctuations) is linearly tied to the level of large-scale motions, which excite both gravity and sound waves due to stratification. For a low 3D Mach number M ~ 0.25, gravity waves mainly drive entropy perturbations, which are traced by preferentially tangential turbulence. For M> 0.5, sound waves start to significantly contribute and pass the leading role to compressive pressure fluctuations, which are associated with isotropic (or slightly radial) turbulence. Density and temperature fluctuations are then characterized by the dominant process: isobaric (low M), adiabatic (high M), or isothermal (strong conduction). Most clusters reside in the intermediate regime, showing a mixture of gravity and sound waves, hence drifting toward isotropic velocities. Remarkably, regardless of the regime, the variance of density perturbations is comparable to the 1D Mach number, M1D ~ δρ/ρ. This linear relation allows us to easily convert between gas motions and ICM perturbations (δρ/ρ< 1), which can be exploited by the available Chandra, XMM data and by the forthcoming Astro-H mission. At intermediate and small scales (10-100 kpc), the turbulent velocities develop a tight Kolmogorov cascade. The thermodynamic perturbations (which can be generally described by log-normal distributions) act as effective tracers of the velocity field, in broad agreement with the Kolmogorov-Obukhov-Corrsin advection theory. The cluster radial gradients and compressive features induce a flattening in the cascade of the perturbations. Thermal conduction, on the other hand, acts to damp the thermodynamic

  12. Effects of nonthermal distribution of electrons and polarity of net dust-charge number density on nonplanar dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves.

    PubMed

    Mamun, A A; Shukla, P K

    2009-09-01

    Effects of the nonthermal distribution of electrons as well as the polarity of the net dust-charge number density on nonplanar (viz. cylindrical and spherical) dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) are investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. It is found that the basic features of the DIASWs are significantly modified by the effects of nonthermal electron distribution, polarity of net dust-charge number density, and nonplanar geometry. The implications of our results in some space and laboratory dusty plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  13. Laser ultrasonic surface wave inspection of alumina ceramics of varying density

    PubMed

    Kehoe; Coyle; Murray; Flannery; Crean

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, the surface acoustic wave velocity results acquired from the inspection of specially manufactured and characterised alumina ceramic materials are presented. Ultrasonic velocity data of alumina-based ceramics in the range 60-100% theoretical density was generated utilising non-contacting laser-ultrasonic measurements based on laser generation and detection of surface acoustic waves with the objective of creating a routine technique for industrial advanced alumina inspection. With linear fitting the surface acoustic wave velocity data serves as a calibration graph for using laser ultrasonics for routine monitoring of alumina. A second laser ultrasonic technique based on the laser generation and foil transducer detection of surface acoustic waves was used to validate the surface acoustic wave velocities measured by the laser generation/detection technique.

  14. Finite temperature and density depletion effects on persistent current state transitions and critical velocity of a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avinash; Eckel, Stephen; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Campbell, Gretchen

    We study the decay of a persistent, quantized current state in a toroidal geometry. Our experiment involves trapping neutral 23Na atoms in an all optical ``target trap'' shaped potential. This potential consists of a disc surrounded by an annular potential. A current in a superfluid can be sustained only below a critical current. This critical current can be tuned by introducing a density perturbation which depletes the local density. The decay time of a persistent current state can also be controlled by enhancing fluctuations of the system thermally. We study the decay at four different temperatures between 30 nK and 190 nK. For each temperature we record the decay at four different perturbation strengths. We find that increasing the magnitude of the density depletion or the temperature leads to a faster decay, and have seen the decay constant change by over two orders of magnitude. We also studied the size of hysteresis loop between different current states as a function of temperature, allowing us to extract a critical velocity. We find that the discrepancies between the experimentally extracted critical velocity and theoretically calculated critical velocity (using local-density approximation) decreases as the temperature is decreased. Now at University of Heidelberg.

  15. Studies of velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar. I - Azimuthal anisotropy. II - Momentum fluxes and energy densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Smith, S. A.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Fritts, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a six-day campaign to observe velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar (Fukao et al., 1985) in Shigaraki, Japan in March, 1986. Consideration is given to the azimuthal anisotropy, the frequency spectra, the vertical profiles of energy density, and the momentum flux of the motion field. It is found that all of the observed azimuthal variations are probably caused by a gravity wave field whose parameters vary with time. The results show significant differences between the mean zonal and meridional frequency spectra and different profiles of mean energy density with height for different frequency bands and for zonal and meridional components.

  16. Anomalous density and elastic properties of basalt at high pressure: Reevaluating of the effect of melt fraction on seismic velocity in the Earth's crust and upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alisha N.; Lesher, Charles E.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Wang, Yanbin

    2016-06-01

    Independent measurements of the volumetric and elastic properties of Columbia River basalt glass were made up to 5.5 GPa by high-pressure X-ray microtomography and GHz-ultrasonic interferometry, respectively. The Columbia River basalt displays P and S wave velocity minima at 4.5 and 5 GPa, respectively, violating Birch's law. These data constrain the pressure dependence of the density and elastic moduli at high pressure, which cannot be modeled through usual equations of state nor determined by stepwise integrating the bulk sound velocity as is common practice. We propose a systematic variation in compression behavior of silicate glasses that is dependent on the degree of polymerization and arises from the flexibility of the aluminosilicate network. This behavior likely persists into the liquid state for basaltic melts resulting in weak pressure dependence for P wave velocities perhaps to depths of the transition zone. Modeling the effect of partial melt on P wave velocity reductions suggests that melt fraction determined by seismic velocity variations may be significantly overestimated in the crust and upper mantle.

  17. Velocity fluctuation analysis via dynamic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Gupta, D. K.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.

    2006-10-15

    A new method of calculating one-dimensional velocity fluctuations from spatially resolved density fluctuation measurements is presented. The algorithm uses vector-matching methods of dynamic programming that match structures, such as turbulent fluctuations, in two data sets. The associated time delay between data sets is estimated by determining an optimal path to transform one vector to another. This time-delay-estimation (TDE) method establishes a new benchmark for velocity analysis by achieving higher sensitivity and frequency response than previously developed methods, such as time-resolved cross correlations and wavelets. TDE has been successfully applied to beam emission spectroscopy measurements of density fluctuations to obtain poloidal flow fluctuations associated with such phenomena as the geodesic acoustic mode. The dynamic programming algorithm should allow extension to high frequency velocity fluctuations associated with underlying electrostatic potential and resulting ExB fluctuations.

  18. SU-D-210-07: The Dependence On Acoustic Velocity of Medium On the Needle Template and Electronic Grid Alignment in Ultrasound QA for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, P; Kapoor, R; Curran, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the impact on acoustic velocity (AV) of two different media (water and milk) using the needle template/electronic grid alignment test. Water, easily available, makes a good material to test the alignment of the template and grid although water’s AV (1498 m/s at 25°C) is significantly different from tissue (1540 m/s). Milk, with an AV much closer (1548 m/s) to prostate tissue, may be a good substitute for water in ultrasound quality assurance testing. Methods: Tests were performed using a Hitachi ultrasound unit with a mechanical arrangement designed to position needles parallel to the transducer. In this work, two materials – distilled water and homogenized whole milk (AVs of 1498 and 1548 m/s at 25°C) were used in a phantom to test ultrasound needle/grid alignment. The images were obtained with both materials and analyzed for their placement accuracy. Results: The needle template/electronic grid alignment tests showed displacement errors between measured and calculated values. The measurements showed displacements of 2.3mm (water) and 0.4mm (milk), and 1.6mm (water) and 0.3mm (milk) at depths of 7cm and 5cm respectively from true needle positions. The calculated results showed a displacement of 2.36 mm (water); 0.435mm (milk), and 1.66mm (water) and 0.31mm (milk) at a depth of 7cm and 5cm respectively. The displacements in the X and Y directions were also calculated. At depths of 7cm and 5cm, the (ΔX,ΔY) displacements in water were (0.829mm, 2.21mm) and (0.273mm, 1.634mm) and for milk were (0.15mm, 0.44mm) and (0.05mm, 0.302mm) respectively. Conclusion: The measured and calculated values were in good agreement for all tests. They show that milk provides superior results when performing needle template and electronic grid alignment tests for ultrasound units used in prostate brachytherapy.

  19. Measured Properties of Turbulent Premixed Flames for Model Assessment, Including Burning Velocities, Stretch Rates, and Surface Densities (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Thermophoresis is the tendency for a particle to drift “down” the temperature gradient. Sung et al. [48] found that the thermophoretic drift velocity...with flamefront strain) are mini- mally affected by thermophoresis since the tempera- ture gradient is small. While deriving a contribution to the

  20. Methods for passivating silicon devices at low temperature to achieve low interface state density and low recombination velocity while preserving carrier lifetime

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Zhizhang; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    1995-01-01

    A new process has been developed to achieve a very low SiO.sub.x /Si interface state density D.sub.it, low recombination velocity S (<2 cm/s), and high effective carrier lifetime T.sub.eff (>5 ms) for oxides deposited on silicon substrates at low temperature. The technique involves direct plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with appropriate growth conditions, followed by a photo-assisted rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process. Approximately 500-A-thick SiO.sub.x layers are deposited on Si by PECVD at 250.degree. C. with 0.02 W/cm.sup.-2 rf power, then covered with SiN or an evaporated thin aluminum layer, and subjected to a photo-assisted anneal in forming gas ambient at 350.degree. C., resulting in an interface state density D.sub.it in the range of about 1-4.times.10.sup.10 cm.sup.-2 eV.sup.-1, which sets a record for the lowest interface state density D.sub.it for PECVD oxides fabricated to date. Detailed analysis shows that the PECVD deposition conditions, photo-assisted anneal, forming gas ambient, and the presence of an aluminum layer on top of the oxides during the anneal, all contributed to this low value of interface state density D.sub.it. Detailed metal-oxide semiconductor analysis and model calculations show that such a low recombination velocity S is the result of moderately high positive oxide charge (5.times.10.sup.11 -1.times.10.sup.12 cm.sup.-2) and relatively low midgap interface state density (1.times.10.sup.10 -4.times.10.sup.10 cm.sup.-2 eV.sup.-1). Photo-assisted anneal was found to be superior to furnace annealing, and a forming gas ambient was better than a nitrogen ambient for achieving a very low surface recombination velocity S.

  1. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  2. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  3. Velocity resolved [C ii], [C i], and CO observations of the N159 star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud: a complex velocity structure and variation of the column densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoko; Requena-Torres, Miguel Angel; Güsten, Rolf; Stutzki, Jürgen; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Pütz, Patrick; Ricken, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Context. The [C ii] 158 μm fine structure line is one of the dominant cooling lines in star-forming active regions. Together with models of photon-dominated regions, the data is used to constrain the physical properties of the emitting regions, such as the density and the radiation field strength. According to the modeling, the [C ii] 158 μm line integrated intensity compared to the CO emission is expected to be stronger in lower metallicity environments owing to lower dust shielding of the UV radiation, a trend that is also shown by spectral-unresolved observations. In the commonly assumed clumpy UV-penetrated cloud scenario, the models predict a [C ii] line profile similar to that of CO. However, recent spectral-resolved observations by Herschel/HIFI and SOFIA/GREAT (as well as the observations presented here) show that the velocity resolved line profile of the [C ii] emission is often very different from that of CO lines, indicating a more complex origin of the line emission including the dynamics of the source region. Aims: The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) provides an excellent opportunity to study in great detail the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a low-metallicity environment by spatially resolving individual star-forming regions. The aim of our study is to investigate the physical properties of the star-forming ISM in the LMC by separating the origin of the emission lines spatially and spectrally. In this paper, we focus on the spectral characteristics and the origin of the emission lines, and the phases of carbon-bearing species in the N159 star-forming region in the LMC. Methods: We mapped a 4' × (3'-4') region in N159 in [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm with the GREAT instrument on board SOFIA. We also observed CO(3-2), (4-3), (6-5), 13CO(3-2), and [C i] 3P1-3P0 and 3P2-3P1 with APEX. All spectra are velocity resolved. Results: The emission of all transitions observed shows a large variation in the line profiles across the map and in

  4. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  5. The spiral density-wave structure of our own Galaxy as traced by open clusters: Least-squares analysis of line-of-sight velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, Evgeny; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2014-05-01

    The rotation about the Galactic center of open clusters belonging to the thin component of the Milky Way Galaxy is studied on the basis of line-of-sight velocities and positions for 169 nearby objects taken from the literature. The minor second-order effects caused by the Lin-Shu-type density waves are taken into account by using the least-squares numerical method. Even preliminary, the physical interpretation of the results obtained in this manner shows that (i) among several Fourier modes of collective oscillations developing in the solar neighborhood the one-armed m=1 spiral mode is the main one; the Galaxy has thus significant lopsidedness in the stellar distribution at large radii, (ii) the Sun is located between the major trailing spiral-arm segments in Carina-Sagittarius and Perseus, closer to the outer Perseus one, (iii) the local Cygnus-Orion segment is not a part of the dominant spiral arm but is a minor one, which is due to a secondary Fourier harmonic of the Galaxy’s oscillations, (iv) the pitch angle of the dominant density-wave pattern in the solar vicinity seems to be relatively small, of the order of 7°, and the wavelength (the radial distance between spiral arms) of the m=1 pattern is about 6 kpc, (v) the Galactocentric distance where the velocities of disk rotation and of the spiral density wave (the corotation radius) coincide is located outside of the solar circle; thus, a pattern angular speed lower than the local angular rotation velocity, and finally (vi) the spiral arms of the Galaxy do not represent small deviations of the surface density and gravitational potential from a basic distribution that is axisymmetric in the mean.

  6. Controls on sonic velocity in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Eberli, Gregor P.

    1993-06-01

    Compressional and shear-wave velocities ( V p and V s) of 210 minicores of carbonates from different areas and ages were measured under variable confining and pore-fluid pressures. The lithologies of the samples range from unconsolidated carbonate mud to completely lithified limestones. The velocity measurements enable us to relate velocity variations in carbonates to factors such as mineralogy, porosity, pore types and density and to quantify the velocity effects of compaction and other diagenetic alterations. Pure carbonate rocks show, unlike siliciclastic or shaly sediments, little direct correlation between acoustic properties ( V p and V s) with age or burial depth of the sediments so that velocity inversions with increasing depth are common. Rather, sonic velocity in carbonates is controlled by the combined effect of depositional lithology and several post-depositional processes, such as cementation or dissolution, which results in fabrics specific to carbonates. These diagenetic fabrics can be directly correlated to the sonic velocity of the rocks. At 8 MPa effective pressure V p ranges from 1700 to 6500 m/s, and V s ranges from 800 to 3400 m/s. This range is mainly caused by variations in the amount and type of porosity and not by variations in mineralogy. In general, the measured velocities show a positive correlation with density and an inverse correlation with porosity, but departures from the general trends of correlation can be as high as 2500 m/s. These deviations can be explained by the occurrence of different pore types that form during specific diagenetic phases. Our data set further suggests that commonly used correlations like “Gardner's Law” ( V p-density) or the “time-average-equation” ( V p-porosity) should be significantly modified towards higher velocities before being applied to carbonates. The velocity measurements of unconsolidated carbonate mud at different stages of experimental compaction show that the velocity increase due to

  7. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  8. Creating and studying ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, T. C.; Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-05-15

    We excite ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas by imprinting density modulations during plasma creation. Laser-induced fluorescence is used to observe the density and velocity perturbations created by the waves. The effect of expansion of the plasma on the evolution of the wave amplitude is described by treating the wave action as an adiabatic invariant. After accounting for this effect, we determine that the waves are weakly damped, but the damping is significantly faster than expected for Landau damping.

  9. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  10. Use of acoustic backscatter and vertical velocity to estimate concentration and dynamics of suspended solids in Upper Klamath Lake, south-central Oregon: Implications for Aphanizomenon flos-aquae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical velocity and acoustic backscatter measurements by acoustic Doppler current profilers were used to determine seasonal, subseasonal (days to weeks), and diel variation in suspended solids in a freshwater lake where massive cyanobacterial blooms occur annually. During the growing season, the suspended material in the lake is dominated by the buoyancy-regulating cyanobacteria, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Measured variables (water velocity, relative backscatter [RB], wind speed, and air and water temperatures) were averaged over the deployment season at each sample time of day to determine average diel cycles. Phase shifts between diel cycles in RB and diel cycles in wind speed, vertical water temperature differences (delta T(degree)), and horizontal current speeds were found by determining the lead or lag that maximized the linear correlation between the respective diel cycles. Diel cycles in RB were more in phase with delta T(degree) cycles, and, to a lesser extent, wind cycles, than to water current cycles but were out of phase with the cycle that would be expected if the vertical movement of buoyant cyanobacteria colonies was controlled primarily by light. Clear evidence of a diel cycle in vertical velocity was found only at the two deepest sites in the lake. Cycles of vertical velocity, where present, were out of phase with expected vertical motion of cyanobacterial colonies based on the theoretical cycle for light-driven vertical movement. This suggests that water column stability and turbulence were more important factors in controlling vertical distribution of colonies than light. Variations at subseasonal time scales were determined by filtering data to pass periods between 1.2 and 15 days. At subseasonal time scales, correlations between RB and currents or air temperature were consistent with increased concentration of cyanobacterial colonies near the surface when water column stability increased (higher air temperatures or weaker currents) and

  11. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  12. Determination of the velocity, density, maximum flux, and enthalpy profiles for a very high temperature arc jet nozzle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Robert William

    1989-06-01

    Hypervelocity flows for velocities is excess of 1.4 km/sec (Mach 5) require very high stagnation temperature to avoid liquefaction. The arc heater wind tunnel was designed to provide such flows. The electric-arc driven wind tunnel can develop stagnation temperatures up to 13,000 K which will produce hypervelocity flows up to 7 km/sec (earth orbital speed). The nature of the flow, however, is such that the high temperature source flow may cause severe gradients at the nozzle exit. In order to perform aerothermodynamic tests the characterization of the flow in the test section is required. This paper experimentally determines the stream profiles for an arcjet wind tunnel conical nozzle directly from calorimetry and pitot probe surveys.

  13. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  14. Analytic representations of high-altitude auroral H^+ and O^+ densities, flow velocities and temperatures in terms of drivers for incorporation into global magnetospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, James; Zeng, Wen

    2008-10-01

    As new methods of describing multiple fluid species and other advances enhance the capability of global magnetospheric models to simulate the dynamics of multiple ion species, they also allow more accurate incorporation of ionospheric plasma outflows as source populations into these large scale models. Here, we shall describe the distilled results of numerous physics-based simulations of ionospheric plasma outflows influenced by auroral driving agents in terms of compact analytic expressions in terms of precipitation electron energy flux levels, characteristic energy levels of the precipitating electrons, the peak spectral wave densities for low-frequency electrostatic waves which transversely heat ionospheric ions, and solar zenith angle. The simulations are conducted with the UT Arlington Dynamic Fluid Kinetic (DyFK) ionospheric plasma transport code. We present these analytic expressions for ionospheric origin O^+ and H^+ densities, temperatures and field-aligned flow velocities at the 3 RE altitude inner boundaries of typical magnetospheric models.

  15. A new electron temperature diagnostic of critical surface based on the ion acoustic decay instability in hot, high density plasma relevant to laser fusion. Semiannual report, April 1--September 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    The authors made analysis of the IADI experiments previously made using OMEGA laser system. They obtained two important new results: the first direct observation of the epw excited by the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability, and the first study of the IADI in a plasma that approaches laser-fusion conditions, in the sense of having a density scale length of order 1 mm and an electron temperature, T{sub e}, in excess of 1 keV. Previous observations of the epw`s have been based on the second harmonic emission, from which little can be inferred because the emission is produced by unknown pairs of epw`s, integrated in a complicated way over wavenumber space and real space. In contrast, they have directly observed the epw by using the 90{degree}, collective Thomson scattering (CTS) of a UV laser (at the third harmonic of the pump) from the epw`s. Because the ratio of probe frequency to electron plasma frequency is only about three, the scattering is collective (i.e. k{sub epw}{lambda}{sub De} is small, where k{sub epw} is the epw wave number and {lambda}{sub De} is the Debye length),m even though the scattering angle is large. The electron temperature can then be deduced from the ion sound velocity, obtained from the measurement of the frequency at which growth is maximum at the scattering wavenumber.

  16. Mathematical modeling of velocity and number density profiles of particles across the flame propagation through a micro-iron dust cloud.

    PubMed

    Bidabadi, Mehdi; Haghiri, Ali; Rahbari, Alireza

    2010-04-15

    In this study, an attempt has been made to analytically investigate the concentration and velocity profiles of particles across flame propagation through a micro-iron dust cloud. In the first step, Lagrangian particle equation of motion during upward flame propagation in a vertical duct is employed and then forces acting upon the particle, such as thermophoretic force (resulted from the temperature gradient), gravitation and buoyancy are introduced; and consequently, the velocity profile as a function of the distance from the leading edge of the combustion zone is extracted. In the resumption, a control volume above the leading edge of the combustion zone is considered and the change in the particle number density in this control volume is obtained via the balance of particle mass fluxes passing through it. This study explains that the particle concentration at the leading edge of the combustion zone is more than the particle agglomeration in a distance far from the flame front. This increase in the particle aggregation above the combustion zone has a remarkable effect on the lower flammability limits of combustible particle cloud. It is worth noticing that the velocity and particle concentration profiles show a reasonable compatibility with the experimental data.

  17. Effect of acoustic frequency and power density on the aqueous ultrasonic-assisted extraction of grape pomace (Vitis vinifera L.) - a response surface approach.

    PubMed

    González-Centeno, María Reyes; Knoerzer, Kai; Sabarez, Henry; Simal, Susana; Rosselló, Carmen; Femenia, Antoni

    2014-11-01

    Aqueous ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of grape pomace was investigated by Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to evaluate the effect of acoustic frequency (40, 80, 120kHz), ultrasonic power density (50, 100, 150W/L) and extraction time (5, 15, 25min) on total phenolics, total flavonols and antioxidant capacity. All the process variables showed a significant effect on the aqueous UAE of grape pomace (p<0.05). The Box-Behnken Design (BBD) generated satisfactory mathematical models which accurately explain the behavior of the system; allowing to predict both the extraction yield of phenolic and flavonol compounds, and also the antioxidant capacity of the grape pomace extracts. The optimal UAE conditions for all response factors were a frequency of 40kHz, a power density of 150W/L and 25min of extraction time. Under these conditions, the aqueous UAE would achieve a maximum of 32.31mg GA/100g fw for total phenolics and 2.04mg quercetin/100g fw for total flavonols. Regarding the antioxidant capacity, the maximum predicted values were 53.47 and 43.66mg Trolox/100g fw for CUPRAC and FRAP assays, respectively. When comparing with organic UAE, in the present research, from 12% to 38% of total phenolic bibliographic values were obtained, but using only water as the extraction solvent, and applying lower temperatures and shorter extraction times. To the best of the authors' knowledge, no studies specifically addressing the optimization of both acoustic frequency and power density during aqueous-UAE of plant materials have been previously published.

  18. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Producing fluid structural interaction estimates of panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. It is a useful practice to simulate the spatial correlation of the applied pressure field over a 2d surface using a matrix of small patch area regions on a finite element model (FEM). Use of a fitted function for the spatial correlation between patch centers can result in an error if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Several patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are first evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative illustrations. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system FEM is then examined in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same model. The convergence study results illustrate the impacts possible from a poor choice of patch density on the analytical response estimate. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  19. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Fluid structural interaction problems that estimate panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. Even when the analyst elects to use a fitted function for the spatial correlation an error may be introduced if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Both qualitative and quantitative illustrations evaluating the adequacy of different patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are provided. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system is then evaluated in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same finite element model. The convergence study results are presented illustrating the impact resulting from a poor choice of patch density. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a Diffuse Acoustic Field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  20. Internal loading theory for mantle convection revisited: the trade-off between viscosity and seismic velocity to density conversion factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandan, D.; Peltier, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    The internal loading theory requires information on the radial viscosity profile and the lateral density heterogeneity in the mantle to compute signatures of the dynamical response to convective overturning. Following observations by Masters et al., (1982), that at long wavelengths the geoid is highly correlated with the heterogeneity observed seiemically at the base of the transition region, it has been suggested [Forte and Peltier, 1987, 1991; Pari and Peltier, 1995,1997] that the form of the viscosity profile that best reduces the variance between the observed geoid and the predicted geoid, be such as to include the presence of a low viscosity layer at the base of the transition zone. The geoid kernels computed using the theory will then peak in the transition zone and pick up features of the heterogeneity that provide a good fit to the geoid. However, within the formalism of the internal loading theory, it is possible to vary the amplitude of the seismic conversion factor instead (within the same region), and achieve an equivalent amount of variance reduction. Recent theoretical results based on a self-consistent thermodynamic model [Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2007] suggest that sharp changes in the amplitude of the conversion factor are in fact expected in the transition zone due to the presence of well documented transitions of mineral phase. We explore this tradeoff between variations in the viscosity profile and the body wave to density conversion factor on the variance reduction achievable for the geoid. Since this tradeoff is shown to be extremely important we explore the results achievable by fixing the viscosity profile to that required by the observables related to the global process of glacial isostatic adjustment and optimizing the fit to the data by adjusting the conversion factor. If time allows, we will also present results for the geodynamic observables predicted by the internal loading theory when the density anomaly is generated using the

  1. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  2. Physics-based formula representations of high-latitude ionospheric outflows: H+ and O+ densities and flow velocities vs. precipitation, wave-heating, and solar zenith angle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Zeng, W.

    2007-12-01

    For many current global magnetospheric modeling efforts, it is highly desirable to try to incorporate realistic compact representations of the ionospheric outflow bulk parameters and their relationships to putative drivers. Recent satellite data analyses by Strangeway et al. [2005] and Zheng et al.[2005] have obtained formula fits for the measurement-based relationships of the outflow levels to parameterizations for electron precipitation and Poynting fluxes, which are expected to be among the principal drivers, or closely related to them, for the ionospheric outflows. In this presentation, we shall use the results of an extensive set of systematic simulation runs with our Dynamic Fluid Kinetic (DyFK) simulation code for ionospheric plasma field-aligned transport to obtain O+ and H+ densities and flow velocities at altitudes corresponding to typical inner boundary levels for prominent current global magnetospheric models which are moving toward multi-fluid treatments. These O+ and H+ densities and parallel flow velocities are parameterized versus precipitation electron energy flux levels, characteristic energy levels of the precipitating electron, the peak spectral wave densities for BBELF waves which transversely heat ionospheric ions, and solar zenith angle. Strangeway, R. J., R. E. Ergun, Y.-J. Su, C. W. Carlson, and R. C. Elphic, Factors controlling ionospheric outflows as observed at intermediate altitudes, J. Geophys. Res., 110, A03221, doi:10.1029/2004JA010829, 2005. Zheng, Y., T. E. Moore, F. S. Mozer, C. T. Russell, and R. J. Strangeway, Polar study of ionospheric ion outflow versus energy input, J. Geophys. Res., 110, A07210, doi:10.1029/2004JA010995, 2005.

  3. Acoustic property reconstruction of a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) forehead based on computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchang; Xu, Xiao; Dong, Jianchen; Xing, Luru; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Xuecheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Songhai; Berggren, Per

    2015-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging and sound experimental measurements were used to reconstruct the acoustic properties (density, velocity, and impedance) of the forehead tissues of a deceased pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps). The forehead was segmented along the body axis and sectioned into cross section slices, which were further cut into sample pieces for measurements. Hounsfield units (HUs) of the corresponding measured pieces were obtained from CT scans, and regression analyses were conducted to investigate the linear relationships between the tissues' HUs and velocity, and HUs and density. The distributions of the acoustic properties of the head at axial, coronal, and sagittal cross sections were reconstructed, revealing that the nasal passage system was asymmetric and the cornucopia-shaped spermaceti organ was in the right nasal passage, surrounded by tissues and airsacs. A distinct dense theca was discovered in the posterior-dorsal area of the melon, which was characterized by low velocity in the inner core and high velocity in the outer region. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in density, velocity, and acoustic impedance between all four structures, melon, spermaceti organ, muscle, and connective tissue (p < 0.001). The obtained acoustic properties of the forehead tissues provide important information for understanding the species' bioacoustic characteristics.

  4. Compensating effect of sap velocity for stand density leads to uniform hillslope-scale forest transpiration across a steep valley cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Maik; Hassler, Sibylle; Blume, Theresa; Weiler, Markus; Hildebrandt, Anke; Guderle, Marcus; Schymanski, Stan; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Roberts (1983) found that forest transpiration is relatively uniform across different climatic conditions and suggested that forest transpiration is a conservative process compensating for environmental heterogeneity. Here we test this hypothesis at a steep valley cross-section composed of European Beech in the Attert basin in Luxemburg. We use sapflow, soil moisture, biometric and meteorological data from 6 sites along a transect to estimate site scale transpiration rates. Despite opposing hillslope orientation, different slope angles and forest stand structures, we estimated relatively similar transpiration responses to atmospheric demand and seasonal transpiration totals. This similarity is related to a negative correlation between sap velocity and site-average sapwood area. At the south facing sites with an old, even-aged stand structure and closed canopy layer, we observe significantly lower sap velocities but similar stand-average transpiration rates compared to the north-facing sites with open canopy structure, tall dominant trees and dense understorey. This suggests that plant hydraulic co-ordination allows for flexible responses to environmental conditions leading to similar transpiration rates close to the water and energy limits despite the apparent heterogeneity in exposition, stand density and soil moisture. References Roberts, J. (1983). Forest transpiration: A conservative hydrological process? Journal of Hydrology 66, 133-141.

  5. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  6. Universal scaling of Néel temperature, staggered magnetization density, and spin-wave velocity of three-dimensional disordered and clean quantum antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D.-R.; Jiang, F.-J.

    2017-02-01

    The Néel temperature, staggered magnetization density, as well as the spin-wave velocity of a three-dimensional (3D) quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic disorder (randomness) are calculated using first-principles nonperturbative quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, we examine the validity of universal scaling relations that are related to these three studied physical quantities. These relations are relevant to experimental data and are firmly established for clean (regular) 3D dimerized spin-1/2 Heisenberg models. Remarkably, our numerical results show that the considered scaling relations remain true for the investigated model with the introduced disorder. In addition, while the presence of disorder may change the physical properties of regular dimerized models, hence leading to different critical theories, both the obtained data of Néel temperature and staggered magnetization density in our study are fully compatible with the expected critical behavior for clean dimerized systems. As a result, it is persuasive to conclude that the related quantum phase transitions of the considered disordered model and its clean analogues are governed by the same critical theory, which is not always the case in general. Finally, we also find smooth scaling curves even emerging when both the data of the investigated disordered model as well as its associated clean system are taken into account concurrently. This in turn implies that, while in a restricted sense, the considered scaling relations for 3D spin-1/2 antiferromagnets are indeed universal.

  7. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  8. Acoustic property reconstruction of a neonate Yangtze finless porpoise's (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) head based on CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chong; Wang, Zhitao; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Au, Whitlow W L; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic properties of a neonate finless porpoise's head was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT). The head of the deceased neonate porpoise was also segmented across the body axis and cut into slices. The averaged sound velocity and density were measured, and the Hounsfield units (HU) of the corresponding slices were obtained from computed tomography scanning. A regression analysis was employed to show the linear relationships between the Hounsfield unit and both sound velocity and density of samples. Furthermore, the CT imaging data were used to compare the HU value, sound velocity, density and acoustic characteristic impedance of the main tissues in the porpoise's head. The results showed that the linear relationships between HU and both sound velocity and density were qualitatively consistent with previous studies on Indo-pacific humpback dolphins and Cuvier's beaked whales. However, there was no significant increase of the sound velocity and acoustic impedance from the inner core to the outer layer in this neonate finless porpoise's melon.

  9. Configuration of geological domains and geodynamic evolution of the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia revisited based on seismic velocity and density models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Sallarès, Valentí; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Bartolome, Rafael; Ranero, César

    2015-04-01

    We present a new classification of geological (basement) domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary offshore SW Iberia, together with a regional geodynamic reconstruction spanning from the Mesozoic extension to the Neogene-to-present-day convergence. It is based on seismic velocity and density models along two regional wide-angle seismic transects, one running NW-SE from the Tagus to the Seine abyssal plains, and the other running N-S from S Portugal to the Seine Abyssal Plain, combined with previously available information. The seismic velocity and density structure at the Seine Abyssal Plain and the internal Gulf of Cadiz indicates the presence of a highly heterogeneous oceanic crust, similar to that described in ultra-slow spreading centers, whereas in the Horseshoe and Tagus abyssal plains, the basement structure resembles that of exhumed mantle sections identified in the Northern Atlantic margin. The integration of all this new information allows defining the presence of three oceanic domains off SW Iberia: (1) the Seine Abyssal Plain domain, generated during the first stages of slow seafloor spreading in the NE segment of the Central Atlantic (Early Jurassic); (2) the Gulf of Cadiz domain, made of oceanic crust generated in the Alpine-Tethys spreading system between Iberia and Africa, which was coeval with the formation of the Seine Abyssal Plain domain and lasted up to the North Atlantic continental break-up (Late Jurassic); and (3) the Gorringe Bank domain, mainly made of rocks exhumed from the mantle with little synchronous magmatism, which formed during the first stages of North Atlantic opening (Early Cretaceous). Our models suggest that the Seine Abyssal Plain and Gulf of Cadiz domains are separated by the Lineament South strike-slip fault, whereas the Gulf of Cadiz and Gorringe Bank domains appear to be limited by a deep thrust fault located at the center of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain, which coincides with the seismicity cluster nucleated in the

  10. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  11. Estimation of acoustical streaming: theoretical model, Doppler measurements and optical visualisation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Kowalewski, T; Secomski, W; Wójcik, J

    1998-02-01

    An approximate solution for the streaming velocity generated by flat and weakly focused transducers was derived by directly solving the Dirichlet boundary conditions for the Poisson equation, the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for the axial components of the streaming velocity. The theoretical model was verified experimentally using a 32 MHz pulsed Doppler unit. The experimental acoustical fields were produced by three different 4 mm diameter flat and focused transducers driven by the transmitter generating the average acoustic power within the range from 1 microW to 6 mW. The streaming velocity was measured along the ultrasonic beam from 0 to 2 cm. Streaming was induced in a solution of water and corn starch. The experimental results showed that for a given acoustic power the streaming velocity was independent of the starch density in water, changed from 0.3 to 40 grams of starch in 1 l of distilled water. For applied acoustic powers, the streaming velocity changed linearly from 0.2 to 40 mm/s. Both, the theoretical solutions for plane and focused waves and the experimental results were in good agreement. The streaming velocity field was also visualised using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and two different evaluation methods. The first based on the FFT-based cross-correlation analysis between small sections for each pair of images and the second employing the algorithm of searching for local displacements between several images.

  12. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  13. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel: Acoustic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in a wind tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a CTOL hybrid inlet, an STOL hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the baseline inlet noise and the effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The 1/3 octave band noise data from these tests are given along with selected plots of 1/3 octave band spectra and directivity and full scale PNL directivities. The test facilities and data reduction techniques used are also described.

  14. Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants of synthetic alpha-quartz for SAW devices.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Juin-ichi; Takanaga, Izumi; Nishiyama, Shouichi

    2002-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants (elastic constants, piezoelectric constants, dielectric constants, and density) of commercially available and widely used surface acoustic wave (SAW)-grade synthetic a-quartz are reported. The propagation directions and modes of bulk waves optimal for accurately determining the constants were selected through numerical calculations, and three principal X-, Y-, and Z-cut specimens and several rotated Y-cut specimens were prepared from a single crystal ingot to determine the constants and to confirm their accuracy. All of the constants were determined through highly accurate measurements of the longitudinal velocities, shear velocities, dielectric constants, and density. The velocity values measured for the specimens that were not used to determine the constants agreed well with those calculated from the determined constants, within a difference of +/- 0.20 m/s (+/- 0.004%).

  15. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory motion in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. The customary approach to modeling acoustic waves inside a rocket chamber is to apply the classical inhomogeneous wave equation to the combustion gas. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while the acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients in pressure, density, and velocity become large, is a notable region where this approach is not applicable. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. An accurate model of the acoustic behavior within this region where acoustic modes are influenced by the presence of a steady mean flow is required for reliable stability predictions. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, (del squared)(psi) - (lambda/c)(exp 2)(psi) - M(dot)[M(dot)(del)(del(psi))] - 2(lambda(M/c) + (M(dot)del(M))(dot)del(psi)-2(lambda)(psi)[M(dot)del(1/c)]=0 (1) with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and lambda as the complex eigenvalue. French apply the finite volume method to solve the steady flow field within the combustion chamber and nozzle with inviscid walls. The complex eigenvalues and eigenvector are determined with the use of the ARPACK eigensolver. The

  16. Double-negative acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Li, Jensen; Chan, C T

    2004-11-01

    We show here the existence of acoustic metamaterial, in which both the effective density and bulk modulus are simultaneously negative, in the true and strict sense of an effective medium. Our double-negative acoustic system is an acoustic analogue of Veselago's medium in electromagnetism, and shares many unique consequences, such as negative refractive index. The double negativity in acoustics is derived from low-frequency resonances, as in the case of electromagnetism, but the negative density and modulus are derived from a single resonance structure as distinct from electromagnetism in which the negative permeability and negative permittivity originates from different resonance mechanisms.

  17. Effect of water velocity on the uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by silicone rubber (SR) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers: an assessment of the efficiency of performance reference compounds (PRCs) in river-like flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Estoppey, Nicolas; Schopfer, Adrien; Omlin, Julien; Esseiva, Pierre; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Delémont, Olivier; De Alencastro, Luiz F

    2014-11-15

    One aim of this study is to determine the impact of water velocity on the uptake of indicator polychlorinated biphenyls (iPCBs) by silicone rubber (SR) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers. A second aim is to assess the efficiency of performance reference compounds (PRCs) to correct for the impact of water velocity. SR and LDPE samplers were spiked with 11 or 12 PRCs and exposed for 6 weeks to four different velocities (in the range of 1.6 to 37.7 cm s(-1)) in river-like flow conditions using a channel system supplied with river water. A relationship between velocity and the uptake was found for each iPCB and enables to determine expected changes in the uptake due to velocity variations. For both samplers, velocity increases from 2 to 10 cm s(-1), 30 cm s(-1) (interpolated data) and 100 cm s(-1) (extrapolated data) lead to increases of the uptake which do not exceed a factor of 2, 3 and 4.5, respectively. Results also showed that the influence of velocity decreased with increasing the octanol-water coefficient partition (log K(ow)) of iPCBs when SR is used whereas the opposite effect was observed for LDPE. Time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of iPCBs in water were calculated from iPCB uptake and PRC release. These calculations were performed using either a single PRC or all the PRCs. The efficiency of PRCs to correct the impact of velocity was assessed by comparing the TWA concentrations obtained at the four tested velocities. For SR, a good agreement was found among the four TWA concentrations with both methods (average RSD<10%). Also for LDPE, PRCs offered a good correction of the impact of water velocity (average RSD of about 10 to 20%). These results contribute to the process of acceptance of passive sampling in routine regulatory monitoring programs.

  18. Predicting Seismic Velocities in Marine Sesiments Using Clay Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A.; Pratson, L. F.

    2001-12-01

    The ability to calculate seismic velocity accurately over the extent of a survey is a problem of interest to the seismic record. Velocity and other lithologic properties can be well resolved in boreholes, but due to structural and stratigraphic variations, these measurements are limited to very near the borehole. Clay content is shown to be the chief variable that affects velocity in sand/shale systems. It controls porosity and bulk density, and plays a major role in determining seismic wave velocity. Despite its importance, high-resolution measurements of clay content are frequently unavailable for many boreholes. As such, a proxy for clay content, such as gamma ray measurements, must be used in estimating clay volumes near a borehole. A forward model is presented that calculates lithologic and acoustic properties of sediment using several petrophysical formulations. The model's primary input is clay content (or gamma ray measurements), and modeled values include porosity, bulk density, overburden pressure, elastic moduli, and wave velocity. Seismic velocities are estimated based on self-consistent elastic moduli by Berryman (1980). The unknown geometric factors needed for Berryman's model are found using simulated annealing optimization. The model is then applied to five wells from the Amazon Fan with measured gamma, porosities, bulk densities and P-wave velocities. The model performs well for porosity, bulk density and velocity predictions for binary mixtures with high contrast in particle sizes (sand/clay). However, if a significant volume of silt or intermediate size particles are present (for example for mass flow deposits), the models fails to predicts these properties.

  19. The dynamics of variable-density turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamics of variable-density turbulent fluids are studied by direct numerical simulation. The flow is incompressible so that acoustic waves are decoupled from the problem, and implying that density is not a thermodynamic variable. Changes in density occur due to molecular mixing. The velocity field, is in general, divergent. A pseudo-spectral numerical technique is used to solve the equations of motion. Three-dimensional simulations are performed using a grid size of 128{sup 3} grid points. Two types of problems are studied: (1) the decay of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, and (2) buoyancy-generated turbulence in a fluid with large density fluctuations. In the case of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, the overall statistical decay behavior, for the cases studied, is relatively unaffected by the presence of density variations when the initial density and velocity fields are statistically independent. The results for this case are in quantitative agreement with previous numerical and laboratory results. In this case, the initial density field has a bimodal probability density function (pdf) which evolves in time towards a Gaussian distribution. The pdf of the density field is symmetric about its mean value throughout its evolution. If the initial velocity and density fields are statistically dependent, however, the decay process is significantly affected by the density fluctuations. For the case of buoyancy-generated turbulence, variable-density departures from the Boussinesq approximation are studied. The results of the buoyancy-generated turbulence are compared with variable-density model predictions. Both a one-point (engineering) model and a two-point (spectral) model are tested against the numerical data. Some deficiencies in these variable-density models are discussed and modifications are suggested.

  20. Accurate characterization of SiO2 thin films using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Matthias; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Warkentin, Paul; Jäger, Philipp M; Ruile, Werner; Kirschner, Hans-Peter; Honal, Matthias; Bleyl, Ingo; Mayer, Andreas P; Reindl, Leonhard M

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the acoustic properties of silicon dioxide thin films. Therefore, we determined the phase velocity dispersion of LiNbO3 substrate covered with SiO2 deposited by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process using differential delay lines and laser ultrasonic method. The density p and the elastic constants (c11 and c44) can be extracted by fitting corresponding finite element simulations to the phase velocities within an accuracy of at least +4%. Additionally, we propose two methods to improve the accuracy of the phase velocity determination by dealing with film thickness variation of the PVD process.

  1. Acoustic imaging and mirage effects with high transmittance in a periodically perforated metal slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sheng-Dong; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a high-quality superlens to focus acoustic waves using a periodically perforated metallic structure which is made of zinc and immersed in water. By changing a geometrical parameter gradually, a kind of gradient-index phononic crystal lens is designed to attain the mirage effects. The acoustic waves can propagate along an arc-shaped trajectory which is precisely controlled by the angle and frequency of the incident waves. The negative refraction imaging effect depends delicately on the transmittance of the solid structure. The acoustic impedance matching between the solid and the liquid proposed in this article, which is determined by the effective density and group velocity of the unit-cell, is significant for overcoming the inefficiency problem of acoustic devices. This study focuses on how to obtain the high transmittance imaging and mirage effects based on the adequate material selection and geometrical design.

  2. Acoustic radiation force on a double-layer microsphere by a Gaussian focused beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Cheng, Kaixuan; Liu, Jiehui; Mao, Yiwei; Gong, Xiufen; Liu, Xiaozhou

    2014-10-14

    A new model for calculating the radiation force on double-layer microsphere is proposed based on the ray acoustics approach. The axial acoustic radiation force resulting from a focused Gaussian beam incident on spherical shells immersed in water is examined theoretically in relation to its thickness and the contents of its double-layer. The attenuation both in the water and inside the sphere is considered in this method, which cannot be ignored while the high frequency ultrasonic is used. Results of numerical calculations are presented for fat and low density polyethylene materials, with the hollow region filled with animal oil, water, or air. These results show how the acoustic impedance and the sound velocity of both layers, together with the thickness of the shell, affect the acoustic radiation force.

  3. Lattice swelling and modulus change in a helium-implanted tungsten alloy: X-ray micro-diffraction, surface acoustic wave measurements, and multiscale modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, F.; Nguyen-Manh, D.; Gilbert, M. R.; Beck, C. E.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Liu, W.; Armstrong, D. E.J.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-02-26

    Using X-ray micro-diffraction and surface acoustic wave spectroscopy, we measure lattice swelling and elastic modulus changes in aW-1% Re alloy after implantation with 3110 appm of helium. An observed lattice expansion of a fraction of a per cent gives rise to an order of magnitude larger reduction in the surface acoustic wave velocity. A multiscale model, combining elasticity and density functional theory, is applied to the interpretation of observations. The measured lattice swelling is consistent with the relaxation volume of self-interstitial and helium-filled vacancy defects that dominate the helium-implanted material microstructure. Larger scale atomistic simulations using an empirical potential confirm the findings of the elasticity and density functional theory model for swelling. The reduction of surface acoustic wave velocity predicted by density functional theory calculations agrees remarkably well with experimental observations.

  4. Acoustic Doppler velocimeter-induced acoustic streaming and its implications for measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C. M.; Rusello, P. J.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-05-01

    The acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) is widely used for the characterization of fluid flow. Secondary flows ("acoustic streaming") generated by the ADV's acoustic pulses may affect the accuracy of measurements in experiments with small velocities. We assessed the impact of acoustic streaming on flow measurement using particle image velocimetry. The probes of two different ADVs were successively mounted in a tank of quiescent water. The probes' ultrasound emitters were aligned with a laser light sheet. Observed flow was primarily in the axial direction, accelerating from the ultrasound emitter and peaking within centimeters of the velocimeter sampling volume before dropping off. We measured the dependence of acoustic streaming velocity on ADV configuration, finding that different settings induce streaming ranging from negligible to more than 2.0 cm s-1. From these results, we describe cases where acoustic streaming affects velocity measurements and also cases where ADVs accurately measure their own acoustic streaming.

  5. Physics-based formula representations of high-latitude ionospheric outflows: H+ and O+ densities, flow velocities, and temperatures versus soft electron precipitation, wave-driven transverse heating, and solar zenith angle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Zeng, W.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive systematic dynamic fluid kinetic (DyFK) model simulations are conducted to obtain advanced simulation-based formula representations of ionospheric outflow parameters, for possible use by global magnetospheric modelers. Under F10.7 levels of 142, corresponding to solar medium conditions, we obtain the H+ and O+ outflow densities, flow velocities, and perpendicular and parallel temperatures versus energy fluxes and characteristic energies of soft electron precipitation, wave spectral densities of ion transverse wave heating, and F region level solar zenith angle in the high-latitude auroral region. From the results of hundreds of DyFK simulations of auroral outflows for ranges of each of these driving agents, we depict the H+ and O+ outflow density and flow velocity parameters at 3 R E altitude at the ends of these 2-h simulation runs in spectrogram form versus various pairs of these influencing parameters. We further approximate these results by various distilled formula representations for the O+ and H+ outflow velocities, densities, and temperatures at 3 R E altitude, as functions of the above indicated four ``driver'' parameters. These formula representations provide insight into the physics of these driven outflows, and may provide a convenient set of tools to set the boundary conditions for ionospheric plasma sources in global magnetospheric simulations.

  6. CLASH-VLT: The mass, velocity-anisotropy, and pseudo-phase-space density profiles of the z = 0.44 galaxy cluster MACS J1206.2-0847

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biviano, A.; Rosati, P.; Balestra, I.; Mercurio, A.; Girardi, M.; Nonino, M.; Grillo, C.; Scodeggio, M.; Lemze, D.; Kelson, D.; Umetsu, K.; Postman, M.; Zitrin, A.; Czoske, O.; Ettori, S.; Fritz, A.; Lombardi, M.; Maier, C.; Medezinski, E.; Mei, S.; Presotto, V.; Strazzullo, V.; Tozzi, P.; Ziegler, B.; Annunziatella, M.; Bartelmann, M.; Benitez, N.; Bradley, L.; Brescia, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Coe, D.; Demarco, R.; Donahue, M.; Ford, H.; Gobat, R.; Graves, G.; Koekemoer, A.; Kuchner, U.; Melchior, P.; Meneghetti, M.; Merten, J.; Moustakas, L.; Munari, E.; Regős, E.; Sartoris, B.; Seitz, S.; Zheng, W.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We constrain the mass, velocity-anisotropy, and pseudo-phase-space density profiles of the z = 0.44 CLASH cluster MACS J1206.2-0847, using the projected phase-space distribution of cluster galaxies in combination with gravitational lensing. Methods: We use an unprecedented data-set of ≃600 redshifts for cluster members, obtained as part of a VLT/VIMOS large program, to constrain the cluster mass profile over the radial range ~0-5 Mpc (0-2.5 virial radii) using the MAMPOSSt and Caustic methods. We then add external constraints from our previous gravitational lensing analysis. We invert the Jeans equation to obtain the velocity-anisotropy profiles of cluster members. With the mass-density and velocity-anisotropy profiles we then obtain the first determination of a cluster pseudo-phase-space density profile. Results: The kinematics and lensing determinations of the cluster mass profile are in excellent agreement. This is very well fitted by a NFW model with mass M200 = (1.4 ± 0.2) × 1015 M⊙ and concentration c200 = 6 ± 1, only slightly higher than theoretical expectations. Other mass profile models also provide acceptable fits to our data, of (slightly) lower (Burkert, Hernquist, and Softened Isothermal Sphere) or comparable (Einasto) quality than NFW. The velocity anisotropy profiles of the passive and star-forming cluster members are similar, close to isotropic near the center and increasingly radial outside. Passive cluster members follow extremely well the theoretical expectations for the pseudo-phase-space density profile and the relation between the slope of the mass-density profile and the velocity anisotropy. Star-forming cluster members show marginal deviations from theoretical expectations. Conclusions: This is the most accurate determination of a cluster mass profile out to a radius of 5 Mpc, and the only determination of the velocity-anisotropy and pseudo-phase-space density profiles of both passive and star-forming galaxies for an individual

  7. Arctic Acoustics Ultrasonic Modeling Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    shear wave velocity and a large acoustic impedance relative to the water ("hard...results, the real part of the leaky Rayleigh wave root equals the shear wave velocity of the acrylic at 9.2*C. Above this temperature the leaky Rayleigh... wave can exist, and below this temperature it violates the theoretical existence condition by exceeding the shear wave velocity . Figure 4.12(b) shows

  8. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  9. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  10. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  11. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  12. Spall strength of liquid copper and accuracy of the acoustic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Y.; Wu, H. A.; Luo, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spallation in liquid copper at high strain rates induced by planar shock loading with classical molecular dynamics simulations. Spallation simulations are performed at different initial temperatures, shock durations, and shock strengths. Loading may have pronounced effects on spall strength. The acoustic method for deducing spall strength and strain rate from free surface velocity histories is discussed in detail and compared to direct simulations. The effects of temperature rise induced by shock wave, tension attenuation, sound speed, and density on the accuracy of the acoustic method are examined; the contributing factors to errors are identified; and the modifications to the choice of sound speed and density are proposed to improve the accuracy of the acoustic method.

  13. High-pressure acoustic properties of glycerol studied by Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min-Seok; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic properties of glycerol was investigated in a wide pressure range from ambient pressure to 30.9 GPa by using a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer and a diamond anvil cell. Pressure dependences of the sound velocity and the Brillouin linewidth showed substantial changes at low pressures below ~4 GPa. This was attributed to the coupling between the main structural relaxation process and the longitudinal acoustic waves. The pressure dependence of the refractive index and the density of glycerol could be obtained by using two scattering geometries and the Lorentz-Lorenz relation.

  14. Experimental Studies of Acoustics in a Spherical Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowen, Savannah; Adams, Matthew; Stone, Douglas; Lathrop, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The Earth, like many other astrophysical bodies, contains turbulent flows of conducting fluid which are able to sustain magnetic field. To investigate the hydromagnetic flow in the Earth's outer core, we have created an experiment which generates flows in liquid sodium. However, measuring these flows remains a challenge because liquid sodium is opaque. One possible solution is the use of acoustic waves. Our group has previously used acoustic wave measurements in air to infer azimuthal velocity profiles, but measurements attempted in liquid sodium remain challenging. In the current experiments we measure acoustic modes and their mode splittings in both air and water in a spherical Couette device. The device is comprised of a hollow 30-cm outer sphere which contains a smaller 10-cm rotating inner sphere to drive flow in the fluid in between. We use water because it has material properties that are similar to those of sodium, but is more convenient and less hazardous. Modes are excited and measured using a speaker and microphones. Measured acoustic modes and their mode splittings correspond well with the predicted frequencies in air. However, water modes are more challenging. Further investigation is needed to understand acoustic measurements in the higher density media.

  15. A model for the Lin-Shu type density-wave structure of our Galaxy: Line-of-sight and transverse-longitudinal velocities of 242 optically visible open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griv, E.; Jiang, I.-G.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the fourth in a series, we examine again one of the implications of the Lin-Shu density-wave theory, specifically, the noncircular systematic motion of the Galactic objects. Our previous investigation is extended by analyzing simultaneously both the line-of-sight and transversal velocities of a sample of open clusters for which velocities, distances and ages are available. The ordinary equations of the Oort-Lindblad theory of galactic differential rotation are used. The minor effects caused by the two-dimensional tightly-wound density waves are also taken into account. The published data of 242 currently known optically visible clusters having distances r<3 kpc from the Sun and -200 < z <200 pc from the Galactic plane, and ages 2 × 108 < t < 2 × 109 yr are collected from Dias et al. (2014), excluding extremely far, high-velocity, young and old objects in our fitting. The most noteworthy result is the fact that the parameters of Lin-Shu type density waves estimated from two independent line-of-sight and transversal along the Galactic longitude velocities are nearly equal. We argue that the resemblance of these Galactic wave structures is so remarkable that no doubt is felt as to the theory's truth with respect to these data. The results obtained allow us to conclude that several low-m trailing density-wave patterns with different number of spiral arms m (say, m=1, 2, 3, and 4), pitch angles (about 5o, 8o, 11o, and 14o, respectively) and amplitudes of the perturbed gravitational potential may coexist in the Galaxy. The latter suggests the asymmetric multiarm, not well-organized (``flocculent'') spiral structure of the system. In memory of Professors Alexei M. Fridman (1940-2010) and Chi Yuan (1937-2008)

  16. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  17. Parvulescu Revisited: Small Tank Acoustics for Bioacousticians.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Peter H; Hawkins, Anthony D; Popper, Arthur N; Fay, Richard R; Gray, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often perform hearing studies on fish in small tanks. The acoustic field in such a tank is considerably different from the acoustic field that occurs in the animal's natural environment. The significance of these differences is magnified by the nature of the fish's auditory system where either acoustic pressure (a scalar), acoustic particle velocity (a vector), or both may serve as the stimulus. It is essential for the underwater acoustician to understand the acoustics of small tanks to be able to carry out valid auditory research in the laboratory and to properly compare and interpret the results of others.

  18. Near-field acoustic streaming jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Garandet, J. P.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical and experimental investigation of the acoustic streaming flow in the near field of a circular plane ultrasonic transducer in water is performed. The experimental domain is a parallelepipedic cavity delimited by absorbing walls to avoid acoustic reflection, with a top free surface. The flow velocities are measured by particle image velocimetry, leading to well-resolved velocity profiles. The theoretical model is based on a linear acoustic propagation model, which correctly reproduces the acoustic field mapped experimentally using a hydrophone, and an acoustic force term introduced in the Navier-Stokes equations under the plane-wave assumption. Despite the complexity of the acoustic field in the near field, in particular in the vicinity of the acoustic source, a good agreement between the experimental measurements and the numerical results for the velocity field is obtained, validating our numerical approach and justifying the planar wave assumption in conditions where it is a priori far from obvious. The flow structure is found to be correlated with the acoustic field shape. Indeed, the longitudinal profiles of the velocity present a wavering linked to the variations in acoustic intensity along the beam axis and transverse profiles exhibit a complex shape strongly influenced by the transverse variations of the acoustic intensity in the beam. Finally, the velocity in the jet is found to increase as the square root of the acoustic force times the distance from the origin of the jet over a major part of the cavity, after a strong short initial increase, where the velocity scales with the square of the distance from the upstream wall.

  19. Gas hydrate saturation from acoustic impedance and resistivity logs in the shenhu area, south china sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, X.; Wu, S.; Lee, M.; Guo, Y.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.

    2011-01-01

    During the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition -1 (GMGS-1), gas hydrate was discovered in layers ranging from 10 to 25 m above the base of gas hydrate stability zone in the Shenhu area, South China Sea. Water chemistry, electrical resistivity logs, and acoustic impedance were used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the chloride concentrations range from 0 to 43% of the pore space. The higher gas hydrate saturations were present in the depth from 152 to 177 m at site SH7 and from 190 to 225 m at site SH2, respectively. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity using Archie equation have similar trends to those from chloride concentrations. To examine the variability of gas hydrate saturations away from the wells, acoustic impedances calculated from the 3 D seismic data using constrained sparse inversion method were used. Well logs acquired at site SH7 were incorporated into the inversion by establishing a relation between the water-filled porosity, calculated using gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, and the acoustic impedance, calculated from density and velocity logs. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from acoustic impedance of seismic data are ???10-23% of the pore space and are comparable to those estimated from the well logs. The uncertainties in estimated gas hydrate saturations from seismic acoustic impedances were mainly from uncertainties associated with inverted acoustic impedance, the empirical relation between the water-filled porosities and acoustic impedances, and assumed background resistivity. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  1. Horns as particle velocity amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Donskoy, Dimitri M; Cray, Benjamin A

    2011-11-01

    Preliminary measurements and numerical predictions reveal that simple, and relatively small, horns generate remarkable amplification of acoustic particle velocity. For example, below 2 kHz, a 2.5 cm conical horn has a uniform velocity amplification ratio (throat-to-mouth) factor of approximately 3, or, in terms of a decibel level, 9.5 dB. It is shown that the velocity amplification factor depends on the horn's mouth-to-throat ratio as well as, though to a lesser degree, the horn's flare rate. A double horn configuration provides limited additional gain, approximately an increase of up to 25%.

  2. STARE velocities: 2. Evening westward electron flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, M.; Koustov, A.; Janhunen, P.; Kauristie, K.; Amm, O.; Pellinen, R.; Opgenoorth, H.; Pirjola, R.

    2003-04-01

    Four evening events of joint EISCAT/STARE radar observations (~18 hours in total) are considered to study differences between the STARE line-of-sight velocities and the EISCAT electron drifts along the STARE beams. We show that Finland velocities were persistently smaller than the EISCAT drifts by a factor of 1.5-2 implying stronger differences than reported in the past. The Norway velocities were also smaller than the EISCAT drifts, but the effect was not as significant as for the Finland radar. We show that stronger STARE/EISCAT velocity differences lead to significant STARE total electron drift underestimation not only with the standard merging method but also with the ion-acoustic approach (IAA), especially for slow total electron flows of less than 800-1000 m/s. We test the performance of a new approach recently proposed by Uspensky et al., Ann. Geophys., 2003 (in press). It is based on the assumption that a coherent radar receives signals from all electrojet heights. For this approach, information on the electron density distribution in the E region is required. We demonstrate for one event (February 12, 1999) for which N(h) profiles were known from concurrent EISCAT measurements that STARE predicitons of the electron drift are consistent with the EISCAT drift measurements. This validates the approach for the analysis of evening westward electron flow observations (validation for the morning eastward flows was presented by Uspensky et al., 2003). We also show the "robustness" of the new approach by looking at other 3 evening events for which no information on the electron density was available.

  3. Calibration method helps in seismic velocity interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, C.E.; Davenport, H.A.; Wilhelm, R.

    1997-11-03

    Acoustic velocities derived from seismic reflection data, when properly calibrated to subsurface measurements, help interpreters make pure velocity predictions. A method of calibrating seismic to measured velocities has improved interpretation of subsurface features in the Gulf of Mexico. In this method, the interpreter in essence creates a kind of gauge. Properly calibrated, the gauge enables the interpreter to match predicted velocities to velocities measured at wells. Slow-velocity zones are of special interest because they sometimes appear near hydrocarbon accumulations. Changes in velocity vary in strength with location; the structural picture is hidden unless the variations are accounted for by mapping in depth instead of time. Preliminary observations suggest that the presence of hydrocarbons alters the lithology in the neighborhood of the trap; this hydrocarbon effect may be reflected in the rock velocity. The effect indicates a direct use of seismic velocity in exploration. This article uses the terms seismic velocity and seismic stacking velocity interchangeably. It uses ground velocity, checkshot average velocity, and well velocity interchangeably. Interval velocities are derived from seismic stacking velocities or well average velocities; they refer to velocities of subsurface intervals or zones. Interval travel time (ITT) is the reciprocal of interval velocity in microseconds per foot.

  4. Response of acoustic and elastic properties to pressure and crystallization of Ce-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Wang, R. J.; Wang, W. H.

    2005-09-01

    The density and acoustic velocities of a Ce70Al10Ni10Cu10 bulk metallic glass (BMG) under hydrostatic-pressure (up to 0.5GPa ) and in crystallized state in ambient conditions were measured in situ by a pulse echo overlap method. The pressure derivatives of velocities and Grüneisen parameters as well as the equation of state (EOS) of the BMG were determined and compared to those of various other BMGs and nonmetallic glasses. Surprisingly, the BMG, unlike other BMGs with normal mode stiffness, exhibits an anomalous soft longitudinal acoustic mode under pressure similar to that of typical oxide glasses. An unusually large softening of longitudinal acoustic phonons in the BMG, relative to its crystalline state, is also observed, analogous with that in oxide glasses. The possible origin for the anomaly is the intrinsic glassy structure containing short-range covalent bonds.

  5. Picosecond acoustics method for measuring the thermodynamical properties of solids and liquids at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Gauthier, M; Ayrinhac, S; Bove, L; Belliard, L; Perrin, B; Morand, M; Le Marchand, G; Bergame, F; Philippe, J

    2015-02-01

    Based on the original combination of picosecond acoustics and diamond anvils cell, recent improvements to accurately measure hypersonic sound velocities of liquids and solids under extreme conditions are described. To illustrate the capability of this technique, results are given on the pressure and temperature dependence of acoustic properties for three prototypical cases: polycrystal (iron), single-crystal (silicon) and liquid (mercury) samples. It is shown that such technique also enables the determination of the density as a function of pressure for liquids, of the complete set of elastic constants for single crystals, and of the melting curve for any kind of material. High pressure ultrafast acoustic spectroscopy technique clearly opens opportunities to measure thermodynamical properties under previously unattainable extreme conditions. Beyond physics, this state-of-the-art experiment would thus be useful in many other fields such as nonlinear acoustics, oceanography, petrology, in of view. A brief description of new developments and future directions of works conclude the article.

  6. Broadband Acoustic Hyperbolic Metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-12-18

    In this Letter, we report on the design and experimental characterization of a broadband acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial. The proposed metamaterial consists of multiple arrays of clamped thin plates facing the y direction and is shown to yield opposite signs of effective density in the x and y directions below a certain cutoff frequency, therefore, yielding a hyperbolic dispersion. Partial focusing and subwavelength imaging are experimentally demonstrated at frequencies between 1.0 and 2.5 kHz. The proposed metamaterial could open up new possibilities for acoustic wave manipulation and may find usage in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  7. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  8. Acoustical, morphological and optical properties of oral rehydration salts (ORS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Preetha Mary; Jayakumar, S.; Divya, P.; Subhashree, N. S.; Ahmed, M. Anees

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity were measured in different concentrations of oral rehydration salts (ORS) at room temperature 303 k. From the experimental data other related thermodynamic parameters, viz adiabatic compressibility, intermolecular free length, acoustic impedence, relaxation time are calculated. The experimental data were discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the liquid mixtures. The results have been discussed in terms of solute-solvent interaction between the components. Structural characterization is important for development of new material. The morphology, structure and grain size of the samples are investigated by SEM. The optical properties of the sample have been studied using UV Visible spectroscopy.

  9. Acoustical, morphological and optical properties of oral rehydration salts (ORS)

    SciTech Connect

    George, Preetha Mary E-mail: jayakumars030@gmail.com; Divya, P.; Jayakumar, S. E-mail: jayakumars030@gmail.com; Subhashree, N. S.; Ahmed, M. Anees

    2015-06-24

    Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity were measured in different concentrations of oral rehydration salts (ORS) at room temperature 303 k. From the experimental data other related thermodynamic parameters, viz adiabatic compressibility, intermolecular free length, acoustic impedence, relaxation time are calculated. The experimental data were discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the liquid mixtures. The results have been discussed in terms of solute-solvent interaction between the components. Structural characterization is important for development of new material. The morphology, structure and grain size of the samples are investigated by SEM. The optical properties of the sample have been studied using UV Visible spectroscopy.

  10. Prediction of depth and velocity on VSP data

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.G.

    1983-03-01

    The Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) method can often be used to assist in making drilling decisions. These decisions may involve anticipation of overpressured zones, distance to the seismically determined target, and verification of geologic or geophysical interpretation. A VSP is recorded with a seismic source on the surface and receivers in the borehole. Both up and downgoing waves are recorded and are separable. Layers beneath the borehole are recorded in the upgoing waves at every receiver position. This redundancy can be exploited to achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio and good quality time-amplitude information. The conversion of amplitude to acoustic impedance gives time and interval velocity with density held constant. Depth is then a function of time and interval velocity. A VSP has several advantages over

  11. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  12. Experimental investigation of geodesic acoustic modes on JET using Doppler backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Hidalgo, C.; Belonohy, E.; Delabie, E.; Gil, L.; Maggi, C. F.; Meneses, L.; Solano, E.; Tsalas, M.; Contributors, JET

    2016-10-01

    Geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) have been investigated in JET ohmic discharges using mainly Doppler backscattering. Characteristics and scaling properties of the GAM are studied. Time and spatial resolved measurements of the perpendicular velocity indicate that GAMs are located in a narrow layer at the edge density gradient region with amplitude corresponding to about 50% of the mean local perpendicular velocity. GAMs on JET appear to be regulated by the turbulence drive rather than by their damping rate. It is also shown that the GAM amplitude is ~20% larger in deuterium than in hydrogen plasmas.

  13. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  14. Sound velocity of drilling mud saturated with reservoir gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carcione, J.M.; Poletto, F.

    2000-04-01

    Knowledge of the in-situ sound velocity of drilling mud can be used in mud-pulse acoustic telemetry for evaluating the presence and amount of gas invasion in the drilling mud. The authors propose a model for calculating the in-situ density and sound velocity of water-based and oil-based drilling muds containing formation gas. Drilling muds are modeled as a suspension of clay particles and high-gravity solids in water or oil, with the acoustic properties of these fluids depending on pressure and temperature. Since mud at different depths experiences different pressures and temperatures, downhold mud weights can be significantly different from those measured at the surface. Taking this fact into consideration, the authors assume constant clay composition and obtained the fraction of high-gravity solids to balance the formation pressure corresponding to a given drilling plan. This gives the in-situ density of the drilling mud, which together with the bulk moduli of the single constituents allow one to compute the second velocity using Reuss's model. In the case of oil-based muds, they take into account the gas solubility in oil. When gas goes into solution, the mud is compassed of solid particles, live oil and, eventually, free gas. A phenomenological model based on a continuous spectrum of relaxation mechanisms is used to describe attenuation due to mud viscosity. The calculations for water-based and oil-based muds showed that the sound velocity is strongly dependent on gas saturation, fluid composition, and drilling depth.

  15. Ion acoustic solitons in unmagnetized inhomogeneous multi-ion component plasmas with vortex distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Asif; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.

    2010-11-15

    The ion acoustic solitons are studied in an inhomogeneous multi-ion component plasma in the presence of heavy and light adiabatic ions and two temperature electrons with vortex distribution. The modified Korteweg-de Vries equation with an additional term due to density gradients is derived by employing reductive perturbation technique. It is found that the amplitude of the soliton enhances as the concentration ratio of cold to hot electrons, density gradient parameter and ion temperature are increased in the system. The effects of mass, charge ratios of heavy to light ions and electron temperature are also investigated on the structural as well as propagation characteristics of solitary wave. The equilibrium density profile is taken to be exponential. The phase velocity of ion acoustic wave is also studied as a function of various plasma parameters. The numerical results are presented for illustration.

  16. Nonlinear standing waves in 2-D acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, Milan; Bednarik, Michal

    2006-12-22

    This paper deals with 2-D simulation of finite-amplitude standing waves behavior in rectangular acoustic resonators. Set of three partial differential equations in third approximation formulated in conservative form is derived from fundamental equations of gas dynamics. These equations form a closed set for two components of acoustic velocity vector and density, the equations account for external driving force, gas dynamic nonlinearities and thermoviscous dissipation. Pressure is obtained from solution of the set by means of an analytical formula. The equations are formulated in the Cartesian coordinate system. The model equations set is solved numerically in time domain using a central semi-discrete difference scheme developed for integration of sets of convection-diffusion equations with two or more spatial coordinates. Numerical results show various patterns of acoustic field in resonators driven using vibrating piston with spatial distribution of velocity. Excitation of lateral shock-wave mode is observed when resonant conditions are fulfilled for longitudinal as well as for transversal direction along the resonator cavity.

  17. Correlation between ultrasound velocity and densitometry in fresh and demineralized cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    de Mesquita, Alessandro Queiroz; Barbieri, Giuliano; Barbieri, Claudio Henrique

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare ultrasound propagation velocity with densitometry in the diaphyseal compact cortical bone of whole sheep metatarsals. METHODS: The transverse ultrasound velocity and bone mineral density of 5-cm-long diaphyseal bone segments were first measured. The bone segments were then divided into four groups of 15 segments each and demineralized in an aqueous 0.5 N hydrochloric acid solution for 6, 12, 24 or 36 hours. All measurements were repeated after demineralization for each time duration and the values measured before and after demineralization were compared. RESULTS: Ultrasound velocity and bone mineral density decreased with demineralization time, and most differences in the pre- and post-demineralization values within each group and between groups were significant: A moderate correlation coefficient (r=0.75956) together with a moderate agreement was determined between both post-demineralization parameters, detected by the Bland-Altman method. CONCLUSION: We conclude that both ultrasound velocity and bone mineral density decrease as a result of demineralization, thus indicating that bone mineral content is of great importance for maintaining the acoustic parameters of cortical bone, as observed for cancellous bone. Ultrasound velocity can be used to evaluate both compact cortical bone quality and bone mineral density. PMID:27982167

  18. Measured wavenumber: frequency spectrum associated with acoustic and aerodynamic wall pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Arguillat, Blandine; Ricot, Denis; Bailly, Christophe; Robert, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Direct measurements of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of wall pressure fluctuations beneath a turbulent plane channel flow have been performed in an anechoic wind tunnel. A rotative array has been designed that allows the measurement of a complete map, 63×63 measuring points, of cross-power spectral densities over a large area. An original post-processing has been developed to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic exciting loadings by transforming space-frequency data into wavenumber-frequency spectra. The acoustic part has also been estimated from a simple Corcos-like model including the contribution of a diffuse sound field. The measured acoustic contribution to the surface pressure fluctuations is 5% of the measured aerodynamic surface pressure fluctuations for a velocity and boundary layer thickness relevant for automotive interior noise applications. This shows that for aerodynamically induced car interior noise, both contributions to the surface pressure fluctuations on car windows have to be taken into account.

  19. Acoustic Type-II Weyl Nodes from Stacking Dimerized Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2016-11-01

    Lorentz-violating type-II Weyl fermions, which were missed in Weyl's prediction of nowadays classified type-I Weyl fermions in quantum field theory, have recently been proposed in condensed matter systems. The semimetals hosting type-II Weyl fermions offer a rare platform for realizing many exotic physical phenomena that are different from type-I Weyl systems. Here we construct the acoustic version of a type-II Weyl Hamiltonian by stacking one-dimensional dimerized chains of acoustic resonators. This acoustic type-II Weyl system exhibits distinct features in a finite density of states and unique transport properties of Fermi-arc-like surface states. In a certain momentum space direction, the velocity of these surface states is determined by the tilting direction of the type-II Weyl nodes rather than the chirality dictated by the Chern number. Our study also provides an approach of constructing acoustic topological phases at different dimensions with the same building blocks.

  20. An improved theoretical model of acoustic agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L. ); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration); Hoffmann, T.L. )

    1994-04-01

    An improved theoretical model is developed to describe the acoustic agglomeration of particles entrained in a gas medium. The improvements to the present theories are twofold: first, wave scattering is included in the orthokinetic interaction of particles and second, hydrodynamic interaction, shown to be an important agglomeration mechanism for certain operation conditions, is incorporated into the model. The influence of orthokinetic and hydrodynamic interactions introduce associated convergent velocities that cause particles to approach each other and collide. The convergent velocities are related with an acoustic agglomeration frequency function (AAFF) through a semi-statistical method. This function is the key parameter for the theoretical simulation of acoustic agglomeration.

  1. Nonlinear ionospheric responses to large-amplitude infrasonic-acoustic waves generated by undersea earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.; Komjathy, A.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2017-02-01

    Numerical models of ionospheric coupling with the neutral atmosphere are used to investigate perturbations of plasma density, vertically integrated total electron content (TEC), neutral velocity, and neutral temperature associated with large-amplitude acoustic waves generated by the initial ocean surface displacements from strong undersea earthquakes. A simplified source model for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake is constructed from estimates of initial ocean surface responses to approximate the vertical motions over realistic spatial and temporal scales. Resulting TEC perturbations from modeling case studies appear consistent with observational data, reproducing pronounced TEC depletions which are shown to be a consequence of the impacts of nonlinear, dissipating acoustic waves. Thermospheric acoustic compressional velocities are ˜±250-300 m/s, superposed with downward flows of similar amplitudes, and temperature perturbations are ˜300 K, while the dominant wave periodicity in the thermosphere is ˜3-4 min. Results capture acoustic wave processes including reflection, onset of resonance, and nonlinear steepening and dissipation—ultimately leading to the formation of ionospheric TEC depletions "holes"—that are consistent with reported observations. Three additional simulations illustrate the dependence of atmospheric acoustic wave and subsequent ionospheric responses on the surface displacement amplitude, which is varied from the Tohoku case study by factors of 1/100, 1/10, and 2. Collectively, results suggest that TEC depletions may only accompany very-large amplitude thermospheric acoustic waves necessary to induce a nonlinear response, here with saturated compressional velocities ˜200-250 m/s generated by sea surface displacements exceeding ˜1 m occurring over a 3 min time period.

  2. Influence of acoustics in separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, H. V.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of introducing high energy acoustics into various filtering and drying systems were studied. With very slow velocity filtration systems, it was found that the introduction of acoustics could substantially increase the flow rate and also aided in the coagulation of the particulates before reaching the filter media. In the drying of temperature sensitive powders, the rate was increased by the introduction of acoustics. The acoustic frequency used was 20 kHz with power levels up to 3 watts per square centimeter.

  3. Acoustical studies of molecular interaction in the solution of propranolol hydrochloride drug at different temperatures and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Ritesh R.; Bawankar, S. V.; Kukade, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    In the present study ultrasonic velocity (υ), density (ρ) and viscosity (η) have been measured at 1MHz frequency in the binary mixtures of propranolol hydrochloride with water in the concentration range (0.1 to 0.0125%) at 303, 308, 313 K using multifrequency ultrasonic interferometer. The measured value of density, ultrasonic velocity, and viscosity have been used to calculate the acoustical parameters namely adiabatic compressibility (βa), relaxation time (τ), acoustic impedance (z), free length ( L f ), free volume ( V f ) and internal pressure (P i ), Wada's constant ( W), Rao's Constant ( R), and cohesive energy ( CE). These parameters explained formation of hydrogen bond and molecular interaction existing in the solution.

  4. Measurements of Low-Frequency Acoustic Attenuation in Soils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Engineering Research Laboratory to design an acoustic subsurface imaging system, a set of experiments was conducted in which the attenuation and the velocity...support of the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory’s efforts to design an acoustic subsurface imaging system which would ideally be...of acoustic waves such as those generated by a subsurface imaging system. An experiment reported in the literature characterized the acoustic

  5. Phase diagrams, thermodynamic properties and sound velocities derived from a multiple Einstein method using vibrational densities of states: an application to MgO-SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Michael H. G.; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer; van den Berg, Arie P.

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper, we showed a technique that simplifies Kieffer's lattice vibrational method by representing the vibrational density of states with multiple Einstein frequencies. Here, we show that this technique can be applied to construct a thermodynamic database that accurately represents thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams for substances in the system MgO-SiO2. We extended our technique to derive shear moduli of the relevant phases in this system in pressure-temperature space. For the construction of the database, we used recently measured calorimetric and volumetric data. We show that incorporating vibrational densities of states predicted from ab initio methods into our models enables discrimination between different experimental data sets for heat capacity. We show a general technique to optimize the number of Einstein frequencies in the VDoS, such that thermodynamic properties are affected insignificantly. This technique allows constructing clones of databases from which we demonstrate that the VDoS has a significant effect on heat capacity and entropy, and an insignificant effect on volume properties.

  6. Joint Impact Proposal: A complete velocity resolved 3-D [CII] map of the M51 grand-design spiral galaxy: Unraveling the impact of spiral density waves on the evolution of the ISM and star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzki, Juergen

    2015-10-01

    We propose to obtain the first complete, velocity resolved [CII] 158um image of the M51 grand-design spiral galaxy with the upGREAT and FIFI-LS instruments on SOFIA. Spiral density waves play a fundamental role on the conversion of atomic to molecular gas, leading to gravitational contraction and thus to star formation. Understanding the impact of spiral density waves on the lifecycle of the interstellar medium and on star formation in galaxies is thus critical for our understanding of galaxy evolution. The [CII] line (in combination with the low-J CO lines and HI 21 cm) is an important tool to diagnose the physical state of the ISM. It can reveal the distribution of the gas that is making a transition between atomic and molecular phases, including the CO-dark H2 gas (hydrogen molecular but carbon ionized, and thus not traced by either HI or CO) in the spiral arms and interarm regions of M51. We will use the high spectral resolution of the upGREAT instrument to resolve spiral arms in velocity, allowing us to study the flow of gas through spiral arms and measure line widths and determine the dynamical state of prominent interarm clouds. The significantly more sensitive FIFI-LS will be used to detect extended faint [CII] emission in the interarm regions and outskirts of the galaxy, including the gas connection to the companion galaxy. The 3-D data cube of velocity-resolved [CII] in this nearby galaxy, combined with the wealth of ancillary data, can be used for a large set of investigations by the broader astronomical community. It will provide for the first time the link between the detailed physical processes in the star-forming ISM in the Milky Way and the average properties of distant external galaxies. This complete map will be also an excellent showcase of SOFIA's capabilities for years to come.

  7. Joint Impact Proposal: A complete velocity resolved 3-D [CII] map of the M51 grand-design spiral galaxy: Unraveling the impact of spiral density waves on the evolution of the ISM and star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    We propose to obtain the first complete, velocity resolved [CII] 158um image of the M51 grand-design spiral galaxy with the upGREAT and FIFI-LS instruments on SOFIA. Spiral density waves play a fundamental role on the conversion of atomic to molecular gas, leading to gravitational contraction and thus to star formation. Understanding the impact of spiral density waves on the lifecycle of the interstellar medium and on star formation in galaxies is thus critical for our understanding of galaxy evolution. The [CII] line (in combination with the low-J CO lines and HI 21 cm) is an important tool to diagnose the physical state of the ISM. It can reveal the distribution of the gas that is making a transition between atomic and molecular phases, including the CO-dark H2 gas (hydrogen molecular but carbon ionized, and thus not traced by either HI or CO) in the spiral arms and interarm regions of M51. We will use the high spectral resolution of the upGREAT instrument to resolve spiral arms in velocity, allowing us to study the flow of gas through spiral arms and measure line widths and determine the dynamical state of prominent interarm clouds. The significantly more sensitive FIFI-LS will be used to detect extended faint [CII] emission in the interarm regions and outskirts of the galaxy, including the gas connection to the companion galaxy. The 3-D data cube of velocity--resolved [CII] in this nearby galaxy, combined with the wealth of ancillary data, can be used for a large set of investigations by the broader astronomical community. It will provide for the first time the link between the detailed physical processes in the star-forming ISM in the Milky Way and the average properties of distant external galaxies. This complete map will be also an excellent showcase of SOFIA's capabilities for years to come.

  8. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  9. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  10. Acoustic waves in medical imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen P; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-07-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term ultrasonography, or its abbreviated version sonography, meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Beginning in the 1990s, there started to emerge numerous acoustic imaging modalities based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. Imaging with these waves was shown to provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We discuss the physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications is presented. We discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications.

  11. Characterization of structural vibration: Field descriptors based on energy density and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linjama, Jukka

    Measurement of energy flow in acoustical and vibrational fields is usually based on the detection of one linear field quantity (e.g. sound pressure) and its spatial gradient, two transducers being used for the measurement. This report first reviews the quantities which can be obtained from the measurement of acoustical intensity with a two-microphone probe: intensity and the energy densities. A set of 'field descriptors', relative quantities giving a measure of propagating (active) character of the waves in the sound field, is proposed. These energetic quantities are based entirely on the transversal velocity measured and the gradient of that velocity, and are available when the two-transducer method of bending wave intensity is used. Examples of the energy densities and field descriptors measured in an aluminum plate are presented, and proposals for further work are given.

  12. Seismic velocity deviation log: An effective method for evaluating spatial distribution of reservoir pore types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirmohamadi, Mohamad; Kadkhodaie, Ali; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Faraji, Mohammad Ali

    2017-04-01

    Velocity deviation log (VDL) is a synthetic log used to determine pore types in reservoir rocks based on a combination of the sonic log with neutron-density logs. The current study proposes a two step approach to create a map of porosity and pore types by integrating the results of petrographic studies, well logs and seismic data. In the first step, velocity deviation log was created from the combination of the sonic log with the neutron-density log. The results allowed identifying negative, zero and positive deviations based on the created synthetic velocity log. Negative velocity deviations (below - 500 m/s) indicate connected or interconnected pores and fractures, while positive deviations (above + 500 m/s) are related to isolated pores. Zero deviations in the range of [- 500 m/s, + 500 m/s] are in good agreement with intercrystalline and microporosities. The results of petrographic studies were used to validate the main pore type derived from velocity deviation log. In the next step, velocity deviation log was estimated from seismic data by using a probabilistic neural network model. For this purpose, the inverted acoustic impedance along with the amplitude based seismic attributes were formulated to VDL. The methodology is illustrated by performing a case study from the Hendijan oilfield, northwestern Persian Gulf. The results of this study show that integration of petrographic, well logs and seismic attributes is an instrumental way for understanding the spatial distribution of main reservoir pore types.

  13. Interferometric phase velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Labelle, J.; Kelley, M. C.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Moore, T.; Arnoldy, R.

    1984-01-01

    Phase velocities of plasma waves near the lower hybrid frequency were measured with an interferometer composed of two spatially separated electron-density probes. The plasma waves were produced in the F-region ionosphere by an argon ion beam. By calculating the normalized cross spectrum of the plasma waves a coherency of .98 was estimated along with a maximum phase difference of pi/3 radians between the two probes. This implies that the wavelength was 6 meters compared to an O(+) gyroradius of 3.8 meters, and that the phase velocity was 45 km/sec compared to an ion-beam velocity of 12.4 km/sec. These numbers compare favorably with recent predictions of a nonresonant mode produced by a dense ion beam.

  14. Chemical Variations Affect Seismic Velocities Less Than Grain Size Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.; Jacobs, M. H.

    2001-12-01

    It is well known that mantle velocities depend on the ``Magnesium number'' of constituent minerals. According to our recently developed equation of state (Jacobs & Oonk, Calphad 24, 133--147, 2000) this speed varies almost linearly between 6.7422 (Mg2SiO4) and 6.0113 (Fe2SiO4) km/sec at 10 GPa and 1500 K, i.e. a velocity contrast of 730 m/sec, the canonical mantle composition at 400 km depth being 52% Mg2SiO4 in accordance with the estimates by Lee et al. (1998). We have shown experimentally elsewhere that grain size variations of isochemical, equal density, holocrystalline alkali disilicates affect acoustic velocities. These vary at room temperature and ambient pressure between 6.6 km/sec (coarse grained) and 7.7 km/sec (fine grained), a difference of 1100 m/sec, i.e. substantially larger than the above mentioned 730 m/sec for chemical variations. Such differences in grain size occur because of variations in time, temperature, transformation (TTT) conditions to which a material is subjected. Thus velocity variations as observed in the mantle do not necessarily reflect current hottter or colder localities or compositional variations. They more likely reflect different TTT conditions with concomitant fabric variation during subduction.

  15. A special relation between Young's modulus, Rayleigh-wave velocity, and Poisson's ratio.

    PubMed

    Malischewsky, Peter G; Tuan, Tran Thanh

    2009-12-01

    Bayon et al. [(2005). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 3469-3477] described a method for the determination of Young's modulus by measuring the Rayleigh-wave velocity and the ellipticity of Rayleigh waves, and found a peculiar almost linear relation between a non-dimensional quantity connecting Young's modulus, Rayleigh-wave velocity and density, and Poisson's ratio. The analytical reason for this special behavior remained unclear. It is demonstrated here that this behavior is a simple consequence of the mathematical form of the Rayleigh-wave velocity as a function of Poisson's ratio. The consequences for auxetic materials (those materials for which Poisson's ratio is negative) are discussed, as well as the determination of the shear and bulk moduli.

  16. Quantitative Interferometry in the Severe Acoustic Environment of Resonant Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Raman, Ganesh

    1999-01-01

    Understanding fundamental fluidic dynamic and acoustic processes in high-speed jets requires quantitative velocity, density and temperature measurements. In this paper we demonstrate a new, robust Liquid Crystal Point Diffraction Interferometer (LCPDI) that includes phase stepping and can provide accurate data even in the presence of intense acoustic fields. This novel common path interferometer (LCPDI) was developed to overcome difficulties with the Mach Zehnder interferometer in vibratory environments and is applied here to the case of a supersonic shock- containing jet. The environmentally insensitive LCPDI that is easy to align and capable of measuring optical wavefronts with high accuracy is briefly described, then integrated line of sight density data from the LCPDI for two underexpanded jets are presented.

  17. Particle-in-cell simulations of ion-acoustic waves with application to Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, Etienne J.; Collier, Andrew B.; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Maharaj, Shimul K.

    2014-07-15

    Using a particle-in-cell simulation, the dispersion and growth rate of the ion-acoustic mode are investigated for a plasma containing two ion and two electron components. The electron velocities are modelled by a combination of two kappa distributions, as found in Saturn's magnetosphere. The ion components consist of adiabatic ions and an ultra-low density ion beam to drive a very weak instability, thereby ensuring observable waves. The ion-acoustic mode is explored for a range of parameter values such as κ, temperature ratio, and density ratio of the two electron components. The phase speed, frequency range, and growth rate of the mode are investigated. Simulations of double-kappa two-temperature plasmas typical of the three regions of Saturn's magnetosphere are also presented and analysed.

  18. Acoustic energy in ducts - Further observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission of acoustic energy in uniform ducts carrying uniform flow is investigated with the purpose of clarifying two points of interest. The two commonly used definitions of acoustic 'energy' flux are shown to be related by a Legendre transformation of the Lagrangian density exactly as in deriving the Hamiltonian density in mechanics. In the acoustic case the total energy density and the Hamiltonian density are not the same which accounts for two different 'energy' fluxes. When the duct has acoustically absorptive walls neither of the two flux expressions gives correct results. A reevaluation of the basis of derivation of the energy density and energy flux provides forms which yield consistent results for soft walled ducts.

  19. Visual control of walking velocity.

    PubMed

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  20. Thermal/acoustical aircraft insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struzik, E. A.; Kunz, R.; Lin, R.

    1975-01-01

    Attempts made to improve the acoustical properties of low density Fiberfrax foam, an aircraft insulation material, are reported. Characterizations were also made of the physical and thermal properties. Two methods, optimization of fiber blend composition and modification of the foam fabrication process, were examined as possible means of improving foam acoustics. Flame impingement tests were also made; results show performance was satisfactory.

  1. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  2. Radio acoustic measurement of temperature profile in the troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuura, N.; Masuda, Y.; Inuki, H.; Kato, S.; Fukao, S.; Sato, T.; Tsuda, T.

    1986-10-01

    The radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) uses radar to measure the temperature profile in the atmosphere. In the standard technique of atmospheric radar, the radar backscatter results from electrical permittivity variations due to natural phenomena such as turbulence and precipitation. In the RASS technique, the radar backscatter results from periodical permittivity variations due to density/temperature variations imposed on the atmosphere by an acoustic wave artificially generated in such a way that the acoustic wavelength is half the radar (electromagnetic) wavelength. This `Bragg condition' is necessary for efficient backscattering. The backscatter echo of the RASS is affected by the Doppler frequency shift arising both from the speed at which the longitudinal acoustic perturbations propagate (the sound speed), and from the radial bulk velocity in the common volume of the atmosphere-the latter can be measured by the standard technique of turbulence scatter. The observed sound speed is reduced to give the local atmospheric temperature. Here we report an experiment using the RASS, carried out on 1-3 August 1985, which consisted of a high-power, very-high-frequency (VHF) Doppler radar at Shigaraki, Shiga, Japan and a movable high-power acoustic transmitter, and which gave the first experimental proof of the possibility of temperature profiling in the troposphere and stratosphere up to an altitude of ~20 km.

  3. Uncertainty estimation in seismo-acoustic reflection travel time inversion.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W

    2007-07-01

    This paper develops a nonlinear Bayesian inversion for high-resolution seabed reflection travel time data including rigorous uncertainty estimation and examination of statistical assumptions. Travel time data are picked on seismo-acoustic traces and inverted for a layered sediment sound-velocity model. Particular attention is paid to picking errors which are often biased, correlated, and nonstationary. Non-Toeplitz data covariance matrices are estimated and included in the inversion along with unknown travel time offset (bias) parameters to account for these errors. Simulated experiments show that neglecting error covariances and biases can cause misleading inversion results with unrealistically high confidence. The inversion samples the posterior probability density and provides a solution in terms of one- and two-dimensional marginal probability densities, correlations, and credibility intervals. Statistical assumptions are examined through the data residuals with rigorous statistical tests. The method is applied to shallow-water data collected on the Malta Plateau during the SCARAB98 experiment.

  4. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  5. Diversity of biomedical applications of acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen

    2010-02-01

    This manuscript is a summary of the paper presented at the ICU'2009 on biomedical applications of acoustic radiation force with emphasis on emerging applications in microfluidics, biotechnology, biosensors and assessment of the skeletal system. In this brief overview of current and projected applications of radiation force, no detailed description of the experiments illustrating particular applications are given as this would result in a far different and longer paper. Various mechanisms of acoustic radiation force generations and their biomedical applications are considered. These mechanisms include: (a) change in the density of energy of the propagating wave due to absorption and scattering; (b) spatial variations of energy density in standing acoustic waves; (c) reflection from inclusions, walls or other interfaces; and (d) spatial variations in propagation velocity. The widest area of biomedical applications of radiation force is related to medical diagnostics, to assessing viscoelastic properties of biological tissues and fluids, and specifically to elasticity imaging. Another actively explored area is related to manipulation of biological cells and particles in standing ultrasonic wave fields. There are several poorly explored areas of potential biomedical applications of ultrasound radiation force. A promising area of biomedical application of ultrasound radiation force is stirring and mixing of microvolumes of liquids in microfluidics and in various biotechnological application where diffusion rate is the main factor limiting the efficiency of the process of interest. A new technique, called "swept frequency method", based on the use of radiation force in the standing acoustic wave for microstirring of liquids is described. The potential applications of the ultrasound radiation force for assessment of skeletal system, where conventional bone ultrasonometry are inapplicable are considered.

  6. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions.

  7. A Klein-Gordon acoustic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    Geophysicists do not associate traveltime variation with density variation in acoustic or elastic wavefield interpretation. Rather, given a constant index of refraction, density variation within the medium of propagation is associated only with amplitudes. This point of view prevails because density does not occur as a variable in classical results such as Snell's Law or the eikonal equation. Nevertheless, in this paper I predict, analytically, a continuum of density effects on acoustic wavefields-including a dispersive traveltime delay when density variation is rapid. I also examine the ability of a common imaging algorithm to cope with this time delay.

  8. A Klein-Gordon acoustic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, Phil D.

    1992-12-01

    Geophysicists do not associate traveltime variation with density variation in acoustic or elastic wavefield interpretation. Rather, given a constant index of refraction, density variation within the medium of propagation is associated only with amplitudes. This point of view prevails because density does not occur as a variable in classical results such as Snell`s Law or the eikonal equation. Nevertheless, in this paper I predict, analytically, a continuum of density effects on acoustic wavefields-including a dispersive traveltime delay when density variation is rapid. I also examine the ability of a common imaging algorithm to cope with this time delay.

  9. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  10. Velocity and attenuation of ultrasound waves under cyclic loading of low-carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunev, Alexey; Nadezhkin, Mikhail; Zuev, Lev

    2016-11-01

    The results of the research of ultrasound wave velocity and attenuation in low-carbon steel during low-cycle fatigue tests have been presented in this work. It has been found that the dependencies of acoustic parameters on the number of cycles have three stages. The first stage is connected with dislocation density growth in a specimen. The transition from the second stage to the third one can be used as a criterion of fatigue wear of metalworks and implemented for nondestructive ultrasound lifetime estimation.

  11. Interactions of coupled acoustic and vortical instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Sohn, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the past, the acoustic combustion instability was studied independently of the hydrodynamic instability induced by vortex motions. This paper is intended to combine the two different sources of energy everywhere within the spatial domain and determine the effect of one upon the other. This can be achieved by calculating the mean flow velocities and vorticities and their fluctuating parts of velocities and vortices, as well as the fluctuating pressure. The Orr-Sommerfeld equation is utilized to determine the wavenumbers and unsteady stream functions from which vortically coupled acoustic instability growth constants are calculated. This process demonstrates that there are two different frequencies, acoustic and hydrodynamic, various combinations of which contribute to either damping or amplification. It is found that stability boundaries for coupled acoustic and vortical oscillations are somewhat similar to the classical hydrodynamic stability boundaries, but they occur in the form of multiple islands.

  12. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  13. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botton, V.; Moudjed, B.; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  14. Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Partha Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu; Phukan, Arindam

    2014-05-15

    The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

  15. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  16. Local wavefield velocity imaging for damage evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Chen Ciang; Gan, Chia Sheng; Mustapha, F.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Propagation Imaging or Acoustic Wavefield Imaging has been widely used to evaluate structural damages and internal features. Inspecting complete wavefield time history for damage identification is tedious and error-prone. A more effective way is by extracting damage-related information into a single image. A wavefield velocity imaging method that maps the local estimates of group or phase velocity is proposed. Actual velocity values rather than arbitrarily-scaled intensities are mapped, enabling damage sizing without the need of supervised training or inspecting wavefield propagation video. Performance of the proposed method was tested by inspecting a 100 mm by 100 mm area of a 2 mm thick stainless steel specimen. Local phase velocity maps of A0 mode showed a half-thickness hole of 2 mm diameter as significant change in local phase velocity from the nominal 2 m/ms. Full width at half maximum of relevant velocity profiles proved the accuracy and consistency of the damage sizing.

  17. Acoustic tensometry. II - Methods and apparatus /survey/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrenko, V. M.; Kutsenko, A. N.; Sheremetikov, A. S.

    1981-08-01

    Acoustic methods for determining the stress-strain state of a solid are analyzed; the methods are based on the results obtained in a previous article on acoustic tensometry (Bobrenko et al., 1980), as well as other literature and patent information on the subject. The analysis, relevant to factory conditions, is broken down into a study of three methods: (1) the measurement of absolute propagation times of ultrasonic space waves; (2) the measurement of absolute velocities of Rayleigh waves; and (3) the measurement of acoustic anisotrophy. Features of the acoustic and electronic units, and the demands imposed on the transducers are also considered. Practical recommendations are given for using the acoustic methods, depending on the relative dimensions of the testpieces.

  18. Acoustic tensometry. II - Methods and apparatus /survey/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrenko, V. M.; Kutsenko, A. N.; Sheremetikov, A. S.

    1980-12-01

    Acoustic methods for determining the stress-strain state of a solid are analyzed; the methods are based on the results obtained in a previous article on acoustic tensometry (Bobrenko et al., 1980), as well as other literature and patent information on the subject. The analysis, relevant to factory conditions, is broken down into a study of three methods: (1) the measurement of absolute propagation times of ultrasonic space waves; (2) the measurement of absolute velocities of Rayleigh waves; and (3) the measurement of acoustic anisotrophy. Features of the acoustic and electronic units, and the demands imposed on the transducers are also considered. Practical recommendations are given for using the acoustic methods, depending on the relative dimensions of the testpieces.

  19. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  20. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  1. A novel ultrasonic method for measuring breast density and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K.; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter J.

    2008-03-01

    Women with high mammographic breast density are at 4- to 6-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared to women with fatty breasts. However, current breast density estimations rely on mammography, which cannot provide accurate volumetric breast representation. Therefore, we explored two techniques of breast density evaluation via ultrasound tomography. A sample of 93 patients was imaged with our clinical prototype; each dataset contained 45-75 tomograms ranging from near the chest wall through the nipple. Whole breast acoustic velocity was determined by creating image stacks and evaluating the sound speed frequency distribution. Ultrasound percent density (USPD) was determined by segmenting high sound speed areas from each tomogram using k-means clustering, integrating over the entire breast, and dividing by total breast area. Both techniques were independently evaluated using two mammographic density measures: (1) qualitative, determined by a radiologist's visual assessment using BI-RADS Categories, and (2) quantitative, via semi-automatic segmentation to calculate mammographic percent density (MPD) for craniocaudal and medio-lateral oblique mammograms. ~140 m/s difference in acoustic velocity was observed between fatty and dense BI-RADS Categories. Increased sound speed was found with increased BI-RADS Category and quantitative MPD. Furthermore, strong positive associations between USPD, BI-RADS Category, and calculated MPD were observed. These results confirm that utilizing sound speed, both for whole-breast evaluation and segmenting locally, can be implemented to evaluate breast density.

  2. Shear waves in acoustic anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Grechka, Vladimir; Zhang, Linbin; Rector, James W.

    2003-01-02

    Acoustic transversely isotropic (TI) media are defined by artificially setting the shear-wave velocity in the direction of symmetry axis, VS0, to zero. Contrary to conventional wisdom that equating VS0 = 0 eliminates shear waves, we demonstrate their presence and examine their properties. Specifically, we show that SV-waves generally have finite nonzero phase and group velocities in acoustic TI media. In fact, these waves have been observed in full waveform modeling, but apparently they were not understood and labeled as numerical artifacts. Acoustic TI media are characterized by extreme, in some sense infinite strength of anisotropy. It makes the following unusual wave phenomena possible: (1) there are propagation directions, where the SV-ray is orthogonal to the corresponding wavefront normal, (2) the SV-wave whose ray propagates along the symmetry axis is polarized parallel to the P-wave propagating in the same direction, (3) P-wave singularities, that is, directions where P- and SV -wave phase velocities coincide might exist in acoustic TI media. We also briefly discuss some aspects of wave propagation in low-symmetry acoustic anisotropic models. Extreme anisotropy in those media creates bizarre phase- and group-velocity surfaces that might bring intellectual delight to an anisotropic guru.

  3. Excitation of dust acoustic waves by an ion beam in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Kaur, Daljeet; Gahlot, Ajay; Sharma, Jyotsna

    2014-10-15

    An ion beam propagating through a plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives a low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales to the one-third power of the beam density. The real part of the frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales to almost one-half power of the beam energy. The phase velocity, frequency, and wavelength results of the unstable mode are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  4. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  6. Broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobb, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    The broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler is an instrument that determines velocity based on the Doppler principle by reflecting acoustic signals off sediment particles in the water. The instrument is capable of measuring velocity magnitude and direction throughout a water column and of measuring water depth. It is also capable of bottom tracking and can, therefore, keep track of its own relative position as it is moved across a channel. Discharge measurements can be made quickly and, based on limited tests, accurately with this instrument. ?? 1993.

  7. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  8. Auditory velocity discrimination in the horizontal plane at very high velocities.

    PubMed

    Frissen, Ilja; Féron, François-Xavier; Guastavino, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    We determined velocity discrimination thresholds and Weber fractions for sounds revolving around the listener at very high velocities. Sounds used were a broadband white noise and two harmonic sounds with fundamental frequencies of 330 Hz and 1760 Hz. Experiment 1 used velocities ranging between 288°/s and 720°/s in an acoustically treated room and Experiment 2 used velocities between 288°/s and 576°/s in a highly reverberant hall. A third experiment addressed potential confounds in the first two experiments. The results show that people can reliably discriminate velocity at very high velocities and that both thresholds and Weber fractions decrease as velocity increases. These results violate Weber's law but are consistent with the empirical trend observed in the literature. While thresholds for the noise and 330 Hz harmonic stimulus were similar, those for the 1760 Hz harmonic stimulus were substantially higher. There were no reliable differences in velocity discrimination between the two acoustical environments, suggesting that auditory motion perception at high velocities is robust against the effects of reverberation.

  9. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  10. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  11. Acoustic imaging of subtle porosity variations in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.; Roth, D. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic images of silicon carbide ceramic disks were obtained using a precision scanning contact pulse-echo technique. Phase and cross-correlation velocity and attenuation maps were used to form color images of microstructural variations. These acoustic images reveal microstructural variations not observable with X-radiography.

  12. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave

  13. Characterization of anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Hyeong; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    In an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial, the off-diagonal components of its effective mass density tensor should be considered in order to describe the anisotropic behavior produced by arbitrarily shaped inclusions. However, few studies have been carried out to characterize anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a method that uses the non-diagonal effective mass density tensor to determine the behavior of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. Our method accurately evaluates the effective properties of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials by separately dealing with slabs made of single and multiple unit cells along the thickness direction. To determine the effective properties, the reflection and transmission coefficients of an acoustic metamaterial slab are calculated, and then the wave vectors inside of the slab are determined using these coefficients. The effective material properties are finally determined by utilizing the spatial dispersion relation of the anisotropic acoustic metamaterial. Since the dispersion relation of an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial is explicitly used, its effective properties can be easily determined by only using a limited number of normal and oblique plane wave incidences into a metamaterial slab, unlike existing approaches requiring a large number of wave incidences. The validity of the proposed method is verified by conducting wave simulations for anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs with Z-shaped elastic inclusions of tilted principal material axes.

  14. Antifade sonar employs acoustic field diversity to recover signals from multipath fading

    SciTech Connect

    Lubman, D.

    1996-04-01

    Co-located pressure and particle motion (PM) hydrophones together with four-channel diversity combiners may be used to recover signals from multipath fading. Multipath fading is important in both shallow and deep water propagation and can be an important source of signal loss. The acoustic field diversity concept arises from the notion of conservation of signal energy and the observation that in rooms at least, the total acoustic energy density is the sum of potential energy (scalar field-sound pressure) and kinetic energy (vector field-sound PM) portions. One pressure hydrophone determines acoustic potential energy density at a point. In principle, three PM sensors (displacement, velocity, or acceleration) directed along orthogonal axes describe the kinetic energy density at a point. For a single plane wave, the time-averaged potential and kinetic field energies are identical everywhere. In multipath interference, however, potential and kinetic field energies at a point are partitioned unequally, depending mainly on relative signal phases. Thus, when pressure signals are in deep fade, abundant kinetic field signal energy may be available at that location. Performance benefits require a degree of uncorrelated fading between channels. The expectation of nearly uncorrelated fading is motivated from room theory. Performance benefits for sonar limited by independent Rayleigh fading are suggested by analogy to antifade radio. Average SNR can be improved by several decibels, holding time on target is multiplied manifold, and the bit error rate for data communication is reduced substantially. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  16. Behaviour of a Premixed Flame Subjected to Acoustic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shafiq R.; Khan, Waqar A.; Prosser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional premixed laminar methane flame is subjected to acoustic oscillations and studied. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the effects of acoustic perturbations on the reaction rates of different species, with a view to their respective contribution to thermoacoustic instabilities. Acoustically transparent non reflecting boundary conditions are employed. The flame response has been studied with acoustic waves of different frequencies and amplitudes. The integral values of the reaction rates, the burning velocities and the heat release of the acoustically perturbed flame are compared with the unperturbed case. We found that the flame's sensitivity to acoustic perturbations is greatest when the wavelength is comparable to the flame thickness. Even in this case, the perturbations are stable with time. We conclude that acoustic fields acting on the chemistry do not contribute significantly to the emergence of large amplitude pressure oscillations. PMID:24376501

  17. Application of Gauge Theory to Acoustic Fields -- Revolutionizing and Rewriting the Whole Field of Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. S.

    2008-12-01

    This paper is to be dedicated to Prof C N Yang's 85th birthday celebration because the idea here was inspired by Prof Yang's public lecture in Singapore in 2006. There are many similarities between electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves. Maxwell's equations for em waves is the oldest gauge theory. We discover symmetries in the pair of wave equations in the acoustic stress field and the velocity field. We also derive a new equation in terms of the stress field for sound propagation in solids. This is different from the Christoffel's equation which is in term of the velocity field. We feel that stress field can better characterize the elastic properties of the sound waves. We also derive the acoustic gauge field condition and gauge invariance and symmetries for the acoustic fields. We also apply symmetries to study negative refraction. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  18. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  19. Acoustic metamaterials for sound mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    We provide theoretical and numerical analyses of the behavior of a plate-type acoustic metamaterial considered in an air-borne sound environment in view of sound mitigation application. Two configurations of plate are studied, a spring-mass one and a pillar system-based one. The acoustic performances of the considered systems are investigated with different approaches and show that a high sound transmission loss (STL) up to 82 dB is reached with a metamaterial plate with a thickness of 0.5 mm. The physical understanding of the acoustic behavior of the metamaterial partition is discussed based on both air-borne and structure-borne approaches. Confrontation between the STL, the band structure, the displacement fields and the effective mass density of the plate metamaterial is made to have a complete physical understanding of the different mechanisms involved.

  20. Studies of Ion Acoustic Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.; Bauer, B.S.; Baker, K.L. |

    1994-03-07

    In this project, we advanced knowledge of Ion Acoustic Decay on several fronts. In this project, we have developed and demonstrated the capability to perform experimental and theoretical studies of the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability. We have at the same time demonstrated an improved capability to do multichannel spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. We made the first observations of the time-resolved second harmonic emission at several angles simultaneously, and the first observations of the emission both parallel and perpendicular to the electric field of the laser light. We used Thomson scattering to make the first observations of the plasma waves driven by acoustic decay in a warm plasma with long density scale lengths. We also advanced both the linear and the nonlinear theory of this instability. We are thus prepared to perform experiments to address this mechanism as needed for applications.

  1. Observation of self-excited acoustic vortices in defect-mediated dust acoustic wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; I, Lin

    2014-07-01

    Using the self-excited dust acoustic wave as a platform, we demonstrate experimental observation of self-excited fluctuating acoustic vortex pairs with ± 1 topological charges through spontaneous waveform undulation in defect-mediated turbulence for three-dimensional traveling nonlinear longitudinal waves. The acoustic vortex pair has helical waveforms with opposite chirality around the low-density hole filament pair in xyt space (the xy plane is the plane normal to the wave propagation direction). It is generated through ruptures of sequential crest surfaces and reconnections with their trailing ruptured crest surfaces. The initial rupture is originated from the amplitude reduction induced by the formation of the kinked wave crest strip with strong stretching through the undulation instability. Increasing rupture causes the separation of the acoustic vortex pair after generation. A similar reverse process is followed for the acoustic vortex annihilating with the opposite-charged acoustic vortex from the same or another pair generation.

  2. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  3. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  4. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  5. Acoustic streaming of a sharp edge.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Zhou, Jianbo; Yalamanchili, Satish

    2014-07-01

    Anomalous acoustic streaming is observed emanating from sharp edges of solid bodies that are vibrating in fluids. The streaming velocities can be orders of magnitude higher than expected from the Rayleigh streaming at similar amplitudes of vibration. Acoustic velocity of fluid relative to a solid body diverges at a sharp edge, giving rise to a localized time-independent body force acting on the fluid. This force results in a formation of a localized jet. Two-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to predict acoustic streaming for low amplitude vibration using two methods: (1) Steady-state solution utilizing perturbation theory and (2) direct transient solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Both analyses agree with each other and correctly predict the streaming of a sharp-edged vibrating blade measured experimentally. The origin of the streaming can be attributed to the centrifugal force of the acoustic fluid flow around a sharp edge. The dependence of this acoustic streaming on frequency and velocity is examined using dimensional analysis. The dependence law is devised and confirmed by numerical simulations.

  6. Acoustic and Physical Properties of Mud Deposit in the Southern Continental Shelf of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G.; Kim, G.; Seo, Y.; Çifci, G.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles and core sediment sampling have been conducted to investigate the acoustic characteristics and physical properties of shelf mud deposit in the southern continental shelf of Korea. The major sediment source is the Seomjin River. The sediments are transported through the Yeosu Sound. Approximately 1000 line-km data of Chirp subbottom profiling and sparker were used. Along with seismic profiling, 40 piston core samples were collected. High-resolution seismic profiles show the Holocene mud deposits dominated in the study area, ranging from 10 to 40 m in thickness, and gas-related acoustic anomalies were also recorded in the Yeosu Sound and the south of Oenaro Island. The late Quaternary deposits on the study area can be divided into three sequences (Unit Ι, Unit ΙΙ, Unit ΙΙΙ). The seismic units ΙΙ and ΙΙΙ are interpreted as the inner-shelf transgressive sand sheet and the deltaic-estuarine complex, respectively. The highstand systems tract (unit Ι) overlying the maximum flooding surface is recent mud deposits formed during recent highstand of sea level. Core samples were analyzed for sediment texture (grain size, sand, silt and clay contents), physical properties (porosity, water content, bulk density, grain density and shear strength), and acoustic properties (compressional wave velocity and attenuation). Thirty-nine piston core samples were employed for the measurement. The mud sediments in the study area is vertically homogenous in texture. The mean grain size decreases generally from the mouth of Yeosu Sound to seaward. The sound velocity decreases from 1505 to 1485 m/s then increases to 1520 m/s southeastward due to Pleistocene sand ridges. Kim et al. (1992) suggested the grading effect of the Seomjin River discharge transported through the Yeosu Peninsula and Namhae Island results in the physical and acoustic properties.

  7. Controlling the acoustic streaming by pulsed ultrasounds.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Castro, Angélica

    2013-01-01

    We propose a technique based on pulsed ultrasounds for controlling, reducing to a minimum observable value the acoustic streaming in closed ultrasonic standing wave fluidic resonators. By modifying the number of pulses and the repetition time it is possible to reduce the velocity of the acoustic streaming with respect to the velocity generated by the continuous ultrasound mode of operation. The acoustic streaming is observed at the nodal plane where a suspension of 800nm latex particles was focused by primary radiation force. A mixture of 800nm and 15μm latex particles has been also used for showing that the acoustic streaming is hardly reduced while primary and secondary forces continue to operate. The parameter we call "pulse mode factor" i.e. the time of applied ultrasound divided by the duty cycle, is found to be the adequate parameter that controls the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulsed ultrasound is more efficient for controlling the acoustic streaming than the variation of the amplitude of the standing waves.

  8. Moving fluid mud sondes, optical and acoustic sensing methods in support of coastal waterway dredging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Rotkiske, Tyler

    2015-10-01

    Airborne, Satellite and In-Situ optical and acoustical imaging provides a means to characterize surface and subsurface water conditions in shallow marine systems. An important research topic to be studied during dredging operations in harbors and navigable waterways is the movement of fluidized muds before, during and after dredging operations. The fluid movement of the surficial sediments in the form of flocs, muck and mud is important to estimate in order to model the transport of solids material during dredging operations. Movement of highly turbid bottom material creates a lutocline or near bottom nephelometric layers, reduces the penetration of light reaching the water bottom. Monitoring and measurement systems recently developed for use in shallow marine areas, such as the Indian River Lagoon are discussed. Newly developed passive sondes and subsurface imaging are described. Methods and techniques for quantifying the mass density flux of total particulate matter demonstrate the use of multiple sensor systems for environmental monitoring and provide directional fluxes and movement of the fluidized solids. Airborne imaging of dredge site provide wide area surveillance during these activities. Passive sondes, optical imaging and acoustical sensors are used to understand horizontal and vertical mass flux processes. The passive sondes can be directionally oriented and are deployed during optical particle velocimetry system (OPVS) imaging of the flocs, particles and colloidal material motion. Comparison of the image based particle velocities are compared to electromagnetic and acoustic velocity imaging results. The newly developed imaging system provides a pathway for integration of subsurface hyperspectral imaging for particle compositional analysis.

  9. Vapor sensing by means of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Schwartz, S. S.; Gunshor, R. L.

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices can function as sensitive detectors of vapors. The high surface acoustic energy density of the device makes it extremely sensitive to the presence of molecules adsorbed from the gas phase. Mass loading by the adsorbate is the primary mechanism for the surface wave velocity perturbation. If the device is used as the frequency control element of an oscillator, perturbations in wave velocity on the order of 10 parts per billion may be resolved by means of a frequency counter. Zno-on-Si SAW resonators have been examined as vapor sensors. The piezoelectric ZnO layer permits transduction between electrical and acoustic energies, as well as endowing the surface with particular adsorptive properties. These devices exhibit C-values up to 12,000 at a resonant frequency of 109 MHZ. The resonant frequency of the device shifts upon exposure to a vapor-air mixture, with a transient response which is distinct for each of the organic vapors tested. Due to the permeability of the polycrystalline ZnO layer, the instantaneous reversibility of the resonant frequency shift is found to depend on the type of adsorbed molecule.

  10. Measuring elastic properties of cells by evaluation of scanning acoustic microscopy V(Z) values using simplex algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, T.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Hillmann, K.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a new technique is proposed to determine the acoustic properties as well as the thickness (and volume) of biological cells. Variations of thickness, density, acoustic wave velocity, stiffness, and attenuation coefficient of a living or dead cell are obtained by scanning the cell by an acoustic microscope. The distance between the cell and the microscope lens is varied and several voltage curves are thus obtained. These curves are then inverted by simplex optimization technique to obtain the cell parameters. The spatial resolution of the method is limited to the resolution of the scanning acoustic microscope. It allows to take advantage of the full range of frequencies and amplification of the microscope. Characteristic distributions of stiffness are exemplified with an endothelial cell in culture. The main part of the thin, lamellar cytoplasm has high stiffness, which drops close to the lamella/cell body transition region and only slightly increases again through the central part of the cell. Acoustic attenuation seems to be related to two factors, cytoplasm accumulation (in the lamellar parts) and scattering in the central part rich in organelles. ImagesFIGURE 10 PMID:19431793

  11. Investigation of zonal flows by using the collective scattering measurement of density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. G.; Yu, Y.; Lan, T.; Li, Y. D.; Liu, A. D.; Xie, J. L.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ti, A.; Li, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    The poloidal {{E}r}× {{B}\\text{T}} rotation velocities in the core plasma region are studied using the instantaneous frequency method (IFM) with the density fluctuations measured by the CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostics on the HT-7 tokamak. A coherent mode is observed in the fluctuations of poloidal velocities with the mode frequency from 10 to 20 kHz. It is identified as geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) zonal flow with poloidal symmetry (m = 0) and its mode frequency coinciding with the theoretical expected GAM frequency. The nonlinear interactions are investigated by applying the envelope analysis on the density fluctuations. The results confirm that the envelope modulation in the high frequency density fluctuations only comes from the shearing by GAM. The comparison between IFM and envelope analysis is also discussed.

  12. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  13. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  14. On the location of frequencies of maximum acoustic-to-seismic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatier, J.M.; Bass, H.E.; Elliott, G.R.

    1986-10-01

    Measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic transfer function (ratio of the normal soil particle velocity at a depth d to the acoustic pressure at the surface) for outdoor ground surfaces quite typically reveal a series of maxima and minima. In a publication (Sabatier et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 80, 646--649 (1986)), the location and magnitude of these maxima are measured and predicted for several outdoor ground surfaces using a layered poroelastic model of the ground surface. In this paper, the seismic transfer function for a desert site is compared to the seismic transfer function for holes dug in the desert floor which were filled with pumice (volcanic rock). The hole geometry was rectangular and the hole depths varied from 0.25--2.0 m. The p- and s-wave speeds, densities, porosities, and flow resistivities for the desert floor and pumice were all measured. By varying the hole depth and the fill material, the maxima in the seismic transfer function can be shifted in frequency and the locations of the maxima compare reasonably with that of a hard-backed layer calculation. The area or extent of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling for pumice was determined to be less than 1 m/sup 2/.

  15. Integrating Acoustic Imaging of Flow Regimes With Bathymetry: A Case Study, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    A unified view of the seafloor and the hydrothermal flow regimes (plumes and diffuse flow) is constructed for three major vent clusters in the Main Endeavour Field (e.g., Grotto, S&M, and Salut) of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Main Endeavour Field is one of RIDGE 2000's Integrated Study Sites. A variety of visualization techniques are used to reconstruct the plumes (3D) and the diffuse flow field (2D) based on our acoustic imaging data set (July 2000 cruise). Plumes are identified as volumes of high backscatter intensity (indicating high particulate content or sharp density contrasts due to temperature variations) that remained high intensity when successive acoustic pings were subtracted (indicating that the acoustic targets producing the backscatter were in motion). Areas of diffuse flow are detected using our acoustic scintillation technique (AST). For the Grotto vent region (where a new Doppler technique was used to estimate vertical velocities in the plume), we estimate the areal partitioning between black smoker and diffuse flow in terms of volume fluxes. The volumetric and areal regions, where plume and diffuse flow were imaged, are registered over the bathymetry and compared to geologic maps of each region. The resulting images provide a unified view of the seafloor by integrating hydrothermal flow with geology.