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Sample records for acoustic velocity oscillations

  1. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan A.; McEwen, Joseph E.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ˜5 ) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  2. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation. PMID:27058069

  3. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  4. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  5. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  6. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  7. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  8. Behaviour of a Premixed Flame Subjected to Acoustic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shafiq R.; Khan, Waqar A.; Prosser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional premixed laminar methane flame is subjected to acoustic oscillations and studied. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the effects of acoustic perturbations on the reaction rates of different species, with a view to their respective contribution to thermoacoustic instabilities. Acoustically transparent non reflecting boundary conditions are employed. The flame response has been studied with acoustic waves of different frequencies and amplitudes. The integral values of the reaction rates, the burning velocities and the heat release of the acoustically perturbed flame are compared with the unperturbed case. We found that the flame's sensitivity to acoustic perturbations is greatest when the wavelength is comparable to the flame thickness. Even in this case, the perturbations are stable with time. We conclude that acoustic fields acting on the chemistry do not contribute significantly to the emergence of large amplitude pressure oscillations. PMID:24376501

  9. Quasinormal acoustic oscillations in the Michel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverra, Eliana; Morales, Manuel D.; Sarbach, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    We study spherical and nonspherical linear acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow, which describes the steady radial accretion of a perfect fluid into a nonrotating black hole. The dynamics of such perturbations are governed by a scalar wave equation on an effective curved background geometry determined by the acoustic metric, which is constructed from the spacetime metric and the particle density and four-velocity of the fluid. For the problem under consideration in this paper the acoustic metric has the same qualitative features as an asymptotically flat, static and spherically symmetric black hole, and thus it represents a natural astrophysical analogue black hole. As for the case of a scalar field propagating on a Schwarzschild background, we show that acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow exhibit quasinormal oscillations. Based on a new numerical method for determining the solutions of the radial mode equation, we compute the associated frequencies and analyze their dependency on the mass of the black hole, the radius of the sonic horizon and the angular momentum number. Our results for the fundamental frequencies are compared to those obtained from an independent numerical Cauchy evolution, finding good agreement between the two approaches. When the radius of the sonic horizon is large compared to the event horizon radius, we find that the quasinormal frequencies scale approximately like the surface gravity associated with the sonic horizon.

  10. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  11. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  12. New Sensors For Flow Velocity And Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1991-01-01

    Paper describes two sensor-development programs at Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center. One program for digital image velocimetry (DIV) sensors, and other program, for advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnels. DIV measures, in real time, instantaneous velocity fields of time-varying flow or of collection of objects moving with varying velocities. Advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnels being developed to reduce effects of interference from wind noise, noise from interactions between flows and sensors, flow-induced vibrations of sensors, deflections of accoustic waves by boundary layers induced by sensors, and reflections from walls and sensor supports.

  13. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  14. Accuracy of acoustic velocity metering systems for measurement of low velocity in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Curtis, R.E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) accuracy depends on equipment limitations, the accuracy of acoustic-path length and angle determination, and the stability of the mean velocity to acoustic-path velocity relation. Equipment limitations depend on path length and angle, transducer frequency, timing oscillator frequency, and signal-detection scheme. Typically, the velocity error from this source is about +or-1 to +or-10 mms/sec. Error in acoustic-path angle or length will result in a proportional measurement bias. Typically, an angle error of one degree will result in a velocity error of 2%, and a path-length error of one meter in 100 meter will result in an error of 1%. Ray bending (signal refraction) depends on path length and density gradients present in the stream. Any deviation from a straight acoustic path between transducer will change the unique relation between path velocity and mean velocity. These deviations will then introduce error in the mean velocity computation. Typically, for a 200-meter path length, the resultant error is less than one percent, but for a 1,000 meter path length, the error can be greater than 10%. Recent laboratory and field tests have substantiated assumptions of equipment limitations. Tow-tank tests of an AVM system with a 4.69-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of 9.3 mms/sec, and the field tests of an AVM system with a 20.5-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of a 4 mms/sec. (USGS)

  15. The terminal velocity of a bubble in an oscillating flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, John Robert; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Romero, Louis Anthony

    2010-11-01

    A bubble in an acoustic field experiences a net 'Bjerknes' force from the nonlinear coupling of its radial oscillations with the oscillating buoyancy force. It is typically assumed that the bubble's net terminal velocity can be found by considering a spherical bubble with the imposed 'Bjerknes stresses'. We have analyzed the motion of such a bubble using a rigorous perturbation approach and found that one must include a term involving an effective mass flux through the bubble that arises from the time average of the second-order nonlinear terms in the kinematic boundary condition. The importance of this term is governed by the dimensionless parameter {alpha} = R{sup 2} {phi}/R{sup 2} {phi} {nu}.-{nu}, where R is the bubble radius, {phi} is the driving frequency, and {nu} is the liquid kinematic viscosity. If {alpha} is large, this term is unimportant, but if {alpha} is small, this term is the dominant factor in determining the terminal velocity.

  16. Oscillational instabilities in single mode acoustics levitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, J.; Barmatz, Martin

    1990-01-01

    An extention of standard results for the acoustic force on an object in a single-mode resonant chamber yields predictions for the onset of oscillational instabilities when objects are levitated or positioned in these chambers. The authors' results are consistent with those of experimental investigators. The present approach accounts for the effects of time delays in the response of a cavity to the motion of an object inside of it. Quantitative features of the instabilities are investigated. The experimental conditions required for sample stability, saturation of sample oscillations, hysteretic effects, and the loss of ability to levitate are discussed.

  17. Wave velocity dispersion and attenuation in media exhibiting internal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Steeb, Holger; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dynamical and acoustical behavior of porous and heterogeneous rocks is of great importance in geophysics, e.g. earthquakes, and for various seismic engineering applications, e.g. hydrocarbon exploration. Within a heterogeneous medium oscillations with a characteristic resonance frequency, depending on the mass and internal length of the heterogeneity, can occur. When excited, heterogeneities can self-oscillate with their natural frequency. Another example of internal oscillations is the dynamical behavior of non-wetting fluid blobs or fluid patches in residually saturated pore spaces. Surface tension forces or capillary forces act as the restoring force that drives the oscillation. Whatever mechanism is involved, an oscillatory phenomena within a heterogeneous medium will have an effect on acoustic or seismic waves propagating through such a medium, i.e. wave velocity dispersion and frequency-dependent attenuation. We present two models for media exhibiting internal oscillations and discuss the frequency-dependent wave propagation mechanism. Both models give similar results: (1) The low-frequency (i.e. quasi-static) limit for the phase velocity is identical with the Gassmann-Wood limit and the high-frequency limit is larger than this value and (2) Around the resonance frequency a very strong phase velocity change and the largest attenuation occurs. (1) Model for a homogeneous medium exhibiting internal oscillations We present a continuum model for an acoustic medium exhibiting internal damped oscillations. The obvious application of this model is water containing oscillating gas bubbles, providing the material and model parameters for this study. Two physically based momentum interaction terms between the two inherent constituents are used: (1) A purely elastic term of oscillatory nature that scales with the volume of the bubbles and (2) A viscous term that scales with the specific surface of the bubble. The model is capable of taking into account

  18. PRSA hydrogen tank thermal acoustic oscillation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    The power reactant storage assembly (PRSA) hydrogen tank test data were reviewed. Two hundred and nineteen data points illustrating the effect of flow rate, temperature ratio and configuration were identified. The test data were reduced to produce the thermal acoustic oscillation parameters. Frequency and amplitude were determined for model correlation. A comparison of PRSA hydrogen tank test data with the analytical models indicated satisfactory agreement for the supply and poor agreement for the full line.

  19. Supersonic velocities in noncommutative acoustic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we derive Schwarzschild and Kerr-like noncommutative acoustic black hole metrics in the (3+1)-dimensional noncommutative Abelian Higgs model. We have found that the changing ΔTH in the Hawking temperature TH due to spacetime noncommutativity accounts for supersonic velocities vg, whose deviation with respect to the sound speed cs is given in the form (vg-cs)/cs=ΔTH/8TH.

  20. Acoustic streaming induced by an ultrasonically oscillating endodontic file.

    PubMed

    Verhaagen, B; Boutsioukis, C; van der Sluis, L W M; Versluis, M

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasonically activated irrigation is an advanced dental technique for irrigation of the root canal system during a root canal treatment. The basic cleaning mechanism is a result of acoustic streaming induced by an oscillating file, leading to mixing of the irrigant and pressure and shear stresses on the walls of the root canal. Here the induced acoustic streaming, pressure, and shear stress are investigated in a two-dimensional cross-section of the root canal, using a combination of theory, numerical predictions, and experimental validation through high-speed particle tracking velocimetry. Acoustic streaming theory describes very well the flow induced by an ultrasonically oscillating endodontic file. It consists of an oscillatory component, which is dominant near the file, and a steady component, or jet, along the axis of oscillation. The importance of the oscillatory component for both the pressure and the shear stress is apparent, as it is two to three orders of magnitude higher than the steady component. A confinement affects the formation of the steady jets; meanwhile the oscillatory velocities and associated pressure and shear stress are increased. Previous work considering only the steady component of the flow therefore, underestimated the hydrodynamic effects induced by ultrasonic files. PMID:25234972

  1. Chromospheric Acoustic Oscillations in Active Flaring Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, T.; Hill, F.; Stassun, K.

    2014-12-01

    Chromospheric p-mode oscillations are studied in Hα to obtain helioseismic information regarding the local structural conditions around highly magnetic regions such as sunspots. Solar flares commonly occur in active regions where these sunspots exist therefore boosting the p-mode power. In our current study of analyzing p-modes in the chromosphere we study the time evolution of acoustic p-mode oscillation data taken from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Hα, and investigate the p-modes across the frequency band (1 < ν < 8.33 mHz). This study entails three active regions directly over sunspots, with accompanying flaring activity from two solar flares, occurring on June 13th and July 12th, 2012. Our analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved around the flare region, to study the frequency bands. We then study how the frequency distribution evolves temporally by constructing a Power Map Movie (PMM) of the regions. From these PMMs we can take a survey of the chromospheric oscillations for each frequency band. We found that the intensity of the flare has an effect on the behavior of the p-modes within different frequency bands. The suppression of power was observed in dark anomalous structures within the PMMs and in other regions there was an observed boost in power due to flaring activity.

  2. Reconstructing transient acoustic radiation from an arbitrary object with a uniform surface velocity distribution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the general formulations for reconstructing the transient acoustic field generated by an arbitrary object with a uniformly distributed surface velocity in free space. These formulations are derived from the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral theory that correlates the transient acoustic pressure at any field point to those on the source surface. For a class of acoustic radiation problems involving an arbitrarily oscillating object with a uniformly distributed surface velocity, for example, a loudspeaker membrane, the normal surface velocity is frequency dependent but is spatially invariant. Accordingly, the surface acoustic pressure is expressible as the product of the surface velocity and the quantity that can be solved explicitly by using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral equation. This surface acoustic pressure can be correlated to the field acoustic pressure using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation. Consequently, it is possible to use nearfield acoustic holography to reconstruct acoustic quantities in entire three-dimensional space based on a single set of acoustic pressure measurements taken in the near field of the target object. Examples of applying these formulations to reconstructing the transient acoustic pressure fields produced by various arbitrary objects are demonstrated. PMID:25096086

  3. Link Between Resistivity and Acoustic Velocity Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacikoylu, P.; Dvorkin, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    sand/shale model for velocity (the modified lower Hashin-Strikman elastic bound). Keywords: formation factor, acoustic velocity, rock physics relations.

  4. Elimination of Thermal Acoustic Oscillations in Cryogenic Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. J.; Gu, Y.

    2006-04-01

    Thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) were recently observed and eliminated in two vacuum-housing cryogenic pumps. This paper documents the results of research performed to identify the critical parameters that affect thermal acoustic oscillations in a vacuum-housing cryogenic pump. Techniques for simplifying this complex oscillation system were developed so that an existing mathematical model for a straight tube with uniform radius could be applied. Based on the simplified model, criteria were defined. These criteria provide design guidelines to prevent thermal acoustic oscillations from occurring inside vacuum-housing cryogenic pumps.

  5. The location of the source of high-frequency solar acoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Lu, Edward )

    1991-07-01

    Recently Libbrecht and Jefferies et al. have reported regular peaks in the solar oscillation power spectrum extending well above 5.3 mHz, the maximum frequency of trapped acoustic modes. Kumar et al. argued that these peaks are primarily due to the interference of traveling waves which are excited due to acoustic emission from turbulent convection. In contrast with the standing wave P-mode frequencies below 5.3 mHz, the positions of the high-frequency interference peaks (HIPs) are dependent on the location of the source of the acoustic oscillations. In the present work, Kumar et al.'s argument is strengthened, and more importantly, use is made of the above dependence to determine the acoustic source strength as a function of depth. It is found that the acoustic source profile, and thus the convective velocity, is peaked about 200 km deeper than what is expected from standard mixing length theory. 13 refs.

  6. Investigation of micromixing by acoustically oscillated sharp-edges.

    PubMed

    Nama, Nitesh; Huang, Po-Hsun; Huang, Tony Jun; Costanzo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Recently, acoustically oscillated sharp-edges have been utilized to achieve rapid and homogeneous mixing in microchannels. Here, we present a numerical model to investigate acoustic mixing inside a sharp-edge-based micromixer in the presence of a background flow. We extend our previously reported numerical model to include the mixing phenomena by using perturbation analysis and the Generalized Lagrangian Mean (GLM) theory in conjunction with the convection-diffusion equation. We divide the flow variables into zeroth-order, first-order, and second-order variables. This results in three sets of equations representing the background flow, acoustic response, and the time-averaged streaming flow, respectively. These equations are then solved successively to obtain the mean Lagrangian velocity which is combined with the convection-diffusion equation to predict the concentration profile. We validate our numerical model via a comparison of the numerical results with the experimentally obtained values of the mixing index for different flow rates. Further, we employ our model to study the effect of the applied input power and the background flow on the mixing performance of the sharp-edge-based micromixer. We also suggest potential design changes to the previously reported sharp-edge-based micromixer to improve its performance. Finally, we investigate the generation of a tunable concentration gradient by a linear arrangement of the sharp-edge structures inside the microchannel. PMID:27158292

  7. Thermal acoustic oscillations, volume 2. [cryogenic fluid storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, L. W.; Sims, W. H.; Fan, C.

    1975-01-01

    A number of thermal acoustic oscillation phenomena and their effects on cryogenic systems were studied. The conditions which cause or suppress oscillations, the frequency, amplitude and intensity of oscillations when they exist, and the heat loss they induce are discussed. Methods of numerical analysis utilizing the digital computer were developed for use in cryogenic systems design. In addition, an experimental verification program was conducted to study oscillation wave characteristics and boiloff rate. The data were then reduced and compared with the analytical predictions.

  8. Metamagnetism and Quantum Acoustic Oscillations in UPt3:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, V.; Shivaram, B.

    We present results of high resolution sound velocity measurements performed at the NHMFL, Tallahassee, in magnetic fields upto 33 T in a dilution refrigerator at temperatures down to 35 mK. For magnetic field parallel to the basal plane the observed quantum acoustic oscillations show a change in frequency as expected at the metamagnetic transition of 20 T. However, we find a similar abrupt change in frequency at 25 T for magnetic field parallel to the c-axis. The implications of this fermi surface instability even though there is no metamagnetic transition in this orientation will be discussed. Work at the University of Virginia was supported through NSF DMR-0073456 and the NHMFL is supported by NSF and the State of Florida.

  9. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Le Goff, J.-M.; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Rich, James; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Samushia, Lado; Santos, Ricardo Tanausú Génova; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a measurement of H0=67.3 ±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1 , with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat Λ CDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ ), our BAO +SN +CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301 ±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003 ±0.003 . When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO +SN +CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat Λ CDM values at ≈1 σ . While the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2 - 2.5 σ ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, ∑mν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to ∑mν<0.25 eV if we include the

  10. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Hartwig, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation discusses the causes of Thermal Acoustic Oscillations, how it can be detected, analyzed and prevented. It also discusses where it can occur, where it doesn't occur and practical mitigation techniques.

  11. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  12. Unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiduo; Fernández Comesaña, Daniel; Carrillo Pousa, Graciano; Yang, Yixin; Xu, Lingji

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the foundations of a unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient. Highly directional characteristics play a key role in reducing the influence of undesired acoustic sources. These characteristics can be achieved by using multiple acoustic sensors in a spatial gradient arrangement. Two particle velocity sensors possessing the figure eight directivity pattern were used in a first-order gradient configuration to yield a unidirectional probe that can reject most excitations originating from both sides and the rear. The effects of key parameters are thoroughly discussed, and the proposed theory is validated in practice. PMID:27369169

  13. Observations of sunspot umbral velocity oscillations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatnagar, A.; Livingston, W. C.; Harvey, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Review of sunspot umbral velocity measurements obtained free from any cross talk introduced by photospheric and penumbral scattered light by using lines formed only in the sunspot umbrae and showing no Zeeman effect. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of the umbral oscillatory velocity component is found to be of the order of 0.5 km per sec.

  14. Acoustic velocity sensor for the NRL ABC research platform

    SciTech Connect

    Corsaro, R.D.; Houston, B.

    1996-04-01

    A new research platform has been constructed for general underwater structural-acoustics studies of sensor/actuator coupling mechanisms, and in particular for active acoustic boundary control (ABC) studies. It consists of an array of 15 {open_quote}{open_quote}ABC{close_quote}{close_quote} tiles arranged in a 5{times}3 pattern on a backing structure (an air-backed steel plate). Tiles are 10 inches square, and each tile contains a large area actuator, pressure sensor, and (acoustic particle) velocity sensor. While the actuator and pressure sensor could be constructed of commercially available transducer material, the selection of a suitable acoustic velocity sensor proved more difficult. This paper describes the velocity sensor system selected and its impact on the resulting performance and characteristics of the ABC Platform. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Sectorial oscillation of acoustically levitated nanoparticle-coated droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Duyang; Chen, Zhen; Geng, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of a third mode sectorial oscillation of nanoparticle-coated droplets using acoustic levitation in combination with active modulation. The presence of nanoparticles at the droplet surface changes its oscillation amplitude and frequency. A model linking the interfacial rheology and oscillation dynamics has been proposed in which the compression modulus ɛ of the particle layer is introduced into the analysis. The ɛ obtained with the model is in good agreement with that obtained by the Wilhelmy plate approach, highlighting the important role of interfacial rheological properties in the sectorial oscillation of droplets.

  16. Precision surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) oscillators.

    PubMed

    Parker, T E; Montress, G K

    1988-01-01

    The evolution of SAW oscillator technology over the past 17 years is described and a review of the current state of the art for high-performance SAW oscillators is presented. This review draws heavily upon the authors' own experience and efforts, which have focused upon the development of a wide variety of SAW oscillators in response to numerous high-performance military system requirements. PMID:18290160

  17. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  18. Acoustic resonances in cylinder bundles oscillating in a compressibile fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-12-01

    This paper deals with an analytical study on acoustic resonances of elastic oscillations of a group of parallel, circular, thin cylinders in an unbounded volume of barotropic, compressible, inviscid fluid. The perturbed motion of the fluid is assumed due entirely to the flexural oscillations of the cylinders. The motion of the fluid disturbances is first formulated in a three-dimensional wave form and then casted into a two-dimensional Helmholtz equation for the harmonic motion in time and in axial space. The acoustic motion in the fluid and the elastic motion in the cylinders are solved simultaneously. Acoustic resonances were approximately determined from the secular (eigenvalue) equation by the method of successive iteration with the use of digital computers for a given set of the fluid properties and the cylinders' geometry and properties. Effects of the flexural wavenumber and the configuration of and the spacing between the cylinders on the acoustic resonances were thoroughly investigated.

  19. Numerical simulation of thermal acoustic oscillations in a liquid helium system

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Youfan; Timmerhaus, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    Thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) can generally be described by the general hydrodynamic equations for flow processes. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms associated with TAOs requires a full solution of these equations. However, the complexity of these equations make an analytical solution for TAOs essentially impossible. Accordingly, a numerical method has been employed to simulate the oscillation process. A combination of the finite difference and finite element method has been found to be most effective in simulating the oscillation process. Simulated oscillation results match the experimental observations with reasonable accuracy. Detailed axial pressure distribution, axial mean gas velocity and radial temperature gradient in an oscillation tube have been obtained and are included in this study.

  20. Efficient construction of mock catalogs for baryon acoustic oscillation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunayama, Tomomi; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Rangel, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    Precision measurements of the large scale structure of the Universe require large numbers of high fidelity mock catalogs to accurately assess, and account for, the presence of systematic effects. We introduce and test a scheme for generating mock catalogs rapidly using suitably derated N-body simulations. Our aim is to reproduce the large scale structure and the gross properties of dark matter halos with high accuracy, while sacrificing the details of the halo's internal structure. By adjusting global and local time-steps in an N-body code, we demonstrate that we recover halo masses to better than 0.5% and the power spectrum to better than 1% both in real and redshift space for k=1hMpc‑1, while requiring a factor of 4 less CPU time. We also calibrate the redshift spacing of outputs required to generate simulated light cones. We find that outputs separated by Δ z=0.05 allow us to interpolate particle positions and velocities to reproduce the real and redshift space power spectra to better than 1% (out to k=1hMpc‑1). We apply these ideas to generate a suite of simulations spanning a range of cosmologies, motivated by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) but broadly applicable to future large scale structure surveys including eBOSS and DESI. As an initial demonstration of the utility of such simulations, we calibrate the shift in the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak position as a function of galaxy bias with higher precision than has been possible so far. This paper also serves to document the simulations, which we make publicly available.

  1. Study of multilayered insulation pipe penetration. Thermal acoustic oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovin, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the net heat leak to a source of liquid nitrogen caused by a metal penetration through the blanket of multilayer insulation. The conditions under which the tests were conducted are described. A graph of the theoretical and experimental temperature distribution is developed for comparison. The variables involved in the computer program to process the data are defined. A study was conducted to develop analytical methods for predicting the effect and magnitudes of thermoacoustic oscillations on the penetration heat leak to cryogens. The oscillations develop as a result of large thermal gradients imposed on a compressible fluid. The predominant amplitudes and frequencies of the thermal acoustic oscillations were investigated.

  2. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  3. Theoretical Estimation of the Acoustic Energy Generation and Absorption Caused by Jet Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Iwagami, Sho; Kobayashi, Taizo; Takami, Toshiya

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the energy transfer between the fluid field and acoustic field caused by a jet driven by an acoustic particle velocity field across it, which is the key to understanding the aerodynamic sound generation of flue instruments, such as the recorder, flute, and organ pipe. Howe's energy corollary allows us to estimate the energy transfer between these two fields. For simplicity, we consider the situation such that a free jet is driven by a uniform acoustic particle velocity field across it. We improve the semi-empirical model of the oscillating jet, i.e., exponentially growing jet model, which has been studied in the field of musical acoustics, and introduce a polynomially growing jet model so as to apply Howe's formula to it. It is found that the relative phase between the acoustic oscillation and jet oscillation, which changes with the distance from the flue exit, determines the quantity of the energy transfer between the two fields. The acoustic energy is mainly generated in the downstream area, but it is consumed in the upstream area near the flue exit in driving the jet. This theoretical examination well explains the numerical calculation of Howe's formula for the two-dimensional flue instrument model in our previous work [Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 061411 (2014)] as well as the experimental result of Yoshikawa et al. [J. Sound Vib. 331, 2558 (2012)].

  4. How does non-linear dynamics affect the baryon acoustic oscillation?

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Naonori S.; Spergel, David N. E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-02-01

    We study the non-linear behavior of the baryon acoustic oscillation in the power spectrum and the correlation function by decomposing the dark matter perturbations into the short- and long-wavelength modes. The evolution of the dark matter fluctuations can be described as a global coordinate transformation caused by the long-wavelength displacement vector acting on short-wavelength matter perturbation undergoing non-linear growth. Using this feature, we investigate the well known cancellation of the high-k solutions in the standard perturbation theory. While the standard perturbation theory naturally satisfies the cancellation of the high-k solutions, some of the recently proposed improved perturbation theories do not guarantee the cancellation. We show that this cancellation clarifies the success of the standard perturbation theory at the 2-loop order in describing the amplitude of the non-linear power spectrum even at high-k regions. We propose an extension of the standard 2-loop level perturbation theory model of the non-linear power spectrum that more accurately models the non-linear evolution of the baryon acoustic oscillation than the standard perturbation theory. The model consists of simple and intuitive parts: the non-linear evolution of the smoothed power spectrum without the baryon acoustic oscillations and the non-linear evolution of the baryon acoustic oscillations due to the large-scale velocity of dark matter and due to the gravitational attraction between dark matter particles. Our extended model predicts the smoothing parameter of the baryon acoustic oscillation peak at z = 0.35 as ∼ 7.7Mpc/h and describes the small non-linear shift in the peak position due to the galaxy random motions.

  5. The Question of Spontaneous Wing Oscillations : Determination of Critical Velocity Through Flight-oscillation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlippe, B V

    1936-01-01

    Determination of the spontaneous oscillations of a wing or tail unit entail many difficulties, both the mathematical determination and the determination by static wing oscillation tests being far from successful and flight tests involving very great risks. The present paper gives a method developed at the Junkers Airplane Company by which the critical velocity with respect to spontaneous oscillations of increasing amplitude can be ascertained in flight tests without undue risks, the oscillation of the surface being obtained in the tests by the application of an external force.

  6. Measurement of acoustic velocity in the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Michard, Marc; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems generate cooling power from a high-amplitude acoustic standing wave. There has recently been a growing interest in this technology because of its simple and robust architecture and its use of environmentally safe gases. With the prospect of commercialization, it is necessary to enhance the efficiency of thermoacoustic cooling systems and more particularly of some of their components such as the heat exchangers. The characterization of the flow field at the end of the stack plates is a crucial step for the understanding and optimization of heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers. In this study, a specific particle image velocimetry measurement is performed inside a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Acoustic velocity is measured using synchronization and phase-averaging. The measurement method is validated inside a void resonator by successfully comparing experimental data with an acoustic plane wave model. Velocity is measured inside the oscillating boundary layers, between the plates of the stack, and compared to a linear model. The flow behind the stack is characterized, and it shows the generation of symmetric pairs of counter-rotating vortices at the end of the stack plates at low acoustic pressure level. As the acoustic pressure level increases, detachment of the vortices and symmetry breaking are observed.

  7. Exploratory experiments on acoustic oscillations driven by periodic vortex shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, R.; Brown, R. S.

    1981-03-01

    Periodic vortex shedding is investigated as a mechanism by which low-amplitude pressure oscillations can be generated in segmented solid propellant rocket engines. Acoustic responses were monitored in an acoustically isolated flow chamber with two flow restrictors in the flow path as a function of resistor spacing and flow Mach number. At Mach 0.042, the maximum acoustic response is observed with a marked increase in the amplitude of the wave corresponding to the third acoustic mode of the chamber. Reduction of the Mach number by a factor of three is found to excite the first longitudinal mode of the chamber at the same restrictor spacing. Attempts to produce the second axial mode are unsuccessful when the restrictors were kept at the center of the chamber, indicating the importance of restrictor position relative to the acoustic mode structure. The restrictor spacing at which maximum response is obtained indicates a Strouhal number of 0.8 characterizing the vortex shedding frequency, in agreement with calculations. The results thus demonstrate that a significant (5-10%) pressure oscillation can be generated by coupling from periodic vortex shedding

  8. Oscillational instabilities in single-mode acoustic levitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, Joseph; Barmatz, M.

    1990-01-01

    An extension of standard results for the acoustic force on an object in a single-mode resonant chamber yields predictions for the onset of oscillational instabilities when objects are levitated or positioned in these chambers. The results are consistent with experimental investigations. The present approach accounts for the effect of time delays on the response of a cavity to the motion of an object inside it. Quantitative features of the instabilities are investigated. The experimental conditions required for sample stability, saturation of sample oscillations, hysteretic effects, and the loss of the ability to levitate are discussed.

  9. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  10. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-01

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  11. Fiber-optic, cantilever-type acoustic motion velocity hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Cranch, G A; Miller, G A; Kirkendall, C K

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between fluid loaded fiber-optic cantilevers and a low frequency acoustic wave is investigated as the basis for an acoustic vector sensor. The displacements of the prototype cantilevers are measured with an integrated fiber laser strain sensor. A theoretical model predicting the frequency dependent shape of acoustically driven planar and cylindrical fiber-optic cantilevers incorporating effects of fluid viscosity is presented. The model demonstrates good agreement with the measured response of two prototype cantilevers, characterized with a vibrating water column, in the regime of Re ≥ 1. The performance of each cantilever geometry is also analyzed. Factors affecting the sensor performance such as fluid viscosity, laser mode profile, and support motion are considered. The planar cantilever is shown to experience the largest acoustically induced force and hence the highest acoustic responsivity. However, the cylindrical cantilever exhibits the smoothest response in water, due to the influence of viscous fluid damping, and is capable of two axis particle velocity measurement. These cantilevers are shown to be capable of achieving acoustic resolutions approaching the lowest sea-state ocean noise. PMID:22779459

  12. Quasi-normal acoustic oscillations in the transonic Bondi flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverra, Eliana; Sarbach, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of nonspherical acoustic perturbations of the transonic Bondi flow, describing the steady radial accretion of a polytropic perfect fluid into a gravity center. The propagation of such perturbations can be described by a wave equation on the curved effective background geometry determined by the acoustic metric introduced by Unruh in the context of experimental black hole evaporation. We show that for the transonic Bondi flow, Unruh's acoustic metric describes an analogue black hole and that the acoustic perturbations undergo quasi-normal oscillations. The associated quasi-normal frequencies are computed and they are proven to scale like the surface gravity of the acoustic black hole. This provides an explanation for results given in an earlier work, where it was shown that the acoustic perturbations of a relativistic fluid accreted by a nonrotating black hole possess quasi-normal modes, and where it was found empirically that the associated frequencies scaled like the surface gravity of the analogue black hole in the limit where the radius of the sonic horizon is much larger than the Schwarzschild radius.

  13. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called “dark energy.” To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 109 individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  14. Baryon acoustic oscillation intensity mapping of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called "dark energy." To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 10(9) individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy. PMID:18352692

  15. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  16. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  17. Constraints on large-scale dark acoustic oscillations from cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; de Putter, Roland; Raccanelli, Alvise; Sigurdson, Kris

    2014-03-01

    If all or a fraction of the dark matter (DM) were coupled to a bath of dark radiation (DR) in the early Universe, we expect the combined DM-DR system to give rise to acoustic oscillations of the dark matter until it decouples from the DR. Much like the standard baryon acoustic oscillations, these dark acoustic oscillations (DAO) imprint a characteristic scale, the sound horizon of dark matter, on the matter power spectrum. We compute in detail how the microphysics of the DM-DR interaction affects the clustering of matter in the Universe and show that the DAO physics also gives rise to unique signatures in the temperature and polarization spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We use cosmological data from the CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations, and large-scale structure to constrain the possible fraction of interacting DM as well as the strength of its interaction with DR. Like nearly all knowledge we have gleaned about DM since inferring its existence this constraint rests on the betrayal by gravity of the location of otherwise invisible DM. Although our results can be straightforwardly applied to a broad class of models that couple dark matter particles to various light relativistic species, in order to make quantitative predictions, we model the interacting component as dark atoms coupled to a bath of dark photons. We find that linear cosmological data and CMB lensing put strong constraints on the existence of DAO features in the CMB and the large-scale structure of the Universe. Interestingly, we find that at most ˜5% of all DM can be very strongly interacting with DR. We show that our results are surprisingly constraining for the recently proposed double-disk DM model, a novel example of how large-scale precision cosmological data can be used to constrain galactic physics and subgalactic structure.

  18. Oscillating load-induced acoustic emission in laboratory experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponomarev, Alexander; Lockner, David A.; Stroganova, S.; Stanchits, S.; Smirnov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of acoustic emission (AE) were studied. A pre-fractured cylinder of granite was loaded in a triaxial machine at 160 MPa confining pressure until stick-slip events occurred. The experiments were conducted at a constant strain rate of 10−7 s−1 that was modulated by small-amplitude sinusoidal oscillations with periods of 175 and 570 seconds. Amplitude of the oscillations was a few percent of the total load and was intended to simulate periodic loading observed in nature (e.g., earth tides or other sources). An ultrasonic acquisition system with 13 piezosensors recorded acoustic emissions that were generated during deformation of the sample. We observed a correlation between AE response and sinusoidal loading. The effect was more pronounced for higher frequency of the modulating force. A time-space spectral analysis for a “point” process was used to investigate details of the periodic AE components. The main result of the study was the correlation of oscillations of acoustic activity synchronized with the applied oscillating load. The intensity of the correlated AE activity was most pronounced in the “aftershock” sequences that followed large-amplitude AE events. We suggest that this is due to the higher strain-sensitivity of the failure area when the sample is in a transient, unstable mode. We also found that the synchronization of AE activity with the oscillating external load nearly disappeared in the period immediately after the stick-slip events and gradually recovered with further loading.

  19. Theoretical analysis of a cell's oscillations in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John S.; Zinin, Pavel

    2005-09-01

    The analysis and deformation of an individual cell in a high-frequency acoustic field is of fundamental interest for a variety of applications such as ultrasound cell separation and drug delivery. The oscillations of biological cells in a sound field are investigated using a shell model for the cell following an approach developed previously [Zinin, Ultrasonics, 30, 26-34 (1992)]. The model accounts for the three components which comprise the cell's motion: the internal fluid (cytoplasma), the cell membrane, and the surrounding fluid. The cell membrane whose thickness is small compared to the cell radius can be approximated as a thin elastic shell. The elastic properties of this shell together with the viscosities of the internal and external fluids determine the oscillations of the cell. The dipole oscillations of the cell depend on the surface area modulus and the maximum frequency for the relative change in cell area can be determined. Moreover, the higher order oscillations starting with the quadrupole oscillations are governed by the shell's shear modulus. Induced stresses in bacteria cell membranes in the vicinity of an oscillating bubble are investigated and cell rupture with respect to these stresses is analyzed.

  20. Numerical calculations of velocity and pressure distribution around oscillating airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.; Kobiske, M.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical procedure based on the Navier-Stokes equations was developed for analyzing and representing properties of unsteady viscous flow around oscillating obstacles. A variational formulation of the vorticity transport equation was discretized in finite element form and integrated numerically. At each time step of the numerical integration, the velocity field around the obstacle was determined for the instantaneous vorticity distribution from the finite element solution of Poisson's equation. The time-dependent boundary conditions around the oscillating obstacle were introduced as external constraints, using the Lagrangian Multiplier Technique, at each time step of the numerical integration. The procedure was then applied for determining pressures around obstacles oscillating in unsteady flow. The obtained results for a cylinder and an airfoil were illustrated in the form of streamlines and vorticity and pressure distributions.

  1. Electromagnetically actuated micromanipulator using an acoustically oscillating bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J. O.; Yang, J. S.; Lee, S. J.; Rhee, K.; Chung, S. K.

    2011-11-01

    A novel non-invasive micromanipulation technique has been developed where a microrobot swimming in an aqueous medium manipulates micro-objects, through electromagnetic actuation using an acoustically oscillating bubble attached to the microrobot as a grasping tool. This micromanipulation concept was experimentally verified; an investigation of electromagnetic actuation and acoustic excitation was also performed. Two-dimensional propulsion of a magnetic piece was demonstrated through electromagnetic actuation, using three pairs of electric coils surrounding the water chamber, and confirming that the propulsion speed of the magnetic piece was linearly proportional to the applied current intensity. Micro-object manipulation was separately demonstrated using an air bubble with glass beads (80 µm diameter) and a steel ball (800 µm diameter) in an aqueous medium. Upon acoustic excitation of the bubble by a piezo-actuator around its resonant frequency, the generated radiation force attracted and captured the neighboring glass beads and steel ball. The grasping force was indirectly measured by exposing the glass beads captured by the oscillating bubble to a stream generated by an auto-syringe pump in a mini-channel. By measuring the maximum speed of the streaming flow when the glass beads detached from the oscillating bubble and flowed downstream, the grasping force was calculated as 50 nN, based on Stokes' drag approximation. Finally, a fish egg was successfully manipulated with the integration of electromagnetic actuation and acoustic excitation, using a mini-robot consisting of a millimeter-sized magnetic piece with a bubble attached to its bottom. This novel micromanipulation may be an efficient tool for both micro device assembly and single-cell manipulation.

  2. A Novel Analysis of Acoustic Oscillations in Chromospheric Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, Teresa; Hill, Frank; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2015-04-01

    A helioseismic analysis of the chromosphere is employed in H-alpha to study how solar flares around active regions affect the behavior of acoustic oscillations. Our analysis deals with flares directly over sunspots, where the region is highly magnetized. In our current study of analyzing these oscillations in the chromosphere we study the temporal evolution of the oscillatory behavior from data taken from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) H-alpha detectors. We investigate the wave behavior across different frequency bands (1 < ν < 8.33 mHz). In order to analyze the frequency bands of the oscillations, our analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved and temporally evolved around the flare region; thereby creating a movie of each frequency band. This study entails three active regions, directly over sunspots, in which flaring activity is taking place from two solar flares, which occurred on June 13th and July 12th, 2012. We found that the intensity of the flare has an effect on the oscillations within different frequency bands. A suppression of power was observed in dark anomalous structures across the total frequency bands and in other regions there was an observed boost in power due to flaring activity. We find that, in the heart of all three regions, the low-frequency power (˜1-2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency and time dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flaring region. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset.

  3. Activation of immobilized enzymes by acoustic wave resonance oscillation.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomoya; Inoue, Yasunobu

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic wave resonance oscillation has been used successfully in the development of methods to activate immobilized enzyme catalysts. In this study, resonance oscillation effects were demonstrated for enzyme reactions on galactose oxidase (GAD), D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), and L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), all of which were immobilized covalently on a ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) device that could generate thickness-extensional resonance oscillations (TERO) of acoustic waves. For galactose oxidation on immobilized GAD in a microreactor, TERO generation immediately increased enzyme activity 2- to 3-fold. Eliminating TERO caused a slight decrease in the activity, with ∼90% of the enhanced activity retained while the reaction proceeded. Contact of the enhanced enzyme with a galactose-free solution caused almost complete reversion of the activity to the original low level before TERO generation, indicating that, not only TERO-induced GAD activation, but also preservation of the increased activity, required a galactose substrate. Similar activity changes with TERO were observed for enzyme reactions on DAAO and LAAO. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that TERO helped strengthen the interactions of the immobilized enzyme with the reactant substrate and promoted formation of an activation complex. PMID:25442945

  4. Intensity and Doppler Velocity Oscillations in Pore Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S.-C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Lim, E.-K.; Park, Y.-D.; Chae, J. C.; Yang, H.-S.; Park, H.-M.; Yurchyshyn, V.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated chromospheric traveling features running across two merged pores from their centers at speeds of about 55 km s‑1, in the active region AR 11828. The pores were observed on 2013 August 24 by using high-time, spatial, and spectral resolution data from the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope. We infer a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity by applying the lambdameter method to the Ca ii 8542 Å band and Hα band, and investigate intensity and LOS velocity changes at different wavelengths and different positions at the pores. We find that they have three-minute oscillations, and the intensity oscillation from the line center (0.0 \\overset{\\circ}A ) is preceded by that from the core (‑0.3 \\overset{\\circ}A ) of the bands. There is no phase difference between the intensity and the LOS velocity oscillations at a given wavelength. The amplitude of LOS velocity from the near core spectra ({Δ }λ =0.10-0.21 \\overset{\\circ}A ) is greater than that from the far core spectra ({Δ }λ =0.24-0.36 \\overset{\\circ}A ). These results support the interpretation of the observed wave as a slow magnetoacoustic wave propagating along the magnetic field lines in the pores. The apparent horizontal motion and a sudden decrease of its speed beyond the pores can be explained by the projection effect caused by inclination of the magnetic field with a canopy structure. We conclude that the observed wave properties of the pores are quite similar to those from the sunspot observations.

  5. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis, and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, R. J.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Acoustic Oscillations (TAO) can occur in cryogenic systems and produce significant sources of heat. This source of heat can increase the boil off rate of cryogenic propellants in spacecraft storage tanks and reduce mission life. This paper discusses the causes of TAO, how it can be detected, what analyses can be done to predict it, and how to prevent it from occurring.The paper provides practical insight into what can aggravate instability, practical methods for mitigation, and when TAO does not occur. A real life example of a cryogenic system with an unexpected heat source is discussed, along with how TAO was confirmed and eliminated.

  6. Temperature response of turbulent premixed flames to inlet velocity oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoola, B.; Hartung, G.; Armitage, C. A.; Hult, J.; Cant, R. S.; Kaminski, C. F.

    2009-01-01

    Flame-turbulence interactions are at the heart of modern combustion research as they have a major influence on efficiency, stability of operation and pollutant emissions. The problem remains a formidable challenge, and predictive modelling and the implementation of active control measures both rely on further fundamental measurements. Model burners with simple geometry offer an opportunity for the isolation and detailed study of phenomena that take place in real-world combustors, in an environment conducive to the application of advanced laser diagnostic tools. Lean premixed combustion conditions are currently of greatest interest since these are able to provide low NO x and improved increased fuel economy, which in turn leads to lower CO2 emissions. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the response of a bluff-body-stabilised flame to periodic inlet fluctuations under lean premixed turbulent conditions. Inlet velocity fluctuations were imposed acoustically using loudspeakers. Spatially resolved heat release rate imaging measurements, using simultaneous planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH and CH2O, have been performed to explore the periodic heat release rate response to various acoustic forcing amplitudes and frequencies. For the first time we use this method to evaluate flame transfer functions and we compare these results with chemiluminescence measurements. Qualitative thermometry based on two-line OH PLIF was also used to compare the periodic temperature distribution around the flame with the periodic fluctuation of local heat release rate during acoustic forcing cycles.

  7. A NEW STATISTIC FOR ANALYZING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Eckel, J.; Mehta, K.; Metchnik, M.; Pinto, P.; White, M.; Padmanabhan, N.; Seo, H.-J.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a new statistic {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) for measuring and analyzing large-scale structure and particularly the baryon acoustic oscillations. {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) is a band-filtered, configuration space statistic that is easily implemented and has advantages over the traditional power spectrum and correlation function estimators. Unlike these estimators, {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) can localize most of the acoustic information into a single dip at the acoustic scale while avoiding sensitivity to the poorly constrained large-scale power (i.e., the integral constraint) through the use of a localized and compensated filter. It is also sensitive to anisotropic clustering through pair counting and does not require any binning of data. We measure the shift in the acoustic peak due to nonlinear effects using the monopole {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) derived from subsampled dark matter (DM) catalogs as well as from mock galaxy catalogs created via halo occupation distribution modeling. All of these are drawn from 44 realizations of 1024{sup 3} particle DM simulations in a 1 h {sup -1} Gpc box at z = 1. We compare these shifts with those obtained from the power spectrum and conclude that the results agree. We therefore expect that distance measurements obtained from {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) and P(k) will be consistent with each other. We also show that it is possible to extract the same amount of acoustic information by fitting over a finite range using either {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) or P(k) derived from equal volume surveys.

  8. Helioseismology and asteroseismology: looking for gravitational waves in acoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt

    2014-10-10

    Current helioseismology observations allow the determination of the frequencies and surface velocity amplitudes of solar acoustic modes with exceptionally high precision. In some cases, the frequency accuracy is better than one part in a million. We show that there is a distinct possibility that quadrupole acoustic modes of low order could be excited by gravitational waves (GWs), if the GWs have a strain amplitude in the range 10{sup –20} h {sub –20} with h {sub –20} ∼ 1 or h {sub –20} ∼ 10{sup 3}, as predicted by several types of GW sources, such as galactic ultracompact binaries or extreme mass ratio inspirals and coalescence of black holes. If the damping rate at low order is 10{sup –3}η {sub N} μHz, with η {sub N} ∼ 10{sup –3}-1, as inferred from the theory of stellar pulsations, then GW radiation will lead to a maximum rms surface velocity amplitude of quadrupole modes of the order of h{sub −20}η{sub N}{sup −1}∼ 10{sup –9}-10{sup –3} cm s{sup –1}, on the verge of what is currently detectable via helioseismology. The frequency and sensitivity range probed by helioseismological acoustic modes overlap with, and complement, the capabilities of eLISA for the brightest resolved ultracompact galactic binaries.

  9. Helioseismology and Asteroseismology: Looking for Gravitational Waves in Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Current helioseismology observations allow the determination of the frequencies and surface velocity amplitudes of solar acoustic modes with exceptionally high precision. In some cases, the frequency accuracy is better than one part in a million. We show that there is a distinct possibility that quadrupole acoustic modes of low order could be excited by gravitational waves (GWs), if the GWs have a strain amplitude in the range 10-20 h -20 with h -20 ~ 1 or h -20 ~ 103, as predicted by several types of GW sources, such as galactic ultracompact binaries or extreme mass ratio inspirals and coalescence of black holes. If the damping rate at low order is 10-3η N μHz, with η N ~ 10-3-1, as inferred from the theory of stellar pulsations, then GW radiation will lead to a maximum rms surface velocity amplitude of quadrupole modes of the order of h_{-20}\\eta _N^{-1}\\sim 10-9-10-3 cm s-1, on the verge of what is currently detectable via helioseismology. The frequency and sensitivity range probed by helioseismological acoustic modes overlap with, and complement, the capabilities of eLISA for the brightest resolved ultracompact galactic binaries.

  10. Long-Lived, Coherent Acoustic Phonon Oscillations in GaN Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Geiser, P.; Jun, J.; Karpinski, J.; Park, J.-R.; Sobolewski, R.

    2006-01-31

    We report on coherent acoustic phonon (CAP) oscillations studied in high-quality bulk GaN single crystals with a two-color femtosecond optical pump-probe technique. Using a far-above-the-band gap ultraviolet excitation (~270 nm wavelength) and a near-infrared probe beam (~810 nm wavelength), the long-lived, CAP transients were observed within a 10 ns time-delay window between the pump and probe pulses, with a dispersionless (proportional to the probe-beam wave vector) frequency of ~45 GHz. The measured CAP attenuation corresponded directly to the absorption of the probe light in bulk GaN, indicating that the actual (intrinsic) phonon-wave attenuation in our crystals was significantly smaller than the measured 65.8 cm^-1 value. The velocity of the phonon propagation was equal to the velocity of sound in GaN.

  11. An investigation of thermally driven acoustical oscillations in helium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    The phenomenon of thermal-acoustic oscillation is seen to arise spontaneously in gas columns subjected to steep temperature gradients, particularly in tubes connecting liquid helium reservoirs with the ambient environment. This if often the arrangement for installed cryogenic instrumentation and is accompanied by undesirably large heat transfer rates to the cold region. Experimental data are collected and matched to theoretical predictions of oscillatory behavior; these results are in good agreement with the analytical model and with previously collected data. The present experiment places the open ends of oscillating tubes of the various lengths and cross sections in communication with flowing helium in the subcooled, 2-phase, or superheated state while the other ends are maintained at some controlled, elevated temperature. Assorted cold end conditions are achieved through adjustments to the Fermilab Tevatron satellite test refrigerator to which the test cryostat is connected. The warm, closed ends of the tubes are maintained by isothermal baths of liquid nitrogen, ice water, and boiling water. The method is contrasted to previous arrangements whereby tubes are run from room temperature into or adjacent to a stagnant pool of liquid helium. Additionally, the effect of pulsations in the flowing helium stream is explored through operation of the refrigerator's wet and dry expanders during data collection. These data confirm the theory to which try were compared and support its use in the design of cryogenic sensing lines for avoidance of thermoacoustic oscillation.

  12. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations with future SKA surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, P.; Camera, S.; Raccanelli, A.; Blake, C.; Ferreira, P.; Santos, M.; Schwarz, D. J.

    2015-04-01

    The imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in large-scale structure can be used as a standard ruler for mapping out the cosmic expansion history, and hence for testing cosmological models. In this article we briefly describe the scientific background to the BAO technique, and forecast the potential of the Phase 1 and 2 SKA telescopes to perform BAO surveys using both galaxy catalogues and intensity mapping, assessing their competitiveness with current and future optical galaxy surveys. We find that a 25,000 sq. deg. intensity mapping survey on a Phase 1 array will preferentially constrain the radial BAO, providing a highly competitive 2% constraint on the expansion rate at z ~ 2. A 30,000 sq. deg. galaxy redshift survey on SKA2 will outperform all other planned experiments for z < 1.4.

  13. Measuring the speed of light with baryon acoustic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Salzano, Vincenzo; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2015-03-13

    In this Letter, we describe a new method to use baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) to derive a constraint on the possible variation of the speed of light. The method relies on the fact that there is a simple relation between the angular diameter distance (D(A)) maximum and the Hubble function (H) evaluated at the same maximum-condition redshift, which includes speed of light c. We note the close analogy of the BAO probe with a laboratory experiment: here we have D(A) which plays the role of a standard (cosmological) ruler, and H^{-1}, with the dimension of time, as a (cosmological) clock. We evaluate if current or future missions such as Euclid can be sensitive enough to detect any variation of c. PMID:25815922

  14. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  15. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  16. The contamination of acoustic pressure measurements by sensor oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, J.; Kezele, D.; Risley, C.

    1996-04-01

    The significance of micromotion (sensor) noise contamination of low frequency, low level, ambient ocean acoustic measurements has been pursued experimentally and analytically. Oceanographic hydrophones are subject to small motions resulting from various phenomena; the present study focussed on a pressure-sensitive hydrophone exposed to vertical oscillations. While under such imposed motion, the responses from a pressure-sensitive hydrophone and a collocated accelerometer were analyzed relative to a stationary reference hydrophone. The imposed motion was vertical, colored noise (1 to 50 Hz) of various acceleration amplitudes (10 {mu}g to 10 mg), transmitted through an elastic isolation suspension. Formation of Frequency Response Functions between the measured transducer signals, demonstrated that a three component model of the hydrophone signal predicts the response-to-motion contamination of the acoustic signal. In the lower frequency range, the vertical motion through the static head gradient generates a signal similar to the response-to-acoustic signal, while in the upper frequency range, the hydrophone responds inertially to the motion. For acceleration greater than 30 {mu}g, these components masked the laboratory ambient sound, except in a narrow frequency band where the two motion related components canceled each other. The in-water acceleration sensitivity of the hydrophone was found to be higher than the measured in-air value, apparently due to two hydrodynamic effects: water mass loading predicted by a classical added-mass term and a greatly magnifying effect from an adjacent moving body. Extrapolating the results to a deep ocean environment, the hydrophone signals would be contaminated below 5 Hz. A spectral technique is demonstrated to remove both forms of motion contamination from laboratory data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Effects of acoustic wave resonance oscillation on immobilized enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomoya; Inoue, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    In aiming at developing a new method to artificially activate enzyme catalysts immobilized on surface, the effects of resonance oscillation of bulk acoustic waves were studied. Glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized by a covalent coupling method on a ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) device that was able to generate thickness-extensional resonance oscillation (TERO). Glucose oxidation by the GOD enzyme was studied in a microreactor. The generation of TERO immediately increased the catalytic activity of immobilized GOD by a factor of 2-3. With turn-off of TERO, no significant activity decrease occurred, and 80-90% of the enhanced activity was maintained while the reaction proceeded. The almost complete reversion of the activity to the original low level before TERO generation was observed when the immobilized GOD was exposed to a glucose substrate-free solution. These results indicated that the presence of glucose substrate was essential for TERO-induced GOD activation and preservation of the increased activity level. The influences of reaction temperature, glucose concentration, pH, and rf electric power on the TERO activation showed that TERO strengthened the interactions of the immobilized enzyme with glucose substrate and hence promoted the formation of an activation complex.

  18. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Jose; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering the Lyman-a forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Survey (BOSS). show that the flat LCDM model, that best describes the CMB data alone, is discrepant at 95% with the LyaF measurements. Hence, in order to reconcile them we consider models with more unusual histories of the dark energy, matter, or radiation components. In part we want to know what our combined data can place on interesting physical, such as neutrino masses, extra relativistic species, or dark energy that is dynamically significant at early times. But we also want to see whether any of these alternative models can resolve the discrepancy with the LyaF measurements at z = 2.34.

  19. Acoustically levitated dancing drops: Self-excited oscillation to chaotic shedding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Cheng; I, Lin

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate self-excited oscillation and shedding of millimeter-sized water drops, acoustically levitated in a single-node standing waves cavity, by decreasing the steady acoustic wave intensity below a threshold. The perturbation of the acoustic field by drop motion is a possible source for providing an effective negative damping for sustaining the growing amplitude of the self-excited motion. Its further interplay with surface tension, drop inertia, gravity and acoustic intensities, select various self-excited modes for different size of drops and acoustic intensity. The large drop exhibits quasiperiodic motion from a vertical mode and a zonal mode with growing coupling, as oscillation amplitudes grow, until falling on the floor. For small drops, chaotic oscillations constituted by several broadened sectorial modes and corresponding zonal modes are self-excited. The growing oscillation amplitude leads to droplet shedding from the edges of highly stretched lobes, where surface tension no longer holds the rapid expanding flow. PMID:26986279

  20. Acoustically levitated dancing drops: Self-excited oscillation to chaotic shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Po-Cheng; I, Lin

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate self-excited oscillation and shedding of millimeter-sized water drops, acoustically levitated in a single-node standing waves cavity, by decreasing the steady acoustic wave intensity below a threshold. The perturbation of the acoustic field by drop motion is a possible source for providing an effective negative damping for sustaining the growing amplitude of the self-excited motion. Its further interplay with surface tension, drop inertia, gravity and acoustic intensities, select various self-excited modes for different size of drops and acoustic intensity. The large drop exhibits quasiperiodic motion from a vertical mode and a zonal mode with growing coupling, as oscillation amplitudes grow, until falling on the floor. For small drops, chaotic oscillations constituted by several broadened sectorial modes and corresponding zonal modes are self-excited. The growing oscillation amplitude leads to droplet shedding from the edges of highly stretched lobes, where surface tension no longer holds the rapid expanding flow.

  1. An Analysis of Consolidation Grouting Effect of Bedrock Based on its Acoustic Velocity Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Lu, Wen-bo; Zhang, Wen-ju; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the mechanical properties of fractured rock masses. Based on the in situ acoustic velocity measurement data of ~20 hydropower stations in China, we assessed the acoustic velocity increase of rock masses as a result of consolidation grouting in different geological conditions, such as fault sites, weathered areas and excavation-induced damage zones. We established an empirical relationship between the acoustic velocity of rock masses before and after consolidation grouting, and examined the correlation between acoustic velocity and deformation modulus. A case study is presented about a foundation consolidation grouting project for an intake tower of Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that different types of rock masses possess distinct ranges for resultant acoustic velocity increase by consolidation grouting. Under a confidence interval of 95 %, the ranges of the increasing rate of acoustic velocity in a faulted zone, weathered zone, and excavation-induced damage zone are observed to be 12.7-43.1, 12.3-31.2, and 6.9-14.5 %, respectively. The acoustic velocity before grouting and its increasing rate can be used to predict the effectiveness of consolidation grouting.

  2. The relationship between mineral content and acoustic velocity of sandstone reservoirs in Junggar basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Gu, Hanming

    2015-08-01

    Sandstone reservoirs have generally high porosity in the Shawan formation of the Chunguang oil field, Junggar basin, because they developed in geological conditions of shallow and weak compaction. High porosity always links lower acoustic velocities in sandstone. However, when it is more than a certain value (approximately 27.5%), the porosity is not in accordance with acoustic velocities. In addition, cast thin sections illustrated incoherence between pore types and porosity. Fluids and mineral content are the two main factors changing acoustic velocities. This means that acoustic velocities of the high-porosity sandstone are mainly affected by the mineral content and fluid properties. Hence, data from litho-electric analysis are used to measure velocities of the compression shear waves, and thin sections are used to identify the mineral content. By the application of cross-plot maps, relations of acoustic velocities and mineral contents are proposed. Mineral contents include mainly quartz, feldspar, and tuff. In normal rock physical models, the shale content is calculated from well logs. The mineral grain is often regarded as pure quartz grain or average mineral composition. However, the application of the normal rock physics model will be inaccurate for high-porosity sandstone. Experience regression functions of the velocity model are established to estimate acoustic velocities. Also, mineral content logs could be predicted by using the P-wave acoustic log, and the rock physics model would be enhanced by using these logs of dynamic mineral contents. Shear wave velocity could also be estimated more accurately.

  3. Enhanced Damping for Capillary Bridge Oscillation Using Velocity Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Wei; Thiessen, David B.; Marston, Philip L.

    2004-01-01

    The stability of cylindrical liquid bridges in reduced gravity is affected by ambient vibrations of the spacecraft. Such vibrations are expected to excite capillary modes of the bridge. The lowest-order unstable mode is particularly susceptible to vibration as the length of the bridge approaches the stability limit. This low-order mode is known as the (2,0) mode and is an axisymmetric varicose mode of one wavelength in the axial direction. In this work, an optical system is used to detect the (2,0)-mode amplitude. The derivative of the error signal produced by this detector is used to produce the appropriate voltages on a pair of ring electrodes which are concentric with the bridge. A mode-coupled Maxwell stress profile is thus generated in proportional to the modal velocity. Depending on the sign of the gain, the damping of the capillary oscillation can be either increased or decreased. This effect has been demonstrated in Plateau-tank experiments. Increasing the damping of the capillary modes on free liquid surfaces in space could be beneficial for containerless processing and other novel technologies. [work supported by NASA

  4. Enhanced Damping for Capillary Bridge Oscillation Using Velocity Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Wei; Thiessen, David B.; Marston, Philip L.

    2004-01-01

    The stability of cylindrical liquid bridges in reduced gravity is affected by ambient vibrations of the spacecraft. Such vibrations are expected to excite capillary modes of the bridge. The lowest-order unstable mode is particularly susceptible to vibration as the length of the bridge approaches the stability limit. This low-order mode is known as the (2,0) mode and is an axisymmetric varicose mode of one wavelength in the axial direction. In this work, an optical system is used to detect the (2,0)-mode amplitude. The derivative of the error signal produced by this detector is used to produce the appropriate voltages on a pair of ring electrodes which are concentric with the bridge. A mode-coupled Maxwell stress profile is thus generated in proportional to the modal velocity. Depending on the sign of the gain, the damping of the capillary oscillation can be either increased or decreased. This effect has been demonstrated in Plateau-tank experiments. Increasing the damping of the capillary modes on free liquid surfaces in space could be beneficial for containerless processing and other novel technologies.

  5. Unexpected tidal variation of the ocean-acoustic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, H.; Fukao, Y.; Hibiya, T.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean sound velocity significantly varies at tidal frequency in not only shallow but also deep pert. Unexpected largely semidiurnal fluctuation of ocean-acoustic waves (T-waves), which propagate through the SOFAR channel, is found on the ocean bottom seismometer records for the 1999 submarine volcanic swarm in northern Mariana. The amplitude is one order larger than any previous artificial experiments. Here we report the first in situ evidence that T-wave travel time provide information about vertical movement of seawater due to internal tides. Numerical 3-D modelling shows the internal tide excited by external tidal forcing is particularly large along the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Ridge because of rough topography. A semidiurnal up-and-down movement associated with the internal tide cause an undulation of the SOFAR channel on the order of 100 m, which causes T-wave travel time variations consistent with the observed ones. The results are consistent with the observed travel time variations both in amplitude and phase, demonstrating that T-waves from volcanic swarms can be used to detect oceanic internal tides. Generation of internal tides is an important sink of the external tidal energy so that accurate estimate of conversion of the external to internal tides is essential to close the global tidal energy budget and to understand the Earth-Moon system evolution.

  6. Experimental and theoretical demonstration of acoustic Bloch oscillations in porous silicon structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lazcano, Z.; Arriaga, J.; Aliev, G. N.

    2014-04-21

    We report the theoretical calculations and the experimental demonstration of acoustic Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders in linear tilted multilayer structures based on porous silicon. The considered structures consist of layers with constant porosity alternated by layers with a linear gradient in the parameter η=1/v{sub L}{sup 2} along the growth direction in order to tilt the acoustic band gap. The purpose of this gradient is to mimic the tilted electronic miniband structure of a superlattice semiconductor under an external electric field. In this way, acoustic Wannier-Stark ladders of equidistant modes are formed and they were experimentally confirmed in the transmission spectrum around 1.2 GHz. Their frequency separation defines the period of the acoustic Bloch oscillations. We fabricated three different structures with the same thicknesses but different values in the η parameter to observe the effect on the period of the Bloch oscillations. We measured the acoustic transmission spectra in the frequency domain, and by using the Fourier transform, we obtained the transmission in the time domain. The transmission spectra of the fabricated samples show acoustic Bloch oscillations with periods of 27, 24, and 19 ns. The experimental results are in good agreement with the transfer matrix calculations. The observed phenomenon is the acoustic counterpart of the well known electronic Bloch oscillations.

  7. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  8. Calculation of reciprocal velocity curves of intrinsic surface acoustic wave in quartz crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yu, Kuanxin

    2010-10-01

    Quartz crystal has excellent piezoelectric properties, it can be used as substrates of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, for example delay line, filter, oscillator, convolver, acousto-optic (AO) device and so on. In this paper, Intrinsic SAW basic equation group and SAW mechanical boundary condition equation group are deduced from character equation of the crystal. Intrinsic SAW velocities are calculated using circle iterative method in three coordinate planes of quartz crystal systematically. Stiffness coefficient of piezoelectric crystal can be changed by piezoelectric effect and it is named as piezoelectric modified stiffness coefficient. Reciprocal velocity curves of quartz crystal in the three coordinate planes using the non-modified stiffness coefficients and the piezoelectric modified stiffness coefficients are drawn respectively. Configurations and periods of the curves are similar to projection figures of crystal lattice of the triangle crystal system in same coordinate planes. It means that there is internal relationship between the SAW properties and point group symmetries of the crystal. Research results lay a solid base for design and manufacture of the SAW device. It has theoretical significance and practical value.

  9. MASS-DEPENDENT BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATION SIGNAL AND HALO BIAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiao; Zhan Hu

    2013-05-10

    We characterize the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) feature in halo two-point statistics using N-body simulations. We find that nonlinear damping of the BAO signal is less severe for halos in the mass range we investigate than for dark matter. The amount of damping depends weakly on the halo mass. The correlation functions show a mass-dependent drop of the halo clustering bias below roughly 90 h {sup -1} Mpc, which coincides with the scale of the BAO trough. The drop of bias is 4% for halos with mass M > 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} and reduces to roughly 2% for halos with mass M > 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun }. In contrast, halo biases in simulations without BAO change more smoothly around 90 h {sup -1} Mpc. In Fourier space, the bias of M > 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} halos decreases smoothly by 11% from wavenumber k = 0.012 h Mpc{sup -1} to 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}, whereas that of M > 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} halos decreases by less than 4% over the same range. By comparing the halo biases in pairs of otherwise identical simulations, one with and the other without BAO, we also observe a modulation of the halo bias. These results suggest that precise calibrations of the mass-dependent BAO signal and scale-dependent bias on large scales would be needed for interpreting precise measurements of the two-point statistics of clusters or massive galaxies in the future.

  10. Measuring Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the clustering of voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal from voids, based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependency of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the methodology on an additional set of 1,000 realistic mock galaxy catalogues reproducing the SDSS-III/BOSS CMASS DR11 data, to control the impact of sky mask and radial selection function. Our solution is based on generating voids from randoms including the same survey geometry and completeness, and a post-processing cleaning procedure in the holes and at the boundaries of the survey. The methodology and optimal selection of void populations validated in this work have been used to perform the first BAO detection from voids in observations, presented in a companion paper.

  11. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations from the clustering of voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal from voids, based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependence of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale-dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the methodology on an additional set of 1000 realistic mock galaxy catalogues reproducing the SDSS-III/BOSS CMASS DR11 data, to control the impact of sky mask and radial selection function. Our solution is based on generating voids from randoms including the same survey geometry and completeness, and a post-processing cleaning procedure in the holes and at the boundaries of the survey. The methodology and optimal selection of void populations validated in this work have been used to perform the first BAO detection from voids in observations, presented in a companion paper.

  12. Acoustic Particle Velocity Sensors: Design, Performance, and Applications Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Berliner, M.J.; Lindberg, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    These proceedings represent the papers presented at a workshop sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and the Acoustical Society of America. The topics discussed include designs, applications and performance of underwater acoustic sensors. There were 29 papers presented and all have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  13. The Rhythm of Perception: Acoustic Rhythmic Entrainment Induces Subsequent Perceptual Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Hickok, Gregory; Farahbod, Haleh; Saberi, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic rhythms are pervasive in speech, music, and environmental sounds. Evidence for neural codes representing periodic information has recently emerged, which seem a likely neural basis for the ability to detect rhythm and rhythmic information has been found to modulate auditory system excitability, providing a potential mechanism for parsing the acoustic stream. Here we explore the effects of a previous rhythmic stimulus on subsequent auditory perception. We found that a low-frequency (3 Hz) amplitute modulated signal induces a subsequent oscillation of perceptual detectability of a brief non-periodic acoustic stimulus (1 kHz tone); the frequency but not phase of the perceptual oscillation matches the entrained stimulus-driven rhythmic oscillation. This provides evidence that rhythmic contexts have a direct influence on subsequent auditory perception of discrete acoustic events. Rhythm coding is likely a fundamental feature of auditory system design that predates the development of explicit human enjoyment of rhythm in music or poetry. PMID:25968248

  14. The Rhythm of Perception: Entrainment to Acoustic Rhythms Induces Subsequent Perceptual Oscillation.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Gregory; Farahbod, Haleh; Saberi, Kourosh

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic rhythms are pervasive in speech, music, and environmental sounds. Recent evidence for neural codes representing periodic information suggests that they may be a neural basis for the ability to detect rhythm. Further, rhythmic information has been found to modulate auditory-system excitability, which provides a potential mechanism for parsing the acoustic stream. Here, we explored the effects of a rhythmic stimulus on subsequent auditory perception. We found that a low-frequency (3 Hz), amplitude-modulated signal induces a subsequent oscillation of the perceptual detectability of a brief nonperiodic acoustic stimulus (1-kHz tone); the frequency but not the phase of the perceptual oscillation matches the entrained stimulus-driven rhythmic oscillation. This provides evidence that rhythmic contexts have a direct influence on subsequent auditory perception of discrete acoustic events. Rhythm coding is likely a fundamental feature of auditory-system design that predates the development of explicit human enjoyment of rhythm in music or poetry. PMID:25968248

  15. The BOSS-WiggleZ overlap region - I. Baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Koda, Jun; Marín, Felipe A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    We study the large-scale clustering of galaxies in the overlap region of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS sample and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We calculate the auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions in the overlap region of the two data sets and detect a Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal in each of them. The BAO measurement from the cross-correlation function represents the first such detection between two different galaxy surveys. After applying density-field reconstruction we report distance-scale measurements D_V r_s^fid / r_s = (1970 ± 45, 2132 ± 65, 2100 ± 200) Mpc from CMASS, the cross-correlation and WiggleZ, respectively. The distance scales derived from the two data sets are consistent, and are also robust against switching the displacement fields used for reconstruction between the two surveys. We use correlated mock realizations to calculate the covariance between the three BAO constraints. This approach can be used to construct a correlation matrix, permitting for the first time a rigorous combination of WiggleZ and CMASS BAO measurements. Using a volume-scaling technique, our result can also be used to combine WiggleZ and future CMASS DR12 results. Finally, we show that the relative velocity effect, a possible source of systematic uncertainty for the BAO technique, is consistent with zero for our samples.

  16. Surface acoustic wave velocity and elastic constants of cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Riobóo, Rafael J.; Cuscó, Ramon; Prieto, Carlos; Kopittke, Caroline; Novikov, Sergei V.; Artús, Luis

    2016-06-01

    We present high-resolution surface Brillouin scattering measurements on cubic GaN layers grown on GaAs substrate. By using a suitable scattering geometry, scattering by surface acoustic waves is recorded for different azimuthal angles, and the surface acoustic wave velocities are determined. A comparison of experimental results with numerical simulations of the azimuthal dependence of the surface wave velocity shows good agreement and allows a consistent set of elastic constants for c-GaN to be determined.

  17. Acoustic streaming in simplified liquid rocket engines with transverse mode oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.; Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    This study considers a simplified model of a liquid rocket engine in which uniform injection is imposed at the faceplate. The corresponding cylindrical chamber has a small length-to-diameter ratio with respect to solid and hybrid rockets. Given their low chamber aspect ratios, liquid thrust engines are known to experience severe tangential and radial oscillation modes more often than longitudinal ones. In order to model this behavior, tangential and radial waves are superimposed onto a basic mean-flow model that consists of a steady, uniform axial velocity throughout the chamber. Using perturbation tools, both potential and viscous flow equations are then linearized in the pressure wave amplitude and solved to the second order. The effects of the headwall Mach number are leveraged as well. While the potential flow analysis does not predict any acoustic streaming effects, the viscous solution carried out to the second order gives rise to steady secondary flow patterns near the headwall. These axisymmetric, steady contributions to the tangential and radial traveling waves are induced by the convective flow motion through interactions with inertial and viscous forces. We find that suppressing either the convective terms or viscosity at the headwall leads to spurious solutions that are free from streaming. In our problem, streaming is initiated at the headwall, within the boundary layer, and then extends throughout the chamber. We find that nonlinear streaming effects of tangential and radial waves act to alter the outer solution inside a cylinder with headwall injection. As a result of streaming, the radial wave velocities are intensified in one-half of the domain and reduced in the opposite half at any instant of time. Similarly, the tangential waves are either enhanced or weakened in two opposing sectors that are at 90° angle to the radial velocity counterparts. The second-order viscous solution that we obtain clearly displays both an oscillating and a steady flow

  18. Effect of tank liquid acoustic velocity on Doppler string phantom measurements.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A

    1991-03-01

    The quantitative effects of degassed water in string phantom tank Doppler measurements are derived theoretically. The Doppler parameter measurements considered are range gate registration, range gate profile, image flow angle measurements, and velocity calculation. The equipment velocity calculation is demonstrated to have an appreciable error which is due to the water acoustic velocity and the transducer acquisition geometry. A velocity calibration technique is proposed that only needs a simple multiplicative factor to compensate for the water in the tank. PMID:2027185

  19. Effect of wind tunnel acoustic modes on linear oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil cascade oscillating in torsion is investigated using the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. For subsonic flow and reduced frequencies as large as 0.9, airfoil surface unsteady pressures resulting from oscillation of one of the airfoils are measured using flush-mounted high-frequency-response pressure transducers. The influence coefficient data are examined in detail and then used to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade oscillating at various interblade phase angles. These results are correlated with experimental data obtained in the traveling-wave mode of oscillation and linearized analysis predictions. It is found that the unsteady pressure disturbances created by an oscillating airfoil excite wind tunnel acoustic modes which have detrimental effects on the experimental data. Acoustic treatment is proposed to rectify this problem.

  20. Effect of wind tunnel acoustic modes on linear oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, D. H.; Fleeter, S.

    1994-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil cascade oscillating in torsion is investigated using the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. For subsonic flow and reduced frequencies as large as 0.9, airfoil surface unsteady pressures resulting from oscillation of one of the airfoils are measured using flush-mounted high-frequency-response pressure transducers. The influence coefficient data are examined in detail and then used to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade oscillating at various interblade phase angles. These results are correlated with experimental data obtained in the traveling-wave mode of oscillation and linearized analysis predictions. It is found that the unsteady pressure disturbances created by an oscillating airfoil excite wind tunnel acoustic modes, which have detrimental effects on the experimental results. Acoustic treatment is proposed to rectify this problem.

  1. Feasibility of using acoustic velocity meters for estimating highly organic suspended-solids concentrations in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Levee 4 canal site below control structure G-88 in the Everglades agricultural area in northwestern Broward County, Florida, to study the relation of acoustic attenuation to suspended-solids concentrations. Acoustic velocity meter and temperature data were obtained with concurrent water samples analyzed for suspended-solids concentrations. Two separate acoustic velocity meter frequencies were used, 200 and 500 kilohertz, to determine the sensitivity of acoustic attenuation to frequency for the measured suspended-solids concentration range. Suspended-solids concentrations for water samples collected at the Levee 4 canal site from July 1993 to September 1994 ranged from 22 to 1,058 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from about 30 to 93 percent. Regression analyses showed that attenuation data from the acoustic velocity meter (automatic gain control) and temperature data alone do not provide enough information to adequately describe the concentrations of suspended solids. However, if velocity is also included as one of the independent variables in the regression model, a satisfactory correlation can be obtained. Thus, it is feasible to use acoustic velocity meter instrumentation to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in streams, even when suspended solids are primarily composed of organic material. Using the most comprehensive data set available for the study (500 kiloherz data), the best fit regression model produces a standard error of 69.7 milligrams per liter, with actual errors ranging from 2 to 128 milligrams per liter. Both acoustic velocity meter transmission frequencies of 200 and 500 hilohertz produced similar results, suggesting that transducers of either frequency could be used to collect attenuation data at the study site. Results indicate that calibration will be required for each acoustic velocity meter system to the unique suspended-solids regime existing at each site. More robust solutions may

  2. Optical and acoustical measuring techniques. [for Doppler measurement of flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the techniques of laser and acoustic Doppler measurement of fluid velocities in confined and free flows. The main mathematical relations are presented, and some systems are studied. Resolution properties of coaxial, bistatic, and pulsed CO2 laser Doppler velocimeter systems are compared. Schematics for pulsed and continuous wave acoustic Doppler systems are discussed. Both of these types of systems benefit from using a bistatic configuration instead of a coaxial system. The pulsed systems avoid contamination of source noise by not sampling until after the source noise has passed the receiver. Comparison of wind velocity measured with a pulsed acoustic Doppler and with a boundary layer profile is made.

  3. Numerical investigation of amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials with nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Manimala, James M; Sun, C T

    2016-06-01

    The amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials having nonlinear local oscillator microstructures is studied using numerical simulations on representative discrete mass-spring models. Both cubically nonlinear hardening and softening local oscillator cases are considered. Single frequency, bi-frequency, and wave packet excitations at low and high amplitude levels were used to interrogate the models. The propagation and attenuation characteristics of harmonic waves in a tunable frequency range is found to correspond to the amplitude and nonlinearity-dependent shifts in the local resonance bandgap for such nonlinear acoustic metamaterials. A predominant shift in the propagated wave spectrum towards lower frequencies is observed. Moreover, the feasibility of amplitude and frequency-dependent selective filtering of composite signals consisting of individual frequency components which fall within propagating or attenuating regimes is demonstrated. Further enrichment of these wave manipulation mechanisms in acoustic metamaterials using different combinations of nonlinear microstructures presents device implications for acoustic filters and waveguides. PMID:27369163

  4. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  5. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  6. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOEpatents

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  7. Digital image processing of sectorial oscillations for acoustically levitated drops and surface tension measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Changle; Xie, Wenjun; Wei, Bingbo

    2010-12-01

    A type of non-axisymmetric oscillations of acoustically levitated drops is excited by modulating the ultrasound field at proper frequencies. These oscillations are recorded by a high speed camera and analyzed with a digital image processing method. They are demonstrated to be the third mode sectorial oscillations, and their frequencies are found to decrease with the increase of equatorial radius of the drops, which can be described by a modified Rayleigh equation. These oscillations decay exponentially after the cessation of ultrasound field modulation. The decaying rates agree reasonably with Lamb's prediction. The rotating rate of the drops accompanying the shape oscillations is found to be less than 1.5 rounds per second. The surface tension of aqueous ethanol has been measured according to the modified Rayleigh equation. The results agree well with previous reports, which demonstrates the possible application of this kind of sectorial oscillations in noncontact measurement of liquid surface tension.

  8. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oshkai; M. Geveci; D. Rockwell; M. Pollack

    2002-12-12

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of,these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  9. Application of Wavelet Packet Analysis to the Measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Kevin; Garcia, Noel; Ford, Taurean; Pando, Jesus; SDSS-FAST Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We develop a method of wavelet packet analysis to measure the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak and apply this method to the CMASS galaxy catalog from the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) collaboration. We compare our results to a fiducial ?CDM flat cosmological model and detect a BAO signature in the power spectrum comparable to the previous consensus results of the BOSS collaboration. We find DA = 1365rd /rd , fid at z = . 54 . Member ID Forthcoming.

  10. First Detection of the Acoustic Oscillation Phase Shift Expected from the Cosmic Neutrino Background.

    PubMed

    Follin, Brent; Knox, Lloyd; Millea, Marius; Pan, Zhen

    2015-08-28

    The unimpeded relativistic propagation of cosmological neutrinos prior to recombination of the baryon-photon plasma alters gravitational potentials and therefore the details of the time-dependent gravitational driving of acoustic oscillations. We report here a first detection of the resulting shifts in the temporal phase of the oscillations, which we infer from their signature in the cosmic microwave background temperature power spectrum. PMID:26371637

  11. Detection of geodesic acoustic mode oscillations, using multiple signal classification analysis of Doppler backscattering signal on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; the Tore Supra Team

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the first observation of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) on Tore Supra plasmas. Using the Doppler backscattering system, the oscillations of the plasma flow velocity, localized between r/a = 0.85 and r/a = 0.95, and with a frequency, typically around 10 kHz, have been observed at the plasma edge in numerous discharges. When the additional heating power is varied, the frequency is found to scale with Cs/R. The MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm is employed to access the temporal evolution of the perpendicular velocity of density fluctuations. The method is presented in some detail, and is validated and compared against standard methods, such as the conventional fast Fourier transform method, using a synthetic signal. It stands out as a powerful data analysis method to follow the Doppler frequency with a high temporal resolution, which is important in order to extract the dynamics of GAMs.

  12. Oscillating bubble concentration and its size distribution using acoustic emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Avvaru, Balasubrahmanyam; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2009-01-01

    New method has been proposed for the estimation of size and number density distribution of oscillating bubbles in a sonochemical reactor using acoustic emission spectra measurements. Bubble size distribution has been determined using Minnaert's equation [M. Minnaert, On musical air bubbles and sound of running water, Philanthr. Mag. 16 (1933) 235], i.e., size of oscillating bubble is inversely related to the frequency of its volume oscillations. Decomposition of the pressure signal measured by the hydrophone in frequency domain of FFT spectrum and then inverse FFT reconstruction of the signal at each frequency level has been carried out to get the information about each of the bubble/cavity oscillation event. The number mean radius of the bubble size is calculated to be in the range of 50-80 microm and it was not found to vary much with the spatial distribution of acoustic field strength of the ultrasound processor used in the work. However, the number density of the oscillating bubbles and the nature of the distribution were found to vary in different horizontal planes away from the driving transducer surface in the ultrasonic bath. A separate set of experiments on erosion assessment studies were carried out using a thin aluminium foil, revealing a phenomena of active region of oscillating bubbles at antinodal points of the stationary waves, identical to the information provided by the acoustic emission spectra at the same location in the ultrasonic bath. PMID:18752981

  13. On the correlation of plume centerline velocity decay of turbulent acoustically excited jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, Uwe H.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic excitation was shown to alter the velocity decay and spreading characteristics of jet plumes by modifying the large-scale structures in the plume shear layer. The present work consists of reviewing and analyzing available published and unpublished experimental data in order to determine the importance and magnitude of the several variables that contribute to plume modification by acoustic excitation. Included in the study were consideration of the effects of internal and external acoustic excitation, excitation Strouhal number, acoustic excitation level, nozzle size, and flow conditions. The last include jet Mach number and jet temperature. The effects of these factors on the plume centerline velocity decay are then summarized in an overall empirical correlation.

  14. Baryon acoustic oscillations in 2D: Modeling redshift-space power spectrum from perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Saito, Shun

    2010-09-15

    We present an improved prescription for the matter power spectrum in redshift space taking proper account of both nonlinear gravitational clustering and redshift distortion, which are of particular importance for accurately modeling baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Contrary to the models of redshift distortion phenomenologically introduced but frequently used in the literature, the new model includes the corrections arising from the nonlinear coupling between the density and velocity fields associated with two competitive effects of redshift distortion, i.e., Kaiser and Finger-of-God effects. Based on the improved treatment of perturbation theory for gravitational clustering, we compare our model predictions with the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of N-body simulations, and an excellent agreement is achieved over the scales of BAOs. Potential impacts on constraining dark energy and modified gravity from the redshift-space power spectrum are also investigated based on the Fisher-matrix formalism, particularly focusing on the measurements of the Hubble parameter, angular diameter distance, and growth rate for structure formation. We find that the existing phenomenological models of redshift distortion produce a systematic error on measurements of the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter by 1%-2%, and the growth-rate parameter by {approx}5%, which would become non-negligible for future galaxy surveys. Correctly modeling redshift distortion is thus essential, and the new prescription for the redshift-space power spectrum including the nonlinear corrections can be used as an accurate theoretical template for anisotropic BAOs.

  15. Precise tailoring of acoustic velocity in optical fibers by hydrogenation and UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanting; Dong, Liang

    2012-12-01

    Tailoring of acoustic properties in solids has many potential applications in both acoustics, i.e. acoustic gratings and waveguides, and photon-phonon interactions, i.e. stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). One immediate application is in the area of SBS suppression in optical fibers. We demonstrate, for the first time, a post-processing technique where hydrogen is diffused in to a fiber core and then locally and permanently bonded to core glass by a subsequent UV exposure. It is discovered that local acoustic velocity can be altered by as much as ~2% this way, with strong potential for much further improvements with an increased hydrogen pressure. It is also found that the large change in acoustic velocity is primarily due to a reduction in bulk modulus, possibly as a result of network bonds being broken up by the addition of OH bonds. It is possible to use this technique to precisely tailor acoustic velocity along a fiber for more optimized SBS suppression in a fiber amplifier. Change in Brillouin Stokes frequency of ~320MHz at 1.064μm was observed. PMID:23262726

  16. Coherent acoustic phonon oscillation accompanied with backward acoustic pulse below exciton resonance in a ZnO epifilm on oxide-buffered Si(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ja-Hon; Shen, Yu-Kai; Liu, Wei-Rein; Lu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Yao-Hui; Chang, Chun-peng; Lee, Wei-Chin; Hong, Minghwei; Kwo, Jueinai-Raynien; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Unlike coherent acoustic phonons (CAPs) generated from heat induced thermal stress by the coated Au film, we demonstrated the oscillation from c-ZnO epitaxial film on oxide buffered Si through a degenerate pump–probe technique. As the excited photon energy was set below the exciton resonance, the electronic stress that resulted from defect resonance was used to induce acoustic wave. The damped oscillation revealed a superposition of a high frequency and long decay CAP signal with a backward propagating acoustic pulse which was generated by the absorption of the penetrated pump beam at the Si surface and selected by the ZnO layer as the acoustic resonator.

  17. Analysis of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Data for Acoustic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a Normal Incidence Tube configuration at various frequency, phase, and amplitude levels. This report presents the results of the PIV analysis and data reduction portions of the test and details the processing that was done. Estimates of lower measurement sensitivity levels were determined based on PIV image quality, correlation, and noise level parameters used in the test. Comparison of measurements with linear acoustic theory are presented. The onset of nonlinear, harmonic frequency acoustic levels were also studied for various decibel and frequency levels ranging from 90 to 132 dB and 500 to 3000 Hz, respectively.

  18. Large area planar fiber optic accelerometers for measurement of acoustic velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Bucaro, J.A.; Lagakos, N.; Houston, B.H.; Kraus, L.

    1996-04-01

    Large area, flexible planar fiber optic accelerometers have been developed for use as acoustic velocity sensors in underwater applications. The devices use a specially designed optical fiber with specific jackets which suppress the fiber sensor{close_quote}s response to acoustic pressure. The sensor has been subjected to a variety of tests including direct acceleration response, direct pressure response, and response to flexural wave excitation when mounted to a {open_quote}{open_quote}hull simulator{close_quote}{close_quote} backing structure. A thorough analysis has been carried out to understand the dynamic responses and limitations of these sensor types. This work is motivated by the desire to measure spatially averaged acoustic velocity while suppressing higher wavenumber mechanical excitations. In conjunction with existing large area pressure sensors (or with suitable structural models), these devices would provide a powerful capability for the measurement and detection of acoustic fields near structures having general impedance properties. This would allow, for example, the decomposition of the acoustic field into backward and forward propagating waves near such a boundary, the determination of acoustic intensity, the detection of the acoustic field with high signal-to-noise ratios even near a soft, pressure release boundary, and determination of the impedance of the structure itself. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Experimental study of the oscillation of spheres in an acoustic levitator.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco A B; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C

    2014-10-01

    The spontaneous oscillation of solid spheres in a single-axis acoustic levitator is experimentally investigated by using a high speed camera to record the position of the levitated sphere as a function of time. The oscillations in the axial and radial directions are systematically studied by changing the sphere density and the acoustic pressure amplitude. In order to interpret the experimental results, a simple model based on a spring-mass system is applied in the analysis of the sphere oscillatory behavior. This model requires the knowledge of the acoustic pressure distribution, which was obtained numerically by using a linear finite element method (FEM). Additionally, the linear acoustic pressure distribution obtained by FEM was compared with that measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer. The comparison between numerical and experimental pressure distributions shows good agreement for low values of pressure amplitude. When the pressure amplitude is increased, the acoustic pressure distribution becomes nonlinear, producing harmonics of the fundamental frequency. The experimental results of the spheres oscillations for low pressure amplitudes are consistent with the results predicted by the simple model based on a spring-mass system. PMID:25324056

  20. Evidence for tip velocity oscillations in dendritic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, J. C.; Koss, M. B.; Frei, J. E.; Giummarra, C.; Lupulescu, A. O.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic growth experiments were conducted in the reduced-convection environment aboard the space shuttle Columbia on STS-87. Spectral analysis was performed on 30-frame/s video data during growths of isothermal dendrites. Results indicate that pivalic acid dendrites exhibit a subtle oscillatory behavior of the axial growth velocity near the tip, with a frequency component that is associated with the sidebranch formation process.

  1. Evidence for tip velocity oscillations in dendritic solidification.

    PubMed

    LaCombe, J C; Koss, M B; Frei, J E; Giummarra, C; Lupulescu, A O; Glicksman, M E

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic growth experiments were conducted in the reduced-convection environment aboard the space shuttle Columbia on STS-87. Spectral analysis was performed on 30-frame/s video data during growths of isothermal dendrites. Results indicate that pivalic acid dendrites exhibit a subtle oscillatory behavior of the axial growth velocity near the tip, with a frequency component that is associated with the sidebranch formation process. PMID:11909070

  2. Acoustic Velocity Of The Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Liu, C.; Huang, P.

    2004-12-01

    Along the Manila Trench south of 21øXN, deep-sea sediments are being underthrusted beneath the Taiwan accretionary prism which is composed of the Kaoping Slope and Hengchun Ridge. Offshore southwestern Taiwan, foreland sediments and Late Miocene strata of the Tainan Basin are being accreted onto the fold-and thrust belt of the syn-collision accretionary wedge of the Kaoping Slope. The Kaoping Slope consists of thick Neogene to Recent siliciclastics deformed by fold-and-thrust structures and mud diapers. These Pliocene-Quaternary sediments deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and upper slope area are considered to be paleo-channel deposits confined by NNE-SSW trend mud diapiric structure. Seismic P-wave velocities of the sediment deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and Kaoping Slope area are derived from mutichannel seismic reflection data and wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles collected by sonobuoys. Sediment velocity structures constrained from mutichannel seismic reflection data using velocity spectrum analysis method and that derived from sonobuoy data using tau-sum inversion method are compared, and they both provide consistent velocity structures. Seismic velocities were analyzed along the seismic profile from the surface to maximum depths of about 2.0 km below the seafloor. Our model features a sediment layer1 with 400 ms in thickness and a sediment layer2 with 600 ms in thickness. For the shelf sediments, we observe a linear interval velocity trend of V=1.53+1.91T in layer1, and V=1.86+0.87T in layer2, where T is the one way travel time within the layer. For the slop sediment, the trend of V=1.47+1.93T in layer1, and V=1.70+1.55T in layer2. The layer1¡¦s velocities gradients are similar between the shelf (1.91 km/sec2) and the slope(1.93 km/sec2). It means layer1 distributes over the slope and shelf widely. The result of the sediment velocity gradients in this area are in good agreement with that reported for the south Atlantic continental margins.

  3. A Void Fraction Characterisation by Low Frequency Acoustic Velocity Measurements in Microbubble Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaro, Matthieu

    Low frequency acoustic velocity measurements have been applied for the characterization of microbubble clouds generated in water. This method, based on the Wood's model (1941) links the acoustic velocity throughout a two-phase medium to its void fraction value. Low frequency means below resonance frequencies of the bubbles inside the cloud. An original bench was developed to allow the qualification of this method. The experiments conducted allowed us to characterize void fraction values between 10-3 and 10-7. The radii of the studied microbubbles are between a few micrometers and a hundred micrometers.

  4. Response of partially premixed flames to acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Lee, J.G.; Quay, B.D.; Santavicca, D.A.

    2010-09-15

    This article describes an experimental investigation of the forced response of a swirl-stabilized partially premixed flame when it is subjected to acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio fluctuations. The flame's response is analyzed using phase-resolved CH{sup *} chemiluminescence images and flame transfer function (FTF) measurements, and compared with the response of a perfectly premixed flame under acoustic perturbations. The nonlinear response of the partially premixed flame is manifested by a partial extinction of the reaction zone, leading to rapid reduction of flame surface area. This nonlinearity, however, is observed only when the phase difference between the acoustic velocity and the equivalence ratio at the combustor inlet is close to zero. The condition, {delta}{phi}{sub {phi}}'-V'{approx}0 , indicates that reactant mixtures with high equivalence ratio impinge on the flame front with high velocity, inducing large fluctuations of the rate of heat release. It is found that the phase difference between the acoustic velocity and equivalence ratio nonuniformities is a key parameter governing the linear/nonlinear response of a partially premixed flame, and it is a function of modulation frequency, inlet velocity, fuel injection location, and fuel injector impedance. The results presented in this article will provide insight into the response of a partially premixed flame, which has not been well explored to date. (author)

  5. A Method for Driving an Oscillator at a Quasi-Uniform Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmeev, D. E.

    2014-04-01

    We describe a simple way to drive an actuator, comprising a superconducting coil moving in a static magnetic field, at a quasi-uniform velocity. The main objective is to avoid oscillations in this system with low damping, as they undermine the uniformity of the velocity. The method consists in calculating the force that should be exerted on the coil from the equation of motion and programming a waveform generator to produce the corresponding current through the coil. The method was tested on a device towing a grid through a closely fitted channel filled with superfluid 4He at temperatures below 100 mK. The motion of the grid over the distance of 4.3 cm at 10 cm/s resulted in oscillations of less than 50 μm in amplitude (or less than 1 mm/s in terms of velocity). The method can be applied to any oscillator.

  6. Aeroacoustics of volcanic jets: Acoustic power estimation and jet velocity dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Ogden, Darcy E.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano acoustics is to relate observed infrasonic signals to the eruptive processes generating them. A link between acoustic power Πvelocity V was proposed by Woulff and McGetchin (1976) based upon the prevailing jet noise theory at the time (acoustic analogy theory). We reexamine this approach in the context of the current understanding of jet noise, using data from a laboratory jet, a full-scale military jet aircraft, and a full-scale rocket motor. Accurate estimates of Πacoustic field experiments. Typical volcano acoustic data better represent point measurements of acoustic intensity Ivelocity-scaling laws currently proposed for acoustic intensity differ from those for acoustic power and are of the form Iacoustic data and thus requires modification. Quantitative integration of field, numerical, and laboratory studies within a modern aeroacoustics framework will lead to a more accurate relationship between volcanic infrasound and eruption parameters.

  7. Acoustic and vibration performance evaluations of a velocity sensing hull array

    SciTech Connect

    Cray, B.A.; Christman, R.A.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic and vibration measurements were conducted at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center{close_quote}s Seneca Lake Facility to investigate the {ital in} {ital situ} signal response of a linear array of velocity sensors (sensors that measure either acoustic particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement have generically been denoted as {ital velocity} {ital sensors}) on a coating. The coating used at Seneca Lake consisted of air-voided elastomeric tiles with an overall coating thickness of approximately 3 inches. The accelerometer array and coating were mounted on the Seneca Lake Hull Fixture, which measures 33 feet lengthwise with an arc length of 20 feet. The fixture weighs approximately 30 tons. Specifically, measurements of {ital in} {ital situ} sensitivity, velocity reduction, reflection gain, array beam response, and equivalent planewave self-noise levels are presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This work also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.

  9. Design guidelines for avoiding thermo-acoustic oscillations in helium piping systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2015-04-02

    Thermo-acoustic oscillations are a commonly observed phenomenon in helium cryogenic systems, especially in tubes connecting hot and cold areas. The open ends of these tubes are connected to the lower temperature (typically at 4.5 K), and the closed ends of these tubes are connected to the high temperature (300 K). Cryogenic instrumentation installations provide ideal conditions for these oscillations to occur due to the steep temperature gradient along the tubing. These oscillations create errors in measurements as well as an undesirable heat load to the system. The work presented here develops engineering guidelines to design oscillation-free helium piping. This workmore » also studies the effect of different piping inserts and shows how the proper geometrical combinations have to be chosen to avoid thermo-acoustic oscillations. The effect of an 80 K intercept is also studied and shows that thermo-oscillations can be dampened by placing the intercept at an appropriate location. As a result, the design of helium piping based on the present work is also verified with the experimental results available in open literature.« less

  10. A study of the connection between tidal velocities, soliton packets and acoustic signal losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin-Bing, Stanley A.; Warn-Varnas, Alex C.; King, David B.; Lamb, Kevin G.; Hawkins, James A.; Teixeira, Marvi

    2002-11-01

    Coupled ocean model and acoustic model simulations of soliton packets in the Yellow Sea have indicated that the environmental conditions necessary for anomalous signal losses can occur several times in a 24 h period. These conditions and the subsequent signal losses were observed in simulations made over an 80 h space-time evolution of soliton packets that were generated by a 0.7 m/s tidal velocity [Chin-Bing et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 2459 (2002)]. This particular tidal velocity was used to initiate the Lamb soliton model because the soliton packets that were generated compared favorably with SAR measurements of soliton packets in the Yellow Sea. The tidal velocities in this region can range from 0.3 m/s to 1.2 m/s. In this work we extend our simulations and analyses to include soliton packets generated by other tidal velocities in the 0.3-1.2 m/s band. Anomalous signal losses are again observed. Examples will be shown that illustrate the connections between the tidal velocities, the soliton packets that are generated by these tidal velocities, and the signal losses that can occur when acoustic signals are propagated through these soliton packets. [Work supported by ONR/NRL and by a High Performance Computing DoD grant.

  11. Permeability determination through NMR detection of acoustically induced fluid oscillation.

    PubMed

    Looyestijn, Wim J; Smits, Robert M M; Abu-Shiekah, Issa; Kuvshinov, Boris; Hofman, Jan P; Schwing, Alex

    2006-11-01

    We present a novel approach for directly measuring the permeability of reservoir rocks by an instrument lowered in a well bore. The measurement is made by creating an oscillatory motion of fluids in the pores by acoustic stimulation and by detecting the amplitude response as a phase shift on a nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation signal. A full theoretical description is given. The feasibility of the method has been verified in the laboratory on a set of sandstone and carbonate samples spanning the entire range of practical interest. PMID:17071341

  12. Angular oscillation of solid scatterers in response to progressive planar acoustic waves: do fish otoliths rock?

    PubMed

    Krysl, Petr; Hawkins, Anthony D; Schilt, Carl; Cranford, Ted W

    2012-01-01

    Fish can sense a wide variety of sounds by means of the otolith organs of the inner ear. Among the incompletely understood components of this process are the patterns of movement of the otoliths vis-à-vis fish head or whole-body movement. How complex are the motions? How does the otolith organ respond to sounds from different directions and frequencies? In the present work we examine the responses of a dense rigid scatterer (representing the otolith) suspended in an acoustic fluid to low-frequency planar progressive acoustic waves. A simple mechanical model, which predicts both translational and angular oscillation, is formulated. The responses of simple shapes (sphere and hemisphere) are analyzed with an acoustic finite element model. The hemispherical scatterer is found to oscillate both in the direction of the propagation of the progressive waves and also in the plane of the wavefront as a result of angular motion. The models predict that this characteristic will be shared by other irregularly-shaped scatterers, including fish otoliths, which could provide the fish hearing mechanisms with an additional component of oscillation and therefore one more source of acoustical cues. PMID:22912710

  13. Angular Oscillation of Solid Scatterers in Response to Progressive Planar Acoustic Waves: Do Fish Otoliths Rock?

    PubMed Central

    Krysl, Petr; Hawkins, Anthony D.; Schilt, Carl; Cranford, Ted W.

    2012-01-01

    Fish can sense a wide variety of sounds by means of the otolith organs of the inner ear. Among the incompletely understood components of this process are the patterns of movement of the otoliths vis-à-vis fish head or whole-body movement. How complex are the motions? How does the otolith organ respond to sounds from different directions and frequencies? In the present work we examine the responses of a dense rigid scatterer (representing the otolith) suspended in an acoustic fluid to low-frequency planar progressive acoustic waves. A simple mechanical model, which predicts both translational and angular oscillation, is formulated. The responses of simple shapes (sphere and hemisphere) are analyzed with an acoustic finite element model. The hemispherical scatterer is found to oscillate both in the direction of the propagation of the progressive waves and also in the plane of the wavefront as a result of angular motion. The models predict that this characteristic will be shared by other irregularly-shaped scatterers, including fish otoliths, which could provide the fish hearing mechanisms with an additional component of oscillation and therefore one more source of acoustical cues. PMID:22912710

  14. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  15. Gated photon correlation spectroscopy for acoustical particle velocity measurements in free-field conditions.

    PubMed

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben; Theobald, Pete

    2013-03-01

    The measurement of acoustic pressure at a point in space using optical methods has been the subject of extensive research in airborne acoustics over the last four decades. The main driver is to reliably establish the acoustic pascal, thus allowing the calibration of microphones with standard and non-standard dimensions to be realized in an absolute and direct manner. However, the research work so far has mostly been limited to standing wave tubes. This Letter reports on the development of an optical system capable of measuring acoustic particle velocities in free-field conditions; agreement within less than 0.6 dB was obtained with standard microphone measurements during these initial experiments. PMID:23464122

  16. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  17. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  18. Measurement of acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, A.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Cunha, M. S.; Ballot, J.; Antia, H. M.; Basu, S.; Houdek, G.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Verner, G. A.; Chaplin, W. J.; Sanderfer, D. T.; Seader, S. E.; Smith, J. C.

    2014-02-10

    For the very best and brightest asteroseismic solar-type targets observed by Kepler, the frequency precision is sufficient to determine the acoustic depths of the surface convective layer and the helium ionization zone. Such sharp features inside the acoustic cavity of the star, which we call acoustic glitches, create small oscillatory deviations from the uniform spacing of frequencies in a sequence of oscillation modes with the same spherical harmonic degree. We use these oscillatory signals to determine the acoustic locations of such features in 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. Four independent groups of researchers utilized the oscillation frequencies themselves, the second differences of the frequencies and the ratio of the small and large separation to locate the base of the convection zone and the second helium ionization zone. Despite the significantly different methods of analysis, good agreement was found between the results of these four groups, barring a few cases. These results also agree reasonably well with the locations of these layers in representative models of the stars. These results firmly establish the presence of the oscillatory signals in the asteroseismic data and the viability of several techniques to determine the location of acoustic glitches inside stars.

  19. Quantum Ion-Acoustic Oscillations in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Iqbal, Z.; Wazir, Z.; Aman-ur-Rehman

    2016-05-01

    Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes are studied by employing a quantum hydrodynamics model. The dispersion equation is obtained by Fourier transformation, which exhibits the existence of quantum ion-acoustic wave affected by change of density balance due to presence of positive or negative heavy species as stationary ion clusters and wave potential at equilibrium. The numerical results are presented, and the role of quantum degeneracy, nanotube geometry, electron exchange-correlation effects, and concentration and polarity of heavy species on wave dispersion is pointed out for typical systems of interest.

  20. Measurement of the flow velocity in unmagnetized plasmas by counter propagating ion-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.X.; Li Yangfang; Xiao Delong; Li Jingju; Li Yiren

    2005-06-15

    The diffusion velocity of an inhomogeneous unmagnetized plasma is measured by means of the phase velocities of ion-acoustic waves propagating along and against the direction of the plasma flow. Combined with the measurement of the plasma density distributions by usual Langmuir probes, the method is applied to measure the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and effective ion collision frequency in inhomogeneous plasmas formed in an asymmetrically discharged double-plasma device. Experimental results show that the measured flow velocities, diffusion coefficients, and effective collision frequencies are in agreement with ion-neutral collision dominated diffusion theory.

  1. Driven acoustic oscillations within a vertical magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Cally, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of a vertical magnetic field on p-mode frequencies, line widths, and eigenfunctions, are examined. A solar model, consisting of a neutrally stable polytropic interior matched to an isothermal chromosphere, is applied. The p-modes are produced by a spatially distributed driver. The atmosphere is threaded by a constant vertical magnetic field. The frequency shifts due to the vertical magnetic field are found to be much smaller than the shifts caused by horizontal fields of similar strength. A large vertical field of 2000 G produces shifts of several nHz. It is found that the frequency shifts decrease with increasing frequency and increase with field strength. The coupling of the acoustic fast mode to the escaping slow modes is inefficient. Constant vertical magnetic field models are therefore incapable of explaining the high level of absorption observed in sunspots and plage.

  2. Fitting methods for baryon acoustic oscillations in the Lyman-α forest fluctuations in BOSS data release 9

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkby, David; Margala, Daniel; Blomqvist, Michael; Slosar, Anže; Bailey, Stephen; Carithers, Bill; Busca, Nicolás G.; Bautista, Julian E.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Croft, Rupert A.C.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; and others

    2013-03-01

    We describe fitting methods developed to analyze fluctuations in the Lyman-α forest and measure the parameters of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We apply our methods to BOSS Data Release 9. Our method is based on models of the three-dimensional correlation function in physical coordinate space, and includes the effects of redshift-space distortions, anisotropic non-linear broadening, and broadband distortions. We allow for independent scale factors along and perpendicular to the line of sight to minimize the dependence on our assumed fiducial cosmology and to obtain separate measurements of the BAO angular and relative velocity scales. Our fitting software and the input files needed to reproduce our main BOSS Data Release 9 results are publicly available.

  3. Quantum beats in conductance oscillations in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity wells and electrostatic wells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Ying-Tao; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-14

    The transport properties in graphene-based asymmetric double velocity well (Fermi velocity inside the well less than that outside the well) and electrostatic well structures are investigated using the transfer matrix method. The results show that quantum beats occur in the oscillations of the conductance for asymmetric double velocity wells. The beating effect can also be found in asymmetric double electrostatic wells, but only if the widths of the two wells are different. The beat frequency for the asymmetric double well is exactly equal to the frequency difference between the oscillation rates in two isolated single wells with the same structures as the individual wells in the double well structure. A qualitative interpretation is proposed based on the fact that the resonant levels depend upon the sizes of the quantum wells. The beating behavior can provide a new way to identify the symmetry of double well structures.

  4. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P Oshkai; M Geveci; D Rockwell; M Pollack

    2004-05-24

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe, which give rise to flow tones, are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  5. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  6. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range. PMID:23927100

  7. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  8. Mass transfer from a sphere in an oscillating flow with zero mean velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Lyman, Frederic A.

    1990-01-01

    A pseudospectral numerical method is used for the solution of the Navier-Stokes and mass transport equations for a sphere in a sinusoidally oscillating flow with zero mean velocity. The flow is assumed laminar and axisymmetric about the sphere's polar axis. Oscillating flow results were obtained for Reynolds numbers (based on the free-stream oscillatory flow amplitude) between 1 and 150, and Strouhal numbers between 1 and 1000. Sherwood numbers were computed and their dependency on the flow frequency and amplitude discussed. An assessment of the validity of the quasi-steady assumption for mass transfer is based on these results.

  9. Frequency of gamma oscillations in humans is modulated by velocity of visual motion

    PubMed Central

    Butorina, Anna V.; Sysoeva, Olga V.; Prokofyev, Andrey O.; Nikolaeva, Anastasia Yu.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are generated in networks of inhibitory fast-spiking (FS) parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons and pyramidal cells. In animals, gamma frequency is modulated by the velocity of visual motion; the effect of velocity has not been evaluated in humans. In this work, we have studied velocity-related modulations of gamma frequency in children using MEG/EEG. We also investigated whether such modulations predict the prominence of the “spatial suppression” effect (Tadin D, Lappin JS, Gilroy LA, Blake R. Nature 424: 312-315, 2003) that is thought to depend on cortical center-surround inhibitory mechanisms. MEG/EEG was recorded in 27 normal boys aged 8–15 yr while they watched high-contrast black-and-white annular gratings drifting with velocities of 1.2, 3.6, and 6.0°/s and performed a simple detection task. The spatial suppression effect was assessed in a separate psychophysical experiment. MEG gamma oscillation frequency increased while power decreased with increasing velocity of visual motion. In EEG, the effects were less reliable. The frequencies of the velocity-specific gamma peaks were 64.9, 74.8, and 87.1 Hz for the slow, medium, and fast motions, respectively. The frequency of the gamma response elicited during slow and medium velocity of visual motion decreased with subject age, whereas the range of gamma frequency modulation by velocity increased with age. The frequency modulation range predicted spatial suppression even after controlling for the effect of age. We suggest that the modulation of the MEG gamma frequency by velocity of visual motion reflects excitability of cortical inhibitory circuits and can be used to investigate their normal and pathological development in the human brain. PMID:25925324

  10. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  11. Coupling of dust acoustic and shear mode through velocity shear in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S. Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-07-15

    In the strongly coupled limit, the generalized hydrodynamic model shows that a dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support a “shear” like mode. It is being demonstrated here that in presence of velocity shear gradient, this shear like mode gets coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperatures of the dust, electron, and ion fluids. In the local analysis, the dispersion relation shows that velocity shear gradient not only couples the two modes but is also responsible for the instabilities of that coupled mode which is confirmed by nonlocal analysis with numerical techniques.

  12. Impact of acoustic velocity structure to measurement of ocean bottom crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Eto, S.; Ando, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method of monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging. The goal of our research is to achieve sub-centimeter accuracy in measuring oceanic crustal deformation by a very short-time measurement like 10 hours. In this study, we focused on lateral variation of acoustic velocity structure in seawater and introduced an inclined acoustic velocity structure model to improve accuracy of the measurement. We have a few measurement sites along Nankai trough, Japan. In each sites, we deployed a trio of transponders on ocean floor (seafloor benchmark units) within distance comparable with the depth. An ultrasonic signal is generated from a surface vessel drifting over the benchmark unit, which is received and replied by the benchmark unit. In this system, both acoustic velocity structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted on an assumption that the acoustic velocity structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. Ikuta et al., (AGU fall meeting 2009) reported an approach to improve accuracy of benchmark positioning using a new additional assumption. The additional assumption was that the configuration of the transponders trio constituting one benchmark unit does not change. They determined the time evolution of weight center for the fixed transponder triangle between different measurements using all repetitively obtained data sets at once. This is contrasting to the previous method in which each data set for different measurement was solved independently. This assumption worked well in reducing number of unknown parameters. As a result, repeatability of benchmark positioning improved from 5 cm to 3 cm. We conducted numerical experiments synthesizing acoustic travel-time data to evaluate the robustness of this new approach. When acoustic travel-time data is

  13. Underwater patch near-field acoustical holography based on particle velocity and vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, DeSen; Li, SiChun; Sun, Yu; Mo, ShiQi; Shi, ShengGuo

    2012-11-01

    One-step patch near-field acoustical holography (PNAH) is a powerful tool for identifying noise sources from the partially known sound pressure field. The acoustical property to be reconstructed on the surface of interest is related to the partially measured pressure on the hologram surface in terms of sampling and bandlimiting matrices, which cost more in computation. A one-step procedure based on measuring of the normal component of the particle velocity is described, including the mathematical formulation. The numerical simulation shows that one-step PNAH based on particle velocity can obtain more accurately reconstructed results and it is also less sensitive to noise than the method based on pressure. These findings are confirmed by an underwater near-field acoustical holography experiment conducted with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results have illustrated the high performance of one-step PNAH based on particle velocity in the reconstruction of sound field and the advantages of a vector hydrophone array in an underwater near-field measurement.

  14. Phase tunability of group velocity by modulated-pump-forced coherent population oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Arrieta-Yanez, Francisco; Melle, Sonia; Calderon, Oscar G.; Anton, M. A.; Carreno, F.

    2009-07-15

    We propose a technique to obtain slow and fast light propagations based on coherent population oscillations forced by a modulated pump. This mechanism produces an enhancement of 1 order of magnitude of the delay or advancement of light signals. The relative phase between the pumps to the signal fields is used as a knob for changing light propagation from ultraslow group velocities to negative group velocities. The experimental realization of the phenomenon was carried out in an erbium-doped fiber amplifier at room temperature.

  15. In vivo force-velocity relation of human muscle: a modelling from sinusoidal oscillation behaviour.

    PubMed

    Desplantez, A; Goubel, F

    2002-12-01

    Isokinetic tests performed on human muscle in vivo during plantar flexion contractions lead to torque-angular velocity relationships usually fitted by Hill's equation expressed in angular terms. However, such tests can lead to discrepant results since they require maximal voluntary contractions performed in dynamic conditions. In the present study, another way to approach mechanical behaviour of a musculo-articular structure was used, i.e. sinusoidal oscillations during sub-maximal contractions. This led to the expression of (i). Bode diagrams allowing the determination of a damping coefficient (B(bode)); and (ii). a viscous parameter (B(sin)) using an adaptation of Hill's equation to sinusoidal oscillations. Then torque-angular velocity relationships were predicted from a model based on the interrelation between B(bode) and B(sin) and on the determination of optimal conditions of contraction. This offers the possibility of characterizing muscle dynamic properties by avoiding the use of isokinetic maximal contractions. PMID:12445609

  16. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process. PMID:26223474

  17. Phase relationships between total electron content variations, Doppler velocity oscillations and geomagnetic pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.Y.; Berkey, F.T.

    1994-09-01

    The phase relationship between variations of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and ground-level ULF geomagnetic pulsations has been examined for the advection and compression mechanisms. To determine the causal mechanism several earlier studies have examined the phase difference between oscillations of Doppler velocity in ionospherically reflected radio waves and simultaneous ULF geomagnetic pulsations. In most instances it was found that the phase relation varied from event to event. With the application of Euler`s formula this study shows that in low geomagnetic and midgeomagnetic latitudes the phase differences between variations of TEC and ULF pulsations in the northward component of the geomagnetic field due to the advection and compression mechanisms are 0{degrees} and 180{degrees}, respectively. The authors also found that TEC variations tend to lead ionospheric Doppler velocity oscillations by 90{degrees}. Furthermore, it is shown that the phase relationship between ionospheric Doppler velocity oscillations and ULF pulsations of the northward component of the geomagnetic field, caused by the advection and compression mechanisms, are functions of the scale length, frequency of ULF waves, and geomagnetic dip. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Current-sheet velocity oscillation and radiation emission in plasma focus discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Melzacki, K.; Nardi, V.

    1995-12-31

    A phenomenon of current sheet velocity oscillation during the compression phase in plasma focus discharge has been found with a Schlieren photography technique. The oscillation period has been determined as about 17 ns and coincided with the period of the simultaneously measured time derivative of the current. The same velocity behavior has been observed with magnetic probes. A microwave emission burst (in 3 cm and 10 cm bands) consisting of a sequence of very narrow (FWHM < 1 ns) peaks, 17 ns apart one another, has also been observed before, during, and after the pinch. The microwave was polarized with the electric field parallel to the electrode axis. All these effects have been recorded on the same PF device (6 kJ). The origin of these oscillations can be interpreted in a few ways, e.g. as related to the electrode-plasma sheath RLC circuit, or to the j{sub s}xB of the plasma current sheet, where j{sub s} is the current density component perpendicular to the current sheet surface. The j{sub s} is related to the current sheet velocity. These results provide the basis of the analysis.

  19. Abnormal acoustic wave velocities in basaltic and (Fe,Al)-bearing silicate glasses at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-01

    We have measured acoustic VP and VS velocities of (Fe,Al)-bearing MgSiO3 silicate glasses and an Icelandic basalt glass up to 25 GPa. The velocity profiles of the (Fe,Al)-bearing and basaltic silicate glasses display decreased VP and VS with minima at approximately 5 and 2 GPa, respectively, which could be explained by the mode softening in the aluminosilicate networks. Our results represent the first observation of such velocity softening extending into the chemically complex basaltic glass at a relatively low transition pressure, which is likely due to its degree of polymerization, while the Fe and Al substitutions reduce sound velocities in MgSiO3 glass. If the velocity softening in the basaltic and silicate glasses can be used as analogs for understanding melts in Earth's interior, these observations suggest that the melt fraction needed to account for the velocity reduction in the upper mantle low-velocity zone may be smaller than previously thought.

  20. Acoustic landmarks drive delta-theta oscillations to enable speech comprehension by facilitating perceptual parsing

    PubMed Central

    Doelling, Keith; Arnal, Luc; Ghitza, Oded; Poeppel, David

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that intrinsic neuronal slow (< 10 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex appear to track incoming speech and other spectro-temporally complex auditory signals. Within this framework, several recent studies have identified critical-band temporal envelopes as the specific acoustic feature being reflected by the phase of these oscillations. However, how this alignment between speech acoustics and neural oscillations might underpin intelligibility is unclear. Here we test the hypothesis that the ‘sharpness’ of temporal fluctuations in the critical band envelope acts as a temporal cue to speech syllabic rate, driving delta-theta rhythms to track the stimulus and facilitate intelligibility. We interpret our findings as evidence that sharp events in the stimulus cause cortical rhythms to re-align and parse the stimulus into syllable-sized chunks for further decoding. Using magnetoencephalographic recordings, we show that by removing temporal fluctuations that occur at the syllabic rate, envelope-tracking activity is reduced. By artificially reinstating these temporal fluctuations, envelope-tracking activity is regained. These changes in tracking correlate with intelligibility of the stimulus. Together, the results suggest that the sharpness of fluctuations in the stimulus, as reflected in the cochlear output, drive oscillatory activity to track and entrain to the stimulus, at its syllabic rate. This process likely facilitates parsing of the stimulus into meaningful chunks appropriate for subsequent decoding, enhancing perception and intelligibility. PMID:23791839

  1. Evidence of Multiple Slow Acoustic Oscillations in the Stellar Flaring Loops of Proxima Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Lalitha, S.; Pandey, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observational evidence of multiple slow acoustic oscillations in the post-flaring loops of the corona of Proxima Centauri using XMM-Newton observations. We find the signature of periodic oscillations localized in the decay phase of the flare in its soft (0.3-10.0 keV) X-ray emissions. Using the standard wavelet tool, we find multiple periodicities of 1261 s and 687 s. These bursty oscillations persist for durations of 90 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively, for more than three cycles. The intensity oscillations with a period of 1261 s may be the signature of the fundamental mode of slow magnetoacoustic waves with a phase speed of 119 km s-1 in a loop of length 7.5 × 109 cm, which is initially heated, producing the flare peak temperature of 33 MK and later cooled down in the decay phase and maintained at an average temperature of 7.2 MK. The other period of 687 s may be associated with the first overtone of slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring loop. The fundamental mode oscillations show dissipation with a damping time of 47 minutes. The period ratio P 1/P 2 is found to be 1.83, indicating that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified stellar loops. We estimate the density scale height of the stellar loop system as ~23 Mm, which is smaller than the hydrostatic scale height of the hot loop system, and implies the existence of non-equilibrium conditions.

  2. EVIDENCE OF MULTIPLE SLOW ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE STELLAR FLARING LOOPS OF PROXIMA CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A. K.; Pandey, J. C.; Lalitha, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observational evidence of multiple slow acoustic oscillations in the post-flaring loops of the corona of Proxima Centauri using XMM-Newton observations. We find the signature of periodic oscillations localized in the decay phase of the flare in its soft (0.3-10.0 keV) X-ray emissions. Using the standard wavelet tool, we find multiple periodicities of 1261 s and 687 s. These bursty oscillations persist for durations of 90 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively, for more than three cycles. The intensity oscillations with a period of 1261 s may be the signature of the fundamental mode of slow magnetoacoustic waves with a phase speed of 119 km s{sup –1} in a loop of length 7.5 × 10{sup 9} cm, which is initially heated, producing the flare peak temperature of 33 MK and later cooled down in the decay phase and maintained at an average temperature of 7.2 MK. The other period of 687 s may be associated with the first overtone of slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring loop. The fundamental mode oscillations show dissipation with a damping time of 47 minutes. The period ratio P {sub 1}/P {sub 2} is found to be 1.83, indicating that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified stellar loops. We estimate the density scale height of the stellar loop system as ∼23 Mm, which is smaller than the hydrostatic scale height of the hot loop system, and implies the existence of non-equilibrium conditions.

  3. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  4. Beam misalignments and fluid velocities in laser-induced thermal acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Schlamp, S.; Hornung, H.G.; Cummings, E.B.

    1999-09-01

    Beam misalignments and bulk fluid velocities can influence the time history and intensity of laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) signals. A closed-form analytic expression for LITA signals incorporating these effects is derived, allowing the magnitude of beam misalignment and velocity to be inferred from the signal shape. It is demonstrated how instantaneous, nonintrusive, and remote measurement of sound speed and velocity (Mach number) can be inferred simultaneously from homodyne-detected LITA signals. The effects of different forms of beam misalignment are explored experimentally and compared with theory, with good agreement, allowing the amount of misalignment to be measured from the LITA signal. This capability could be used to correct experimental misalignments and account for the effects of misalignment in other LITA measurements. It is shown that small beam misalignments have no influence on the accuracy or repeatability of sound speed measurements with LITA. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  5. Beam Misalignments and Fluid Velocities in Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan; Cummings, Eric B.; Hornung, Hans G.

    1999-09-01

    Beam misalignments and bulk fluid velocities can influence the time history and intensity of laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) signals. A closed-form analytic expression for LITA signals incorporating these effects is derived, allowing the magnitude of beam misalignment and velocity to be inferred from the signal shape. It is demonstrated how instantaneous, nonintrusive, and remote measurement of sound speed and velocity (Mach number) can be inferred simultaneously from homodyne-detected LITA signals. The effects of different forms of beam misalignment are explored experimentally and compared with theory, with good agreement, allowing the amount of misalignment to be measured from the LITA signal. This capability could be used to correct experimental misalignments and account for the effects of misalignment in other LITA measurements. It is shown that small beam misalignments have no influence on the accuracy or repeatability of sound speed measurements with LITA.

  6. Acoustic impedance of micro perforated membranes: Velocity continuity condition at the perforation boundary.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Cazzolato, Ben; Zander, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The classic analytical model for the sound absorption of micro perforated materials is well developed and is based on a boundary condition where the velocity of the material is assumed to be zero, which is accurate when the material vibration is negligible. This paper develops an analytical model for finite-sized circular micro perforated membranes (MPMs) by applying a boundary condition such that the velocity of air particles on the hole wall boundary is equal to the membrane vibration velocity (a zero-slip condition). The acoustic impedance of the perforation, which varies with its position, is investigated. A prediction method for the overall impedance of the holes and the combined impedance of the MPM is also provided. The experimental results for four different MPM configurations are used to validate the model and good agreement between the experimental and predicted results is achieved. PMID:26827008

  7. Suppressed alpha oscillations predict intelligibility of speech and its acoustic details.

    PubMed

    Obleser, Jonas; Weisz, Nathan

    2012-11-01

    Modulations of human alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) accompany many cognitive processes, but their functional role in auditory perception has proven elusive: Do oscillatory dynamics of alpha reflect acoustic details of the speech signal and are they indicative of comprehension success? Acoustically presented words were degraded in acoustic envelope and spectrum in an orthogonal design, and electroencephalogram responses in the frequency domain were analyzed in 24 participants, who rated word comprehensibility after each trial. First, the alpha power suppression during and after a degraded word depended monotonically on spectral and, to a lesser extent, envelope detail. The magnitude of this alpha suppression exhibited an additional and independent influence on later comprehension ratings. Second, source localization of alpha suppression yielded superior parietal, prefrontal, as well as anterior temporal brain areas. Third, multivariate classification of the time-frequency pattern across participants showed that patterns of late posterior alpha power allowed best for above-chance classification of word intelligibility. Results suggest that both magnitude and topography of late alpha suppression in response to single words can indicate a listener's sensitivity to acoustic features and the ability to comprehend speech under adverse listening conditions. PMID:22100354

  8. Suppressed Alpha Oscillations Predict Intelligibility of Speech and its Acoustic Details

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Modulations of human alpha oscillations (8–13 Hz) accompany many cognitive processes, but their functional role in auditory perception has proven elusive: Do oscillatory dynamics of alpha reflect acoustic details of the speech signal and are they indicative of comprehension success? Acoustically presented words were degraded in acoustic envelope and spectrum in an orthogonal design, and electroencephalogram responses in the frequency domain were analyzed in 24 participants, who rated word comprehensibility after each trial. First, the alpha power suppression during and after a degraded word depended monotonically on spectral and, to a lesser extent, envelope detail. The magnitude of this alpha suppression exhibited an additional and independent influence on later comprehension ratings. Second, source localization of alpha suppression yielded superior parietal, prefrontal, as well as anterior temporal brain areas. Third, multivariate classification of the time–frequency pattern across participants showed that patterns of late posterior alpha power allowed best for above-chance classification of word intelligibility. Results suggest that both magnitude and topography of late alpha suppression in response to single words can indicate a listener's sensitivity to acoustic features and the ability to comprehend speech under adverse listening conditions. PMID:22100354

  9. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular plug nozzles. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Blozy, J. T.; Staid, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of model scale parametric static and wind tunnel aerodynamic performance tests on unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle configurations with inverted velocity profile are discussed. The nozzle configurations are high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles applicable to dual-stream exhaust systems typical of a variable cycle engine for Advanced Supersonic Transport application. In all, seven acoustic models and eight aerodynamic performance models were tested. The nozzle geometric variables included outer stream radius ratio, inner stream to outer stream ratio, and inner stream plug shape. When compared to a conical nozzle at the same specific thrust, the results of the static acoustic tests with the coannular nozzles showed noise reductions of up to 7 PNdB. Extensive data analysis showed that the overall acoustic results can be well correlated using the mixed stream velocity and the mixed stream density. Results also showed that suppression levels are geometry and flow regulation dependent with the outer stream radius ratio, inner stream-to-outer stream velocity ratio and inner stream velocity ratio and inner stream plug shape, as the primary suppression parameters. In addition, high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzles were found to yield shock associated noise level reductions relative to a conical nozzle. The wind tunnel aerodynamic tests showed that static and simulated flight thrust coefficient at typical takeoff conditions are quite good - up to 0.98 at static conditions and 0.974 at a takeoff Mach number of 0.36. At low inner stream flow conditions significant thrust loss was observed. Using an inner stream conical plug resulted in 1% to 2% higher performance levels than nozzle geometries using a bent inner plug.

  10. Time-sliced perturbation theory II: baryon acoustic oscillations and infrared resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    We use time-sliced perturbation theory (TSPT) to give an accurate description of the infrared non-linear effects affecting the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) present in the distribution of matter at very large scales. In TSPT this can be done via a systematic resummation that has a simple diagrammatic representation and does not involve uncontrollable approximations. We discuss the power counting rules and derive explicit expressions for the resummed matter power spectrum up to next-to leading order and the bispectrum at the leading order. The two-point correlation function agrees well with N-body data at BAO scales. The systematic approach also allows to reliably assess the shift of the baryon acoustic peak due to non-linear effects.

  11. NONLINEAR BEHAVIOR OF BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN REDSHIFT SPACE FROM THE ZEL'DOVICH APPROXIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    McCullagh, Nuala; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2015-01-10

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are a powerful probe of the expansion history of the universe, which can tell us about the nature of dark energy. In order to accurately characterize the dark energy equation of state using BAO, we must understand the effects of both nonlinearities and redshift space distortions on the location and shape of the acoustic peak. In a previous paper, we introduced a novel approach to second order perturbation theory in configuration space using the Zel'dovich approximation, and presented a simple result for the first nonlinear term of the correlation function. In this paper, we extend this approach to redshift space. We show how to perform the computation and present the analytic result for the first nonlinear term in the correlation function. Finally, we validate our result through comparison with numerical simulations.

  12. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  13. Active Control of Jet Noise Using High Resolution TRPIV Part 2: Velocity-Pressure-Acoustic Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Kerwin; Kostka, Stanislav; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Glauser, Mark

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the pressure, velocity and acoustic field of a transonic jet. Test conditions comprise a 2 inch nozzle, analyzing two flow speeds, Mach 0.6 and 0.85, with open loop control explored for the Mach 0.6 case. We make simultaneous measurements of the near-field pressure and far-field acoustics at 40 kHz, alongside 10 kHz time resolved PIV measurements in the r-z plane. Cross correlations are performed exploring how both the near-field Fourier filtered pressure and low dimensional POD modes relate to the far-field acoustics. Of interest are those signatures witch exhibit the strongest correlation with far-field, and subsequently how these structures can be controlled. The goal is to investigate how flow-induced perturbations, via synthetic jet actuators, of the developing shear layer might bring insight into how one may alter the flow such that the far-field acoustic signature is mitigated. The TR-PIV measurements will prove to be a powerful tool in being able to track the propagation of physical structures for both the controlled and uncontrolled jet.

  14. Planar nearfield acoustical holography in moving fluid medium at subsonic and uniform velocity.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyu-Sang; Niu, Yaying; Kim, Yong-Joe

    2010-10-01

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) data measured by using a microphone array attached to a high-speed aircraft or ground vehicle include significant airflow effects. For the purpose of processing the measured NAH data, an improved nearfield acoustical holography procedure is introduced that includes the effects of a fluid medium moving at a subsonic and uniform velocity. The convective wave equation along with the convective Euler's equation is used to develop the proposed NAH procedure. A mapping function between static and moving fluid medium cases is derived from the convective wave equation. Then, a conventional wave number filter designed for static fluid media is modified to be applicable to the moving fluid cases by applying the mapping function to the static wave number filter. In order to validate the proposed NAH procedure, a monopole simulation at the airflow speed of Mach=-0.6 is conducted. The reconstructed acoustic fields obtained by applying the proposed NAH procedure to the simulation data agree well with directly-calculated acoustic fields. Through an experiment with two loudspeakers performed in a wind tunnel operating at Mach=-0.12, it is shown that the proposed NAH procedure can be also used to reconstruct the sound fields radiated from the two loudspeakers. PMID:20968355

  15. Measuring the distance-redshift relation with the baryon acoustic oscillations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veropalumbo, A.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Moresco, M.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-05-01

    We analyse the largest spectroscopic samples of galaxy clusters to date, and provide observational constraints on the distance-redshift relation from baryon acoustic oscillations. The cluster samples considered in this work have been extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at three median redshifts, z = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5. The number of objects is 12 910, 42 215 and 11 816, respectively. We detect the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations for all the three samples. The derived distance constraints are rs/DV(z = 0.2) = 0.18 ± 0.01, rs/DV(z = 0.3) = 0.124 ± 0.004 and rs/DV(z = 0.5) = 0.080 ± 0.002. Combining these measurements with the sound horizon scale measured from the cosmic microwave background, we obtain robust constraints on cosmological parameters. Our results are in agreement with the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. Specifically, we constrain the Hubble constant in a ΛCDM model, H_0 = 64_{-8}^{+17} km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1} , the density of curvature energy, in the oΛCDM context, Ω _K = -0.01_{-0.33}^{+0.34}, and finally the parameter of the dark energy equation of state in the wCDM case, w = -1.06_{-0.52}^{+0.49}. This is the first time the distance-redshift relation has been constrained using only the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations of galaxy clusters.

  16. Isocurvature modes and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations II: gains from combining CMB and Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Mangilli, Anna; Verde, Licia E-mail: anna.mangilli@icc.ub.edu

    2011-09-01

    We consider cosmological parameters estimation in the presence of a non-zero isocurvature contribution in the primordial perturbations. A previous analysis showed that even a tiny amount of isocurvature perturbation, if not accounted for, could affect standard rulers calibration from Cosmic Microwave Background observations such as those provided by the Planck mission, affect Baryon Acoustic Oscillations interpretation, and introduce biases in the recovered dark energy properties that are larger than forecasted statistical errors from future surveys. Extending on this work, here we adopt a general fiducial cosmology which includes a varying dark energy equation of state parameter and curvature. Beside Baryon Acoustic Oscillations measurements, we include the information from the shape of the galaxy power spectrum and consider a joint analysis of a Planck-like Cosmic Microwave Background probe and a future, space-based, Large Scale Structure probe not too dissimilar from recently proposed surveys. We find that this allows one to break the degeneracies that affect the Cosmic Microwave Background and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations combination. As a result, most of the cosmological parameter systematic biases arising from an incorrect assumption on the isocurvature fraction parameter f{sub iso}, become negligible with respect to the statistical errors. We find that the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure combination gives a statistical error σ(f{sub iso}) ∼ 0.008, even when curvature and a varying dark energy equation of state are included, which is smaller that the error obtained from Cosmic Microwave Background alone when flatness and cosmological constant are assumed. These results confirm the synergy and complementarity between Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure, and the great potential of future and planned galaxy surveys.

  17. Preliminary investigation of acoustic oscillations in an H2-O2 fired Hall generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, B.

    1981-01-01

    Burner pressure oscillations and interelectrode voltage oscillations measured in an open-cycle supersonic flow Hall generator are presented. The ionized gas for the channel was supplied by seeding the approximately 1 lb/sec of hydrogen-oxygen combustion products with cesium. Since both the burner and the channel were located within magnetic fields exceeding 4 Tesla during operation, an infinite probe pressure measurement technique was used to measure burner pressure oscillations. Calibration of the burner pressure transducer using a resonance tube technique is presented. Evidence is presented for the existence of the first longitudinal mode of oscillations (5000 Hz) within the burner. Interelectrode voltage oscillations were simultaneously measured at two separate axial stations. The magnitude change and the phase shift between the two signals was interpreted as a decaying magnetoacoustic wave driven by the burner that propagates at local gas plus sonic velocities. The amplitude of the electrical voltage oscillations at the start of the power producing region of the channel varied with the magnetic field. This variation is compared with the results of a simple perturbation analysis. Arguments are presented for using an unsteady model for analyzing wave processes in channels.

  18. Velocity dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments: comparison of measurements with predictions using acoustic models.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2011-06-01

    The large velocity dispersion recently reported could be explained by a gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model) proposed by the author. However, at high frequencies, some measured results have been reported for negative velocity dispersion and attenuation proportional to the first to fourth power of frequency. In this study, first, it is shown that the results of velocity dispersion and attenuation calculated using the BIMGS model are consistent with the results measured in two kinds of water-saturated sands with different grain sizes, except in the high-frequency range. Then, the velocity dispersion and attenuation in six kinds of water-saturated glass beads and four kinds of water-saturated silica sands with different grain sizes are measured in the frequency ranges of 80-140 and 300-700 kHz. The measured results are compared with those calculated using the BIMGS model plus some acoustic models. It is shown that the velocity dispersion and attenuation are well predicted by using the BIMGS model in the range of kd ≤ 0.5 (k: wavenumber in water, d: grain diameter) and by using the BIMGS model plus multiple scattering effects in the range of kd ≥ 0.5 in which negative velocity dispersion appears. PMID:21682381

  19. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  20. Influence of an oscillating circuit on the radiation of transient acoustic waves by an electroelastic cylinder.

    PubMed

    Babaev, A E; Babaev, A A; Yanchevskiy, I V

    2010-04-01

    The problem of nonstationary wave radiation in an infinitely long thick-wall piezoelectric cylinder in fluid medium is considered. The influence of an oscillating circuit with lumped parameters on characteristics of transient process is taken into consideration. Problem formulation is executed within the forced electrostatic theory, acoustic approximations, and quasistatic theory for electric circuit. The solution method is based on the integral Laplace transform in time. This allows analytically reducing the problem to solving a system of Volterra integral equations with retarded arguments. The numerical results of calculations are presented and analyzed. PMID:20370009

  1. A simple analytic treatment of linear growth of structure with baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    In linear perturbation theory, all information about the growth of structure is contained in the Green's function, or equivalently, transfer function. These functions are generally computed using numerical codes or by phenomenological fitting formula anchored in accurate analytic results in the limits of large and small scale. Here, we present a framework for analytically solving all scales, in particular the intermediate scales relevant for the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We solve for the Green's function and transfer function using spherically averaged overdensities and the approximation that the density of the coupled baryon-photon fluid is constant interior to the sound horizon.

  2. Application of acoustic tomography to reconstruct the horizontal flow velocity field in a shallow river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Kaneko, Arata; Nistor, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    A novel acoustic tomographic measurement system capable of resolving sound travel time in extremely shallow rivers is introduced and the results of an extensive field measurements campaign are presented and further discussed. Acoustic pulses were transmitted over a wide frequency band of 20-35 kHz between eight transducers for about a week in a meandering reach of theBāsen River, Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the field experiment was validating the concept of acoustic tomography in rivers for visualizing current fields. The particular novelty of the experiment resides in its unusual tomographic features: subbasin scale (100 m × 270 m) and shallowness (0.5-3.0 m) of the physical domain, frequency of the transmitted acoustic signals (central frequency of 30 kHz), and the use of small sampling intervals (105 s). Inverse techniques with no a priori statistical information were used to estimate the depth-average current velocity components from differential travel times. Zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization, in conjunction with L-curve method deployed to stabilize the solution and to determine the weighting factor appearing in the inverse analysis. Concurrent direct environmental measurements were provided in the form of ADCP readings close to the right and left bank. Very good agreement found between along-channel velocities larger than 0.2 m/s obtained from the two techniques. Inverted quantities were, however, underestimated, perhaps due to vicinity of the ADCPs to the banks and strong effect of river geometry on the readings. In general, comparing the visualized currents with direct nodal measurements illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures.

  3. Solar cycle variations in the powers and damping rates of low-degree solar acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomhall, A.-M.; Pugh, C. E.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Helioseismology uses the Sun's natural resonant oscillations to study the solar interior. The properties of the solar oscillations are sensitive to the Sun'2019;s magnetic activity cycle. Here we examine variations in the powers, damping rates, and energy supply rates of the most prominent acoustic oscillations in unresolved, Sun-as-a-star data, obtained by the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON) during solar cycles 22, 23, and the first half of 24. The variations in the helioseismic parameters are compared to the 10.7 cm flux, a well-known global proxy of solar activity. As expected the oscillations are most heavily damped and the mode powers are at a minimum at solar activity maximum. The 10.7 cm flux was linearly regressed using the fractional variations of damping rates and powers observed during cycle 23. In general, good agreement is found between the damping rates and the 10.7 cm flux. However, the linearly regressed 10.7 cm flux and fractional variation in powers diverge in cycles 22 and 24, indicating that the relationship between the mode powers and the 10.7 cm flux is not consistent from one cycle to the next. The energy supply rate of the oscillations, which is usually approximately constant, also decreases at this time. We have determined that this discrepancy is not because of the first-order bias introduced by an increase in the level of background noise or gaps in the data. Although we cannot categorically rule out an instrumental origin, the divergence observed in cycle 24, when the data were of high quality and the data coverage was over 80%, raises the possibility that the effect may be solar in origin.

  4. Permeability, electrical impedance, and acoustic velocities on reservoir rocks from the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Boyd, P.J.

    1996-01-24

    Previous measurements of acoustic velocities on NEGU- 17 cores indicate that saturation effects are significant enough to cause Vp/Vs anomalies observed in the field. In this study we report on the results of new measurements on core recently recovered from SB-15-D along with some additional measurements on the NEGU-17 cores. The measurements indicate correlations between mechanical, transport, and water storage properties of the matrix which may prove useful for reservoir assessment and management. The SB-15-D material is found to be similar to the NEGU-17 material in terms of acoustic velocities, being characterized by a notably weak pressure dependence on the velocities and a modest Vp/Vs signature of saturation. The effect of saturation on Vp/Vs appears to result in part from a chemo-mechanical weakening of the shear modulus due to the presence of water. Electrical properties of SB-15-D material are qualitatively similar to those of the NEGU-17 cores, although resistivities of SB-15-D cores are notably lower and dielectric permittivities higher than in their NEGU- 17 counterparts. While some limited correlations of measured properties with depth are noted, no clear change in character is observed within SB-15-D cores which can be associated with the proposed cap-rock/reservoir boundary.

  5. Asymptotic solutions for shocked resonant acoustic oscillations between concentric spheres and coaxial cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian R.; Mortell, Michael P.; Amundsen, David E.

    2012-02-01

    For resonant oscillations of a gas in a straight tube with a closed end, shocks form and all harmonics are generated, see Chester ["Resonant oscillations in a closed tube," J. Fluid Mech. 18, 44 (1964)], 10.1017/S0022112064000040. When the gas is confined between two concentric spheres or coaxial cylinders, the radially symmetric resonant oscillations may be continuous or shocked. For a fixed small Mach number of the input, the flow is continuous for sufficiently small L, defined as the ratio of the inner radius to the difference of the radii, see Seymour et al. ["Resonant oscillations of an inhomogeneous gas between concentric spheres," Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 467, 2149 (2011)], 10.1098/rspa.2010.0576. However, shocks appear in the resonant flow for either larger values of L or larger input Mach number. A nonlinear geometric acoustics approximation is used to analyse the shocked motion of the gas when L ≫ 1. This approximation and the exact numerical solution are compared for the shocked wave profiles and shock strengths, and the approximation is valid for surprisingly small values of L. The flow in the plane wave case for a straight tube is recovered in the limit L → ∞ for both the spherical and cylindrical cases, providing a check on the results. The shocked solutions given here complement those continuous solutions previously derived from a dominant first mode approximation.

  6. High frequency stability oscillator for surface acoustic wave-based gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; He, Shitang; Li, Shunzhou; Pan, Yong

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a 158 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) oscillator used for a gas sensor. As the oscillator element, a SAW delay line on ST-X quartz substrate with low insertion loss (<8 dB) and single mode selection capability was developed. Low insertion loss was achieved by an electrode width control single phase unidirectional transducer (EWC/SPUDT) configuration. Single mode selection was simply accomplished by a comb transducer which is a means of combining the frequency selectivity of two interdigital transducers (IDTs). Coupling of modes (COM) simulation was performed to predict device performance prior to fabrication. The measured frequency response S12 showed a good agreement with simulated results. The effect of the oscillator circuit system temperature shift upon frequency stability was observed in detail. The experimental results showed that the baseline noise was typically up to ~0.7 × 10-7 in a laboratory environment with temperature control. The oscillator was successfully applied to a gas sensor coated self-assembled composite monolayer as a sensor material for dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate (DMMP). The sensitivity for low DMMP concentration detection was evaluated as ~25 Hz mg-1 m-3, and the threshold detection limit was up to 0.5 mg m-3.

  7. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  8. Acoustic wave velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on acousto-optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'neva, P. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Sound velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on isotropic and anisotropic acousto-optical crystals have been determined by numerical simulations. The isotropic materials are represented by fused quartz (SiO2) and flint glass, while anisotropic materials include tetragonal crystals of paratellurite (TeO2) and rutile (TiO2) and a trigonal crystal of tellurium (Te). It is established that the acoustic anisotropy of periodic composite structures strongly depends on both the chemical composition and geometric parameters of components.

  9. Velocity lag of solid particles in oscillating gases and in gases passing through normal shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, B. R.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The velocity lag of micrometer size spherical particles is theoretically determined for gas particle mixtures passing through a stationary normal shock wave and also for particles embedded in an oscillating gas flow. The particle sizes and densities chosen are those considered important for laser Doppler velocimeter applications. The governing equations for each flow system are formulated. The deviation from Stokes flow caused by inertial, compressibility, and rarefaction effects is accounted for in both flow systems by use of an empirical drag coefficient. Graphical results are presented which characterize particle tracking as a function of system parameters.

  10. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  11. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  12. Parametrized mode decomposition for bifurcation analysis applied to a thermo-acoustically oscillating flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter; Richecoeur, Franck; Durox, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Thermo-acoustic systems belong to a class of dynamical systems that are governed by multiple parameters. Changing these parameters alters the response of the dynamical system and causes it to bifurcate. Due to their many applications and potential impact on a variety of combustion systems, there is great interest in devising control strategies to weaken or suppress thermo-acoustic instabilities. However, the system dynamics have to be available in reduced-order form to allow the design of such controllers and their operation in real-time. As the dominant modes and their respective frequencies change with varying the system parameters, the dynamical system needs to be analyzed separately for a set of fixed parameter values, before the dynamics can be linked in parameter-space. This two-step process is not only cumbersome, but also ambiguous when applied to systems operating close to a bifurcation point. Here we propose a parametrized decomposition algorithm which is capable of analyzing dynamical systems as they go through a bifurcation, extracting the dominant modes of the pre- and post-bifurcation regime. The algorithm is applied to a thermo-acoustically oscillating flame and to pressure signals from experiments. A few selected mode are capable of reproducing the dynamics.

  13. Energy analysis during acoustic bubble oscillations: relationship between bubble energy and sonochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2014-01-01

    In this work, energy analysis of an oscillating isolated spherical bubble in water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave has been theoretically studied for various conditions of acoustic amplitude, ultrasound frequency, static pressure and liquid temperature in order to explain the effects of these key parameters on both sonochemistry and sonoluminescence. The Keller-Miksis equation for the temporal variation of the bubble radius in compressible and viscous medium has been employed as a dynamics model. The numerical calculations showed that the rate of energy accumulation, dE/dt, increased linearly with increasing acoustic amplitude in the range of 1.5-3.0 atm and decreased sharply with increasing frequency in the range 200-1000 kHz. There exists an optimal static pressure at which the power w is highest. This optimum shifts toward a higher value as the acoustic amplitude increases. The energy of the bubble slightly increases with the increase in liquid temperature from 10 to 60 °C. The results of this study should be a helpful means to explain a variety of experimental observations conducted in the field of sonochemistry and sonoluminescence concerning the effects of operational parameters. PMID:23683796

  14. Surface acoustic BLOCH oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling in a solid.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M M; Kosevich, Yu A; Santos, P V; Cantarero, A

    2010-04-23

    We present the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling of surface acoustic waves in perturbed grating structures on a solid substrate. A model providing a quantitative description of our experimental observations, including multiple Landau-Zener transitions of the anticrossed surface acoustic Wannier-Stark states, is developed. The use of a planar geometry for the realization of the Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling allows a direct access to the elastic field distribution. The vertical surface displacement has been measured by interferometry. PMID:20482064

  15. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Allen, John S., III

    2009-02-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin , Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell’s oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell’s shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus KA , (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency fK˜(1)/(2π)KA/(ρa3) , where a is the cell’s radius and ρ is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency fK is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E . coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q<1) . For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q>1) , the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency fK ; however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers).

  16. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble.

    PubMed

    Zinin, Pavel V; Allen, John S

    2009-02-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin, Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell's oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell's shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus K{A} , (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency f{K} approximately 1/2pi square root[K{A}(rhoa;{3})] , where a is the cell's radius and rho is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency f{K} is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E . coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q<1). For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q>1) , the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency f{K} however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers). PMID:19391781

  17. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble

    PubMed Central

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Allen, John S.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin et al., Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell’s oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell’s shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus KA, (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency fK∼12πKA/(ρa3), where a is the cell’s radius and ρ is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency fK is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E. coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q < 1). For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q > 1), the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency fK; however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers). PMID:19391781

  18. Investigation of the impact of imposed air inlet velocity oscillations on the formation and oxidation of soot using simultaneous 2-Colour-TIRE-LII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A.; Suntz, R.; Bockhorn, H.

    2015-05-01

    The response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (0-350 Hz) and the impact of imposed air inlet velocity oscillations on the formation and oxidation of soot are investigated. The results obtained from these flames are of special interest for "rich-quenched-lean" (RQL) combustion concepts applied in modern gas turbines. In RQL combustion, the fuel is initially oxidized by air under fuel-rich conditions in a first stage followed by a fuel-lean combustion step in a second stage. To mimic soot formation and oxidation in RQL combustion, soot particle measurements in highly turbulent, non-premixed swirling natural gas/ethylene-confined flames at imposed air inlet velocity oscillations are performed using simultaneous 2-Colour-Time-Resolved-Laser-Induced Incandescence (simultaneous 2-Colour-TIRE-LII). The latter technique is combined with line-of-sight averaged OH*-chemiluminescence imaging, measurements of the velocity field by high-speed particle imaging velocimetry under reactive combustion conditions and measurements of the mean temperature field obtained by a thermocouple. A natural gas/ethylene mixture (Φ = 1.56, 42 % C2H4, 58 % natural gas, P th = 17.6 kW at atmospheric pressure) is used as a fuel, which is oxidized by air under fuel-rich conditions in the first combustion chamber.

  19. Ultrasonic database development for the acoustic inspection device: the velocity-attenuation measurement system (VAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Burghard, Brion J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2004-07-01

    The inspection of sealed containers is a critical task for personnel charged with enforcing government policies, maintaining public safety, and ensuring national security. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, handheld acoustic inspection device (AID) that provides non-invasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities. The AID technology has been deployed worldwide and user"s are providing feedback and requesting additional capabilities and functionality. Recently, PNNL has developed a laboratory-based system for automated, ultrasonic characterization of fluids to support database development for the AID. Using pulse-echo ultrasound, ultrasonic pulses are launched into a container or bulk-solid commodity. The return echoes from these pulses are analyzed in terms of time-of-flight and frequency content (as a function of temperature) to extract physical property measurements (acoustic velocity and attenuation) of the material under test. These measured values are then compared to a tailored database of materials and fluids property data acquired using the Velocity-Attenuation Measurement System (VAMS). This bench-top platform acquires key ultrasonic property measurements as a function of temperature and frequency. This paper describes the technical basis for operation of the VAMS, recent enhancements to the measurement algorithms for both the VAMS and AID technologies, and new measurement data from laboratory testing and performance demonstration activities. Applications for homeland security and counterterrorism, law enforcement, drug-interdiction and fuel transportation compliance activities will be discussed.

  20. Particle velocity gradient based acoustic mode beamforming for short linear vector sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Gur, Berke

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a subtractive beamforming algorithm for short linear arrays of two-dimensional particle velocity sensors is described. The proposed method extracts the highly directional acoustic modes from the spatial gradients of the particle velocity field measured at closely spaced sensors along the array. The number of sensors in the array limits the highest order of modes that can be extracted. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that the acoustic mode beamformer achieves directivity comparable to the maximum directivity that can be obtained with differential microphone arrays of equivalent aperture. When compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamformers for pressure sensor arrays, the proposed method achieves comparable directivity with 70%-85% shorter apertures. Moreover, the proposed method has additional capabilities such as high front-back (port-starboard) discrimination, frequency and steer direction independent response, and robustness to correlated ambient noise. Small inter-sensor spacing that results in very compact apertures makes the proposed beamformer suitable for space constrained applications such as hearing aids and short towed arrays for autonomous underwater platforms. PMID:24907810

  1. Measurements of the bulk and interfacial velocity profiles in oscillating Newtonian and Maxwellian fluids.

    PubMed

    Torralba, M; Castrejón-Pita, J R; Castrejón-Pita, A A; Huelsz, G; del Río, J A; Ortín, J

    2005-07-01

    We present the dynamic velocity profiles of a Newtonian fluid (glycerol) and a viscoelastic Maxwell fluid (CPyCl-NaSal in water) driven by an oscillating pressure gradient in a vertical cylindrical pipe. The frequency range explored has been chosen to include the first three resonance peaks of the dynamic permeability of the viscoelastic-fluid--pipe system. Three different optical measurement techniques have been employed. Laser Doppler anemometry has been used to measure the magnitude of the velocity at the center of the liquid column. Particle image velocimetry and optical deflectometry are used to determine the velocity profiles at the bulk of the liquid column and at the liquid-air interface respectively. The velocity measurements in the bulk are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of a linear theory. The results, however, show dramatic differences in the dynamic behavior of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids, and demonstrate the importance of resonance phenomena in viscoelastic fluid flows, biofluids in particular, in confined geometries. PMID:16090087

  2. Error analysis of the impulse excitation of vibration measurement of acoustic velocities in steel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raggio, Leandro Iglesias; Etcheverry, Javier; Sánchez, Gustavo; Bonadeo, Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge of the acoustic velocities in solid materials is crucial for several nondestructive evaluation techniques such as wall thickness measurement, materials characterization, determination of the location of cracks and inclusions, TOFD, etc. The longitudinal wave velocity is easily measured using ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, while a simple and accurate way to measure the shear wave speed would be a useful addition to the commonly available tools. In this work we use the impulse excitation of vibration, a very well known technique to determine the elastic constants of solid materials from the measurement of the lowest resonant frequencies excited by an impulse, to determine both longitudinal and transversal sound velocities for steel samples. Significant differences were found when comparing the longitudinal wave velocity with the one determined by a standard pulse-echo technique. Part of the difference was tracked back to the use of analytical formulas for the resonant frequencies, and corrected through the use of accurate numerical simulations. In this paper the systematic analysis of the possible error sources is reported.

  3. Shipboard acoustic Doppler profiler velocity observations near Point Conception: Spring 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.; Brink, K. H.

    1987-04-01

    During April 1983, shipboard Doppler acoustic log current profiles were collected in an effort to characterize the flow field near points Conception and Arguello, California. Subsurface velocity maps derived from these profiles have been used to describe spatial flow structures both on and off the shelf and to investigate flow variability as a function of time and of wind stress. Persistent westward flow out of the northern half of the Santa Barbara Channel and eastward flow into its southern half were observed regardless of the direction of the local wind stress. During one well-documented upwelling-favorable wind event, currents responded in the form of an energetic (maximum 21-m speeds of >60 cm s-1) offshore squirt of cold water. During weak or downwelling-favorable winds, currents continuous with the Santa Barbara Channel outflow were observed flowing to the northwest following the local isobaths before turning offshore west of Point Arguello. Evidence for wind forcing of current fluctuations nearshore between the points and north of Point Arguello was found. Lack of a thermal wind balance between directly measured velocity shear and horizontal density gradient was explained by the presence of large accelerations in the momentum equations. Lack of a consistent relation between velocity and temperature gradient illustrates the difficulty in estimating velocity from temperature information alone in this area.

  4. Blood flow velocity in the popliteal vein using transverse oscillation ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechsgaard, Thor; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Holbek, Simon; Lönn, Lars; Strandberg, Charlotte; Bækgaard, Niels; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition leading to varicose veins, leg edema, post-thrombotic syndrome and venous ulcerations. Ultrasound (US) is the main modality for examination of venous disease. Color Doppler and occasionally spectral Doppler US (SDUS) are used for evaluation of the venous flow. Peak velocities measured by SDUS are rarely used in a clinical setting for evaluating chronic venous disease due to inadequate reproducibility mainly caused by the angle dependency of the estimate. However, estimations of blood velocities are of importance in characterizing venous disease. Transverse Oscillation US (TOUS), a non-invasive angle independent method, has been implemented on a commercial scanner. TOUS's advantage compared to SDUS is a more elaborate visualization of complex flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate, whether TOUS perform equal to SDUS for recording velocities in the veins of the lower limbs. Four volunteers were recruited for the study. A standardized flow was provoked with a cuff compression-decompression system placed around the lower leg. The average peak velocity in the popliteal vein of the four volunteers was 151.5 cm/s for SDUS and 105.9 cm/s for TOUS (p <0.001). The average of the peak velocity standard deviations (SD) were 17.0 cm/s for SDUS and 13.1 cm/s for TOUS (p <0.005). The study indicates that TOUS estimates lower peak velocity with improved SD when compared to SDUS. TOUS may be a tool for evaluation of venous disease providing quantitative measures for the evaluation of venous blood flow.

  5. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program was developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions showed significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. The velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation, since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field, as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provided a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  6. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  7. Application of acoustic velocity meters for gaging discharge of three low-velocity tidal streams in the St. Johns River basin, northeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloat, J.V.; Gain, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    Index-velocity data collected with acoustic velocity meters, stage data, and cross-sectional area data were used to calculate discharge at three low-velocity, tidal streamflow stations in north-east Florida. Discharge at three streamflow stations was computed as the product of the channel cross-sectional area and the mean velocity as determined from an index velocity measured in the stream using an acoustic velocity meter. The tidal streamlflow stations used in the study were: Six Mile Creek near Picolata, Fla.; Dunns Creek near Satsuma, Fla.; and the St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Cross-sectional areas at the measurement sections ranged from about 3,000 square feet at Six Mile Creek to about 18,500 square feet at St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Physical characteristics for all three streams were similar except for drainage area. The topography primarily is low-relief, swampy terrain; stream velocities ranged from about -2 to 2 feet per second; and the average change in stage was about 1 foot. Instantaneous discharge was measured using a portable acoustic current meter at each of the three streams to develop a relation between the mean velocity in the stream and the index velocity measured by the acoustic velocity meter. Using least-squares linear regression, a simple linear relation between mean velocity and index velocity was determined. Index velocity was the only significant linear predictor of mean velocity for Six Mile Creek and St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. For Dunns Creek, both index velocity and stage were used to develop a multiple-linear predictor of mean velocity. Stage-area curves for each stream were developed from bathymetric data. Instantaneous discharge was computed by multiplying results of relations developed for cross-sectional area and mean velocity. Principal sources of error in the estimated discharge are identified as: (1) instrument errors associated with measurement of stage and index velocity, (2) errors in the representation of

  8. Experimental investigation of the nonlinear response of turbulent premixed flames to imposed inlet velocity oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, R.; Dowling, A.P.; Mastorakos, E.; Ayoola, B.O.; Kaminski, C.F.

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of acoustically forced lean premixed turbulent bluff-body-stabilised flames in an enclosure short enough so that no coupling of the combustor downstream acoustics occurred for the frequencies studied here, which allows an unambiguous examination of the flame response to inlet velocity fluctuations. Special emphasis was placed on the amplitude dependence of this response. Measurements of the heat release rate were performed with OH{sup *} and CH{sup *} chemiluminescence, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH from which the flame surface density (FSD) was computed, and simultaneous CH{sub 2}O and OH PLIF imaging from which the local heat release rate (RX) was estimated. The global heat release measured with chemiluminescence and that integrated from the local FSD measurements were in close agreement, while a comparison between FSD and high-resolution RX imaging also showed good agreement. This suggests that estimates of the flame area are sufficient to determine heat release rate for this flow. The heat release response became nonlinear after inlet velocity amplitudes of around 15% of the bulk velocity. This value depended on the forcing frequency and the equivalence ratio. The nonlinearity was found to occur when the shear layers rolled up into vortices. The vortices induced by the inlet velocity fluctuations not only generated flame area when the flame wrapped around them, but also caused cusps and even large-scale flame annihilation events, as observed in time-resolved OH PLIF images. Such events occurred when parts of the flame stabilised on the inner shear layer close to the recirculation zone collapsed on parts of the flame stabilised on the outer recirculation zone, a phenomenon that was made more prominent with increasing forcing amplitude. A further nonlinearity occurred at high amplitudes and at some equivalence ratios, where a significant leakage of energy to higher harmonics was observed, but the

  9. Acoustic Emissions, Velocities And Permeability Evolution During Formation Of Compaction Bands In Sandstone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, J.; Stanchits, S.; Dresen, G.; Schubnel, A.; Gueguen, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Compaction bands are zones of localized deformation observed in high porosity rock (Mollema et al. [1996], Klein et al. [2001], Fortin et al. [2003]). These planar bands form perpendicular to the direction of maximum compression. Compaction bands display significantly reduced porosity and are potentially important permeability barriers in reservoir rocks and aquifers. To investigate localized compaction and changes in physical properties of porous sandstone, we performed triaxial tests on Bleurswiller sandstone, (50% quartz 30% feldspars and 20% clay, 25% porosity), on Fontainebleau sandstone (100% quartz, 25% porosity) and on Flechtingen sandstone (65-75% quartz, calcite and illite 15%, porosity 5.5-7%). Experiments were performed under wet conditions at a pore pressure of 10 MPa. Thirteen experiments were performed at the Laboratoire de Geologie (Ecole Normal Superieur Paris) and at GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam. Evolution of volumetric strain, elastic wave velocities and permeability were recorded at confining pressures of 12 and 180 MPa. Acoustic Emission (AE) characteristics during deformation were studied at GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam. To monitor velocity change and microcracking of sandstone, 10 P-wave sensors and 8 polarized S-wave piezoelectric sensors were glued to the cylindrical surface of the samples. To monitor fracture-induced anisotropy, two additional P sensors were installed in axial direction. Fully digitized waveforms were recorded by 10 MHz/16bit Data Acquisition System with an accuracy of AE hypocenters determination of about 2.5 mm. Location of acoustic emission events reveal the evolution of localized compaction bands in sandstone subjected to axial compression. The formation of the bands depends on rock type and effective pressure. Our experiments show a reduction of permeability across compaction bands by about one to two orders of magnitude (Vajdova et al. [2004]; Holcomb et al., [2003]) suggesting that the bands may act as barriers to

  10. Prediction of thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) in the CLAES solid CO2/neon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, I. E.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a study initiated to investigate the possibility that the existence of thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) in the Cryogenic Limb Atmospheric Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) neon plumbing system ground configuration could be the cause of higher-than-predicted heat rates measured during thermal ground testing. Tests were conducted between warm boundary temperatures ranging from 40 to 100 K, which simulated the actual test conditions of the CLAES CO2/neon system. TAOs were observed between 6 and 106 Torr, which agreed with the analytical predictions, and verified the possible existence of TAOs in the CLAES system during ground testing. The presence of TAOs was eventually confirmed in the CLAES system during a subsequent thermal test and were determined to have caused the higher heat rates measured during the prior thermal test.

  11. A cross-check for H0 from Lyman-α Forest and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busti, V. C.; Guimarães, R. N.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2016-04-01

    A new method is proposed to infer the Hubble constant H0 through the observed mean transmitted flux from high-redshift quasars and the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). A semi-analytical model for the cosmological-independent volume density distribution function was adopted; it allowed us to obtain constraints on the cosmological parameters once a moderate knowledge of the Inter Galactic Medium (IGM) parameters is assumed. Our analysis, based on two different samples of Lyman-α forest and the BAO measurement, restricts (h, Ωm) to the intervals 0.19 ≤ Ωm ≤ 0.23 and 0.53 ≤ h ≤ 0.82 (1σ). Although the constraints are weaker compared with other estimates, we point out that, with a bigger sample and a better knowledge of the IGM, this method could provide complementary results to measure the Hubble constant independently of the cosmic distance ladder.

  12. The Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Broadband and Broad-beam Array: Design Overview and Sensitivity Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; DeBoer, David R.; McDonald, Patrick; McQuinn, Matthew; Aguirre, James E.; Ali, Zaki; Bradley, Richard F.; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Morales, Miguel F.

    2013-03-01

    This work describes a new instrument optimized for a detection of the neutral hydrogen 21 cm power spectrum between redshifts of 0.5 and 1.5: the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Broadband and Broad-beam (BAOBAB) array. BAOBAB will build on the efforts of a first generation of 21 cm experiments that are targeting a detection of the signal from the Epoch of Reionization at z ~ 10. At z ~ 1, the emission from neutral hydrogen in self-shielded overdense halos also presents an accessible signal, since the dominant, synchrotron foreground emission is considerably fainter than at redshift 10. The principle science driver for these observations are baryon acoustic oscillations in the matter power spectrum which have the potential to act as a standard ruler and constrain the nature of dark energy. BAOBAB will fully correlate dual-polarization antenna tiles over the 600-900 MHz band with a frequency resolution of 300 kHz and a system temperature of 50 K. The number of antennas will grow in staged deployments, and reconfigurations of the array will allow for both traditional imaging and high power spectrum sensitivity operations. We present calculations of the power spectrum sensitivity for various array sizes, with a 35 element array measuring the cosmic neutral hydrogen fraction as a function of redshift, and a 132 element system detecting the BAO features in the power spectrum, yielding a 1.8% error on the z ~ 1 distance scale, and, in turn, significant improvements to constraints on the dark energy equation of state over an unprecedented range of redshifts from ~0.5 to 1.5.

  13. An experimental study on resonance of oscillating air/vapor bubbles in water using a two-frequency acoustic apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaka, K.

    2003-05-01

    A two-frequency acoustic apparatus is employed to study the growth behavior of vapor-saturated bubbles driven in a volumetric mode. A unique feature of the apparatus is its capability of trapping a bubble by an ultrasonic standing wave while independently driving it into oscillations by a second lower-frequency acoustic wave. It is observed that the growing vapor bubbles exhibit a periodic shape transition between the volumetric and shape modes due to resonant coupling. In order to explain this observation, we performed an experimental investigation on resonant coupling of air bubbles and obtained the following results: First, the induced shape oscillations are actually a mixed mode that contains the volume component, thus, vapor bubbles can grow while they exhibit shape oscillations. Second, the acoustically levitated bubbles are deformed and therefore, degeneracy in resonant frequency is partially removed. As a result, the vapor bubbles exhibit the shape oscillations in both the axisymmetric mode and asymmetric (three-dimensional) modes. Nonlinear effects in addition to the frequency shift and split due to deformation creates overlapping of the coupling ranges for different modes, which leads to the continuous shape oscillations above a certain bubble radius as the bubble grows.

  14. A spatiotemporally controllable chemical gradient generator via acoustically oscillating sharp-edge structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Hsun; Chan, Chung Yu; Li, Peng; Nama, Nitesh; Xie, Yuliang; Wei, Cheng-Hsin; Chen, Yuchao; Ahmed, Daniel; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-11-01

    The ability to generate stable, spatiotemporally controllable concentration gradients is critical for resolving the dynamics of cellular response to a chemical microenvironment. Here we demonstrate an acoustofluidic gradient generator based on acoustically oscillating sharp-edge structures, which facilitates in a step-wise fashion the rapid mixing of fluids to generate tunable, dynamic chemical gradients. By controlling the driving voltage of a piezoelectric transducer, we demonstrated that the chemical gradient profiles can be conveniently altered (spatially controllable). By adjusting the actuation time of the piezoelectric transducer, moreover, we generated pulsatile chemical gradients (temporally controllable). With these two characteristics combined, we have developed a spatiotemporally controllable gradient generator. The applicability and biocompatibility of our acoustofluidic gradient generator are validated by demonstrating the migration of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d) in response to a generated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gradient, and by preserving the viability of HMVEC-d cells after long-term exposure to an acoustic field. Our device features advantages such as simple fabrication and operation, compact and biocompatible device, and generation of spatiotemporally tunable gradients. PMID:26338516

  15. Galaxy bias and its effects on the Baryon acoustic oscillations measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Kushal T.; Seo, Hee -Jong; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Metchnik, Marc; Pinto, Philip; Xu, Xiaoying

    2011-05-31

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al. (2009). For the less biased HOD models (b < 3), we do not detect any shift in the acoustic scale relative to the no-bias case, typically 0.10% ± 0.10%. However, the most biased HOD models (b > 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% ± 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at nearly twice the wavenumber after reconstruction. Reconstruction reduces the shifts and errors on the shifts. We find that after reconstruction the shifts from the galaxy cases and the dark matter case are consistent with each other and with no shift. The 1σ systematic errors on the distance measurements inferred from our BAO measurements with various HODs after reconstruction are about 0.07%-0.15%.

  16. Surface acoustic wave velocity of gold films deposited on silicon substrates at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, E.; Jimenez Rioboo, R. J.; Prieto, C.; Every, A. G.

    2011-07-15

    Au thin films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on Si (001) substrates at different substrate temperatures, ranging from 200 K to 450 K. With increasing temperature, the expected crystallinity and morphology of the Au thin film are clearly improved, as shown by x ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy experiments. Parallel to this, the surface acoustic wave propagation velocity shows a clear enhancement toward the ideal values obtained from numerical simulations of a Au thin film on Si (001) substrate. Moreover, a very thin and slightly rough interlayer between the Si (001) substrate and the Au thin film is developed for temperatures above 350 K. The composition and nature of this interlayer is not known. This interlayer may be responsible for the steep change in the structural and elastic properties of the Au thin films at the higher temperatures and possibly also for an improvement of the adhesion properties of the Au on the Si (001) substrate.

  17. Optical multi-point measurements of the acoustic particle velocity with frequency modulated Doppler global velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; König, Jörg; Haufe, Daniel; Schlüssler, Raimund; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    To reduce the noise of machines such as aircraft engines, the development and propagation of sound has to be investigated. Since the applicability of microphones is limited due to their intrusiveness, contactless measurement techniques are required. For this reason, the present study describes an optical method based on the Doppler effect and its application for acoustic particle velocity (APV) measurements. While former APV measurements with Doppler techniques are point measurements, the applied system is capable of simultaneous measurements at multiple points. In its current state, the system provides linear array measurements of one component of the APV demonstrated by multi-tone experiments with tones up to 17 kHz for the first time. PMID:23927110

  18. Quasar-Lyman α forest cross-correlation from BOSS DR11: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; Kirkby, David; Blomqvist, Michael; Busca, Nicolas; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian; Ross, Nicholas P.; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Carithers, Bill; Slosar, Anže; Rich, James; Delubac, Timothée; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; and others

    2014-05-01

    We measure the large-scale cross-correlation of quasars with the Lyα forest absorption, using over 164,000 quasars from Data Release 11 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We extend the previous study of roughly 60,000 quasars from Data Release 9 to larger separations, allowing a measurement of the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale along the line of sight c/(H(z = 2.36)r{sub s}) = 9.0±0.3 and across the line of sight D{sub A}(z = 2.36)/r{sub s} = 10.8±0.4, consistent with CMB and other BAO data. Using the best fit value of the sound horizon from Planck data (r{sub s} = 147.49 Mpc), we can translate these results to a measurement of the Hubble parameter of H(z = 2.36) = 226±8 km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1} and of the angular diameter distance of D{sub A}(z = 2.36) = 1590±60 Mpc. The measured cross-correlation function and an update of the code to fit the BAO scale (baofit) are made publicly available.

  19. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  20. Linking water surface roughness to velocity patterns using terrestrial laser scanning and acoustic doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heritage, George; Milan, David; Entwistle, Neil

    2010-05-01

    There are well established links between water surface characteristics and hydraulics. Biotope identification is currently an important part of the River Habitat Survey in England and Wales. Their differentiation is based upon recognition of a family of flow features exhibited on the water surface. Variability in this water surface ‘roughness' is dependent upon the interaction of flow with boundary roughness and flow depth. Past research that has attempted to differentiate biotopes based upon differences in Froude number (Fr) and Reynolds number (Re), however this linkage has only been limited to local analysis between flow velocity, depth and roughness. Milan et al. (2010) have recently demonstrated that terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can be applied to produce fully quantitative maps of hydraulic habitat, based upon defined water surface roughness delimeters. However the nature of the linkages between water surface roughness, flow velocity and depth are still poorly understood, particularly at the reach-scale. This study attempts to provide a full spatial picture of the links between water surface roughness, flow depth and velocity. A Sontek Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP) was used to provide detailed information on vertical velocity and water depth for a 300 m reach of the gravel-bed River Wharfe, Yorkshire, UK. Simultaneous to the ADVP measurements, a Riegl LMS-Z210 TLS was used to take a series of first return scans of the water surface. Categorisation of the point cloud elevation data for the water surface was achieved through the allocation of moving window standard deviation values to a regular grid, thus defining water surface roughness. The ADVP data demonstrate gross reach-scale variation in velocity and depth linked to bedforms, and more localised spatial and temporal variation within biotope units. The ADVP data was used to produce reach-scale maps of Fr and Re. The extent to which water surface roughness defined biotopes mapped onto these

  1. Sound velocity of iron up to 152 GPa by picosecond acoustics in diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decremps, F.; Antonangeli, D.; Gauthier, M.; Ayrinhac, S.; Morand, M.; Marchand, G. Le; Bergame, F.; Philippe, J.

    2014-03-01

    High-pressure method combining diamond anvil cell with picosecond ultrasonics technique is demonstrated to be a very suitable tool to measure the acoustic properties of iron up to 152 GPa. Such innovative approach allows to measure directly the longitudinal sound velocity under pressure of hundreds of GPa in laboratory, overcoming most of the drawbacks of traditional techniques. The very high accuracy, comparable to piezoacoustics technique, allows to observe the kink in elastic properties at the body-centered cubic-hexagonal close packed transition and to show with a good confidence that the Birch's law still stands up to 1.5 Mbar and ambient temperature. The linear extrapolation of the measured sound velocities versus densities of hcp iron is out of the preliminary reference Earth model, arguing for alloying effects or anharmonic high-temperature effects. A comparison between our measurements and shock wave experiments allowed us to quantify temperature corrections at constant pressure in ~-0.35 and ~-0.30 m s-1/K at 100 and 150 GPa, respectively. More in general, the here-presented technique allows detailed elastic and viscoelastic studies under extreme thermodynamic conditions on a wide variety of systems as liquids, crystalline, or polycrystalline solids, metallic or not, with very broad applications in Earth and planetary science.

  2. Shape oscillations of acoustically levitated drops in water: Early research with Bob Apfel on modulated radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2001-05-01

    In 1976, research in collaboration with Bob Apfel demonstrated that low-frequency shape oscillations of hydrocarbon drops levitated in water could be driven using modulated radiation pressure. While that response to modulated ultrasound was subsequently extended to a range of systems, the emphasis here is to recall the initial stages of development in Bob Apfel's laboratory leading to some publications [P. L. Marston and R. E. Apfel, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 68, 280-286 (1979); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 27-37 (1980)]. The levitation technology used at that time was such that it was helpful to develop a sensitive method for detecting weak oscillations using the interference pattern in laser light scattered by levitated drops. The initial experiments to verify this scattering method used shape oscillations induced by modulated electric fields within the acoustic levitator. Light scattering was subsequently used to detect shape oscillations induced by amplitude modulating a carrier having a high frequency (around 680 kHz) at a resonance of the transducer. Methods were also developed for quantitative measurements of the drop's response and with improved acoustic coupling drop fission was observed. The connection with research currently supported by NASA will also be noted.

  3. Resolving the source of the solar acoustic oscillations: What will be possible with DKIST?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, Mark; Martinez Pillet, Valentin

    2016-05-01

    The solar p-modes are likely excited by small-scale convective dynamics in the solar photosphere, but the detailed source properties are not known. Theoretical models differ and observations are yet unable to differentiate between them. Resolving the underlying source events is more than a curiosity. It is important to the veracity of global helioseismic measurements (including local spectral methods such as ring diagram analysis) because global p-mode line shapes and thus accurate frequency determinations depend critically on the relationship between intensity and velocity during the excitation events. It is also fundamental to improving the accuracy of the local time-distance measurements because in these kernel calculations depend on knowledge of the source profile and the properties of the excitation noise. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) will have the spatial resolution and spectral range needed to resolve the solar acoustic excitation events in both time and space (horizontally and with height) using multi-wavelength observations. Inversions to determine the dynamic and thermodynamic evolution of the discrete small-scale convective events that serve as acoustic sources may also be possible, though determination of the pressure fluctuations associated with the sources is a challenge. We describe the DKIST capabilities anticipated and the preliminary work needed to prepare for them.

  4. The Effect of Shape Mode Oscillations on the Particle Scavenging Efficiency of Water Droplets Using Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizzee, J.; Saylor, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    The effect of drop oscillations on the scavenging of solid particles is studied using an ultrasonic transducer to levitate a water droplet in an airflow of particles. Shape mode oscillations are induced in the drop by modulating the acoustic field used for levitation. The effect of oscillation frequency, the oscillation amplitude, and the drop diameter on the scavenging of particles is presented. The particle diameters are on the order of 1μm and the drop diameters are on the order of 1mm. Although single droplets are studied here, the application of interest is improved scavenging of particles by spray drops. Specifically, improving the elimination of coal dust particles from mines using waters sprays excited ultrasonically is of interest.

  5. Investigation of the nonlinear response of turbulent premixed flames to imposed inlet velocity oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, C.A.; Mastorakos, E.; Cant, R.S.; Balachandran, R.

    2006-08-15

    Acoustically forced lean premixed turbulent bluff-body stabilized flames are investigated using turbulent combustion CFD. The calculations simulate aspects of the experimental investigation by Balachandran et al. [R. Balachandran, B. Ayoola, C. Kaminski, A. Dowling, E. Mastorakos, Combust. Flame 143 (2005) 37-55] and focus on the amplitude dependence of the flame response. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach is appropriate. The combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic representation of the flame surface density. The predictions are compared with flame surface density (FSD) and OH* chemiluminescence measurements. In the experiments the response of the flame has been quantified by means of a number of single-frequency, amplitude-dependent transfer functions. The predicted flame shape and position are in good agreement with the experiment. The dynamic response of the flame to inlet velocity forcing is also well captured by the calculations. At moderate frequencies nonlinear behavior of the transfer functions is observed as the forcing amplitude is increased. In the experiments this nonlinearity was attributed in part to the rollup of the reacting shear layer into vortices and in part to the collision of the inner and outer flame sheets. This transition to nonlinearity is also observed in the transfer functions obtained from the predictions. Furthermore, the vortex shedding and flame-sheet collapse may be seen in snapshots of the predicted flow field taken throughout the forcing cycle. The URANS methodology successfully predicts the behavior of the forced premixed turbulent flames and captures the effects of saturation in the transfer function of the response of the heat release to velocity fluctuations. (author)

  6. Reliability of Phase Velocity Measurements of Flexural Acoustic Waves in the Human Tibia In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Axial-transmission acoustics have shown to be a promising technique to measure individual bone properties and detect bone pathologies. With the ultimate goal being the in-vivo application of such systems, quantification of the key aspects governing the reliability is crucial to bring this method towards clinical use. Materials and Methods This work presents a systematic reliability study quantifying the sources of variability and their magnitudes of in-vivo measurements using axial-transmission acoustics. 42 healthy subjects were measured by an experienced operator twice per week, over a four-month period, resulting in over 150000 wave measurements. In a complementary study to assess the influence of different operators performing the measurements, 10 novice operators were trained, and each measured 5 subjects on a single occasion, using the same measurement protocol as in the first part of the study. Results The estimated standard error for the measurement protocol used to collect the study data was ∼ 17 m/s (∼ 4% of the grand mean) and the index of dependability, as a measure of reliability, was Φ = 0.81. It was shown that the method is suitable for multi-operator use and that the reliability can be improved efficiently by additional measurements with device repositioning, while additional measurements without repositioning cannot improve the reliability substantially. Phase velocity values were found to be significantly higher in males than in females (p < 10−5) and an intra-class correlation coefficient of r = 0.70 was found between the legs of each subject. Conclusions The high reliability of this non-invasive approach and its intrinsic sensitivity to mechanical properties opens perspectives for the rapid and inexpensive clinical assessment of bone pathologies, as well as for monitoring programmes without any radiation exposure for the patient. PMID:27015093

  7. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. PMID:25465962

  8. Hunting down systematics in baryon acoustic oscillations after cosmic high noon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, Francisco; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Yepes, Gustavo; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Gottlöber, Stefan; Zhao, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Future dark energy experiments will require accurate theoretical predictions for the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Here, we use large N-body simulations to study any systematic shifts and damping in BAO due to non-linear effects. The impact of cosmic variance is largely reduced by dividing the tracer power spectrum by that from a `BAO-free' simulation starting with the same random amplitudes and phases. The accuracy of our simulations allows us to resolve well dark matter (sub)haloes, which permits us to study with high accuracy (better than 0.02 per cent for dark matter and 0.07 per cent for low-bias haloes) small BAO shifts α towards larger k, and non-linear damping Σnl of BAO in the power spectrum. For dark matter, we provide an accurate parametrization of the evolution of α as a function of the linear growth factor D(z). For halo samples, with bias from 1.2 to 2.8, we measure a typical BAO shift of ≈0.25 per cent, with no appreciable evolution with redshift. Moreover, we report a constant shift as a function of halo bias. We find a different evolution of the BAO damping in all halo samples as compared to dark matter with haloes suffering less damping, and also find some weak dependence on bias. Larger BAO shift and damping are measured in redshift-space, which can be explained by linear theory due to redshift-space distortions. A clear modulation in phase with the acoustic scale is observed in the scale-dependent halo bias due to the presence of BAOs. We compare our results with previous works.

  9. An Approximate Solution to the Equation of Motion for Large-Angle Oscillations of the Simple Pendulum with Initial Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannessen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    An analytic approximation of the solution to the differential equation describing the oscillations of a simple pendulum at large angles and with initial velocity is discussed. In the derivation, a sinusoidal approximation has been applied, and an analytic formula for the large-angle period of the simple pendulum is obtained, which also includes…

  10. Optimizing baryon acoustic oscillation surveys - II. Curvature, redshifts and external data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, David; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Bassett, Bruce A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Vardanyan, Mihran

    2010-02-01

    We extend our study of the optimization of large baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) surveys to return the best constraints on the dark energy, building on Paper I of this series by Parkinson et al. The survey galaxies are assumed to be pre-selected active, star-forming galaxies observed by their line emission with a constant number density across the redshift bin. Star-forming galaxies have a redshift desert in the region 1.6 < z < 2, and so this redshift range was excluded from the analysis. We use the Seo & Eisenstein fitting formula for the accuracies of the BAO measurements, using only the information for the oscillatory part of the power spectrum as distance and expansion rate rulers. We go beyond our earlier analysis by examining the effect of including curvature on the optimal survey configuration and updating the expected `prior' constraints from Planck and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We once again find that the optimal survey strategy involves minimizing the exposure time and maximizing the survey area (within the instrumental constraints), and that all time should be spent observing in the low-redshift range (z < 1.6) rather than beyond the redshift desert, z > 2. We find that, when assuming a flat universe, the optimal survey makes measurements in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.7, but that including curvature as a nuisance parameter requires us to push the maximum redshift to 1.35, to remove the degeneracy between curvature and evolving dark energy. The inclusion of expected other data sets (such as WiggleZ, the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and a stage III Type Ia supernova survey) removes the necessity of measurements below redshift 0.9, and pushes the maximum redshift up to 1.5. We discuss considerations in determining the best survey strategy in light of uncertainty in the true underlying cosmological model.

  11. Redshift weights for baryon acoustic oscillations: application to mock galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fangzhou; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gongbo

    2016-09-01

    Large redshift surveys capable of measuring the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal have proven to be an effective way of measuring the distance-redshift relation in cosmology. Building off the work in Zhu et al., we develop a technique to directly constrain the distance-redshift relation from BAO measurements without splitting the sample into redshift bins. We apply the redshift weighting technique in Zhu et al. to the clustering of galaxies from 1000 Quick particle mesh (QPM) mock simulations after reconstruction and achieve a 0.75 per cent measurement of the angular diameter distance DA at z = 0.64 and the same precision for Hubble parameter H at z = 0.29. These QPM mock catalogues mimic the clustering and noise level of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12). We compress the correlation functions in the redshift direction on to a set of weighted correlation functions. These estimators give unbiased DA and H measurements across the entire redshift range of the combined sample. We demonstrate the effectiveness of redshift weighting in improving the distance and Hubble parameter estimates. Instead of measuring at a single `effective' redshift as in traditional analyses, we report our DA and H measurements at all redshifts. The measured fractional error of DA ranges from 1.53 per cent at z = 0.2 to 0.75 per cent at z = 0.64. The fractional error of H ranges from 0.75 per cent at z = 0.29 to 2.45 per cent at z = 0.7. Our measurements are consistent with a Fisher forecast to within 10-20 per cent depending on the pivot redshift. We further show the results are robust against the choice of fiducial cosmologies, galaxy bias models, and redshift-space distortions streaming parameters.

  12. Estimating Discharge using Multi-level Velocity Data from Acoustic Doppler Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang Poulsen, J.; Rømer Rasmussen, K.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2010-12-01

    In the majority of Danish streams, weed growth affects the effective stream width and bed roughness and therefore imposes temporal variations on the stage-discharge relationship. Small stream-gradients and firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations and thus remove or limit such influences. Hence, estimation of the hydrograph is based on continuous stream gauging combined with monthly control measurements of discharge and assuming linear variation of bed roughness between the monthly measurements. As a result, any non-linear drift in weed density or structure which affect the frictional characteristics of the stream during both normal and peak flows are ignored. The present investigation studies if such temporal variation in the conveyance may be detected and eventually compensated for when estimating the hydrograph. Therefore acoustic Dopplers have been placed at the main discharge station in one of the largest Danish catchments (the Skjern). The instruments were set out in early February 2010 during the winter season and have been running since then. The long term average discharge at the station is near 14 m3/s and the cross sectional profile is roughly trapezoidal having width about 15 m., but slightly skew so that the stream is about 0.5 m. deeper off the right than off the left bank. During winter, the depths are typically near 2 m. while during summer they are about 1.5 m. During peak flows, when the discharge exceeds 35 m3/s, the depth increases to more than 3 m. The Doppler instruments (Nortek) are placed on a vertical pole about 2 m. off the right bank at three fixed elevations above the streambed (0.3, 0.6, and 1.3 m); the beams point horizontally towards the left bank perpendicularly to the average flow direction. At each depth, the Doppler sensor records 10 minute average stream velocities in the central 10 m. section of the stream. During summer periods with low flow, stream velocity has only

  13. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  14. Anisotropy in Experimentally Compressed Kaolinite-Illite-Quartz Aggregates: Microstructure, Preferred Orientation and Acoustic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voltolini, M.; Wenk, H.; Mondol, N. H.; Bjørlykke, K.; Jahren, J.

    2007-12-01

    Shales and mudstones composed of clay minerals and quartz are important sedimentary rocks that frequently display anisotropy of physical properties. This study investigates anisotropy in experimentally compressed kaolinite-illite-quartz aggregates by determining preferred orientation (texture) of component phases and comparing results with acoustic anisotropy. Sample were prepared compressing clay (81% kaolinite, 14% illite and 4% K-feldspar)-silt (~99% quartz) mixtures (0 to 100% clay) at 5 and 50 MPa vertical effective stress to explore the role of clay content and compaction stress on the elastic properties. Optical and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize microstructures. Texture patterns are quantified based on synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns analyzed with the Rietveld method. Preferred orientation of quartz is more or less random. Clay minerals are strongly oriented. Pole figures display axisymmetric (001) maxima parallel to the compression direction, ranging in strength from 1.6 to 8 multiples of a random distribution. Texture strength strongly increases with compaction pressure and clay content. Both microstructure and preferred orientation are essential contributions to aggregate elastic properties that have been calculated by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distributions. Calculated P-wave velocity anisotropies range from 0% (100% quartz) to 44% (100% clay, 50 MPa). Anisotropy roughly doubles by increasing the vertical effective stress from 5 to 50 MPa. In experiments only P- and S-wave velocities parallel to the compression direction were measured and values (2-3 km/s) are much lower than those predicted by single crystal averaging (5-7 km/s) which we attribute mainly to the influence of porosity that was not considered in the model. With these experimental compaction data we are currently refining a model to determine macroscopic properties of mudstones and shales based on detailed information of

  15. REMOVING BARYON-ACOUSTIC-OSCILLATION PEAK SHIFTS WITH LOCAL DENSITY TRANSFORMS

    SciTech Connect

    McCullagh, Nuala; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2013-01-20

    Large-scale bulk flows in the universe distort the initial density field, broadening the baryon-acoustic-oscillation (BAO) feature that was imprinted when baryons were strongly coupled to photons. Additionally, there is a small shift inward in the peak of the conventional overdensity correlation function, a mass-weighted statistic. This shift occurs when high-density peaks move toward each other. We explore whether this shift can be removed by applying to the density field a transform (such as a logarithm) that gives fairer statistical weight to fluctuations in underdense regions. Using configuration-space perturbation theory in the Zel'dovich approximation, we find that the log-density correlation function shows a much smaller inward shift in the position of the BAO peak at low redshift than is seen in the overdensity correlation function. We also show that if the initial, Lagrangian density of matter parcels could be estimated at their Eulerian positions, giving a displaced-initial-density field, its peak shift would be even smaller. In fact, a transformed field that accentuates underdensities, such as the reciprocal of the density, pushes the peak the other way, outward. In our model, these shifts in the peak position can be attributed to shift terms, involving the derivative of the linear correlation function, that entirely vanish in this displaced-initial-density field.

  16. Model-independent dark energy equation of state from unanchored baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah

    2016-09-01

    Ratios of line of sight baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peaks at two redshifts only depend upon the average dark energy equation of states between those redshifts, as the dependence on anchors such as the BAO scale or the Hubble constant is canceled in a ratio. As a result, BAO ratios provide a probe of dark energy which is independent of both the cosmic distance ladder and the early evolution of universe. In this note, we use ratios to demonstrate that the known tension between the Lyman alpha forest BAO measurement and other probes arises entirely from recent (0.57 < z < 2.34) cosmological expansion. Using ratios of the line of sight Lyman alpha forest and BOSS CMASS BAO scales, we show that there is already more than 3 σ tension with the standard ΛCDM cosmological model which implies that either (i) The BOSS Lyman alpha forest measurement of the Hubble parameter was too low as a result of a statistical fluctuation or systematic error or else (ii) the dark energy equation of state falls steeply at high redshift.

  17. A Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the Distribution of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 79,091 galaxy clusters in the redshift region of z≤slant 0.5, selected from the WH15 cluster catalog. With a weight of cluster mass, a significant baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is detected on the correlation function with a significance of 3.7σ . By fitting the correlation function with a ΛCDM model curve, we find {D}v(z=0.331){r}d{fid}/{r}d=1261.5+/- 48 Mpc, which is consistent with the Planck 2015 cosmology. We find that the correlation function of the higher mass sub-sample shows a higher amplitude at small scales of r\\lt 80 {h}-1 {{Mpc}}, which is consistent with our previous result. The two-dimensional correlation function of this large sample of galaxy clusters shows a faint BAO ring with a significance of 1.8σ , from which we find that the distance scale parameters on directions across and along the line of sight are {α }σ =1.02+/- 0.06 and {α }π =0.94+/- 0.10, respectively.

  18. Small scale aspects of warm dark matter: Power spectra and acoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, Daniel; Wu Jun

    2011-02-15

    We provide a semianalytic derivation of approximate evolution equations for density perturbations of warm dark matter candidates that decoupled while relativistic with arbitrary distribution functions, their solutions at small scales, and a simple numerical implementation that yields their transfer functions and power spectra. Density perturbations evolve through three stages: radiation domination when the particle is relativistic and nonrelativistic and matter domination. An early integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect during the first stage leads to an enhancement of density perturbations and a plateau in the transfer function for k < or approx. k{sub fs}, the free-streaming wave vector. An effective fluid description emerges at small scales which includes the effects of free streaming in initial conditions and inhomogeneities. The transfer function features warm dark matter acoustic oscillations at scales k > or approx. 2k{sub fs}. A simple analytic interpolation of the power spectra between large and small scales and a numerical implementation valid for arbitrary distribution functions is provided. As an application we study the power spectra for two models of sterile neutrinos with m{approx}keV produced nonresonantly and compare our results to those obtained from Boltzmann codes.

  19. Dynamic behavior of acoustic metamaterials and metaconfigured structures with local oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimala, James Mathew

    Dynamic behavior of acoustic metamaterials (AM) and metaconfigured structures (MCS) with various oscillator-type microstructures or local attachments was investigated. AM derive their unusual elastic wave manipulation capabilities not just from material constituents but more so from engineered microstructural configurations. Depending on the scale of implementation, these "microstructures" may be deployed as microscopic inclusions in metacomposites or even as complex endo-structures within load-bearing exo-structures in MCS. The frequency-dependent negative effective-mass exhibited by locally resonant microstructures when considered as a single degree of freedom system was experimentally verified using a structure with an internal mass-spring resonator. AM constructed by incorporating resonators in a host material display spatial attenuation of harmonic stress waves within a tunable bandgap frequency range. An apparent damping coefficient was derived to compare the degree of attenuation achieved in these wholly elastic AM to equivalent conventionally damped models illustrating their feasibility as stiff structures that simultaneously act as effective damping elements. Parametric studies were performed using simulations to design and construct MCS with attached resonators for dynamic load mitigation applications. 98% payload isolation at resonance (7 Hz) was experimentally attained using a low-frequency vibration isolator with tip-loaded cantilever beam resonators. Pendulum impact tests on a resonator stack substantiated a peak transmitted stress reduction of about 60% and filtering of the resonator frequencies in the transmitted spectrum. Drop-tower tests were done to gauge the shock mitigation performance of an AM-inspired infrastructural building-block with internal resonators. Proof-of-concept experiments using an array of multifunctional resonators demonstrate the possibility of integrating energy harvesting and transducer capabilities. Stress wave attenuation

  20. Repeatability of Surface Wave Velocity Estimates from Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, N.; Wagner, A. M.; Dou, S.; Martin, E. R.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Daley, T. M.; Robertson, M.; Freifeld, B. M.; Bjella, K.; Ulrich, C.

    2015-12-01

    The repeatability of surface wave velocity estimates from local ambient noise hinges on the stability of the crosscorrelation function for the receiver pair in the presence of a variable noise field, assuming near-surface soil properties are invariant over the duration of the surveys. Distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) data recorded on a linear trenched fiber optic cable sensor can accurately sample surface waves in a near continuous fashion (>1 kHz) with high spatial resolution (>1 receiver/m) and long range (10's of km). DAS recordings of ambient noise represent a unique means to explore the practical reliability of field-scale seismic property estimation from seismic interferometry. We test this hypothesis using continuous DAS field recordings from a shallow trench experiment near a busy road with diurnally-variable traffic patterns. Continuous records are processed using a modified ambient noise workflow consisting of receiver pair crosscorrelation, signal stacking, dispersion analysis, and a Monte Carlo search procedure to determine a best-fitting Vs model. The same processing flow is also applied to campaign data acquired with geophones to determine the repeatability benefit of trenched DAS deployment.

  1. Loss reduction of leaky surface acoustic wave by loading with high-velocity thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakio, Shoji; Hosaka, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    The propagation properties of a leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) on rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (YX-LN) substrates loaded with an aluminum nitride (AlN) thin film with a higher phase velocity than that of the substrate were investigated theoretically and experimentally. From the theoretical calculation, it was found that the minimum attenuation can be obtained at a certain thickness of the AlN thin film for a cut angle ranging from 0 to 60° because the cut angle giving the minimum attenuation shifts toward a smaller cut angle as the film thickness is increased. The propagation properties of an LSAW on several rotated YX-LN substrates were measured by using an interdigital transducer (IDT) pair with a wavelength λ of 8 µm, and the predicted shifts of the minimum attenuation toward a smaller cut angle were demonstrated experimentally. For 0° and 10°YX-LN samples, the measured insertion loss and propagation loss were markedly reduced by loading with the AlN thin film. A larger electromechanical coupling factor (16.9%) than that at the cut angle giving zero attenuation without a film and a propagation loss less of 0.02 dB/λ were obtained simultaneously at a film thickness of 0.125 λ for the 10°YX-LN sample.

  2. Density-velocity equations with bulk modulus for computational hydro-acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Po-Hsien; Chen, Yung-Yu; John Yu, S.-T.

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports a new set of model equations for Computational Hydro Acoustics (CHA). The governing equations include the continuity and the momentum equations. The definition of bulk modulus is used to relate density with pressure. For 3D flow fields, there are four equations with density and velocity components as the unknowns. The inviscid equations are proved to be hyperbolic because an arbitrary linear combination of the three Jacobian matrices is diagonalizable and has a real spectrum. The left and right eigenvector matrices are explicitly derived. Moreover, an analytical form of the Riemann invariants are derived. The model equations are indeed suitable for modeling wave propagation in low-speed, nearly incompressible air and water flows. To demonstrate the capability of the new formulation, we use the CESE method to solve the 2D equations for aeolian tones generated by air flows passing a circular cylinder at Re = 89,000, 46,000, and 22,000. Numerical results compare well with previously published data. By simply changing the value of the bulk modulus, the same code is then used to calculate three cases of water flows passing a cylinder at Re = 89,000, 67,000, and 44,000.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of low velocity impact damage in graphite/epoxy laminates during tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) system was set up in a linear location data acquisition mode to monitor the tensile loading of eight-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy specimens containing low velocity impact damage. The impact damage was induced using an instrumented drop weight tower. During impact, specimens were supported by either an aluminum plate or a membrane configuration. Cross-sectional examinations revealed that the aluminum plate configuration resulted in primarily matrix cracking and back surface fiber failure. The membrane support resulted in only matrix cracking and delamination damage. Penetrant enhanced radiography and immersion ultrasonics were used in order to assess the amount of impact damage in each tensile specimen. During tensile loading, AE reliably detected and located the damage sites which included fiber failure. All specimens with areas of fiber breakage ultimately failed at the impact site. AE did not reliably locate damage which consisted of only delaminations and matrix cracking. Specimens with this type of damage did not ultimately fail at the impact site. In summary, AE demonstrated the ability to increase the reliability of structural proof tests; however, the successful use of this technique requires extensive baseline testing.

  4. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R.; Miller, James G.

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (cg) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (α') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (cp) and attenuation coefficient (α) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for cg and α' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  5. Effects of Variations of Parallel Angular Velocity and Vorticity on the Oscillations of Compressible Homogeneous Rotating Ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, T. T.; Pung, S. Y.

    1995-07-01

    Earlier work on the oscillations of an ellipsoid is extended to investigate the behaviour of a nonequilibrium compressible homogeneous rotating gaseous ellipsoid, with the components of the velocity field as linear functions of the coordinates, and with parallel angular velocity and uniform vorticity. The dynamical behaviour of the ellipsoid is obtained by numerically integrating the relevant differential equations for different values of the initial angular velocity and vorticity. This behaviour is displayed by the (a 1,a 2) and (a 1,a 3) phase plots, where thea i's (i = 1, 2, 3) are the semi-diameters, and by the graphs ofa 1,a 2,a 3, the volume, and the angular velocity as functions of time. The dynamical behaviour of the nonequilibrium ellipsoid depends on the deviation of the angular momentum from its equilibrium value; for larger deviations, the oscillations are more nonperiodic with larger amplitudes. An initially ellipsoidal configuration always remains ellipsoidal, but it cannot become spheroidal about its rotation axis, though it may become spheroidal instantaneously about either one of the other two principal axes. For an ellipsoid approaching axisymmetry about its axis of rotation, the angular velocity can suddenly increase by a large amount. Thus if an astrophysical object can be modelled by a nonequilibrium ellipsoid, it may occasionally undergo sudden large increases of angular velocity.

  6. Elastic wave velocity and acoustic emission monitoring during Gypsum dehydration under triaxial stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; David, E. C.; Héripré, E.; Schubnel, A. J.; Zimmerman, R. W.; Gueguen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Dehydration experiments were performed on natural Gypsum polycrystal samples coming from Volterra, Italy in order to study contemporaneously the evolution of P and S elastic wave velocities and acoustic emission (AE) triggering. During these experiments, temperature was slowly raised at 0.15 degrees C per minute under constant stress conditions. Two experiments were realized under quasi-hydrostatic stress (15 and 55 MPa respectively). The third experiment was realized under constant triaxial stress (σ3=45MPa, σ1=75MPa). All three were drained (10MPa constant pore pressure). In each experiments, both P and S wave velocities reduced drastically (as much as approx. 50% in the low confining pressure case) at the onset of dehydration. Importantly, the Vp/Vs ratio also decreased. Shortly after the onset of decrease in P and S wave velocities, the dehydration reaction was also accompanied by bursts of AEs. Time serie locations of the AEs show that they initiated from the pore pressure port, ie from where the pore fluid could easily be drained, and then slowly migrated within the sample. In each experiments, the AE rate could be positively correlated to the reaction rate, inferred from pore volumetry. In such a way, the AE rate reached a peak when the reaction was the fastest. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed they had a large volumetric component in compaction, confirming that AEs were indeed related to pore closure and/or collapse. In addition, the AE rate also increased with confinement, ie when a larger amount of compaction was observed. Interestingly, when under differential stress conditions, AE focal mechanisms were mainly in shear. Additional dehydration experiments performed within an environmental scanning electron microscope under low vacuum highlight that, in drained conditions at least, the reaction seems to take place in two phases. First, cracks are being opened along cleavage planes within a single gypsum crystal, which allows for the

  7. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  8. Measurement of surface acoustic wave velocity using phase shift mask and application on thin film of thermoelectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyao; Zhao, Peng; Gunning, Noel; Johnson, David; Zhao, Ji-Cheng; Cahill, David

    2014-03-01

    We describe a convenient approach for measuring the velocity vSAW of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) of the near-surface layer of a material through optical pump-probe measurements and apply this method, in combination with conventional picosecond acoustics, to determine a subset of the elastic constants of thin films of semiconducting misfit layered compounds. SAWs with a wavelength of 700 nm are generated and detected using an elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phase-shift mask which is fabricated using a commercially-available Si grating as a mold. The velocity of SAWs of [(SnSe)1.04]m[MoSe2]n synthesized by elemental reactants show subtle variations in their elastic constants as a function of m and n. Precise measurements of elastic constants will enable a better understanding of interfacial stiffness in nanoscale multilayers and the effects of phonon focusing on thermal conductivity.

  9. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program has been developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions show significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. In addition, as shown in the paper, the velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provides a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  10. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  11. An acoustic velocity measurement system for aiding barge traffic in the Colorado River locks near Matagorda, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, J.W.; Scheffler, C.

    2004-01-01

    In July 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey installed an acoustic Doppler velocity meter in the Colorado River, near the city of Matagorda in southeast Texas. The meter is part of an integrated system used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to control barge traffic that passes through a lock system located at the confluence of the Colorado River and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. The meter was installed on the river bottom as part of a system developed and used by the National Weather Service. The upward-looking meter measures the average velocity in the top 3 meters (10 feet) of the water column. These river-velocity data are used in conjunction with additional velocity and water-stage data, from proximal sites, by the barge operators to assess conditions at the Colorado River crossing and for lock operations. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  12. Relative contributions of sand and gravel bedload transport to acoustic Doppler bedload- velocity magnitudes in the Trinity River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeuman, D.; Pittman, S.

    2007-12-01

    Apparent bedload velocities measured using the bottom-track feature of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have received attention over the past few years as potential surrogate technique for estimating bedload transport rates and for investigating bedload dynamics. This poster reports findings from perhaps the first use of ADCP bedload velocity measurements in an applied sediment monitoring program. Sediment transport data reported here were collected under the auspices of the Trinity River Restoration Program as part of an intensive sediment monitoring effort to assess the effects of the 2006 flow release in the Trinity River of Northern California. A 1200-kHz ADCP was deployed for a subset of bedload samples collected during the release to evaluate whether acoustic bedload velocities can be used to aid interpolation between less-frequent physical samples. Paired conventional bedload samples and acoustic bedload velocity samples supplemented by underwater video showed that the instrument used in this study is sensitive primarily to the motion of sand-sized particles at the bed, but comparatively insensitive to the motion of gravel- and cobble-sized particles. High bed velocities were measured at times and in locations where sand transport rates at the bed were high, as determined by both physical samples and video. Low bed velocities were measured where both the video and bedload samples indicated that little or no bedload was being transported, irrespective of the persistence of fast-moving sand particles in the near-bed water column. To the extent that suspended or saltating particles influence the bottom- track signal, they are near enough to the bed to be captured in the physical sampler. Thus, contamination of the bottom-track signal by suspended particles (commonly referred to as water bias) is not a significant problem with this instrument in streams with low to moderate suspended sediment concentrations. These results demonstrate that acoustic

  13. Estimation of Shear Wave Velocity in Seafloor Sediment by Seismo-Acoustic Interface Waves:. a Case Study for Geotechnical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hefeng; Hovem, Jens M.; Frivik, Svein Arne

    2006-10-01

    Estimates of shear wave velocity profiles in seafloor sediments can be obtained from inversion of measured dispersion relations of seismo-acoustic interface waves propagating along the seabed. The interface wave velocity is directly related to shear wave velocity with value of between 87-96% of the shear wave velocity, dependent on the Poission ratio of the sediments. In this paper we present two different techniques to determine the dispersion relation: a single-sensor method used to determine group velocity and a multi-sensor method used to determine the phase velocity of the interface wave. An inversion technique is used to determine shear wave velocity versus depth and it is based on singular value decomposition and regularization theory. The technique is applied to data acquired at Steinbåen outside Horten in the Oslofjorden (Norway) and compared with the result from independent core measurements taken at the same location. The results show good agreement between the two ways of determining shear wave velocity.

  14. Evidence for an environment-dependent shift in the baryon acoustic oscillation peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukema, Boudewijn F.; Buchert, Thomas; Ostrowski, Jan J.; France, Martin J.

    2015-04-01

    The Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric assumes comoving spatial rigidity of metrical properties. The curvature term in comoving coordinates is environment independent and cannot evolve. In the standard model, structure formation is interpreted accordingly: structures average out on the chosen metrical background, which remains rigid in comoving coordinates despite nonlinear structure growth. The latter claim needs to be tested, since it is a hypothesis that is not derived using general relativity. We introduce a test of the comoving rigidity assumption by measuring the two-point autocorrelation function on comoving scales - assuming FLRW comoving spatial rigidity - in order to detect shifts in the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak location for luminous red galaxy (LRG) pairs of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. In tangential directions, subsets of pairs overlapping with superclusters or voids show the BAO peak. The tangential BAO peak location for overlap with Nadathur & Hotchkiss superclusters is 4.3 ± 1.6 h-1 Mpc less than that for LRG pairs unselected for supercluster overlap, and 6.6 ± 2.8 h-1 Mpc less than that of the complementary pairs. Liivamägi et al. superclusters give corresponding differences of 3.7 ± 2.9 h-1 Mpc and 6.3 ± 2.6 h-1 Mpc, respectively. We have found moderately significant evidence (Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests suggest very significant evidence) that the BAO peak location for supercluster-overlapping pairs is compressed by about 6 per cent compared to that of the complementary sample, providing a potential challenge to FLRW models and a benchmark for predictions from models based on an averaging approach that leaves the spatial metric a priori unspecified.

  15. The Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters and Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z <= 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/R 0)-γ on the scales of 10 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 50 h -1 Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R 0 = 18.84 ± 0.27 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 15 and a smaller length of R 0 = 16.15 ± 0.13 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 5. The power-law index of γ = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r ~ 110 h -1 Mpc with a significance of ~1.9σ. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 200 h -1 Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are Dv (zm = 0.276) = 1077 ± 55(1σ) Mpc and h = 0.73 ± 0.039(1σ), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density Ω m h 2 = 0.093 ± 0.0077(1σ), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3σ. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  16. THE CORRELATION FUNCTION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AND DETECTION OF BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-10

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z {<=} 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model {xi}(r) = (r/R{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}} on the scales of 10 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R{sub 0} = 18.84 {+-} 0.27 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 15 and a smaller length of R{sub 0} = 16.15 {+-} 0.13 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 5. The power-law index of {gamma} = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r {approx} 110 h{sup -1} Mpc with a significance of {approx}1.9{sigma}. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 200 h{sup -1} Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are D{sub v} (z{sub m} = 0.276) = 1077 {+-} 55(1{sigma}) Mpc and h = 0.73 {+-} 0.039(1{sigma}), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density {Omega}{sub m} h{sup 2} = 0.093 {+-} 0.0077(1{sigma}), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3{sigma}. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  17. Effect of Model-dependent Covariance Matrix for Studying Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale structures in the universe are a powerful tool to test cosmological models and constrain cosmological parameters. A particular feature of interest comes from baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), which are sound waves traveling in the hot plasma of the early universe that stopped at the recombination time. This feature can be observed as a localized bump in the correlation function at the scale of the sound horizon rs . As such, it provides a standard ruler and a lot of constraining power in the correlation function analysis of galaxy surveys. Moreover, the detection of BAOs at the expected scale gives strong support to cosmological models. Both of these studies (BAO detection and parameter constraints) rely on a statistical modeling of the measured correlation function \\hat{\\xi }. Usually \\hat{\\xi } is assumed to be Gaussian, with a mean ξθ depending on the cosmological model and a covariance matrix C generally approximated as a constant (i.e., independent of the model). In this article, we study whether a realistic model-dependent C θ changes the results of cosmological parameter constraints compared to the approximation of a constant covariance matrix C. For this purpose, we use a new procedure to generate lognormal realizations of the luminous red galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to obtain a model-dependent C θ in a reasonable time. The approximation of C θ as a constant creates small changes in the cosmological parameter constraints on our sample. We quantify this modeling error using a lot of simulations and find that it only has a marginal influence on cosmological parameter constraints for current and next-generation galaxy surveys. It can be approximately taken into account by extending the 1σ intervals by a factor ≈1.3.

  18. EFFECT OF MODEL-DEPENDENT COVARIANCE MATRIX FOR STUDYING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale structures in the universe are a powerful tool to test cosmological models and constrain cosmological parameters. A particular feature of interest comes from baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), which are sound waves traveling in the hot plasma of the early universe that stopped at the recombination time. This feature can be observed as a localized bump in the correlation function at the scale of the sound horizon r{sub s} . As such, it provides a standard ruler and a lot of constraining power in the correlation function analysis of galaxy surveys. Moreover, the detection of BAOs at the expected scale gives strong support to cosmological models. Both of these studies (BAO detection and parameter constraints) rely on a statistical modeling of the measured correlation function {xi}-circumflex. Usually {xi}-circumflex is assumed to be Gaussian, with a mean {xi}{sub {theta}} depending on the cosmological model and a covariance matrix C generally approximated as a constant (i.e., independent of the model). In this article, we study whether a realistic model-dependent C {sub {theta}} changes the results of cosmological parameter constraints compared to the approximation of a constant covariance matrix C. For this purpose, we use a new procedure to generate lognormal realizations of the luminous red galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to obtain a model-dependent C {sub {theta}} in a reasonable time. The approximation of C {sub {theta}} as a constant creates small changes in the cosmological parameter constraints on our sample. We quantify this modeling error using a lot of simulations and find that it only has a marginal influence on cosmological parameter constraints for current and next-generation galaxy surveys. It can be approximately taken into account by extending the 1{sigma} intervals by a factor Almost-Equal-To 1.3.

  19. Model-independent Evidence for Dark Energy Evolution from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s-1 Mpc-1 at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh 2 from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh 2 ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω0m h 2 for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω0m h 2 = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  20. MODEL-INDEPENDENT EVIDENCE FOR DARK ENERGY EVOLUTION FROM BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A. E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh {sup 2} from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh {sup 2} ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  1. Distinguishing interacting dark energy from wCDM with CMB, lensing, and baryon acoustic oscillation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väliviita, Jussi; Palmgren, Elina

    2015-07-01

    We employ the Planck 2013 CMB temperature anisotropy and lensing data, and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data to constrain a phenomenological wCDM model, where dark matter and dark energy interact. We assume time-dependent equation of state parameter for dark energy, and treat dark matter and dark energy as fluids whose energy-exchange rate is proportional to the dark-matter density. The CMB data alone leave a strong degeneracy between the interaction rate and the physical CDM density parameter today, ωc, allowing a large interaction rate |Γ| ~ H0. However, as has been known for a while, the BAO data break this degeneracy. Moreover, we exploit the CMB lensing potential likelihood, which probes the matter perturbations at redshift z ~ 2 and is very sensitive to the growth of structure, and hence one of the tools for discerning between the ΛCDM model and its alternatives. However, we find that in the non-phantom models (wde>-1), the constraints remain unchanged by the inclusion of the lensing data and consistent with zero interaction, -0.14 < Γ/H0 < 0.02 at 95% CL. On the contrary, in the phantom models (wde<-1), energy transfer from dark energy to dark matter is moderately favoured over the non-interacting model; 0-0.57 < Γ/H0 < -0.1 at 95% CL with CMB+BAO, while addition of the lensing data shifts this to -0.46 < Γ/H0 < -0.01.

  2. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes III: nonaxisymmetric propagation and circumferential modes in lossless conditions.

    PubMed

    Baik, Kyungmin; Jiang, Jian; Leighton, Timothy G

    2013-03-01

    Equations for the nonaxisymmetric modes that are axially and circumferentially propagating in a liquid-filled tube with elastic walls surrounded by air/vacuum are presented using exact elasticity theory. Dispersion curves for the axially propagating modes are obtained and verified through comparison with measurements. The resulting theory is applied to the circumferential modes, and the pressures and the stresses in the liquid-filled pipe are calculated under external forced oscillation by an acoustic source. This provides the theoretical foundation for the narrow band acoustic bubble detector that was subsequently deployed at the Target Test Facility (TTF) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), TN. PMID:23463995

  3. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Survey of Flow Velocities in Detroit River, a Connecting Channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to survey flow velocities in Detroit River from July 8-19, 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. More than 3.5 million point velocities were measured at 130 cross sections. Cross sections were generally spaced about 1,800 ft apart along the river from the head of Detroit River at the outlet of Lake St. Clair to the mouth of Detroit River on Lake Erie. Two transects were surveyed at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were generally obtained 0.8-2.2 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved though the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  4. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in St. Clair River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure flow velocities in St. Clair River during a survey in May and June of 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. The survey provides 2.7 million point velocity measurements at 104 cross sections. Sections are spaced about 1,630 ft apart along the river from Port Huron to Algonac, Michigan, a distance of 28.6 miles. Two transects were obtained at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were obtained 2-4 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved through the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  5. Electrodynamic soil plate oscillator: Modeling nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior and hysteresis in nonlinear acoustic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, M. S.; Duong, D. V.; Kalsbeck, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    An apparatus (SPO), designed to study flexural vibrations of a soil loaded plate, consists of a thin circular elastic clamped plate (and cylindrical wall) supporting a vertical soil column. A small magnet attached to the center of the plate is driven by a rigid AC coil (located coaxially below the plate) to complete the electrodynamic soil plate oscillator SPO design. The frequency dependent mechanical impedance Zmech (force / particle velocity, at the plate's center) is inversely proportional to the electrical motional impedance Zmot. Measurements of Zmot are made using the complex output to input response of a Wheatstone bridge that has an identical coil element in one of its legs. Near resonance, measurements of Zmot (with no soil) before and after a slight point mass loading at the center help determine effective mass, spring, damping and coupling constant parameters of the system. "Tuning curve" behavior of real{ Zmot } and imaginary{ Zmot } at successively higher vibration amplitudes of dry sifted masonry sand are measured. They exhibit a decrease "softening" in resonance frequency along with a decrease in the quality Q factor. In soil surface vibration measurements a bilinear hysteresis model predicts the tuning curve shape for this nonlinear mesoscopic elastic SPO behavior - which also models the soil vibration over an actual plastic "inert" VS 1.6 buried landmine. Experiments are performed where a buried 1m cube concrete block supports a 12 inch deep by 30 inch by 30 inch concrete soil box for burying a VS 1.6 in dry sifted masonry sand for on-the-mine and off-the-mine soil vibration experiments. The backbone curve (a plot of the peak amplitude vs. corresponding resonant frequency from a family of tuning curves) exhibits mostly linear behavior for "on target" soil surface vibration measurements of the buried VS 1.6 or drum-like mine simulants for relatively low particle velocities of the soil. Backbone curves for "on target" measurements exhibit

  6. Particle Mesh Simulations of the Lyα Forest and the Signature of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Martin; Pope, Adrian; Carlson, Jordan; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Fasel, Patricia; Daniel, David; Lukic, Zarija

    2010-04-01

    We present a set of ultra-large particle-mesh simulations of the Lyα forest targeted at understanding the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations in the inter-galactic medium. We use nine dark matter only simulations which can, for the first time, simultaneously resolve the Jeans scale of the intergalactic gas while covering the large volumes required to adequately sample the acoustic feature. Mock absorption spectra are generated using the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation which have approximately correct flux probability density functions and small-scale power spectra. On larger scales, there is clear evidence in the redshift-space correlation function for an acoustic feature, which matches a linear theory template with constant bias. These spectra, which we make publicly available, can be used to test pipelines, plan future experiments, and model various physical effects. As an illustration, we discuss the basic properties of the acoustic signal in the forest, the scaling of errors with noise and source number density, modified statistics to treat mean flux evolution and mis-estimation, and non-gravitational sources such as fluctuations in the photoionizing background and temperature fluctuations due to He II reionization.

  7. Finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations for acoustic group velocity and attenuation derivative applied to encapsulated microbubble suspensions.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Joel

    2007-04-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the conflict between the inherently bandlimited data and the requirement of KK integrals for a complete infinite spectrum of input information. For data exhibiting localized extrema, KK relations can provide accurate transforms over finite bandwidths due to the local-weighting properties of the KK kernel. Recently, acoustic KK relations have been derived for the determination of the group velocity (cg) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (alpha') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number). These relations are applicable to bandlimited data exhibiting resonant features without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. In contrast to twice-subtracted finite-bandwidth KK predictions for phase velocity and attenuation coefficient (components of the undifferentiated wave number), these more recently derived relations for cg and alpha' provide stricter tests of causal consistency because the resulting shapes are invariant with respect to subtraction constants. The integrals in these relations can be formulated so that they only require the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient data without differentiation. Using experimental data from suspensions of encapsulated microbubbles, the finite-bandwidth KK predictions for cg and alpha' are found to provide an accurate mapping of the primary wave number quantities onto their derivatives. PMID:17471707

  8. Applicability of acoustic Doppler devices for flow velocity measurements and discharge estimation in flows with sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Guillaume; Gallart, Francesc; Gratiot, Nicolas; Soler, Montserrat; Reid, Ian; Vachtman, Dina; Latron, Jérôme; Martín-Vide, Juan Pedro; Laronne, Jonathan B.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic Doppler devices (Unidata Starflow) have been deployed for velocity measurements and discharge estimates in five contrasted open-channel flow environments, with particular attention given to the influence of sediment transport on instrument performance. The analysis is based on both field observations and flume experiments. These confirm the ability of the Starflow to provide reliable discharge time-series, but point out its limitations when sediment is being transported. (i) After calibration of the instrument by the Index Velocity Method, the deviation from reference discharge measurements was < 20% at the 95% confidence level. (ii) In ungauged conditions at high flows, the Starflow was particularly useful in providing velocity data for approximating measurements of discharge. (iii) However, channel and flume experiments revealed the effects of mobilised sediment on velocity estimates: coarse particles (⩾ 150 μm) transported by way of saltation or as bedload caused a significant underestimation of velocity by as much as 50%; a slight underestimation (10-15%) was also observed when significant quantities of fine particles (⩽150 μm) were transported in suspension; this underestimation was shown to reach 20-30% when suspended sediment concentrations were very high (c. 50-100 g L-1).

  9. An acoustic levitation technique for the study of nonlinear oscillations of gas bubbles in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. A.; Crum, L. A.

    1983-08-01

    A technique of acoustic levitation was developed for the study of individual gas bubbles in a liquid. Isopropyl alcohol and a mixture of glycerine and water (33-1/3% glycerine by volume) were the two liquids used in this research. Bubbles were levitated near the acoustic pressure antinode of an acoustic wave in the range of 20-22 kHz. Measurements were made of the levitation number as a function of the normalized radius of the bubbles. The levitation number is the ratio of the hydrostatic pressure gradient to the acoustic pressure gradient. These values were then compared to a nonlinear theory. Results were very much in agreement except for the region near the n=2 harmonic. An explanation for the discrepancy between theory and experiment appears to lie in the polytropic exponent associated with the gas in the interior of the bubble.

  10. Ion acoustic wave velocity measurement of the concentration of two ion species in a multi-dipole plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hala, A. M.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2001-05-01

    The concentration of two species in a multi-dipole plasma was determined by measuring the ion acoustic wave group velocity and the electron temperature. The wave was launched from a grid immersed in the plasma and was detected by a Langmuir probe. Electron temperature was found separately from an I--V characteristic trace. The measurements were performed in helium/xenon and argon/xenon plasmas. Typical parameters of the plasma were T{sub e}{approx}0.5--3eV, density 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3}, plasma potential of 3--5 V, and pressure range from 1 to 20 mTorr. The accuracy of the measurement was from 2% to 4% depending on the mass difference between the two species and how accurately the group velocity and electron temperature are measured.

  11. Feasibility of using an acoustic velocity meter to measure flow in the Chipps Island channel, Suisun Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffard, Stuart H.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted in 1978 to determine the feasibility of using an acoustic velocity meter to measure the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta outflow in the Chipps Island Channel, Suisun Bay, Calif. Three parts of transducers with frequencies of 100, 40, and 24 kilohertz were installed on a cross-channel test path and operated at three elevations, 15.5, 8.0, and 4.0 feet below mean lower low water, to test signal transmission at varying depths. Transmission was most reliable at the lowest depth, and the 24-kilohertz transducers at the 7-millivolt threshold of signal strength met the study 's criterion of no persistent signal loss of more than one hour 's duration in any phase of the tidal cycle. Signal strength was statistically correlated with the environmental factors of wind velocity, wind direction, solar insolation, electrical conductivity, water temperature, water velocity, stage, rate of change in stage, and the acceleration of the rate of change in stage. All correlations were weak. Signal strength is apparently a function of the interaction of several environmental factors. A 32-day test to observe if aquatic growth on the transducers would affect signal transmission showed no reduction in signal strength. Suspended-sediment samples indicated that both the size and concentration of particles are greater than presumed in earlier studies. According to the results of this study, chances are good for reliable transmission of acoustic velocity meter signals. Usually some signals were much stronger than the average 20-second signal strength at 15-minute intervals used for correlation and the frequency analysis. Superior equipment is now being developed specifically for the Chipps Island site to transmit signals several times stronger than the signals analyzed in these tests. (USGS)

  12. Modelling baryon acoustic oscillations with perturbation theory and stochastic halo biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Yepes, Gustavo; Prada, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    In this work we investigate the generation of mock halo catalogues based on perturbation theory and non-linear stochastic biasing with the novel PATCHY code. In particular, we use Augmented Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (ALPT) to generate a dark matter density field on a mesh starting from Gaussian fluctuations and to compute the peculiar velocity field. ALPT is based on a combination of second order LPT (2LPT) on large scales and the spherical collapse model on smaller scales. We account for the systematic deviation of perturbative approaches from N-body simulations together with halo biasing adopting an exponential bias model. We then account for stochastic biasing by defining three regimes: a low-, an intermediate- and a high-density regime, using a Poisson distribution in the intermediate regime and the negative binomial distribution - including an additional parameter - to model over-dispersion in the high-density regime. Since we focus in this study on massive haloes, we suppress the generation of haloes in the low-density regime. The various non-linear and stochastic biasing parameters, and density thresholds, are calibrated with the large BigMultiDark N-body simulation to match the power spectrum of the corresponding halo population. Our model effectively includes only five parameters, as they are additionally constrained by the halo number density. Our mock catalogues show power spectra, in both real- and redshift-space, which are compatible with N-body simulations within about 2 per cent up to k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1 at z = 0.577 for a sample of haloes with the typical Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS (constant stellar mass galaxy sample) galaxy number density. The corresponding correlation functions are compatible down to a few Mpc. We also find that neglecting over-dispersion in high-density regions produces power spectra with deviations of 10 per cent at k ˜ 0.4 h Mpc-1. These results indicate the need to account for an accurate

  13. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  14. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants. PMID:27392205

  15. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  16. Comment on "Acoustical observation of bubble oscillations induced by bubble popping"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, É.; Ollivier, F.; Antkowiak, A.; Wunenburger, R.

    2015-03-01

    We have reproduced the experiment of acoustic monitoring of spontaneous popping of single soap bubbles standing in air reported by Ding et al. [2aa Phys. Rev. E 75, 041601 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.041601]. By using a single microphone and two different signal acquisition systems recording in parallel the signal at the microphone output, among them the system used by Ding et al., we have experimentally evidenced that the acoustic precursors of bubble popping events detected by Ding et al. actually result from an acausal artifact of the signal processing performed by their acquisition system which lies outside of its prescribed working frequency range. No acoustic precursor of popping could be evidenced with the microphone used in these experiments, whose sensitivity is 1 V Pa-1 and frequency range is 500 Hz-100 kHz.

  17. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  18. VELOCITY OSCILLATIONS AND PLUME DISPERSION IN A RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD DURING WINTERTIME NIGHTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of velocity and tracer plume concentrations during stable atmospheric conditions were obtained in the Boise River Valley as part of the EPA Integrated Air Cancer Project during December, 1986. ind speed, temperature, and wind direction were measured at two levels on ...

  19. Blowoff characteristics of bluff-body stabilized conical premixed flames with upstream spatial mixture gradients and velocity oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2008-06-15

    This experimental study concerns determination of blowoff equivalence ratios for lean premixed conical flames for different mixture approach velocities ranging from 5 to 16 m/s in the presence of spatial mixture gradients and upstream velocity modulation. Conical flames were anchored on a disk-shaped bluff body that was attached to a central rod in the burner nozzle. A combustible propane-air mixture flowed through a converging axisymmetric nozzle with a concentric insert, allowing radial mixture variation by tailoring the composition in the inner and outer parts of the nozzle. The radial mixture profiles were characterized near the location of the flame holder by laser Rayleigh light scattering. Additionally, a loudspeaker at the nozzle base allowed introduction of periodic velocity oscillations with an amplitude of 9% of the mean flow velocity up to a frequency of 350 Hz. The flame blowoff equivalence ratio was experimentally determined by continuously lowering the fuel flow rates and determining the flame detachment point from the flame holder. Flame detachment was detected by a rapid reduction of CH* emission from the flame base imaged by a photomultiplier detector. It was found that the flame blowoff is preceded by progressive narrowing of the flame cone for the case of higher inner jet equivalence ratios. In this case, the fuel-lean outer flow cannot sustain combustion, and clearly this is not a good way of operating a combustor. Nevertheless, the overall blowoff equivalence ratio is reduced by inner stream fuel enrichment. A possible explanation for this behavior is given based on the radial extent of the variable-equivalence-ratio mixture burning near the flame stabilization region. Fuel enrichment in the outer flow was found to have no effect on blowoff as compared to the case of uniform mixture. The results were similar for the whole range of mean flow velocities and upstream excitation frequencies. (author)

  20. Supernova, baryon acoustic oscillations, and CMB surface distance constraints on f(G) higher order gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Moldenhauer, Jacob; Ishak, Mustapha; Thompson, John; Easson, Damien A.

    2010-03-15

    We consider recently proposed higher-order gravity models where the action is built from the Einstein-Hilbert action plus a function f(G) of the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. The models were previously shown to pass physical acceptability conditions as well as solar system tests. In this paper, we compare the models to combined data sets of supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and constraints from the CMB surface of last scattering. We find that the models provide fits to the data that are close to those of the lambda cold dark matter concordance model. The results provide a pool of higher-order gravity models that pass these tests and need to be compared to constraints from large scale structure and full CMB analysis.

  1. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  2. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041-like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code "CST Particle Studio" has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ˜108 kW with ˜15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041-like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  3. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q→0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,ω) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q -dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  4. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q, omega) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q-->0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q, omega) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra. PMID:16906814

  5. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora

    2006-06-15

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q{yields}0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,{omega}) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  6. Real-time GPU implementation of transverse oscillation vector velocity flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Kjær, Carsten Straso; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-03-01

    Rapid estimation of blood velocity and visualization of complex flow patterns are important for clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound. This paper presents real-time processing for two-dimensional (2-D) vector flow imaging which utilizes an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit (GPU). In this work, Open Computing Language (OpenCL) is used to estimate 2-D vector velocity flow in vivo in the carotid artery. Data are streamed live from a BK Medical 2202 Pro Focus UltraView Scanner to a workstation running a research interface software platform. Processing data from a 50 millisecond frame of a duplex vector flow acquisition takes 2.3 milliseconds seconds on an Advanced Micro Devices Radeon HD 7850 GPU card. The detected velocities are accurate to within the precision limit of the output format of the display routine. Because this tool was developed as a module external to the scanner's built-in processing, it enables new opportunities for prototyping novel algorithms, optimizing processing parameters, and accelerating the path from development lab to clinic.

  7. Suppression of nonlinear oscillations in combustors with partial length acoustic liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espander, W. R.; Mitchell, C. E.; Baer, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical model is formulated for a three-dimensional nonlinear stability problem in a rocket motor combustion chamber. The chamber is modeled as a right circular cylinder with a short (multi-orifice) nozzle, and an acoustic linear covering an arbitrary portion of the cylindrical periphery. The combustion is concentrated at the injector and the gas flow field is characterized by a mean Mach number. The unsteady combustion processes are formulated using the Crocco time lag model. The resulting equations are solved using a Green's function method combined with numerical evaluation techniques. The influence of acoustic liners on the nonlinear waveforms is predicted. Nonlinear stability limits and regions where triggering is possible are also predicted for both lined and unlined combustors in terms of the combustion parameters.

  8. Nonlinear Resonant Oscillations of Gas in Optimized Acoustical Resonators and the Effect of Central Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimizing resonator shapes for maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of the resonator is investigated numerically. It is well known that the resonant frequencies and the nonlinear standing waveform in an acoustical resonator strongly depend on the resonator geometry. A quasi-Newton type scheme was used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes achieving the maximum pressure compression ratio with an acceleration of constant amplitude. The acoustical field was solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects were obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation method. Results are presented for optimizing three types of geometry: a cone, a horn-cone and a half cosine-shape. For each type, different optimized shapes were found when starting with different initial guesses. Further, the one-dimensional model was modified to study the effect of an axisymmetric central blockage on the nonlinear standing wave.

  9. Nonlinear Resonant Oscillations of Gas in Optimized Acoustical Resonators and the Effect of Central Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimizing resonator shapes for maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of the resonator is investigated numerically. It is well known that the resonant frequencies and the nonlinear standing waveform in an acoustical resonator strongly depend on the resonator geometry. A quasi-Newton type scheme was used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes achieving the maximum pressure compression ratio with an acceleration of constant amplitude. The acoustical field was solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects were obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation method. Results are presented for optimizing three types of geometry: a cone, a horn-cone and a half cosine- shape. For each type, different optimized shapes were found when starting with different initial guesses. Further, the one-dimensional model was modified to study the effect of an axisymmetric central blockage on the nonlinear standing wave.

  10. Experimental Study on Effects of Frequency and Mean Pressure on Heat Pumping by Acoustic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Akira; Ozawa, Mamoru; Kataoka, Masaki; Takifuji, Tomonari

    Experimental studies were conducted for the fundamental understanding of the thermoacoustic behavior in the simulated resonance-tube refrigerator with special reference to the effect of imposed frequency and mean pressure. The resonance frequency in the case of helium was lower by about 20% than the theoretical prediction, while the experimental value in the case of air was almost the same as the theoretical one. The temperature difference observed along the stack increased with the increase in the amplitude of acoustic pressure, and decreased with the increase in the mean pressure, Based on the simplified model of heat pumping process, the relationship between the temperature variation and the acoustic pressure field was formulated, and thus the characteristic parameter which represents overall heat transfer between gas and stack plates or heat exchangers was obtained.

  11. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  12. Comparison of P- and S-waves velocities estimated from Biot-Gassmann and Kuster-Toksöz models with results obtained from acoustic wavetrains interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BałA, Maria; Cichy, Adam

    2007-06-01

    Kuster-Toksöz and Biot-Gassmann models for estimating velocities of longitudinal and shear waves on the basis of well-logging data were analysed. P-wave and S-wave velocity models are crucial for interpretation of seismic data. Discussed models enable determination with quite good accuracy, in some cases higher than the acoustic full wavetrains interpretation. Because velocity strongly depends on lithology and saturation of pore space, the selection of parameters of rock matrix, hydrocarbons and formation waters has a strong effect on the quality of velocities estimation.

  13. The source of solar oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, R.

    1999-05-01

    In this study the role of line asymmetry and phase difference between velocity and intensity helioseismic spectra for understanding the excitation of solar oscillations is discussed. The solar intensity and velocity oscillations are usually observed from variations in an absorption line. These variations consist of two parts: solar oscillation modes and granulation noise. Because the oscillation modes are excited by granulation, we argue that the granulation signal (noise) is partially correlated with the oscillations. The data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have clearly revealed a reversal of asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra. We have shown that the cause of reversal in asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra is due to the presence of the correlated noise in the intensity data. This noise is also responsible for the high-frequency shift in the two spectra at and above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Our theory also explains the deviation of the observed phase difference between velocity and intensity from that predicted by simple adiabatic theory of solar oscillations. The observed phase, jumps in the vicinity of an eigenfrequency, but theory does not explain such jumps. We studied different types of excitation sources at various depths and found that monopole and quadrupole acoustic sources when placed in the superadiabatic layer (at a depth of 75 km below the photosphere) match the observations. For these source types, the sign of the correlation is negative corresponding to photospheric darkening. Finally, an asymmetric fitting formula is used to determine the eigenfrequencies of solar oscillations by fitting both the velocity and intensity power spectra.

  14. The Source of Solar Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, R.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    1998-12-01

    In this study the role of line asymmetry and phase difference between velocity and intensity helioseismic spectra for understanding the excitation of solar oscillations is discussed. The solar intensity and velocity oscillations are usually observed from variations in an absorption line. These variations consist of two parts: solar oscillation modes and granulation noise. Because the oscillation modes are excited by granulation, we argue that the granulation signal (noise) is partially correlated with the oscillations. The data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have clearly revealed a reversal of asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra. We have shown that the cause of reversal in asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra is due to the presence of the correlated noise in the intensity data. This noise is also responsible for the high-frequency shift in the two spectra at and above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Our theory also explains the deviation of the observed phase difference between velocity and intensity from that predicted by simple adiabatic theory of solar oscillations. The observed phase, jumps in the vicinity of an eigenfrequency, but theory does not explain such jumps. We studied different types of excitation sources at various depths and found that monopole and quadrupole acoustic sources when placed in the superadiabatic layer (at a depth of 75 km below the photosphere) match the observations. For these source types, the sign of the correlation is negative corresponding to photospheric darkening. Finally, an asymmetric fitting formula is used to determine the eigenfrequencies of solar oscillations by fitting both the velocity and intensity power spectra.

  15. Simulated flight acoustic investigation of treated ejector effectiveness on advanced mechanical suppresors for high velocity jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brausch, J. F.; Motsinger, R. E.; Hoerst, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Ten scale-model nozzles were tested in an anechoic free-jet facility to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of a mechanically suppressed inverted-velocity-profile coannular nozzle with an accoustically treated ejector system. The nozzle system used was developed from aerodynamic flow lines evolved in a previous contract, defined to incorporate the restraints imposed by the aerodynamic performance requirements of an Advanced Supersonic Technology/Variable Cycle Engine system through all its mission phases. Accoustic data of 188 test points were obtained, 87 under static and 101 under simulated flight conditions. The tests investigated variables of hardwall ejector application to a coannular nozzle with 20-chute outer annular suppressor, ejector axial positioning, treatment application to ejector and plug surfaces, and treatment design. Laser velocimeter, shadowgraph photograph, aerodynamic static pressure, and temperature measurement were acquired on select models to yield diagnositc information regarding the flow field and aerodynamic performance characteristics of the nozzles.

  16. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report. [nozzle transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; and (3) to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer function versus nondimensional frequency.

  17. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  18. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys. PMID:27176512

  19. Velocity dependence of biphasic flow structuration: steady-state and oscillating flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tore Tallakstad, Ken; Jankov, Mihailo; Løvoll, Grunde; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Mâløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Schäfer, Gerhard; Méheust, Yves; Arendt Knudsen, Henning

    2010-05-01

    We study various types of biphasic flows in quasi-two-dimensional transparent porous models. These flows imply a viscous wetting fluid, and a lowly viscous one. The models are transparent, allowing the displacement process and structure to be monitored in space and time. Three different aspects will be presented: 1. In stationary biphasic flows, we study the relationship between the macroscopic pressure drop (related to relative permeability) and the average flow rate, and how this arises from the cluster size distribution of the lowly viscous fluid [1]. 2. In drainage situations, we study how the geometry of the invader can be explained, and how it gives rise to apparent dynamic capillary effects. We show how these can be explained by viscous effects on evolving geometries of invading fluid [2]. 3. We study the impact of oscillating pressure fields superimposed to a background flow over the flow regimes patterns [3]. Steady-State Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Statistics and Transport Properties. First, in stationary flow with a control of the flux of both fluids, we show how the pressure drop depends on the flow rate. We will show that the dynamics is dominated by the interplay between a viscous pressure field from the wetting fluid and bubble transport of a less viscous, nonwetting phase. In contrast with more studied displacement front systems, steady-state flow is in equilibrium, statistically speaking. The corresponding theoretical simplicity allows us to explain a data collapse in the cluster size distribution of lowly viscous fluid in the system, as well as the relation |?P|∞√Ca--. This allows to explain so called relative permeability effects by the morphological changes of the cluster size distribution. Influence of viscous fingering on dynamic saturation-pressure curves in porous media. Next, we study drainage in such models, and investigate the relationship between the pressure field and the morphology of the invading fluid. This allows to model

  20. Measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations in the Lyman-α forest fluctuations in BOSS data release 9

    SciTech Connect

    Slosar, Anže; Iršič, Vid; Kirkby, David; Blomqvist, Michael; Bailey, Stephen; Carithers, Bill; Busca, Nicolás G.; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel; Dawson, Kyle S.; Bovy, Jo; Croft, Rupert A.C.; Ho, Shirley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; and others

    2013-04-01

    We use the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 9 (DR9) to detect and measure the position of the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the three-dimensional correlation function in the Lyman-α flux fluctuations at a redshift z{sub eff} = 2.4. The feature is clearly detected at significance between 3 and 5 sigma (depending on the broadband model and method of error covariance matrix estimation) and is consistent with predictions of the standard ΛCDM model. We assess the biases in our method, stability of the error covariance matrix and possible systematic effects. We fit the resulting correlation function with several models that decouple the broadband and acoustic scale information. For an isotropic dilation factor, we measure 100 × (α{sub iso} − 1) = −1.6{sup +2.0+4.3+7.4}{sub −2.0−4.1−6.8} (stat.) ±1.0 (syst.) (multiple statistical errors denote 1,2 and 3 sigma confidence limits) with respect to the acoustic scale in the fiducial cosmological model (flat ΛCDM with Ω{sub m} = 0.27, h = 0.7). When fitting separately for the radial and transversal dilation factors we find marginalised constraints 100 × (α{sub ||} − 1) = −1.3{sup +3.5+7.6+12.3}{sub −3.3−6.7−10.2} (stat.) ±2.0 (syst.) and 100 × (α{sub p}erpendicular − 1) = −2.2{sup +7.4+17}{sub −7.1−15} (stat.) ±3.0 (syst.). The dilation factor measurements are significantly correlated with cross-correlation coefficient of ∼ −0.55. Errors become significantly non-Gaussian for deviations over 3 standard deviations from best fit value. Because of the data cuts and analysis method, these measurements give tighter constraints than a previous BAO analysis of the BOSS DR9 Lyman-α sample, providing an important consistency test of the standard cosmological model in a new redshift regime.

  1. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  2. [EFFECTS OF MUSIC-ACOUSTIC SIGNALS, ONLINE CONTROLLED BY EEG OSCILLATORS OF THE SUBJECT].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2015-08-01

    The effects of 2 variants of the method of musical EEG neurofeedback, in which the dominant spectral components of subject's EEG (EEG oscillators) are online converted to music-like signals similar by timbre to flute sounds, have been studied. In the first case, these music-like signals were smoothly varying by the pitch and intensity in accordance with the current amplitude of the EEG oscillator. In the second case, the same variations of flute-like sound were accompanied by such musical element as rhythm. After the single exposure, the modifications of subject's brain activity and positive changes in psycho-physiological state of the subject have been found. Particularly pronounced effects were observed under rhythmically organized music-like stimuli. PMID:26591592

  3. Asymptotic theory of intermediate- and high-degree solar acoustic oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodsky, M.; Vorontsov, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    A second-order asymptotic approximation is developed for adiabatic nonradial p-modes of a spherically symmetric star. The exact solutions of adiabatic oscillations are assumed in the outermost layers, where the asymptotic description becomes invalid, which results in a eigenfrequency equation with model-dependent surface phase shift. For lower degree modes, the phase shift is a function of frequency alone; for high-degree modes, its dependence on the degree is explicitly taken into account.

  4. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  5. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  6. Boundary conditions for simulations of oscillating bubbles using the non-linear acoustic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. R. C.; Ziolkowski, A. M.; Ruffert, M.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a new boundary condition for finite volume simulations of oscillating bubbles. Our method uses an approximation to the motion outside the domain, based on the solution at the domain boundary. We then use this approximation to apply boundary conditions by defining incoming characteristic waves at the domain boundary. Our boundary condition is applicable in regions where the motion is close to spherically symmetric. We have tested our method on a range of one- and two-dimensional test cases. Results show good agreement with previous studies. The method allows simulations of oscillating bubbles for long run times (5 ×105 time steps with a CFL number of 0.8) on highly truncated domains, in which the boundary condition may be applied within 0.1% of the maximum bubble radius. Conservation errors due to the boundary conditions are found to be of the order of 0.1% after 105 time steps. The method significantly reduces the computational cost of fixed grid finite volume simulations of oscillating bubbles. Two-dimensional results demonstrate that highly asymmetric bubble features, such as surface instabilities and the formation of jets, may be captured on a small domain using this boundary condition.

  7. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic-velocity methods used to characterise the excavation disturbance associated with deep tunnels in hard rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Stephen D.; Young, R. Paul

    1998-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic-velocity monitoring studies have been undertaken at both the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) and at the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Company (SKB) Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). At both locations the excavations were tunnels in granitic material at approximately 420 m depth. However, the stress regime was more severe at the URL Mine-by tunnel site than the HRL ZEDEX tunnel. Different parts of the ZEDEX tunnel were created using different excavation techniques. Using AE and ultrasonic techniques to study these tunnels we have been able to examine the nature of the excavation-disturbed zone around the tunnel, as well as examining the effects of different stress regimes and excavation techniques. Studies were undertaken both during and after the Mine-by tunnel excavation and during excavation in the ZEDEX tunnel. AE monitoring in the wall of the Mine-by tunnel during excavation showed that some activity occurred in the sidewall regions, but the spatial density of AE hypocentres increased toward the regions in the floor and roof of the tunnel where breakout notches formed. This sidewall activity was clustered primarily within 0.5 m of the tunnel wall. AE monitoring in the floor of the tunnel showed that small numbers of AE continued to occur in the notch region in the floor of the tunnel over 2 years after excavation was completed. This activity became more acute as the rock was heated, imposing thermally induced stresses on the volume. Ultrasonic-velocity studies both in the floor and the wall of the tunnel showed that the velocity is strongly anisotropic with the direction of slowest velocity orthogonal to the tunnel surface. The velocity increased with distance into the rock from the tunnel surface. In the floor, this effect was seen up to 2 m from the tunnel surface. Most of the change occurred within the first 0.5 m from the tunnel perimeter. At the lower-stress HRL, most of

  8. Surface deformation, crack formation, and acoustic velocity changes in pyrophyllite under polyaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spetzler, Hartmut A.; Sobolev, Gennady A.; Sondergeld, Carl H.; Salov, Boris G.; Getting, Ivan C.; Koltsov, Anotoli

    1981-02-01

    Jacketed cubes of pyrophyllite (31.6 mm on an edge) with variable water content were stressed monotonically to failure under polyaxial compression (σ1 > σ2 = 2σ3). The maximum and minimum principal stresses, σ1, and σ3, were applied with pistons, and the intermediate stress σ2 with a transparent fluid. An optical window in the pressure vessel allowed in situ measurements of the σ2 face deformation by optical holography. In addition, the more conventional techniques of stress, strain, and elastic wave velocity measurements as well as optical and electron microscopy were used to study the formation and propagation of fractures. The strength ( σ1 - σ3)f of the samples increased by about 50% as σ2 was increased from 5 MPa to 100 MPa. Air dry samples were stronger than water-soaked samples by about ˜20%. Increasing the strain rate from 2 × 10-8 to 10-6 s-1 at σ2 = 5 MPa and 30 MPa increased the strength by about 10%. At σ2 = 100 MPa this trend was reversed, and samples that were deformed at the low strain rate were stronger by approximately 5%. The crack morphology of recovered samples was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Subparallel sets of fractures and en échelon fracture patterns ahead of the macrofracture were easily visible with the unaided eye when σ2 was 5 MPa or 30 MPa. However, at σ2 = 100 MPa these fracture patterns were only visible under the microscope, and the cracks appeared much thinner. The holographic observations of the σ2 face revealed the following: as σ1 was increased, broad bulges formed in a crosslike pattern along the lines of the maximum shear stress. Macrofracture initiation, which occurred in a corner, was preceded by concentrated surface deformation. As the macrofracture propagated across the sample, it deviated from the direction of the maximum shear stress. Ahead of the tip of the macrofracture and migrating with it was a pronounced bulge. In response to monotonically increasing σ1, the displacement

  9. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M.; Vanstreels, K.

    2014-07-14

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (ψ) of a 500 nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E = 25 ± 1 GPa and ψ=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  10. Length and velocity form calculations of generalized oscillator strengths of dipole, quadrupole and monopole excitations of argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Diallo, S.; Tall, M. S.; Diedhiou, I.; Hibbert, A.; Daul, C. A.; Diatta, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The quadrupole, monopole and dipole generalized oscillator strengths (GOSs) as a function of momentum transfer are respectively calculated for these 3p6 → 3p5 (4p, 5p, 6p) and 3p6 → 3p5 (4s, 5s, 6s) transitions. Configuration interaction (CI) and random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE) methods are used in the determination of these GOS, in the length and velocity forms. The code of Hibbert has been used to generate the wavefunctions from which a partial of argon GOSs are been computed. The present work has reduced the gap between the absolute values of the theoretical calculations of GOSs and those of the experimental results of Zhu et al for the quadrupole excitations to 3p5 (4p, 5p). The profile of our quadrupole GOS 3p6 → 3p55p transition agrees well with the experimental result of Zhu. The best agreement (0.7%) is observed between the (length) first maximum position and the experimental one for the quadrupole GOS 3p6 → 3p54p transition. The present velocity GOS minimum position for the dipole excitation in 3p6 → 3p54s and the calculated velocity GOS maximum position of the monopole 3p6 → 3p54p transition are in good agreement with the experimental observations (differences of 1.82% and 3.08%, respectively). Correlation effects decrease with increasing of the excited state principal quantum number and have no great influence on the extrema positions.

  11. Stabilization and Low-Frequency Oscillation of Capillary Bridges with Modulated Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Morse, S. F.; Thiessen, David B.

    1996-01-01

    In the work reported here it is demonstrated that acoustic radiation pressure may be used in simulated low gravity to produce stable bridges significantly beyond the Rayleigh limit with S as large as 3.6. The bridge (PDMS mixed with a dense liquid) has the same density as the surrounding water bath containing an ultrasonic standing wave. Modulation was first used to excite specific bridge modes. In the most recent work reported here the shape of the bridge is optically sensed and the ultrasonic drive is electronically adjusted such that the radiation stress distribution dynamically quenches the most unstable mode. This active control simulates passive stabilization suggested for low gravity. Feedback increases the mode frequency in the naturally stable region since the effective stiffness of the mode is increased.

  12. Ultrahigh-pressure acoustic wave velocities of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses up to 200 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Itaru; Murakami, Motohiko; Kohara, Shinji; Ohara, Koji; Ohtani, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    Extensive experimental studies on the structure and density of silicate glasses as laboratory analogs of natural silicate melts have attempted to address the nature of dense silicate melts that may be present at the base of the mantle. Previous ultrahigh-pressure experiments, however, have been performed on simple systems such as SiO2 or MgSiO3, and experiments in more complex system have been conducted under relatively low-pressure conditions below 60 GPa. The effect of other metal cations on structural changes that occur in dense silicate glasses under ultrahigh pressures has been poorly understood. Here, we used a Brillouin scattering spectroscopic method up to pressures of 196.9 GPa to conduct in situ high-pressure acoustic wave velocity measurements of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses in order to understand the effect of Al2O3 on pressure-induced structural changes in the glasses as analogs of aluminosilicate melts. From 10 to 40 GPa, the transverse acoustic wave velocity ( V S ) of Al2O3-rich glass (SiO2 + 20.5 mol% Al2O3) was greater than that of Al2O3-poor glass (SiO2 + 3.9 mol% Al2O3). This result suggests that SiO2-Al2O3 glasses with higher proportions of Al ions with large oxygen coordination numbers (5 and 6) become elastically stiffer up to 40 GPa, depending on the Al2O3 content, but then soften above 40 GPa. At pressures from 40 to ~100 GPa, the increase in V S with increasing pressure became less steep than below 40 GPa. Above ~100 GPa, there were abrupt increases in the P-V S gradients ( dV S /dP) at 130 GPa in Al2O3-poor glass and at 116 GPa in Al2O3-rich glass. These changes resemble previous experimental results on SiO2 glass and MgSiO3 glass. Given that changes of dV S / dP have commonly been related to changes in the Si-O coordination states in the glasses, our results, therefore, may indicate a drastic structural transformation in SiO2-Al2O3 glasses above 116 GPa, possibly associated with an average Si-O coordination number change to higher than 6. Compared

  13. Experiments on nonlinear acoustic landmine detection: Tuning curve studies of soil-mine and soil-mass oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Murray S.; Witten, Thomas R.; Fenneman, Douglas J.

    2004-10-01

    Donskoy [SPIE Proc. 3392, 211-217 (1998); 3710, 239-246 (1999)] has suggested a nonlinear technique that is insensitive to relatively noncompliant targets that can detect an acoustically compliant buried mine. Airborne sound at two primary frequencies eventually causes interactions with the soil and mine generating combination frequencies that can affect the vibration velocity at the surface. In current experiments, f1 and f2 are closely spaced near a mine resonance and a laser Doppler vibrometer profiles the surface. In profiling, certain combination frequencies have a much greater contrast ratio than the linear profiles at f1 and f2-but off the mine some nonlinearity exists. Near resonance, the bending (a softening) of a family of tuning curves (over the mine) exhibits a linear relationship between peak velocity and corresponding frequency, which is characteristic of nonlinear mesoscopic elasticity effects that are observed in geomaterials like rocks or granular media. Results are presented for inert plastic VS 1.6, VS 2.2 and M14 mines buried 3.6 cm in loose soil. Tuning curves for a rigid mass plate resting on a soil layer exhibit similar results, suggesting that nonresonant conditions off the mine are desirable. [Work supported by U.S. Army RDECOM, CERDEC, NVESD, Fort Belvoir, VA.

  14. Velocity dependence of biphasic flow structuration: steady-state and oscillating flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tore Tallakstad, Ken; Jankov, Mihailo; Løvoll, Grunde; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Mâløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Schäfer, Gerhard; Méheust, Yves; Arendt Knudsen, Henning

    2010-05-01

    We study various types of biphasic flows in quasi-two-dimensional transparent porous models. These flows imply a viscous wetting fluid, and a lowly viscous one. The models are transparent, allowing the displacement process and structure to be monitored in space and time. Three different aspects will be presented: 1. In stationary biphasic flows, we study the relationship between the macroscopic pressure drop (related to relative permeability) and the average flow rate, and how this arises from the cluster size distribution of the lowly viscous fluid [1]. 2. In drainage situations, we study how the geometry of the invader can be explained, and how it gives rise to apparent dynamic capillary effects. We show how these can be explained by viscous effects on evolving geometries of invading fluid [2]. 3. We study the impact of oscillating pressure fields superimposed to a background flow over the flow regimes patterns [3]. Steady-State Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Statistics and Transport Properties. First, in stationary flow with a control of the flux of both fluids, we show how the pressure drop depends on the flow rate. We will show that the dynamics is dominated by the interplay between a viscous pressure field from the wetting fluid and bubble transport of a less viscous, nonwetting phase. In contrast with more studied displacement front systems, steady-state flow is in equilibrium, statistically speaking. The corresponding theoretical simplicity allows us to explain a data collapse in the cluster size distribution of lowly viscous fluid in the system, as well as the relation |?P|∞√Ca--. This allows to explain so called relative permeability effects by the morphological changes of the cluster size distribution. Influence of viscous fingering on dynamic saturation-pressure curves in porous media. Next, we study drainage in such models, and investigate the relationship between the pressure field and the morphology of the invading fluid. This allows to model

  15. Acoustic Emission and Velocity Measurements using a Modular Borehole Prototype Tool to Provide Real Time Rock Mass Characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. S.; Pettitt, W. S.; Young, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    Permanent changes to rock mass properties can occur due to the application of excavation or thermal induced stresses. This project involves the design of hardware and software for the long term monitoring of a rock volume, and the real time analysis and interpretation of induced microcracks and their properties. A set of borehole sondes have been designed with each sonde containing up to 6 sensor modules. Each piezoelectric sensor is dual mode allowing it to either transmit an ultrasonic pulse through a rock mass, or receive ultrasonic waveform data. Good coupling of the sensors with the borehole wall is achieved through a motorized clamping mechanism. The borehole sondes are connected to a surface interface box and digital acquisition system and controlled by a laptop computer. The system allows acoustic emission (AE) data to be recorded at all times using programmable trigger logic. The AE data is processed in real time for 3D source location and magnitude, with further analysis such as mechanism type available offline. Additionally the system allows velocity surveys to be automatically performed at pre-defined times. A modelling component of the project, using a 3D dynamic finite difference code, is investigating the effect that different microcrack distributions have on velocity waveform data in terms of time and frequency amplitude. The modelling codes will be validated using data recorded from laboratory tests on rocks with known crack fabrics, and then used in insitu experimental tests. This modelling information will be used to help interpret, in real time, microcrack characteristics such as crack density, size, and fluid content. The technology has applications in a number of branches of geotechnical and civil engineering including radioactive waste storage, mining, dams, bridges, and oil reservoir monitoring.

  16. Temperature and velocity determination of shock-heated flows with non-resonant heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, F. J.; Baab, S.; Lamanna, G.; Weigand, B.

    2015-12-01

    Non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), a four-wave mixing technique, was applied to post-shock flows within a shock tube. Simultaneous single-shot determination of temperature, speed of sound and flow velocity behind incident and reflected shock waves at different pressure and temperature levels are presented. Measurements were performed non-intrusively and without any seeding. The paper describes the technique and outlines its advantages compared to more established laser-based methods with respect to the challenges of shock tube experiments. The experiments include argon and nitrogen as test gas at temperatures of up to 1000 K and pressures of up to 43 bar. The experimental data are compared to calculated values based on inviscid one-dimensional shock wave theory. The single-shot uncertainty of the technique is investigated for worst-case test conditions resulting in relative standard deviations of 1, 1.7 and 3.4 % for Mach number, speed of sound and temperature, respectively. For all further experimental conditions, calculated values stay well within the 95 % confidence intervals of the LITA measurement.

  17. Evaluation of the Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter for Computation of Discharge Records at Three Sites in Colorado, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Diaz, Paul; Smits, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted a study in 2004-2005 at three sites in Colorado: Bear Creek at Morrison, Clear Creek near Empire, and Redlands Canal near Grand Junction. The study was done to evaluate acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADVM) technology in different hydrologic settings that are characteristic of many Colorado streamflow-gaging sites. ADVMs have been tested and used extensively in many parts of the United States by USGS but not in Colorado where relatively small, shallow, clear, coarse-bed streams that ice up in the winter may affect the ADVM suitability. In this study, ADVM instrumentation was successfully used and discharge computations compared favorably, generally within 5 to 10 percent, with conventional USGS stage/discharge methods at the three Colorado sites. However, two factors, encountered in this study, may adversely affect the use of ADVM technology in Colorado. First, for some streams, the depth required (about 1.5 feet for a side-looking instrument) cannot be met during low-flow periods of the year. Second, cold temperatures and freezing-thawing cycles can produce ice effects that could prevent collection of usable ADVM (and stage) data.

  18. Simultaneous estimation of cortical bone thickness and acoustic wave velocity using a multivariable optimization approach: Bone phantom and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Podhajecki, Jerzy; Falińska, Katarzyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents a method that allows the thickness of a compact bone layer and longitudinal wave velocity in the bone to be determined simultaneously with the use of reflected waves, with particular emphasis on the case of layers when the propagation time through the layer is shorter than the time duration of the interrogating pulse. The proposed method estimates simultaneously the thickness of the cortical bone layer and acoustic wave velocity by fitting the temporal spectrum of the simulated reflected wave to the spectrum of the reflected wave measured experimentally. For the purpose of echo-simulations the model of "soft tissue - compact bone layer - cancellous bone" was developed. Next, the cost function was defined as the least square error between the measured and simulated temporal spectra. Minimization of the cost function allowed us to determine the values of the parameters of the cortical bone layer which best fitted the measurements. To solve the optimization problem a simulated annealing algorithm was used. The method was tested using acoustic data obtained at the frequency of 0.6 MHz and 1 MHz respectively for a custom designed bone mimicking phantom and a calf femur. For the cortical shell of the calf femur whose thickness varies from 2.1 mm to 2.4 mm and velocity of 2910 m/s, the relative errors of the thickness estimation ranged from 0.4% to 5.5%. The corresponding error of the acoustic wave velocity estimation in the layer was 3.1%. In the case of artificial bone the thickness of the cortical layer was equal to 1.05 and 1.2 mm and acoustic wave velocity was 2900 m/s. These parameters were determined with the errors ranging from 1.9% to 10.8% and from 3.9% to 4.5% respectively. PMID:26522955

  19. Evaluation of acoustic doppler velocity meters to quantify flow from Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal

  20. Effect of ion temperature on ion-acoustic solitary waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Kaushik; Saha, Taraknath; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2012-10-15

    The effect of ion temperature on the existence of arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves is studied in a two component plasma in presence of a q-nonextensive velocity distributed electrons by using Sagdeev's pseudo potential technique. The range of relevent parameters for which solitons may exist is discussed. It is observed that both q, the nonextensive parameter and the ion temperature {sigma}, play significant roles in the formation and existence of solitons.

  1. Lyman-tomography of Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations with Euclid: Probing Emissions and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations at z ≳ 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R. G.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Helgason, K.

    2015-11-01

    The Euclid space mission, designed to probe evolution of the Dark Energy (DE), will map a large area of the sky at three adjacent near-IR filters, Y, J, and H. This coverage will also enable mapping source-subtracted cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations with unprecedented accuracy on sub-degree angular scales. Here, we propose methodology, using the Lyman-break tomography applied to the Euclid-based CIB maps, to accurately isolate the history of CIB emissions as a function of redshift from 10 ≲ z ≲ 20 and to identify the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) at those epochs. To identify the BAO signature, we would assemble individual CIB maps over conservatively large contiguous areas of ≳400 deg2. The method can isolate the CIB spatial spectrum by z to sub-percent statistical accuracy. We illustrate this with a specific model of CIB production at high z normalized to reproduce the measured Spitzer-based CIB fluctuation. We show that even if the latter contains only a small component from high-z sources, the amplitude of that component can be accurately isolated with the methodology proposed here and the BAO signatures at z ≳ 10 are recovered well from the CIB fluctuation spatial spectrum. Probing the BAO at those redshifts will be an important test of the underlying cosmological paradigm and would narrow the overall uncertainties on the evolution of cosmological parameters, including the DE. Similar methodology is applicable to the planned WFIRST mission, where we show that a possible fourth near-IR channel at ≥2 μm would be beneficial.

  2. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  3. Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Ion Velocity Distribution in the Plume of a 6 kW Hall Thruster with Unperturbed Discharge Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durot, Christopher; Gallimore, Alec

    2014-10-01

    We present laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the time-resolved ion velocity distribution in the plume of a 6 kW laboratory Hall thruster. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of time-resolved ion velocity distribution on completely unperturbed Hall thruster operating conditions. To date, time-resolved LIF measurements have been made on Hall thrusters with oscillations driven or perturbed to be amenable to averaging techniques that assume a periodic oscillation. Natural Hall thruster breathing and spoke oscillations, however, are not periodic due to chaotic variations in amplitude and frequency. Although the system averages over many periods of nonperiodic oscillation, it recovers the time-resolved signal in part by assuming that a constant transfer function exists relating discharge current and LIF signal and averaging over the transfer function itself (http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4856635). The assumption of a constant transfer function has been validated for a Hall thruster and the technique is now applied to a Hall thruster for the first time.

  4. On the stability analysis of a pair of van der Pol oscillators with delayed self-connection, position and velocity couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Kun; Chung, Kwok-wai

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of a pair of van der Pol oscillators with delayed self-connection, position and velocity couplings. Bifurcation diagram of the damping, position and velocity coupling strengths is constructed, which gives insight into how stability boundary curves come into existence and how these curves evolve from small closed loops into open-ended curves. The van der Pol oscillator has been considered by many researchers as the nodes for various networks. It is inherently unstable at the zero equilibrium. Stability control of a network is always an important problem. Currently, the stabilization of the zero equilibrium of a pair of van der Pol oscillators can be achieved only for small damping strength by using delayed velocity coupling. An interesting question arises naturally: can the zero equilibrium be stabilized for an arbitrarily large value of the damping strength? We prove that it can be. In addition, a simple condition is given on how to choose the feedback parameters to achieve such goal. We further investigate how the in-phase mode or the out-of-phase mode of a periodic solution is related to the stability boundary curve that it emerges from a Hopf bifurcation. Analytical expression of a periodic solution is derived using an integration method. Some illustrative examples show that the theoretical prediction and numerical simulation are in good agreement.

  5. A new time-marching scheme that suppresses spurious oscillations in the dynamic rupture problem of the spectral element method: the weighted velocity Newmark scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Jiang, Han

    2015-11-01

    For dynamic rupture problems, numerical simulation methods, such as the finite-difference method, the finite-element method and the boundary integral element method, usually produce spurious high-frequency oscillations that are mainly generated by discontinuities in the friction law and poor resolution of the breakdown zone. Techniques have been developed to reduce the oscillations; for example, the application of a damping coefficient, the introduction of a Green's function with higher accuracy and the use of a high-frequency filter. Presently, the spectral element method (SEM) is an important method used to simulate strong ground motion because of its high precision in calculations and flexibility in gridding media. Its greatest advantage is that it applies the orthogonal property of Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre points to form a diagonal mass matrix and is thus suitable for parallel computation that greatly reduces the computational time. However, comparisons made in the SCEC/USGS Spontaneous Rupture Code Verification Project show that the SEM has larger high-frequency oscillations than some other numerical methods for dynamic rupture problems. In this paper, we propose a new time-marching scheme of the SEM that has the frequency response of suppressing high-frequency oscillations for the slip-weakening friction law. Computation in rupture problem illustrates that the scheme greatly reduces spurious high-frequency oscillations. Furthermore, in the Appendix of the paper we provide some formula derivation to distinguish our scheme from generalized velocity schemes.

  6. Feasibility of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters for the Production of Discharge Records from U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Ross, Jerry H.

    2002-01-01

    It is feasible to use acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVM's) installed at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations to compute records of river discharge. ADVM's are small acoustic current meters that use the Doppler principle to measure water velocities in a two-dimensional plane. Records of river discharge can be computed from stage and ADVM velocity data using the 'index velocity' method. The ADVM-measured velocities are used as an estimator or 'index' of the mean velocity in the channel. In evaluations of ADVM's for the computation of records of river discharge, the USGS installed ADVM's at three streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana: Kankakee River at Davis, Fall Creek at Millersville, and Iroquois River near Foresman. The ADVM evaluation study period was from June 1999 to February 2001. Discharge records were computed, using ADVM data from each station. Discharge records also were computed using conventional stage-discharge methods of the USGS. The records produced from ADVM and conventional methods were compared with discharge record hydrographs and statistics. Overall, the records compared closely from the Kankakee River and Fall Creek stations. For the Iroquois River station, variable backwater was present and affected the comparison; because the ADVM record compensates for backwater, the ADVM record may be superior to the conventional record. For the three stations, the ADVM records were judged to be of a quality acceptable to USGS standards for publications and near realtime ADVM-computed discharges are served on USGS real-time data World Wide Web pages.

  7. Angular spectrum approach for the computation of group and phase velocity surfaces of acoustic waves in anisotropic materials

    PubMed

    Pluta; Schubert; Jahny; Grill

    2000-03-01

    The decomposition of an acoustic wave into its angular spectrum representation creates an effective base for the calculation of wave propagation effects in anisotropic media. In this method, the distribution of acoustic fields is calculated in arbitrary planes from the superposition of the planar components with proper phase shifts. These phase shifts depend on the ratio of the distance between the planes to the normal component of the phase slowness vector. In anisotropic media, the phase shifts depend additionally on the changes of the slowness with respect to the direction of the propagation vector and the polarization. Those relations are obtained from the Christoffel equation. The method employing the fast Fourier transformation algorithm is especially suited for volume imaging in anisotropic media, based on holographic detection in transmission of acoustic waves generated by a point source. This technique is compared with measurements on crystals performed by phase-sensitive scanning acoustic microscopy. PMID:10829665

  8. Acoustic velocity measurement by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry: Development of an Extended Kalman Filter and validation in free-field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duff, Alain; Plantier, Guy; Valière, Jean C.; Gazengel, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    A signal processing technique, based on the use of an Extended Kalman Filter, has been developed to measure sound fields by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry in weak flow. This method allows for the parametric estimation of both the acoustic particle and flow velocity for a forced sine-wave excitation where the acoustic frequency is known. The measurements are performed from the in-phase and the quadrature components of the Doppler downshifted signal thanks to an analog quadrature demodulation technique. Then, the estimated performance is illustrated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations obtained from synthesized signals and compared with asymptotic and analytical forms for the Cramer-Rao Bounds. Results allow the validity domain of the method to be defined and show the availability for free-field measurements in a large range. Finally, an application based on real data obtained in free field is presented.

  9. A test device for premixed gas turbine combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Yip, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    This report discusses design and operation of a single-nozzle test combustor for studying lean, premixed combustion oscillations from gas turbine fuel nozzles. It was used to study oscillations from a prototype fuel nozzle that produced oscillations during testing in a commercial engine. Similar, but not identical, oscillations were recorded in the test device. Basic requirements of the device design were that the flame geometry be maintained and acoustic losses be minimized; this was achieved by using a Helmholtz resonator as the combustor geometry. Surprisingly, the combustor oscillated strongly at several frequencies, without modification of the resonator. Brief survey of operating conditions suggests that it may be helpful to characterize oscillating behavior in terms of reference velocity and inlet air temperature with the rig backpressure playing a smaller role. The preliminary results do not guarantee that the single-nozzle test device will reproduce arbitrary oscillations that occur on a complete engine test. Nozzle/nozzle interactions may complicate the response, and oscillations controlled by acoustic velocities transverse to the nozzle axis may not be reproduced in a test device that relies on a bulk Helmholtz mode. Nevertheless, some oscillations can be reproduced, and the single-nozzle test device allows both active and passive control strategies to be tested relatively inexpensively.

  10. A qualitative and quantitative investigation of the uncracked and cracked condition of concrete beams using impulse excitation, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic pulse velocity techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliopoulos, S.; Iliopoulos, A.; Pyl, L.; Sol, H.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    The Impulse Excitation Technique (IET) is a useful tool for characterizing the structural condition of concrete. Processing the obtained dynamic parameters (damping ratio, response frequency) as a function of response amplitude, clear and systematic differences appear between intact and cracked specimens, while factors like age and sustained load are also influential. Simultaneously, Acoustic Emission (AE) and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) techniques are used during the three point bending test of the beams in order to supply additional information on the level of damage accumulation which resulted in the specific dynamic behavior revealed by the IET test.

  11. Coupled noisy spiking neurons as velocity-controlled oscillators in a model of grid cell spatial firing

    PubMed Central

    Zilli, Eric A; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    One of the two primary classes of models of grid cell spatial firing uses interference between oscillators at dynamically modulated frequencies. Generally these models are presented in terms of idealized oscillators (modeled as sinusoids) which differ from biological oscillators in multiple, important ways. Here we show that two more realistic, noisy neural models (Izhikevich's simple model and a biophysical model of an entorhinal cortex stellate cell) can be successfully used as oscillators in a model of this type. When additive noise is included in the models such that uncoupled or sparsely-coupled cells show realistic interspike interval variance, both synaptic and gap-junction coupling can synchronize networks of cells to produce comparatively less variable network-level oscillations. We show that the frequency of these oscillatory networks can be controlled sufficiently well to produce stable grid cell spatial firing on the order of at least 2-5 minutes, despite the high noise level. Our results suggest that the basic principles of oscillatory interference models work with more realistic models of noisy neurons. Nevertheless, a number of simplifications were still made and future work should examine increasingly realistic models. PMID:20943925

  12. Estimating sea-ice coverage, draft, and velocity in Marguerite Bay (Antarctica) using a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Visbeck, Martin; Beardsley, Robert C.; Brechner Owens, W.

    2008-02-01

    A technique for the analysis of data from a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to determine ice coverage, draft and velocity is presented and applied to data collected in Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula shelf. This method provides sea-ice information when no dedicated upward-looking sonar (ULS) data are available. Ice detection is accomplished using windowed variances of ADCP vertical velocity, vertical error velocity, and surface horizontal speed. ADCP signal correlation and backscatter intensity were poor indicators of the presence of ice at this site. Ice draft is estimated using a combination of ADCP backscatter data, atmospheric and oceanic pressure data, and information about the thermal stratification. This estimate requires corrections to the ADCP-derived range for instrument tilt and sound speed profile. Uncertainties of ±0.20 m during midwinter and ±0.40 m when the base of the surface mixed layer is above the ADCP for ice draft are estimated based on: (a) a Monte Carlo simulation, (b) uncertainty in the sound speed correction, and (c) performance of the zero-draft estimate during times of known open water. Ice velocity is taken as the ADCP horizontal velocity in the depth bin specified by the range estimate.

  13. The 2.2 GHz Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) oscillator development Ku-band frequency source development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Two 2.2 GHz SAW oscillators using aluminum nitride on sapphire (AlN/Al2O3) delay lines were fabricated. The oscillators were electronically temperature compensated and characterized. One of the oscillators was used as the frequency reference for the Ku band source; the second oscillator is available for continued evaluation. A 15 GHz frequency source was designed and fabricated. The 15 GHz source consists of a Ku band FET oscillator which is phase locked to the frequency multiplied (X7) output of the 2.2 GHz SAW reference source. The Ku band source was built using microstrip circuit designs, which are hybrid compatible. Two wafer runs of 2.2 GHz TED devices were fabricated and evaluated. The devices were mounted on microstrip test substrates and evaluated as 15 GHz divide by 7 circuits. The device evaluation indicated that in their present form the TED is not a practical circuit element.

  14. An experimental investigation of flow-induced oscillations of the Bruel and Kjaer in-flow microphone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Richard S., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    One source contributing to wind tunnel background noise is microphone self-noise. An experiment was conducted to investigate the flow-induced acoustic oscillations of Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) in-flow microphones. The results strongly suggest the B&K microphone cavity behaves more like an open cavity. Their cavity acoustic oscillations are likely caused by strong interactions between the cavity shear layer and the cavity trailing edge. But the results also suggest that cavity shear layer oscillations could be coupled with cavity acoustic resonance to generate tones. Detailed flow velocity measurements over the cavity screen have shown inflection points in the mean velocity profiles and high disturbance and spectral intensities in the vicinity of the cavity trailing edge. These results are the evidence for strong interactions between cavity shear layer oscillations and the cavity trailing edge. They also suggest that beside acoustic signals, the microphone inside the cavity has likely recorded hydrodynamic pressure oscillations, too. The results also suggest that the forebody shape does not have a direct effect on cavity oscillations. For the FITE (Flow Induced Tone Eliminator) microphone, it is probably the forebody length and the resulting boundary layer turbulence that have made it work. Turbulence might have thickened the boundary layer at the separation point, weakened the shear layer vortices, or lifted them to miss impinging on the cavity trailing edge. In addition, the study shows that the cavity screen can modulate the oscillation frequency but not the cavity acoustic oscillation mechanisms.

  15. Use of acoustic velocity methodology and remote sensing techniques to measure unsteady flow on the lower Yazoo River in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cooper, Lance M.; Davis, Angela A.

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for computing continuous discharge during varied, non-uniform low and medium flows on the Yazoo River at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, using acoustic signal processing and conventional streamgaging techniques. Procedures were also developed to compute locations of discharges during future high flow events when the stream reach is subject to hi-directional and reverse flow caused by rising stages on the Mississippi River using a combination of acoustic equipment and remote sensing technology. A description of the study area is presented. Selected results of these methods are presented for the period from March through September 1997.

  16. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Oscillations of the Vocal Folds and of the Resulting Acoustic Phenomena in the Vocal Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švancara, P.; Horáček, J.; Švec, J. G.

    The study presents a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the flow-induced self-oscillation of the human vocal folds in interaction with acoustics of simplified vocal tract models. The 3D vocal tract models of the acoustic spaces shaped for simulation of phonation of Czech vowels [a:], [i:] and [u:] were created by converting the data from the magnetic resonance images (MRI). For modelling of the fluid-structure interaction, explicit coupling scheme with separated solvers for fluid and structure domain was utilized. The FE model comprises vocal folds pretension before starting phonation, large deformations of the vocal fold tissue, vocal-fold collisions, fluid-structure interaction, morphing the fluid mesh according to the vocal-fold motion (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach), unsteady viscous compressible airflow described by the Navier-Stokes equations and airflow separation. The developed FE model enables to study the relationship between flow-induced vibrations of the vocal folds and acoustic wave propagation in the vocal tract and can also be used to simulate for example pathological changes in the vocal fold tissue and their influence on the voice production.

  17. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  18. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  19. Alternative dust-ion acoustic waves in a magnetized charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons having a vortex-like velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjaz, Idir; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-06-01

    Alternative localized dust-ion acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons having a vortex-like velocity distribution. The correct non-Maxwellian charging currents are obtained based on the well-known orbit limited motion theory. Following the standard reductive perturbation technique, a Schamel-Zakharov Kuznetsov Burgers (S-ZKB) equation is derived. It is shown that due to an interplay between trapping and nonthermality, our dusty plasma model may support solitary as well as shock waves the main quantities (phase velocity, amplitude and width) of which are drastically influenced by trapping, nonthermality and charge variation. Due to the flexibility provided by the outlined distribution function (two concepts of non isothermality), we stress that our model should provide a good fit of the space observations.

  20. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillinger, M.; Shaposhnikov, K.; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Schmid, U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (ScxAl1-xN) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S21 measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  1. Wind velocity measurement accuracy with highly stable 12 mJ/pulse high repetition rate CO2 laser master oscillator power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James W.; Johnson, Steven C.; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1987-01-01

    A coherent CO2 lidar operating in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration (MOPA) is described for both ground-based and airborne operation. Representative data taken from measurements against stationary targets in both the ground-based and airborne configurations are shown for the evaluation of the frequency stability of the system. Examples of data are also given which show the results of anomalous system operation. Overall results demonstrate that velocity measurements can be performed consistently to an accuracy of + or - 0.5 m/s and in some cases + or - 0.1 m/s.

  2. Velocity Structure of the Alpine Fault Zone, New Zealand: Laboratory and Log-Based Fault Rock Acoustic Properties at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppson, T.; Graham, J. L., II; Tobin, H. J.; Paris Cavailhes, J.; Celerier, B. P.; Doan, M. L.; Nitsch, O.; Massiot, C.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of fault zone rocks at seismogenic depth play a key role in rupture nucleation, propagation, and damage associated with fault slip. In order to understand the seismic hazard posed by a fault we need to both measure these properties and understand how they govern that particular fault's behavior. The Alpine Fault is the principal component of the active transpressional plate boundary through the South Island of New Zealand. Rapid exhumation along the fault provides an opportunity to study near-surface rocks that have experienced similar histories to those currently deforming at mid-crustal depths. In this study, we examine the acoustic properties of the Alpine Fault in Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP)-1 drill core samples and borehole logs from the shallow fault zone, DFDP-2 borehole logs from the hanging wall, and outcrop samples from a number of field localities along the central Alpine Fault. P- and S-wave velocities were measured at ultrasonic frequencies on saturated 2.5 cm-diameter core plugs taken from DFDP-1 core and outcrops. Sampling focused on mylonites, cataclasites, and fault gouge from both the hanging and foot walls of the fault in order to provide a 1-D seismic velocity transect across the entire fault zone. Velocities were measured over a range of effective pressures between 1 and 68 MPa to determine the variation in acoustic properties with depth and pore pressure. When possible, samples were cut in three orthogonal directions and S-waves were measured in two polarization directions on all samples to constrain velocity anisotropy. XRD and petrographic characterization were used to examine how fault-related alteration and deformation change the composition and texture of the rock, and to elucidate how these changes affect the measured velocities. The ultrasonic velocities were compared to sonic logs from DFDP to examine the potential effects of frequency dispersion, brittle deformation, and temperature on the measured

  3. Combustion Oscillations in a Twin-Stream Afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macquisten, M. A.

    1995-12-01

    In a modern turbo-fan engine, the afterburner flame-holders are positioned in the mixing flow between the core and bypass streams. These two streams have different velocities and temperatures. They also have different duct lengths and, therefore, different acoustic properties. The influence of such a twin-stream supply on acoustically coupled combustion oscillations is investigated in this paper. Measurements on an experimental rig show how differences in the acoustic impedances, the mean velocities and the mean temperatures in the two supply streams lead to appreciably different unsteady heat release rates in the two streams. These affect the frequency of the combustion oscillations. A theory explains these results and correctly describes the variation in frequency as the properties of the two supply streams are varied.

  4. Acoustic disturbances in a gas with an axial temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariononv, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Linear analysis acoustic disturbances in one-dimensional gas flow with a longitudinal gradient of the sound speed provided. Known wave equation for the acoustic velocity is used. In the case of linear distribution of the sound speed in the hot part of the flow equation has an exact analytic solution. This allows to define the expression describing the propagation acoustic disturbances in a gas with varying mean temperature and density. The results can be used to calculate the resonance frequencies of the gas oscillations in the laboratory and industrial combustors.

  5. Acoustic power absorption and enhancement generated by slow and fast MHD waves. Evidence of solar cycle velocity/intensity amplitude changes consistent with the mode conversion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Jiménez, A.; Elsworth, Y.; Schunker, H.

    2010-06-01

    We used long duration, high quality, unresolved (Sun-as-a star) observations collected by the ground based network BiSON and by the instruments GOLF and VIRGO on board the ESA/NASA SOHO satellite to search for solar-cycle-related changes in mode characteristics in velocity and continuum intensity for the frequency range between 2.5 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz. Over the ascending phase of solar cycle 23 we found a suppression in the p-mode amplitudes both in the velocity and intensity data between 2.5 mHz <ν< 4.5 mHz with a maximum suppression for frequencies in the range between 2.5 mHz <ν< 3.5 mHz. The size of the amplitude suppression is 13 ± 2 per cent for the velocity and 9 ± 2 per cent for the intensity observations. Over the range of 4.5 mHz <ν< 5.5 mHz the findings hint within the errors to a null change both in the velocity and intensity amplitudes. At still higher frequencies, in the so called High-frequency Interference Peaks (HIPs) between 5.8 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz, we found an enhancement in the velocity amplitudes with the maximum 36 ± 7 per cent occurring for 6.3 mHz <ν< 6.8 mHz. However, in intensity observations we found a rather smaller enhancement of about 5 ± 2 per cent in the same interval. There is evidence that the frequency dependence of solar-cycle velocity amplitude changes is consistent with the theory behind the mode conversion of acoustic waves in a non-vertical magnetic field, but there are some problems with the intensity data, which may be due to the height in the solar atmosphere at which the VIRGO data are taken.

  6. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  7. Acoustic Velocity Log Numerical Simulation and Saturation Estimation of Gas Hydrate Reservoir in Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method. PMID:23935407

  8. SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS AND ACTIVITY IN PROCYON: A COMPARISON OF THE 2007 MOST AND GROUND-BASED RADIAL VELOCITY CAMPAIGNS

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Stello, Dennis; Arentoft, Torben; Kjeldsen, Hans; Gruberbauer, Michael; Guenther, David B.; Houdek, Guenter; Kallinger, Thomas; Weiss, Werner W.; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2011-04-20

    We compare the simultaneous 2007 space-based MOST photometry and ground-based radial velocity (RV) observations of the F5 star Procyon. We identify slow variations in the MOST data that are similar to those reported in the RV time series and confirm by comparison with the Sun that these variations are likely the signature of stellar activity. The MOST power spectrum yields clear evidence for individual oscillation frequencies that match those found in the RV data by Bedding et al. We identify the same ridges due to modes of different spherical degree in both data sets, but are not able to confirm a definite ridge identification using the MOST data. We measure the luminosity amplitude per radial mode A{sub l=0,phot} = 9.1 {+-} 0.5 ppm. Combined with the estimate for the RV data by Arentoft et al., this gives a mean amplitude ratio of A{sub l=0,phot}/A{sub l=0,RV} = 0.24 {+-} 0.02 ppm cm{sup -1} s, considerably higher than expected from scaling relations but in reasonable agreement with theoretical models by Houdek. We also compare the amplitude ratio as a function of frequency and find that the maximum of the oscillation envelope is shifted to higher frequencies in photometry than in velocity.

  9. Acoustic forcing of a liquid drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of systems such as acoustic levitation chambers will allow for the positioning and manipulation of material samples (drops) in a microgravity environment. This provides the capability for fundamental studies in droplet dynamics as well as containerless processing work. Such systems use acoustic radiation pressure forces to position or to further manipulate (e.g., oscillate) the sample. The primary objective was to determine the effect of a viscous acoustic field/tangential radiation pressure forcing on drop oscillations. To this end, the viscous acoustic field is determined. Modified (forced) hydrodynamic field equations which result from a consistent perturbation expansion scheme are solved. This is done in the separate cases of an unmodulated and a modulated acoustic field. The effect of the tangential radiation stress on the hydrodynamic field (drop oscillations) is found to manifest as a correction to the velocity field in a sublayer region near the drop/host interface. Moreover, the forcing due to the radiation pressure vector at the interface is modified by inclusion of tangential stresses.

  10. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Gill, T. S.; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2011-02-15

    The modulational instability (MI) of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in a two-component plasma is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics proposed by Tsallis [J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) which governs the MI of the IAWs is obtained. The presence of the nonextensive electron distribution is shown to influence the MI of the waves. Three different ranges of the nonextensive q-parameter are considered and in each case the MI sets in under different conditions. Furthermore, the effects of the q-parameter on the growth rate of MI are discussed in detail.

  11. REGARDING THE LINE-OF-SIGHT BARYONIC ACOUSTIC FEATURE IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY AND BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY LUMINOUS RED GALAXY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kazin, Eyal A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Scoccimarro, Roman; McBride, Cameron K.; Berlind, Andreas A.

    2010-08-20

    We analyze the line-of-sight baryonic acoustic feature in the two-point correlation function {xi} of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample (0.16 < z < 0.47). By defining a narrow line-of-sight region, r{sub p} < 5.5 h {sup -1} Mpc, where r{sub p} is the transverse separation component, we measure a strong excess of clustering at {approx}110 h {sup -1} Mpc, as previously reported in the literature. We also test these results in an alternative coordinate system, by defining the line of sight as {theta} < 3{sup 0}, where {theta} is the opening angle. This clustering excess appears much stronger than the feature in the better-measured monopole. A fiducial {Lambda}CDM nonlinear model in redshift space predicts a much weaker signature. We use realistic mock catalogs to model the expected signal and noise. We find that the line-of-sight measurements can be explained well by our mocks as well as by a featureless {xi} = 0. We conclude that there is no convincing evidence that the strong clustering measurement is the line-of-sight baryonic acoustic feature. We also evaluate how detectable such a signal would be in the upcoming Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) LRG volume. Mock LRG catalogs (z < 0.6) suggest that (1) the narrow line-of-sight cylinder and cone defined above probably will not reveal a detectable acoustic feature in BOSS; (2) a clustering measurement as high as that in the current sample can be ruled out (or confirmed) at a high confidence level using a BOSS-sized data set; (3) an analysis with wider angular cuts, which provide better signal-to-noise ratios, can nevertheless be used to compare line-of-sight and transverse distances, and thereby constrain the expansion rate H(z) and diameter distance D{sub A}(z).

  12. Numerical investigation of the turbulent energy budget in the wake of freely oscillating elastically mounted cylinder at low reduced velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Abhishek; Schlüter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    We present a numerical study of the turbulent kinetic energy budget in the wake of cylinders undergoing Vortex-Induced Vibration (VIV). We show three-dimensional Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of an elastically mounted circular cylinder in the synchronization regime at Reynolds number of Re=8000. The Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) is used to account for the presence of the cylinder. The flow field in the wake is decomposed using the triple decomposition splitting the flow variables in mean, coherent and stochastic components. The energy transfer between these scales of motions are then studied and the results of the free oscillation are compared to those of a forced oscillation. The turbulent kinetic energy budget shows that the maximum amplitude of VIV is defined by the ability of the mean flow to feed energy to the coherent structures in the wake. At amplitudes above this maximum amplitude, the energy of the coherent structures needs to be fed additionally by small scale, stochastic energy in form of backscatter to sustain its motion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the maximum amplitude of the VIV is defined by the integral length scale of the turbulence in the wake.

  13. Characterization of oscillations during premix gas turbine combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

    1998-04-01

    The use of premix combustion in stationary gas turbines can produce very low levels of NO{sub x} emissions. This benefit is widely recognized, but turbine developers routinely encounter problems with combustion oscillations during the testing of new premix combustors. Because of the associated pressure fluctuations, combustion oscillations must be eliminated in a final combustor design. Eliminating these oscillations is often time-consuming and costly because there is no single approach to solve an oscillation problem. Previous investigations of combustion stability have focused on rocket applications, industrial furnaces, and some aeroengine gas turbines. Comparatively little published data is available for premixed combustion at conditions typical of an industrial gas turbine. In this paper, the authors report experimental observations of oscillations produced by a fuel nozzle typical of industrial gas turbines. Tests are conducted in a specially designed combustor capable of providing the acoustic feedback needed to study oscillations. Tests results are presented for pressures up to 10 atmospheres, theoretical considerations, it is expected that oscillations can be characterized by a nozzle reference velocity, with operating pressure playing a smaller role. This expectation is compared to observed data that shows both the benefits and limitations of characterizing the combustor oscillating behavior in terms of a reference velocity rather than other engine operating parameters. This approach to characterizing oscillations is then used to evaluate how geometric changes to the fuel nozzle will affect the boundary between stable and oscillating combustion.

  14. Source localization corrections for airborne acoustic platforms based on a climatological assessment of temperature and wind velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Cheinet, Sylvain; Collier, Sandra L.; Reiff, Christian; Ligon, David A.; Wilson, D. Keith; Noble, John M.; Alberts, W. C. Kirkpatrick, II

    2012-06-01

    Acoustic sensors are being employed on airborne platforms, such as Persistent Threat Detection System (PTDS) and Persistent Ground Surveillance System (PGSS), for source localization. Under certain atmospheric conditions, airborne sensors oer a distinct advantage over ground sensors. The performance of both ground and airborne sensors is aected by environmental factors, such as atmospheric turbulence and wind and temperature proles. For airborne sensors, the eects of refraction must be accounted for in order to determine the source coordinates. Such a method for ground-to-air applications has been developed and is further rened here. Ideally, knowledge of the exact atmospheric proles will allow for the most accurate mitigation of refractive eects. However, acoustic sensors deployed in theater are rarely supported by atmospheric sensing systems that retrieve real-time temperature and wind elds. Atmospheric conditions evolve through seasons, time of day, and are strongly location dependent. Therefore, the development of an atmospheric proles database based on a long time series climatological assessment will provide knowledge for use in physics-based bearing estimation algorithms, where otherwise no correction would have been performed. Long term atmospheric data sets from weather modeling systems are used for a climatological assessment of the refraction corrections and localization errors over selected sites.

  15. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes II: simulation for Spallation Neutron Sources and planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Baik, Kyungmin; Leighton, Timothy G

    2011-08-01

    This paper uses a finite element method (FEM) to compare predictions of the attenuation and sound speeds of acoustic modes in a fluid-filled pipe with those of the analytical model presented in the first paper in this series. It explains why, when the predictions of the earlier paper were compared with experimental data from a water-filled PMMA pipe, the uncertainties and agreement for attenuation data were worse than those for sound speed data. Having validated the FEM approach in this way, the versatility of FEM is thereafter demonstrated by modeling two practical applications which are beyond the analysis of the earlier paper. These applications model propagation in the mercury-filled steel pipework of the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee), and in a long-standing design for acoustic sensors for use on planetary probes. The results show that strong coupling between the fluid and the solid walls means that erroneous interpretations are made of the data if they assume that the sound speed and attenuation in the fluid in the pipe are the same as those that would be measured in an infinite volume of identical fluid, assumptions which are common when such data have previously been interpreted. PMID:21877784

  16. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles, volume 1. [jet engine noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken to: (1) define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; (3) and to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan nozzle convergence angle, core extention length to annulus height ratio, and flow Mach number and temperatures were studied. The results are presented as normalized directivity plots.

  17. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  18. Evidence for the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and velocity reconstruction from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaan, Emmanuel; Ferraro, Simone; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Smith, Kendrick M.; Ho, Shirley; Aiola, Simone; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bond, J. Richard; De Bernardis, Francesco; Calabrese, Erminia; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn; Hill, J. Colin; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Hubmayr, Johannes; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent D.; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Li, Dale; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maurin, Loïc; McMahon, Jeffrey John; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Pappas, Christine G.; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sherwin, Blake D.; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J.; ACTPol Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We use microwave temperature maps from two seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at 146 GHz, together with the "Constant Mass" CMASS galaxy sample from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to measure the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect over the redshift range z =0.4 - 0.7 . We use galaxy positions and the continuity equation to obtain a reconstruction of the line-of-sight velocity field. We stack the microwave temperature at the location of each halo, weighted by the corresponding reconstructed velocity. We vary the size of the aperture photometry filter used, thus probing the free electron profile of these halos from within the virial radius out to three virial radii, on the scales relevant for investigating the missing baryons problem. The resulting best fit kSZ model is preferred over the no-kSZ hypothesis at 3.3 and 2.9 σ for two independent velocity reconstruction methods, using 25,537 galaxies over 660 square degrees. The data suggest that the baryon profile is shallower than the dark matter in the inner regions of the halos probed here, potentially due to energy injection from active galactic nucleus or supernovae. Thus, by constraining the gas profile on a wide range of scales, this technique will be useful for understanding the role of feedback in galaxy groups and clusters. The effect of foregrounds that are uncorrelated with the galaxy velocities is expected to be well below our signal, and residual thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich contamination is controlled by masking the most massive clusters. Finally, we discuss the systematics involved in converting our measurement of the kSZ amplitude into the mean free electron fraction of the halos in our sample.

  19. Propagation of Electron Acoustic Soliton, Periodic and Shock Waves in Dissipative Plasma with a q-Nonextensive Electron Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. M., El-Hanbaly; E. K., El-Shewy; Elgarayhi, A.; A. I., Kassem

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear properties of small amplitude electron-acoustic (EA) solitary and shock waves in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma with nonextensive distribution for hot electrons have been investigated. A reductive perturbation method used to obtain the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation. Bifurcation analysis has been discussed for non-dissipative system in the absence of Burgers term and reveals different classes of the traveling wave solutions. The obtained solutions are related to periodic and soliton waves and their behavior are shown graphically. In the presence of the Burgers term, the EXP-function method is used to solve the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation and the obtained solution is related to shock wave. The obtained results may be helpful in better conception of waves propagation in various space plasma environments as well as in inertial confinement fusion laboratory plasmas.

  20. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar Tribeche, Mouloud E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz; Bains, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  1. Dust ion-acoustic shock waves in charge varying dusty plasmas with electrons having vortexlike velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Tribeche, M.

    2010-12-15

    A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to investigate the properties of dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with vortexlike electron distribution. We use the ionization model, hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a trapped electron charging current derived from the well-known orbit limited motion theory. A new modified Burger equation is derived. Besides nonlinear trapping, this equation involves two kinds of dissipation (the anomalous one inherent to nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and the one due to the particle loss and ionization). These two kinds of dissipation can act concurrently. The traveling wave solution has been acquired by employing the modified extended tanh-function method. The shocklike solution is numerically analyzed based on the typical numerical data from laboratory dusty plasma devices. It is found that ion temperature, trapped particles, and weak dissipations significantly modify the shock structures.

  2. Variable charge dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2010-06-15

    A first theoretical work is presented to study variable charge dust acoustic solitons within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. Our results reveal that the spatial patterns of the variable charge solitary wave are significantly modified by electron nonextensive effects. In particular, it may be noted that for -11. As the electrons deviate from their thermodynamic equilibrium, the dust grain charge Q{sub d} becomes more negative and the dust grains localization (accumulation) less pronounced. The electrons are locally expelled and pushed out of the region of the soliton's localization. This electron depletion becomes less effective as the electrons evolve far away from their thermal equilibrium. The case q>1 provides qualitatively opposite results: electron nonextensivity makes the solitary structure more spiky. Our results should help in providing a good fit between theoretical and experimental results.

  3. Solar-like Oscillations and Activity in Procyon: A Comparison of the 2007 MOST and Ground-based Radial Velocity Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Arentoft, Torben; Gruberbauer, Michael; Guenther, David B.; Houdek, Günter; Kallinger, Thomas; Kjeldsen, Hans; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Stello, Dennis; Weiss, Werner W.

    2011-04-01

    We compare the simultaneous 2007 space-based MOST photometry and ground-based radial velocity (RV) observations of the F5 star Procyon. We identify slow variations in the MOST data that are similar to those reported in the RV time series and confirm by comparison with the Sun that these variations are likely the signature of stellar activity. The MOST power spectrum yields clear evidence for individual oscillation frequencies that match those found in the RV data by Bedding et al. We identify the same ridges due to modes of different spherical degree in both data sets, but are not able to confirm a definite ridge identification using the MOST data. We measure the luminosity amplitude per radial mode A l=0,phot = 9.1 ± 0.5 ppm. Combined with the estimate for the RV data by Arentoft et al., this gives a mean amplitude ratio of A l=0,phot/A l=0,RV = 0.24 ± 0.02 ppm cm-1 s, considerably higher than expected from scaling relations but in reasonable agreement with theoretical models by Houdek. We also compare the amplitude ratio as a function of frequency and find that the maximum of the oscillation envelope is shifted to higher frequencies in photometry than in velocity. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  4. Dayside ionospheric convection changes in response to long-period interplanetary magnetic field oscillations - Determination of the ionospheric phase velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, M. A.; Freeman, M. P.; Southwood, D. J.; Cowley, S. W.; Lockwood, M.; Samson, J. C.; Farrugia, C. J.; Hughes, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Ground magnetic field perturbations recorded by the CANOPUS magnetometer network in the 7 to 13 MLT sector are used to examine how reconfigurations of the dayside polar ionospheric flow take place in response to north-south changes of the IMF. During the 6-h interval in question, IMF Bz oscillates between +/- 7 nT with about a 1-h period. Corresponding variations in the ground magnetic disturbance are observed which we infer are due to changes in ionospheric flow. Cross correlation of the data obtained from two ground stations at 73.5 deg magnetic latitude, but separated by about 2 hours in MLT, shows that changes in the flow are initiated in the prenoon sector (about 10 MLT) and then spread outward toward dawn and dusk with a phase speed of about 5 km/s over the longitude range about 8 to 12 MLT, slowing to about 2 km/s outside this range. Cross correlating the data from these ground stations with IMP 8 IMF Bz records produces a MLT variation in the ground response delay relative to the IMF which is compatible with these deduced phase speeds.

  5. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  6. Local perturbations of the upper layers of a sun-like star: The impact on the acoustic oscillation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Brito, Ana; Lopes, Ilídio E-mail: ilidio.lopes@ist.utl.pt

    2014-02-10

    In the last decade, the quality and the amount of observational asteroseismic data that has been made available by space based missions had a tremendous upgrowth. The determination of asteroseismic parameters to estimate the fundamental physical processes occurring in stars' interiors can be done today in a way that has never been possible before. In this work, we propose to compute the seismic observable β, which is a proxy of the phase shift of the acoustic modes propagating in the envelope of the Sun-like stars. This seismic parameter β can be used to identify rapid variation regions usually known as glitches. We show that a small variation in the structure, smaller than 1% in the sound speed, produces a glitch in the acoustic potential that could explain the oscillatory character of β. This method allows us to determine the location and the thickness of the glitch with precision. We applied this idea to the Sun-like star α Centauri A and found a glitch located at approximately 0.94 R (1400 s) and with a thickness of 0.2% of the stars' radius. This is fully consistent with the data and also validates other seismic tests.

  7. Acoustic streaming and Sun's meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    A vast number of physical processes involving oscillations of a bounded viscous fluid are relevantly influenced by acoustic streaming. When this happens a steady circulation of fluid develops in a thin boundary adjacent to the interface. Some examples are refracted sound waves, a fluid inside a spherical cavity undergoing torsional oscillations or a pulsating liquid droplet. Steady streaming around circular interfaces consists of a hemispherically symmetric recirculation of fluid from the equatorial plane to the polar axes closely resembling the meridional circulation pattern observed in the Sun's convection zone that determines the solar cycle. In this paper, it is argued that the acoustic pulsations exhibited by the Sun would lead to acoustic streaming in the boundary of the convection zone. A simple estimation using a typical dominant frequency of 3 mHz and the observed surface oscillation amplitude yields a steady streaming velocity us ∼ 10 m s‑1, which is on the order of the meridional circulation velocity observed in the Sun's convection zone.

  8. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  9. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  10. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: baryon acoustic oscillations in the correlation function of LOWZ and CMASS galaxies in Data Release 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, Antonio J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Beutler, Florian; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron K.; Maraston, Claudia; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Reid, Beth A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Verde, Licia; White, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We present distance scale measurements from the baryon acoustic oscillation signal in the constant stellar mass and low-redshift sample samples from the Data Release 12 of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. The total volume probed is 14.5 Gpc3, a 10 per cent increment from Data Release 11. From an analysis of the spherically averaged correlation function, we infer a distance to z = 0.57 of D_V(z)r^fid_d/r_d = 2028± 21 Mpc and a distance to z = 0.32 of D_V(z)r^fid_d/r_d = 1264± 22 Mpc assuming a cosmology in which r^fid_d = 147.10 Mpc. From the anisotropic analysis, we find an angular diameter distance to z = 0.57 of D_A(z)r^fid_d/r_d = 1401± 21 Mpc and a distance to z = 0.32 of 981 ± 20 Mpc, a 1.5 and 2.0 per cent measurement, respectively. The Hubble parameter at z = 0.57 is H(z)r_d/r^fid_d = 100.3± 3.7 km s-1 Mpc-1 and its value at z = 0.32 is 79.2 ± 5.6 km s-1 Mpc-1, a 3.7 and 7.1 per cent measurement, respectively. These cosmic distance scale constraints are in excellent agreement with a Λ cold dark matter model with cosmological parameters released by the recent Planck 2015 results.

  11. Large-Scale Distribution of Total Mass versus Luminous Matter from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: First Search in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 10.

    PubMed

    Soumagnac, M T; Barkana, R; Sabiu, C G; Loeb, A; Ross, A J; Abdalla, F B; Balan, S T; Lahav, O

    2016-05-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations in the early Universe are predicted to leave an as yet undetected signature on the relative clustering of total mass versus luminous matter. A detection of this effect would provide an important confirmation of the standard cosmological paradigm and constrain alternatives to dark matter as well as nonstandard fluctuations such as compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs). We conduct the first observational search for this effect, by comparing the number-weighted and luminosity-weighted correlation functions, using the SDSS-III BOSS Data Release 10 CMASS sample. When including CIPs in our model, we formally obtain evidence at 3.2σ of the relative clustering signature and a limit that matches the existing upper limits on the amplitude of CIPs. However, various tests suggest that these results are not yet robust, perhaps due to systematic biases in the data. The method developed in this Letter used with more accurate future data such as that from DESI, is likely to confirm or disprove our preliminary evidence. PMID:27258862

  12. Large-Scale Distribution of Total Mass versus Luminous Matter from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: First Search in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumagnac, M. T.; Barkana, R.; Sabiu, C. G.; Loeb, A.; Ross, A. J.; Abdalla, F. B.; Balan, S. T.; Lahav, O.

    2016-05-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations in the early Universe are predicted to leave an as yet undetected signature on the relative clustering of total mass versus luminous matter. A detection of this effect would provide an important confirmation of the standard cosmological paradigm and constrain alternatives to dark matter as well as nonstandard fluctuations such as compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs). We conduct the first observational search for this effect, by comparing the number-weighted and luminosity-weighted correlation functions, using the SDSS-III BOSS Data Release 10 CMASS sample. When including CIPs in our model, we formally obtain evidence at 3.2 σ of the relative clustering signature and a limit that matches the existing upper limits on the amplitude of CIPs. However, various tests suggest that these results are not yet robust, perhaps due to systematic biases in the data. The method developed in this Letter used with more accurate future data such as that from DESI, is likely to confirm or disprove our preliminary evidence.

  13. Photoelectric observations of propagating sunspot oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Lites, B.W.; White, O.R.; Packman, D.

    1982-02-01

    The Sacramento Park Observatory Vacuum Tower Telescope and diode array were used to make repeated intensity and velocity images of a large, isolated sunspot in both a chromospheric (lambda8542 Ca II) and a photospheric (lambda5576 Fe I) line. The movie of the digital data for the chromospheric line shows clearly a relationship between the propagating umbral disturbances and the running penumbral waves. The velocities for transverse propagating of the umbral and penumbral disturbances are 60--70 km s/sup -1/ and 20--35 km s/sup -1/, respectively. Power spectra of the oscillations show a sharp peak at a period of about 170 s in both the velocity and intensity signals. The rms velocity fluctuation of this power peak is 0.26 km s/sup -1/. The oscillations at any given point in the sunspot are very regular, and the phase relationship between the velocity and intensity of the chromospheric oscillations is radically different than that for the quiet Sun. Our preliminary interpretation of the phase relationship involves acoustic waves with wave vector directed downwards along the magnetic field lines; however, this interpretation relies on assumptions involved in the data reduction scheme. The mechanical energy flux carried by the observed umbral disturbances does not appear to be a significant contributor to the overall energy budget of the sunspot or the surrounding active region.

  14. Feasibility study of the use of the acoustic velocity meter for measurement of net outflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Winchell

    1969-01-01

    A reliable measure of the fresh-water outflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta is needed for the operation of the California Water Project and for the evaluation of the interrelated water problems of the delta and San Francisco Bay regions. The Chipps Island channel, immediately downstream from the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, is the most promising site for this flow measurement, but the conventional techniques used for evaluating steady flows cannot be employed there because the channel reach is in the tidal zone, and reversals of flow occur during each tidal cycle. Net outflows, which may be as little-as 2,000 cubic feet per second must necessarily be computed as the difference between the large ebbflow and floodflow volumes that move back and forth between the delta region and San Francisco Bay. Discharges during peak periods of the ebb and flood tidal cycles may exceed 300,000 cubic feet per second. In consequence, a very high degree of precision must be maintained in the gross flow measurements if meaningful computations of net outflow are to be made. This report evaluates the probable accuracies that might be achieved by use of an AVM (acoustic velocity meter), a device which measures the stream velocity along a diagonal line across the channel. The study indicates that this line velocity will provide a stable index of the mean velocity in the channel and that such an index could be used as a primary parameter for the computation of discharge. Therefore, net outflows probably could be computed with the required accuracy by the use of such a device. The significant factors controlling the precision of measurement would be the stability of the channel geometry and streamline orientation, the precision with which the current-meter measurements needed for calibration of the system could be made, the instrumental calibration stability of the AVM system, and the length of period over which net outflows were computed. The AVM system

  15. Acoustic velocities of pure and iron-bearing magnesium silicate perovskite measured to 25 GPa and 1200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantel, Julien; Frost, Daniel J.; McCammon, Catherine A.; Jing, Zhicheng; Wang, Yanbin

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasonic interferometry measurements in conjunction with in situ X-ray techniques have been used to measure compressional and shear wave velocities and densities of MgSiO3 perovskite (Mg-Pv) and Mg0.95Fe0.042+Fe0.013+SiO3 perovskite ((Mg, Fe)-Pv) in the multianvil at pressures up to 25 GPa and temperatures to 1200 K. Data for Mg-Pv are consistent with previous studies and the (Mg, Fe)-Pv sample has almost identical shear properties to Mg-Pv. The adiabatic bulk modulus, Ks, for (Mg, Fe)-Pv, however, is found to be substantially lower than Mg-Pv, with a refined value of 236 GPa and a pressure derivative of 4.7. It is proposed that this low KS value result from a change in the elasticity of Fe-bearing perovskite at low pressures <30 GPa. High temperature data are consistent with recent models and it is shown that the obtained elastic properties of (Mg, Fe)-Pv are not inconsistent with a lower mantle of bulk silicate Earth composition.

  16. Redshift-space Enhancement of Line-of-sight Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main-galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. J.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2011-02-01

    We show that redshift-space distortions of galaxy correlations have a strong effect on correlation functions with distinct, localized features, like the signature of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). Near the line of sight, the features become sharper as a result of redshift-space distortions. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the correlation function in Gaussian simulations and the Millennium simulation. We also analyze the SDSS DR7 main-galaxy sample, splitting the sample into slices 2fdg5 on the sky in various rotations. Measuring two-dimensional correlation functions in each slice, we do see a sharp bump along the line of sight. Using Mexican-hat wavelets, we localize it to (110 ± 10) h -1 Mpc. Averaging only along the line of sight, we estimate its significance at a particular wavelet scale and location at 2.2σ. In a flat angular weighting in the (π, rp ) coordinate system, the noise level is suppressed, pushing the bump's significance to 4σ. We estimate that there is about a 0.2% chance of getting such a signal anywhere in the vicinity of the BAO scale from a power spectrum lacking a BAO feature. However, these estimates of the significances make some use of idealized Gaussian simulations, and thus are likely a bit optimistic.

  17. Redshift-Space Enhancement of Line-of-Sight Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main-Galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Haijun; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Budavari, Tamas; SZALAY, AlEXANDER

    2015-08-01

    We show that redshift-space distortions of galaxy correlations have a strong effect on correlation functions with distinct, localized features, like the signature of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). Near the line of sight, the features become sharper as a result of redshift-space distortions. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the correlation function in Gaussian simulations and the Millennium simulation. We also analyze the SDSS DR7 main-galaxy sample, splitting the sample into slices 2.5 on the sky in various rotations. Measuring two-dimensional correlation functions in each slice, we do see a sharp bump along the line of sight. Using Mexican-hat wavelets, we localize it to (110 ± 10) Mpc/h. Averaging only along the line of sight, we estimate its significance at a particular wavelet scale and location at 2.2σ. In a flat angular weighting in the (π,rp) coordinate system, the noise level is suppressed, pushing the bump’s significance to 4σ . We estimate that there is about a 0.2% chance of getting such a signal anywhere in the vicinity of the BAO scale from a power spectrum lacking a BAO feature. However, these estimates of the significances make some use of idealized Gaussian simulations, and thus are likely a bit optimistic.

  18. Optoelectronic oscillator using an acousto-optic delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Sin Hyuk; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Sangkyung; Roh, Hee Sook; Shim, Kyu Min

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) based on an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). The free spectral range between the modes is a function of the total loop length of the OEO, which is dependent on the propagation time of the acoustic wave through the AOM. By using the huge difference in the magnitude between the speed of light and the acoustic velocity in the AOM, we can extend the effective loop length of the OEO up to 3.8 km. We have measured phase noise of the OEO. Further developments will be made by using a dual-loop configuration. Agency for Defense Development.

  19. Comparison, analysis, and estimation of discharge data from two acoustic velocity meters on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melching, Charles S.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM) on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (the Canal) at Romeoville, Ill., provides vital information for the accounting of the diversion of water from Lake Michigan. A detailed analysis of the discharge record on the Canal at Romeoville was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to establish the most accurate estimates of discharge for water years 1986-91. The analysis involved (1) checking the consistency of the discharges estimated by two different AVM's installed at Romeoville for consecutive time periods by statistical and regression analyses, (2) adjusting the discharge record to account for corrections to the width and depth of the Canal determined by field measurements, and (3) development of equations for estimating discharge on days when the AVM was inoperative using discharge estimates made by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago at the lock, powerhouse, and controlling works at Lockport, Ill. No signi- ficant difference in the discharge estimates made by the two AVM's could be documented. The estimation equations combined regression analysis with physical principles of the outlet-works operation. The estimation equations simulated the verification period of October 1, 1991, to May 31, 1992, within 0.22, 5.15, and 0.66 percent for the mean, standard deviation, and skewness coefficient, respectively. Discharges were recalculated for the corrected width and depth, estimated for the periods of AVM inoperation, and entered into the discharge record for the station.

  20. High-frequency multi-wavelength acoustic power maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frank; Ladenkov, Oleg; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic power maps have been constructed using SOHO/MDI velocity and intensity data in Ni I 6768; NSO High-L Helioseismometer (HLH) Ca K intensity; and Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) intensity in Ca K. The HLH data provides maps up to a frequency of 11.9 mHz, substantially higher than the usual 8.33 mHz. The Ca K observations show a surprising strong enhancement of power within a sunspot at all temporal frequencies, while the Ni I data show the well-known suppression of power. Tests suggest that this apparent acoustic enhancement is the result of strong intensity gradients observed through terrestrial seeing.

  1. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  2. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-01

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  3. Direct measurement of clarinet air column oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jesse; Rogers, Chris; French, Chris

    2003-10-01

    The internal oscillation of a clarinet air column has been directly measured through the implementation of hot-wire anemometry. By taking a series of measurements down the centerline of the bore, velocity and pressure modal shapes of individual harmonics are separated, measured, and plotted. Finally, composite averaged power spectra of the internal oscillation are presented and compared to acoustic measurements acquired outside the clarinet. In many cases, the even harmonics of the internal oscillation dominate over the power found in the odd harmonics. This contradicts the classic model of the clarinet as a cylindrical pipe closed at one end and open at the other (where only odd harmonics are produced). Further, the data from the direct velocity measurements also contradict the externally acquired acoustic data, where odd harmonics generally dominate for the lowest 5-9 harmonics. Thus the clarinet, in theory and practice, is generally considered incapable of generating strong even harmonics. In this research, however, it is seen that dominate even harmonics are generated, but the energy for these frequencies is largely trapped inside the clarinet, whereas the energy associated with the odd harmonics is released to the ambient. [This research was conducted with the support of Selmer Musical Instruments.

  4. The source of 5 minute period photospheric umbral oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, M. J.; Labonte, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    We observed the oscillations in the umbrae of two sunspots, using the MCCD imaging spectrograph at the Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, Maui. We perform four spatial analyses of the umbral velocity and find that (1) there is more power traveling toward the center of the umbrae than leaving the center of the umbrae (this provides a direct measure of the absorption of p-modes by the sunspot umbrae); (2) the umbral oscillations display power in the same spatial and temporal frequency band as the quiet-sun oscillations; (3) Fourier-Bessel analysis of one umbra shows no obvious resonant frequencies which might represent natural oscillation modes; and (4) the centers of the umbrae have less rms velocity at high spatial wavenumber than the edges of the umbrae. We conclude: (1) the photospheric umbral oscillations are driven by a source external to the sunspot, the global p-mode oscillations; (2) there are no resonant frequencies in the oscillations; and (3) the absorption of acoustic waves occurs inside the umbrae.

  5. Modeling of spray combustion in an acoustic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R.K.; McQuay, M.Q.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    Combustion characteristics of an ethanol flame in a Rijke-tube, pulse combustor was theoretically studied to analyze the effects of injection velocity, burner location, droplet size distribution, surrounding gas velocity, and droplet phase difference on Sauter-mean diameter. The effects of these parameters were studied at first (80 Hz), second (160 Hz), and third (240 Hz) acoustic modes with steady (no oscillations) case as reference. The sound pressure level was kept constant at 150 decibels for all theoretical simulations. The simulation frequencies and sound pressure level was selected to match the actual conditions inside the rector. For all simulations, actual droplet size and velocity distributions, as experimentally measured using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer, at the injector exit were used. Significant effects on spray size distributions were found when the burning droplets were placed at the locations corresponding to the maximum acoustic velocity amplitude. Also, for both simulations and experimental results, the Sauter-mean diameters were higher for oscillating conditions compared to steady value because small droplets burn faster under an acoustic field and therefore, Sauter-mean diameter, which is biased towards larger droplets, increases.

  6. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  7. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  8. SU-D-210-07: The Dependence On Acoustic Velocity of Medium On the Needle Template and Electronic Grid Alignment in Ultrasound QA for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, P; Kapoor, R; Curran, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the impact on acoustic velocity (AV) of two different media (water and milk) using the needle template/electronic grid alignment test. Water, easily available, makes a good material to test the alignment of the template and grid although water’s AV (1498 m/s at 25°C) is significantly different from tissue (1540 m/s). Milk, with an AV much closer (1548 m/s) to prostate tissue, may be a good substitute for water in ultrasound quality assurance testing. Methods: Tests were performed using a Hitachi ultrasound unit with a mechanical arrangement designed to position needles parallel to the transducer. In this work, two materials – distilled water and homogenized whole milk (AVs of 1498 and 1548 m/s at 25°C) were used in a phantom to test ultrasound needle/grid alignment. The images were obtained with both materials and analyzed for their placement accuracy. Results: The needle template/electronic grid alignment tests showed displacement errors between measured and calculated values. The measurements showed displacements of 2.3mm (water) and 0.4mm (milk), and 1.6mm (water) and 0.3mm (milk) at depths of 7cm and 5cm respectively from true needle positions. The calculated results showed a displacement of 2.36 mm (water); 0.435mm (milk), and 1.66mm (water) and 0.31mm (milk) at a depth of 7cm and 5cm respectively. The displacements in the X and Y directions were also calculated. At depths of 7cm and 5cm, the (ΔX,ΔY) displacements in water were (0.829mm, 2.21mm) and (0.273mm, 1.634mm) and for milk were (0.15mm, 0.44mm) and (0.05mm, 0.302mm) respectively. Conclusion: The measured and calculated values were in good agreement for all tests. They show that milk provides superior results when performing needle template and electronic grid alignment tests for ultrasound units used in prostate brachytherapy.

  9. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts. PMID:26764815

  10. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q , the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v1≪cs for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v1≪cs/Q . Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  11. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  12. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, T.; Coakley, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows has been conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation turbulence model. It was found that the unsteady diffuser flowfields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity and shock. Computational results suggest that the mechanism causing the self-excited oscillation changes from viscous convective wave dominated oscillations to inviscid acoustic wave dominated oscillations when the location of downstream boundary varies from 8.66 to 134.7 throat height. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setup obscures the physical downstream boundary and, therefore, presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  13. Heat release and flame structure measurements of self-excited acoustically-driven premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin M.; Tuttle, Steven G.; Renfro, Michael W.; King, Galen B.

    2009-10-15

    An open-open organ pipe burner (Rijke tube) with a bluff-body ring was used to create a self-excited, acoustically-driven, premixed methane-air conical flame, with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.05. The feed tube velocities corresponded to Re = 1780-4450. Coupled oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release from the flame are naturally encouraged at resonant frequencies in the Rijke tube combustor. This coupling creates sustainable self-excited oscillations in flame front area and shape. The period of the oscillations occur at the resonant frequency of the combustion chamber when the flame is placed {proportional_to}1/4 of the distance from the bottom of the tube. In this investigation, the shape of these acoustically-driven flames is measured by employing both OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and chemiluminescence imaging and the images are correlated to simultaneously measured pressure in the combustor. Past research on acoustically perturbed flames has focused on qualitative flame area and heat release relationships under imposed velocity perturbations at imposed frequencies. This study reports quantitative empirical fits with respect to pressure or phase angle in a self-generated pressure oscillation. The OH-PLIF images were single temporal shots and the chemiluminescence images were phase averaged on chip, such that 15 exposures were used to create one image. Thus, both measurements were time resolved during the flame oscillation. Phase-resolved area and heat release variations throughout the pressure oscillation were computed. A relation between flame area and the phase angle before the pressure maximum was derived for all flames in order to quantitatively show that the Rayleigh criterion was satisfied in the combustor. Qualitative trends in oscillating flame area were found with respect to feed tube flow rates. A logarithmic relation was found between the RMS pressure and both the normalized average area and heat release rate

  14. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  15. Use of acoustic backscatter and vertical velocity to estimate concentration and dynamics of suspended solids in Upper Klamath Lake, south-central Oregon: Implications for Aphanizomenon flos-aquae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical velocity and acoustic backscatter measurements by acoustic Doppler current profilers were used to determine seasonal, subseasonal (days to weeks), and diel variation in suspended solids in a freshwater lake where massive cyanobacterial blooms occur annually. During the growing season, the suspended material in the lake is dominated by the buoyancy-regulating cyanobacteria, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Measured variables (water velocity, relative backscatter [RB], wind speed, and air and water temperatures) were averaged over the deployment season at each sample time of day to determine average diel cycles. Phase shifts between diel cycles in RB and diel cycles in wind speed, vertical water temperature differences (delta T(degree)), and horizontal current speeds were found by determining the lead or lag that maximized the linear correlation between the respective diel cycles. Diel cycles in RB were more in phase with delta T(degree) cycles, and, to a lesser extent, wind cycles, than to water current cycles but were out of phase with the cycle that would be expected if the vertical movement of buoyant cyanobacteria colonies was controlled primarily by light. Clear evidence of a diel cycle in vertical velocity was found only at the two deepest sites in the lake. Cycles of vertical velocity, where present, were out of phase with expected vertical motion of cyanobacterial colonies based on the theoretical cycle for light-driven vertical movement. This suggests that water column stability and turbulence were more important factors in controlling vertical distribution of colonies than light. Variations at subseasonal time scales were determined by filtering data to pass periods between 1.2 and 15 days. At subseasonal time scales, correlations between RB and currents or air temperature were consistent with increased concentration of cyanobacterial colonies near the surface when water column stability increased (higher air temperatures or weaker currents) and

  16. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  17. Highly directional acoustic receivers.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A; Evora, Victor M; Nuttall, Albert H

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources. PMID:12656387

  18. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  19. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggen, Lars; Voon, L. C. Lew Yan; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics.

  20. Characterization of acoustic emissions resulting from particle collision with a stationary bubble.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Spencer, Steven J; Coghill, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The present work characterizes the acoustic emissions resulting from the collision of a particle driven under gravity with a captive bubble. Conventional methods to investigate the bubble particle collision interaction model measure a descriptive parameter known as the collision time. During such a collision, particle impact may cause a strong deformation and a following oscillation of the bubble-particle interface generates detectable passive acoustic emissions (AE). Experiments and models presented show that the AE frequency monotonically decreases with the particle radius and is independent of the impact velocity, whereas the AE amplitude has a more complicated relationship with impact parameters. PMID:23654360

  1. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  2. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  3. Nonlinear saturation of thermoacoustic oscillations in annular combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardo, Giulio; Juniper, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Continuous combustion systems such as aeroplane engines can experience self-sustained pressure oscillations, called thermoacoustic oscillations. Quite often the combustion chamber is rotationally symmetric and confined between inner and outer walls, with a fixed number of burners equispaced along the annulus, at the chamber inlet. We focus on thermoacoustic oscillations in the azimuthal direction, and discuss the nonlinear saturation of the system towards 2 types of solutions: standing waves (with velocity and pressure nodes fixed in time and in space) and spinning waves (rotating waves, in clockwise or anti-clockwise direction). We neglect the effect of the transverse velocity oscillating in the azimuthal direction in the combustion chamber, and focus the model on the nonlinear effect that the longitudinal velocity, just upstream of each burner, has on the fluctuating heat-release response in the chamber. We present a low-order analytical framework to discuss the stability of the 2 types of solutions. We discuss how the stability and amplitudes of the 2 solutions depend on: 1) the acoustic damping in the system; 2) the number of injectors equispaced in the annulus; 3) the nonlinear response of the flames.

  4. A simple violin oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    For acoustic tests the violin is driven laterally at the bridge by a small speaker of the type commonly found in pocket transistor radios. An audio oscillator excites the tone which is picked up by a sound level meter. Gross patterns of vibration modes are obtained by the Chladni method.

  5. Simultaneous three-component velocity measurements in a swirl-stabilized flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüßler, Raimund; Bermuske, Mike; Czarske, Jürgen; Fischer, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Modern gas turbines are operated with lean fuel mixtures causing instabilities of the heat release and, by means of a thermoacoustic coupling, oscillations of the flow velocity within the flame. Since these oscillations can reduce the combustion efficiency, a better understanding of their formation mechanism and spatial origin is necessary. Therefore, simultaneous, three-component (3C) velocity measurements with high measurement rate are required. The Doppler global velocimetry with laser frequency modulation (FM-DGV) achieves measurement rates up to 100 kHz and was successfully applied for measurements in flames, but does not provide simultaneous 3C velocity data. In order to overcome this drawback, the FM-DGV is extended to allow simultaneous 3C measurements. The functionality is demonstrated by measurements within a swirl-stabilized flame. In combination with time-resolved measurements of the sound pressure and chemiluminescence emission, the spatial origin of the sound pressure emission in the acoustic far-field is identified as flow velocity and heat release oscillations in the acoustic near-field of the flame. Hence, a deeper insight into the thermoacoustic coupling can be achieved.

  6. Asymmetric steady streaming as a mechanism for acoustic propulsion of rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal, François; Lauga, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Recent experiments showed that standing acoustic waves could be exploited to induce self-propulsion of rigid metallic particles in the direction perpendicular to the acoustic wave. We propose in this paper a physical mechanism for these observations based on the interplay between inertial forces in the fluid and the geometrical asymmetry of the particle shape. We consider an axisymmetric rigid near-sphere oscillating in a quiescent fluid along a direction perpendicular to its symmetry axis. The kinematics of oscillations can be either prescribed or can result dynamically from the presence of an external oscillating velocity field. Steady streaming in the fluid, the inertial rectification of the time-periodic oscillating flow, generates steady stresses on the particle which, in general, do not average to zero, resulting in a finite propulsion speed along the axis of the symmetry of the particle and perpendicular to the oscillation direction. Our derivation of the propulsion speed is obtained at leading order in the Reynolds number and the deviation of the shape from that of a sphere. The results of our model are consistent with the experimental measurements, and more generally explains how time periodic forcing from an acoustic field can be harnessed to generate autonomous motion.

  7. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  8. A test device for premixed gas turbine combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Yip, M.J.

    1996-09-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a test combustor suitable for studying combustion oscillations caused by a commercial-scale gas turbine fuel nozzle. Aside from the need to be conducted at elevated pressures and temperatures, it is desirable for the experimental device to be flexible in its geometry so as to provide an acoustic environment representative of the commercial device. The combustor design, capabilities, and relevant instrumentation for such a device are presented, along with initial operating experience and preliminary data that suggests the importance of nozzle reference velocity and air temperature.

  9. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  10. Rocket Engine Oscillation Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Rocket engine oscillating data can reveal many physical phenomena ranging from unsteady flow and acoustics to rotordynamics and structural dynamics. Because of this, engine diagnostics based on oscillation data should employ both signal analysis and physical modeling. This paper describes an approach to rocket engine oscillation diagnostics, types of problems encountered, and example problems solved. Determination of design guidelines and environments (or loads) from oscillating phenomena is required during initial stages of rocket engine design, while the additional tasks of health monitoring, incipient failure detection, and anomaly diagnostics occur during engine development and operation. Oscillations in rocket engines are typically related to flow driven acoustics, flow excited structures, or rotational forces. Additional sources of oscillatory energy are combustion and cavitation. Included in the example problems is a sampling of signal analysis tools employed in diagnostics. The rocket engine hardware includes combustion devices, valves, turbopumps, and ducts. Simple models of an oscillating fluid system or structure can be constructed to estimate pertinent dynamic parameters governing the unsteady behavior of engine systems or components. In the example problems it is shown that simple physical modeling when combined with signal analysis can be successfully employed to diagnose complex rocket engine oscillatory phenomena.

  11. Imaging the Anisotropic Shear-wave Velocity in the Earth's Mantle using Free Oscillations, Body Waves, Surface Waves and Long-period Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekstrom, G.

    2013-12-01

    We incorporate normal-mode splitting functions into a framework containing surface-wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body-wave travel times to investigate the three-dimensional structure of anisotropic shear-wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. In contrast with earlier studies, our modeling approach spans a wider spectrum (0.3-50 mHz) of seismological observables, jointly inverts for velocity and anisotropy apart from the discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the nonlinear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+, an update to S362ANI, gives better fits to the recently measured splitting functions of spheroidal and toroidal modes that are modeled in this study. The splitting functions require additional isotropic variations in the transition zone and the mid mantle that are geographically distributed in the southern hemisphere. The level of agreement in the isotropic shear-velocity structure is higher between S362ANI+ and other recent studies than in the earlier generation of models. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+ is similar to S362ANI and is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle since only small improvements in fits are observed on adding anisotropy at depth. We also show that modeling the splitting functions reduces the tradeoffs between lateral variations in velocity and anisotropy in the lowermost mantle. Therefore, more data should be included to constrain any radial anisotropy in the transition zone and in the lower mantle.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Surface Acoustic Wave Propagation Velocity in InxGa1-xN Films Obtained by High-Resolution Brillouin Spectroscopy: Determination of Temperature Coefficient of Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riobóo, Rafael J. Jiménez; Prieto, Carlos; Cuscó, Ramón; Artús, Lluís; Boney, Chris; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2013-05-01

    Temperature-dependent surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation velocity and temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) have been determined for the first time in InxGa1-xN alloys by means of high-resolution Brillouin spectroscopy (HRBS). HRBS offers an alternative way of determining TCF. The obtained TCF values present a non-linear behavior with the In concentration. TCF of pure InN (-13.75 ppm/K) is similar to those of AlN and GaN (-19 and -17.7 ppm/K, respectively). InxGa1-xN samples exhibit frequency values that are very stable against temperature changes, which makes InxGa1-xN a good candidate for current SAW-based technological applications.

  13. Acoustic communication by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert

    2002-05-01

    Many ant species communicate acoustically by stridulating, i.e., running a scraper over a washboard-like set of ridges. Ants appear to be insensitive to airborne sound. Consequently, myrmecologists have concluded that the stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. This has tended to diminish the importance of acoustic communication, and it is currently believed that ant communication is based almost exclusively on pheromones, with acoustic communication assigned an almost nonexistent role. However, it can be shown that acoustic communication between ants is effective only if the medium is air and not the substrate. How, then, is it possible for ants to appear deaf to airborne sound and yet communicate through the air? An explanation is provided in a paper [R. Hickling and R. L. Brown, ``Analysis of acoustic communication by ants,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1920-1929 (2000)]. Ants are small relative to the wavelengths they generate. Hence, they create a near field, which is characterized by a major increase in sound velocity (particle velocity of sound) in the vicinity of the source. Hair sensilla on the ants' antennae respond to sound velocity. Thus, ants are able to detect near-field sound from other ants and to exclude extraneous airborne sound.

  14. Large eddy simulations of a transcritical round jet submitted to transverse acoustic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Flesca, M.; Schmitt, T.; Ducruix, S.; Candel, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article reports numerical computations of a turbulent round jet of transcritical fluid (low temperature nitrogen injected under high pressure conditions) surrounded by the same fluid at rest under supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) and submitted to transverse acoustic modulations. The numerical framework relies on large eddy simulation in combination with a real-gas description of thermodynamics and transport properties. A stationary acoustic field is obtained by modulating the normal acoustic velocity at the lateral boundaries of the computational domain. This study specifically focuses on the interaction of the jet with the acoustic field to investigate how the round transcritical jet changes its shape and mixes with the surrounding fluid. Different modulation amplitudes and frequencies are used to sweep a range of conditions. When the acoustic field is established in the domain, the jet length is notably reduced and the jet is flattened in the spanwise direction. Two regimes of oscillation are identified: for low Strouhal numbers a large amplitude motion is observed, while for higher Strouhal numbers the jet oscillates with a small amplitude around the injector axis. The minimum length is obtained for a Strouhal number of 0.3 and the jet length increases with increasing Strouhal numbers after reaching this minimum value. The mechanism of spanwise deformation is shown to be linked with dynamical effects resulting from reduction of the pressure in the transverse direction in relation with increased velocities on the two sides of the jet. A propagative wave is then introduced in the domain leading to similar effects on the jet, except that a bending is also observed in the acoustic propagation direction. A kinematic model, combining hydrodynamic and acoustic contributions, is derived in a second stage to represent the motion of the jet centerline. This model captures details of the numerical simulations quite well. These various

  15. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  16. The planar jet-plate oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthurs, David; Ziada, Samir

    2011-01-01

    The aeroacoustic noise generated by a high speed, planar gas jet impinging on a flat plate is investigated experimentally. The jet used in this study is typical of those commonly found in industrial applications such as in various coating control and heat transfer processes. Normal jet impingement on the plate is found to generate strong acoustic tones over a wide range of impingement distances and jet velocities. The characteristics of these tones, as a function of the jet velocity and impingement distance, are quantified. Phase and amplitude measurements of the pressure fluctuations on the impingement plate indicate that the acoustic tones are generated by an antisymmetric instability mode of the jet oscillation. The effect of plate inclination in both the transverse and span-wise directions, with respect to the incident jet, is also studied. The jet-plate tone is found to be much more sensitive to changes in the span-wise plate inclination than to changes in the transverse inclination, but in both cases, a complete suppression of the tone is found to be possible.

  17. Finite-element modeling of an acoustic cloak for three-dimensional flexible shells with structural excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, M.; Akl, W.; Elnady, T.; Elsabbagh, A.

    2011-06-01

    A finite-element model for three-dimensional acoustic cloaks in both cylindrical and spherical coordinates is presented. The model is developed through time-harmonic analysis to study pressure and velocity field distributions as well as the cloak's performance. The model developed accounts for the fluid-structure interaction of thin fluid-loaded shells. A plane strain model is used for the thin shell. Mechanical harmonic excitation is applied to the fluid-loaded shell to investigate the effect of mechanical oscillation of the shell on the performance of the acoustic cloak. In developing this model, a deeper insight into the acoustic cloak phenomena presented by Cummer and Shurig in 2007 is presented. Different nonlinear coordinate transformations are presented to study their effect on the acoustic cloak performance.

  18. Use of acoustic sensors to probe the mechanical properties of liposomes.

    PubMed

    Melzak, Kathryn; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic sensors probe the response of a thin layer to the mechanical displacement associated with an acoustic wave. Acoustic measurements provide two simultaneous time-resolved signals; one signal is related to the velocity or frequency of the acoustic wave and is mainly a function of adsorbed mass, while the second signal, related to the oscillation amplitude, is associated with energy dissipation and is a function of the viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed layer. The methods described in this chapter explore the relationship between the acoustic measurements of adsorbed liposomes and the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer. This is carried out using a well-characterized model system consisting of liposomes prepared from an unsaturated phospholipid and a range of mole fractions of cholesterol. Real-time acoustic measurements are shown to be sensitive to changes in the liposome cholesterol content, regardless of the mode of attachment of the liposome to the device surface. This sensitivity is not due to changes in the density of the bilayer, or to changes in the extent of liposome-surface interactions, thus leaving the mechanical properties of the bilayer as the feature that is probably being measured. Some mechanisms by which the acoustic response could be generated are suggested in this chapter. PMID:19913160

  19. Combustor oscillation pressure stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    In accordance with the objective of the present invention, the active control of unsteady combustion induced oscillations in a combustion chamber fired by a suitable fuel and oxidizer mixture, such as a hydrocarbon fuel and air mixture, is provided by restructuring and moving the position of the main flame front and thereby increasing the transport time and displacing the pressure wave further away from the in-phase relationship with the periodic heat release. The restructuring and repositioning of the main flame are achieved by utilizing a pilot flame which is pulsed at a predetermined frequency corresponding to less than about one-half the frequency of the combustion oscillation frequency with the duration of each pulse being sufficient to produce adequate secondary thermal energy to restructure the main flame and thereby decouple the heat release from the acoustic coupling so as to lead to a reduction in the dynamic pressure amplitude. The pulsating pilot flame produces a relatively small and intermittently existing flame front in the combustion zone that is separate from the oscillating main flame front but which provides the thermal energy necessary to effectively reposition the location of the oscillating main flame front out of the region in the combustion zone where the acoustic coupling can occur with the main flame and thereby effectively altering the oscillation-causing phase relationship with the heat of combustion.

  20. Nonlinear acoustic techniques for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Korman, Murray S; Sabatier, James M

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of the top surface vibration of a buried (inert) VS 2.2 anti-tank plastic landmine reveal significant resonances in the frequency range between 80 and 650 Hz. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity (due to sufficient acoustic-to-seismic coupling) have been used in detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds nonlinearly to pressure fluctuations, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for a method of buried landmine detection not previously exploited. Tuning curve experiments (revealing "softening" and a back-bone curve linear in particle velocity amplitude versus frequency) help characterize the nonlinear resonant behavior of the soil-landmine oscillator. The results appear to exhibit the characteristics of nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior, which is explored. When two primary waves f1 and f2 drive the soil over the mine near resonance, a rich spectrum of nonlinearly generated tones is measured with a geophone on the surface over the buried landmine in agreement with Donskoy [SPIE Proc. 3392, 221-217 (1998); 3710, 239-246 (1999)]. In profiling, particular nonlinear tonals can improve the contrast ratio compared to using either primary tone in the spectrum. PMID:15658688

  1. Analytical model of nonlinear thermo-acoustic effects in a matrix burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, Maria A.

    2013-08-01

    This paper considers a fundamental thermo-acoustic test rig developed by Noiray (Linear and Nonlinear Analysis of Combustion Instabilities, Application to Multipoint Injection Systems and Control Strategies", Ph.D. Thesis, École Centrale Paris, 2007) and models it with an entirely analytical approach. The measured flame describing function is represented by a surprisingly simple time-lag law, which is then used to derive the governing equation for a single acoustic mode in the test rig. This equation turns out to be that of a harmonic oscillator with a damping/amplification coefficient that depends on the velocity amplitude. On this basis we find analytically the pattern of the oscillation regimes in parameter space, in particular the frequency and amplitude of limit cycles at various tube lengths. There is good qualitative agreement with some, but not all, features of Noiray's observations.

  2. Observation of coherent acoustic phonon in titanyl phthalocyanine thin solid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Hyeyoung; Su, Shiu-Ho

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast exciton dynamics is investigated in titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) micrograin films in this study. Exponential exciton relaxation and oscillatory responses are observed in transient reflectivity measurements of the films. Laser-induced coherent acoustic waves (LCAW) are proposed to be responsible for this oscillation. Despite their fast attenuation with the increase in temperature, LCAWs are successfully detected at room temperature through probing at a large oblique angle near the low-energy absorption edge of the Q-Band. From the oscillation period of the LCAW, the sound velocity is estimated to be ∼3.1 × 103 m/s, and an acoustic echo arising from the boundary between the films and substrate is also observed.

  3. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Fleming, James G.; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  4. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  5. Cosmic microwave background acoustic peak locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Knox, L.; Mulroe, B.; Narimani, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and 12 extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g. that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 deg out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models versus numerical calculations. Here, we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential transients, neutrino free-streaming, the breakdown of tight coupling, the shape of the primordial power spectrum, details of the geometric projection from three to two dimensions, and the thickness of the last scattering surface. We also compare the peak locations determined from Planck measurements to expectations under the Λ cold dark matter model. Taking into account how the peak locations were determined, we find them to be in agreement.

  6. Aggregate sound velocities and acoustic Grüneisen parameter of iron up to 300 GPa and 1,200 K

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovinsky, L. S.; Dubrovinskaia, N. A.; Le Bihan, T.

    2001-01-01

    Successful interpretation of available geophysical data requires experimental and theoretical information on the elasticity of solids under physical conditions of Earth's interior. Because iron is considered as major component in Earth's core, elastic properties of iron at high pressures and temperatures are very important for modeling its composition and dynamics. We use in situ x-ray diffraction data on ɛ-iron at static pressures up to 300 GPa and temperatures to 1,200 K to determine the Debye–Waller temperature factors and calculate aggregate sound velocities and Grüneisen parameter of ɛ-iron by using an approach that is based on Rietveld refinement at high pressures and temperatures. PMID:11504937

  7. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel: Acoustic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in a wind tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a CTOL hybrid inlet, an STOL hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the baseline inlet noise and the effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The 1/3 octave band noise data from these tests are given along with selected plots of 1/3 octave band spectra and directivity and full scale PNL directivities. The test facilities and data reduction techniques used are also described.

  8. Acoustic noise from volcanoes - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woulff, G.; Mcgetchin, T. R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses some theoretical aspects of acoustic investigation of volcanoes and describes a field experiment involving the recording, analysis, and interpretation of acoustic radiation from energetic fumaroles at Volcan Acatenango, Guatemala, during mid-January 1973. Particular attention is given to deriving information about the flow velocity of the erupting medium from acoustics as a means to study eruption dynamics. Theoretical considerations suggest that acoustic power radiated during gaseous volcanic eruptions may be related to gas exit velocity according to appropriate power laws. Eruption acoustics proves useful as a means of quantitative monitoring of volcanic activity.

  9. Self-oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain dynamical systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy into the vibration: no external rate needs to be adjusted to the resonant frequency. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the swaying of the London Millennium Footbridge in 2000. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments. The heart is a “relaxation oscillator”, i.e., a non-sinusoidal self-oscillator whose period is determined by sudden, nonlinear switching at thresholds. We review the general criterion that determines whether a linear system can self-oscillate. We then describe the limiting cycles of the simplest nonlinear self-oscillators, as well as the ability of two or more coupled self-oscillators to become spontaneously synchronized (“entrained”). We characterize the operation of motors as self-oscillation and prove a theorem about their limit efficiency, of which Carnot’s theorem for heat engines appears as a special case. We briefly discuss how self-oscillation applies to servomechanisms, Cepheid variable stars, lasers, and the macroeconomic business cycle, among other applications. Our emphasis throughout is on the energetics of self-oscillation, often neglected by the literature on nonlinear dynamical systems.

  10. The acoustic vector sensor: a versatile battlefield acoustics sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bree, Hans-Elias; Wind, Jelmer W.

    2011-06-01

    The invention of the Microflown sensor has made it possible to measure acoustic particle velocity directly. An acoustic vector sensor (AVS) measures the particle velocity in three directions (the source direction) and the pressure. The sensor is a uniquely versatile battlefield sensor because its size is a few millimeters and it is sensitive to sound from 10Hz to 10kHz. This article shows field tests results of acoustic vector sensors, measuring rifles, heavy artillery, fixed wing aircraft and helicopters. Experimental data shows that the sensor is suitable as a ground sensor, mounted on a vehicle and on a UAV.

  11. Non-premixed acoustically perturbed swirling flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Idahosa, Uyi; Saha, Abhishek; Xu, Chengying; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-09-15

    An investigation into the response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (f{sub p}=0-315 Hz) and swirl intensities (S=0.09 and 0.34) is carried out. Perturbations are generated using a loudspeaker at the base of an atmospheric co-flow burner with resulting velocity oscillation amplitudes vertical stroke u'/U{sub avg} vertical stroke in the 0.03-0.30 range. The dependence of flame dynamics on the relative richness of the flame is investigated by studying various constant fuel flow rate flame configurations. Flame heat release rate is quantitatively measured using a photomultiplier with a 430 nm bandpass filter for observing CH* chemiluminescence which is simultaneously imaged with a phase-locked CCD camera. The flame response is observed to exhibit a low-pass filter characteristic with minimal flame response beyond pulsing frequencies of 200 Hz. Flames at lower fuel flow rates are observed to remain attached to the central fuel pipe at all acoustic pulsing frequencies. PIV imaging of the associated isothermal fields show the amplification in flame aspect ratio is caused by the narrowing of the inner recirculation zone (IRZ). Good correlation is observed between the estimated flame surface area and the heat release rate signature at higher swirl intensity flame configurations. A flame response index analogous to the Rayleigh criterion in non-forced flames is used to assess the potential for a strong flame response at specific perturbation configurations and is found to be a good predictor of highly responsive modes. Phase conditioned analysis of the flame dynamics yield additional criteria in highly responsive modes to include the effective amplitude of velocity oscillations induced by the acoustic pulsing. In addition, highly responsive modes were characterized by velocity to heat release rate phase differences in the {+-}{pi}/2 range. A final observed characteristic in highly responsive flames is a Strouhal number between

  12. Dynamics of rotating and oscillating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Trinh, E. H.; Croonquist, A. P.; Elleman, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of rotation and oscillation is investigated of a freely suspended liquid drop under the influence of surface tension and positioned inside an experimental apparatus by acoustic forces in the low acceleration environment of Spacelab 3. After a drop was observed to be spherical and stably located at the center of the chamber, it was set into rotation or oscillation by acoustic torque or modulated radiation pressure force.

  13. Experimental analysis of the aero-acoustic coupling in a plane impinging jet on a slotted plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoum, Hassan H.; El Hassan, Mouhammad; Abed-Meraïm, Kamel; Martinuzzi, Robert; Sakout, Anas

    2013-08-01

    Impinging jets are encountered in many industrial applications and suppression of the noise generated by these jets is of great fundamental and practical interest. The vortex dynamics and the interaction between the vortical structures and the impinging wall should be understood in order to control the aero-acoustic coupling between shear layer oscillation and the acoustic modes (self-sustained tones). In this study, a plane jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle and impinging on a plate is considered for Re = 3900. The sound pressure, the vibration of the impinged plate and the spatial velocity field are obtained simultaneously using a microphone, an accelerometer and the time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique, respectively. Spectra and cross-correlations are used to educe the role of different vortical structures leading to the aero-acoustic coupling. The results show the evolution of the correlation between acoustic and transverse velocity fields in the longitudinal direction. A pre-whitening technique is used to investigate the coupling between the acoustic and the velocity signals. This method shows that the correlation between the two signals has a centred peak that is not directly related to the passage of the dominant Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  14. Polariton Condensation in Dynamic Acoustic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-Méndez, E. A.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Wouters, M.; Bradley, R.; Biermann, K.; Guda, K.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.; Sarkar, D.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that the tunable potential introduced by a surface acoustic wave on a homogeneous polariton condensate leads to fragmentation of the condensate into an array of wires which move with the acoustic velocity. Reduction of the spatial coherence of the condensate emission along the surface acoustic wave direction is attributed to the suppression of coupling between the spatially modulated condensates. Interparticle interactions observed at high polariton densities screen the acoustic potential, partially reversing its effect on spatial coherence.

  15. An experimental investigation of an acoustically excited laminar premixed flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kartheekeyan, S.; Chakravarthy, S.R.

    2006-08-15

    A two-dimensional laminar premixed flame is stabilized over a burner in a confined duct and is subjected to external acoustic forcing from the downstream end. The equivalence ratio of the flame is 0.7. The flame is stabilized in the central slot of a three-slotted burner. The strength of the shear layer of the cold reactive mixture through the central slot is controlled by the flow rate of cold nitrogen gas through the side slots. The frequency range of acoustic excitation is 400-1200 Hz, and the amplitude levels are such that the acoustic velocity is less than the mean flow velocity of the reactants. Time-averaged chemiluminescence images of the perturbed flame front display time-mean changes as compared to the unperturbed flame shape at certain excitation frequencies. Prominent changes to the flame front are in the form of stretching or shrinkage, asymmetric development of its shape, increased/preferential lift-off of one or both of the stabilization points of the flame, and nearly random three-dimensional fluctuations over large time scales under some conditions. The oscillations of the shear layer and the response of the confined jet of the hot products to the acoustic forcing, such as asymmetric flow development and jet spreading, are found to be responsible for the observed mean changes in the flame shape. A distinct low-frequency component ({approx}60-90 Hz) relative to the excitation frequency is observed in the fluctuations of the chemiluminescent intensity in the flame under most conditions. It is observed that fluctuations in the flame area predominantly contribute to the origin of the low-frequency component. This is primarily due to the rollup of vortices and the generation of enthalpy waves at the burner lip. Both of these processes are excited at the externally imposed acoustic time scale, but convect/propagate downstream at the flow time scale, which is much larger. (author)

  16. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect. PMID:26585023

  17. Solar oscillation frequency and solar neutrino predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1990-07-05

    The light and velocity variations of the Sun and solar-like stars are unique among intrinsic variable stars. Unlike all other standard classes, such as Cepheids, B stars, and white dwarfs, the pulsation driving is caused by coupling with the acoustic noise in the upper convection zone. Each global pulsation mode is just another degree of freedom for the turbulent convection, and energy is shared equally between these g{sup {minus}}-modes and the solar oscillation modes. This driving and damping, together with the normal stellar pulsation mechanisms produce extremely low amplitude solar oscillations. Actually, the surface layer radiative damping is strong, and the varying oscillation mode amplitudes manifest the stochastic convection driving and the steady damping. Thus stability calculations for solar-like pulsations are difficult and mostly inconclusive, but calculations of pulsation periods are as straightforward as for all the other classes of intrinsic variable stars. The issue that is important for the Sun is its internal structure, because the mass, radius, and luminosity are extremely well known. Conventionally, we need the pulsation constants for each of millions of modes. Unknown parameters for constructing solar models are the composition and its material pressure, energy, and opacity, as well as the convection mixing length. We treat the nuclear energy and neutrino production formulas as sufficiently well known. The presence of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) orbiting the solar center affects the predicted oscillation frequencies so that they do not agree with observations as well as those for models without WIMPs. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  18. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERACTION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Chitta, Lakshmi Pradeep; Kariyappa, R.; Jain, Rekha; Jefferies, Stuart M. E-mail: rkari@iiap.res.in E-mail: stuartj@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-01-10

    The effect of the magnetic field on photospheric intensity and velocity oscillations at the sites of small-scale magnetic fields (SMFs) in a quiet Sun near the solar disk center is studied. We use observations made by the G-band filter in the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode for intensity oscillations; Doppler velocity, magnetic field, and continuum intensity are derived from an Ni I photospheric absorption line at 6767.8 A using the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Our analysis shows that both the high-resolution intensity observed in the G band and velocity oscillations are influenced by the presence of a magnetic field. While intensity oscillations are suppressed at all frequencies in strong magnetic field regions compared to weak magnetic field regions, velocity oscillations show an enhancement of power in the frequency band 5.5-7 mHz. We find that there is a drop of 20%-30% in the p-mode power of velocity oscillations within the SMFs when compared to the regions surrounding them. Our findings indicate that the nature of the interaction of acoustic waves with the quiet Sun SMFs is similar to that of large-scale magnetic fields in active regions. We also report the first results of the center-to-limb variation of such effects using the observations of the quiet Sun from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The independent verification of these interactions using SDO/HMI suggests that the velocity power drop of 20%-30% in p-modes is fairly constant across the solar disk.

  19. Method and means for measuring acoustic emissions

    DOEpatents

    Renken, Jr., Claus J.

    1976-01-06

    The detection of acoustic emissions emanating from an object is achieved with a capacitive transducer coupled to the object. The capacitive transducer is charged and then allowed to discharge with the rate of discharge being monitored. Oscillations in the rate of discharge about the normally exponential discharge curve for the capacitive transducer indicate the presence of acoustic emissions.

  20. Fundamentals of enhanced scalar transport in strongly oscillating and/or resonant flow fields as created by pulse combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J. O.; Gemmen, R. S.; Ozer, R. W.

    In this paper, we discuss the major features of strongly oscillating flow fields as they pertain to scalar transport. The flow fields to be discussed have been created by the acoustic resonance of a pulse combustor. Discussions of the fluid-dynamic flow field in the tailpipe where the flow is in acoustic resonance, and out of the end of the tailpipe where the flow is a pulsating free jet are presented. The flow fields to be discussed are full of intriguing features that are responsible for significantly increasing the convective transport of scalars. These features are a direct result of velocity oscillations that are sufficiently large to create flow reversal. The fundamental mechanisms that cause the increased transport of mass, momentum, and energy are discussed. We end this paper with some examples of practical systems which exploit the physics described here.

  1. An experimental evaluation of the application of the Kirchhoff formulation for sound radiation from an oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Kirchhoff integral formulation is evaluated for its effectiveness in quantitatively predicting the sound radiated from an oscillating airfoil whose chord length is comparable with the acoustic wavelength. A rigid airfoil section was oscillated at samll amplitude in a medium at rest to produce the sound field. Simultaneous amplitude and phase measurements were made of surface pressure and surface velocity distributions and the acoustic free field. Measured surface pressure and motion are used in applying the theory, and airfoil thickness and contour are taken into account. The result was that the theory overpredicted the sound pressure level by 2 to 5, depending on direction. Differences are also noted in the sound field phase behavior.

  2. Fractional oscillator.

    PubMed

    Stanislavsky, A A

    2004-11-01

    We consider a fractional oscillator which is a generalization of the conventional linear oscillator in the framework of fractional calculus. It is interpreted as an ensemble average of ordinary harmonic oscillators governed by a stochastic time arrow. The intrinsic absorption of the fractional oscillator results from the full contribution of the harmonic oscillator ensemble: these oscillators differ a little from each other in frequency so that each response is compensated by an antiphase response of another harmonic oscillator. This allows one to draw a parallel in the dispersion analysis for media described by a fractional oscillator and an ensemble of ordinary harmonic oscillators with damping. The features of this analysis are discussed. PMID:15600586

  3. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, Randall S.; Richards, George A.; Yip, Mui-Tong Joseph; Robey, Edward H.; Cully, Scott R.; Addis, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time.

  4. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.H.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1998-08-11

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time. 7 figs.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  6. Acoustic velocity measurements on Na 2O-TiO 2-SiO 2 liquids: Evidence for a highly compressible TiO 2 component related to five-coordinated Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Lange, Rebecca A.; Ai, Yuhui

    2007-09-01

    Longitudinal acoustic velocities were measured at 1 bar in 10 Na 2O-TiO 2-SiO 2 (NTS) liquids for which previous density and thermal expansion data are reported in the literature. Data were collected with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer at centered frequencies of 4.5, 5, and 6 MHz between 1233 and 1896 K; in all cases, the sound speeds decrease with increasing temperature. Six of the liquids have a similar TiO 2 concentration (˜25 mol %), so that the effect of varying Na/Si ratio on the partial molar compressibility of the TiO 2 component can be evaluated. Theoretically based models for βT and (∂ V/∂ P) T as a function of composition and temperature are presented. As found previously for the partial molar volume of TiO 2(V) in sodium silicate melts, values of β (13.7-18.8 × 10 -2/GPa) vary systematically with the Na/Si and Na/(Si + Ti) ratio in the liquid. In contrast values of β for the SiO 2 and Na 2O components (6.6 and 8.0 × 10 -2/GPa, respectively, at 1573 K) are independent of composition. Na 2O is the only component that contributes to the temperature dependence of the compressibility of NTS liquids (1.13 ± 0.04 × 10 -4/GPa K). The results further indicate that the TiO 2 component is twice as compressible as the Na 2O and SiO 2 components. The enhanced compressibility of TiO 2 appears to be related to the abundance of five-coordinated Ti ( [5]Ti) in these liquids, but not with a change in Ti coordination. Instead, it is proposed that the asymmetric geometry of [5]Ti in a square pyramidal site promotes different topological rearrangements in alkali titanosilicate liquids, which lead to the enhanced compressibility of TiO 2.

  7. Ion Acoustic Waves in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; Killian, T. C.

    2010-08-06

    We photoionize laser-cooled atoms with a laser beam possessing spatially periodic intensity modulations to create ultracold neutral plasmas with controlled density perturbations. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging reveals that the density perturbations oscillate in space and time, and the dispersion relation of the oscillations matches that of ion acoustic waves, which are long-wavelength, electrostatic, density waves.

  8. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  9. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  10. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-20

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics. PMID:26986189

  11. Experimental investigation of cryogenic flame dynamics under transverse acoustic modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méry, Yoann; Hakim, Layal; Scouflaire, Philippe; Vingert, Lucien; Ducruix, Sébastien; Candel, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation is focused on high-frequency combustion instabilities coupled by transverse acoustic modes. This phenomenon has been observed during the development of many liquid rocket engines and other high performance devices. Such instabilities induce an unsteady heat release which leads in many cases to a rapid intensification of heat fluxes to the thrust chamber walls, causing fatal damage and a spectacular destruction of the propulsion system. One central objective of this effort is to observe and understand the physical processes leading the coupling between acoustics and combustion, and resulting in the growth of such instabilities. Experiments carried out on the Mascotte testbed at ONERA serve to identify the main processes involved and bring forth mechanisms taking place when an engine becomes unstable. Hot fire experiments are carried out in a model scale combustor reproducing many of the conditions prevailing in unstable rocket engines. Subcritical and transcritical cryogenic jets are injected in a multiple injector combustion chamber (MIC). This system is fed with LOx and methane through five injection units. The flames formed in this configuration are modulated by an acoustic wave with an amplitude of several bars. This is obtained with a new Very Large Amplitude Modulator (VHAM) capable of generating acoustic mode amplitudes representative of those found in actual engine undergoing HF instabilities. It is shown first that the strength of the acoustic field and the frequency range of oscillation (1 kHz-3.5 kHz) are consistent with rocket instability observations. Conditions where a feedback of the flame on the acoustic field occurs are obtained. High speed diagnostics indicates that the velocity field dramatically enhances the atomization process. The liquid core length is strongly reduced. At moderate amplitudes, the liquid jets are flattened in the spanwise direction and heat release takes place in two sheets neighboring the dense core

  12. Acoustical Characterization of the Columbia River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Investigations of near-shore and in-shore environments have, rightly, focused on geological, thermodynamic and hydrodynamic parameters. A complementary acoustical characterization of the estuarine environment provides another layer of information to facilitate a more complete understanding of the physical environment. Relatively few acoustical studies have been carried out in rivers, estuaries or other energetic environments; nearly all acoustical work in such environments has been done at high acoustic frequencies—in the 10's and 100's of kHz. To this end, within the context of a larger hydrodynamic field experiment (RIVET II), a small acoustic field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE), the acoustic objective of which was to characterize the acoustic environment in the CRE in terms of ambient noise field statistics and acoustic propagation characteristics at low-to-mid-frequencies. Acoustically, the CRE salt wedge consists of two isospeed layers separated by a thin, three-dimensional high-gradient layer. Results demonstrate that (1) this stratification supports ducting of low-angle acoustic energy in the upper layer and the creation of an acoustic shadow zone in the lower layer; (2) the spatiotemporal dynamics of the salt wedge structure during the very energetic flood and ebb tides induce significant variability in the acoustic environment, as well as significant flow noise across the acoustic transducer; and (3) this flow noise correlates to current velocity and complicates acoustical observations at low frequencies.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigations of resonant acoustic waves in near-critical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nusair; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2015-10-01

    Flow and transport induced by resonant acoustic waves in a near-critical fluid filled cylindrical enclosure is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Supercritical carbon dioxide (near the critical or the pseudo-critical states) in a confined resonator is subjected to acoustic field created by an electro-mechanical acoustic transducer and the induced pressure waves are measured by a fast response pressure field microphone. The frequency of the acoustic transducer is chosen such that the lowest acoustic mode propagates along the enclosure. For numerical simulations, a real-fluid computational fluid dynamics model representing the thermo-physical and transport properties of the supercritical fluid is considered. The simulated acoustic field in the resonator is compared with measurements. The formation of acoustic streaming structures in the highly compressible medium is revealed by time-averaging the numerical solutions over a given period. Due to diverging thermo-physical properties of supercritical fluid near the critical point, large scale oscillations are generated even for small sound field intensity. The strength of the acoustic wave field is found to be in direct relation with the thermodynamic state of the fluid. The effects of near-critical property variations and the operating pressure on the formation process of the streaming structures are also investigated. Irregular streaming patterns with significantly higher streaming velocities are observed for near-pseudo-critical states at operating pressures close to the critical pressure. However, these structures quickly re-orient to the typical Rayleigh streaming patterns with the increase operating pressure. PMID:26520322

  14. Parvulescu Revisited: Small Tank Acoustics for Bioacousticians.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Peter H; Hawkins, Anthony D; Popper, Arthur N; Fay, Richard R; Gray, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often perform hearing studies on fish in small tanks. The acoustic field in such a tank is considerably different from the acoustic field that occurs in the animal's natural environment. The significance of these differences is magnified by the nature of the fish's auditory system where either acoustic pressure (a scalar), acoustic particle velocity (a vector), or both may serve as the stimulus. It is essential for the underwater acoustician to understand the acoustics of small tanks to be able to carry out valid auditory research in the laboratory and to properly compare and interpret the results of others. PMID:26611052

  15. Calculations of combustion response profiles and oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The theory and procedures for determining the characteristics of pressure oscillations in rocket engines with prescribed burning rate oscillations are presented. Pressure and velocity oscillations calculated using this procedure are presented for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) to show the influence of baffles and absorbers on the burning rate oscillations required to achieve neutral stability. Results of calculations to determine local combustion responses using detailed physical models for injection, atomization, and vaporization with gas phase oscillations in baffled and unbaffled SSME combustors are presented. The contributions of the various physical phenomena occurring in a combustor to oscillations in combustion response were determined.

  16. A new type of magnetoresistance oscillations: Interaction of a two-dimensional electron gas with leaky interface phonons

    SciTech Connect

    ZUDOV,M.A.; PONOMAREV,I.V.; EFROS,A.L.; DU,R.R.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.

    2000-05-11

    The authors report a new type of oscillations in magnetoresistance observed in high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), in GaAs-AIGaAs heterostructures. Being periodic in 1/B these oscillations appear in weak magnetic field (B < 0.3 T) and only in a narrow temperature range (3 K < T < 7 K). Remarkably, these oscillations can be understood in terms of magneto-phonon resonance originating from the interaction of 2DEG and leaky interface-acoustic phonon modes. The existence of such modes on the GaAs:AIGaAs interface is demonstrated theoretically and their velocities are calculated. It is shown that the electron-phonon scattering matrix element exhibits a peak for the phonons carrying momentum q = 2k{sub F} (k{sub F} is the Fermi wave-vector of 2DEG).

  17. Measurement of microbubble-induced acoustic microstreaming using microparticle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, Paul; Zhu, Yonggang; Manasseh, Richard; Ooi, Andrew

    2005-02-01

    Micro particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the velocity fields around oscillating gas bubbles in microfluidic geometries were undertaken. Two sets of experiments were performed. The first measured the acoustic microstreaming around a gas bubble with a radius of 195 μm attached to a wall in a chamber of 30 mm× 30 mm× 0.66 mm. Under acoustic excitation, vigorous streaming in the form of a circulation around on the bubble was observed. The streaming flow was highest near the surface of the bubble with velocities around 1mm/s measured. The velocity magnitude decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the bubble. The velocity field determined by micro-PIV matched the streaklines of the fluorescent particles very well. The second set of experiments measured the streaming at the interface between a trapped air bubble and water inside a microchannel of cross section 100 μm × 90 μm. The streaming flow was limited to within a short distance from the interface and was observed as a looping flow, moving towards the interface from the top and being circulated back from the bottom of the channel. The characteristic streaming velocity was in the order of 100 μm/s.

  18. Neurodynamic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  19. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  20. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  1. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  2. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  3. Galactic oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    Long-lived oscillations that act like normal modes are described. The total kinetic energy is found to vary with time by amounts far in excess of the fluctuations expected from the virial theorem, and the variation shows periodic patterns that suggest oscillations. Experimental results indicate that oscillation amplitudes depend on the nature of the model. It is noted that it is difficult to answer questions about likely amplitudes in real galaxies with any confidence at the present time.

  4. EXCITATION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES BY VORTICES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2011-02-01

    The five-minute oscillations are one of the basic properties of solar convection. Observations show a mixture of a large number of acoustic wave fronts propagating from their sources. We investigate the process of acoustic waves excitation from the point of view of individual events, by using a realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic simulation of the quiet Sun. The results show that the excitation events are related to the dynamics of vortex tubes (or swirls) in intergranular lanes of solar convection. These whirlpool-like flows are characterized by very strong horizontal velocities (7-11 km s{sup -1}) and downflows ({approx}7 km s{sup -1}), and are accompanied by strong decreases of temperature, density, and pressure at the surface and 0.5-1 Mm below the surface. High-speed whirlpool flows can attract and capture other vortices. According to our simulation results the processes of vortex interaction, such as vortex annihilation, can cause excitation of acoustic waves on the Sun.

  5. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  6. The detection and characterization of high frequency and high wavenumber solar oscillations. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, David Neil

    1992-01-01

    Doppler shift measurements of the Na D(sub 1) absorption line have revealed solar oscillations in a new regime of frequency and wavenumber. Oscillations of vertical velocities in the temperature minimum and low chromosphere of the Sun are observed with frequencies ranging up to 9.5 mHz. There is no evidence for chromospheric modes of 3 minute period. This indicates that the chromosphere does not form a good cavity for acoustic waves. The fundamental-modes appear with wavenumbers up to 5.57 M per m (equivalent spherical harmonic degree, 3877). The frequencies lie below the predicted values at wavenumbers above 1 M per m. The values are in agreement with previous measurements that exist for wavenumbers up to 2.67 M per m. Spatial maps of velocity power show that high wavenumber oscillations are suppressed in active regions. The shape of the power depression indicates that wave motion is affected in the layer of atmosphere where the measurement is made. The f-modes are suppressed in the same way as p-modes, indicating that the mechanism for wave suppression affects velocity fluctuations. Mode frequencies are not affected by the magnetic fields by more than 50 micro Hz, the precision of the measurement.

  7. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  8. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  9. Features of Propagation of the Acoustic-Gravity Waves Generated by High-Power Periodic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogor, L. F.; Frolov, V. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of the bandpass filtering of temporal variations of the Doppler frequency shift of radio signals from a vertical-sounding Doppler radar located near the city of Kharkov when the ionosphere was heated by high-power periodic (with 10 and 15-min periods) radiation from the Sura facility. The filtering was done in the ranges of periods that are close to the acoustic cutoff period and the Brunt—Väisälä period (4-6, 8-12, and 13-17 min). Oscillations with periods of 4-6 min and amplitudes of 50-100 mHz were not recorded in fact. Oscillations with periods of 8-12 and 13-17 min and amplitudes of 60-100 mHz were detected in almost all the sessions. In the former and the latter oscillations, the time of delay with respect to the heater switch-on was close to 100 min and about 40-50 min, respectively. These values correspond to group propagation velocities of about 160 and 320-400 m/s. The Doppler shift oscillations were caused by the acoustic-gravity waves which led to periodic variations in the electron number density with a relative amplitude of about 0.1-1.0%. It was demonstrated that the acoustic-gravity waves were not recorded when the effective power of the Sura facility was equal to 50 MW and they were confidently observed when the effective power was increased up to 130 MW. It is shown that the period of the wave processes was determined by the period of the heating-pause cycles, and the duration of the wave trains did not depend on the duration of the series of heating-pause cycles. The data suggest that the generation mechanism of recorded wave disturbances is different from the mechanism proposed in 1970-1990.

  10. Orbital revolution of a pair of bubbles in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Yamashita, Kou; Inamura, Takao

    2011-11-01

    This experimental study aims to clarify the mechanism of orbital motion of two oscillating bubbles in an acoustic field. Trajectory of the orbital motion was observed using a high-speed video camera. Because of a good repeatability in volume oscillation of bubbles, we were also able to observe the radial motion driven at 24 kHz by stroboscopic like imaging; the cyclic bubble oscillation was appeared to slow down by capturing images at the framing rate close to the forcing frequency. The orbital motions of bubbles raging from 0.13 to 0.18 mm were examined with different forcing amplitude and in different viscous oils. As a result, we found that pairs of bubbles revolve along a circular orbit around the center of mass of the orbiting two bubbles. We also found that the two bubbles perform anti-phase radial oscillation. Although this radial oscillation should result in a repulsive secondary Bjerknes force, the bubbles kept a constant separate distance of about 1 mm, which indicates the existence of centripetal primary Bjerknes force. The angular velocity of orbital revolution increases linearly with the increase in Bjerknes force.

  11. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1987-07-10

    A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

  12. Dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by surface acoustic waves: Gravity effects and correlation between oscillatory and translational motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussonnière, A.; Baudoin, M.; Brunet, P.; Matar, O. Bou

    2016-05-01

    When sessile droplets are excited by ultrasonic traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs), they undergo complex dynamics with both oscillations and translational motion. While the nature of the Rayleigh-Lamb quadrupolar drop oscillations has been identified, their origin and their influence on the drop mobility remains unexplained. Indeed, the physics behind this peculiar dynamics is complex with nonlinearities involved both at the excitation level (acoustic streaming and radiation pressure) and in the droplet response (nonlinear oscillations and contact line dynamics). In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by SAWs. For pendant drops, so-far unreported dynamics are observed close to the drop detachment threshold with the suppression of the translational motion. Away from this threshold, the comparison between pendant and sessile drop dynamics allows us to identify the role played by gravity or, more generally, by an initial or dynamically induced stretching of the drop. In turn, we elucidate the origin of the resonance frequency shift, as well as the origin of the strong correlation between oscillatory and translational motion. We show that for sessile drops, the velocity is mainly determined by the amplitude of oscillation and that the saturation observed is due to the nonlinear dependence of the drop response frequency on the dynamically induced stretching.

  13. Rijke-type thermoacoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beke, Tamas

    2011-03-01

    Thermoacoustic instability can appear in any thermal device when the unsteady heat transfer is favourably coupled with the fluctuations of acoustic pressure. In this paper, we present a project type of physical measuring and modelling task; the aim of our project is to help our students increase their knowledge of thermoacoustics. Our paper proposes several experiments and describes some tools' setups that are easy to obtain and work with. Free software is offered to analyse the signals with a personal computer. In this paper, the basis of standing wave theory and the tie between thermodynamics and acoustical oscillations are also discussed; some devices and technical applications of thermoacoustic oscillations are presented. The objective of this paper is to present the theory of frequency shifting of thermoacoustic oscillations as well. The frequencies of the acoustic modes in the excited state are of interest for practical purposes; the differences between the calculated and the measured values of these frequencies are shown. The behaviour of the properties of the exited modes shows the complexity of the real thermoacoustic systems; the mathematical modelling intended to simulate the effect of frequency shifting is observed in tests. We think that these experiments can be implemented in physics courses on thermodynamics for graduates or specialized courses for undergraduates.

  14. High Q Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated high Q measurements in a room temperature Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator (MSAR). Initial measurements of bulk acoustic modes in room temperature sapphire at 39 MHz have demonstrated a Q of 8.8 x 10(exp 6). The long term goal of this work is to integrate such a high Q resonator with small, low noise quartz oscillator electronics, providing a fractional frequency stability better than 1 x 10(exp -14) @ 1s.

  15. Nonlinear surface acoustic waves in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, Ronald Edward

    Model equations developed by Hamilton, Il'inskii, and Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 639-651 (1999)] are used to perform theoretical and numerical studies of nonlinear surface acoustic waves in a variety of nonpiezoelectric cubic crystals. The basic theory underlying the model equations is outlined, quasilinear solutions of the equations are derived, and expressions are developed for the shock formation distance and nonlinearity coefficient. A time-domain equation corresponding to the frequency-domain model equations is derived and shown to reduce to a time-domain equation introduced previously for Rayleigh waves [E. A. Zabolotskaya, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 2569-2575 (1992)]. Numerical calculations are performed to predict the evolution of initially monofrequency surface waves in the (001), (110), and (111) planes of the crystals RbCl, KCl, NaCl, CaF2, SrF2, BaF2, C (diamond), Si, Ge, Al, Ni, Cu in the moverline 3m point group, and the crystals Cs-alum, NH4- alum, and K-alum in the moverline 3 point group. The calculations are based on measured second- and third- order elastic constants taken from the literature. Nonlinearity matrix elements which describe the coupling strength of harmonic interactions are shown to provide a powerful tool for characterizing waveform distortion. Simulations in the (001) and (110) planes show that in certain directions the velocity waveform distortion may change in sign, generation of one or more harmonies may be suppressed and shock formation postponed, or energy may be transferred rapidly to the highest harmonics and shock formation enhanced. Simulations in the (111) plane show that the nonlinearity matrix elements are generally complex-valued, which may lead to asymmetric distortion and the appearance of low frequency oscillations near the peaks and shocks in the velocity waveforms. A simple transformation based on the phase of the nonlinearity matrix is shown to provide a reasonable approximation of asymmetric waveform

  16. Raindrop oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the change in shape of a raindrop is presented. Raindrops measured by two orthogonal cameras were classified by shape and orientation to determine the nature of the oscillation. A physical model based on potential energy was then developed to study the amplitude variation of oscillating drops. The model results show that oscillations occur about the equilibrium axis ratio, but the time average axis ratio if significantly more spherical for large amplitudes because of asymmetry in the surface potential energy. A generalization of the model to oscillations produced by turbulence yields average axis ratios that are consistent with the camera measurements. The model results for average axis ratios were applied to rainfall studies with a dual polarized radar.

  17. Microelectronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Bipolar transistor operated in a grounded base configuration is used as the inductor in a microelectronic oscillator. This configuration is employed using thin-film hybrid technology and is also applicable to monolithic technology.

  18. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  19. Light diffraction by acoustically induced domains in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustina, O. A.

    2006-05-15

    The phenomenon of light diffraction by a system of linear domains formed in planar layers of nematic liquid crystals in an oscillating Couette flow, acoustically induced at sound frequencies, is investigated.

  20. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  1. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  2. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  3. Wavelet Analysis of Umbral Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulou, E. B.; Skodras, A.; Georgakilas, A. A.; Koutchmy, S.

    2003-07-01

    We study the temporal behavior of the intensity and velocity chromospheric umbral oscillations, applying wavelet analysis techniques to four sets of observations in the Hα line and one set of simultaneous observations in the Hα and the nonmagnetic Fe I (5576.099 Å) line. The wavelet and Fourier power spectra of the intensity and the velocity at chromospheric levels show both 3 and 5 minute oscillations. Oscillations in the 5 minute band are prominent in the intensity power spectra; they are significantly reduced in the velocity power spectra. We observe multiple peaks of closely spaced cospatial frequencies in the 3 minute band (5-8 mHz). Typically, there are three oscillating modes present: (1) a major one near 5.5 mHz, (2) a secondary near 6.3 mHz, and (3) oscillations with time-varying frequencies around 7.5 mHz that are present for limited time intervals. In the frame of current theories, the oscillating mode near 5.5 mHz should be considered as a fingerprint of the photospheric resonator, while the other two modes can be better explained by the chromospheric resonator. The wavelet spectra show a dynamic temporal behavior of the 3 minute oscillations. We observed (1) frequency drifts, (2) modes that are stable over a long time and then fade away or split up into two oscillation modes, and (3) suppression of frequencies for short time intervals. This behavior can be explained by the coupling between modes closely spaced in frequency or/and by long-term variations of the driving source of the resonators. Based on observations performed on the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak Observatory Richard B. Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) and on the Big Bear Solar Observatory Harold Zirin Telescope.

  4. Oscillation damping means for magnetically levitated systems

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2009-01-20

    The present invention presents a novel system and method of damping rolling, pitching, or yawing motions, or longitudinal oscillations superposed on their normal forward or backward velocity of a moving levitated system.

  5. 2k{sub F}-selected conductance oscillations of high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas in Corbino devices

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Yuying; Yang, Changli; Lu, Li; Du, Lingjie; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Kenneth; Du, Rui-Rui

    2014-11-03

    We have observed electrical-field induced magneto-conductivity oscillations measured in Corbino samples made of a GaAs high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas, and found a consistent interpretation based on a semiclassical model of 2k{sub F}-selected orbital transitions between N and N + 1, 2, 3,…, Landau levels at respective local potentials, where k{sub F} is the Fermi wavevector. From the oscillation period, we deduce an effective mass value, which is consistent with the bare electron band mass of GaAs. In the same devices but with a vanishing electrical field and at elevated temperatures, we observed additional oscillation features, which can be attributed to cyclotron resonance by population of acoustic phonons. We thus demonstrate a method to determine the carrier effective mass and the sound velocity of host crystals by standard electrical transport.

  6. 2D fluid simulations of acoustic waves in pulsed ICP discharges: Comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neutral depletion, which is mostly caused by gas heating under typical material processing conditions, is an important phenomenon in high-density plasmas. In low pressure pulsed discharges, experiments show that additional depletion due to electron pressure (Pe) may have a non-negligible influence on radical transport [1]. To evaluate this effect, comparisons between 2D fluid simulations and measurements of gas convection in Ar/Cl2 pulsed ICP plasmas are reported. In the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly by electron cooling which generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls. This in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Time-resolved measurements of atoms drift velocity and gas temperature by LIF and LAS in the early afterglow are consistent with gas drifting at acoustic wave velocity followed by rapid gas cooling. Similar results are predicted by the model. The ion flux at the reactor walls is also shown to oscillate in phase with the acoustic wave due to ion-neutral friction forces. Finally, during plasma ignition, experiments show opposite phenomena when Pe rises.[4pt] [1] Cunge et al, APL 96, 131501 (2010)

  7. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B.; Barry, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Non-Newtonian mechanics of oscillation centers

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-10-15

    Classical particles oscillating in high-frequency or static fields effectively exhibit a modified rest mass m{sub eff} which determines the oscillation center motion. Unlike the true mass, m{sub eff} depends on the field parameters and can be a nonanalytic function of the particle average velocity and the oscillation energy; hence non-Newtonian ''metaplasmas'' that permit a new type of plasma maser, signal rectification, frequency doubling, and one-way walls.

  9. Solar oscillations instrumentation and measurement theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appourchaux, T.

    1988-01-01

    Solar-oscillation instruments are reviewed. Common characteristics include detecting solar radial velocities on Fraunhofer lines with a 2-point measuring technique, high spectral resolution and stability, etc. The choice of the spectral line for getting a high signal to solar noise ratio is addressed. Velocity imaging of solar oscillations modes is detailed, including spatial sampling and span, highest observable degree. Applications of these different analyses is applied to existing or future helioseismology instruments.

  10. An Oscillating System with Sliding Friction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamela, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Both harmonic oscillations and friction are the types of concepts in freshman physics that are readily applicable to the "real world" and as such, most students find these ideas interesting. Damped oscillations are usually presented with resistance proportional to velocity, which has the advantage of a relatively straightforward mathematical…

  11. Compressible flow in fluidic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, Emilio; Hirsch, Damian; Gharib, Mory

    2013-11-01

    We present qualitative observations on the internal flow characteristics of fluidic oscillator geometries commonly referred to as sweeping jets in active flow control applications. We also discuss the effect of the geometry on the output jet in conditions from startup to supersonic exit velocity. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  12. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  13. Acoustic Inspection Device V1.0

    2002-01-16

    The Acoustic Inspection Device (AID) is an instrument used to interrogate materials with ultrasonic acoustic waves. The AID application software program runs under the Microsoft Windows 98 or Windows 2000 operating system. Is serves as the instrument controller and provides the user interface for the instrument known as the Acoustic Inspection Device (AID). The program requests, acquires, and analyzes acoustic waveforms from the AID hardware (pulser/receiver module, digitizer, and communications link). Graphical user displays ofmore » the AID application program include the real-time display of ultrasonic acoustic waveforms and analytical results including acoustic time-of-flight, velocity, and material identification. This program utilizes a novel algorithm, developed at PNNL, that automatically extracts the time-of-flight and amplitude data from the raw waveform and compares the extracted data to a material database.« less

  14. Acoustic Characteristics of Simulated Respiratory-Induced Vocal Tremor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Rosemary A.; Story, Brad H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation of respiratory forced oscillation to the acoustic characteristics of vocal tremor. Method: Acoustical analyses were performed to determine the characteristics of the intensity and fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) for speech samples obtained by Farinella, Hixon, Hoit, Story,…

  15. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  16. Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator - MSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A room temperature sapphire acoustics resonator incorporated into an oscillator represents a possible opportunity to improve on quartz ultrastable oscillator (USO) performance, which has been a staple for NASA missions since the inception of spaceflight. Where quartz technology is very mature and shows a performance improvement of perhaps 1 dB/decade, these sapphire acoustic resonators when integrated with matured quartz electronics could achieve a frequency stability improvement of 10 dB or more. As quartz oscillators are an essential element of nearly all types of frequency standards and reference systems, the success of MSAR would advance the development of frequency standards and systems for both groundbased and flight-based projects. Current quartz oscillator technology is limited by quartz mechanical Q. With a possible improvement of more than x 10 Q with sapphire acoustic modes, the stability limit of current quartz oscillators may be improved tenfold, to 10(exp -14) at 1 second. The electromagnetic modes of sapphire that were previously developed at JPL require cryogenic temperatures to achieve the high Q levels needed to achieve this stability level. However sapphire fs acoustic modes, which have not been used before in a high-stability oscillator, indicate the required Q values (as high as Q = 10(exp 8)) may be achieved at room temperature in the kHz range. Even though sapphire is not piezoelectric, such a high Q should allow electrostatic excitation of the acoustic modes with a combination of DC and AC voltages across a small sapphire disk (approximately equal to l mm thick). The first evaluations under this task will test predictions of an estimated input impedance of 10 kilohms at Q = 10(exp 8), and explore the Q values that can be realized in a smaller resonator, which has not been previously tested for acoustic modes. This initial Q measurement and excitation demonstration can be viewed similar to a transducer converting electrical energy to

  17. The electrical soliton oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, David Shawn

    Solitons are a special class of pulse-shaped waves that propagate in nonlinear dispersive media while maintaining their spatial confinement. They are found throughout nature where the proper balance between nonlinearity and dispersion is achieved. Examples of the soliton phenomena include shallow water waves, vibrations in a nonlinear spring-mass lattice, acoustic waves in plasma, and optical pulses in fiber optic cable. In electronics, the nonlinear transmission line (NLTL) serves as a nonlinear dispersive medium that propagates voltage solitons. Electrical solitons on the NLTL have been actively investigated over the last 40 years, particularly in the microwave domain, for sharp pulse generation applications and for high-speed RF and microwave sampling applications. In these past studies the NLTL has been predominantly used as a 2-port system where a high-frequency input is required to generate a sharp soliton output through a transient process. One meaningful extension of the past 2-port NLTL works would be to construct a 1-port self-sustained electrical soliton oscillator by properly combining the NLTL with an amplifier (positive active feedback). Such an oscillator would self-start by growing from ambient noise to produce a train of periodic soliton pulses in steady-state, and hence would make a self-contained soliton generator not requiring an external high-frequency input. While such a circuit may offer a new direction in the field of electrical pulse generation, there has not been a robust electrical soliton oscillator reported to date to the best of our knowledge. In this thesis we introduce the first robust electrical soliton oscillator, which is able to self-generate a stable, periodic train of electrical solitons. This new oscillator is made possible by combining the NLTL with a unique nonlinear amplifier that is able to "tame" the unruly dynamics of the NLTL. The principle contribution of this thesis is the identification of the key instability

  18. Programmable Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Lee, Clement G.; Nguyen, Huy

    2011-01-01

    A programmable oscillator is a frequency synthesizer with an output phase that tracks an arbitrary function. An offset, phase-locked loop circuit is used in combination with an error control feedback loop to precisely control the output phase of the oscillator. To down-convert the received signal, several stages of mixing may be employed with the compensation for the time-base distortion of the carrier occurring at any one of those stages. In the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), the compensation occurs in the mixing from an intermediate frequency (IF), whose value is dependent on the station and band, to a common IF used in the final stage of down-conversion to baseband. The programmable oscillator (PO) is used in the final stage of down-conversion to generate the IF, along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier, thus removing it from the final down-converted signal.

  19. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  20. Investigations on the self-excited oscillations in a kerosene spray flame

    SciTech Connect

    de la Cruz Garcia, M.; Mastorakos, E.; Dowling, A.P.

    2009-02-15

    A laboratory scale gas turbine type burner at atmospheric pressure and with air preheat was operated with aviation kerosene Jet-A1 injected from a pressure atomiser. Self-excited oscillations were observed and analysed to understand better the relationship between the spray and thermo-acoustic oscillations. The fluctuations of CH{sup *} chemiluminescence measured simultaneously with the pressure were used to determine the flame transfer function. The Mie scattering technique was used to record spray fluctuations in reacting conditions with a high speed camera. Integrating the Mie intensity over the imaged region gave a temporal signal acquired simultaneously with pressure fluctuations and the transfer function between the light scattered from the spray and the velocity fluctuations in the plenum was evaluated. Phase Doppler anemometry was used for axial velocity and drop size measurements at different positions downstream the injection plane and for various operating conditions. Pressure spectra showed peaks at a frequency that changed with air mass flow rate. The peak for low air mass flow rate operation was at 220 Hz and was associated with a resonance of the supply plenum. At the same global equivalence ratio but at high air mass flow rates, the pressure spectrum peak was at 323 Hz, a combustion chamber resonant frequency. At low air flow rates, the spray fluctuation motion was pronounced and followed the frequency of the pressure oscillation. At high air flow rates, more effective evaporation resulted in a complete disappearance of droplets at an axial distance of about 1/3 burner diameters from the injection plane, leading to a different flame transfer function and frequency of the self-excited oscillation. The results highlight the sensitivity of the self-excited oscillation to the degree of mixing achieved before the main recirculation zone. (author)