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Sample records for acoustic vibration analysis

  1. Acoustical analysis of gear housing vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1991-01-01

    The modal and acoustical analysis of the NASA gear-noise rig is described. Experimental modal analysis techniques were used to determine the modes of vibration of the transmission housing. The resulting modal data were then used in a boundary element method (BEM) analysis to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing as well as the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiencies of the transmission housing modes are compared with theoretical results for finite, baffled plates. A method that uses the measured mode shapes and the BEM to predict the effect of simple structural changes on the sound radiation efficiency of the modes of vibration is also described.

  2. Analysis of Vibration and Acoustic Noise in Permanent Magnet Motors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sangmoon

    The drive motor is a frequent source of vibration and acoustic noise in many precision spindle motors. One of the electromagnetic sources of vibration in permanent magnet motors is the torque ripple, consisting of the reluctance torque and electromagnetic torque fluctuation. This type of vibration is becoming more serious with the advent of new high-grade magnets with increased flux density. Acoustic noise of electromagnetic origin is difficult to predict and its exact mechanism is unclear. The mechanism of noise generation should be revealed to design a quieter motor which is the modern customer's demand. For motor operation at low speeds and loads, torque ripple due to the reluctance torque is often a source of vibration and control difficulty. The reluctance torque in a motor was calculated from the flux density by a finite element method and the Maxwell stress method. Effects of design parameters, such as stator slot width, permanent slot width, airgap length and magnetization direction, were investigated. Magnet pole shaping, by gradually decreasing the magnet thickness toward edges, yields a sinusoidal shape of the reluctance torque with reduced harmonics, thus reducing the vibration. This dissertation also presents two motor design techniques: stator tooth notching and rotor pole skewing with magnet pole shaping, and the effect of each method on the output torque. The analysis shows that the reluctance torque can be nearly eliminated by the suggested designs, with minimal sacrifice of the output torque. In permanent magnet DC motors, the most popular design type is the trapezoidal back electro-motive force (BEMF), for switched DC controllers. It is demonstrated that the output torque profile of one phase energized is qualitatively equivalent to the BEMF profile for motors with reduced reluctance torque. It implies that design of BEMF profile is possible by magnetic modeling of a motor, without expensive and time-consuming experiments for different designs

  3. Acoustic vibration analysis for utilization of woody plant in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Yukari; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Sato, Seigo; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Motohashi, Kyohei; Sakurai, Naoki; Nakagawa-izumi, Akiko

    2012-07-01

    We are proposing to raise woody plants for space agriculture in Mars. Space agriculture has the utilization of wood in their ecosystem. Nobody knows the real tree shape grown under space environment under the low or micro gravitational conditions such as outer environment. Angiosperm tree forms tension wood for keeping their shape. Tension wood formation is deeply related to gravity, but the details of the mechanism of its formation has not yet been clarified. For clarifying the mechanism, the space experiment in international space station, ISS is the best way to investigate about them as the first step. It is necessary to establish the easy method for crews who examine the experiments at ISS. Here, we are proposing to investigate the possibility of the acoustic vibration analysis for the experiment at ISS. Two types of Japanese cherry tree, weeping and upright types in Prunus sp., were analyzed by the acoustic vibration method. Coefficient-of-variation (CV) of sound speed was calculated by the acoustic vibration analysis. The amount of lignin and decomposed lignin were estimated by both Klason and Py-GC/MS method, respectively. The relationships of the results of acoustic vibration analysis and the inner components in tested woody materials were investigated. After the experiments, we confirm the correlation about them. Our results indicated that the acoustic vibration analysis would be useful for determining the inside composition as a nondestructive method in outer space environment.

  4. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  5. Guidelines for numerical vibration and acoustic analysis of disc brake squeal using simple models of brake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.; Marburg, S.

    2013-04-01

    Brake squeal has become of increasing concern to the automotive industry but guidelines on how to confidently predict squeal propensity are yet to be established. While it is standard practice to use the complex eigenvalue analysis to predict unstable vibration modes, there have been few attempts to calculate their acoustic radiation. Here guidelines are developed for numerical vibration and acoustic analysis of brake squeal using models of simplified brake systems with friction contact by considering (1) the selection of appropriate elements, contact and mesh; (2) the extraction of surface velocities via forced response; and (3) the calculation of the acoustic response itself. Results indicate that quadratic tetrahedral elements offer the best option for meshing more realistic geometry. A mesh has to be sufficiently fine especially in the contact region to predict mesh-independent unstable vibration modes. Regarding the vibration response, only the direct, steady-state method with a pressurised pad and finite sliding formulation (allowing contact separation) should be used. Comparison of different numerical methods suggest that a obroadband fast multi-pole boundary element method with the Burton-Miller formulation would efficiently solve the acoustic radiation of a full brake system. Results also suggest that a pad lift-off can amplify the acoustic radiation similar to a horn effect. A horn effect is also observed for chamfered pads which are used in practice to reduce the number and strength of unstable vibration modes. These results highlight the importance of optimising the pad shape to reduce acoustic radiation of unstable vibration modes.

  6. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  7. A New Acoustic Portal into the Odontocete Ear and Vibrational Analysis of the Tympanoperiotic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cranford, Ted W.; Krysl, Petr; Amundin, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Global concern over the possible deleterious effects of noise on marine organisms was catalyzed when toothed whales stranded and died in the presence of high intensity sound. The lack of knowledge about mechanisms of hearing in toothed whales prompted our group to study the anatomy and build a finite element model to simulate sound reception in odontocetes. The primary auditory pathway in toothed whales is an evolutionary novelty, compensating for the impedance mismatch experienced by whale ancestors as they moved from hearing in air to hearing in water. The mechanism by which high-frequency vibrations pass from the low density fats of the lower jaw into the dense bones of the auditory apparatus is a key to understanding odontocete hearing. Here we identify a new acoustic portal into the ear complex, the tympanoperiotic complex (TPC) and a plausible mechanism by which sound is transduced into the bony components. We reveal the intact anatomic geometry using CT scanning, and test functional preconceptions using finite element modeling and vibrational analysis. We show that the mandibular fat bodies bifurcate posteriorly, attaching to the TPC in two distinct locations. The smaller branch is an inconspicuous, previously undescribed channel, a cone-shaped fat body that fits into a thin-walled bony funnel just anterior to the sigmoid process of the TPC. The TPC also contains regions of thin translucent bone that define zones of differential flexibility, enabling the TPC to bend in response to sound pressure, thus providing a mechanism for vibrations to pass through the ossicular chain. The techniques used to discover the new acoustic portal in toothed whales, provide a means to decipher auditory filtering, beam formation, impedance matching, and transduction. These tools can also be used to address concerns about the potential deleterious effects of high-intensity sound in a broad spectrum of marine organisms, from whales to fish. PMID:20694149

  8. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  9. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  10. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1993-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  11. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications. PMID:22969364

  12. Evaluation of vibration specifications for acoustic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Zeronian, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    To properly design any structure, it is necessary to determine the effects of various environments, vibration, and shock on that surface. Usually the environment which has the worst effect will be used as the design criteria for comparison with the static (yield or ultimate) material allowables. Analyzing the same structure under all of the various environments can be time consuming and costly. A method was devised previously to allow for various environments to be compared to each other to select the highest load or acceleration producing environment. A technique which extends the above method and allows an additional environment, acoustic vibration, to be compared with sine, random vibration and shock environments is introduced. Furthermore, these techniques enable all dynamic environments to be added together so only a single stress analysis of the structure is needed for combined environments.

  13. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  14. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 2. Measurement Techniques and Data Analysis, Dynamic Measurements, Vibration and Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    FM TRANS- is not comercially available. LATIONAL MOBILITIIS Rotational Velocity/Force lobility EXCITATION: fA(t )#! t A) RESPONSE: *e(t) wB(w ) v...Vibration Handbook, 44:22-45, 1976. REFERENCES 9. Coermann, R. R., et al, Aerospace Medi- 1. Hoerlein, A. B., "Preconditioning of beef cine , 31:443, 1960

  15. Acoustic vibration can enhance bacterial biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark F; Edwards, Thomas; Hobbs, Glyn; Shepherd, Joanna; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    This paper explores the use of low-frequency-low-amplitude acoustic vibration on biofilm formation. Biofilm development is thought to be governed by a diverse range of environmental signals and much effort has gone into researching the effects of environmental factors including; nutrient availability, pH and temperature on the growth of biofilms. Many biofilm-forming organisms have evolved to thrive in mechanically challenging environments, for example soil yet, the effects of the physical environment on biofilm formation has been largely ignored. Exposure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to vibration at 100, 800 and 1600 Hz for 48 h, resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation compared with the control, with the greatest growth seen at 800 Hz vibration. The results also show that this increase in biofilm formation is accompanied with an increase in P. aeruginosa cell number. Acoustic vibration was also found to regulate the spatial distribution of biofilm formation in a frequency-dependent manner. Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to acoustic vibration also resulted in enhanced biofilm formation with the greatest level of biofilm being formed following 48 h exposure at 1600 Hz. These results show that acoustic vibration can be used to control biofilm formation and therefore presents a novel and potentially cost effective means to manipulate the development and yield of biofilms in a range of important industrial and medical processes.

  16. Acoustic vibrations of single suspended gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Todd A.

    The acoustic vibrations for single gold nanowires and gold plates were studied using time-resolved ultrafast transient absorption. The objective of this work was to remove the contribution of the supporting substrate from the damping of the acoustic vibrations of the metal nano-objects. This was achieved by suspending the nano-objects across trenches created by photolithography and reactive ion etching. Transient absorption measurements for single suspended gold nanowires were initially completed in air and water environments. The acoustic vibrations for gold nanowires over the trench in air last typically for several nanoseconds, whereas gold nanowires in water are damped more quickly. Continuum mechanics models suggest that the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and water dominates the damping rate. Later transient absorption studies on single suspended gold nanowires were completed in glycerol and ethylene glycol environments. However, our continuum mechanical model suggests nearly complete damping in glycerol due to its high viscosity, but similar damping rates are seen between the two liquids. The continuum mechanics model thus incorrectly addresses high viscosity effects on the lifetimes of the acoustic vibrations, and more complicated viscoelastic interactions occur for the higher viscosity liquids. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  17. Vibration and acoustic testing of TOPEX/Poseidon satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boatman, Dave; Scharton, Terry; Hershfeld, Donald; Larkin, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The satellite was subjected to a 1.5G swept sine vibration test and a 146 dB overall level acoustic test, in accordance with Ariane launch vehicle requirements, at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Extensive pretest analysis of the sine test was conducted to plan the input notching and to justify vibration testing the satellite only in the longitudinal axis. A unique measurement system was utilized to determine the six components of interface force between the shaker and the satellite in the sine vibration test. The satellite was heavily instrumented in both the sine vibration and acoustic test in order to insure that the launch loads were enveloped with appropriate margin and that satellite responses did not exceed the compatibilities of the structure and equipment. The test specification, objectives, instrumentation, and test results are described herein.

  18. Vibration and acoustic testing of TOPEX/Poseidon satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatman, Dave; Scharton, Terry; Hershfeld, Donald; Larkin, Paul

    1992-11-01

    The satellite was subjected to a 1.5G swept sine vibration test and a 146 dB overall level acoustic test, in accordance with Ariane launch vehicle requirements, at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Extensive pretest analysis of the sine test was conducted to plan the input notching and to justify vibration testing the satellite only in the longitudinal axis. A unique measurement system was utilized to determine the six components of interface force between the shaker and the satellite in the sine vibration test. The satellite was heavily instrumented in both the sine vibration and acoustic test in order to insure that the launch loads were enveloped with appropriate margin and that satellite responses did not exceed the compatibilities of the structure and equipment. The test specification, objectives, instrumentation, and test results are described herein.

  19. Analysis of Free Vibration of STRUCTURAL ACOUSTIC Coupled Systems, Part i: Development and Verification of the Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. L.; Kim, J.

    1995-12-01

    A new procedure to formulate and analyze the free vibration problem of structural-acoustic coupled systems is suggested. The system equations are formulated utilizing the concept of the equivalent mass source. The modal expansion method and a matrix transformation technique are used to solve the system equations to obtain the natural frequencies and modes of system. The procedure is verified by comparing its result with the exact solution of a one-dimensional coupled system. Parameters dictating coupling effects are also identified and discussed.

  20. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  1. Laser method of acoustical emission control from vibrating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    For limitation of the noise in environment, the necessity occurs of determining and location of sources of sounds emitted from surfaces of many machines and devices, assuring in effect the possibility of suitable constructional changes implementation, targeted at decreasing of their nuisance. In the paper, the results of tests and calculations are presented for plane surface sources emitting acoustic waves. The tests were realized with the use of scanning laser vibrometer which enabled remote registration and the spectral analysis of the surfaces vibrations. The known hybrid digital method developed for determination of sound wave emission from such surfaces divided into small finite elements was slightly modified by distinguishing the phase correlations between such vibrating elements. The final method being developed may find use in wide range of applications for different forms of vibrations of plane surfaces.

  2. Detection of Gear Failures via Vibration and Acoustic Signals Using Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydar, N.; Ball, A.

    2003-07-01

    Vibration analysis is widely used in machinery diagnostics and the wavelet transform has also been implemented in many applications in the condition monitoring of machinery. In contrast to previous applications, this paper examines whether acoustic signal can be used effectively along vibration signal to detect the various local faults in gearboxes using the wavelet transform. Two commonly encountered local faults, tooth breakage and tooth crack, were simulated. The results from acoustic signals were compared with vibration signals. The results suggest that acoustic signals are very affective for the early detection of faults and may provide a powerful tool to indicate the various types of progressing faults in gearboxes.

  3. Effects of vibration excitation methodology and configuration of an acoustic needle on its tip vibration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hu, Junhui

    2013-04-01

    One of design purposes of an acoustic needle is to obtain a big vibration displacement at its tip. In this paper, vibration characteristics of the tip of the acoustic needle driven by a sandwich type ultrasonic transducer, is investigated to obtain the guidelines for increasing the tip vibration. It is found that the tip vibration can be increased by employing acoustic needles with proper vibration excitation structure and configuration. The effective measures include using a sandwich type piezoelectric transducer with flexurally vibrating end plates and an acoustic needle with conical tip section, decreasing the length of vibration excitation section at the needle root, bonding the needle root at a proper location of the transducer end plate, and tuning the length ratio of the conical tip section to the whole needle.

  4. Note: Vibration energy harvesting based on a round acoustic fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiao-bin; Huang, Cheng-ping; Hu, Jun-hui

    2015-07-01

    An energy harvester based on a round acoustic fence (RAF) has been proposed and studied. The RAF is composed of cylindrical stubs stuck in a circular array on a thin metal plate, which can confine the acoustic energy efficiently. By removing one stub and thus opening a small gap in the RAF, acoustic leakage with larger intensity can be produced at the gap opening. With the vibration source surrounded by the RAF, the energy harvesting at the gap opening has a wide bandwidth and is insensitive to the position of the vibration source. The results may have potential applications in harvesting the energy of various vibration sources in solid structure.

  5. Interferometric correlator for acoustic radiation and underlying structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Adela; Kilpatrick, James; Markov, Vladimir; Bendiksen, Oddvar O.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the background and principles of an optical non-contact sensor fusion concept, the Interferometric Correlator for Acoustic Radiation and Underlying Structural Vibration (ICARUSV) and give practical example of its capabilities, focusing on its ability to simultaneously capture, visualize and quantitatively characterize full-field non-stationary structural dynamics and unsteady radiated sound fields or transient flow fields around the structure of interest. The ICARUSV's multi-sensor design is based on a parallel architecture and therefore the data capture is fast and inherently support a wide variety of spatio-temporal or spatio-spectral analysis methods which characterize the structural or acoustic/flow field dynamics as it occurs in real time, including short-lived transient events. No other technology available today offers this level of multi-parameter multi-dimensional data1.

  6. Nonlinear Scattering of Acoustic Waves by Vibrating Obstacles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    AD-A129 282 NONLINEAR SCATTERING OF ACOUSTIC WAVES BY VIBRATING OBSTACLES (U) NAVAL RESEARCH LAR WASHINOTON DC d C PIQUETTE 01 JUN 83 NRL-MR-5077...MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NAIOAL IBtJ[IAU Of S1ANDARD~If A3 NRL Memorandum Report 5077 Nonlinear Scattering of Acoustic Waves by Vibrating Obstacles ... Obstacles continuing problem. S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMMER 7. AUTHOR(s) 6. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMIISER( ) Jean C. Piquette* S. PERFORMING

  7. Acoustical measurements of vibrational relaxation in moist N2 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Meredith, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Sound absorption measurements are conducted by the resonant tube technique to study vibrational relaxation in moist N2 at 301, 343, and 387 K. Analysis of the data shows that improved measurement accuracy at the higher temperatures establishes vibrational-vibrational energy transfer as the operative relaxation path for the de-excitation of N2 by H2O beyond the uncertainty of experimental error. The best-fitted temperature dependence of the vibrational-vibrational rate constant is given, noting that the expression is consistent with seven independent sets of both acoustical and nonacoustical data.

  8. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  9. Acoustic streaming induced by ultrasonic flexural vibrations and associated enhancement of convective heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Loh, Byoung-Gook; Hyun, Sinjae; Ro, Paul I; Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2002-02-01

    Acoustic streaming induced by ultrasonic flexural vibrations and the associated convection enhancement are investigated. Acoustic streaming pattern, streaming velocity, and associated heat transfer characteristics are experimentally observed. Moreover, analytical analysis based on Nyborg's formulation is performed along with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation using a numerical solver CFX 4.3. Two distinctive acoustic streaming patterns in half-wavelength of the flexural vibrations are observed, which agree well with the theory. However, acoustic streaming velocities obtained from CFD simulation, based on the incompressible flow assumption, exceed the theoretically estimated velocity by a factor ranging from 10 to 100, depending upon the location along the beam. Both CFD simulation and analytical analysis reveal that the acoustic streaming velocity is proportional to the square of the vibration amplitude and the wavelength of the vibrating beam that decreases with the excitation frequency. It is observed that the streaming velocity decreases with the excitation frequency. Also, with an open-ended channel, a substantial increase in streaming velocity is observed from CFD simulations. Using acoustic streaming, a temperature drop of 40 degrees C with a vibration amplitude of 25 microm at 28.4 kHz is experimentally achieved.

  10. Acoustic buffeting by infrasound in a low vibration facility.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, B P; Hoffman, J E; Burke, S A; Bonn, D A

    2016-09-01

    Measurement instruments and fabrication tools with spatial resolution on the atomic scale require facilities that mitigate the impact of vibration sources in the environment. One approach to protection from vibration in a building's foundation is to place the instrument on a massive inertia block, supported on pneumatic isolators. This opens the questions of whether or not a massive floating block is susceptible to acoustic forces, and how to mitigate the effects of any such acoustic buffeting. Here this is investigated with quantitative measurements of vibrations and sound pressure, together with finite element modeling. It is shown that a particular concern, even in a facility with multiple acoustic enclosures, is the excitation of the lowest fundamental acoustic modes of the room by infrasound in the low tens of Hz range, and the efficient coupling of the fundamental room modes to a large inertia block centered in the room.

  11. Acoustic buffeting by infrasound in a low vibration facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, B. P.; Hoffman, J. E.; Burke, S. A.; Bonn, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    Measurement instruments and fabrication tools with spatial resolution on the atomic scale require facilities that mitigate the impact of vibration sources in the environment. One approach to protection from vibration in a building's foundation is to place the instrument on a massive inertia block, supported on pneumatic isolators. This opens the questions of whether or not a massive floating block is susceptible to acoustic forces, and how to mitigate the effects of any such acoustic buffeting. Here this is investigated with quantitative measurements of vibrations and sound pressure, together with finite element modeling. It is shown that a particular concern, even in a facility with multiple acoustic enclosures, is the excitation of the lowest fundamental acoustic modes of the room by infrasound in the low tens of Hz range, and the efficient coupling of the fundamental room modes to a large inertia block centered in the room.

  12. Multi-objective optimization of acoustic black hole vibration absorbers.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Micah R; Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C

    2016-09-01

    Structures with power law tapers exhibit the acoustic black hole (ABH) effect and can be used for vibration reduction. However, the design of ABHs for vibration reduction requires consideration of the underlying theory and its regions of validity. To address the competing nature of the best ABH design for vibration reduction and the underlying theoretical assumptions, a multi-objective approach is used to find the lowest frequency where both criteria are sufficiently met. The Pareto optimality curve is estimated for a range of ABH design parameters. The optimal set could then be used to implement an ABH vibration absorber.

  13. Finite element analysis of effective mechanical properties, vibration and acoustic performance of auxetic chiral core sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Hrishikesh Ravindra

    Honeycomb cellular materials are widely used in engineering applications due to their high strength to weight ratio and controllable effective mechanical properties. The effective properties are controlled by varying the geometry of the repetitive unit cells of honeycomb structure. Sandwich panels made of honeycomb cores are beneficial in many applications including vibration isolation and sound transmission reduction. Sandwich panels with standard honeycomb core configurations have previously been studied with regards to sound transmission behavior. It has been established that the auxetic honeycomb cores, having negative in-plane Poisson's ratio, exhibit higher sound transmission loss as compared to regular honeycomb cores. In this study, the vibration and sound transmission response of novel auxetic chiral honeycomb structures (both hexa-chiral and anti-tetra chiral), have been investigated in detail using finite element analysis with two-dimensional plane elasticity elements. Chiral honeycomb structures are made up of a linear tessellation of periodic unit cell, which consists of circular nodes of radius ' r ' connected to each other by tangent ligaments of length ' L '. The distance between two adjacent circular nodes is ' R '. These geometric parameters are tailored to obtain the chiral structure with desired effective mechanical properties of in-plane Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus and shear modulus. Results show that, for both the hexa-chiral and anti-tetra-chiral configurations with same thickness, structures with smaller node radius 'r' have higher in-plane negative Poisson's ratio, effective Young's modulus, and shear modulus. The Poisson's ratio of anti-tetra-chiral structure with small node radius and thickness is found to approach the limit of -1. A steady state dynamic response of the chiral honeycomb sandwich panel subjected to uniform pressure load on the bottom face-sheet is also investigated over a frequency range of 1 Hz to 2000 Hz. It is

  14. Measurement of food texture by an acoustic vibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Naoki; Taniwaki, Mitsuru; Iwatani, Shin-ichiro; Akimoto, Hidemi

    2011-09-01

    Food texture was measured by a new acoustic vibration method. A piezoelectric sensor sandwiched between a probe and piston was inserted into a food sample by delivery of silicon oil to a cylinder by a pump. Vibration emitted from the food sample on insertion of the probe was monitored by voltage outputs of the sensor. The voltage signals were passed through 19 half octave bands to calculate texture index for each band. The texture index was defined as vibration energy of the probe caused by the food rupture and/or breakage per unit time.

  15. Acoustic determination of cracks in welded joints. [by resonant structural vibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltanoiu, M.; Criciotoiu, E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic analysis method permits detection of any cracks that might take place and their manner of propagation. The study deals with the cracks produced in experiments to determine the welding technology for a welded gray cast iron workpiece by using piezoelectric transducers to determine vibration acceleration.

  16. Feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control launch vehicle acoustics and structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Cudney, Harley H.

    2000-06-01

    Future launch vehicle payload fairings will be manufactured form advanced lightweight composite materials. The loss of distributed mass causes a significant increase in the internal acoustic environment, causing a severe threat to the payload. Using piezoelectric actuators to control the fairing vibration and the internal acoustic environment has been proposed. To help determine the acoustic control authority of piezoelectric actuators mounted on a rocket fairing, the internal acoustic response created by the actuators needs to be determined. In this work, the internal acoustic response of a closed simply-supported (SS) cylinder actuated by piezoelectric (PZT) actuators is determined using a n impedance model for the actuator and boundary element analysis. The experimentally validated model is used to extrapolate results for a SS cylinder that emulates a Minotaur payload fairing. The internal cylinder acoustic levels are investigated for PZT actuation between 35 and 400 Hz. Significant reductions in the structural response due to increased damping do not equate to similar reductions in the acoustic SPLs for the cylinder. The sound levels at the acoustic resonant frequencies are essentially unaffected by the significant increase in structural damping while the acoustic level sat the structural resonant frequencies are mildly reduced. The interior acoustic response of the cylinder is dominated by the acoustic modes and therefore significant reductions in the overall interior acoustic levels will not be achieved if only the structural resonances are controlled. As the actuation frequency is reduced, the number of actuators required to generate acoustic levels commensurate to that found in the fairing increases to impractical values. Below approximately 100 Hz, the current demands reach levels that are extremely difficult to achieve with a practical system. The results of this work imply that PZT actuators do not have the authority to control the payload fairing

  17. C0 Vibrational analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Craig D.; Johnson, Todd; Martens, Mike; Syphers, Mike; McCrory, E.; McGee, Mike; Reilly, Rob; /Fermilab

    1999-08-01

    This is an attempt to document some of the measurements and analysis relating to the modulation of the spill due to the vibration of the magnets in the new C0 area. Not all of the relevant graphs were saved at the time, however an attempt has been made to show representative illustrations albeit not in the proper chronological order.

  18. The effects of acoustic vibration on fibroblast cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Taybia; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Cells are known to interact and respond to external mechanical cues and recent work has shown that application of mechanical stimulation, delivered via acoustic vibration, can be used to control complex cell behaviours. Fibroblast cells are known to respond to physical cues generated in the extracellular matrix and it is thought that such cues are important regulators of the wound healing process. Many conditions are associated with poor wound healing, so there is need for treatments/interventions, which can help accelerate the wound healing process. The primary aim of this research was to investigate the effects of mechanical stimulation upon the migratory and morphological properties of two different fibroblast cells namely; human lung fibroblast cells (LL24) and subcutaneous areolar/adipose mouse fibroblast cells (L929). Using a speaker-based system, the effects of mechanical stimulation (0-1600Hz for 5min) on the mean cell migration distance (μm) and actin organisation was investigated. The results show that 100Hz acoustic vibration enhanced cell migration for both cell lines whereas acoustic vibration above 100Hz was found to decrease cell migration in a frequency dependent manner. Mechanical stimulation was also found to promote changes to the morphology of both cell lines, particularly the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. Overall lamellipodia was the most prominent actin structure displayed by the lung cell (LL24), whereas filopodia was the most prominent actin feature displayed by the fibroblast derived from subcutaneous areolar/adipose tissue. Mechanical stimulation at all the frequencies used here was found not to affect cell viability. These results suggest that low-frequency acoustic vibration may be used as a tool to manipulate the mechanosensitivity of cells to promote cell migration.

  19. Acoustic metamaterials with coupled local resonators for broadband vibration suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guobiao; Tang, Lihua; Das, Raj; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates a modified acoustic metamaterial system with local resonators coupled through linear springs. The proposed acoustic metamaterial system can provide three band gaps for broadband vibration suppression. First, the band structure of the modified acoustic metamaterial is calculated by using Bloch's theorem under the assumption of infinite lattice. The existence of three band gaps is confirmed in the band structure. Effects of mass and spring parameters on the band gap behaviour of the modified metamaterial are investigated through a dimensionless parametric study. Based on the parametric study, optimal dimensionless parameters are proposed to achieve maximal total band gap width in the low frequency range. Subsequently, a more realistic finite lattice model is established. The transmittances of the conventional and modified metamaterial systems are compared. The three band gaps predicted from transmittances and broadband vibration suppression behaviour are consistent with the predictions from infinite lattice model using Bloch's theorem. Finally, the time-domain responses are simulated and the superiority of the modified acoustic metamaterial over the conventional one is demonstrated.

  20. Vibration and Acoustic Testing for Mars Micromission Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Dennis L.; Scharton, Terry D.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the Mars Micromission program being managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for NASA is to develop a common spacecraft that can carry telecommunications equipment and a variety of science payloads for exploration of Mars. The spacecraft will be capable of carrying robot landers and rovers, cameras, probes, balloons, gliders or aircraft, and telecommunications equipment to Mars at much lower cost than recent NASA Mars missions. The lightweight spacecraft (about 220 Kg mass) will be launched in a cooperative venture with CNES as a TWIN auxiliary payload on the Ariane 5 launch vehicle. Two or more Mars Micromission launches are planned for each Mars launch opportunity, which occur every 26 months. The Mars launch window for the first mission is November 1, 2002 through April 2003, which is planned to be a Mars airplane technology demonstration mission to coincide with the 100 year anniversary of the Kittyhawk flight. Several subsequent launches will create a telecommunications network orbiting Mars, which will provide for continuous communication with lenders and rovers on the Martian surface. Dedicated science payload flights to Mars are slated to start in 2005. This new cheaper and faster approach to Mars exploration calls for innovative approaches to the qualification of the Mars Micromission spacecraft for the Ariane 5 launch vibration and acoustic environments. JPL has in recent years implemented new approaches to spacecraft testing that may be effectively applied to the Mars Micromission. These include 1) force limited vibration testing, 2) combined loads, vibration and modal testing, and 3) direct acoustic testing. JPL has performed nearly 200 force limited vibration tests in the past 9 years; several of the tests were on spacecraft and large instruments, including the Cassini and Deep Space One spacecraft. Force limiting, which measures and limits the spacecraft base reaction force using triaxial force gages sandwiched between the

  1. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  2. Coherent acoustic vibrations in silicon submicron spiral arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masashi; Liu, Jianxun; Ye, Dexian; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2009-08-01

    Mechanical properties of complex silicon submicron structures have been studied both experimentally and theoretically using time resolved ultrafast spectroscopy and finite element analysis. Periodic and random arrays of single-turned silicon submircron spirals were grown using the oblique angle deposition technique. Resonant vibrational modes of the submicron spirals were coherently excited by femtosecond laser pulses. Excitation of multiple harmonics of the resonant vibrations has been observed, and the mode patterns of the excited vibrations in the submicron spirals have been calculated.

  3. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, LU

    1993-01-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  4. Multivariate Analysis of Ladle Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenus, Jaefer; Brooks, Geoffrey; Dunn, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The homogeneity of composition and uniformity of temperature of the steel melt before it is transferred to the tundish are crucial in making high-quality steel product. The homogenization process is performed by stirring the melt using inert gas in ladles. Continuous monitoring of this process is important to make sure the action of stirring is constant throughout the ladle. Currently, the stirring process is monitored by process operators who largely rely on visual and acoustic phenomena from the ladle. However, due to lack of measurable signals, the accuracy and suitability of this manual monitoring are problematic. The actual flow of argon gas to the ladle may not be same as the flow gage reading due to leakage along the gas line components. As a result, the actual degree of stirring may not be correctly known. Various researchers have used one-dimensional vibration, and sound and image signals measured from the ladle to predict the degree of stirring inside. They developed online sensors which are indeed to monitor the online stirring phenomena. In this investigation, triaxial vibration signals have been measured from a cold water model which is a model of an industrial ladle. Three flow rate ranges and varying bath heights were used to collect vibration signals. The Fast Fourier Transform was applied to the dataset before it has been analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS). PCA was used to unveil the structure in the experimental data. PLS was mainly applied to predict the stirring from the vibration response. It was found that for each flow rate range considered in this study, the informative signals reside in different frequency ranges. The first latent variables in these frequency ranges explain more than 95 pct of the variation in the stirring process for the entire single layer and the double layer data collected from the cold model. PLS analysis in these identified frequency ranges demonstrated that the latent

  5. Monitoring Gold Nanoparticle Growth in Situ via the Acoustic Vibrations Probed by Four-Wave Mixing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Xiang, Dao; Gordon, Reuven

    2017-02-21

    We monitor in situ gold nanoparticle growth in aqueous solution by probing the acoustic vibrations with four-wave mixing. We observe two acoustic vibrational modes of gold nanoparticles from the nonlinear optical response: an extensional mode with longitudinal expansion and transverse contraction and a breathing mode with radial expansion and contraction. The mode frequencies, which show an inverse dependence on the nanoparticle diameter, allow one to monitor the nanoparticle size and size distribution during synthesis. The information about the nanoparticle size and size distribution calculated on the basis of the mode frequencies agrees well with the results obtained from the electron microscopy analysis, validating the four-wave mixing technique as an accurate and effective tool for in situ monitoring of colloidal growth.

  6. Gearbox tooth cut fault diagnostics using acoustic emission and vibration sensors--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yongzhi; He, David; Yoon, Jae; Van Hecke, Brandon; Bechhoefer, Eric; Zhu, Junda

    2014-01-14

    In recent years, acoustic emission (AE) sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance.

  7. Gearbox Tooth Cut Fault Diagnostics Using Acoustic Emission and Vibration Sensors — A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yongzhi; He, David; Yoon, Jae; Van Hecke, Brandon; Bechhoefer, Eric; Zhu, Junda

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, acoustic emission (AE) sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance. PMID:24424467

  8. Vibration damping using a spiral acoustic black hole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Yeon; Jeon, Wonju

    2017-03-01

    This study starts with a simple question: can the vibration of plates or beams be efficiently reduced using a lightweight structure that occupies a small space? As an efficient technique to damp vibration, the concept of an acoustic black hole (ABH) is adopted with a simple modification of the geometry. The original shape of an ABH is a straight wedge-type profile with power-law thickness, with the reduction of vibration in beams or plates increasing as the length of the ABH increases. However, in real-world applications, there exists an upper bound of the length of an ABH due to space limitations. Therefore, in this study, the authors propose a curvilinear shaped ABH using the simple mathematical geometry of an Archimedean spiral, which allows a uniform gap distance between adjacent baselines of the spiral. In numerical simulations, the damping performance increases as the arc length of the Archimedean spiral increases, regardless of the curvature of the spiral in the mid- and high-frequency ranges. Adding damping material to an ABH can also strongly enhance the damping performance while not significantly increasing the weight. In addition, the radiated sound power of a spiral ABH is similar to that of a standard ABH.

  9. New algorithm for controlling electric arc furnaces using their vibrational and acoustic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, V. S.; Bikeev, R. A.; Serikov, V. A.; Rechkalov, A. V.; Cherednichenko, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The processes occurring in arc discharges are analyzed as the sources of acoustic radiation in an electric arc furnace (EAF). Acoustic vibrations are shown to transform into mechanical vibrations in the furnace laboratory. The shielding of the acoustic energy fluxes onto water-cooled wall panels by a charge is experimentally studied. It is shown that the rate of charge melting and the depth of submergence of arc discharges in the slag and metal melt can be monitored by measuring the vibrational characteristics of furnaces and using them in a universal industrial process-control system, which was developed for EAFs.

  10. Wavenumber transform analysis for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic black holes (ABHs) are effective, passive, lightweight vibration absorbers that have been developed and shown to effectively reduce the structural vibration and radiated sound of beam and plate structures. ABHs employ a local thickness change that reduces the speed of bending waves and increases the transverse vibration amplitude. The vibrational energy can then be effectively focused and dissipated by material losses or through conventional viscoelastic damping treatments. In this work, the measured vibratory response of embedded ABH plates was transformed into the wavenumber domain in order to investigate the use of wavenumber analysis for characterizing, designing, and optimizing practical ABH systems. The results showed that wavenumber transform analysis can be used to simultaneously visualize multiple aspects of ABH performance including changes in bending wave speed, transverse vibration amplitude, and energy dissipation. The analysis was also used to investigate the structural acoustic coupling of the ABH system and determine the radiation efficiency of the embedded ABH plates compared to a uniform plate. The results demonstrated that the ABH effect results in acoustic decoupling as well as vibration reduction. The wavenumber transform based methods and results will be useful for implementing ABHs into real world structures.

  11. Phase-sensitive imaging of tissue acoustic vibrations using spectrally encoded interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ilgayev, Ovadia; Yelin, Dvir

    2013-08-26

    Acoustic vibrations in tissue are often difficult to image, requiring high-speed scanning, high sensitivity and nanometer-scale axial resolution. Here we use spectrally encoded interferometry to measure the vibration pattern of two-dimensional surfaces, including the skin of a volunteer, at nanometric resolution, without the need for rapid lateral scanning and with no prior knowledge of the driving acoustic waveform. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for measuring tissue biomechanics using simple and compact imaging probes.

  12. Acoustic metamaterial structures based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, P. Frank; Peng, Hao

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new metamaterial beam based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers for broadband vibration absorption. The proposed metamaterial beam consists of a uniform isotropic beam and small two-mass spring-mass- damper subsystems at many locations along the beam to act as multi-frequency vibration absorbers. For an infinite metamaterial beam, governing equations of a unit cell are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The existence of two stopbands is demonstrated using a model based on averaging material properties over a cell length and a model based on finite element modeling and the Bloch-Floquet theory for periodic structures. For a finite metamaterial beam, because these two idealized models cannot be used for finite beams and/or elastic waves having short wavelengths, a finite-element method is used for detailed modeling and analysis. The concepts of negative effective mass and effective stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystem creates two stopbands are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed metamaterial beam is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. For an incoming wave with a frequency in one of the two stopbands, the absorbers are excited to vibrate in their optical modes to create shear forces to straighten the beam and stop the wave propagation. For an incoming wave with a frequency outside of but between the two stopbands, it can be efficiently damped out by the damper with the second mass of each absorber. Hence, the two stopbands are connected into a wide stopband. Numerical examples validate the concept and show that the structure's boundary conditions do not have significant influence on the absorption of high-frequency waves. However, for absorption of low-frequency waves, the structure's boundary conditions and resonance frequencies and the location and spatial distribution of absorbers need to be considered in design, and it

  13. Light scattering from acoustic vibrational modes in confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandhu, Rudra Shyam

    The acoustic vibrational modes and their light scattering intensities in confined structures such as supported films, double layer free-standing membrane and sub-micron sized wires on a free-standing membrane have been studied using Brillouin Light Scattering (BLS). Standing wave type acoustic phonons were recently observed in supported thin films of silicon oxy-nitride. We build upon this finding to study the acoustic modes in thin zinc selenide (ZnSe) films on gallium arsenide (GaAs). The surprising behaviour of the Brillouin intensities of the standing wave modes in ZnSe are explained in terms of interference of the elasto-optic scattering amplitudes from the film and substrate. Numerical calculations of the scattering cross-section, which takes into account ripple and elasto-optic scattering mechanism, agrees well with the experimental data. Light scattering studies of standing wave type modes in free-standing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) layer on Si3N4 were carried out. In these bilayer structures PMMA is much softer than Si3N 4, a property that leads to confinement of low frequency modes associated with the PMMA layer to within its boundaries. In addition, the flexural and the dilatational modes from the Si3N4 layer are observed and are found to hybridize with the standing wave modes from the PMMA layer. Our study of phonon modes in PMMA wires supported on a free-standing Si3N4 membrane extends our work on free-standing double layer membranes. In recent years there is much interest in the study of phonon modes in nano-scale structures such as wires or dots. Although much theoretical work has been carried out in this direction, no experiments exist that explore the dispersion of the phonon modes in such structures. Brillouin Light scattering is ideally suited for studying phonons in such reduced dimensions and our work represents the first effort in this direction. The spectra reveal modes which are quantized both along the width, as well along the thickness

  14. Spectrum analysis for introductory musical acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, John E.

    1998-02-01

    A "real time" fast Fourier transform spectrum analyzer facilitates several experiments for an introductory course in musical acoustics. With its rapidly updated display, the time-dependent vibrations of an aluminum bar are easily studied. Using longer time acquisitions and correspondingly higher resolution facilitates the study of string inharmonicities, resonant energy transfer, and sound radiation patterns in guitar acoustics.

  15. Enhanced vibration based energy harvesting using embedded acoustic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Semperlotti, F.; Conlon, S. C.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of dynamic structural tailoring via the concept of an Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) to enhance the performance of piezoelectric based energy harvesting from operational mechanical vibrations. The ABH is a variable thickness structural feature that can be embedded in the host structure allowing a smooth reduction of the phase velocity while minimizing the amplitude of reflected waves. The ABH thickness variation is typically designed according to power-law profiles. As a propagating wave enters the ABH, it is progressively slowed down while its wavelength is compressed. This effect results in structural areas with high energy density that can be exploited effectively for energy harvesting. The potential of ABH for energy harvesting is shown via a numerical study based on fully coupled finite element electromechanical models of an ABH tapered plate with surface mounted piezo-transducers. The performances of the novel design are evaluated by direct comparison with a non-tapered structure in terms of energy ratios and attenuation indices. Results show that the tailored structural design allows a drastic increase in the harvested energy both for steady state and transient excitation. Performance dependencies of key design parameters are also investigated.

  16. Sensitivity to intermodal asynchrony between acoustic and structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kent; Martens, William L.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover the attributes of musical stimuli which facilitate sensory integration in bi-modal music reproduction systems incorporating sound and whole-body vibration. It was hypothesized that subjective judgments regarding bimodal synchrony would vary depending on the spectral, temporal, and spatial properties of the stimuli. To test this hypothesis, musical instruments with significant low frequency energy and a variety of spectra-temporal envelopes were recorded. These stimuli were then reproduced with varying intermodal delay and overlap in frequency content between displayed vibratory and acoustic components. The air-born component of the bimodal stimuli was presented via a multichannel loudspeaker array, with a direct sound component, as well as a reproduced indirect sound arriving from all around the observer. Psychometric functions were constructed for time order judgment (TOJ) over a range of intermodal delay values. Changes in the slope and intercept of the transformed psychometric functions gave a clear picture of the influence of spectra-temporal and spatial parameters of the multimodal stimuli, the most striking results being the decreased tolerance for intermodal asynchrony associated with instruments recorded in reverberant environments. [Work supported by a Grant from VRQ of the Government of Quebec.

  17. A violin shell model: vibrational modes and acoustics.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2015-03-01

    A generic physical model for the vibro-acoustic modes of the violin is described treating the body shell as a shallow, thin-walled, guitar-shaped, box structure with doubly arched top and back plates. comsol finite element, shell structure, software is used to identify and understand the vibrational modes of a simply modeled violin. This identifies the relationship between the freely supported plate modes when coupled together by the ribs and the modes of the assembled body shell. Such coupling results in a relatively small number of eigenmodes or component shell modes, of which a single volume-changing breathing mode is shown to be responsible for almost all the sound radiated in the monopole signature mode regime below ∼1 kHz for the violin, whether directly or by excitation of the Helmholtz f-hole resonance. The computations describe the influence on such modes of material properties, arching, plate thickness, elastic anisotropy, f-holes cut into the top plate, the bass-bar, coupling to internal air modes, the rigid neck-fingerboard assembly, and, most importantly, the soundpost. Because the shell modes are largely determined by the symmetry of the guitar-shaped body, the model is applicable to all instruments of the violin family.

  18. Vibration-Response Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of structures analyzed interactively. Interactive steadystate vibration-response program, VIBRA, developed. Frequency-response analyses commonly used in evaluating dynamic behaviors of structures subjected to cyclic external forces. VIBRA calculates frequency response using modalsuperposition approach. Method applicable to single or multiple forces applied to linear, proportionally damped structure in which damping is viscous or structural. VIBRA written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution.

  19. Stress analysis of vibrating pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachwieja, Janusz

    2017-03-01

    The pipelines are subject to various constraints variable in time. Those vibrations, if not monitored for amplitude and frequency, may result in both the fatigue damage in the pipeline profile at high stress concentration and the damage to the pipeline supports. If the constraint forces are known, the system response may be determined with high accuracy using analytical or numerical methods. In most cases, it may be difficult to determine the constraint parameters, since the industrial pipeline vibrations occur due to the dynamic effects of the medium in the pipeline. In that case, a vibration analysis is a suitable alternative method to determine the stress strain state in the pipeline profile. Monitoring the pipeline vibration levels involves a comparison between the measured vibration parameters and the permissible values as depicted in the graphs for a specific pipeline type. Unfortunately, in most cases, the studies relate to the petrochemical industry and thus large diameter, long and straight pipelines. For a pipeline section supported on both ends, the response in any profile at the entire section length can be determined by measuring the vibration parameters at two different profiles between the pipeline supports. For a straight pipeline section, the bending moments, variable in time, at the ends of the analysed section are a source of the pipe excitation. If a straight pipe section supported on both ends is excited by the bending moments in the support profile, the starting point for the stress analysis are the strains, determined from the Euler-Bernoulli equation. In practice, it is easier to determine the displacement using the experimental methods, since the factors causing vibrations are unknown. The industrial system pipelines, unlike the transfer pipelines, are straight sections at some points only, which makes it more difficult to formulate the equation of motion. In those cases, numerical methods can be used to determine stresses using the

  20. Acoustically Evoked Different Vibration Pattern Across the Width of the Cochlea Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Dingjun; Chen, Fangyi; Friderberg, Anders; Choudhury, Niloy; Nuttall, Alfred

    2011-11-01

    Using optical low coherence interferometry, the acoustically evoked vibration patterns of the basilar membrane (BM) and reticular lamina (RL) in the first turn of living guinea pigs were measured as function of the radial location. It was demonstrated that the vibration of the BM varied widely in amplitude, but little in phase across the width of the partition, while the RL had a different vibration pattern compared with the BM.

  1. Numerical analysis of strongly nonlinear extensional vibrations in elastic rods.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of transduction, nondestructive testing, and nonlinear acoustic characterization, this article presents the analysis of strongly nonlinear vibrations by means of an original numerical algorithm. In acoustic and transducer applications in extreme working conditions, such as the ones induced by the generation of high-power ultrasound, the analysis of nonlinear ultrasonic vibrations is fundamental. Also, the excitation and analysis of nonlinear vibrations is an emergent technique in nonlinear characterization for damage detection. A third-order evolution equation is derived and numerically solved for extensional waves in isotropic dissipative media. A nine-constant theory of elasticity for isotropic solids is constructed, and the nonlinearity parameters corresponding to extensional waves are proposed. The nonlinear differential equation is solved by using a new numerical algorithm working in the time domain. The finite-difference numerical method proposed is implicit and only requires the solution of a linear set of equations at each time step. The model allows the analysis of strongly nonlinear, one-dimensional vibrations and can be used for prediction as well as characterization. Vibration waveforms are calculated at different points, and results are compared for different excitation levels and boundary conditions. Amplitude distributions along the rod axis for every harmonic component also are evaluated. Special attention is given to the study of high-amplitude damping of vibrations by means of several simulations. Simulations are performed for amplitudes ranging from linear to nonlinear and weak shock.

  2. Acoustic metamaterial panels based on multi frequency vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chao; Sun, Hongwei; Hu, Xiaolei; Gu, Jinliang

    2016-04-01

    Presented here is a new metamaterial panel based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers for broadband vibration absorption. The proposed metamaterial panel consists of a uniform isotropic panel and small two-mass spring-mass-damper subsystem many locations along the panel to act as multi-frequency vibration absorbers. The existence of two stopbands is demonstrated using a model based on averaging material properties over a cell length and a model based on finite element modeling and the Bloch-Floquet theory for periodic structures. For a finite metamaterial panel, because these two idealized models can not be used for finite panels and/or elastic waves having short wavelengths, a finite-element method is used for detailed modeling and analysis. The concepts of negative effective stiffness is explained in detail. For an incoming wave with a frequency in one of the two stopbands, the absorbers are excited to vibrate in their optical modes to create shear forces to straighten the panel and stop the wave propagation. For an incoming wave with a frequency outside of but between the two stopbands, it can be efficiently damped out by the damper with these mass of each absorber. Hence, the two stopbands are connected in to a wide stopband. Numerical examples validate the concept and show that the structures boundary conditions do not have significant influence on the absorption of high-frequency waves. However, for absorption of low-frequency waves, the structures boundary conditions and resonance frequencies and the location and spatial distribution of absorbers need to be considered in design, and it is better to use heavier masses for absorbers.

  3. Towards identifying the dynamics of sliding by acoustic emission and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The results of experiments with high load and sliding speed sliding conditions on tribologically mated pairs such as steel 1045/steel 1045 (test 1), steel 1045/basalt (test 2) and Hadfield steel/basalt (test 3) have been carried out in order to identify their response in terms of the acoustic emission and vibration signals. The steel to rock and rock to steel transfer has been revealed by examining the worn surfaces of both steel and rock samples with the use of laser scanning microscopy. The AE signal characteristics have been determined for the tribological pairs studied. The dynamics of sliding has been evaluated by measuring the vibration accelerations. Relationship between wear mode and either acoustic emission signal or vibration signal has been established. The minimal vibration oscillations amplitude and acoustic emission signal energy have been found out in sliding Hadfield steel/basalt pair.

  4. Innovative Techniques Simplify Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the early years of development, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers encountered challenges related to components in the space shuttle main engine. To assess the problems, they evaluated the effects of vibration and oscillation. To enhance the method of vibration signal analysis, Marshall awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to AI Signal Research, Inc. (ASRI), in Huntsville, Alabama. ASRI developed a software package called PC-SIGNAL that NASA now employs on a daily basis, and in 2009, the PKP-Module won Marshall s Software of the Year award. The technology is also used in many industries: aircraft and helicopter, rocket engine manufacturing, transportation, and nuclear power."

  5. A Spectral Analysis Approach for Acoustic Radiation from Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Mei, Chuh

    2004-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the vibration response of a composite panel and the resulting far-field acoustic radiation due to acoustic excitation. The acoustic excitation is assumed to consist of obliquely incident plane waves. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. The approach can easily include other effects such as shape memory alloy (SMA) ber reinforcement, large detection thermal postbuckling, and non-symmetric SMA distribution or lamination. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Results for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement. The mechanisms for further transmission loss improvement are identified and discussed.

  6. Detection of bearing damage by statistic vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The condition of bearings, which are essential components in mechanisms, is crucial to safety. The analysis of the bearing vibration signal, which is always contaminated by certain types of noise, is a very important standard for mechanical condition diagnosis of the bearing and mechanical failure phenomenon. In this paper the method of rolling bearing fault detection by statistical analysis of vibration is proposed to filter out Gaussian noise contained in a raw vibration signal. The results of experiments show that the vibration signal can be significantly enhanced by application of the proposed method. Besides, the proposed method is used to analyse real acoustic signals of a bearing with inner race and outer race faults, respectively. The values of attributes are determined according to the degree of the fault. The results confirm that the periods between the transients, which represent bearing fault characteristics, can be successfully detected.

  7. Acoustic emission signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, O.; Pardee, J. W.

    1981-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) in plate glass and steel was studied as a function of angle. The low frequency AE in glass was studied in detail, and contributions from P, S, and Rayleigh waves identified. These results were isotropic, as expected theoretically. Limited high frequency (5 to 20 MHz) results were obtained in glass. The measurement of AE on transgranular crack growth in steel during fatigue crack growth was accomplished by use of a low noise manual hydraulic loading system and an electronic gate to reject grip noise. The concept of the wave momentum of an AE was elaborated and a measurement technique suggested. The theoretical study of this problem led to the discovery of an infinite family of elastic surface (Rayleigh-like) waves, and to further cylindrical, radially propagating plate waves.

  8. Comparison of electroglottographic and acoustic analysis of pitch perturbation.

    PubMed

    LaBlance, G R; Maves, M D; Scialfa, T M; Eitnier, C M; Steckol, K F

    1992-11-01

    Pitch perturbation is a measure of the cycle-to-cycle variation in vocal fold vibration. Perturbation can be assessed by means of electroglottographic or acoustic signals. The purpose of this study was to determine if these two analysis techniques are equivalent measures. The Laryngograph, an electroglottograph, and the Visi-Pitch, an acoustic analyzer, were used to measure pitch perturbation in 80 dysphonic subjects. Both instruments use Koike's formula to calculate relative average perturbation. While intra-subject variability appeared erratic, statistical analysis of intersubject data indicated that the two instruments provided an equivalent measure of pitch perturbation.

  9. Extraction of the acoustic component of a turbulent flow exciting a plate by inverting the vibration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoq, D.; Pézerat, C.; Thomas, J.-H.; Bi, W. P.

    2014-06-01

    An improvement of the Force Analysis Technique (FAT), an inverse method of vibration, is proposed to identify the low wavenumbers including the acoustic component of a turbulent flow that excites a plate. This method is a significant progress since the usual techniques of measurements with flush-mounted sensors are not able to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic energies of the excitation because the aerodynamic component is too high. Moreover, the main cause of vibration or acoustic radiation of the structure might be due to the acoustic part by a phenomenon of spatial coincidence between the acoustic wavelengths and those of the plate. This underlines the need to extract the acoustic part. In this work, numerical experiments are performed to solve both the direct and inverse problems of vibration. The excitation is a turbulent boundary layer and combines the pressure field of the Corcos model and a diffuse acoustic field. These pressures are obtained by a synthesis method based on the Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectra matrices and are used to excite a plate. Thus, the application of the inverse problem FAT that requires only the vibration data shows that the method is able to identify and to isolate the acoustic part of the excitation. Indeed, the discretization of the inverse operator (motion equation of the plate) acts as a low-pass wavenumber filter. In addition, this method is simple to implement because it can be applied locally (no need to know the boundary conditions), and measurements can be carried out on the opposite side of the plate without affecting the flow. Finally, an improvement of FAT is proposed. It regularizes optimally and automatically the inverse problem by analyzing the mean quadratic pressure of the reconstructed force distribution. This optimized FAT, in the case of the turbulent flow, has the advantage of measuring the acoustic component up to higher frequencies even in the presence of noise. the aerodynamic component

  10. A fast full frequency range measurement of nonlinear distortions in the vibration of acoustic transducers and acoustically driven membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, J. R. M.; Dirckx, J. J. J.

    2007-11-01

    Recently, a new method was proposed to measure nonlinear distortions in weak nonlinear systems using specially designed broadband excitation signals (odd random phase multisines). During one single experiment, the output response level, the noise level and the level of the nonlinear distortions are simultaneously measured. We implement this method in an opto-acoustic set-up which allows us to measure vibrations with high accuracy. To demonstrate the method, we present results obtained on the membrane of an earphone speaker and a latex membrane. On the earphone good agreement is found between measurements of the produced sound field and the actual membrane vibration using heterodyne interferometry. The results show that heterodyne vibrometry can be used to detect nonlinear distortions which are up to 80 dB below the output level in an acoustically driven system.

  11. Pressure potential and stability analysis in an acoustical noncontact transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, C. J.; Zhang, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Near field acoustic traveling wave is one of the most popular principles in noncontact manipulations and transportations. The stability behavior is a key factor in the industrial applications of acoustical noncontact transportation. We present here an in-depth analysis of the transportation stability of a planar object levitated in near field acoustic traveling waves. To more accurately describe the pressure distributions on the radiation surface, a 3D nonlinear traveling wave model is presented. A closed form solution is derived based on the pressure potential to quantitatively calculate the restoring forces and moments under small disturbances. The physical explanations of the effects of fluid inertia and the effects of non-uniform pressure distributions are provided in detail. It is found that a vibration rail with tapered cross section provides more stable transportation than a rail with rectangular cross section. The present study sheds light on the issue of quantitative evaluation of stability in acoustic traveling waves and proposes three main factors that influence the stability: (a) vibration shape, (b) pressure distribution and (c) restoring force/moment. It helps to provide a better understanding of the physics behind the near field acoustic transportation and provide useful design and optimization tools for industrial applications.

  12. Fourier Analysis Of Vibrations Of Round Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier-series representation developed for analysis of vibrations in complicated, round structures like turbopump impellers. Method eliminates guesswork involved in characterization of shapes of vibrational modes. Easy way to characterize complicated modes, leading to determination of responsiveness of given mode to various forcing functions. Used in conjunction with finite-element numerical simulation of vibrational modes of structure.

  13. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  14. Emergence of colour symmetry in free-vibration acoustic resonance of a nonlinear hyperelastic material

    PubMed Central

    Tarumi, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated free-vibration acoustic resonance (FVAR) of two-dimensional St Venant–Kirchhoff-type hyperelastic materials and revealed the existence and structure of colour symmetry embedded therein. The hyperelastic material is isotropic and frame indifferent and includes geometrical nonlinearity in its constitutive equation. The FVAR state is formulated using the principle of stationary action with a subsidiary condition. Numerical analysis based on the Ritz method revealed the existence of four types of nonlinear FVAR modes associated with the irreducible representations of a linearized system. Projection operation revealed that the FVAR modes can be classified on the basis of a single colour (black or white) and three types of bicolour (black and white) magnetic point groups: , , and . These results demonstrate that colour symmetry naturally arises in the finite amplitude nonlinear FVAR modes, and its vibrational symmetries are explained in terms of magnetic point groups rather than the irreducible representations that have been used for linearized systems. We also predicted a grey colour nonlinear FVAR mode which cannot be derived from a linearized system. PMID:24204182

  15. Measurements of Acoustic Properties of Porous and Granular Materials and Application to Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Junhong; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    For application of porous and granular materials to vibro-acoustic controls, a finite dynamic strength of the solid component (frame) is an important design factor. The primary goal of this study was to investigate structural vibration damping through this frame wave propagation for various poroelastic materials. A measurement method to investigate the vibration characteristics of the frame was proposed. The measured properties were found to follow closely the characteristics of the viscoelastic materials - the dynamic modulus increased with frequency and the degree of the frequency dependence was determined by its loss factor. The dynamic stiffness of hollow cylindrical beams containing porous and granular materials as damping treatment was measured also. The data were used to extract the damping materials characteristics using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The results suggested that the acoustic structure interaction between the frame and the structure enhances the dissipation of the vibration energy significantly.

  16. Vibration analysis for electronic equipment (2nd edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Dave S.

    This book describes methods for designing electronic equipment that must work with a high degree of reliability in severe vibration and shock environments. It explains how to design and predict the operational life of electronic equipment based upon the type of electronic components used and the type of vibration and shock exposure. The book begins with a review of the dynamics of nonuniform sections and composite construction methods for electronic assemblies, followed by a discussion of methods for mounting electronic components and determining electrical lead wire and solder joint stresses and fatigue life. Printed circuit boards and chassis assemblies are examined in detail, with methods for determining natural frequency, dynamic coupling transmissibility, and fatigue life. The design and analysis of electronic components, circuit boards, electrical lead wires, and solder joints for sinusoidal and random vibrations, acoustics, shock, and pyrotechnic shock are addressed.

  17. Mems-Based Waste Vibration and Acoustic Energy Harvesters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Timothy J. Householder Approved by: Dragoslav Grbovic Thesis Advisor Bruce Denardo Co-Advisor Andres Larraza Chair, Department...MotionPro X3 high-speed camera with a Carl Zeiss MAKRO-PLANAR T*, 2-100 mm, ZF.2 macro-lens was used to observe the vibrational mode at 3910 frames

  18. Vibration and acoustic response of an orthotropic composite laminated plate in a hygroscopic environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Qian; Li, Yueming

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a study of the vibration and acoustic response characteristics of orthotropic laminated composite plate with simple supported boundary conditions excited by a harmonic concentrated force in a hygroscopic environment. First the natural vibration of the plate with the in-plane forces induced by hygroscopic stress is obtained analytically. Secondly, the sound pressure distribution of the plate at the far field is obtained using the Rayleigh integral. Furthermore, the sound radiation efficiency is deduced. Third, different ratios of elastic modulus in material principal directions are set to research the effects of increasing stiffness of the orthotropic plate on the vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics. Finally, to verify the theoretical solution, numerical simulations are also carried out with commercial finite software. It is found that the natural frequencies decrease with the increase of the moisture content and the first two order modes interconvert at high moisture content. The dynamic response and sound pressure level float to lower frequencies with elevated moisture content. Acoustic radiation efficiency generally floats to the low frequencies and decreases with an increase of moisture content. The dynamic and acoustic responses reduce and the coincidence frequency decreases with the enhanced stiffness.

  19. A theoretical study of the vibration and acoustics of ancient Chinese bells.

    PubMed

    Jing, M

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, the acoustics of an ancient Chinese bell, which was made some 3000 years B.C., is studied theoretically. In ancient times, a set of the bells was used as a musical instrument. Unlike a western church bell and an ancient Indian bell, an ancient Chinese bell has two interesting acoustics. First, two tones can be heard separately as the bell is struck at two special points. The interval between the two pitches is always a minor or major third. Second, tones of the bell attenuate quickly, which is necessary for a musical instrument. So, an ancient Chinese bell is sometimes called a two-tone bell or a music bell. Although a three-dimensional model should be used to simulate the acoustics of the bell, a simplified model proposed in this paper does give some insight. Based on the lens-shaped cross section of an ancient Chinese bell, two tones of an ancient Chinese bell can be simulated by the vibration of a double-circular arch and the quick attenuation of tones can be simulated by acoustics of a cylinder with the lens-shaped cross section like a double-circular arch. Numerical results on the vibration and acoustics of the models are presented.

  20. Axial vibrations of brass wind instrument bells and their acoustical influence: Experiments.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas R; Gorman, Britta R; Rokni, Michelle; Kausel, Wilfried; Chatziioannou, Vasileios

    2015-08-01

    It has recently been proposed that the effects of structural vibrations on the radiated sound of brass wind instruments may be attributable to axial modes of vibration with mode shapes that contain no radial nodes [Kausel, Chatziioannou, Moore, Gorman, and Rokni, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137, 3149-3162 (2015)]. Results of experiments are reported that support this theory. Mechanical measurements of a trumpet bell demonstrate that these axial modes do exist in brass wind instruments. The quality factor of the mechanical resonances can be on the order of 10 or less, making them broad enough to encompass the frequency range of previously reported effects attributed to bell vibrations. Measurements of the input impedance show that damping bell vibrations can result in impedance changes of up to 5%, in agreement with theory. Measurements of the acoustic transfer function demonstrate that the axial vibrations couple to the internal sound field as proposed, resulting in changes in the transfer function of approximately 1 dB. In agreement with theory, a change in the sign of the effect is observed at the frequency of the structural resonance.

  1. The analysis of nonstationary vibration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1987-01-01

    The general methodology for the analysis of arbitrary nonstationary random data is reviewed. A specific parametric model, called the product model, that has applications to space vehicle launch vibration data analysis is discussed. Illustrations are given using the nonstationary launch vibration data measured on the Space Shuttle orbiter vehicle.

  2. Vibration Analysis of AN Induction Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, C.; LAI, J. C. S.

    1999-07-01

    With the advent of power electronics, variable speed induction motors are finding increasing use in industries because of their low cost and potential savings in energy consumption. However, the acoustic noise emitted by the motor increases due to switching harmonics introduced by the electronic inverters. Consequently, the vibro-acoustic behaviour of the motor structure has attracted more attention. In this paper, considerations given to modelling the vibration behaviour of a 2·2 kW induction motor are discussed. By comparing the calculated natural frequencies and the mode shapes with the results obtained from experimental modal testing, the effects of the teeth of the stator, windings, outer casing, slots, end-shields and support on the overall vibration behaviour are analyzed. The results show that when modelling the vibration behaviour of a motor structure, the laminated stator should be treated as an orthotropic structure, and the teeth of the stator could be neglected. As the outer casing, end-shields and the support all affect the vibration properties of the whole structure, these substructures should be incorporated in the model to improve the accuracy.

  3. Interaction of electric and acoustic vibrations in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Sadikov, K. G.; Mitrofanov, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of the interaction of electrical discharges in the acoustic oscillations in the combustion of isobutane are presented in the article. Electric discharges were created using a pulsed high voltage source at specified intervals. The purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility of using electrical pulse action to control combustion. The study was conducted on the specifically designed pattern of the combustion chamber with a swirl burner in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1400 Hz. The study found that the method of periodic pulsed electrical influences can be used to control the combustion in the combustion chamber model. There is a steady increase in the amplitude of the oscillations in the combustion chamber model. Effects due to the mechanism of interaction of acoustic waves and oscillations heat release from the combustion zone. Estimated physical mechanism is a periodic change in the concentration of ions in the interaction of the combustion zone with the electric field of high potential. The proposed control method is advantageous in terms of energy costs.

  4. Probing the Raman-active acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles with extraordinary spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Skyler; Gelfand, Ryan M.; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots, viruses, DNA and all other nanoparticles have acoustic vibrations that can act as ‘fingerprints’ to identify their shape, size and mechanical properties, yet high-resolution Raman spectroscopy in this low-energy range has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy to measure the Raman-active vibrations of single isolated nanoparticles in the 0.1-10 cm-1 range with ˜0.05 cm-1 resolution, to resolve peak splitting from material anisotropy and to probe the low-frequency modes of biomolecules. EAR employs a nanoaperture laser tweezer that can select particles of interest and manipulate them once identified. We therefore believe that this nanotechnology will enable expanded capabilities for the study of nanoparticles in the materials and life sciences.

  5. Time-Resolved Studies of the Acoustic Vibrational Modes of Metal and Semiconductor Nano-objects.

    PubMed

    Major, Todd A; Lo, Shun Shang; Yu, Kuai; Hartland, Gregory V

    2014-03-06

    Over the past decade, there have been a number of transient absorption studies of the acoustic vibrational modes of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. This Perspective provides an overview of this work. The way that the frequencies of the observed modes depend on the size and shape of the particles is described, along with their damping. Future research directions are also discussed, especially how these measurements provide information about the way nano-objects interact with their environment.

  6. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  7. Vibration Analysis by Speckle Interferometry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The vibrational modes of complex systems can be visualized with high sensitivity by laser light speckle interferometry. Electronic speckle pattern...interferometry (ESPI), in contrast to holography, does not use photo-chemical storage media but shows a live image of the vibrational modes created by

  8. Statistical quality control through overall vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnero, M. a. Carmen; González-Palma, Rafael; Almorza, David; Mayorga, Pedro; López-Escobar, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The present study introduces the concept of statistical quality control in automotive wheel bearings manufacturing processes. Defects on products under analysis can have a direct influence on passengers' safety and comfort. At present, the use of vibration analysis on machine tools for quality control purposes is not very extensive in manufacturing facilities. Noise and vibration are common quality problems in bearings. These failure modes likely occur under certain operating conditions and do not require high vibration amplitudes but relate to certain vibration frequencies. The vibration frequencies are affected by the type of surface problems (chattering) of ball races that are generated through grinding processes. The purpose of this paper is to identify grinding process variables that affect the quality of bearings by using statistical principles in the field of machine tools. In addition, an evaluation of the quality results of the finished parts under different combinations of process variables is assessed. This paper intends to establish the foundations to predict the quality of the products through the analysis of self-induced vibrations during the contact between the grinding wheel and the parts. To achieve this goal, the overall self-induced vibration readings under different combinations of process variables are analysed using statistical tools. The analysis of data and design of experiments follows a classical approach, considering all potential interactions between variables. The analysis of data is conducted through analysis of variance (ANOVA) for data sets that meet normality and homoscedasticity criteria. This paper utilizes different statistical tools to support the conclusions such as chi squared, Shapiro-Wilks, symmetry, Kurtosis, Cochran, Hartlett, and Hartley and Krushal-Wallis. The analysis presented is the starting point to extend the use of predictive techniques (vibration analysis) for quality control. This paper demonstrates the existence

  9. Vibration analysis using digital correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Lehner, David L.; Dudderar, T. Dixon; Matthys, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of a computer-based optical method for locating the positions of nodes and antinodes in vibrating members. Structured light patterns are projected at an angle onto the vibrating surface using a 35 mm slide projector. The vibrating surface and the projected images are captured in a time averaged photograph which is subsequently digitized. The inherent fringe patterns are filtered to determine amplitudes of vibration, and computer programs are used to compare the time averaged images to images recorded prior to excitation to locate nodes and antinodes. Some of the influences of pattern regularity on digital correlation are demonstrated, and a speckle-based method for determining the mode shapes and the amplitudes of vibration with variable sensitivity is suggested.

  10. Effects of heat exchange and nonlinearity on acoustic streaming in a vibrating cylindrical cavity.

    PubMed

    Gubaidullin, Amir A; Yakovenko, Anna V

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic streaming in a gas filled cylindrical cavity subjected to the vibration effect is investigated numerically. Both thermally insulated walls and constant temperature walls are considered. The range of vibration frequencies from low frequencies, at which the process can be described by an approximate analytical solution, to high frequencies giving rise to strong nonlinear effects is studied. Frequencies lower than the resonant one are chosen, and nonlinearity is achieved due to the large amplitude. The problem is solved in an axisymmetric statement. The dependence of acoustic streaming in narrow channels at vibration frequencies lower than the resonant one on the type of thermal boundary conditions is shown. The streaming vortices' directions of rotation in the case of constant temperature walls are found to be opposite to those in the case of thermally insulated walls. Different nonlinear effects, which increase with the frequency of vibration, are obtained. Nonlinear effects manifesting as the nonuniformity of average temperature, pressure, and density are in turn found to be influencing the streaming velocity and streaming structure.

  11. Bond-selective photoacoustic imaging by converting molecular vibration into acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Jie; Li, Rui; Phillips, Evan H.; Goergen, Craig J.; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The quantized vibration of chemical bonds provides a way of detecting specific molecules in a complex tissue environment. Unlike pure optical methods, for which imaging depth is limited to a few hundred micrometers by significant optical scattering, photoacoustic detection of vibrational absorption breaks through the optical diffusion limit by taking advantage of diffused photons and weak acoustic scattering. Key features of this method include both high scalability of imaging depth from a few millimeters to a few centimeters and chemical bond selectivity as a novel contrast mechanism for photoacoustic imaging. Its biomedical applications spans detection of white matter loss and regeneration, assessment of breast tumor margins, and diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This review provides an overview of the recent advances made in vibration-based photoacoustic imaging and various biomedical applications enabled by this new technology. PMID:27069873

  12. Bond-selective photoacoustic imaging by converting molecular vibration into acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jie; Li, Rui; Phillips, Evan H; Goergen, Craig J; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-03-01

    The quantized vibration of chemical bonds provides a way of detecting specific molecules in a complex tissue environment. Unlike pure optical methods, for which imaging depth is limited to a few hundred micrometers by significant optical scattering, photoacoustic detection of vibrational absorption breaks through the optical diffusion limit by taking advantage of diffused photons and weak acoustic scattering. Key features of this method include both high scalability of imaging depth from a few millimeters to a few centimeters and chemical bond selectivity as a novel contrast mechanism for photoacoustic imaging. Its biomedical applications spans detection of white matter loss and regeneration, assessment of breast tumor margins, and diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This review provides an overview of the recent advances made in vibration-based photoacoustic imaging and various biomedical applications enabled by this new technology.

  13. Embedded Acoustic Black Holes for semi-passive broadband vibration attenuation in thin-walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liuxian; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    We explore the use of structure-embedded Acoustic Black Holes (ABH) to design thin-walled structural components exhibiting broadband vibration attenuation characteristics. The ABH is a geometric taper with a power-law profile fully integrated into the structural component and able to induce a smooth and progressive decrease of both the velocity and the wavelength of flexural waves. Previous studies have shown these characteristics to be critical to enable highly efficient vibration attenuation systems. The performance of ABH thin-walled structures is numerically and experimentally evaluated under both transient and steady state excitation conditions. Both numerical and experimental results suggest that the proposed approach enables highly efficient and broadband vibration attenuation performance.

  14. Damping of acoustic vibrations of immobilized single gold nanorods in different environments.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuai; Zijlstra, Peter; Sader, John E; Xu, Qing-Hua; Orrit, Michel

    2013-06-12

    We present measurements of the acoustic vibrations of single gold nanorods deposited on a glass substrate immersed in air and water by ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. The nanorods display two vibration modes, the breathing mode and the extensional mode. The damping time of the two modes is influenced by the environment, and a reduction of the quality factor is observed when the particles are immersed in water. The reduced quality factor of the breathing mode is in good agreement with a model that takes into account viscous damping and radiation of sound waves into the medium. The extension mode, however, is heavily damped when the particles are immersed in water, which is attributed to hydrodynamic lubrication forces between the nanoparticle and the glass substrate. Our results identify a new mode of damping in supported nanoparticles and indicate that the immersion medium can have different effects on different modes of vibration.

  15. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  16. Vibro-acoustic coupling dynamics of a finite cylindrical shell under a rotor-bearing-foundation system's nonlinear vibration excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qizheng; Wang, Deshi

    2015-07-01

    The vibro-acoustic coupling dynamics of a rotor-bearing-foundation-cylinder system are investigated. Using rotor dynamics, structure dynamics and acoustical theory, the vibro-acoustic coupling equation of a cylindrical shell under rotor-bearing-foundation system's nonlinear vibration excitations is derived based on variational principle. In order to solve the coupling equation, the influences of the shell's vibration to the rotor-bearing system are neglected, and then the dynamical equation is reduced. The nonlinear forces transmitted to the cylinder are fitted in the Fourier series by the fast Fourier translation and the harmonic balance method, and then the analytical solution of the vibro-acoustic coupling equation of the cylinder is derived. Based on inherent assumption, the analytical expressions of the acoustic radiation power and the surface velocity are given. Then bifurcation diagrams, phase diagrams, time history diagrams and spectrum graphs are employed to study the nonlinear vibration characteristics and the acoustic radiation characteristics. It is inferred that the present work proposes a semi-analytical and semi-numerical method for the nonlinear vibro-acoustic coupling system. The motions of the forces transmitted to the cylinder are periodic motions, quasi-periodic motions, and so on. The vibro-acoustic characteristics of shell are dominated by the rotation frequency of the rotor, while there are some harmonic components dominating the vibro-acoustic characteristics at resonant frequencies.

  17. Structure borne noise analysis using Helmholtz equation least squares based forced vibro acoustic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Logesh Kumar

    This dissertation presents a structure-borne noise analysis technology that is focused on providing a cost-effective noise reduction strategy. Structure-borne sound is generated or transmitted through structural vibration; however, only a small portion of the vibration can effectively produce sound and radiate it to the far-field. Therefore, cost-effective noise reduction is reliant on identifying and suppressing the critical vibration components that are directly responsible for an undesired sound. However, current technologies cannot successfully identify these critical vibration components from the point of view of direct contribution to sound radiation and hence cannot guarantee the best cost-effective noise reduction. The technology developed here provides a strategy towards identifying the critical vibration components and methodically suppressing them to achieve a cost-effective noise reduction. The core of this technology is Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS) based nearfield acoustic holography method. In this study, the HELS formulations derived in spherical co-ordinates using spherical wave expansion functions utilize the input data of acoustic pressures measured in the nearfield of a vibrating object to reconstruct the vibro-acoustic responses on the source surface and acoustic quantities in the far field. Using these formulations, three steps were taken to achieve the goal. First, hybrid regularization techniques were developed to improve the reconstruction accuracy of normal surface velocity of the original HELS method. Second, correlations between the surface vibro-acoustic responses and acoustic radiation were factorized using singular value decomposition to obtain orthogonal basis known here as the forced vibro-acoustic components (F-VACs). The F-VACs enables one to identify the critical vibration components for sound radiation in a similar manner that modal decomposition identifies the critical natural modes in a structural vibration. Finally

  18. Detection of nonlinear distortions in the vibration of acoustically driven mechanical systems using heterodyne vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, J. R. M.; Dirckx, J. J. J.; Pintelon, R.

    2008-06-01

    Recently, a measurement set-up was presented to detect small nonlinear distortions in the vibration of acoustically driven mechanical systems. A speaker generates a specially designed multisine excitation signal that drives the vibration of a test object. The generated sound pressure is measured with a probe microphone in front of the test object, and an heterodyne vibrometer measures the corresponding vibration. Due to the high degree of linearity of the heterodyne technique, very small nonlinear distortions can be detected. In this paper the set-up is used to verify whether small nonlinear distortions are present in the vibration of the middle ear system, which is classically considered to be a completely linear system. In vitro measurements on the right ear of an adult male gerbil proved that nonlinear distortions are present in the vibration of the tympanic membrane. Similar results were seen in measurements on the left ear. The influence of post-mortem changes on the nonlinear behaviour of the middle ear was verified in a number of successive measurements. These indicated that the nonlinear behaviour of the middle ear decreases in time.

  19. Piezoelectric Shunt Vibration Damping of F-15 Panel under High Acoustic Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shu-Yau; Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    At last year's SPIE symposium, we reported results of an experiment on structural vibration damping of an F-15 underbelly panel using piezoelectric shunting with five bonded PZT transducers. The panel vibration was induced with an acoustic speaker at an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of about 90 dB. Amplitude reductions of 13.45 and 10.72 dB were achieved for the first and second modes, respectively, using single- and multiple-mode shunting. It is the purpose of this investigation to extend the passive piezoelectric shunt-damping technique to control structural vibration induced at higher acoustic excitation levels, and to examine the controllability and survivability of the bonded PZT transducers at these high levels. The shunting experiment was performed with the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) at the NASA Langley Research Center using the same F-15 underbelly panel. The TAFA is a progressive wave tube facility. The panel was mounted in one wall of the TAFA test section using a specially designed mounting fixture such that the panel was subjected to grazing-incidence acoustic excitation. Five PZT transducers were used with two shunt circuits designed to control the first and second modes of the structure between 200 and 400 Hz. We first determined the values of the shunt inductance and resistance at an OASPL of 130 dB. These values were maintained while we gradually increased the OASPL from 130 to 154 dB in 6-dB steps. During each increment, the frequency response function between accelerometers on the panel and the acoustic excitation measured by microphones, before and after shunting, were recorded. Good response reduction was observed up to the 148dB level. The experiment was stopped at 154 dB due to wire breakage from vibration at a transducer wire joint. The PZT transducers, however, were still bonded well on the panel and survived at this high dB level. We also observed shifting of the frequency peaks toward lower frequency when the OASPL

  20. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

    1999-11-15

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to

  1. Acoustofluidics 13: Analysis of acoustic streaming by perturbation methods.

    PubMed

    Sadhal, S S

    2012-07-07

    In this Part 13 of the tutorial series "Acoustofluidics--exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation," the streaming phenomenon is presented from an analytical standpoint, and perturbation methods are developed for analyzing such flows. Acoustic streaming is the phenomenon that takes place when a steady flow field is generated by the absorption of an oscillatory field. This can happen either by attenuation (quartz wind) or by interaction with a boundary. The latter type of streaming can also be generated by an oscillating solid in an otherwise still fluid medium or vibrating enclosure of a fluid body. While we address the first kind of streaming, our focus is largely on the second kind from a practical standpoint for application to microfluidic systems. In this Focus article, we limit the analysis to one- and two-dimensional problems in order to understand the analytical techniques with examples that most-easily illustrate the streaming phenomenon.

  2. Vibration signature analysis of AFM images

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, G.A.; Fu, J.; Pandit, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    Vibration signature analysis has been commonly used for the machine condition monitoring and the control of errors. However, it has been rarely employed for the analysis of the precision instruments such as an atomic force microscope (AFM). In this work, an AFM was used to collect vibration data from a sample positioning stage under different suspension and support conditions. Certain structural characteristics of the sample positioning stage show up as a result of the vibration signature analysis of the surface height images measured using an AFM. It is important to understand these vibration characteristics in order to reduce vibrational uncertainty, improve the damping and structural design, and to eliminate the imaging imperfections. The choice of method applied for vibration analysis may affect the results. Two methods, the data dependent systems (DDS) analysis and the Welch`s periodogram averaging method were investigated for application to this problem. Both techniques provide smooth spectrum plots from the data. Welch`s periodogram provides a coarse resolution as limited by the number of samples and requires a choice of window to be decided subjectively by the user. The DDS analysis provides sharper spectral peaks at a much higher resolution and a much lower noise floor. A decomposition of the signal variance in terms of the frequencies is provided as well. The technique is based on an objective model adequacy criterion.

  3. Vibro-acoustic analysis of composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigül, A. S.; Karagözlü, E.

    2014-03-01

    Vibro-acoustic analysis plays a vital role on the design of aircrafts, spacecrafts, land vehicles and ships produced from thin plates backed by closed cavities, with regard to human health and living comfort. For this type of structures, it is required a coupled solution that takes into account structural-acoustic interaction which is crucial for sensitive solutions. In this study, coupled vibro-acoustic analyses of plates produced from composite materials have been performed by using finite element analysis software. The study has been carried out for E-glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and Carbon/Epoxy plates with different ply angles and numbers of ply. The effects of composite material, ply orientation and number of layer on coupled vibro-acoustic characteristics of plates have been analysed for various combinations. The analysis results have been statistically examined and assessed.

  4. The Rheology of Granular Flow with Acoustic Vibrations at Constant Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, A.; van der Elst, N.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Granular flow - the movement of grains as a continuum material - is present in landslides, faulting, and river sedimentation. If a single grain falls down a hill it will respond like an object in projectile motion whereas if a landslide cascades down a hill, the motion will be different due to the interactions between the grains. Predicting behavior during these events is difficult because the constitutive equation for granular flow may change depending on boundary conditions and shear rates. Previous experiments were performed to measure the change in volume of an angular granular medium with an increase in velocity at a constant pressure. Three regimes are present when angular loose grains are moved from a slow velocity to a high velocity: Quasi-Static (QS), Transitional, and Grain-Inertial (GI). The QS regime usually occurs when the packing of grains moves at a slow velocity. At this regime the grains move like solid particles where the motion is undetected or very minor. Next an unexpected transitional regime takes place where compaction occurs, and granular flow is continuous and fluid like. Finally, the grains undergo a GI regime where the particles' inertia is so great that the grains are agitated like gas particles and stresses are supported by collisions. A similar set of experiments was carried out in the presence of external acoustic vibration. When acoustic vibrations were applied, the thickness of the shear layer decreased, showing that internally-generated acoustic vibrations are the cause for the transitional regime for angular grains. New experiments have been performed to measure the transitional rheology under constant volume boundary conditions, with and without acoustic vibrations. It is predicted that the constant volume experiments will be similar to the constant normal force experiments based on the cyclic rule. The cyclic rule is a mathematical relationship used to show the association of three partial derivatives and its variables. Where

  5. Experimental and theoretical identification of a four- acoustic-inputs/two-vibration-outputs hearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, P. A.

    1999-07-01

    A cricket's ear is a directional acoustic sensor. It has a remarkable level of sensitivity to the direction of sound propagation in a narrow frequency bandwidth of 4-5 KHz. Because of its complexity, the directional sensitivity has long intrigued researchers. The cricket's ear is a four-acoustic-inputs/two-vibration-outputs system. In this dissertation, this system is examined in depth, both experimentally and theoretically, with a primary goal to understand the mechanics involved in directional hearing. Experimental identification of the system is done by using random signal processing techniques. Theoretical identification of the system is accomplished by analyzing sound transmission through complex trachea of the ear. Finally, a description of how the cricket achieves directional hearing sensitivity is proposed. The fundamental principle involved in directional heating of the cricket has been utilized to design a device to obtain a directional signal from non- directional inputs.

  6. Acoustic and vibration performance evaluations of a velocity sensing hull array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Christman, Russell A.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic and vibration measurements were conducted at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Seneca Lake Facility to investigate the in situ signal response of a linear array of velocity sensors (sensors that measure either acoustic particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement have generically been denoted as velocity sensors) on a coating. The coating used at Seneca Lake consisted of air-voided elastomeric tiles with an overall coating thickness of approximately 3 inches. The accelerometer array and coating were mounted on the Seneca Lake Hull Fixture, which measures 33 feet lengthwise with an arc length of 20 feet. The fixture weighs approximately 30 tons. Specifically, measurements of in situ sensitivity, velocity reduction, reflection gain, array beam response, and equivalent planewave self-noise levels are presented.

  7. Vibration analysis utilizing Mossbauer effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roughton, N. A.

    1967-01-01

    Measuring instrument analyzes mechanical vibrations in transducers at amplitudes in the range of a few to 100 angstroms. This instrument utilizes the Mossbauer effect, the phenomenon of the recoil-free emission and resonant absorption of nuclear gamma rays in solids.

  8. Measurement of cantilever vibration using impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masaki; Hamashima, Hiromitsu; Kondoh, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor was demonstrated to monitor the vibration frequency. Commercialized pressure sensors and a variable capacitor were chosen as external sensors, which were connected to a reflector on a SAW device. As the reflection coefficient of the reflector depended on the impedance, the echo amplitude was influenced by changes in the impedance of the external sensor. The vibration frequency of the cantilever was determined by monitoring the echo amplitude of the SAW device. Moreover, the attenuation constant of an envelope was estimated. The results of our feasibility study indicate that the impedance-loaded SAW sensor can be applied as a detector for structural health monitoring.

  9. Remote vibration measurement: A wireless passive surface acoustic wave resonator fast probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedt, J.-M.; Droit, C.; Ballandras, S.; Alzuaga, S.; Martin, G.; Sandoz, P.

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators can advantageously operate as passive sensors which can be interrogated through a wireless link. Amongst the practical applications of such devices, structural health monitoring through stress measurement and more generally vibration characteristics of mechanical structures benefit from the ability to bury such sensors within the considered structure (wireless and battery-less). However, measurement bandwidth becomes a significant challenge when measuring wideband vibration characteristics of mechanical structures. A fast SAW resonator measurement scheme is demonstrated here. The measurement bandwidth is limited by the physical settling time of the resonator (Q/π periods), requiring only two probe pulses through a monostatic RADAR-like electronic setup to identify the sensor resonance frequency and hence stress on a resonator acting as a strain gauge. A measurement update rate of 4800 Hz using a high quality factor SAW resonator operating in the 434 MHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band is experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Remote vibration measurement: a wireless passive surface acoustic wave resonator fast probing strategy.

    PubMed

    Friedt, J-M; Droit, C; Ballandras, S; Alzuaga, S; Martin, G; Sandoz, P

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators can advantageously operate as passive sensors which can be interrogated through a wireless link. Amongst the practical applications of such devices, structural health monitoring through stress measurement and more generally vibration characteristics of mechanical structures benefit from the ability to bury such sensors within the considered structure (wireless and battery-less). However, measurement bandwidth becomes a significant challenge when measuring wideband vibration characteristics of mechanical structures. A fast SAW resonator measurement scheme is demonstrated here. The measurement bandwidth is limited by the physical settling time of the resonator (Q/π periods), requiring only two probe pulses through a monostatic RADAR-like electronic setup to identify the sensor resonance frequency and hence stress on a resonator acting as a strain gauge. A measurement update rate of 4800 Hz using a high quality factor SAW resonator operating in the 434 MHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band is experimentally demonstrated.

  11. An application review of dielectric electroactive polymer actuators in acoustics and vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenghong; Shuai, Changgeng; Gao, Yan; Rustighi, Emiliano; Xuan, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAPs) and their potential in actuator applications due to the large strain capabilities. This paper starts with an overview of some configurations of the DEAP actuators and follows with an in-depth literature and technical review of recent advances in the field with special considerations given to aspects pertaining to acoustics and vibration control. Significant research has shown that these smart actuators are promising replacement for many conventional actuators. The paper has been written with reference to a large number of published papers listed in the reference section.

  12. Full skin quantitative optical coherence elastography achieved by combining vibration and surface acoustic wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    By combining with the phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT), vibration and surface acoustic wave (SAW) methods have been reported to provide elastography of skin tissue respectively. However, neither of these two methods can provide the elastography in full skin depth in current systems. This paper presents a feasibility study on an optical coherence elastography method which combines both vibration and SAW in order to give the quantitative mechanical properties of skin tissue with full depth range, including epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat. Experiments are carried out on layered tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo human forearm and palm skin. A ring actuator generates vibration while a line actuator were used to excited SAWs. A PhS-OCT system is employed to provide the ultrahigh sensitive measurement of the generated waves. The experimental results demonstrate that by the combination of vibration and SAW method the full skin bulk mechanical properties can be quantitatively measured and further the elastography can be obtained with a sensing depth from ~0mm to ~4mm. This method is promising to apply in clinics where the quantitative elasticity of localized skin diseases is needed to aid the diagnosis and treatment.

  13. History of bioresponse to vibration in the Acoustical Society of America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberger, Janet M.

    2003-04-01

    Human response to vibratory stimulation of the skin surface has long been considered an aspect of the sense of touch; however, the debate over whether vibration was one aspect of pressure sensation, as espoused by von Frey in the late 1800s, or a separate sense, as argued by Katz (1925), focused attention on this mode of stimulation. Experimental investigations from the 1920s to the 1960s by Knudsen, Geldard, Sherrick, Verrillo, Mountcastle, and others provided basic data on vibrotactile perception and the neural transduction of vibratory stimulation. Within the Acoustical Society of America, work on bioresponse to vibration has included not only basic investigations of vibrotactile perception and physiology, but also studies of the loss of sensitivity resulting from intense hand-arm vibration induced by occupational use of chainsaws and jackhammers, studies of human response to whole-body vibration, and evaluations of the utility of vibrotactile devices for communication of speech to hearing-impaired persons. Contributions in each of these areas, as well as future research directions, are discussed.

  14. Study on the radial vibration and acoustic field of an isotropic circular ring radiator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu; Xu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Based on the exact analytical theory, the radial vibration of an isotropic circular ring is studied and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. By means of the equivalent circuit model, the resonance frequency equation is derived; the relationship between the radial resonance frequency, the radial displacement amplitude magnification and the geometrical dimensions, the material property is analyzed. For comparison, numerical method is used to simulate the radial vibration of isotropic circular rings. The resonance frequency and the radial vibrational displacement distribution are obtained, and the radial radiation acoustic field of the circular ring in radial vibration is simulated. It is illustrated that the radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method and the numerical method are in good agreement when the height is much less than the radius. When the height becomes large relative to the radius, the frequency deviation from the two methods becomes large. The reason is that the exact analytical theory is limited to thin circular ring whose height must be much less than its radius.

  15. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Lightweight External Tank (LWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Space Shuttle LWT is divided into zones and subzones. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specifications. A subzone (general Specification) is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, specifications for appropriate subzone weight ranges are available. Along with the specifications are vibration, acoustic, shock, transportation, handling, and acceptance test requirements and procedures. A method of selecting applicable vibration, acoustic, and shock specifications is presented.

  16. Ultralow frequency acoustic bandgap and vibration energy recovery in tetragonal folding beam phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nansha; Wu, Jiu Hui; Yu, Lie; Hou, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates ultralow frequency acoustic properties and energy recovery of tetragonal folding beam phononic crystal (TFBPC) and its complementary structure. The dispersion curve relationships, transmission spectra and displacement fields of the eigenmodes are studied with FEA in detail. Compared with the traditional three layer phononic crystal (PC) structure, this structure proposed in this paper not only unfold bandgaps (BGs) in lower frequency range (below 300 Hz), but also has lighter weight because of beam structural cracks. We analyze the relevant physical mechanism behind this phenomenon, and discuss the effects of the tetragonal folding beam geometric parameters on band structure maps. FEM proves that the multi-cell structures with different arrangements have different acoustic BGs when compared with single cell structure. Harmonic frequency response and piezoelectric properties of TFBPC are specifically analyzed. The results confirm that this structure does have the recovery ability for low frequency vibration energy in environment. These conclusions in this paper could be indispensable to PC practical applications such as BG tuning and could be applied in portable devices, wireless sensor, micro-electro mechanical systems which can recycle energy from vibration environment as its own energy supply.

  17. High Sensitivity Detection of Broadband Acoustic Vibration Using Optical Demodulation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen

    Measuring the high frequency acoustic vibrations represents the fundamental interest in revealing the intrinsic dynamic characteristic of board range of systems, such as the growth of the fetus, blood flow in human palms, and vibrations of carbon nanotube. However, the acoustic wave detection capability is limited by the detection bandwidth and sensitivity of the commonly used piezoelectric based ultrasound detectors. To overcome these limitations, this thesis focuses on exploring the optical demodulation method for highly sensitive detection of broadband acoustic vibration. First, a transparent optical ultrasonic detector has been developed using micro-ring resonator (MRR) made of soft polymeric materials. It outperforms the traditional piezoelectric detectors with broader detection bandwidth, miniaturized size and wide angular sensitivity. Its ease of integration into photoacoustic microscopy system has resulted in the great improvement of the imaging resolution. A theoretic framework has been developed to establish the quantitative understanding of its unique distance and angular dependent detection characteristics and was subsequently validated experimentally. The developed theoretic framework provides a guideline to fully accounts for the trade-offs between axial and lateral resolution, working distance, and the field of view in developing optimal imaging performance for a wide range of biological and clinical applications. MRR-based ultrasonic detector is further integrated into confocal fluorescence microscopy to realize the simultaneous imaging of fluorescence and optical absorption of retinal pigment epithelium, achieving multi-contrast imaging at sub-cellular level. The needs to resolve the fine details of the biological specimen with the resolution beyond the diffraction limit further motivate the development of optical demodulated ultrasonic detection method based on near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). The nano-focusing probe was developed

  18. On the effect of acoustic coupling on random and harmonic plate vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, A.; Robinson, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acoustic coupling on random and harmonic plate vibrations is studied using two numerical models. In the coupled model, the plate response is obtained by integration of the nonlinear plate equation coupled with the nonlinear Euler equations for the surrounding acoustic fluid. In the uncoupled model, the nonlinear plate equation with an equivalent linear viscous damping term is integrated to obtain the response of the plate subject to the same excitation field. For a low-level, narrow-band excitation, the two models predict the same plate response spectra. As the excitation level is increased, the response power spectrum predicted by the uncoupled model becomes broader and more shifted towards the high frequencies than that obtained by the coupled model. In addition, the difference in response between the coupled and uncoupled models at high frequencies becomes larger. When a high intensity harmonic excitation is used, causing a nonlinear plate response, both models predict the same frequency content of the response. However, the level of the harmonics and subharmonics are higher for the uncoupled model. Comparisons to earlier experimental and numerical results show that acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the plate response at high excitation levels. Its absence in previous models may explain the discrepancy between predicted and measured responses.

  19. Spectral analysis methods for vehicle interior vibro-acoustics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Nor, Mohd. Jailani Mohd.; Ariffin, Ahmad Kamal

    2009-02-01

    Noise has various effects on comfort, performance and health of human. Sound are analysed by human brain based on the frequencies and amplitudes. In a dynamic system, transmission of sound and vibrations depend on frequency and direction of the input motion and characteristics of the output. It is imperative that automotive manufacturers invest a lot of effort and money to improve and enhance the vibro-acoustics performance of their products. The enhancement effort may be very difficult and time-consuming if one relies only on 'trial and error' method without prior knowledge about the sources itself. Complex noise inside a vehicle cabin originated from various sources and travel through many pathways. First stage of sound quality refinement is to find the source. It is vital for automotive engineers to identify the dominant noise sources such as engine noise, exhaust noise and noise due to vibration transmission inside of vehicle. The purpose of this paper is to find the vibro-acoustical sources of noise in a passenger vehicle compartment. The implementation of spectral analysis method is much faster than the 'trial and error' methods in which, parts should be separated to measure the transfer functions. Also by using spectral analysis method, signals can be recorded in real operational conditions which conduce to more consistent results. A multi-channel analyser is utilised to measure and record the vibro-acoustical signals. Computational algorithms are also employed to identify contribution of various sources towards the measured interior signal. These achievements can be utilised to detect, control and optimise interior noise performance of road transport vehicles.

  20. Dynamic friction in sheared fault gouge: Implications of acoustic vibration on triggering and slow slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieou, Charles K. C.; Elbanna, Ahmed E.; Carlson, Jean M.

    2016-03-01

    Friction and deformation in granular fault gouge are among various dynamic interactions associated with seismic phenomena that have important implications for slip mechanisms on earthquake faults. To this end, we propose a mechanistic model of granular fault gouge subject to acoustic vibrations and shear deformation. The grain-scale dynamics is described by the Shear-Transformation-Zone theory of granular flow, which accounts for irreversible plastic deformation in terms of flow defects whose density is governed by an effective temperature. Our model accounts for stick-slip instabilities observed at seismic slip rates. In addition, as the vibration intensity increases, we observe an increase in the temporal advancement of large slip events, followed by a plateau and gradual decrease. Furthermore, slip becomes progressively slower upon increasing the vibration intensity. The results shed important light on the physical mechanisms of earthquake triggering and slow slip and provide essential elements for the multiscale modeling of earthquake ruptures. In particular, the results suggest that slow slip may be triggered by tremors.

  1. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  2. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  3. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  4. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  5. Frequency Response of the Sample Vibration Mode in Scanning Probe Acoustic Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ya-Jun; Cheng, Qian; Qian, Meng-Lu

    2010-05-01

    Based on the interaction mechanism between tip and sample in the contact mode of a scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM), an active mass of the sample is introduced in the mass-spring model. The tip motion and frequency response of the sample vibration mode in the SPAM are calculated by the Lagrange equation with dissipation function. For the silicon tip and glass assemblage in the SPAM the frequency response is simulated and it is in agreement with the experimental result. The living myoblast cells on the glass slide are imaged at resonance frequencies of the SPAM system, which are 20kHz, 30kHz and 120kHz. It is shown that good contrast of SPAM images could be obtained when the system is operated at the resonance frequencies of the system in high and low-frequency regions.

  6. Ground based studies of the vibrational and rotational dynamics of acoustically levitated drops and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Leung, E.

    1990-01-01

    A substantial amount of experimental data can be gathered on the dynamics of acoustically positioned liquids in a ground-based laboratory and during short duration low-gravity parabolic flights of the KC-135. The preliminary results of a set of measurements of the static shape, of the vibrational spectrum, and the rotation equilibrium shapes of simple drops and liquid shells carried out using ultrasonic levitators working between 19 and 40 kHz is presented. The droplet diameter ranges between 1 and 5 mm, the surface tension of the liquid used varies between 25 and 70 dynes/cm, and the viscosity is changed between 1 to 1,000 cP. Of particular interest is the variation of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation with various factors, and the effects of static drop shape deformation on the limit of stability of the axisymmetric shape of a drop in solid-body rotation.

  7. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  8. Statistical evaluation of vibration analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, G. Martin; Miller, Patrice S.

    1987-01-01

    An evaluation methodology is presented for a selection of candidate vibration analysis techniques applicable to machinery representative of the environmental control and life support system of advanced spacecraft; illustrative results are given. Attention is given to the statistical analysis of small sample experiments, the quantification of detection performance for diverse techniques through the computation of probability of detection versus probability of false alarm, and the quantification of diagnostic performance.

  9. Analysis of real-time vibration data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, a few structures have been instrumented to provide continuous vibration data in real time, recording not only large-amplitude motions generated by extreme loads, but also small-amplitude motions generated by ambient loads. The main objective in continuous recording is to track any changes in structural characteristics, and to detect damage after an extreme event, such as an earthquake or explosion. The Fourier-based spectral analysis methods have been the primary tool to analyze vibration data from structures. In general, such methods do not work well for real-time data, because real-time data are mainly composed of ambient vibrations with very low amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios. The long duration, linearity, and the stationarity of ambient data, however, allow us to utilize statistical signal processing tools, which can compensate for the adverse effects of low amplitudes and high noise. The analysis of real-time data requires tools and techniques that can be applied in real-time; i.e., data are processed and analyzed while being acquired. This paper presents some of the basic tools and techniques for processing and analyzing real-time vibration data. The topics discussed include utilization of running time windows, tracking mean and mean-square values, filtering, system identification, and damage detection.

  10. Nonlinear vibration and radiation from a panel with transition to chaos induced by acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Frendi, Abdelkader; Brown, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic response of an aircraft panel forced at resonance and off-resonance by plane acoustic waves at normal incidence is investigated experimentally and numerically. Linear, nonlinear (period doubling) and chaotic responses are obtained by increasing the sound pressure level of the excitation. The response time history is sensitive to the input level and to the frequency of excitation. The change in response behavior is due to a change in input conditions, triggered either naturally or by modulation of the bandwidth of the incident waves. Off-resonance, bifurcation is diffused and difficult to maintain, thus the panel response drifts into a linear behavior. The acoustic pressure emanated by the panel is either linear or nonlinear as is the vibration response. The nonlinear effects accumulate during the propagation with distance. Results are also obtained on the control of the panel response using damping tape on aluminum panel and using a graphite epoxy panel having the same size and weight. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results.

  11. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  12. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  13. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  14. Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA) Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Charles T.; Roth, Don J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research and NASA White Sands Test Facility have developed software supporting an automated pressure vessel structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on acoustic emissions (AE). The software, referred to as the Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA), provides analysts with a tool that can interrogate data collected on Digital Wave Corp. and Physical Acoustics Corp. software using a wide spectrum of powerful filters and charts. This software can be made to work with any data once the data format is known. The applet will compute basic AE statistics, and statistics as a function of time and pressure (see figure). AEAA provides value added beyond the analysis provided by the respective vendors' analysis software. The software can handle data sets of unlimited size. A wide variety of government and commercial applications could benefit from this technology, notably requalification and usage tests for compressed gas and hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Future enhancements will add features similar to a "check engine" light on a vehicle. Once installed, the system will ultimately be used to alert International Space Station crewmembers to critical structural instabilities, but will have little impact to missions otherwise. Diagnostic information could then be transmitted to experienced technicians on the ground in a timely manner to determine whether pressure vessels have been impacted, are structurally unsound, or can be safely used to complete the mission.

  15. Vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB), Lightweight External Tank (LWT), and Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The vibration, acoustics, and shock design and test criteria for components and subassemblies on the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB), lightweight tank (LWT), and main engines (SSME) are presented. Specifications for transportation, handling, and acceptance testing are also provided.

  16. Acoustic spectrum analysis for gyro bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzman, C. E.

    1981-08-01

    An acoustic system analyzer has been developed that will be an aid in bearing analysis for displacement gyros. The phenomenon of the Fourier Transform has made possible the development of an optical processor that operates by the interaction of light from a light emitting diode array sweeping across a binary frequency mask and through lenses onto a vidicon tube. This arrangement performs the Fourier Transform of large time samples of sound in a parallel process, preserving amplitude, frequency and phase information. The resultant information can then be entered into a computer for programmed analysis or displayed for visual analysis of the condition of gyro-bearings.

  17. Vibration and acoustic properties of honeycomb sandwich structures subject to variable incident plane-wave angle pressure loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaxue

    Honeycomb structures are widely used in many areas for their material characteristics such as high strength-to-weight ratio, stiffness-to-weight, sound transmission, and other properties. Honeycomb structures are generally constructed from periodically spaced tessellations of unit cells. It can be shown that the effective stiffness and mass properties of honeycomb are controlled by the local geometry and wall thickness of the particular unit cells used. Of particular interest are regular hexagonal (6-sided) honeycomb unit cell geometries which exhibit positive effective Poisson's ratio, and modified 6-sided auxetic honeycomb unit cells with Poisson's ratio which is effectively negative; a property not found in natural materials. One important honeycomb meta-structure is sandwich composites designed with a honeycomb core bonded between two panel layers. By changing the geometry of the repetitive unit cell, and overall depth and material properties of the honeycomb core, sandwich panels with different vibration and acoustic properties can be designed to shift resonant frequencies and improve intensity and Sound Transmission Loss (STL). In the present work, a honeycomb finite element model based on beam elements is programmed in MATLAB and verified with the commercial finite element software ABAQUS for frequency extraction and direct frequency response analysis. The MATLAB program was used to study the vibration and acoustic properties of different kinds of honeycomb sandwich panels undergoing in-plane loading with different incident pressure wave angles and frequency. Results for the root mean square intensity IRMS based on normal velocity on the transmitted side of the panel measure vibration magnitude are reported for frequencies between 0 and 1000 Hz. The relationship between the sound transmission loss computed with ABAQUS and the inverse of the intensity of surface velocity is established. In the present work it is demonstrated that the general trend between the

  18. Vibrational analysis of α-cyanohydroxycinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojica, Elmer-Rico E.; Vedad, Jayson; Desamero, Ruel Z. B.

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, a comparative Raman vibrational analysis of alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CHCA) and its derivative, alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamic acid (3CHCA), was performed. The Raman spectra of the 4CHCA and 3CHCA in solid form were obtained and analyzed to determine differences between the two structurally similar derivatives. For comparison, the CHCA derivatives cyanocinnamic acid (CCA) and coumaric acid (CA) were also studied. The plausible vibrational assignments were made and matched with those obtained theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) based method employing a 6-31 g basis set. The computational wavenumbers obtained were in good agreement with the observed experimental results. This was the first reported Raman study of CCA, 3CHCA and 4CHCA.

  19. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the SRB, ET, and SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Specifications for vibration, acoustic and shock design for components and subassemblies on the External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), and Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Included are vibration, acoustic, shock, transportation, handling, and acceptance test requirements and procedures. The space shuttle ET, SRB, and SSME have been divided into zones and subzones. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specifications. A subzone (General Specification) is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, specifications for appropriate subzone weight ranges are available. Criteria for some specific components are also presented.

  20. Performance, Thermal, and Vibration Qualification Testing of Zetec Acoustic Transducers, Model Z0002659-2, Sondicator Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, G; Gemberling, S; Lavietes, A

    2006-03-10

    This report is a result of Qualification Test Plan No.001 prepared by Anthony Lavietes. The Qualification Test Plan outlines a list of requirements for thermal and vibrational testing of Zetac's Z0002659-2 Sondicator Probe acoustic transducers (hereafter called ''transducers''). The Zetec transducers are used in a system that employs an array of 7 acoustic transducers. Qualification testing of these transducers was required since they are a modified version of a standard catalog item from the manufacturer. This report documents the thermal, vibrational, and performance testing that was performed on a sampling of these transducers in order to qualify them for flight. A total of 14 transducers were tested. All 14 passed qualification testing with no failures.

  1. Silicon Micromachined Sensor for Broadband Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Adolfo; Edmans, Daniel; Cormeau, Chris; Seidler, Gernot; Deangelis, Dave; Maby, Edward

    1995-01-01

    The development of a family of silicon based integrated vibration sensors capable of sensing mechanical resonances over a broad range of frequencies with minimal signal processing requirements is presented. Two basic general embodiments of the concept were designed and fabricated. The first design was structured around an array of cantilever beams and fabricated using the ARPA sponsored multi-user MEMS processing system (MUMPS) process at the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina (MCNC). As part of the design process for this first sensor, a comprehensive finite elements analysis of the resonant modes and stress distribution was performed using PATRAN. The dependence of strain distribution and resonant frequency response as a function of Young's modulus in the Poly-Si structural material was studied. Analytical models were also studied. In-house experimental characterization using optical interferometry techniques were performed under controlled low pressure conditions. A second design, intended to operate in a non-resonant mode and capable of broadband frequency response, was proposed and developed around the concept of a cantilever beam integrated with a feedback control loop to produce a null mode vibration sensor. A proprietary process was used to integrat a metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensing device, with actuators and a cantilever beam, as part of a compatible process. Both devices, once incorporated as part of multifunction data acquisition and telemetry systems will constitute a useful system for NASA launch vibration monitoring operations. Satellite and other space structures can benefit from the sensor for mechanical condition monitoring functions.

  2. Analysis of acoustic communication by ants.

    PubMed

    Hickling, R; Brown, R L

    2000-10-01

    An analysis is presented of acoustic communication by ants, based on near-field theory and on data obtained from the black imported fire ant Solenopsis richteri and other sources. Generally ant stridulatory sounds are barely audible, but they occur continuously in ant colonies. Because ants appear unresponsive to airborne sound, myrmecologists have concluded that stridulatory signals are transmitted through the substrate. However, transmission through the substrate is unlikely, for reasons given in the paper. Apparently ants communicate mainly through the air, and the acoustic receptors are hairlike sensilla on the antennae that respond to particle sound velocity. This may seem inconsistent with the fact that ants are unresponsive to airborne sound (on a scale of meters), but the inconsistency can be resolved if acoustic communication occurs within the near field, on a scale of about 100 mm. In the near field, the particle sound velocity is significantly enhanced and has a steep gradient. These features can be used to exclude extraneous sound, and to determine the direction and distance of a near-field source. Additionally, we observed that the tracheal air sacs of S. richteri can expand within the gaster, possibly amplifying the radiation of stridulatory sound.

  3. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals.

  4. Design and Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Networks with Reflected Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emokpae, Lloyd

    -of-sight (LOS) and NLOS links by utilizing directional antennas, which will boost the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the receiver while promoting NLOS usage. In our model, we employ a directional underwater acoustic antenna composed of an array of hydrophones that can be summed up at various phases and amplitudes resulting in a beam-former. We have also adopted a practical multimodal directional transducer concept which generates both directional and omni-directional beam patterns by combining the fundamental vibration modes of a cylindrical acoustic radiator. This allows the transducer to be electrically controlled and steered by simply adjusting the electrical voltage weights. A prototype acoustic modem is then developed to utilize the multimodal directional transducer for both LOS and NLOS communication. The acoustic modem has also been used as a platform for empirically validating our SBR communication model in a tank and with empirical data. Networking protocols have been developed to exploit the SBR communication model. These protocols include node discovery and localization, directional medium access control (D-MAC) and geographical routing. In node discovery and localization, each node will utilize SBR-based range measurements to its neighbors to determine their relative position. The D-MAC protocol utilizes directional antennas to increase the network throughput due to the spatial efficiency of the antenna model. In the proposed reflection-enabled directional MAC protocol (RED-MAC), each source node will be able to determine if an obstacle is blocking the LOS link to the destination and switch to the best NLOS link by utilizing surface/bottom reflections. Finally, we have developed a geographical routing algorithm which aims to establish the best stable route from a source node to a destination node. The optimized route is selected to achieve maximum network throughput. Extensive analysis of the network throughput when utilizing directional antennas is also presented

  5. High speed image correlation for vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Wood, R.; Splitthof, K.

    2009-08-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  6. Dictums for problem solving and approximation in mathematical acoustics: examples involving low-frequency vibration and radiation.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Allan D; Thiam, Amadou G

    2012-03-01

    A sequence of dictums for mathematical acoustics is given representing opinions intended to be regarded as authoritative, but not necessarily universally agreed upon. The dictums are presented in the context of the detailed solution for a class of problems involving the forced vibration of a long cylinder protruding half-way into a half-space bounded by a compliant surface (impedance boundary) characterized by a spring constant. One limiting case corresponds to a cylinder vibrating within an infinite rigid baffle, and another limiting case corresponds to a vibrating cylinder on the compliant surface of an incompressible fluid. The second limiting case is identified as analogous to that of a floating half-submerged cylinder whose vibrations cause water waves to propagate over the surface. Attention is focused on vibrations at very low frequencies. Difficulties with insuring a causal solution are pointed out and dictums are given as to how one overcomes such difficulties. Various approximation techniques are described. The derivations involve application of the theory of complex variables and the method of matched asymptotic expansions, and the results include the apparent entrained mass in the near field of the cylinder and the radiation resistance per unit length experienced by the vibrating cylinder.

  7. Cavitation damage prediction for spallation target vessels by assessment of acoustic vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Ikeda, Dr. Yujiro; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Haines, John R; Bauer, Guenter; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Okita, Dr. Kohei; Fujiwara, Dr. Akiko; Matsumoto, Dr. Yoichiro; Tanaka, Dr. Nobuatsu

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed around the world. Proton beams are used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion, i.e. the pitting damage formed by the collapse of cavitation bubbles, off-beam tests were performed by using an electric magnetic impact testing machine (MIMTM), which can impose equivalent pressure pulses in mercury. The damage potential was defined based on the relationship between the pitting damage and the time-integrated acoustic vibration induced by impact due to the bubble collapses. Additionally, the damage potential was measured in on-beam tests carried out by using the proton beam at WNR (Weapons Neutron Research) facility in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In this paper, the concept of the damage potential, the relationship between the pitting damage formation and the damage potential both in off-beam and on-beam tests is shown.

  8. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  9. The effects of wood variability on the free vibration of an acoustic guitar top plate.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Micah R; Hambric, Stephen A; Wess, Dennis B

    2014-11-01

    A finite element model of a bare top plate with braces and a bridge plate was created using orthotropic material properties. The natural variation of the wood properties including dependence on moisture content was also determined. The simulated modes were then compared to experimentally obtained modes from top plate prototypes. Uncertainty analysis was also performed to determine the statistical bound of natural variability between wood samples. The natural frequencies of the model fall within the computed error bound. These results reinforce the importance of obtaining accurate material properties for acoustic guitar modeling.

  10. Vibration testing and analysis using holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Time average holography is useful in recording steady state vibrational mode patterns. Phase relationships under steady state conditions are measured with real time holography and special phase shifting techniques. Data from Michelson interferometer verify vibration amplitudes from holographic data.

  11. FY-93 noncontacting acoustic ultrasonic signature analysis development

    SciTech Connect

    Tow, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.G.; Williamson, R.L.; Blackwood, L.G.

    1994-04-01

    A noncontacting, long-standoff inspection system with proven capabilities in container fill identification has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The system detects subtle change in container vibration characteristics caused by differences in the physical properties of the fill materials. A container is inspected by acoustically inducting it to vibrate and sensing the vibrational response with a laser vibrometer. A standoff distance of several meters is feasible. In previous work the system proved to be a reliable means of distinguishing between munitions with a variety of chemical fills. During FY-93, the system was modified to improve performance and simplify operation. Other FY-93 accomplishments include progress in modeling the vibrational characteristics of containers and refinements to the statistical classification algorithms. Progress was also made in identifying other applications for this technology.

  12. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  13. Vibration analysis of a hydro generator for different operating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haţiegan, C.; Pădureanu, I.; Jurcu, M.; Nedeloni, M. D.; Hamat, C. O.; Chioncel, C. P.; Trocaru, S.; Vasile, O.; Bădescu, O.; Micliuc, D.; (Filip Nedeloni, L.; Băra, A.; (Barboni Haţiegan, L.

    2017-01-01

    Based on experimental measurements, this paper presents the vibration analysis of a hydro generator that equips a Kaplan hydraulic turbine of a Hydropower plant in Romania. This analysis means vibrations measurement to different operating regimes of the hydro generator respectively before installing it and into operation, namely putting off load mode (unexcited and excited) respectively putting on load mode. By comparing, through the experimental results obtained before and after the operation of hydro aggregates are observed vibrations improvements.

  14. Seminar on Understanding Digital Control and Analysis in Vibration Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The advantages of the digital methods over the analog vibration methods are demonstrated. The following topics are covered: (1) methods of computer-controlled random vibration and reverberation acoustic testing, (2) methods of computer-controlled sinewave vibration testing, and (3) methods of computer-controlled shock testing. General algorithms are described in the form of block diagrams and flow diagrams.

  15. Vibration and acoustic radiation of a finite cylindrical shell submerged at finite depth from the free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenjie; Li, Tianyun; Zhu, Xiang; Miao, Yuyue; Zhang, Guanjun

    2017-04-01

    The far-field acoustic radiation of a cylindrical shell with finite length submerged at finite depth from the water surface is studied. Two steps are utilized to solve the problem. The first step is to determine the vibration response of the submerged cylindrical shell by using an analytical method and the second one is to determine the far field sound radiation with the boundary element method. To address the vibration responses of the shell analytically, the cylindrical shell and surrounding fluid are described by the Flügge shell equations and Laplace equation in the cylindrical coordinate system respectively. The free surface effect is taken into consideration by using the image method and the Graf's addition theorem. The reliability and efficiency of the present method are validated by comparison with the finite element method. Then, based on the vibration responses of the shell obtained from the first step, the far-field sound pressure is computed by using the boundary element method. It is found that the vibration of the cylindrical shell submerged at finite depth from the free surface tends to be the same as that in infinite fluid when the submerged depth exceeds a certain value. The frequency and the submerged depth have crucial effects on the fluctuation of the far-field sound pressure, while for the curve of sound pressure level versus immersion depth, the ratio of the distance between the adjacent peak points of sound pressure to the wavelength is independent of the frequency. Moreover, the petal number of the directivity of the far-field sound pressure increases with the increase of the frequency and the submerged depth. The work provides more understanding on the vibration and acoustic radiation behavior of a finite cylindrical shell submerged at finite depth.

  16. Analysis of vibration of two-dimensional periodic cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sang Min (Joseph)

    The vibration of and wave propagation in periodic cellular structures are analyzed. Cellular structures exhibit a number of desirable multifunctional properties, which make them attractive in a variety of engineering applications. These include ultra-light structures, thermal and acoustic insulators, and impact amelioration systems, among others. Cellular structures with deterministic architecture can be considered as example of periodic structures. Periodic structures feature unique wave propagation characteristics, whereby elastic waves propagate only in specific frequency bands, known as "pass band", while they are attenuated in all other frequency bands, known as "stop bands". Such dynamic properties are here exploited to provide cellular structures with the capability of behaving as directional, pass-band mechanical filters, thus complementing their well documented multifunctional characteristics. This work presents a methodology for the analysis of the dynamic behavior of periodic cellular structures, which allows the evaluation of location and spectral width of propagation and attenuation regions in non-dimensional form. The filtering characteristics are tested and demonstrated for structures of various geometry and topology, including cylindrical grid-like structures, Kagome and tetrhedral truss core lattices. Experimental investigations is done on a 2-D lattice manufactured out of aluminum. The complete wave field of the specimen at various frequencies is measured using a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV). Experimental results show good agreement with the methodology and computational tools developed in this work. The results demonstrate how wave propagation characteristics are defined by cell geometry and configuration. Numerical and experimental results show the potential of periodic cellular structures as mechanical filters and/or isolators of vibrations.

  17. The Vibration and Acoustic Properties of Pipes with Squeeze Film and Some Friction Damping Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng

    1991-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This study was motivated by the need to decrease the noise radiation and vibration of pipework in power plants, particularly at elevated temperature. A thin circular cylindrical shell has been studied theoretically. The exact solutions for natural frequencies of the symmetrical and anti-symmetrical modes for cylindrical shell vibration have been derived in matrix form. Using this theory, numerical results for natural frequencies and mode shapes with free-free, clamped-free and clamped -clamped boundary conditions have been evaluated. Based upon studies of the thin cylindrical shell theory and the physical phenomenon of air film damping of two parallel plates, the theory for predicting the loss factor of an annular double pipe damping system with a very small air gap has been developed. Flugge's thin shell equations of motion and the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous fluid were employed in the analysis. The fluid motion was expressed in terms of the shell displacement by using a travelling wave type solution. The solutions gave the fluid velocity profiles and stresses in the clearance between two cylindrical, concentric shells. According to the definition of energy dissipated in the fluid, an equation was derived for predicting the loss factor of the whole damping system. Based on the principle of similarity, an optimum design for a system generating squeeze film damping in pipes has been made. The theory was then extended to study the damping caused by various kinds of viscous fluid in the gap between the two annular structures. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the loss factor of the double pipe system with in-phase and out-of-phase modes of vibration. Friction damping has been studied experimentally on a thin-walled pipe with a coiled steel spring or wire rope attached or with a mineral wool wrapping. Flexural vibration was examined in the experiments. This study included an experimental

  18. Analysis of potential helicopter vibration reduction concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, A. J.; Davis, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of analytical investigations to develop, understand, and evaluate potential helicopter vibration reduction concepts are presented in the following areas: identification of the fundamental sources of vibratory loads, blade design for low vibration, application of design optimization techniques, active higher harmonic control, blade appended aeromechanical devices, and the prediction of vibratory airloads. Primary sources of vibration are identified for a selected four-bladed articulated rotor operating in high speed level flight. The application of analytical design procedures and optimization techniques are shown to have the potential for establishing reduced vibration blade designs through variations in blade mass and stiffness distributions, and chordwise center-of-gravity location.

  19. A simplified approach for the calculation of acoustic emission in the case of friction-induced noise and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobbarayen, K.; Besset, S.; Sinou, J.-. J.

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic response associated with squeal noise radiations is a hard issue due to the need to consider non-linearities of contact and friction, to solve the associated nonlinear dynamic problem and to calculate the noise emissions due to self-excited vibrations. In this work, the focus is on the calculation of the sound pressure in free space generated during squeal events. The calculation of the sound pressure can be performed by the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The inputs of this method are a boundary element model, a field of normal velocity characterized by a unique frequency. However, the field of velocity associated with friction-induced vibrations is composed of several harmonic components. So, the BEM equation has to be solved for each frequency and in most cases, the number of harmonic components is significant. Therefore, the computation time can be prohibitive. The reduction of the number of harmonic component is a key point for the quick estimation of the squeal noise. The proposed approach is based on the detection and the selection of the predominant harmonic components in the mean square velocity. It is applied on two cases of squeal and allows us to consider only few frequencies. In this study, a new method will be proposed in order to quickly well estimate the noise emission in free space. This approach will be based on an approximated acoustic power of brake system which is assumed to be a punctual source, an interpolated directivity and the decrease of the acoustic power levels. This method is applied on two classical cases of squeal with one and two unstable modes. It allows us to well reconstruct the acoustic power levels map. Several error estimators are introduced and show that the reconstructed field is close to the reference calculated with a complete BEM.

  20. Interaction of electronic excitations of Tm3+ ions with acoustic vibrations in KTm(MoO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenskyi, D.; Poperezhai, S.; Gogoi, P.; Engelkamp, H.; Maan, J. C.; Wosnitza, J.; Kut'ko, V.

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of KTm(MoO4)2 were measured as a function of magnetic field between 3 and 11.5 cm-1 at T =2 K. We found that in addition to the absorption line caused by the electronic excitation of Tm3+ ions, the spectra contain sidebands. Far-infrared transmission measured with polarized light from 10 to 75 cm-1 revealed vibration modes at 16.7 and 25.7 cm-1 for polarizations Eω∥a and Eω∥c, respectively. We show that sidebands in the spectra of paramagnetic resonance result from a parametric resonance between the electronic excitations of the Tm3+ ions and the acoustic vibrations of the crystal lattice.

  1. Anharmonic damping of terahertz acoustic waves in a network glass and its effect on the density of vibrational states.

    PubMed

    Baldi, G; Giordano, V M; Ruta, B; Dal Maschio, R; Fontana, A; Monaco, G

    2014-03-28

    We report the observation, by means of high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering, of an unusually large temperature dependence of the sound attenuation of a network glass at terahertz frequency, an unprecedentedly observed phenomenon. The anharmonicity can be ascribed to the interaction between the propagating acoustic wave and the bath of thermal vibrations. At low temperatures the sound attenuation follows a Rayleigh-Gans scattering law. As the temperature is increased the anharmonic process sets in, resulting in an almost quadratic frequency dependence of the damping in the entire frequency range. We show that the temperature variation of the sound damping accounts quantitatively for the temperature dependence of the density of vibrational states.

  2. Integrated predictive maintenance program vibration and lube oil analysis: Part I - history and the vibration program

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, H.

    1996-12-01

    This paper is the first of two papers which describe the Predictive Maintenance Program for rotating machines at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The organization has recently been restructured and significant benefits have been realized by the interaction, or {open_quotes}synergy{close_quotes} between the Vibration Program and the Lube Oil Analysis Program. This paper starts with the oldest part of the program - the Vibration Program and discusses the evolution of the program to its current state. The {open_quotes}Vibration{close_quotes} view of the combined program is then presented.

  3. Fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes via torsional vibration signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Zuo, Ming J.

    2013-04-01

    Torsional vibration signals are theoretically free from the amplitude modulation effect caused by time variant vibration transfer paths due to the rotation of planet carrier and sun gear, and therefore their spectral structure are simpler than transverse vibration signals. Thus, it is potentially easy and effective to diagnose planetary gearbox faults via torsional vibration signal analysis. We give explicit equations to model torsional vibration signals, considering both distributed gear faults (like manufacturing or assembly errors) and local gear faults (like pitting, crack or breakage of one tooth), and derive the characteristics of both the traditional Fourier spectrum and the proposed demodulated spectra of amplitude envelope and instantaneous frequency. These derivations are not only effective to diagnose single gear fault of planetary gearboxes, but can also be generalized to detect and locate multiple gear faults. We validate experimentally the signal models, as well as the Fourier spectral analysis and demodulation analysis methods.

  4. Acoustic Analysis of Vowels Following Glossectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara L.; Ciocca, Valter; Chan, Judy C-T.; Samman, Nabil

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the acoustic characteristics of vowels produced by speakers with partial glossectomy. Acoustic variables investigated included first formant (F1) frequency, second formant (F2) frequency, F1 range, F2 range and vowel space area. Data from the speakers with partial glossectomy were compared with age- and gender-matched controls.…

  5. Analysis of acoustic signals on CO{sub 2} arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Sumitomo, T.; Koga, H.

    1995-12-31

    The sound emitted during the arc welding process is closely related to the welding phenomenon, and sometimes it provides useful information for monitoring and controlling the welding process. It is important to use different kinds of information to control the welding process to improve the quality of controlling system, especially for underwater welding. Because the recovery process of weld defects is a time and money consuming matter, and sometimes it is difficult to monitor the arc condition by a visual system. The fundamental analysis of acoustic signals and their relations with the other parameters such as arc voltage, arc current and a vibration of weld plate had been carried out in order to understand the feature of acoustic signals and to develop effective signal processing algorithm. All of the data were recorded by the cassette recorder. After the experiment was completed, the analysis of recorded data was carried out by using of a signal processor and a computer system.

  6. Influence of resonators on the acoustic and propulsion performance characteristics of a ramjet ejector chamber under conditions with vibration hydrogen combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, A. V.; Moskvichev, D. Yu.

    2008-09-01

    The influence of acoustic resonators on the acoustic and propulsion performance characteristics of a ramjet ejector chamber under conditions with vibration hydrogen combustion was experimentally examined. In the study, resonators having identical throats and different cavity diameters were used. For fixed-volume resonators the best propulsion performance characteristics were achieved in the case in which the cavity diameter differed little from the resonator throat diameter.

  7. Structural and vibrational analysis of thymoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschi, A. B.; Romano, E.; Benavente, A. M.; Altabef, A. Ben; Tuttolomondo, M. E.

    2010-10-01

    The molecular structure of 2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, C 6O 2H 2 (CH 3) 3CH, has been optimized using methods based on density functional theory (DFT) and Moller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2). As regards C 6O 2H 2 (CH 3) 3CH, two populated conformations with C 1 ( trans) and C s ( cis) symmetries are obtained, the former being more stable than the latter. The theoretical data indicate that although both anti and cis conformers are possible by rotation about the C-C bond, the preferred conformation is trans. The effects governing the torsion barriers and preferred conformations were analyzed at B3LYP/6-311++G** level. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was applied to the cis and trans conformers in order to detect intramolecular contacts. Furthermore, the infrared spectra for the gas and solid phases and the Raman spectrum for the solid one, were recorded and the observed bands assigned to the vibrational modes.

  8. Modal Vibration Analysis of Large Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Margasahayam, Ravi N.

    2009-01-01

    The art of experimental modal vibration analysis (MVA) has been extended to apply to large castings. This extension was made to enable the use of experimental MVA as a relatively inexpensive, simple means of assessing the internal structural integrity of tread shoes of crawler transporters used to move spacecraft to the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center. Each tread shoe is made from cast iron and weighs about a ton (has a mass .907 kg). The present extended version of experimental MVA could also be applied to other large castings. It could be especially useful to manufacturers as a means of rapidly discriminating against large castings that contain unacceptably large concentrations of internal defects. The use of experimental MVA to assess structural integrity is not new. What are new here are those aspects of the extension of experimental MVA that pertain to the application of MVA to objects so massive that it may not be practical or cost effective to mount them in special test fixtures that impose special test boundary conditions to test them in place under normal conditions of use.

  9. Ambient noise analysis of underwater acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Mark A.; Orlin, Pete; Schulte, Annette; Newcomb, Joal

    2003-04-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summers of 2001 and 2002. The buoys recorded frequencies up to 5859 Hz continuously for 36 days in 2001 and for 72 days in 2002. The acoustic signals recorded include sperm whale vocalizations, seismic airguns, and shipping traffic. The variability of the ambient noise is analyzed using spectrograms, time series, and statistical measurements. Variations in ambient noise before, during, and after tropical storm/hurricane passage are also investigated.

  10. Vibration Analysis of a Split Path Gearbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Rashidi, Majid

    1995-01-01

    Split path gearboxes can be attractive alternatives to the common planetary designs for rotorcraft, but because they have seen little use, they are relatively high risk designs. To help reduce the risk of fielding a rotorcraft with a split path gearbox, the vibration and dynamic characteristics of such a gearbox were studied. A mathematical model was developed by using the Lagrangian method, and it was applied to study the effect of three design variables on the natural frequencies and vibration energy of the gearbox. The first design variable, shaft angle, had little influence on the natural frequencies. The second variable, mesh phasing, had a strong effect on the levels of vibration energy, with phase angles of 0 deg and 180 deg producing low vibration levels. The third design variable, the stiffness of the shafts connecting the spur gears to the helical pinions, strongly influenced the natural frequencies of some of the vibration modes, including two of the dominant modes. We found that, to achieve the lowest level of vibration energy, the natural frequencies of these two dominant modes should be less than those of the main excitation sources.

  11. Simulation of the acoustic environment of a launcher and of the noise-induced vibrations on its structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgine, A.

    1983-03-01

    During the launching and transonic flight of a launcher, high level and wide-band frequency vibrations are transmitted to the payload and equipments. Preliminary simulation tests are planned to reproduce these dangerous phenomena; however, classical test facilities (reverberant acoustic chambers) generally do not provide simultaneously the true space and time distribution of the flight pressure fluctuations. A method is described for forcing the vibratory response of the launcher wall, for instance at the shroud which shelters the satellite. (Statistical characteristics of this response are known by a previous analytical prediction). Forced vibrations are produced by using a few number of electrodynamic shakers acting on the wall; the N random forces are simultaneously synthesized on a digital computer. The proper simulation is realized when measured responses at N points exhibit spectral distributions and overall RMS levels very close to the predicted flight values. Then, the noise level inside the shroud and the vibrations transmitted to the payload are also very close to the flight conditions. Some examples of applications to realistic structures, as the shroud of the Ariane vehicle, are presented.

  12. Fracture energy analysis via acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, I. I.; Gradov, O. M.

    1986-04-01

    The results of previous studies on acoustic emission during fatigue loading are used to relate the characteristics of the acoustic signals to the fracture processes occurring at the crack tip. At stresses below the yield point of the material, discrete acoustic emissions are produced, their amplitude distribution being described by a monotonically decreasing function. At stresses near the yield point, the signals are continuous with a peak observed in the amplitude distribution function, while above the yield point the acoustic emission resumes the character it had below the yield point. It is shown that these emissions correspond to the formation of individual microfractures, to the process of macroplastic deformation and to stepwise crack propagation of the structurally disordered material, respectively.

  13. Graphical Acoustic Liner Design and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An interactive liner design and impedance modeling tool comprises software utilized to design acoustic liners for use in constrained spaces, both regularly and irregularly shaped. A graphical user interface allows the acoustic channel geometry to be drawn in a liner volume while the surface impedance calculations are updated and displayed in real-time. A one-dimensional transmission line model may be used as the basis for the impedance calculations.

  14. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.; Garandet, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  15. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  16. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  17. Acoustic analysis of prosody in Sydenham's chorea.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Patrícia M; Cardoso, Francisco; Maia, Débora P; Cunningham, Mauro César Q; Teixeira Jr, Antonio Lúcio; Reis, César

    2010-10-01

    There are few studies of language and speech in patients with Sydenham's chorea (SC). We have done an acoustic analysis of fundamental frequency (F0), duration and intensity of declarative and interrogative sentences made by 20 SC patients, 20 patients with rheumatic fever (RF) without chorea, and compared them with 20 healthy age-matched controls (CO). Each group included 12 females. We found that there is no difference between the RF and CO groups in all studied parameters. Patients with SC, however, presented with a speech characterized by decreased F0 range (difference between minimum and maximum F0), shorter duration of sentences, and higher intensity of the first syllable of sentences. The findings were not influenced by the nature of the sentences (i.e. , declarative or interrogative), but for all variables they were significantly more severe in males than females. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that patients with acute SC have an impairment of modulation of F0 and longer duration of emission of sentences, resulting in a monotone and slow speech. This pattern is similar to what has been described in other basal ganglia illnesses, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Wilson's disease.

  18. The POD analysis of a metal plate under vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, D.; Barrientos, B.; Pérez-López, C.; Cywiak, M.; Mendoza-Santoyo, F.

    2006-02-01

    The Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) method is applied to the vibrations analysis of a metal plate. The data obtained from the metal plate under vibrations were measured with a laser vibrometer and Fringe projection technique. The metal plate was subject to vibrations with an electrodynamical shaker in a range of frequencies from 100 to 5000 Hz. The vertical velocity displacement measurements were taken on a quarter of the plate in a rectangular grid of 7 x 8 points using a Laser Vibrometer. The plate vibration measurements were used to calculate the eigenfunctions and the eigenvalues. It was found that a large fraction of the total energy of the vibration is contained within the two first POD modes. The essential features of the deformation are thus described by only the two first eigenfunctions.

  19. Space Launch System Vibration Analysis Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Katie

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal for my efforts during this internship was to help prepare for the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated modal test (IMT) with Rodney Rocha. In 2018, the Structural Engineering Loads and Dynamics Team will have 10 days to perform the IMT on the SLS Integrated Launch Vehicle. After that 10 day period, we will have about two months to analyze the test data and determine whether the integrated vehicle modes/frequencies are adequate for launching the vehicle. Because of the time constraints, NASA must have newly developed post-test analysis methods proven well and with technical confidence before testing. NASA civil servants along with help from rotational interns are working with novel techniques developed and applied external to Johnson Space Center (JSC) to uncover issues in applying this technique to much larger scales than ever before. We intend to use modal decoupling methods to separate the entangled vibrations coming from the SLS and its support structure during the IMT. This new approach is still under development. The primary goal of my internship was to learn the basics of structural dynamics and physical vibrations. I was able to accomplish this by working on two experimental test set ups, the Simple Beam and TAURUS-T, and by doing some light analytical and post-processing work. Within the Simple Beam project, my role involves changing the data acquisition system, reconfiguration of the test set up, transducer calibration, data collection, data file recovery, and post-processing analysis. Within the TAURUS-T project, my duties included cataloging and removing the 30+ triaxial accelerometers, coordinating the removal of the structure from the current rolling cart to a sturdy billet for further testing, preparing the accelerometers for remounting, accurately calibrating, mounting, and mapping of all accelerometer channels, and some testing. Hammer and shaker tests will be performed to easily visualize mode shapes at low frequencies. Short

  20. Numerical analysis of acoustic impedance microscope utilizing acoustic lens transducer to examine cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Agus Indra; Hozumi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Kenta; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    A new technique is proposed for non-contact quantitative cell observation using focused ultrasonic waves. This technique interprets acoustic reflection intensity into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the biological cell. The cells are cultured on a plastic film substrate. A focused acoustic beam is transmitted through the substrate to its interface with the cell. A two-dimensional (2-D) reflection intensity profile is obtained by scanning the focal point along the interface. A reference substance is observed under the same conditions. These two reflections are compared and interpreted into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the cell based on a calibration curve that was created prior to the observation. To create the calibration curve, a numerical analysis of the sound field is performed using Fourier Transforms and is verified using several saline solutions. Because the cells are suspended by two plastic films, no contamination is introduced during the observation. In a practical observation, a sapphire lens transducer with a center frequency of 300 MHz was employed using ZnO thin film. The objects studied were co-cultured rat-derived glial (astrocyte) cells and glioma cells. The result was the clear observation of the internal structure of the cells. The acoustic impedance of the cells was spreading between 1.62 and 1.72 MNs/m(3). Cytoskeleton was indicated by high acoustic impedance. The introduction of cytochalasin-B led to a significant reduction in the acoustic impedance of the glioma cells; its effect on the glial cells was less significant. It is believed that this non-contact observation method will be useful for continuous cell inspections.

  1. Acoustic and vibration response of a structure with added noise control treatment under various excitations.

    PubMed

    Rhazi, Dilal; Atalla, Noureddine

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of the acoustic performance of noise control treatments is of great importance in many engineering applications, e.g., aircraft, automotive, and building acoustics applications. Numerical methods such as finite- and boundary elements allow for the study of complex structures with added noise control treatment. However, these methods are computationally expensive when used for complex structures. At an early stage of the acoustic trim design process, many industries look for simple and easy to use tools that provide sufficient physical insight that can help to formulate design criteria. The paper presents a simple and tractable approach for the acoustic design of noise control treatments. It presents and compares two transfer matrix-based methods to investigate the vibroacoustic behavior of noise control treatments. The first is based on a modal approach, while the second is based on wave-number space decomposition. In addition to the classical rain-on-the-roof and diffuse acoustic field excitations, the paper also addresses turbulent boundary layer and point source (monopole) excitations. Various examples are presented and compared to a finite element calculation to validate the methodology and to confirm its relevance along with its limitations.

  2. Vibration analysis of rotor blades with pendulum absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Hammond, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of rotor blades with spherical pendulum absorbers is presented. Linearized equations of motion for small oscillations about the steady-state deflection of a spherical pendulum on elastic rotor blades undergoing coupled flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsional vibrations are obtained. A transmission matrix formulation is given to determine the natural vibrational characteristics of rotor blades with spherical or simple flapping pendulum absorbers. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of a hingeless rotor blade with a spherical pendulum are computed.

  3. Method of Laser Vibration Defect Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-04

    cutoffs. [0051] Switch 119, buffer 123, amp 124 and headphones 126 provide a system for manually monitoring environmental noise. Buffer 123 is...amplitude versus frequency. [0068] Speaker 107 is utilized to play back sounds that may be created during the vibration examination utilizing

  4. Free vibration analysis of beams and shafts by programmable calculators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, M. T.; Dias, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The general problem of free vibration analysis of beams and shafts is presented in such a way that the necessary computations can be carried out by using tables, a programmable calculator, or a microcomputer. This approach is of interest to both the vibration specialist and the design engineer. Illustrative examples are given, in which the transfer matrix method is implemented with a programmable calculator or microcomputer.

  5. Visco-acoustic modelling of a vibrating plate interacting with water confined in a domain of micrometric size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebental, B.; Bourquin, F.

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that concrete durability strongly depends on the capillary porosity of the material. Hence, structural health monitoring of concrete structure could take advantage of concrete microporosity monitoring. To this end, a new method for the in situ non-destructive testing of capillary porosity in cementitious materials has been proposed. A sensing device that seems well suited to this application is a capacitive ultrasonic transducer with a characteristic size of 1 μm. It is to be embedded in the material. Its vibrating membrane is made of aligned carbon nanotubes forming a thin layer with a typical thickness of 1 nm. It generates acoustic waves of micrometric wavelength into water-filled micropores, aiming at measuring their properties. The present paper focuses on the numerical simulation of the embedded sensor. In order to properly account for viscous effects in fluids at the micrometric scale, we have developed a specific computational method for the visco-acoustic modelling of a microplate vibrating between 10 MHz and 2 GHz in a water-filled domain of micrometric size. Our approach is based on the condensation of the fluid part of the fluid-structure problem on the structure by a finite element method, and on a spectral approximation of the structural equations. The numerical results indicate that the fluid domain is resonant despite the viscous terms, which causes a frequency downshift of the resonances and a decrease of the quality factor. In the coupled system, the plate does not perturb the fluid resonances, whereas the plate resonances are strongly upshifted by the water load. The resonance frequencies of the system are shown to display a clear dependence on the pore width, which makes the device a good candidate as a porosity sensor.

  6. Acoustical Analysis of a Test Horn.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-20

    Laboratories, Inc. if /pliable) Flight Dynamics Laboratory (AFWAL/ FIBRA ) n/a Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIPCode) 7b...AFWAL/ FIBRA DO Form 1473, JUN 86 Previous editions are obsolete. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED "S.,, PREFACE This acoustical

  7. Acoustic vibrations contribute to the diffuse scatter produced by ribosome crystals

    PubMed Central

    Polikanov, Yury S.; Moore, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse scattering pattern produced by frozen crystals of the 70S ribosome from Thermus thermophilus is as highly structured as it would be if it resulted entirely from domain-scale motions within these particles. However, the qualitative properties of the scattering pattern suggest that acoustic displacements of the crystal lattice make a major contribution to it. PMID:26457426

  8. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  9. Acoustic source analysis of supersonic jets from complex nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Kreitzman, Jordan

    2015-11-01

    We compute acoustic source terms corresponding to Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy from an unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulation of a supersonic jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle with chevrons. The simulation data are validated against experimental measurements of mean and turbulence flow statistics as well as far-field noise. We evaluate fourth-order correlations from the simulation data to assess assumptions of quasi-normality and statistical axisymmetry that underpin reduced-order acoustic source models originally developed for round jets. A spatial analysis of these correlations in relation to the complex geometry of the nozzle reveals locations where the validity of these assumptions begins to break down. Using two point two-time correlations of the simulation data, we also directly evaluate and compare the accuracy of four different acoustic source models, including the Gaussian, moving-frame, fixed-frame, and modified distance models. Computational resources were provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  10. Vibrational analysis of tertiary alkyl chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, G. A.; Harper, Clay

    1980-11-01

    Vibrational spectra were obtained for 2-chloro-2-methylpentane, 3-chloro-3-methylpentane, 2-chloro-2-methylhexane, and 3-chloro-3-methylhexane. All four compounds exist in T HHH and T CHH conformations in the neat liquid, and the T HHH' conformer of the last named compound also seems to be present. Only the T HHH conformer is present in the crystalline state of the two pentanes, but the hexanes could not be made to crystallize and both conformers were present in the solid. A 44-parameter modified valence force field was used in normal coordinate calculations, with fifteen force constants being adjusted to fit 188 assigned frequencies below 1500 cm -1 of six molecules (two conformers each of 2-chloro-2-methylbutane, 2-chloro-2-methylpentane, and 3-chloro-3-methylpentane). The resulting force constant values were used in zero-order calculations of the two hexanes as an aid in interpreting vibrational spectra for those compounds.

  11. E/M launcher vibration and acceleration data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grzesik, R.G.; Mitchell, D.E.; Sebastian, J.H. ); Chin, I.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on acquired acceleration curves for projectiles electromagnetically launched out of the non-stiff, (epoxy fiber wrapped copper rails) 50 mm Benet barrel which were very noisy and difficult to interpret. The cause for the noise was assumed to be the induced vibration from the barrel and projectile. Standard numerical smoothing techniques were not deemed plausible candidates for mathematical analysis because using them alone would have resulted in curves which would have been superficially smoothed over, concealing possibly interesting transient responses and/or distorting valuable acceleration data. The barrel low frequency vibrations were too interwoven with the acceleration signal and could not be extracted non-intrusively, and the high frequency barrel vibrations were not apparent. The projectile vibrations turned out to be negligible being on the order of magnitude of the accelerometer's background noise.

  12. A random rotor molecule: Vibrational analysis and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Shi, Xing-Qiang; Lin, Zijing; Van Hove, Michel A.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular structures that permit intramolecular rotational motion have the potential to function as molecular rotors. We have employed density functional theory and vibrational frequency analysis to study the characteristic structure and vibrational behavior of the molecule (4',4″″-(bicyclo[2,2,2]octane-1,4-diyldi-4,1-phenylene)-bis-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine. IR active vibrational modes were found that favor intramolecular rotation. To demonstrate the rotor behavior of the isolated single molecule, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures were carried out. This molecular rotor is expected to be thermally triggered via excitation of specific vibrational modes, which implies randomness in its direction of rotation.

  13. Membrane Vibration Analysis Above the Nyquist Limit with Fluorescence Videogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2004-01-01

    A new method for generating photogrammetric targets by projecting an array of laser beams onto a membrane doped with fluorescent laser dye has recently been developed. In this paper we review this new fluorescence based technique, then proceed to show how it can be used for dynamic measurements, and how a short pulsed (10 ns) laser allows the measurement of vibration modes at frequencies several times the sampling frequency. In addition, we present experimental results showing the determination of fundamental and harmonic vibration modes of a drum style dye-doped polymer membrane tautly mounted on a 12-inch circular hoop and excited with 30 Hz and 62 Hz sinusoidal acoustic waves. The projected laser dot pattern was generated by passing the beam from a pulsed Nd:YAG laser though a diffractive optical element, and the resulting fluorescence was imaged with three digital video cameras, all of which were synchronized with a pulse and delay generator. Although the video cameras are capable of 240 Hz frame rates, the laser s output was limited to 30 Hz and below. Consequently, aliasing techniques were used to allow the measurement of vibration modes up to 186 Hz with a Nyquist limit of less than 15 Hz.

  14. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  15. Theoretical and experimental dynamic analysis aimed at the improvement of an acoustic method for fresco detachment diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vescovo, Dionisio; Fregolent, Annalisa

    2009-10-01

    An acoustic non-invasive method for the diagnosis of detachment in frescos was previously proposed by the authors. This method is based on the indirect evaluation of the vibrations due to detachments, by means of a surface inspection. In this paper the relations between the dynamics of the structure to be inspected and the operational principles of the acoustic method of diagnosis are presented. The dynamic analysis is carried out using experimental investigations and analytical and numerical models. It shows that the quality of the diagnosis depends on the capability of the acoustic device to excite the structural resonances related to the detachments. These results are useful for future improvements, in particular to enhance the sensitivity of the proposed method.

  16. Vertical vibration dynamics of acoustically levitated drop containing two immiscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Duyang; Zhai, Zhicong; Li, Lin; Lin, Kejun; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the levitation and oscillation dynamics of complex drops containing two immiscible liquids. Two types of drops, core-shell drop and abnormal-shaped drop, have been obtained depending on the levitation procedures. The oscillation dynamics of the drops have been studied using a high speed camera. It has been found that the oscillation of the abnormal-shaped drop has a longer oscillation period and decays much faster than that of the core-shell drop, which cannot be accounted for by the air resistance itself. The acoustic streaming induced by ultrasound may bring an additional force against the motion of the drop due to the Bernoulli effect. This is responsible for the enhanced damping during the oscillation in acoustic levitation.

  17. Payload bay atmospheric vent airflow testing at the Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, James D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Several concerns related to venting the Space Shuttle Orbiter payload bay during launch led to laboratory experiments with a flight-type vent box installed in the wall of a subsonic wind tunnel. This report describes the test setups and procedures used to acquire data for characterization of airflow through the vent box and acoustic tones radiated from the vent-box cavity. A flexible boundary-layer spoiler which reduced the vent-tone amplitude is described.

  18. Vibrational analysis of tertiary alkyl bromides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, G. A.; Richardson, Mary Townsends; Gross, Lorelei

    Infrared spectra have been obtained for 2-bromo-2-methylpentane and 3-bromo-3-methylpentane. Both compounds exist in THHH and TCHH conformations. Normal coordinate calculations were made for these two compounds and for 2-bromo-2-methylbutane, using the 44-parameter modified valence force field that was used for tertiary chlorides. Fifteen force constants were adjusted to fit 169 frequencies below 1500 cm-1 of six molecules (two each for the three named compounds) with an average error of 5.6 cm-1. Vibrational assignments are presented.

  19. Vibrational analysis of tertiary alkyl bromides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, G. A.; Richardson, Mary Townsends; Gross, Lorelei

    1982-11-01

    Infrared spectra have been obtained for 2-bromo-2-methylpentane and 3-bromo-3-methylpentane. Both compounds exist in THHH and TCHH conformations. Normal coordinate calculations were made for these two compounds and for 2-bromo-2-methylbutane, using the 44-parameter modified valence force field that was used for tertiary chlorides. Fifteen force constants were adjusted to fit 169 frequencies below 1500 cm -1 of six molecules (two each for the three named compounds) with an average error of 5.6 cm -1. Vibrational assignments are presented.

  20. Statistical analysis of vibration in tyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bot, Alain; Bazari, Zakia; Klein, Philippe; Lelong, Joël

    2017-03-01

    The vibration in tyres submitted to random forces in the contact zone is investigated with the model of prestressed orthotropic plate on visco-elastic foundation. It is shown that beyond a cut-on frequency a single wave propagates whose speed is directional-dependent. A systematic numerical exploration of the governing equation solutions shows that three regimes may exist in such plates. These are modal field, diffuse field and free field. For actual tyres which present a high level of damping, the passage from low to high frequencies generally explores the modal and free field regimes but not the diffuse field regime.

  1. Principal Components Analysis of Triaxial Vibration Data From Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Huff, Edward M.

    2001-01-01

    Research on the nature of the vibration data collected from helicopter transmissions during flight experiments has led to several crucial observations believed to be responsible for the high rates of false alarms and missed detections in aircraft vibration monitoring systems. This work focuses on one such finding, namely, the need to consider additional sources of information about system vibrations. In this light, helicopter transmission vibration data, collected using triaxial accelerometers, were explored in three different directions, analyzed for content, and then combined using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to analyze changes in directionality. In this paper, the PCA transformation is applied to 176 test conditions/data sets collected from an OH58C helicopter to derive the overall experiment-wide covariance matrix and its principal eigenvectors. The experiment-wide eigenvectors. are then projected onto the individual test conditions to evaluate changes and similarities in their directionality based on the various experimental factors. The paper will present the foundations of the proposed approach, addressing the question of whether experiment-wide eigenvectors accurately model the vibration modes in individual test conditions. The results will further determine the value of using directionality and triaxial accelerometers for vibration monitoring and anomaly detection.

  2. Acoustic systems containing curved duct sections. [numerical analysis of wave propagation in acoustic ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis of waves in bends in acoustical ducting of rectangular cross section was extended to the study of motion near discontinuities. This included determination of the characteristics of the tangential and radial components of the nonpropagating modes. It is established that attenuation of the nonpropagating modes strongly depends on frequency and that, in general, the sharper the bend, the less attenuation may be expected. Evaluation of a bend's impedance and of impedance-generated reflections is also presented in detail.

  3. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. .

  4. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria.

  5. Analysis and Modelling of Muscles Motion during Whole Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesarelli, M.; Fratini, A.; Bifulco, P.; La Gatta, A.; Romano, M.; Pasquariello, G.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study is to characterize the local muscles motion in individuals undergoing whole body mechanical stimulation. In this study we aim also to evaluate how subject positioning modifies vibration dumping, altering local mechanical stimulus. Vibrations were delivered to subjects by the use of a vibrating platform, while stimulation frequency was increased linearly from 15 to 60 Hz. Two different subject postures were here analysed. Platform and muscles motion were monitored using tiny MEMS accelerometers; a contra lateral analysis was also presented. Muscle motion analysis revealed typical displacement trajectories: motion components were found not to be purely sinusoidal neither in phase to each other. Results also revealed a mechanical resonant-like behaviour at some muscles, similar to a second-order system response. Resonance frequencies and dumping factors depended on subject and his positioning. Proper mechanical stimulation can maximize muscle spindle solicitation, which may produce a more effective muscle activation.

  6. Special considerations for vibration analysis on longwall equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Towles, B.

    1996-12-31

    West Elk Mine has included vibration analysis as a part of the longwall maintenance program since 1993. Longwall equipment presents several special problems which are not common to most vibration analysis applications: (1) Heavy construction of equipment damps some signals making machine condition determinations difficult, and (2) Complexity of longwall equipment; (3) Difficulty in isolating spectrum frequencies to individual machinery components; (4) Flexing of equipment frames and housings due to longwall face advance affects vibration spectrums; (5) Difficulty of obtaining necessary information on internal machinery components from longwall equipment suppliers; (6) Permissibility of data collection instruments. In spite of these difficulties, West Elk has had positive results in preventing catastrophic failures, predicting life expectancy of failing components, making general machinery improvements in cooperation with manufacturers and determining rebuild quality.

  7. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing. [for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Three systems for the control of acoustic testing are compared: a hybrid digital/analog system, a digital vibration system, and the same digital vibration system modified by a software change. The hybrid system was constructed to control the 1/3-octaves from 50 to 1000 Hz. The vibration system was equipped with programs for sine and random vibration tests, shock analysis and synthesis, and signal analysis. For the modified vibration system, the random-vibration control program of the unmodified unit was changed so that acoustic tests could be performed. The performance of the three systems is compared by conducting probability-density and time-history analyses of the proposed test spectrum for the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 1977 program. The results of the analyses show that the hybrid and modified vibration systems perform almost equally, but the modified vibration system is easier to use and produces better test documentation.

  8. Development of an Efficient Binaural Simulation for the Analysis of Structural Acoustic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalime, Aimee L.; Johnson, Marty E.; Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Binaural or "virtual acoustic" representation has been proposed as a method of analyzing acoustic and vibroacoustic data. Unfortunately, this binaural representation can require extensive computer power to apply the Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) to a large number of sources, as with a vibrating structure. This work focuses on reducing the number of real-time computations required in this binaural analysis through the use of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Equivalent Source Reduction (ESR). The SVD method reduces the complexity of the HRTF computations by breaking the HRTFs into dominant singular values (and vectors). The ESR method reduces the number of sources to be analyzed in real-time computation by replacing sources on the scale of a structural wavelength with sources on the scale of an acoustic wavelength. It is shown that the effectiveness of the SVD and ESR methods improves as the complexity of the source increases. In addition, preliminary auralization tests have shown that the results from both the SVD and ESR methods are indistinguishable from the results found with the exhaustive method.

  9. Modal analysis and acoustic transmission through offset-core honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Adam Dustin

    The work presented in this thesis is motivated by an earlier research that showed that double, offset-core honeycomb sandwich panels increased thermal resistance and, hence, decreased heat transfer through the panels. This result lead to the hypothesis that these panels could be used for acoustic insulation. Using commercial finite element modeling software, COMSOL Multiphysics, the acoustical properties, specifically the transmission loss across a variety of offset-core honeycomb sandwich panels, is studied for the case of a plane acoustic wave impacting the panel at normal incidence. The transmission loss results are compared with those of single-core honeycomb panels with the same cell sizes. The fundamental frequencies of the panels are also computed in an attempt to better understand the vibrational modes of these particular sandwich-structured panels. To ensure that the finite element analysis software is adequate for the task at hand, two relevant benchmark problems are solved and compared with theory. Results from these benchmark results compared well to those obtained from theory. Transmission loss results from the offset-core honeycomb sandwich panels show increased transmission loss, especially for large cell honeycombs when compared to single-core honeycomb panels.

  10. Shape and 3D acoustically induced vibrations of the human eardrum characterized by digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Furlong, Cosme; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Rosowski, John J.

    2014-07-01

    The eardrum or Tympanic Membrane (TM) transfers acoustic energy from the ear canal (at the external ear) into mechanical motions of the ossicles (at the middle ear). The acousto-mechanical-transformer behavior of the TM is determined by its shape and mechanical properties. For a better understanding of hearing mysteries, full-field-of-view techniques are required to quantify shape, nanometer-scale sound-induced displacement, and mechanical properties of the TM in 3D. In this paper, full-field-of-view, three-dimensional shape and sound-induced displacement of the surface of the TM are obtained by the methods of multiple wavelengths and multiple sensitivity vectors with lensless digital holography. Using our developed digital holographic systems, unique 3D information such as, shape (with micrometer resolution), 3D acoustically-induced displacement (with nanometer resolution), full strain tensor (with nano-strain resolution), 3D phase of motion, and 3D directional cosines of the displacement vectors can be obtained in full-field-ofview with a spatial resolution of about 3 million points on the surface of the TM and a temporal resolution of 15 Hz.

  11. Smartphones as experimental tools to measure acoustical and mechanical properties of vibrating rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.

    2016-07-01

    Modern smartphones have calculation and sensor capabilities that make them suitable for use as versatile and reliable measurement devices in simple teaching experiments. In this work a smartphone is used, together with low cost materials, in an experiment to measure the frequencies emitted by vibrating rods of different materials, shapes and lengths. The results obtained with the smartphone have been compared with theoretical calculations and the agreement is good. Alternatively, physics students can perform the experiment described here and use their results to determine the dependencies of the obtained frequencies on the rod characteristics. In this way they will also practice research methods that they will probably use in their professional life.

  12. Vibration analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers: an overview-Part 2: vibration response, fretting-wear, guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Taylor, C. E.

    2003-11-01

    Design guidelines were developed to prevent tube failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers. An overview of vibration analysis procedures and recommended design guidelines is presented in this paper. This paper pertains to liquid, gas and two-phase heat exchangers such as nuclear steam generators, reboilers, coolers, service water heat exchangers, condensers, and moisture-separator-reheaters. Part 2 of this paper covers forced vibration excitation mechanisms, vibration response prediction, resulting damage assessment, and acceptance criteria.

  13. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision.

    PubMed

    Goavec-Mérou, G; Chrétien, N; Friedt, J-M; Sandoz, P; Martin, G; Lenczner, M; Ballandras, S

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates.

  14. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: Demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goavec-Mérou, G.; Chrétien, N.; Friedt, J.-M.; Sandoz, P.; Martin, G.; Lenczner, M.; Ballandras, S.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates.

  15. Shunted Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Analysis Including Centrifugal Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue problems which require damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. One method is the use of piezoelectric materials as passive or active dampers. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery rotor blades research, an effort has been made to investigate the effectiveness of a shunted piezoelectric for the turbomachinery rotor blades vibration control, specifically for a condition with centrifugal rotation. While ample research has been performed on the use of a piezoelectric material with electric circuits to attempt to control the structural vibration damping, very little study has been done regarding rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. Specifically, the objectives of this study are: (a) to create and analyze finite element models for harmonic forced response vibration analysis coupled with shunted piezoelectric circuits for engine blade operational conditions, (b) to validate the experimental test approaches with numerical results and vice versa, and (c) to establish a numerical modeling capability for vibration control using shunted piezoelectric circuits under rotation. Study has focused on a resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches on plate specimens. Tests and analyses were performed for both non-spinning and spinning conditions. The finite element (FE) shunted piezoelectric circuit damping simulations were performed using the ANSYS Multiphysics code for the resistive and inductive circuit piezoelectric simulations of both conditions. The FE results showed a good correlation with experimental test results. Tests and analyses of shunted piezoelectric damping control, demonstrating with plate specimens, show a great potential to reduce blade vibrations under centrifugal loading.

  16. Acoustic Analysis Before and After Voice Therapy for Laryngeal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, S S; Gautam, R

    2015-01-01

    Background Voice problems caused by pathologies in vocal folds are well known. Some types of laryngeal pathologies have certain acoustic characteristics. Objective evaluation helps characterize the voice and voice problems providing supporting evidences, severity of disorders. It helps assess the response to the treatment and measures the outcomes. Objective The objective of the study is to determine the effectiveness of the voice therapy and quantify the results objectively by voice parameters. Method Study includes 61 patients who presented with different types of laryngeal pathologies. Acoustic analyses and voice assessment was done with Dr. Speech ver 4 (Tiger DRS Inc.). Acoustic parameters including fundamental frequency, jitters, shimmers, Harmonic to noise ratio (HNR), Normalized noise energy (NNE) were analyzed before and after voice therapy. Result Bilateral vocal nodules were the most common pathologies comprising 44.26%. All acoustic parameters showed a significant difference after the therapy (p<0.05) except for NNE. Dysphonia due to vocal fold polyp showed no improvement even after voice therapy (p>0.05). Conclusion Acoustic analysis provides an objective, recordable data regarding the voice parameters and its pathologies. Though, few pathology require alternative therapy rather than voice therapy, overall it has a good effect on glottic closure. As the voice therapy can improve the different indices of voice, it can be viewed as imperative part of treatment and to monitor progression.

  17. MOCHA - Multi-Study Ocean Acoustics Human Effects Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    innovative methods for the analysis of the results from BRSs. The working group is composed of the chief scientists of existing BRS projects ( Sirena sonar...www.creem.st-and.ac.uk/mocha/links • Sirena sonar trials on sperm whales • BRS Bahamas (AUTEC): http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/acoustics

  18. Basin Acoustic Seamount Scattering Experiment (BASSEX) Data Analysis and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Kauai source at various ranges and bearings . OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this work is to measure aspects of acoustic propagation that...horizontal plane, arriving at the array from a different bearing . Further analysis will include processing all of the BASSEX KNPAL receptions and

  19. Acoustic indicators for targeted detection of stored product and urban insect pests by inexpensive infrared, acoustic, and vibrational detection of movement.

    PubMed

    Mankin, R W; Hodges, R D; Nagle, H T; Schal, C; Pereira, R M; Koehler, P G

    2010-10-01

    Crawling and scraping activity of three stored-product pests, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), and Stegobium paniceum (L.) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), and two urban pests, Blattella germanica (L.) (Blattodea: Blattellidae) and Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), were monitored individually by infrared sensors, microphones, and a piezoelectric sensor in a small arena to evaluate effects of insect locomotory behavior and size on the ability of an inexpensively constructed instrument to detect insects and distinguish among different species. Adults of all species could be detected when crawling or scraping. The smallest insects in the study, first-fourth-instar C. lectularius nymphs, could not be detected easily when crawling, but could be detected when scraping. Sound and vibration sensors detected brief, 3-10-ms impulses from all tested species, often grouped in distinctive trains (bursts), typical of impulses in previous acoustic detection experiments. To consider the potential for targeting or focusing detection on particular species of interest, indicators were developed to assess the likelihood of detection of C. lectularius. Statistically significant differences were found between C. lectularius and other species in distributions of three measured variables: infrared signal durations, sound impulse-burst durations, and sound pressure levels (energy) of impulses that best matched an averaged spectrum (profile) of scraping behavior. Thus, there is potential that signals collected by an inexpensive, polymodal-sensor instrument could be used in automated trapping systems to detect a targeted species, 0.1 mg or larger, in environments where servicing of traps is difficult or when timeliness of trapping information is important.

  20. Vibration analysis by digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinchen, Wolfgang; Yang, Lian Xiang; Kupfer, Gerhard; Maeckel, Peter; Thiemich, Anderas

    1997-09-01

    Digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry is described as a robust measuring method due to its simple optical setup and the insensitivity against ambient noise. It has been sued in industry for nondestructive testing and strain measuring. This paper explores the possibilities for vibration analysis using digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry. The measuring device performing both time- average and stroboscopic methods is described. The time average digital speckle patten shearing interferometry in conjunction with the stroboscopic technique is suited well for both qualitative and quantitative vibration analyses. The determination of dynamic deformation and strain fields form the phase map of shearogram is demonstrated, and some preliminary results are shown.

  1. Energy Finite Element Analysis Developments for Vibration Analysis of Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Schiller, Noah H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) has been utilized successfully for modeling complex structural-acoustic systems with isotropic structural material properties. In this paper, a formulation for modeling structures made out of composite materials is presented. An approach based on spectral finite element analysis is utilized first for developing the equivalent material properties for the composite material. These equivalent properties are employed in the EFEA governing differential equations for representing the composite materials and deriving the element level matrices. The power transmission characteristics at connections between members made out of non-isotropic composite material are considered for deriving suitable power transmission coefficients at junctions of interconnected members. These coefficients are utilized for computing the joint matrix that is needed to assemble the global system of EFEA equations. The global system of EFEA equations is solved numerically and the vibration levels within the entire system can be computed. The new EFEA formulation for modeling composite laminate structures is validated through comparison to test data collected from a representative composite aircraft fuselage that is made out of a composite outer shell and composite frames and stiffeners. NASA Langley constructed the composite cylinder and conducted the test measurements utilized in this work.

  2. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  3. Perturbation analysis of electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-06-15

    Lagrangian displacement and magnetic field perturbation response to the geodesic acoustic mode is analyzed by using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak. δB{sub θ}, the poloidal component of magnetic field perturbation, has poloidal wave number m = 2 created by the poloidal displacement ξ{sub θ}. The parallel perturbation of magnetic field, δB{sub ∥}, has a poloidally asymmetric structure with m = 1 and is on the same order of magnitude with δB{sub θ} to the leading order. The radial displacement ξ{sub r} is of order O(βϵξ{sub θ}) but plays a significant role in determining δB{sub ∥}, where β is the plasma/magnetic pressure ratio and ϵ is the inverse aspect ratio.

  4. Free vibration Analysis of Sandwich Plates with cutout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, N.; Basa, B.; Sarangi, S. K.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the free vibration analysis of sandwich plates with cutouts. Cutouts are inevitable in structural applications and the presence of these cutouts in the structures greatly influences their dynamic characteristics. A finite element model has been developed here using the ANSYS 15.0 software to study the free vibration characteristics of sandwich plates in the presence of cutouts. Shell 281 element, an 8-noded element with six degrees of freedom suited for analyzing thin to moderately thick structures is considered in the development of the model. Block Lanczose method is adopted to extract the mode shapes to obtain the natural frequency corresponding to free vibration of the plate. The effects of parametric variation on the natural frequency of the sandwich plates with cutout are studied and results are presented.

  5. High-vibration detection using motor current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castleberry, K.N.

    1996-08-01

    Motor current signature analysis (CSA) has been used for several years as a diagnostic tool for electrical problems in ac, induction motors. Personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found that CSA can also provide information about system vibrations and imbalances similar to the information provided by an accelerometer. As a result, CSA techniques for monitoring the status of the equipment, such as pumps and compressors, driven by induction motors have been developed and used in dedicated monitoring systems. In this work, researchers have found that CSA responds proportionately to imbalances in rotating equipment and can be used to detect the In high-vibration conditions that can result. This report describes how vibration monitoring with CSA can be implemented and presents test data to support that use.

  6. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-09

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  7. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  8. Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA): scopes and limitations.

    PubMed

    Jamróz, Michał H

    2013-10-01

    The principle of operations of the VEDA program written by the author for Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis of theoretical vibrational spectra is described. Nowadays, the PED analysis is indispensible tool in serious analysis of the vibrational spectra. To perform the PED analysis it is necessary to define 3N-6 linearly independent local mode coordinates. Already for 20-atomic molecules it is a difficult task. The VEDA program reads the input data automatically from the Gaussian program output files. Then, VEDA automatically proposes an introductory set of local mode coordinates. Next, the more adequate coordinates are proposed by the program and optimized to obtain maximal elements of each column (internal coordinate) of the PED matrix (the EPM parameter). The possibility for an automatic optimization of PED contributions is a unique feature of the VEDA program absent in any other programs performing PED analysis.

  9. Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA): Scopes and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Michał H.

    2013-10-01

    The principle of operations of the VEDA program written by the author for Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis of theoretical vibrational spectra is described. Nowadays, the PED analysis is indispensible tool in serious analysis of the vibrational spectra. To perform the PED analysis it is necessary to define 3N-6 linearly independent local mode coordinates. Already for 20-atomic molecules it is a difficult task. The VEDA program reads the input data automatically from the Gaussian program output files. Then, VEDA automatically proposes an introductory set of local mode coordinates. Next, the more adequate coordinates are proposed by the program and optimized to obtain maximal elements of each column (internal coordinate) of the PED matrix (the EPM parameter). The possibility for an automatic optimization of PED contributions is a unique feature of the VEDA program absent in any other programs performing PED analysis.

  10. Surface roughness monitoring by singular spectrum analysis of vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Plaza, E.; Núñez López, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed two methods for enhanced surface roughness (Ra) monitoring based on the application of singular spectrum analysis (SSA) to vibrations signals generated in workpiece-cutting tool interaction in CNC finish turning operations i.e., the individual analysis of principal components (I-SSA), and the grouping analysis of correlated principal components (G-SSA). Singular spectrum analysis is a non-parametric technique of time series analysis that decomposes a signal into a set of independent additive time series referred to as principal components. A number of experiments with different cutting conditions were performed to assess surface roughness monitoring using both of these methods. The results show that singular spectrum analysis of vibration signal processing discriminated the frequency ranges effective for predicting surface roughness. Grouping analysis of correlated principal components (G-SSA) proved to be the most efficient method for monitoring surface roughness, with optimum prediction and reliability results at a lower analytical-computational cost. Finally, the results show that singular spectrum analysis is an ideal method for analyzing vibration signals applied to the on-line monitoring of surface roughness.

  11. A Comparative Study of the Monitoring of a Self Aligning Spherical Journal using Surface Vibration, Airborne Sound and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharjo, P.; Tesfa, B.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    A Self aligning spherical journal bearing is a plain bearing which has spherical surface contact that can be applied in high power industrial machinery. This type of bearing can accommodate a misalignment problem. The journal bearing faults degrade machine performance, decrease life time service and cause unexpected failure which are dangerous for safety issues. Non-intrusive measurements such as surface vibration (SV), airborne sound (AS) and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are appropriate monitoring methods for early stage journal bearing fault in low, medium and high frequency. This paper focuses on the performance comparison using SV, AS and AE measurements in monitoring a self aligning spherical journal bearing for normal and faulty (scratch) conditions. It examines the signals in the time domain and frequency domain and identifies the frequency ranges for each measurement in which significant changes are observed. The results of SV, AS and AE experiments indicate that the spectrum can be used to detect the differences between normal and faulty bearing. The statistic parameter shows that RMS value and peak value for faulty bearing is higher than normal bearing.

  12. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio are examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution is developed for use in the time domain analysis. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings.

  13. Vibration detection of component health and operability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, B. C.

    1975-01-01

    In order to prevent catastrophic failure and eliminate unnecessary periodic maintenance in the shuttle orbiter program environmental control system components, some means of detecting incipient failure in these components is required. The utilization was investigated of vibrational/acoustic phenomena as one of the principal physical parameters on which to base the design of this instrumentation. Baseline vibration/acoustic data was collected from three aircraft type fans and two aircraft type pumps over a frequency range from a few hertz to greater than 3000 kHz. The baseline data included spectrum analysis of the baseband vibration signal, spectrum analysis of the detected high frequency bandpass acoustic signal, and amplitude distribution of the high frequency bandpass acoustic signal. A total of eight bearing defects and two unbalancings was introduced into the five test items. All defects were detected by at least one of a set of vibration/acoustic parameters with a margin of at least 2:1 over the worst case baseline. The design of a portable instrument using this set of vibration/acoustic parameters for detecting incipient failures in environmental control system components is described.

  14. Equivalent Linearization Analysis of Geometrically Nonlinear Random Vibrations Using Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    Two new equivalent linearization implementations for geometrically nonlinear random vibrations are presented. Both implementations are based upon a novel approach for evaluating the nonlinear stiffness within commercial finite element codes and are suitable for use with any finite element code having geometrically nonlinear static analysis capabilities. The formulation includes a traditional force-error minimization approach and a relatively new version of a potential energy-error minimization approach, which has been generalized for multiple degree-of-freedom systems. Results for a simply supported plate under random acoustic excitation are presented and comparisons of the displacement root-mean-square values and power spectral densities are made with results from a nonlinear time domain numerical simulation.

  15. Meshfree natural vibration analysis of 2D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosta, Tomislav; Tsukanov, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Determination of resonance frequencies and vibration modes of mechanical structures is one of the most important tasks in the product design procedure. The main goal of this paper is to describe a pioneering application of the solution structure method (SSM) to 2D structural natural vibration analysis problems and investigate the numerical properties of the method. SSM is a meshfree method which enables construction of the solutions to the engineering problems that satisfy exactly all prescribed boundary conditions. This method is capable of using spatial meshes that do not conform to the shape of a geometric model. Instead of using the grid nodes to enforce boundary conditions, it employs distance fields to the geometric boundaries and combines them with the basis functions and prescribed boundary conditions at run time. This defines unprecedented geometric flexibility of the SSM as well as the complete automation of the solution procedure. In the paper we will explain the key points of the SSM as well as investigate the accuracy and convergence of the proposed approach by comparing our results with the ones obtained using analytical methods or traditional finite element analysis. Despite in this paper we are dealing with 2D in-plane vibrations, the proposed approach has a straightforward generalization to model vibrations of 3D structures.

  16. Acoustic analysis of an Olmecan whistle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio; Menchaca, Rolando; Velazquez, Roberto

    2002-05-01

    Thousands of stone artifacts over 2500 years of age have been found in the Olmecan area in the southeast region of Mexico. These range from the famous big heads with helmets (about 2 m in diameter), to small pieces with precisely drilled holes, which some archaeologists consider to have some simple uses, much simpler than the work needed to produce the stone artifact itself. The one studied here (about 3 cm in size), is considered by the acoustics community as an air-phone, and a detailed anaysis has been done employing FFT techniques in order to find out the frequency spread, the particular tones produced and the sound radiated power through the different holes and cavities. The artifact is made of a very solid stone, so-called ilmenite, believed to have titanium, which is very hard to drill. Nevertheless, many similar pieces have been found in the area, which means they were built on purpose, and the material used gives the idea of a sacred application. Attempts have been made to reproduce the artifacts, which produce sounds similar to those from the original pieces.

  17. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfergani, H. A.; Pullin, R.; Holford, K. M.

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  18. Advanced superposition methods for high speed turbopump vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.; Campany, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    The small, high pressure Mark 48 liquid hydrogen turbopump was analyzed and dynamically tested to determine the cause of high speed vibration at an operating speed of 92,400 rpm. This approaches the design point operating speed of 95,000 rpm. The initial dynamic analysis in the design stage and subsequent further analysis of the rotor only dynamics failed to predict the vibration characteristics found during testing. An advanced procedure for dynamics analysis was used in this investigation. The procedure involves developing accurate dynamic models of the rotor assembly and casing assembly by finite element analysis. The dynamically instrumented assemblies are independently rap tested to verify the analytical models. The verified models are then combined by modal superposition techniques to develop a completed turbopump model where dynamic characteristics are determined. The results of the dynamic testing and analysis obtained are presented and methods of moving the high speed vibration characteristics to speeds above the operating range are recommended. Recommendations for use of these advanced dynamic analysis procedures during initial design phases are given.

  19. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus. PMID:26647655

  20. Vibration Signature Analysis of a Faulted Gear Transmission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Huang, S.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    A comprehensive procedure in predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions is presented. Experimental data were obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA/Lewis. Time-synchronous-averaged vibration data were recorded throughout the test as the fault progressed from a small single pit to severe pitting over several teeth, and finally tooth fracture. A numerical procedure based on the Wigner-Ville distribution was used to examine the time-averaged vibration data. Results from the Wigner-Ville procedure are compared to results from a variety of signal analysis techniques that include time-domain analysis methods and frequency analysis methods. Using photographs of the gear tooth at various stages of damage, the limitations and accuracy of the various techniques are compared and discussed. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of the different approaches as well as the applicability of the Wigner-Ville method in predicting gear faults.

  1. Vibration Signature Analysis of a Faulted Gear Transmission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Huang, S.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive procedure in predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions is presented. Experimental data was obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. Time synchronous averaged vibration data was recorded throughout the test as the fault progressed from a small single pit to severe pitting over several teeth, and finally tooth fracture. A numerical procedure based on the Winger-Ville distribution was used to examine the time averaged vibration data. Results from the Wigner-Ville procedure are compared to results from a variety of signal analysis techniques which include time domain analysis methods and frequency analysis methods. Using photographs of the gear tooth at various stages of damage, the limitations and accuracy of the various techniques are compared and discussed. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of the different approaches as well as the applicability of the Wigner-Ville method in predicting gear faults.

  2. Long-range vibration sensor based on correlation analysis of optical frequency-domain reflectometry signals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenyang; Yao, X Steve; Liu, Tiegen; Du, Yang; Liu, Kun; Han, Qun; Meng, Zhuo; Chen, Hongxin

    2012-12-17

    We present a novel method to achieve a space-resolved long- range vibration detection system based on the correlation analysis of the optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) signals. By performing two separate measurements of the vibrated and non-vibrated states on a test fiber, the vibration frequency and position of a vibration event can be obtained by analyzing the cross-correlation between beat signals of the vibrated and non-vibrated states in a spatial domain, where the beat signals are generated from interferences between local Rayleigh backscattering signals of the test fiber and local light oscillator. Using the proposed technique, we constructed a standard single-mode fiber based vibration sensor that can have a dynamic range of 12 km and a measurable vibration frequency up to 2 kHz with a spatial resolution of 5 m. Moreover, preliminarily investigation results of two vibration events located at different positions along the test fiber are also reported.

  3. An analysis of blade vortex interaction aerodynamics and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The impulsive noise associated with helicopter flight due to Blade-Vortex Interaction, sometimes called blade slap is analyzed especially for the case of a close encounter of the blade-tip vortex with a following blade. Three parts of the phenomena are considered: the tip-vortex structure generated by the rotating blade, the unsteady pressure produced on the following blade during the interaction, and the acoustic radiation due to the unsteady pressure field. To simplify the problem, the analysis was confined to the situation where the vortex is aligned parallel to the blade span in which case the maximum acoustic pressure results. Acoustic radiation due to the interaction is analyzed in space-fixed coordinates and in the time domain with the unsteady pressure on the blade surface as the source of chordwise compact, but spanwise non-compact radiation. Maximum acoustic pressure is related to the vortex core size and Reynolds number which are in turn functions of the blade-tip aerodynamic parameters. Finally noise reduction and performance are considered.

  4. MRI acoustic noise: sound pressure and frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Counter, S A; Olofsson, A; Grahn, H F; Borg, E

    1997-01-01

    The large gradient coils used in MRI generate, simultaneously with the pulsed radiofrequency (RF) wave, acoustic noise of high intensity that has raised concern regarding hearing safety. The sound pressure levels (SPLs) and power spectra of MRI acoustic noise were measured at the position of the human head in the isocenter of five MRI systems and with 10 different pulse sequences used in clinical MR scanning. Each protocol, including magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE; 113 dB SPL linear), fast gradient echo turbo (114 dB SPL linear), and spin echo T1/2 mm (117 dB SPL linear), was found to have the high SPLs, rapid pulse rates, amplitude-modulated pulse envelopes, and multipeaked spectra. Since thickness and SPL were inversely related, the T1-weighted images generated more intense acoustic noise than the proton-dense T2-weighted measures. The unfiltered linear peak values provided more accurate measurements of the SPL and spectral content of the MRI acoustic noise than the commonly used dB A-weighted scale, which filters out the predominant low frequency components. Fourier analysis revealed predominantly low frequency energy peaks ranging from .05 to approximately 1 kHz, with a steep high frequency cutoff for each pulse sequence. Ear protectors of known attenuation ratings are recommended for all patients during MRI testing.

  5. Vibration and impulsivity analysis of hand held olive beaters.

    PubMed

    Deboli, Roberto; Calvo, Angela; Preti, Christian

    2016-07-01

    To provide more effective evaluations of hand arm vibration syndromes caused by hand held olive beaters, this study focused on two aspects: the acceleration measured at the tool pole and the analysis of the impulsivity, using the crest factor. The signals were frequency weighted using the weighting curve Wh as described in the ISO 5349-1 standard. The same source signals were also filtered by the Wh-bl filter (ISO/TS 15694), because the weighting filter Wh (unlike the Wh-bl filter) could underestimate the effect of high frequency vibration on vibration-induced finger disorders. Ten (experienced) male operators used three beater models (battery powered) in the real olive harvesting condition. High vibration total values were obtained with values never lower than 20 m(-2). Concerning the crest factor, the values ranged from 5 to more than 22. This work demonstrated that the hand held olive beaters produced high impulsive loads comparable to the industry hand held tools.

  6. Vibration analysis of multiple-cracked non-uniform beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazanoglu, K.; Yesilyurt, I.; Sabuncu, M.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents the energy-based method for the vibration identification of non-uniform Euler-Bernoulli beams having multiple open cracks. The method includes significant modifications for the energy-based method presented by Yang et al. [Crack identification in vibrating beams using the energy method, Journal of Sound and Vibration 244 (2) (2001) 339-357.] The distribution of the energy consumed is determined by taking into account not only the strain change at the cracked beam surface as in general but also the considerable effect of the stress field caused by the angular displacement of the beam due to bending. The Rayleigh-Ritz approximation method is used in the analysis. The method is adapted to the cases of multiple cracks with an approach based on the definition of strain disturbance variation along the beam. Examples are presented on cantilever beams having different truncation factors. When the results are compared with a commercial finite element program and with the results of Zheng and Fan [Natural frequencies of a non-uniform beam with multiple cracks via modified Fourier series, Journal of Sound and Vibration 242 (4) (2001) 701-717], good agreements are obtained. The effects of truncation factors and positions of cracks on the natural frequency ratios are presented in graphics.

  7. Compendium of Methods for Applying Measured Data to Vibration and Acoustic Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    statistical energy analysis , finite element models, transfer function...Procedures for the Modal Analysis Method .............................................. 8-22 8.4 Summary of the Procedures for the Statistical Energy Analysis Method... statistical energy analysis . 8-1 • o + . . i... "_+,A" L + "+..• •+A ’! i, + +.+ +• o.+ -ore -+. • -..- , .%..% ". • 2 -".-2- ;.-.’, . o . It is helpful

  8. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  9. Vibration analysis of a large underwater shell of revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuzawa, Y.; Kagawa, K.; Takahashi, H.

    1995-12-31

    This is the 2nd report on structural feasibility study of an underwater half drop shaped shell , the 1st one was reported in ISOPE`93. Dynamic characteristics of a large underwater shell of revolution are studied in the paper. Large rotational shell having optimum shape with respect to the hydrostatic pressure can be used for a storage of LNG or vessel of super conducting coil for power storage in the future. In this study, which is one of many structural feasibility studies for the shell, vibration characteristics of the shell are examined using numerical analysis, in which finite elements for the structure and boundary elements for surrounding water are used. Natural frequencies and modes of an underwater drop shaped shell are examined using a developed numerical code DASOR. The code was justified by comparison with other results of vibration analysis of a submerged cylindrical shell for various water levels. The added mass effect of the underwater drop shaped shell in each vibration mode is discussed and the ratio of modal mass of structure in water and in air in the lowest mode proved to be very large specially for axisymmetrical mode and horizontal lowest mode. A seismic response analysis of the underwater shell of revolution with the excitation coming from a horizontally moving seabed is performed numerically and statistically. The analysis using power spectrum density function provide with the responses of distribution of displacements, membrane stresses, and bending moments.

  10. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  11. Acoustical Characteristics of Mastication Sounds: Application of Speech Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochetti, Denise

    Food scientists have used acoustical methods to study characteristics of mastication sounds in relation to food texture. However, a model for analysis of the sounds has not been identified, and reliability of the methods has not been reported. Therefore, speech analysis techniques were applied to mastication sounds, and variation in measures of the sounds was examined. To meet these objectives, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, a digital sound spectrograph generated waveforms and wideband spectrograms of sounds by 3 adult subjects (1 male, 2 females) for initial chews of food samples differing in hardness and fracturability. Acoustical characteristics were described and compared. For all sounds, formants appeared in the spectrograms, and energy occurred across a 0 to 8000-Hz range of frequencies. Bursts characterized waveforms for peanut, almond, raw carrot, ginger snap, and hard candy. Duration and amplitude of the sounds varied with the subjects. In the second experiment, the spectrograph was used to measure the duration, amplitude, and formants of sounds for the initial 2 chews of cylindrical food samples (raw carrot, teething toast) differing in diameter (1.27, 1.90, 2.54 cm). Six adult subjects (3 males, 3 females) having normal occlusions and temporomandibular joints chewed the samples between the molar teeth and with the mouth open. Ten repetitions per subject were examined for each food sample. Analysis of estimates of variation indicated an inconsistent intrasubject variation in the acoustical measures. Food type and sample diameter also affected the estimates, indicating the variable nature of mastication. Generally, intrasubject variation was greater than intersubject variation. Analysis of ranks of the data indicated that the effect of sample diameter on the acoustical measures was inconsistent and depended on the subject and type of food. If inferences are to be made concerning food texture from acoustical measures of mastication

  12. Acoustical and functional analysis of Mountain lion (Puma concolor) vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Jacquelyn

    2002-05-01

    A 2-year study resulted in acoustic analysis of the structure of over 900 mountain lion vocalizations recorded in a seminatural setting at Wildlife Prairie Park near Peoria, Illinois. A vocal repertoire was obtained by describing quantitative variables about the sounds, i.e., frequency of the dominant part of the sound (beginning, ending, maximum, and minimum), duration, and number of components. Other variables described the tonal, harmonic, and wideband qualities of the sounds. Behavioral data were collected during the same period. Further analysis of both acoustic and behavioral data was completed to develop a correlation matrix between vocalizations and behavior. This study also looked at the effects of seasons on vocal behavior. Correlations were found between vocalization types and rates of usage with specific behaviors. Vocalization type and the usage rate also varied by season.

  13. Is acoustic analysis of snoring an alternative to sleep nasendoscopy?

    PubMed

    Saunders, N C; Tassone, P; Wood, G; Norris, A; Harries, M; Kotecha, B

    2004-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that acoustic analysis may be useful in distinguishing different types of snoring prior to possible corrective surgery. This study aimed to establish whether it could replace sleep nasendoscopy in a clinical setting. Thirty-five patients undergoing sleep nasendoscopy had their snoring recorded and analysed using commercially available equipment. It was found that centre frequency can be used to distinguish pure palatal from tongue base snoring, with a clear cut-off value of 90 Hz between the two. Multisegmental snoring cannot be identified on the basis of centre frequency alone. It may be distinguished from tongue base, but not palatal snoring by the nature of the frequency distribution plot (sensitivity 77%, specificity 81%). Blinded assessment of waveforms of individual snores gave poor accuracy (53%) and poor interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.10). Acoustic analysis may help screen for pure tongue base snoring. However, we feel that it is unlikely to replace sleep nasendoscopy.

  14. Vibrational Analysis of a Shipboard Free Electron Laser Beam Path

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    springs. Reducing the sprung mass of the system allows for a lower spring rate and more easily produced real springs. The uneven distribution of mass due...the rate change of the deformation is small enough due to the long period of oscillation to allow operation. 35 Figure 21. Underwater...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited VIBRATIONAL ANALYSIS

  15. Forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.; Skalski, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A new capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axis of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical, user's, programmer's and demonstration manuals for this new capability are presented.

  16. MOCHA - Multi-Study Ocean Acoustics Human Effects Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    understanding of the response of marine mammals to navy sonar and other acoustic stimuli, by maximizing the information gain from Behavioral Response Studies...of this project has been to develop and implement innovative statistical methodologies for the analysis of behavioral response study data. Our focus...project has four specific objectives: 1. Improve methods for combining diverse behavioral measures into metrics of behavioral response

  17. Analysis of classical guitars' vibrational behavior based on scanning laser vibrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowska, Marzena

    2012-06-01

    One of the main goals in musical acoustics research is to link measurable, physical properties of a musical instrument with subjective assessments of its tone quality. The aim of the research discussed in this paper was to observe the structural vibrations of different class classical guitars in relation to their quality. This work focuses on mid-low-and low-class classical (nylon-stringed) guitars. The main source of guitar body vibrations come from top and back plate vibrations therefore these were the objects of structural mode measurements and analysis. Sixteen classical guitars have been investigated, nine with cedar and seven with spruce top plate. Structural modes of top and back plates have been measured with the aid of a scanning laser vibrometer and the instruments were excited with a chirp signal transferred by bone vibrator. The issues related to excitor selection have been discussed. Correlation and descriptive statistics of top and back plates measurement results have been investigated in relation to guitar quality. The frequency range of 300 Hz to 5 kHz as well as selected narrowed frequency bands have been analyzed for cedar and spruce guitars. Furthermore, the influence of top plate wood type on vibration characteristics have been observed on three pairs of guitars. The instruments were of the same model but different top plate material. Determination and visualization of both guitar plates' modal patterns in relation to frequency are a significant attainment of the research. Scanning laser vibrometer measurements allow particular mode observation and therefore mode identification, as opposed to sound pressure response measurements. When correlating vibration characteristics of top and back plates it appears that Pearson productmoment correlation coefficient is not a parameter that associates with guitar quality. However, for best instruments with cedar top, top-back correlation coefficient has relatively greater value in 1-2 kHz band and lower in

  18. Evolution of the vibrational behavior of a guitar soundboard along successive construction phases by means of the modal analysis technique

    PubMed

    Elejabarrieta; Ezcurra; Santamaria

    2000-07-01

    The crucial piece of a craft guitar is the soundboard since it determines the quality of the sound given by the instrument. From the initial phase (the gross plate with no hole) until the last construction phase (the plate with the full structure) several stages are followed to modify the dynamic behavior of the structure and hence the acoustic response of the final guitar. The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of each modification on the vibrational response of the plate. With this in mind, an experimental modal analysis of all the construction phases has been performed in the low frequency range under free conditions. The response of the plate in each stage is defined by vibration patterns, resonance frequencies, quality factors, and admittance curves.

  19. Capabilities, Design, Construction and Commissioning of New Vibration, Acoustic, and Electromagnetic Capabilities Added to the World's Largest Thermal Vacuum Chamber at NASA's Space Power Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Susan M.; Ludwiczak, Damian R.; Carek, Gerald A.; Sorge, Richard N.; Free, James M.; Cikanek, Harry A., III

    2011-01-01

    NASA s human space exploration plans developed under the Exploration System Architecture Studies in 2005 included a Crew Exploration Vehicle launched on an Ares I launch vehicle. The mass of the Crew Exploration Vehicle and trajectory of the Ares I coupled with the need to be able to abort across a large percentage of the trajectory generated unprecedented testing requirements. A future lunar lander added to projected test requirements. In 2006, the basic test plan for Orion was developed. It included several types of environment tests typical of spacecraft development programs. These included thermal-vacuum, electromagnetic interference, mechanical vibration, and acoustic tests. Because of the size of the vehicle and unprecedented acoustics, NASA conducted an extensive assessment of options for testing, and as result, chose to augment the Space Power Facility at NASA Plum Brook Station, of the John H. Glenn Research Center to provide the needed test capabilities. The augmentation included designing and building the World s highest mass capable vibration table, the highest power large acoustic chamber, and adaptation of the existing World s largest thermal vacuum chamber as a reverberant electromagnetic interference test chamber. These augmentations were accomplished from 2007 through early 2011. Acceptance testing began in Spring 2011 and will be completed in the Fall of 2011. This paper provides an overview of the capabilities, design, construction and acceptance of this extraordinary facility.

  20. Link Budget Analysis for Undersea Acoustic Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    wireless communications for estimating signal-to- noise ratio ( SNR ) at the receiver. Link-budget analysis considers transmitter power, transmitter...is represented as an intermediate result called the channel SNR . The channel SNR includes ambient-noise and transmission-loss components. Several...to satellite and wireless communications for estimating signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) at the receiver. Link-budget analysis considers transmitter

  1. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  2. Vibration Analysis of Plates by MLS-Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Xiang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method, the moving least square element (MLS-element) method for the free vibration analysis of plates based on the Mindlin shear deformable plate theory. In the MLS-element method, a plate can be first divided into multiple elements which are connected through selected nodal points on the interfaces of the elements. An element can be of any shape and the size of the element varies dependent on the problem at hand. The shape functions of the element for the transverse displacement and the rotations are derived based on the MLS interpolation technique. The convergence and accuracy of the method can be controlled by either increasing the number of elements or by increasing the number of MLS interpolation points within elements. Two selected examples for vibration of a simply supported square Mindlin plate and a clamped L-shaped Mindlin plate are studied to illustrate the versatility and accuracy of the proposed method. It shows that the proposed method is highly accurate and flexible for the vibration analysis of plate problems. The method can be further developed to bridge the existing meshless method and the powerful finite element method in dealing with various engineering computational problems, such as large deformation and crack propagation in solid mechanics.

  3. Three dimensional analysis for vibration of unidirectional composite parallelepiped

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Yoshiki

    1995-11-01

    Pressure vessels and piping structures made of composite materials are being increasingly used, primarily because of the large values of specific strength and stiffness which may be obtained in comparison with conventional materials, such as metals. The composite structure may be considered as an assemblage of plate and shell components, likewise in conventional metal structures, and the vibration of composite plates and shells constitutes an important area in applied mechanics. Here, a method of analysis is presented for solving the free vibration problem of a rectangular parallelepiped. The parallelepiped is made of an undirectionally reinforced fiber composite, which is modeled to have rectangular orthotropy. The method is based on the Ritz method, and accommodates arbitrary boundary conditions on the six faces by introducing the boundary indices into the displacement functions. Numerical results are given for the first several frequencies of isotropic and orthotropic parallelepipeds, including the cube, and are compared to the existing results by other theories.

  4. Time-average TV holography for vibration fringe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Upputuri Paul; Kalyani, Yanam; Mohan, Nandigana Krishna; Kothiyal, Mahendra Prasad

    2009-06-01

    Time-average TV holography is widely used method for vibration measurement. The method generates speckle correlation time-averaged J0 fringes that can be used for full-field qualitative visualization of mode shapes at resonant frequencies of an object under harmonic excitation. In order to map the amplitudes of vibration, quantitative evaluation of the time-averaged fringe pattern is desired. A quantitative evaluation procedure based on the phase-shifting technique used in two beam interferometry has also been adopted for this application with some modification. The existing procedure requires a large number of frames to be recorded for implementation. We propose a procedure that will reduce the number of frames required for the analysis. The TV holographic system used and the experimental results obtained with it on an edge-clamped, sinusoidally excited square aluminium plate sample are discussed.

  5. Vibration analysis and optimization of sandwich composite with curvilinear fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, S.; Narita, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper develops a shell element based on the refined zigzag theory (RZT) and applies it to the vibration analysis and optimization problem of the composite sandwich plate composed of CFRP skins and soft-cores. The RZT accepts large differences in layer stiffness, and requires less calculation effort than the layer-wise or three-dimensional theories. Numerical results revealed that the present method predicts vibration characteristics of composite sandwich plates with soft-core accurately. Then, shapes of reinforcing fibers in CFRP composite skins are optimized to maximize fundamental frequencies. As an optimizer, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach is employed since curvilinear fiber shapes are defined by continuous design variables. Obtained results showed that the composite sandwich with optimum curvilinear fiber shapes indicates higher fundamental frequencies compared with straight fibers.

  6. Conformational analysis and vibrational spectroscopic studies on dapsone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ildiz, Gulce Ogruc; Akyuz, Sevim

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the theoretical conformation analysis of free dapsone has been performed by single point energy calculations at both semi-empirical PM3 and DFT/B3LYP-3-21G theory levels and three stable conformers were determined. Both the IR and Raman spectra of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The IR intensities and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of each conformer were calculated by DFT method at B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) theory level. For the fundamental characterization, the total energy distribution (TED) calculations of the vibrational modes were done using parallel quantum mechanic solution program (SQM) and the fundamental modes were assigned. The theoretical results are in agreement with the experimental ones.

  7. Analysis and correlation of SA349/2 helicopter vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffernan, Ruth; Precetti, Dominique; Johnson, Wayne

    1991-01-01

    Helicopter airframe vibration is examined using calculation and measurements for the SA349/2 research helicopter. The hub loads, which transmit excitation to the fuselage, are predicted using a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis and correlated with measured hub loads. The predicted and measured hub loads are then coupled with finite element models representing the SA349/2 fuselage. The resulting vertical acceleration at the pilot seat is examined. Adjustments are made to the airframe structural models to examine the sensitivity of predicted vertical acceleration to the model. Changes of a few percent to the damping and frequency of specific modes lead to large reductions in predicted vibration and to major improvements in the correlations with measured pilot seat vertical acceleration.

  8. Vibration analysis of the SA349/2 helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffernan, Ruth; Precetti, Dominique; Johnson, Wayne

    1991-01-01

    Helicopter airframe vibration is examined using calculations and measurements for the SA349/2 research helicopter. The hub loads, which transmit excitations to the fuselage, are predicted using a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis and correlated with measuring hub loads. The predicted and measured hub loads are then coupled with finite element models representing the SA349/2 fuselage. The resulting vertical acceleration at the pilot seat is examined. Adjustments are made to the airframe structural models to examine the sensitivity of predicted vertical acceleration to the model. Changes of a few percent to the damping and frequency of specific models lead to large reductions in predicted vibration, and to major improvements in the correlations with measured pilot-seat vertical acceleration.

  9. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  10. Acoustic source analysis of a supersonic rectangular chevron jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzman, Jordan Richard

    Source terms corresponding to Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy are computed from a high-fidelity simulation of a supersonic jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle with chevrons. Simulated data are validated against experimental data. We investigate the theoretical underpinning of reduced-order acoustic source models by testing the assumptions of quasi-normality and statistical axisymmetry. It is found that the flow is not quasi-normal in the axial direction but is quasi-normal in the transverse directions. Our analysis also shows that the flow is locally statistically axisymmetric close to the edges of the flow but not near the center. Fourth order correlation statistics are fit to previously used acoustic source models originally developed for axisymmetric jets. This thesis performs a detailed analysis of four different models: the Gaussian, moving-frame, fixed-frame, and modified-distance models. The latter three models are found to be similar in accuracy, while the Gaussian model is found to be a poorer fit.

  11. Synchronized imaging and acoustic analysis of the upper airway in patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Chung; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Pham, Van-Truong; Chen, Yunn-Jy; Jiang, Sun-Fen; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Lin, Chen; Tsao, Jenho; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Progressive narrowing of the upper airway increases airflow resistance and can produce snoring sounds and apnea/hypopnea events associated with sleep-disordered breathing due to airway collapse. Recent studies have shown that acoustic properties during snoring can be altered with anatomic changes at the site of obstruction. To evaluate the instantaneous association between acoustic features of snoring and the anatomic sites of obstruction, a novel method was developed and applied in nine patients to extract the snoring sounds during sleep while performing dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The degree of airway narrowing during the snoring events was then quantified by the collapse index (ratio of airway diameter preceding and during the events) and correlated with the synchronized acoustic features. A total of 201 snoring events (102 pure retropalatal and 99 combined retropalatal and retroglossal events) were recorded, and the collapse index as well as the soft tissue vibration time were significantly different between pure retropalatal (collapse index, 2 ± 11%; vibration time, 0.2 ± 0.3 s) and combined (retropalatal and retroglossal) snores (collapse index, 13 ± 7% [P ≤ 0.0001]; vibration time, 1.2 ± 0.7 s [P ≤ 0.0001]). The synchronized dynamic MRI and acoustic recordings successfully characterized the sites of obstruction and established the dynamic relationship between the anatomic site of obstruction and snoring acoustics.

  12. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Shuttle Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John; Hooker, Jeffery; Immer, Christopher; Walker, James

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated from projectile impacts on reinforced and advanced carbon/carbon (RCC and ACC) panels, fired from a compressed-gas gun, identify the type and severity of damage sustained by the target. This type of testing is vital in providing the required "return to flight" (RTF) data needed to ensure continued and safe operation of NASA's Space Shuttle fleet. The gas gun at Kennedy Space Center is capable of propelling 12-inch by 3-inch cylinders of external tank (ET) foam at exit velocities exceeding 1,000 feet per second. Conventional AE analysis techniques require time domain processing of impulse data, along with amplitude distribution analysis. It is well known that identical source excitations can produce a wide range of AE signals amplitudes. In order to satisfy RTF goals, it is necessary to identify impact energy levels above and below damage thresholds. Spectral analysis techniques involving joint time frequency analysis (JTFA) are used to reinforce time domain AE analysis. JTFA analysis of the AE signals consists of short-time Fourier transforms (STFT) and the Huang-Hilbert transform (HHT). The HHT provides a very good measure of the instantaneous frequency of impulse events dominated by a single component. Identifying failure modes and cracking of fibers from flexural and/or extensional mode acoustic signals will help support in-flight as well as postflight impact analysis.

  13. Nonlinear Acoustic Landmine Detection: Profiling Soil Surface Vibrations and Modeling Mesoscopic Elastic Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-04

    amplitude of oscillation, 01 0, kF ox <<−=− and A kF ox <<−=+ 02 , , where 12 kk < . If 02 =k , the elastoplastic case of Iwan’s model for...curve identifies the system as potentially mesoscopic elastic. The elasto-slip model of elastoplastic hysteresis presented by Iwan exhibits linear...in damaged concrete: Quantitative analysis of slow and fast dynamics,” Phys. Rev. B, 73, 014116 (2006). Bolton, M.D., and Wilson, J.M.R, “An

  14. Finite element models of wire rope for vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Fitz-Coy, N. G.; Cutchins, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of wire rope in shock and vibration isolation is briefly reviewed and its modeling for the purpose of vibration analysis is addressed. A model of a nominally straight segment of wire rope is described in which the rope structure is represented by a maiden, or central, strand of wire with one (or more) strand(s) wrapped around it in a helix (helices). The individual strands are modeled using finite elements and MSC NASTRAN. Small linear segments of each wire are modeled mathematically by dividing them lengthwise into triangular prisms representing each prism by a solid NASTRAN element. To model pretensioning and allow for extraction of internal force information from the NASTRAN model, the wound strands are connected to the maiden strand and each other using spring (scalar elastic) elements. Mode shapes for a length of wire rope with one and fixed to a moving base and the other attached to a point mass, are presented. The use of the NASTRAN derived mode shapes to approximate internal normal forces in equations of motion for vibration analyses is considered.

  15. Development of vibration signature analysis using multiwavelet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem, S. E.; Rezaee, M.

    2003-04-01

    In this paper the vibration analysis for local faults and transient phenomena detection, using multiwavelet systems, is developed. Unlike the scalar wavelet systems, in which their coefficients are scalar parameters, the transformation coefficients of multiwavelet systems are vector valued, and their calculation requires specialized techniques. In this investigation, having considered the technique used to obtain the scalar wavelet system coefficients, the transformation coefficients of the multiwavelet system are calculated, and by applying the method to artificial vibration signals, decomposition of the signal into different multiscale and multiwavelet functions (as introduced by Donovan, Geronimo, Hardin and Massopust) is examined, as well as the capability of this multiwavelet system for transient phenomena detection. By analyzing the vibration signal of a faulty gearing system the applicability of Donovan, Geronimo, Hardin and Massopust multiwavelet system for local fault detection of the mechanical systems is shown. The results confirm that using the multiwavelet system, not only can the fault in the gearing system be diagnosed, but also its location can be determined precisely.

  16. Vibrational Power Flow Analysis of Rods and Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlever, James Christopher; Bernhard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to model vibrational power flow and predict the resulting energy density levels in uniform rods and beams is investigated. This method models the flow of vibrational power in a manner analogous to the flow of thermal power in a heat conduction problem. The classical displacement solutions for harmonically excited, hysteretically damped rods and beams are used to derive expressions for the vibrational power flow and energy density in the rod and beam. Under certain conditions, the power flow in these two structural elements will be shown to be proportional to the energy density gradient. Using the relationship between power flow and energy density, an energy balance on differential control volumes in the rod and beam leads to a Poisson's equation which models the energy density distribution in the rod and beam. Coupling the energy density and power flow solutions for rods and beams is also discussed. It is shown that the resonant behavior of finite structures complicates the coupling of solutions, especially when the excitations are single frequency inputs. Two coupling formulations are discussed, the first based on the receptance method, and the second on the travelling wave approach used in Statistical Energy Analysis. The receptance method is the more computationally intensive but is capable of analyzing single frequency excitation cases. The traveling wave approach gives a good approximation of the frequency average of energy density and power flow in coupled systems, and thus, is an efficient technique for use with broadband frequency excitation.

  17. Interval process model and non-random vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Ni, B. Y.; Liu, N. Y.; Han, X.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper develops an interval process model for time-varying or dynamic uncertainty analysis when information of the uncertain parameter is inadequate. By using the interval process model to describe a time-varying uncertain parameter, only its upper and lower bounds are required at each time point rather than its precise probability distribution, which is quite different from the traditional stochastic process model. A correlation function is defined for quantification of correlation between the uncertain-but-bounded variables at different times, and a matrix-decomposition-based method is presented to transform the original dependent interval process into an independent one for convenience of subsequent uncertainty analysis. More importantly, based on the interval process model, a non-random vibration analysis method is proposed for response computation of structures subjected to time-varying uncertain external excitations or loads. The structural dynamic responses thus can be derived in the form of upper and lower bounds, providing an important guidance for practical safety analysis and reliability design of structures. Finally, two numerical examples and one engineering application are investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of the interval process model and corresponding non-random vibration analysis method.

  18. Bayesian inference approach to room-acoustic modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Wesley; Goggans, Paul; Xiang, Ning; Botts, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Spectrum estimation is a problem common to many fields of physics, science, and engineering, and it has thus received a great deal of attention from the Bayesian data analysis community. In room acoustics, the modal or frequency response of a room is important for diagnosing and remedying acoustical defects. The physics of a sound field in a room dictates a model comprised of exponentially decaying sinusoids. Continuing in the tradition of the seminal work of Bretthorst and Jaynes, this work contributes an approach to analyzing the modal responses of rooms with a time-domain model. Room acoustic spectra are constructed of damped sinusoids, and the modelbased approach allows estimation of the number of sinusoids in the signal as well as their frequencies, amplitudes, damping constants, and phase delays. The frequency-amplitude spectrum may be most useful for characterizing a room, but in some settings the damping constants are of primary interest. This is the case for measuring the absorptive properties of materials, for example. A further challenge of the room acoustic spectrum problem is that modal density increases quadratically with frequency. At a point called the Schroeder frequency, adjacent modes overlap enough that the spectrum - particularly when estimated with the discrete Fourier transform - can be treated as a continuum. The time-domain, model-based approach can resolve overlapping modes and in some cases be used to estimate the Schroeder frequency. The proposed approach addresses the issue of filtering and preprocessing in order for the sampling to accurately identify all present room modes with their quadratically increasing density.

  19. Vibration Analysis using 3D Image Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Splitthof, K.

    2010-06-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  20. Quality Prediction of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Coatings Using Acoustic Emission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Wang, G.; Zielke, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, acoustic emission analysis is utilized in the twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) process to study the influence of the adjustable process parameters on the simultaneously obtained acoustic signals at the nozzle and at the substrate. The amplitude of recorded signals at the substrate was in general much higher than those recorded at the nozzle. At the substrate side, the amplitude of emitted acoustic signals is dependent on feedstock materials and is higher when using solid wires. The acoustic signals were recorded at the spraying gun for different gas pressures without arc ignition (as dry runs) in order to reveal the effect of the arc on the emitted acoustic signals. A correlation between controllable parameters, the acoustic signals, and the obtained in-flight particle characteristics was observed. This work contributes to the online control of TWAS processes and is one of many proposed publications in the research field of the conducted acoustic emission analysis.

  1. Modal Analysis of MARS Solar Panel and Planar Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonyan, Andranik; Williams, R. Brett

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the modal analysis of MARS solar panels and the planar vibrations. Included are views of the solar panels mock-up assembly, a view of the test seup,a view of the plot from the test, with the raw numbers of the frequencies in Hz values with the mode number, the spatial acceleration plots of Center sub panel at resonant frequencies, predictions from the Finite element models, an explanation of the two test that were done on the plate and the results from both tests,

  2. Advanced Vibration Analysis Tool Developed for Robust Engine Rotor Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to develop vibration analysis tools, design tools, and design strategies to significantly improve the safety and robustness of turbine engine rotors. Bladed disks in turbine engines always feature small, random blade-to-blade differences, or mistuning. Mistuning can lead to a dramatic increase in blade forced-response amplitudes and stresses. Ultimately, this results in high-cycle fatigue, which is a major safety and cost concern. In this research program, the necessary steps will be taken to transform a state-of-the-art vibration analysis tool, the Turbo- Reduce forced-response prediction code, into an effective design tool by enhancing and extending the underlying modeling and analysis methods. Furthermore, novel techniques will be developed to assess the safety of a given design. In particular, a procedure will be established for using natural-frequency curve veerings to identify ranges of operating conditions (rotational speeds and engine orders) in which there is a great risk that the rotor blades will suffer high stresses. This work also will aid statistical studies of the forced response by reducing the necessary number of simulations. Finally, new strategies for improving the design of rotors will be pursued.

  3. Transmission Acoustic Vibration Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    DRVENO Fiue6 xeimna eroCosScin HOUIN The baeiehuig(iue7 sasn odZ4Amgei umalycsigwihn 5 pud ro omciig h hosn isteoiihmcie.ndwih 0 ons h mahie catnosfte...tooth load, P is power, and the suL- scripts indicate reference level. These relationships reflect that doubling the speed, load or power increases...USAAVRACON-TR-83-D-34 UNCLASSIFIED D AAK5I92- - 82-CSSF/61/3 NL I0013EI sonl*.lf.~fmommmmoii-m NNNNNEl 1.8. 1111L2 111. NATION -W EUO TNAOS-16 *~)fl 11111

  4. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  5. Dynamic response analysis of an aircraft structure under thermal-acoustic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Li, H. B.; Zhang, W.; Wu, Z. Q.; Liu, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Future hypersonic aircraft will be exposed to extreme combined environments includes large magnitude thermal and acoustic loads. It presents a significant challenge for the integrity of these vehicles. Thermal-acoustic test is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to combined loads. In this research, the numerical simulation process for the thermal acoustic test is presented, and the effects of thermal loads on vibro-acoustic response are investigated. To simulate the radiation heating system, Monte Carlo theory and thermal network theory was used to calculate the temperature distribution. Considering the thermal stress, the high temperature modal parameters are obtained with structural finite element methods. Based on acoustic finite element, modal-based vibro-acoustic analysis is carried out to compute structural responses. These researches are very vital to optimum thermal-acoustic test and structure designs for future hypersonic vehicles structure

  6. Modal vibration analysis of a metal plate by using a laser vibrometer and the POD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, D.; Barrientos, B.; Pérez-López, C.; Mendoza Santoyo, F.

    2005-06-01

    The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), also known as Karhunen-Loève expansion, is applied to the modal vibration analysis of a metal plate. The metal plate was subject to vibrations with an electrodynamical shaker in a range of frequencies from 100 to 5000 Hz. The data were obtained from the measurements with a laser vibrometer. The plate vibration measurements were used to calculate the eigenfunctions and the eigenvalues. It was found that a large fraction of the total energy of the vibrations is contained within the first four POD modes. The essential features of the vibrations are thus described by only the first four eigenfunctions.

  7. Mobility power flow analysis of coupled plate structure subjected to mechanical and acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The mobility power flow approach that was previously applied in the derivation of expressions for the vibrational power flow between coupled plate substructures forming an L configuration and subjected to mechanical loading is generalized. Using the generalized expressions, both point and distributed mechanical loads on one or both of the plates can be considered. The generalized approach is extended to deal with acoustic excitation of one of the plate substructures. In this case, the forces (acoustic pressures) acting on the structure are dependent on the response of the structure because of the scattered pressure component. The interaction between the plate structure and the acoustic fluid leads to the derivation of a corrected mode shape for the plates' normal surface velocity and also for the structure mobility functions. The determination of the scattered pressure components in the expressions for the power flow represents an additional component in the power flow balance for the source plate and the receiver plate. This component represents the radiated acoustical power from the plate structure. For a number of coupled plate substrates, the acoustic pressure generated by one substructure will interact with the motion of another substructure. That is, in the case of the L-shaped plate, acoustic interaction exists between the two plate substructures due to the generation of the acoustic waves by each of the substructures. An approach to deal with this phenomena is described.

  8. Assessing the underwater acoustics of the world's largest vibration hammer (OCTA-KONG) and its potential effects on the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Yuping; Duan, Guoqin; Cao, Hanjiang; Liu, Jianchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its potential adverse effects on the environment and aquatic life. The Hongkong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge is currently under construction in the Pearl River Estuary, a hot spot for the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in China. The OCTA-KONG, the world's largest vibration hammer, is being used during this construction project to drive or extract steel shell piles 22 m in diameter. This activity poses a substantial threat to marine mammals, and an environmental assessment is critically needed. The underwater acoustic properties of the OCTA-KONG were analyzed, and the potential impacts of the underwater acoustic energy on Sousa, including auditory masking and physiological impacts, were assessed. The fundamental frequency of the OCTA-KONG vibration ranged from 15 Hz to 16 Hz, and the noise increments were below 20 kHz, with a dominant frequency and energy below 10 kHz. The resulting sounds are most likely detectable by Sousa over distances of up to 3.5 km from the source. Although Sousa clicks do not appear to be adversely affected, Sousa whistles are susceptible to auditory masking, which may negatively impact this species' social life. Therefore, a safety zone with a radius of 500 m is proposed. Although the zero-to-peak source level (SL) of the OCTA-KONG was lower than the physiological damage level, the maximum root-mean-square SL exceeded the cetacean safety exposure level on several occasions. Moreover, the majority of the unweighted cumulative source sound exposure levels (SSELs) and the cetacean auditory weighted cumulative SSELs exceeded the acoustic threshold levels for the onset of temporary threshold shift, a type of potentially recoverable auditory damage resulting from prolonged sound exposure. These findings may aid in the identification and design of appropriate mitigation methods, such as the use of air bubble curtains, "soft start" and "power down" techniques.

  9. Assessing the Underwater Acoustics of the World's Largest Vibration Hammer (OCTA-KONG) and Its Potential Effects on the Indo-Pacific Humpbacked Dolphin (Sousa chinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Yuping; Duan, Guoqin; Cao, Hanjiang; Liu, Jianchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its potential adverse effects on the environment and aquatic life. The Hongkong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge is currently under construction in the Pearl River Estuary, a hot spot for the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in China. The OCTA-KONG, the world's largest vibration hammer, is being used during this construction project to drive or extract steel shell piles 22 m in diameter. This activity poses a substantial threat to marine mammals, and an environmental assessment is critically needed. The underwater acoustic properties of the OCTA-KONG were analyzed, and the potential impacts of the underwater acoustic energy on Sousa, including auditory masking and physiological impacts, were assessed. The fundamental frequency of the OCTA-KONG vibration ranged from 15 Hz to 16 Hz, and the noise increments were below 20 kHz, with a dominant frequency and energy below 10 kHz. The resulting sounds are most likely detectable by Sousa over distances of up to 3.5 km from the source. Although Sousa clicks do not appear to be adversely affected, Sousa whistles are susceptible to auditory masking, which may negatively impact this species' social life. Therefore, a safety zone with a radius of 500 m is proposed. Although the zero-to-peak source level (SL) of the OCTA-KONG was lower than the physiological damage level, the maximum root-mean-square SL exceeded the cetacean safety exposure level on several occasions. Moreover, the majority of the unweighted cumulative source sound exposure levels (SSELs) and the cetacean auditory weighted cumulative SSELs exceeded the acoustic threshold levels for the onset of temporary threshold shift, a type of potentially recoverable auditory damage resulting from prolonged sound exposure. These findings may aid in the identification and design of appropriate mitigation methods, such as the use of air bubble curtains, “soft start” and “power down

  10. Interpretation of DNA vibrational spectra by normal coordinate analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghomi, M; Letellier, R; Liquier, J; Taillandier, E

    1990-01-01

    1. In the following article we undertake a brief review of the most prominent DNA vibrational markers as observed experimentally by Raman and i.r. spectroscopies on polynucleotides and explain how a simplified valence force field can account for the evolution of the DNA vibrational spectra. 2. Our discussion made as a review of our previous investigations on the interpretation of DNA vibration modes, is based on some of the most characteristic and structure dependent DNA vibrational markers.

  11. DARHT Multi-intelligence Seismic and Acoustic Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Garrison Nicole; Van Buren, Kendra Lu; Hemez, Francois M.

    2016-07-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the analysis of seismic and acoustic data collected at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for robust, multi-intelligence decision making. The data utilized herein is obtained from two tri-axial seismic sensors and three acoustic sensors, resulting in a total of nine data channels. The goal of this analysis is to develop a generalized, automated framework to determine internal operations at DARHT using informative features extracted from measurements collected external of the facility. Our framework involves four components: (1) feature extraction, (2) data fusion, (3) classification, and finally (4) robustness analysis. Two approaches are taken for extracting features from the data. The first of these, generic feature extraction, involves extraction of statistical features from the nine data channels. The second approach, event detection, identifies specific events relevant to traffic entering and leaving the facility as well as explosive activities at DARHT and nearby explosive testing sites. Event detection is completed using a two stage method, first utilizing signatures in the frequency domain to identify outliers and second extracting short duration events of interest among these outliers by evaluating residuals of an autoregressive exogenous time series model. Features extracted from each data set are then fused to perform analysis with a multi-intelligence paradigm, where information from multiple data sets are combined to generate more information than available through analysis of each independently. The fused feature set is used to train a statistical classifier and predict the state of operations to inform a decision maker. We demonstrate this classification using both generic statistical features and event detection and provide a comparison of the two methods. Finally, the concept of decision robustness is presented through a preliminary analysis where

  12. [Structure analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of the structure and properties of identified pathogenic proteins are important for elucidating the molecular basis of diseases and in drug discovery research. Vibrational spectroscopy has advantages over other techniques in terms of sensitivity of detection of structural changes. Spectral analysis, however, is complicated because the spectrum involves a substantial amount of information. This article includes examples of structural analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy in combination with additional techniques that facilitate data acquisition and analysis. Residue-specific conformation analysis of an amyloid fibril was conducted using IR absorption spectroscopy in combination with (13)C-isotope labeling, linear dichroism measurement, and analysis of amide I band features. We reveal a pH-dependent property of the interacting segment of an amyloidogenic protein, β2-microglobulin, which causes dialysis-related amyloidosis. We also reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying pH-dependent sugar-binding activity of human galectin-1, which is involved in cell adhesion, using spectroscopic techniques including UV resonance Raman spectroscopy. The decreased activity at acidic pH was attributed to a conformational change in the sugar-binding pocket caused by protonation of His52 (pKa 6.3) and the cation-π interaction between Trp68 and the protonated His44 (pKa 5.7). In addition, we show that the peak positions of the Raman bands of the C4=C5 stretching mode at approximately 1600 cm(-1) and the Nπ-C2-Nτ bending mode at approximately 1405 cm(-1) serve as markers of the His side-chain structure. The Raman signal was enhanced 12 fold using a vertical flow apparatus.

  13. Optical vibration detection spectral analysis assembly and method for detecting vibration in an object of interest

    DOEpatents

    Hale, T.C.; Telschow, K.L.

    1998-10-27

    A vibration detection assembly is described which includes an emitter of light which has object and reference beams, the object beam reflected off of a vibrating object of interest; and a photorefractive substance having a given response time and which passes the reflected object beam and the reference beam, the reference beam and the object beam interfering within the photorefractive substance to create a space charge field which develops within the response time of the photorefractive substance. 6 figs.

  14. Optical vibration detection spectral analysis assembly and method for detecting vibration in an object of interest

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Thomas C.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    A vibration detection assembly is described which includes an emitter of light which has object and reference beams, the object beam reflected off of a vibrating object of interest; and a photorefractive substance having a given response time and which passes the reflected object beam and the reference beam, the reference beam and the object beam interfering within the photorefractive substance to create a space charge field which develops within the response time of the photorefractive substance.

  15. Analysis of acoustic emission signals and monitoring of machining processes

    PubMed

    Govekar; Gradisek; Grabec

    2000-03-01

    Monitoring of a machining process on the basis of sensor signals requires a selection of informative inputs in order to reliably characterize and model the process. In this article, a system for selection of informative characteristics from signals of multiple sensors is presented. For signal analysis, methods of spectral analysis and methods of nonlinear time series analysis are used. With the aim of modeling relationships between signal characteristics and the corresponding process state, an adaptive empirical modeler is applied. The application of the system is demonstrated by characterization of different parameters defining the states of a turning machining process, such as: chip form, tool wear, and onset of chatter vibration. The results show that, in spite of the complexity of the turning process, the state of the process can be well characterized by just a few proper characteristics extracted from a representative sensor signal. The process characterization can be further improved by joining characteristics from multiple sensors and by application of chaotic characteristics.

  16. Analysis of different vibration patterns to guide blind people.

    PubMed

    Durá-Gil, Juan V; Bazuelo-Ruiz, Bruno; Moro-Pérez, David; Mollà-Domenech, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The literature indicates the best vibration positions and frequencies on the human body where tactile information is transmitted. However, there is a lack of knowledge about how to combine tactile stimuli for navigation. The aim of this study is to compare different vibration patterns outputted to blind people and to determine the most intuitive vibration patterns to indicate direction for navigation purposes through a tactile belt. The vibration patterns that stimulate the front side of the waist are preferred for indicating direction. Vibration patterns applied on the back side of the waist could be suitable for sending messages such as stop.

  17. Analysis of different vibration patterns to guide blind people

    PubMed Central

    Bazuelo-Ruiz, Bruno; Moro-Pérez, David; Mollà-Domenech, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The literature indicates the best vibration positions and frequencies on the human body where tactile information is transmitted. However, there is a lack of knowledge about how to combine tactile stimuli for navigation. The aim of this study is to compare different vibration patterns outputted to blind people and to determine the most intuitive vibration patterns to indicate direction for navigation purposes through a tactile belt. The vibration patterns that stimulate the front side of the waist are preferred for indicating direction. Vibration patterns applied on the back side of the waist could be suitable for sending messages such as stop. PMID:28348928

  18. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  19. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botton, V.; Moudjed, B.; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  20. Non-linear analysis of vibrations of irregular plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, D. W.; Nayfeh, A. H.; Mook, D. T.

    1977-01-01

    A numerical perturbation method is used to investigate the forced vibrations of irregular plates. Nonlinear terms associated with the midplane stretching are retained in the analysis. The numerical part of the method involves the use of linear, finite element techniques to determine the free oscillation mode shapes and frequencies and to obtain the linear midplane stress resultants caused by the midplane stretching. Representing the solution as an expansion in terms of these linear mode shapes, these modes and the resultants are used to determine the equations governing the time-dependent coefficients of this expansion. These equations are solved by using the method of multiple scales. Specific solutions are given for the main-resonant vibrations of an elliptical plate in the presence of internal resonances. The results indicate that modes other than the driven mode can be drawn into the steady state response. Though the excitation is composed of a single harmonic, the response may not be periodic. Moreover, the particular types of responses that can occur are highly dependent on the mode being excited and are sensitive to small geometrical changes.

  1. Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin Study - Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) tested two identical gearboxes. One was tested on the NWTCs 2.5 MW dynamometer and the other was field tested in a turbine in a nearby wind plant. In the field, the test gearbox experienced two oil loss events that resulted in damage to its internal bearings and gears. Since the damage was not severe, the test gearbox was removed from the field and retested in the NWTCs dynamometer before it was disassembled. During the dynamometer retest, some vibration data along with testing condition information were collected. These data enabled NREL to launch a Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin project, as described in this report. The main objective of this project was to evaluate different vibration analysis algorithms used in wind turbine condition monitoring (CM) and find out whether the typical practices are effective. With involvement of both academic researchers and industrial partners, the project sets an example on providing cutting edge research results back to industry.

  2. Vibration mode analysis of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Liu, L. F.; Wei, M. Y.; Wu, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks usually undergo vibration during packing, transportation, and serving time, in particular for those used in the automobiles or portable equipment. To study the stack vibration response, based on finite element method (FEM), a mode analysis is carried out in the present paper. Using this method, we can distinguish the local vibration from the stack global modes, predict the vibration responses, such as deformed shape and direction, and discuss the effects of the clamping configuration and the clamping force magnitude on vibration modes. It is found that when the total clamping force remains the same, increasing the bolt number can strengthen the stack resistance to vibration in the clamping direction, but cannot obviously strengthen stack resistance to vibration in the translations perpendicular to clamping direction and the three axis rotations. Increasing the total clamping force can increase both of the stack global mode and the bolt local mode frequencies, but will decrease the gasket local mode frequency.

  3. Finite element analysis for acoustic characteristics of a magnetostrictive transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Jung, Eunmi

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a finite element analysis for a magnetostrictive transducer by taking into account the nonlinear behavior of the magnetostrictive material and fluid interaction. A finite element formulation is derived for the coupling of magnetostrictive and elastic materials based upon a separated magnetic and displacement field calculation and a curve fitting technique of material properties. The fluid and structure coupled problem is taken into account based upon pressure and velocity potential fields formulation. Infinite wave envelope elements are introduced at an artificial boundary to deal with the infinite fluid domain. A finite element code for the analysis of a magnetostrictive transducer is developed. A magnetostrictive tonpilz transducer is taken as an example and verification for the developed program is made by comparing with a commercial code. The acoustic characteristics of the magnetostrictive tonpilz transducer are calculated in terms of radiation pattern and transmitted current response.

  4. CH-46 rotor head acoustic fault detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Busch, Darryl; Menon, Sunil

    1999-05-01

    Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this requires new enabling diagnostic technologies. Stress-wave acoustic emission technology has shown promise for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults. In September 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month, proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. Honeywell is presently developing a time- frequency-based real-time processing algorithm under internal research efforts to automate the fault-detection process. The focus of this paper is to overview the CH-46 flight test and system configuration and present preliminary results of the time-frequency analysis of the flight-test dataset.

  5. Multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies stress impact on human femur computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Bertram; Yeoh, Han Teik

    2011-01-01

    Whole-body vibration training using single-frequency methods has been reported to improve bone mineral density. However, the intensities can exceed safe levels and have drawn unfavorable comments from subjects. In a previous article, whole-body vibration training using multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies (MVDMVF) was reported. This article presents the computational simulation evaluation of stress dispersion on a femur with and without the MVDMVF input. A model of bone femur was developed from a computed tomography image of the lower limb with Mimics software from Materialise (Plymouth, Michigan). We analyzed the mesh model in COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL, Inc; Burlington, Massachusetts) with and without MVDMVF input, with constraints and load applied to the femur model. We compared the results with published joint stresses during walking, jogging, and stair-climbing and descending and with standard vibration exposure limits. Results showed stress levels on the femur are significantly higher with MVDMVF input than without. The stress levels were within the published levels during walking and stair-climbing and descending but below the stress levels during jogging. Our computational results demonstrate that MVDMVF generates stress level equivalent to the level during walking and stair-climbing. This evidence suggests that MVDMVF is safe for prolonged use in subjects with osteoporosis who ambulate independently.

  6. PC-based trending and analysis of floor vibration in sensitive fabrication areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Jon E.; Middleton, Ben

    1992-02-01

    This paper describes a floor monitoring system utilizing a PC that continuously monitors very low levels of vibration and warns the user of possible " vibration contamination" that might result. The floor monitoring system designed by DataSignal Systems Inc. in Friendswood Texas is a complete package including special purpose microvelocity sensors signal conditioning and band specific velocity detection electronics analog-todigital sampling vibration spectrum analysis parameter trending alarming and archiving measurements. An IBM or compatible computer runs the systems software and displays the measured results. The computer can be installed in a convenient location for ease of use and maintenance. In order to maximize its effectiveness for alarms and ease of data display interpretation a VGA color monitor is a must. Since the system monitors facility vibration continuously the computer must be dedicated and not time shared. 2 . MEASURE MICRO-VIBRATION In many of todays high technology manufacturing facilities vibration can have a costly impact on the process and quality of an operation. This system can be set to alarm at vibration levels determined to be critical allowing an operator to take appropriate steps including date and time coding the process or even stopping the process. The system can also be used to establish limits for manufacturing operations in an adjoining facility that causes structure borne vibration to be transmitted to the vibration sensitive manufacturing area. Up to eight micro velocity sensor can be monitored simultaneously with results being displayed in a bar chart format on the computer screen. For detailed analysis purposes to help identify the source of vibration a narrowband FFT processor is used to display a vibration spectrum from a selected sensors output signal. The vibration spectrum analysis capability can be manually activated or be automatically acquired upon an alarm condition. 0819407577/92J$4. OO SPIE Vol. 1619 Vibration

  7. Comparative estimation of vibrational entropy changes in proteins through normal modes analysis.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Benjamin J; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2004-10-01

    We compare the vibrational entropy changes of proteins calculated using a full and a number of approximate normal modes analysis methods. The vibrational entropy differences for three conformational changes and three protein binding interactions were computed. In general, the approximate methods yield good estimates of the vibrational entropy change in a fraction of the time required by full normal modes analysis. The absolute entropies are either overestimated or greatly underestimated, but the difference is sufficiently accurate for some methods. This indicates that some of the approximate methods can give reasonable estimates of the associated vibrational entropy changes, making them suitable for inclusion in free energy calculations.

  8. Amide I vibrational circular dichroism of dipeptide: Conformation dependence and fragment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2004-03-01

    The amide I vibrational circular dichroic response of alanine dipeptide analog (ADA) was theoretically investigated and the density functional theory calculation and fragment analysis results are presented. A variety of vibrational spectroscopic properties, local and normal mode frequencies, coupling constant, dipole, and rotational strengths, are calculated by varying two dihedral angles determining the three-dimensional ADA conformation. Considering two monopeptide fragments separately, we show that the amide I vibrational circular dichroism of the ADA can be quantitatively predicted. For several representative conformations of the model ADA, vibrational circular dichroism spectra are calculated by using both the density functional theory calculation and fragment analysis methods.

  9. Improved methods of vibration analysis of pretwisted, airfoil blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1984-01-01

    Vibration analysis of pretwisted blades of asymmetric airfoil cross section is performed by using two mixed variational approaches. Numerical results obtained from these two methods are compared to those obtained from an improved finite difference method and also to those given by the ordinary finite difference method. The relative merits, convergence properties and accuracies of all four methods are studied and discussed. The effects of asymmetry and pretwist on natural frequencies and mode shapes are investigated. The improved finite difference method is shown to be far superior to the conventional finite difference method in several respects. Close lower bound solutions are provided by the improved finite difference method for untwisted blades with a relatively coarse mesh while the mixed methods have not indicated any specific bound.

  10. Analysis & Test of Reaction Wheel Induced Micro-Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runte, Torben; Brito, Miguel; Bourne, Duncan M.; Mariani, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Microvibrations are a major disturbance source of the pointing stability for high-precision Spacecraft. These undesirable mechanical vibrations are generated by active mechanisms and transferred via the Spacecraft structure.Throughout OHB System's design of Spacecraft platforms for Spacecraft missions with high precision pointing performance, Reaction Wheels (RWs) have been identified as the most dominant source of microvibrations in Spacecraft platforms. The RW perturbations consist of numerous harmonic components whose frequencies and amplitudes depend on the wheel speed and the ball bearing characteristics of each unit. This paper focuses on the analysis methodology used to estimate the disturbance caused by these units, its transmission via the Spacecraft structure and its verification by measurement.

  11. Structural and torsional vibration analysis of a dry screw compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willie, J.; Sachs, R.

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates torsional vibration and pulsating noise in a dry screw compressor. The compressor is designed at Gardner Denver (GD) and is oil free and use for mounting on highway trucks. They are driven using a Power Take-Off (PTO) transmission and gear box on a truck. Torque peak fluctuation and noise measurements are done and their sources are investigated and reported in this work. To accurately predict the torsional response (frequency and relative angular deflection and torque amplitude), the Holzer method is used. It is shown that the first torsional frequency is manifested as sidebands in the gear train meshing frequencies and this can lead to noise that is the result of amplitude modulation. Sensitivity analysis of the drive train identifies the weakest link in the drive train that limits the first torsional frequency to a low value. Finally, the significance of higher mode shapes on inter-lobe clearance distribution of the rotors is investigated.

  12. An analysis of beam parameters on proton-acoustic waves through an analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Aytac Kipergil, Esra; Erkol, Hakan; Kaya, Serhat; Gulsen, Gultekin; Unlu, Mehmet

    2017-03-02

    It has been reported that acoustic waves are generated when a high energy pulsed proton beam is deposited in a small volume within tissue. One possible application of the proton induced acoustics is to get a real-time feedback for intratreatment adjustments by monitoring such acoustic waves. High spatial resolution in ultrasound imaging may reduce proton range uncertainty. Thus, it is crucial to understand the dependence of the acoustic waves on the proton beam characteristics. In this manuscript, firstly, an analytic solution to the proton induced acoustic wave is presented to reveal the dependence of signal on beam parameters, and then combined with an analytic approximation of the Bragg curve. The influence of the beam energy, pulse duration, and beam diameter variation on the acoustic waveform are investigated. Further analysis is performed regarding the Fourier decomposition of proton-acoustic signals. Our results show that smaller spill time of proton beam upsurges the amplitude of acoustic wave for constant number of protons, and hence beneficial for dose monitoring. The increase in the energy of each individual proton in the beam leads to spatial broadening of the Bragg curve, which also yields acoustic waves of greater amplitude. The pulse duration and the beam width of the proton beam do not affect the central frequency of the acoustic wave, but they change the amplitude of the spectral components.

  13. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling in Porous Ground - Measurements and Analysis for On-Site-Inspection Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    During on-site inspections (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) a local seismic network can be installed to measure seismic aftershock signals of an assumed underground nuclear explosion. These signals are caused by relaxation processes in and near the cavity created by the explosion and when detected can lead to a localisation of the cavity. This localisation is necessary to take gas samples from the ground which are analysed for radioactive noble gas isotopes to confirm or dismiss the suspicion of a nuclear test. The aftershock signals are of very low magnitude so they can be masked by different sources, in particular periodic disturbances caused by vehicles and aircraft in the inspection area. Vehicles and aircraft (mainly helicopters) will be used for the inspection activities themselves, e.g. for overhead imagery or magnetic-anomaly sensing. While vehicles in contact with the ground can excite soil vibrations directly, aircraft and vehicles alike emit acoustic waves which excite soil vibrations when hitting the ground. These disturbing signals are of periodic nature while the seismic aftershock signals are pulse-shaped, so their separation is possible. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is yet incomplete, a better understanding is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. In a project funded by the Young Scientist Research Award of the CTBTO to one of us (ML), we investigated the acoustic-seismic coupling of airborne signals of jet aircraft and artificially induced ones by a speaker. During a measurement campaign several acoustic and seismic sensors were placed below the take-off trajectory of an airport at 4 km distance. Therefore taking off and landing jet aircraft passed nearly straightly above the setup. Microphones were placed close to the ground to record the sound pressure of incident

  14. Experimental vibration level analysis of a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, D. M.; Dunca, G.; Cǎlinoiu, C.

    2012-11-01

    In this study the vibration level of a Francis turbine is investigated by experimental work in site. Measurements are carried out for different power output values, in order to highlight the influence of the operation regimes on the turbine behavior. The study focuses on the turbine shaft to identify the mechanical vibration sources and on the draft tube in order to identify the hydraulic vibration sources. Analyzing the vibration results, recommendations regarding the operation of the turbine, at partial load close to minimum values, in the middle of the operating domain or close to maximum values of electric power, can be made in order to keep relatively low levels of vibration. Finally, conclusions are drawn in order to present the real sources of the vibrations.

  15. Thermodynamical analysis of acoustical perturbations in the bronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, Margarita; Perez-Guerrero, Armando; Alvarado, Manuel

    2002-11-01

    In the airways, very complex flows occur because of different conditions and the existence of a lot of complications: constantly changing temperature and pressure during the respiration process, a normally turbulent flow in the trachea which, in heavy breathing, remains so in the first three or four generations of airways, changes of the direction of the flow over the breathing cycle, from inspiration to expiration, etc. We also know the air that flows in the bronchial tree is perturbed by several sources such as the heart and the circulatory system, the diaphragm and stomach movements, etc., which produce sound waves. Thus an acoustical analysis of the phenomenon can lead us to a physical model which could help us to better understand the phenomena and to demonstrate the importance to clinical applications such as the pneumocardiograms. To this purpose we use a thermodynamical model that originally was developed to analyze supersonic air jets to explain the production of shock waves in the bronchial tree.

  16. Near-field beamforming analysis for acoustic emission source localization.

    PubMed

    He, Tian; Pan, Qiang; Liu, Yaoguang; Liu, Xiandong; Hu, Dayong

    2012-07-01

    This paper attempts to introduce a near-field acoustic emission (AE) beamforming method to estimate the AE source locations by using a small array of sensors closely placed in a local region. The propagation characteristics of AE signals are investigated based on guided wave theory to discuss the feasibility of using beamforming techniques in AE signal processing. To validate the effectiveness of the AE beamforming method, a series of pencil lead break tests at various regions of a thin steel plate are conducted. The potential of this method for engineering applications are explored through rotor-stator rubbing tests. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively determine the region where rubbing occurs. It is expected that the work of this paper may provide a helpful analysis tool for near-field AE source localization.

  17. Acoustic Seaglider: PhilSea10 Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    understanding that the navigation and the ocean sound speed and currents be jointly determined. LONG-TERM GOALS Within the Ocean Acoustics Deep Water... temperature and salinity were deployed (Figure 1). General objectives of the experiment are to understand the acoustic propagation in the...an acoustic recording system (ARS) to record the moored source transmissions, as well as temperature , salinity and pressure sensors (from which

  18. Analysis of underwater decoupling properties of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling-Zhi, Huang; Yong, Xiao; Ji-Hong, Wen; Hai-Bin, Yang; Xi-Sen, Wen

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical solution for the vibration and sound radiation of a semi-infinite plate covered by a decoupling layer consisting of locally resonant acoustic metamaterial. Formulations are derived based on a combination use of effective medium theory and the theory of elasticity for the decoupling material. Theoretical results show good agreements between the method developed in this paper and the conventional finite element method (FEM), but the method of this paper is more efficient than FEM. Numerical results also show that system with acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer exhibits significant noise reduction performance at the local resonance frequency of the acoustic metamaterial, and such performance can be ascribed to the vibration suppression of the base plate. It is demonstrated that the effective density of acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer has a great influence on the mechanical impedance of the system. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of locally resonant structure can be effectively predicted by a simple model, and it can be significantly affected by the material properties of the locally resonant structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51305448 and 51275519).

  19. Used fuel rail shock and vibration testing options analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

    2014-09-25

    The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a cask’s internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges

  20. Acoustic streaming of a sharp edge.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Zhou, Jianbo; Yalamanchili, Satish

    2014-07-01

    Anomalous acoustic streaming is observed emanating from sharp edges of solid bodies that are vibrating in fluids. The streaming velocities can be orders of magnitude higher than expected from the Rayleigh streaming at similar amplitudes of vibration. Acoustic velocity of fluid relative to a solid body diverges at a sharp edge, giving rise to a localized time-independent body force acting on the fluid. This force results in a formation of a localized jet. Two-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to predict acoustic streaming for low amplitude vibration using two methods: (1) Steady-state solution utilizing perturbation theory and (2) direct transient solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Both analyses agree with each other and correctly predict the streaming of a sharp-edged vibrating blade measured experimentally. The origin of the streaming can be attributed to the centrifugal force of the acoustic fluid flow around a sharp edge. The dependence of this acoustic streaming on frequency and velocity is examined using dimensional analysis. The dependence law is devised and confirmed by numerical simulations.

  1. Analysis and control of the vibration of doubly fed wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Manye; Lin, Ying

    2017-01-01

    The fault phenomena of the violent vibration of certain doubly-fed wind turbine were researched comprehensively, and the dynamic characteristics, load and fault conditions of the system were discussed. Firstly, the structural dynamics analysis of wind turbine is made, and the dynamics mold is built. Secondly, the vibration testing of wind turbine is done with the German test and analysis systems BBM. Thirdly, signal should be analyzed and dealt with. Based on the experiment, spectrum analysis of the motor dynamic balance can be made by using signal processing toolbox of MATLAB software, and the analysis conclusions show that the vibration of wind turbine is caused by dynamic imbalance. The results show that integrating mechanical system dynamics theory with advanced test technology can solve the vibration problem more successfully, which is important in vibration diagnosis of mechanical equipment.

  2. Using rotor or tip speed in the acoustical analysis of small wind turbines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustical noise data have been collected and analyzed on small wind turbines used for water pumping at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) near Bushland, Texas. This acoustical analysis differed from previous research in that the data were analyzed with rotor or tip ...

  3. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  4. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept.

  5. A Legendre spectral element model for sloshing and acoustic analysis in nearly incompressible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Kishor, D.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2010-04-01

    A new spectral finite element formulation is presented for modeling the sloshing and the acoustic waves in nearly incompressible fluids. The formulation makes use of the Legendre polynomials in deriving the finite element interpolation shape functions in the Lagrangian frame of reference. The formulated element uses Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre quadrature scheme for integrating the volumetric stiffness and the mass matrices while the conventional Gauss-Legendre quadrature scheme is used on the rotational stiffness matrix to completely eliminate the zero energy modes, which are normally associated with the Lagrangian FE formulation. The numerical performance of the spectral element formulated here is examined by doing the inf-sup test on a standard rectangular rigid tank partially filled with liquid. The eigenvalues obtained from the formulated spectral element are compared with the conventional equally spaced node locations of the h-type Lagrangian finite element and the predicted results show that these spectral elements are more accurate and give superior convergence. The efficiency and robustness of the formulated elements are demonstrated by solving few standard problems involving free vibration and dynamic response analysis with undistorted and distorted spectral elements, and the obtained results are compared with available results in the published literature.

  6. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing

  7. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  8. Vibration and noise analysis of a gear transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Qian, W.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive procedure to predict both the vibration and noise generated by a gear transmission system under normal operating conditions. The gearbox vibrations were obtained from both numerical simulation and experimental studies using a gear noise test rig. In addition, the noise generated by the gearbox vibrations was recorded during the experimental testing. A numerical method was used to develop linear relationships between the gearbox vibration and the generated noise. The hypercoherence function is introduced to correlate the nonlinear relationship between the fundamental noise frequency and its harmonics. A numerical procedure was developed using both the linear and nonlinear relationships generated from the experimental data to predict noise resulting from the gearbox vibrations. The application of this methodology is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and experimental results from the gear noise test rig.

  9. Test and reliability analysis of PBGA assemblies under random vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingjin; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Geok H.; Pang, Hock Lye J.; Yap, Fook F.; Lin, Rongming

    2000-10-01

    To understand the high-cycle reliability of plastic ball grid array (PBGA) interconnections under external random vibration loading, a series of vibration test of PBGA assemblies were conducted. The test vehicle has four PBGA modules assembled on a printed circuit board. The assembly was clamped at two opposite sides on a fixture, which was bolted to a vibration excitation. Firstly, the dynamic properties of the assembly under external random vibration excitation were characterized. The resonant frequencies of the assembly were identified, and the maximum dynamic deflection was estimated. Then the reliability test were carried out. In the reliability tests, the electrical resistance of PBGA modules was continuously monitored, so that any failure could be detected. This paper describes the test procedures, and shows the typical vibration fatigue failures in the PBGA interconnections. Test results will be analyzed in detail.

  10. [Vibrational assignment analysis of Raman spectra of fatty alcohols].

    PubMed

    Zou, Qiao; Du, Xian-Yuan; Zhang, Chen; Li, Xing-Chun; Li, Yu

    2013-01-01

    In the present research, Raman spectra of 31 fatty alcohols were calculated by B3LYP/6-31G (d) and verified by taking methanol for example. The study results indicate that B3LYP/6-31G (d) is an effective approach for the fatty alcohols Raman spectra calculated. The vibrational assignment and Raman spectra features of 6 unbranched alcohols were discussed and the vibrating peaks derived from stretching vibration by C-O were chosen as the research target selection, and the multiple principal component regression models were established and validated with the parameters including polarizability, thermodynamic and energy parameters of the above unbranched alcohols. There exists significant correlation between the vibrating peaks derived from stretching vibration by C-O of fatty alcohols and the parameters (sig. = 0.015). This study will benefit the Raman spectra research of homologs.

  11. Analysis of passive acoustic ranging of helicopters from the joint acoustic propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Benny L.; Morgan, John C.

    1993-01-01

    For more than twenty years, personnel of the U.S.A.E. Waterways Experiment Station (WES) have been performing research dealing with the application of sensors for detection of military targets. The WES research has included the use of seismic, acoustic, magnetic, and other sensors to detect, track, and classify military ground targets. Most of the WES research has been oriented toward the employment of such sensors in a passive mode. Techniques for passive detection are of particular interest in the Army because of the advantages over active detection. Passive detection methods are not susceptible to interception, detection, jamming, or location of the source by the threat. A decided advantage for using acoustic and seismic sensors for detection in tactical situations is the non-line-of-sight capability; i.e., detection of low flying helicopters at long distances without visual contact. This study was conducted to analyze the passive acoustic ranging (PAR) concept using a more extensive data set from the Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE).

  12. Feigned Depression and Feigned Sleepiness: A Voice Acoustical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Nicole; Cannizzaro, Michael S.; Harel, Brian T.; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    We sought to profile the voice acoustical correlates of simulated, or feigned depression by neurologically and psychiatrically healthy control subjects. We also sought to identify the voice acoustical correlates of feigned sleepiness for these same subjects. Twenty-two participants were asked to speak freely about a cartoon, to count from 1 to 10,…

  13. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Producing fluid structural interaction estimates of panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. It is a useful practice to simulate the spatial correlation of the applied pressure field over a 2d surface using a matrix of small patch area regions on a finite element model (FEM). Use of a fitted function for the spatial correlation between patch centers can result in an error if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Several patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are first evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative illustrations. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system FEM is then examined in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same model. The convergence study results illustrate the impacts possible from a poor choice of patch density on the analytical response estimate. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  14. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Fluid structural interaction problems that estimate panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. Even when the analyst elects to use a fitted function for the spatial correlation an error may be introduced if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Both qualitative and quantitative illustrations evaluating the adequacy of different patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are provided. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system is then evaluated in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same finite element model. The convergence study results are presented illustrating the impact resulting from a poor choice of patch density. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a Diffuse Acoustic Field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  15. Alignment of an acoustic manipulation device with cepstral analysis of electronic impedance data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D A; Qiu, Y; Démoré, C; Weijer, C J; Cochran, S

    2015-02-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation is an emerging technology that uses ultrasonic standing waves to position objects with pressure gradients and acoustic radiation forces. To produce strong standing waves, the transducer and the reflector must be aligned properly such that they are parallel to each other. This can be a difficult process due to the need to visualise the ultrasound waves and as higher frequencies are introduced, this alignment requires higher accuracy. In this paper, we present a method for aligning acoustic resonators with cepstral analysis. This is a simple signal processing technique that requires only the electrical impedance measurement data of the resonator, which is usually recorded during the fabrication process of the device. We first introduce the mathematical basis of cepstral analysis and then demonstrate and validate it using a computer simulation of an acoustic resonator. Finally, the technique is demonstrated experimentally to create many parallel linear traps for 10 μm fluorescent beads inside an acoustic resonator.

  16. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 3. Skylab, Vibration Testing and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-06-01

    34 METHODS J. R. Peoples, Naval Ship Research and Deve..pment Center, Bethesda, Maryland ON THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF STRUCTURAL RESONANCE TESTING C. C...relations, or comfort criteria, a vibration psychological research such as choice of subject ride comfort program is now underway at the Langley population...elimination of psychological bias, and Research Center of the NASA. In this paper, two so forth. Thus, a psychologically valid comfort studies that

  17. Monitoring gear vibrations through motor current signature analysis and wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Chinmaya; Mohanty, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    In gearboxes, load fluctuations on the gearbox and gear defects are two major sources of vibration. Further, at times, measurement of vibration in the gearbox is not easy because of the inaccessibility in mounting the vibration transducers. An efficient and new but non-intrusive method to detect the fluctuation in gear load may be the motor current signature analysis (MCSA). In this paper, a multi-stage transmission gearbox (with and without defects) has been studied in order to replace the conventional vibration monitoring by MCSA. It has been observed through FFT analysis that low frequencies of the vibration signatures have sidebands across line frequency of the motor current whereas high frequencies of vibration signature are difficult to be detected. Hence, discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is suggested to decompose the current signal, and FFT analysis is carried out with the decomposed current signal to trace the sidebands of the high frequencies of vibration. The advantage of DWT technique to study the transients in MCSA has also been cited. The inability of CWT in detecting either defects or load fluctuation has been shown. The results indicate that MCSA along with DWT can be a good replacement for conventional vibration monitoring.

  18. Acoustic analysis and mood classification of pain-relieving music.

    PubMed

    Knox, Don; Beveridge, Scott; Mitchell, Laura A; MacDonald, Raymond A R

    2011-09-01

    Listening to preferred music (that which is chosen by the participant) has been shown to be effective in mitigating the effects of pain when compared to silence and a variety of distraction techniques. The wide range of genre, tempo, and structure in music chosen by participants in studies utilizing experimentally induced pain has led to the assertion that structure does not play a significant role, rather listening to preferred music renders the music "functionally equivalent" as regards its effect upon pain perception. This study addresses this assumption and performs detailed analysis of a selection of music chosen from three pain studies. Music analysis showed significant correlation between timbral and tonal aspects of music and measurements of pain tolerance and perceived pain intensity. Mood classification was performed using a hierarchical Gaussian Mixture Model, which indicated the majority of the chosen music expressed contentment. The results suggest that in addition to personal preference, associations with music and the listening context, emotion expressed by music, as defined by its acoustical content, is important to enhancing emotional engagement with music and therefore enhances the level of pain reduction and tolerance.

  19. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-07

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  20. Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.

    PubMed

    Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface.

  1. Vibration analysis of rotor blades with an attached concentrated mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Barna, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of an attached concentrated mass on the dynamics of helicopter rotor blades is determined. The point transmission matrix method was used to define, through three completely automated computer programs, the natural vibrational characteristics (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of rotor blades. The problems of coupled flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsional vibration of a twisted nonuniform blade and its special subcase pure torsional vibration are discussed. The orthogonality relations that exist between the natural modes of rotor blades with an attached concentrated mass are derived. The effect of pitch, rotation, and point mass parameters on the collective, cyclic, scissor, and pure torsional modes of a seesaw rotor blade is determined.

  2. Target vibration estimation in SAR based on phase-analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Weijie; Huang, Linlin

    2016-12-01

    An efficient vibration estimation method for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems based on phase-analysis method is presented. Small vibrations, which consist of multiple frequency components and are usually rather weak, introduce phase modulation in radar echoes. They contain important signatures of objects. Extracting and analyzing the phase from radar echoes is one of the significant approaches to acquire vibration characteristics. In order to separate different targets in different range cells, the proposed method acts the range compression and range migration correction on the radar echoes, followed by extracting the phase history of each target's radar echoes. Since the phase history contains the time-varying ranges from the targets to airborne radar besides the vibration signal, we apply wavelet transform to the phase history to extract the vibration signal. Then the vibration signatures would be estimated quantitatively. The method is a more efficient and convenient approach to estimate the vibration amplitudes and frequencies of one or more targets, whose vibration signal is a single-frequency or multi-frequency signal. Moreover, it can be applied in the case where the airborne radar moves along the desirable or undesirable trajectory. Simulation results indicate that this method provides a larger range of estimable vibration frequency, higher estimation precision, and lower computation complexity.

  3. Vibration characteristic analysis method for the quartz microgyroscope based on the admittance circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoxu; Dong, Peitao; Xie, Liqiang; Wu, Xuezhong

    2014-03-01

    The vibration characteristic analysis method for a quartz microgyroscope based on the admittance circle is reported in this paper. Admittance theory is introduced and the admittance circle principle is analysed to study the vibration characteristics of the quartz microgyroscope. The prototype gyroscope was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The admittance and phase diagram of the work mode were obtained by vibration mode test systems. Then the admittance circle of the work mode was drawn, and the parameter identification of the transfer function between the voltage and current was completed to analyse the vibration characteristics. Therefore, the vibration characteristic analysis method based on the admittance circle can be used to build the transfer function of the quartz microgyroscope, which is helpful for the design of a high performance quartz microgyroscope.

  4. Vibrational analysis of vertical axis wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapucu, Onur

    The goal of this research is to derive a vibration model for a vertical axis wind turbine blade. This model accommodates the affects of varying relative flow angle caused by rotating the blade in the flow field, uses a simple aerodynamic model that assumes constant wind speed and constant rotation rate, and neglects the disturbance of wind due to upstream blade or post. The blade is modeled as elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam under transverse bending and twist deflections. Kinetic and potential energy equations for a rotating blade under deflections are obtained, expressed in terms of assumed modal coordinates and then plugged into Lagrangian equations where the non-conservative forces are the lift and drag forces and moments. An aeroelastic model for lift and drag forces, approximated with third degree polynomials, on the blade are obtained assuming an airfoil under variable angle of attack and airflow magnitudes. A simplified quasi-static airfoil theory is used, in which the lift and drag coefficients are not dependent on the history of the changing angle of attack. Linear terms on the resulting equations of motion will be used to conduct a numerical analysis and simulation, where numeric specifications are modified from the Sandia-17m Darrieus wind turbine by Sandia Laboratories.

  5. Calculation of Raman optical activity spectra for vibrational analysis.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Shaun T; Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A; Blanch, Ewan W

    2015-05-07

    By looking back on the history of Raman Optical Activity (ROA), the present article shows that the success of this analytical technique was for a long time hindered, paradoxically, by the deep level of detail and wealth of structural information it can provide. Basic principles of the underlying theory are discussed, to illustrate the technique's sensitivity due to its physical origins in the delicate response of molecular vibrations to electromagnetic properties. Following a short review of significant advances in the application of ROA by UK researchers, we dedicate two extensive sections to the technical and theoretical difficulties that were overcome to eventually provide predictive power to computational simulations in terms of ROA spectral calculation. In the last sections, we focus on a new modelling strategy that has been successful in coping with the dramatic impact of solvent effects on ROA analyses. This work emphasises the role of complementarity between experiment and theory for analysing the conformations and dynamics of biomolecules, so providing new perspectives for methodological improvements and molecular modelling development. For the latter, an example of a next-generation force-field for more accurate simulations and analysis of molecular behaviour is presented. By improving the accuracy of computational modelling, the analytical capabilities of ROA spectroscopy will be further developed so generating new insights into the complex behaviour of molecules.

  6. Vibration Propagation of Gear Dynamics in a Gear-Bearing-Housing System Using Mathematical Modeling and Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert G.; Guo, Yi; Eritenel, Tugan; Ericson, Tristan M.

    2012-01-01

    Vibration and noise caused by gear dynamics at the meshing teeth propagate through power transmission components to the surrounding environment. This study is devoted to developing computational tools to investigate the vibro-acoustic propagation of gear dynamics through a gearbox using different bearings. Detailed finite element/contact mechanics and boundary element models of the gear/bearing/housing system are established to compute the system vibration and noise propagation. Both vibration and acoustic models are validated by experiments including the vibration modal testing and sound field measurements. The effectiveness of each bearing type to disrupt vibration propagation is speed-dependent. Housing plays an important role in noise radiation .It, however, has limited effects on gear dynamics. Bearings are critical components in drivetrains. Accurate modeling of rolling element bearings is essential to assess vibration and noise of drivetrain systems. This study also seeks to fully describe the vibro-acoustic propagation of gear dynamics through a power-transmission system using rolling element and fluid film wave bearings. Fluid film wave bearings, which have higher damping than rolling element bearings, could offer an energy dissipation mechanism that reduces the gearbox noise. The effectiveness of each bearing type to disrupt vibration propagation in explored using multi-body computational models. These models include gears, shafts, rolling element and fluid film wave bearings, and the housing. Radiated noise is mapped from the gearbox surface to surrounding environment. The effectiveness of rolling element and fluid film wave bearings in breaking the vibro-acoustic propagation path from the gear to the housing is investigated.

  7. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Hartwig, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation discusses the causes of Thermal Acoustic Oscillations, how it can be detected, analyzed and prevented. It also discusses where it can occur, where it doesn't occur and practical mitigation techniques.

  8. [Evaluation of acoustic effectiveness of personnel protectors from extra-aural exposure to aviation noise].

    PubMed

    Dragan, S P; Soldatov, S K; Bogomolov, A V; Drozdov, S V; Poliakov, N M

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to validate testing acoustic effectiveness of a personnel vest-like protector (PP) from extra-aural exposure to aviation noise. Levels of aviation noise for PP testing were determined through calculation. Vest effectiveness in protecting from acoustic vibration generated by high-intensity aviation noise was evaluated both in laboratory and field tests. For comparison analysis, PP was also tested with a dummy exposed on a special tester, i.e. acoustic interferometer.

  9. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  10. Acoustic emission intensity analysis of corrosion in prestressed concrete piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion of steel strands in prestressed concrete (PC) bridges may lead to substantial damage or collapse well before the end of the design life. Acoustic Emission (AE) is a suitable nondestructive technique to detect and locate corrosion in reinforced and prestressed concrete, which is key to prioritize inspection and maintenance. An effective tool to analyze damage-related AE data is intensity analysis (IA), which is based on two data trends, namely Severity (average signal strength of high amplitude hits) and Historic Index (ratio of the average signal strength of the most recent hits to the average of all hits). IA criteria for corrosion assessment in PC were recently proposed based on empirical evidence from accelerated corrosion tests. In this paper, AE data from prestressed and non-prestressed concrete pile specimens exposed to salt water wet-dry cycling for over 600 days are used to analyze the relation between Severity and Historic Index and actual corrosion. Evidence of corrosion is gained from the inspection of decommissioned specimens. The selection of suitable J and K parameters for IA is discussed, and an IA chart with updated corrosion criteria for PC piles is presented.

  11. Parallel Finite Element Domain Decomposition for Structural/Acoustic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Tungkahotara, Siroj; Watson, Willie R.; Rajan, Subramaniam D.

    2005-01-01

    A domain decomposition (DD) formulation for solving sparse linear systems of equations resulting from finite element analysis is presented. The formulation incorporates mixed direct and iterative equation solving strategics and other novel algorithmic ideas that are optimized to take advantage of sparsity and exploit modern computer architecture, such as memory and parallel computing. The most time consuming part of the formulation is identified and the critical roles of direct sparse and iterative solvers within the framework of the formulation are discussed. Experiments on several computer platforms using several complex test matrices are conducted using software based on the formulation. Small-scale structural examples are used to validate thc steps in the formulation and large-scale (l,000,000+ unknowns) duct acoustic examples are used to evaluate the ORIGIN 2000 processors, and a duster of 6 PCs (running under the Windows environment). Statistics show that the formulation is efficient in both sequential and parallel computing environmental and that the formulation is significantly faster and consumes less memory than that based on one of the best available commercialized parallel sparse solvers.

  12. Analysis of nonlinear modulation between sound and vibrations in metallic structure and its use for damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Gang, Tie; Wan, Chuhao; Wang, Changxi; Luo, Zhiwei

    2015-07-01

    Vibro-acoustic modulation technique is a nonlinear ultrasonic method in nondestructive testing. This technique detects the defects by monitoring the modulation components generated by the interaction between the vibration and the ultrasound wave due to the nonlinear material behaviour caused by the damage. In this work, a swept frequency signal was used as high frequency excitation, then the Hilbert transform based amplitude and phase demodulation and synchronous demodulation (SD) were used to extract the modulation information from the received signal, the results were graphed in the time-frequency domain after the short time Fourier transform. The demodulation results were quite different from each other. The reason for the difference was investigated by analysing the demodulation process of the two methods. According to the analysis and the subsequent verification test, it was indicated that the SD method was more proper for the test and a new index called MISD was defined to evaluate the structure quality in the Vibro-acoustic modulation test with swept probing excitation.

  13. A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system for a two-bladed teetering rotor using finite element methods in space and time is developed which incorporates consistent rotor/fuselage structural, aerodynamic, and inertial couplings and a modern free wake model. A coordinate system is developed to take into account a teetering rotor's unique characteristics, such as teetering motion and undersling. Coupled nonlinear periodic blade and fuselage equations are transformed to the modal space in the fixed frame and solved simultaneously. The elastic line and detailed 3-D NASTRAN finite element models of the AH-1G helicopter airframe from the DAMVIBS program are integrated into the elastic rotor finite element model. Analytical predictions of rotor control angles, blade loads, hub forces, and vibration are compared with AH-1G Operation Load Survey flight test data. The blade loads predicted by present analysis show generally fair agreement with the flight test data, especially blade chord bending moment estimation shows good agreement. Calculated 2/rev vertical vibration levels at pilot seat show good correlation with the flight test data both in magnitude and phase, but 4/rev vibration levels show fair correlation only in magnitude. Lateral vibration results show more disagreement than vertical vibration results. Pylon flexibility effect is essential in the two-bladed teetering rotor vibration analysis. The pylon flexibility increases the first lag frequency by about 14%, and decreases 2/rev longitudinal and lateral hub forces by more than half. Rotor/fuselage coupling reduces 2/rev vertical and lateral vibration levels by 60% to 70% and has a small effect on 4/rev vibration levels. Modeling of difficult components (secondary structures, doors/panels, etc) is essential in predicting airframe natural frequencies. Refined aerodynamics such as free wake and unsteady aerodynamics have an important role in the prediction of vibration. For example, free

  14. A Government/Industry Summary of the Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center in 1984 initiated a rotorcraft structural dynamics program, designated DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), with the objective of establishing the technology base needed by the rotorcraft industry for developing an advanced finite-element-based dynamics design analysis capability for vibrations. An assessment of the program showed that the DAMVIBS Program has resulted in notable technical achievements and major changes in industrial design practice, all of which have significantly advanced the industry's capability to use and rely on finite-element-based dynamics analyses during the design process.

  15. Analysis of two-phase flow included vibrations in piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, T.; Komura, Y.; Yano, S.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to predict the vibration level of a pipe conveying a two-phase flowing fluid. Experiments were carried out with a horizontally supported U-type piping system, conveying an air-water two-phase flow in a steady state condition. A theoretical analysis is achieved using the transfer method for vibration responses of the system excited by the forces of traveling liquid piston and the momentum change of two-phase flow. Comparing experimental and theoretical studies, the author concluded that the vibrational behavior of piping systems conveying two-phase flowing fluid can be predicted quantitatively. 8 refs.

  16. Analysis of vibration and pressure pulsation in positive displacement drilling motors

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, D.B.; Dreesen, D.S.

    1998-12-31

    Three, Moineau principle, positive displacement (drilling) motors were tested on a dynamometer using water, air/mist, and foam. In conjunction with a traditional motor performance test, data were collected at 5000 samples per second using an adapted seismic data acquisition system. Shaft speed, torque, pressure, and three-axis vibration data were processed using Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) to obtain energy density spectrums (EDSs). Cascade plots were generated by plotting the EDSs against shaft speed. The cascade plots revealed that pressure pulses and motor vibrations are closely related to the eccentric rotation of the rotor in the power section. Excessive no-load vibrations were not observed in the small motors and test apparatus used; increasing torque usually decreases the amplitude of vibrations observed. Motor vibration amplitudes were as a rule not increased when compressible fluids were substituted for water.

  17. Acoustic wave network and multivariate analysis for biosensing in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarajah, Christine N.; Thompson, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Bioanalytical techniques play an important role in monitoring the effects of environmental stress factors on fundamental life processes. In terms of space flight and extraterrestrial research, radiation, altered and microgravity are known to induce changes in gene expression. We report the use of an on-line transverse shear mode (TSM) acoustic wave biosensor to detect the initiation of gene transcription and DNA — drug binding. Since this biosensor offers real-time, label free monitoring of biological processes, it is possible to detect sequential binding steps as demonstrated in this paper. Furthermore, this sensor responds to several factors in the liquid phase such as viscosity, elasticity, surface tension, charge distribution and mass loading, which can in turn be influenced by specific gravity. The sensing device is a piezoelectric quartz crystal onto which the probe molecule (DNA in this case) is immobilized. Change in resonance frequency of the crystal in response to the binding of the target molecule(s), RNA polymerase and actinomycin-D, is fit to an equivalent circuit model from which multidimensional data is extracted. By performing multivariate analysis on this data we are able to observe interactions between several of these data series representing parameters such as motional resistance and capacitance. As well, we are able to observe the dominating parameters (for instance, frequency vs. motional resistance, which in turn can correspond to mass loading vs. energy dissipation) during the course of the experiment, as they vary between the different steps. Such advantages offered by the TSM sensor along with multivariate analysis are indispensable for biotechnological work under the influence of microgravity as several variables come into play.

  18. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  19. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  20. An acoustical analysis of a room with a concave dome ceiling element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi S.

    2004-05-01

    Concave surfaces are often considered detrimental in room acoustics, especially because of the impact they have on the distribution of sound energy. This paper explores certain acoustical characteristics and anomalies found in spaces below concave dome ceiling elements. The architectural design of the Darusshollah mosque in East Java, Indonesia is used as a case study with specific spatial and functional concerns. Investigations of the mosque have been conducted through both a 1:12 scale model and a computer model that utilizes ray tracing and image source methods. Analysis techniques are discussed. Results are presented and compared to provide useful insights into the acoustics of such distinctive environments.

  1. Numerical analysis of the transportation characteristics of a self-running sliding stage based on near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kai; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Miaomiao

    2015-12-01

    Owing to its distinct non-contact and oil-free characteristics, a self-running sliding stage based on near-field acoustic levitation can be used in an environment, which demands clean rooms and zero noise. This paper presents a numerical analysis on the lifting and transportation capacity of a non-contact transportation system. Two simplified structure models, namely, free vibration and force vibration models, are proposed for the study of the displacement amplitude distribution of two cases using the finite element method. After coupling the stage displacement into the film thickness, the Reynolds equation is solved by the finite difference method to obtain the lifting and thrusting forces. Parametric analyses of the effects of amplitude, frequency, and standing wave ratio (SWR) on the sliding stage dynamic performance are investigated. Numerical results show good agreement with published experimental values. The predictions also reveal that greater transportation capacity of the self-running sliding stage is generally achieved at less SWR and at higher amplitude.

  2. Time average vibration fringe analysis using Hilbert transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Upputuri Paul; Mohan, Nandigana Krishna; Kothiyal, Mahendra Prasad

    2010-10-20

    Quantitative phase information from a single interferogram can be obtained using the Hilbert transform (HT). We have applied the HT method for quantitative evaluation of Bessel fringes obtained in time average TV holography. The method requires only one fringe pattern for the extraction of vibration amplitude and reduces the complexity in quantifying the data experienced in the time average reference bias modulation method, which uses multiple fringe frames. The technique is demonstrated for the measurement of out-of-plane vibration amplitude on a small scale specimen using a time average microscopic TV holography system.

  3. Double-pulse digital speckle pattern interferometry for vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dazhi; Xue, Jingfeng; Chen, Lu; Wen, Juying; Wang, Jingjing

    2014-12-01

    The double-pulse Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) in the laboratory is established. Two good performances have been achieved at the same time, which is uniform distribution of laser beam energy by space filter and recording two successive pictures by a CCD camera successfully. Then two-dimensional discrete orthogonal wavelet transform method is used for the process of filtering method. By using the DSPI, speckle pattern of a vibrated object is obtained with interval of (2~800)μs, and 3D plot of the transient vibration is achieved. Moreover, good agreements of the mode shapes and displacement are obtained by comparing with Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) .

  4. Vibration analysis of structural elements using differential quadrature method

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mohamed; Matbuly, Mohamed S.; Ragb, Ola

    2012-01-01

    The method of differential quadrature is employed to analyze the free vibration of a cracked cantilever beam resting on elastic foundation. The beam is made of a functionally graded material and rests on a Winkler–Pasternak foundation. The crack action is simulated by a line spring model. Also, the differential quadrature method with a geometric mapping are applied to study the free vibration of irregular plates. The obtained results agreed with the previous studies in the literature. Further, a parametric study is introduced to investigate the effects of geometric and elastic characteristics of the problem on the natural frequencies. PMID:25685406

  5. Ab initio structures and vibrational analysis of the isoprene conformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Ch. W.; Panchenko, Yu. N.; Krasnoshchiokov, S. V.; Aroca, R.

    1987-09-01

    Complete gradient optimizations of the structures and the calculation of the harmonic force fields of the s- trans( anti) and gauche conformers of isoprene (2-methylbuta-1,3-diene) are reported at the RHF/6-31G level. The dihedral angle of the gauche conformer is found to be 41.0° from the planar s- cis( syn) form. The force fields obtained are refined using scale factors transferred from analogous calculations for trans-butadiene-1,3 and ethane. The direct vibrational problems are solved for both conformers of isoprene. A complete assignment of the experimental vibrational frequencies is given.

  6. Free flexural vibration analysis of symmetric honeycomb panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. D.; Cleghorn, W. L.

    2005-06-01

    The free flexural vibration of symmetric rectangular honeycomb panels having simple support boundary conditions is investigated in this paper using the classical plate theory, Mindlin's improved plate theory, and Reddy's third-order plate theory. The honeycomb core of hexagonal cells is modeled as a thick layer of orthotropic material whose physical and mechanical properties are determined using the Gibson and Ashby correlations. The comparative studies conducted on aluminum honeycomb panels indicate that both the classical and improved plate theories are inadequate for the flexural vibration of honeycomb panels.

  7. Simulation and analysis chain for acoustic ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, M.; Anton, G.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Sieger, C.

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach for large-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water. In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water will be presented. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and its propagation to the sensors within the detector. Currently, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, equivalent to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it is used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic source reconstruction algorithms are integrated in an analysis chain. An overview of design and capabilities of the simulation and analysis chain will be presented and preliminary studies will be discussed.

  8. Vibrational and electronic investigations, thermodynamic parameters, HOMO and LUMO analysis on Lornoxicam by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhasini, M.; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of Lornoxicam were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameters, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the Vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator's strength calculated by TD-DFT and Lornoxicam is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like Entropy, Enthalpy, Specific heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was investigated using theoretical calculations.

  9. Analysis of damped tissue vibrations in time-frequency space: a wavelet-based approach.

    PubMed

    Enders, Hendrik; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-11-15

    There is evidence that vibrations of soft tissue compartments are not appropriately described by a single sinusoidal oscillation for certain types of locomotion such as running or sprinting. This paper discusses a new method to quantify damping of superimposed oscillations using a wavelet-based time-frequency approach. This wavelet-based method was applied to experimental data in order to analyze the decay of the overall power of vibration signals over time. Eight healthy subjects performed sprinting trials on a 30 m runway on a hard surface and a soft surface. Soft tissue vibrations were quantified from the tissue overlaying the muscle belly of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The new methodology determines damping coefficients with an average error of 2.2% based on a wavelet scaling factor of 0.7. This was sufficient to detect differences in soft tissue compartment damping between the hard and soft surface. On average, the hard surface elicited a 7.02 s(-1) lower damping coefficient than the soft surface (p<0.05). A power spectral analysis of the muscular vibrations occurring during sprinting confirmed that vibrations during dynamic movements cannot be represented by a single sinusoidal function. Compared to the traditional sinusoidal approach, this newly developed method can quantify vibration damping for systems with multiple vibration modes that interfere with one another. This new time-frequency analysis may be more appropriate when an acceleration trace does not follow a sinusoidal function, as is the case with multiple forms of human locomotion.

  10. Acoustic source analysis of a rectangular supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzman, Jordan; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    We apply Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy to identify acoustic sources in two high-fidelity unstructured large eddy simulation databases of a Mach 1.4 rectangular jet with and without chevrons. Two-point, two-time correlations of the acoustic source terms are evaluated at different positions in the three dimensional flow that develops downstream of the complex nozzle. Two-point statistics are compared to single-point statistics to test the quasi-normality hypothesis and other noise source models for a non-axisymmetric jet. In particular, we assess the predictive capability of a Gaussian model, a fixed-frame model and a modified-distance model. The nozzle geometries used for the simulations exactly match an experimental configuration tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center, allowing for validation in terms of both farfield noise as well as turbulence statistics. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  11. Analysis of an axial compressor blade vibration based on wave reflection theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owczarek, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes application of the theory of wave reflection in turbomachines to rotor blade vibrations measured in an axial compressor stage. The blade vibrations analyzed could not be predicted using various flutter prediction techniques. The wave reflection theory, first advanced in 1966, is expanded, and more general equations for the rotor blade excitation frequencies are derived. The results of the analysis indicate that all examined rotor blade vibrations can be explained by forced excitations caused by reflecting waves (pressure pulses). Wave reflections between the rotor blades and both the upstream and downstream stator vanes had to be considered.

  12. Numerical analysis of the vibroacoustic properties of plates with embedded grids of acoustic black holes.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Stephen C; Fahnline, John B; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of an Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) has been developed and exploited as an approach for passively attenuating structural vibration. The basic principle of the ABH relies on proper tailoring of the structure geometrical properties in order to produce a gradual reduction of the flexural wave speed, theoretically approaching zero. For practical systems the idealized "zero" wave speed condition cannot be achieved so the structural areas of low wave speed are treated with surface damping layers to allow the ABH to approach the idealized dissipation level. In this work, an investigation was conducted to assess the effects that distributions of ABHs embedded in plate-like structures have on both vibration and structure radiated sound, focusing on characterizing and improving low frequency performance. Finite Element and Boundary Element models were used to assess the vibration response and radiated sound power performance of several plate configurations, comparing baseline uniform plates with embedded periodic ABH designs. The computed modal loss factors showed the importance of the ABH unit cell low order modes in the overall vibration reduction effectiveness of the embedded ABH plates at low frequencies where the free plate bending wavelengths are longer than the scale of the ABH.

  13. Two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial structure for potential image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Han, Yu; Li, Ying; Pai, Frank

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents modeling, analysis techniques and experiment of for two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure for filtering acoustic waves. For a unit cell of an infinite two-Dimensional Acoustic metamaterial Structure, governing equations are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The concepts of negative effective mass and stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystems create a stopband are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed acoustic metamaterial structure is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. It uses the incoming wave in the structure to resonate the integrated membrane-mass-damper absorbers to vibrate in their optical mode at frequencies close to but above their local resonance frequencies to create shear forces and bending moments to straighten the panel and stop the wave propagation. Moreover, a two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure consisting of lumped mass and elastic membrane is fabricated in the lab. We do experiments on the model and The results validate the concept and show that, for two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure do exist two vibration modes. For the wave absorption, the mass of each cell should be considered in the design. With appropriate design calculations, the proposed two-dimension acoustic metamaterial structure can be used for absorption of low-frequency waves. Hence this special structure can be used in filtering the waves, and the potential using can increase the ultrasonic imaging quality.

  14. Vibration analysis of rolling element bearings with various defects under the action of an unbalanced force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kıral, Zeki; Karagülle, Hira

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, a method based on the finite element vibration analysis is presented for defect detection in rolling element bearings with single or multiple defects on different components of the bearing structure using the time and frequency domain parameters. A dynamic loading model is proposed in order to create the nodal excitation functions used in the finite element vibration analysis as external loading. A computer code written in Visual Basic programming language with a graphical user interface is developed to create the nodal excitations for different cases including the outer ring, inner ring or rolling element defects. Forced vibration analysis of a bearing structure is performed using the commercial finite element package I-DEAS under the action of an unbalanced force transferred to the structure via a ball bearing. Time and frequency domain parameters such as rms, crest factor, kurtosis and band energy ratio for the frequency spectrum of the enveloped signals are used to analyse the effect of the defect location and the number of defects on the time and frequency domain parameters. The role of the receiving point for vibration measurements is also investigated. The vibration data for various defect cases including the housing structure effect can be obtained using the finite element vibration analysis in order to develop an optimum monitoring method in condition monitoring studies.

  15. A formulation of rotor-airframe coupling for design analysis of vibrations of helicopter airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, R. G.; Walton, W. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A linear formulation of rotor airframe coupling intended for vibration analysis in airframe structural design is presented. The airframe is represented by a finite element analysis model; the rotor is represented by a general set of linear differential equations with periodic coefficients; and the connections between the rotor and airframe are specified through general linear equations of constraint. Coupling equations are applied to the rotor and airframe equations to produce one set of linear differential equations governing vibrations of the combined rotor airframe system. These equations are solved by the harmonic balance method for the system steady state vibrations. A feature of the solution process is the representation of the airframe in terms of forced responses calculated at the rotor harmonics of interest. A method based on matrix partitioning is worked out for quick recalculations of vibrations in design studies when only relatively few airframe members are varied. All relations are presented in forms suitable for direct computer implementation.

  16. A coupled rotor-fuselage vibration analysis for helicopter rotor system fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mao

    A coupled rotor-fuselage vibration analysis for helicopter rotor system fault detection is developed. The coupled rotor/fuselage/vibration absorbers (bifilar type) system incorporates consistent structural, aerodynamic and inertial couplings. The aeroelastic analysis is based on finite element methods in space and time. The coupled rotor, absorbers and fuselage equations are transformed into the modal space and solved in the fixed coordinate system. A coupled trim procedure is used to solve the responses of rotor, fuselage and vibration absorber, rotor trim control and vehicle orientation simultaneously. Rotor system faults are modeled by changing blade structural, inertial and aerodynamic properties. Both adjustable and component faults, such as misadjusted trim-tab, misadjusted pitch-control rod (PCR), imbalanced mass and pitch-control bearing freeplay, are investigated. Detailed SH-60 helicopter fuselage NASTRAN model is integrated into the analysis. Validation study was performed using SH-60 helicopter flight test data. The prediction of fuselage natural frequencies show fairly large error compared to shake test data. Analytical predictions of fuselage baseline (without fault) 4/rev vibration and fault-induced 1/rev vibration and blade displacement deviations are compared with SH-60 flight test (with prescribed fault) data. The fault-induced 1/rev fuselage vibration (magnitude and phase) predicted by present analysis generally capture the trend of the flight test data, although prediction under-predicts. The large discrepancy of fault-induced 1/rev vibration magnitude at hover between prediction and flight test data partially comes from the variation of flight condition (not perfect hover) and partially due to the effect of the rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interaction (wake effect) at low speed which is not considered in the analysis. Also the differences in the phase prediction is not clear since only the magnitude and phase information were given instead of the

  17. Modeling and analysis of circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yihua; Huang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    We propose a circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer and perform a theoretical analysis of the transformer. An equivalent circuit is derived from the equations of piezoelectricity and the Hamilton's principle. With this equivalent circuit, the voltage gain ratio, input impedance, and the efficiency of the circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer can be determined. The basic behavior of the transformer is shown by numerical results.

  18. Reprint: A multivariate data analysis approach towards vibration analysis and vibration-based damage assessment: Application for delamination detection in a composite beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, David; Trendafilova, Irina

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel methodology for structural vibration analysis and vibration-based monitoring which utilises a special type of Principal Components Analysis (PCA), known as Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA). In this study the methodology is introduced and demonstrated for the purposes of damage assessment in structures using their free decay response. The method's damage assessment properties are first demonstrated on a numerical example for a two-degree-of-freedom (2-DoF) spring-mass and damper system with nonlinear stiffness. The method is then applied to an experimental case study of a composite laminate beam. The method is based on the decomposition of the frequency domain structural variation response using new variables, the Principal Components (PCs). Only a certain number of the new variables are used to approximate the original vibration signal with very good accuracy. The presented results demonstrate the potential of the method for vibration based signal reconstruction and damage diagnosis. The healthy and the different damaged scenarios are clearly distinguishable in the new space of only two reconstructed components where a strong clustering effect is observed.

  19. A multivariate data analysis approach towards vibration analysis and vibration-based damage assessment:. Application for delamination detection in a composite beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, David; Trendafilova, Irina

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel methodology for structural vibration analysis and vibration-based monitoring which utilises a special type of Principal Components Analysis (PCA), known as Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA). In this study the methodology is introduced and demonstrated for the purposes of damage assessment in structures using their free decay response. The method's damage assessment properties are first demonstrated on a numerical example for a two degree-of-freedom (2DoF) spring-mass and damper system with nonlinear stiffness. The method is then applied to an experimental case study of a composite laminate beam. The method is based on the decomposition of the frequency domain structural variation response using new variables, the Principal Components (PCs). Only a certain number of new variables are used to approximate the original vibration signal with very good accuracy. The presented results demonstrate the potential of the method for vibration based signal reconstruction and damage diagnosis. The healthy and the different damaged scenarios are clearly distinguishable in the new space of only two reconstructed components where a strong clustering effect is observed.

  20. Dynamical energy analysis for built-up acoustic systems at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, D J; Giani, S; Tanner, G

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods for describing the intensity distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave fields in the high frequency asymptotic limit are often based on flow transport equations. Common techniques are statistical energy analysis, employed mostly in the context of vibro-acoustics, and ray tracing, a popular tool in architectural acoustics. Dynamical energy analysis makes it possible to interpolate between standard statistical energy analysis and full ray tracing, containing both of these methods as limiting cases. In this work a version of dynamical energy analysis based on a Chebyshev basis expansion of the Perron-Frobenius operator governing the ray dynamics is introduced. It is shown that the technique can efficiently deal with multi-component systems overcoming typical geometrical limitations present in statistical energy analysis. Results are compared with state-of-the-art hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin finite element simulations.

  1. Analysis of Acoustic Synthesizers for Passive Sonar Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    Survey: Thirty-three Form lQ8 Work Unit Plars %..,ere studied. This information led to several contacts with various acvernment ornanizations. d. Source ... Study by TAEG, Naval Trainirn Fauipment Center (reference 7), see Appendix A. e. The above data was supplemented for facilities that had ar acoustic

  2. Acoustic Analysis of /?/ and /ð/ Sounds in Pakistani English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmood, Muhammad Asim; Asghar, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farhat

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at discovering the nature and extent of deviation in the articulation of consonants in Pakistani English due to the impact of mother tongue. A detailed experiment has been carried out with the help of Praat to analyze the acoustic properties of /?/ and /ð/ sounds spoken by Pakistani speakers. The research reveals that Pakistani…

  3. Design and performance analysis of digital acoustic underwater telemetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catipovic, J. A.; Baggeroer, A. B.; Vonderheydt, K.; Koelsch, D. E.

    1985-11-01

    The work discusses the design and performance characteristics of a Digital Acoustic Telemetry System (DATS) which incorporates the current state-of-the-art technology and is capable of reliable data transmission at rates useful to a wide range of ocean exploration and development gear.

  4. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  5. The NASA/industry design analysis methods for vibrations (DAMVIBS) program - Accomplishments and contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1991-01-01

    A NASA Langley-sponsored rotorcraft structural dynamics program, known as Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS), has been under development since 1984. The objective of this program was to establish the technology base needed by the industry to develop an advanced finite-element-based dynamics design analysis capability for vibrations. Under the program, teams from the four major helicopter manufacturers have formed finite-element models, conducted ground vibration tests, made test/analysis comparisons of both metal and composite airframes, performed 'difficult components' studies on airframes to identify components which need more complete finite-element representation for improved correlation, and evaluated industry codes for computing coupled rotor-airframe vibrations. Studies aimed at establishing the role that structural optimization can play in airframe vibrations design work have also been initiated. Five government/industry meetings were held in connection with these activities during the course of the program. Because the DAMVIBS Program is coming to an end, the fifth meeting included a brief assessment of the program and its benefits to the industry.

  6. A dimensionless analysis of a 2DOF piezoelectric vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Han; Wang, Xu; John, Sabu

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a dimensionless analysis method is proposed to predict the output voltage and harvested power for a 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system. This method allows us to compare the harvesting power and efficiency of the 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system and to evaluate the harvesting system performance regardless the sizes or scales. The analysis method is a hybrid of time domain simulation and frequency response analysis approaches, which would be a useful tool for parametric study, design and optimisation of a 2DOF piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. In a case study, a quarter car suspension model with a piezoelectric material insert is chosen to be studied. The 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system could potentially be applied in a vehicle to convert waste or harmful ambient vibration energy into electrical energy for charging the battery. Especially for its application in a hybrid vehicle or an electrical vehicle, the 2DOF vibration energy harvesting system could improve charge mileage, comfort and reliability.

  7. Calculation of rotor impedance for use in design analysis of helicopter airframe vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygren, Kip P.

    1990-01-01

    Excessive vibration is one of the most prevalent technical obstacles encountered in the development of new rotorcraft. The inability to predict these vibrations is primarily due to deficiencies in analysis and simulation tools. The Langley Rotorcraft Structural Dynamics Program was instituted in 1984 to meet long term industry needs in the area of rotorcraft vibration prediction. As a part of the Langley program, this research endeavors to develop an efficient means of coupling the rotor to the airframe for preliminary design analysis of helicopter airframe vibrations. The main effort was to modify the existing computer program for modeling the dynamic and aerodynamic behavior of rotorcraft called DYSCO (DYnamic System COupler) to calculate the rotor impedance. DYSCO was recently developed for the U.S. Army and has proven to be adaptable for the inclusion of new solution methods. The solution procedure developed to use DYSCO for the calculation of rotor impedance is presented. Verification of the procedure by comparison with a known solution for a simple wind turbine model is about 75 percent completed, and initial results are encouraging. After the wind turbine impedance is confirmed, the verification effort will continue by comparison to solutions of a more sophisticated rotorcraft model. Future work includes determination of the sensitivity of the rotorcraft airframe vibrations to helicopter flight conditions and rotor modeling assumptions. When completed, this research will ascertain the feasibility and efficiency of the impedance matching method of rotor-airframe coupling for use in the analysis of airframe vibrations during the preliminary rotorcraft design process.

  8. The NASA/industry design analysis methods for vibrations (DAMVIBS) program: Accomplishments and contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1991-01-01

    A NASA Langley-sponsored rotorcraft structural dynamics program, known as Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS), has been under development since 1984. The objective of this program was to establish the technology base needed by the industry to develop an advanced finite-element-based dynamics design analysis capability for vibrations. Under the program, teams from the four major helicopter manufacturers have formed finite-element models, conducted ground vibration tests, made test/analysis comparisons of both metal and composite airframes, performed 'difficult components' studies on airframes to identify components which need more complete finite-element representation for improved correlation, and evaluated industry codes for computing coupled rotor-airframe vibrations. Studies aimed at establishing the role that structural optimization can play in airframe vibrations design work have also been initiated. Five government/industry meetings were held in connection with these activities during the course of the program. Because the DAMVIBS Program is coming to an end, the fifth meeting included a brief assessment of the program and its benefits to the industry.

  9. Assessment of Infant Cry: Acoustic Cry Analysis and Parental Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGasse, Linda L.; Neal, A. Rebecca; Lester, Barry M.

    2005-01-01

    Infant crying signals distress to potential caretakers who can alleviate the aversive conditions that gave rise to the cry. The cry signal results from coordination among several brain regions that control respiration and vocal cord vibration from which the cry sounds are produced. Previous work has shown a relationship between acoustic…

  10. Prediction and mitigation analysis of ground vibration caused by running high-speed trains on rigid-frame viaducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liangming; Xie, Weiping; He, Xingwen; Hayashikawa, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    In this study a 3D numerical analysis approach is developed to predict the ground vibration around rigid-frame viaducts induced by running high-speed trains. The train-bridge-ground interaction system is divided into two subsystems: the train-bridge interaction and the soil-structure interaction. First, the analytical program to simulate bridge vibration with consideration of train-bridge interaction is developed to obtain the vibration reaction forces at the pier bottoms. The highspeed train is described by a multi-DOFs vibration system and the rigid-frame viaduct is modeled with 3D beam elements. Second, applying these vibration reaction forces as input external excitations, the ground vibration is simulated by using a general-purpose program that includes soil-structure interaction effects. The validity of the analytical procedure is confirmed by comparing analytical and experimental results. The characteristics of high-speed train-induced vibrations, including the location of predominant vibration, are clarified. Based on this information a proposed vibration countermeasure using steel strut and new barrier is found effective in reducing train-induced vibrations and it satisfies environmental vibration requirements. The vibration screening efficiency is evaluated by reduction VAL based on 1/3 octave band spectral analysis.

  11. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 3. Structural Analysis, Fatigue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    Mecanique Applique. Bisancon, France FRST-PASSAGE FAILURE PROBABILITY IN RANDOM VIBRATION SOF STRUCTURES WITH RANDOM PROPERTIESI..................... 83...the diagram l’ezpression de la puissance complexe fournie in function of A of k, PR and P eables one -to Recharche Mrospatiale, n0130, juin 139 4...enforced at the interface between the transmission and radiation is essential core and the layers. Transverse shear for the overall assessment of their

  12. Analytical and Experimental Vibration Analysis of a Faulty Gear System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Braun, M. J.; Polyshchuk, V.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical procedure was developed for predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions. A gear tooth fault model is developed to simulate the effects of pitting and wear on the vibration signal under normal operating conditions. The model uses changes in the gear mesh stiffness to simulate the effects of gear tooth faults. The overall dynamics of the gear transmission system is evaluated by coupling the dynamics of each individual gear-rotor system through gear mesh forces generated between each gear-rotor system and the bearing forces generated between the rotor and the gearbox structure. The predicted results were compared with experimental results obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. The Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) was used to give a comprehensive comparison of the predicted and experimental results. The WVD method applied to the experimental results were also compared to other fault detection techniques to verify the WVD's ability to detect the pitting damage, and to determine its relative performance. Overall results show good correlation between the experimental vibration data of the damaged test gear and the predicted vibration from the model with simulated gear tooth pitting damage. Results also verified that the WVD method can successfully detect and locate gear tooth wear and pitting damage.

  13. Quantitative Analysis Of Acoustic Emission From Rock Fracture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Sebastian David

    This thesis aims to advance the methods of quantitative acoustic emission (AE) analysis by calibrating sensors, characterizing sources, and applying the results to solve engi- neering problems. In the first part of this thesis, we built a calibration apparatus and successfully calibrated two commercial AE sensors. The ErgoTech sensor was found to have broadband velocity sensitivity and the Panametrics V103 was sensitive to surface normal displacement. These calibration results were applied to two AE data sets from rock fracture experiments in order to characterize the sources of AE events. The first data set was from an in situ rock fracture experiment conducted at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The Mine-By experiment was a large scale excavation response test where both AE (10 kHz - 1 MHz) and microseismicity (MS) (1 Hz - 10 kHz) were monitored. Using the calibration information, magnitude, stress drop, dimension and energy were successfully estimated for 21 AE events recorded in the tensile region of the tunnel wall. Magnitudes were in the range -7.5 < Mw < -6.8, which is consistent with other laboratory AE results, and stress drops were within the range commonly observed for induced seismicity in the field (0.1 - 10 MPa). The second data set was AE collected during a true-triaxial deformation experiment, where the objectives were to characterize laboratory AE sources and identify issues related to moving the analysis from ideal in situ conditions to more complex laboratory conditions in terms of the ability to conduct quantitative AE analysis. We found AE magnitudes in the range -7.8 < Mw < -6.7 and as with the in situ data, stress release was within the expected range of 0.1 - 10 MPa. We identified four major challenges to quantitative analysis in the laboratory, which in- hibited our ability to study parameter scaling (M0 ∝ fc -3 scaling). These challenges were 0c (1) limited knowledge of attenuation which we proved was continuously evolving, (2

  14. Experimental and computational study on molecular structure and vibrational analysis of an antihyperglycemic biomolecule: gliclazide.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Mustafa; Kürekçi, Mehmet; Eskiyurt, Buse; Sert, Yusuf; Çırak, Çağrı

    2015-01-25

    In present study, the experimental and theoretical harmonic vibrational frequencies of gliclazide molecule have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (400-4000 cm(-1)) and Laser-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm(-1)) of the molecule in the solid phase were recorded. Theoretical vibrational frequencies and geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) have been calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF), density functional theory (B3LYP hybrid function) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets by Gaussian 09W program. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies were performed by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 program. Theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been compared with the corresponding experimental data, and they have been shown to be in a good agreement with each other. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies have been found.

  15. Vibrational analysis of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzonitrile by quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sert, Yusuf; Çırak, Çağrı; Ucun, Fatih

    2013-04-15

    In the present study, the experimental and theoretical harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzonitrile were investigated. The experimental FT-IR (400-4000 cm(-1)) and μ-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm(-1)) of the molecule in the solid phase were recorded. Theoretical vibrational frequencies and geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) were calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF), density functional B3LYP and M06-2X methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 09 W program, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies were performed by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 program. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies were compared with the corresponding experimental data, and they were seen to be in a good agreement with each other. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies were found.

  16. Vibrational analysis of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzonitrile by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Yusuf; Çırak, Çağrı; Ucun, Fatih

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, the experimental and theoretical harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzonitrile were investigated. The experimental FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1) and μ-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm-1) of the molecule in the solid phase were recorded. Theoretical vibrational frequencies and geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) were calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF), density functional B3LYP and M06-2X methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 09 W program, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies were performed by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 program. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies were compared with the corresponding experimental data, and they were seen to be in a good agreement with each other. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies were found.

  17. Experimental and computational study on molecular structure and vibrational analysis of an antihyperglycemic biomolecule: Gliclazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakaya, Mustafa; Kürekçi, Mehmet; Eskiyurt, Buse; Sert, Yusuf; Çırak, Çağrı

    2015-01-01

    In present study, the experimental and theoretical harmonic vibrational frequencies of gliclazide molecule have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1) and Laser-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm-1) of the molecule in the solid phase were recorded. Theoretical vibrational frequencies and geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) have been calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF), density functional theory (B3LYP hybrid function) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets by Gaussian 09W program. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies were performed by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 program. Theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been compared with the corresponding experimental data, and they have been shown to be in a good agreement with each other. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies have been found.

  18. Buckling and vibration analysis of a simply supported column with a piecewise constant cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis and sample results for the lateral buckling and vibration of a compressively loaded column is presented whose cross section is piecewise constant along its length. The column is symmetric about its mid-span and consists of three sections, the center section having a stiffer cross section than the two identical end sections. Buckling and vibration characteristics of the column are determined from numerical solution of the exact eigenvalue problems. Parametric structural efficiency analyses are performed using a nondimensionalized set of governing equations to determine the optimum ratio between the lengths of the center section and the outer sections based on both buckling load and vibration frequency requirements. In these analyses, two relationships exist. One is between cross-sectional mass and the cross section, and the other is a high-efficiency scheme. The effect of axial load on vibration frequency is also examined and compared with that of a uniform column.

  19. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  20. Modeling, design and analysis of low frequency platform for attenuating micro-vibration in spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamesh, D.; Pandiyan, R.; Ghosal, Ashitava

    2010-08-01

    One of the most important factors that affect the pointing of precision payloads and devices in space platforms is the vibration generated due to static and dynamic unbalanced forces of rotary equipments placed in the neighborhood of payload. Generally, such disturbances are of low amplitude, less than 1 kHz, and are termed as 'micro-vibrations'. Due to low damping in the space structure, these vibrations have long decay time and they degrade the performance of payload. This paper addresses the design, modeling and analysis of a low frequency space frame platform for passive and active attenuation of micro-vibrations. This flexible platform has been designed to act as a mount for devices like reaction wheels, and consists of four folded continuous beams arranged in three dimensions. Frequency and response analysis have been carried out by varying the number of folds, and thickness of vertical beam. Results show that lower frequencies can be achieved by increasing the number of folds and by decreasing the thickness of the blade. In addition, active vibration control is studied by incorporating piezoelectric actuators and sensors in the dynamic model. It is shown using simulation that a control strategy using optimal control is effective for vibration suppression under a wide variety of loading conditions.

  1. Vibro-acoustic analysis of coupled spherical-cylindrical-spherical shells stiffened by ring and stringer reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yegao; Hua, Hongxing; Meng, Guang

    2015-10-01

    A semi-analytical method is developed to predict the vibration and acoustic responses of submerged coupled spherical-cylindrical-spherical shells stiffened by circumferential rings and longitudinal stringers. The structural model of the coupled stiffened shell is formulated using a modified variational method combined with a multi-segment partitioning technique, whereas a spectral Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral formulation is employed to model the exterior fluid. The stiffened rings and stringers, which may be few or many in number, non-uniform or uniform in size, and non-uniformly or uniformly spaced, are treated as discrete elements. The displacement and sound pressure variables are expanded in the form of a double mixed series using Fourier series and Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials. This provides a flexible way for the present method to account for the individual contributions of circumferential wave modes to the vibration and acoustic responses of coupled stiffened shells in an analytical manner. The application of the method is illustrated with several numerical examples, and comparisons are made with available solutions obtained from the coupled finite element/boundary element method. The contributions of different circumferential wave modes to the vibration responses, sound power and the directivity of radiated sound pressure for coupled shells bounded by light or heavy fluid are examined. Effects of the rings and stringers on the vibration and acoustic responses of the coupled shells are investigated.

  2. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods... Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2495 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: tduda@whoi.edu James F. Lynch Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering...Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2230 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: jlynch@whoi.edu Ying

  3. Perceptually-Driven Signal Analysis for Acoustic Event Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-26

    study of musical timbre . Defined as "the subjective attribute of sound which differentiates two or more sounds that have the same loudness, pitch and...therefore a better estimate of the likelihood function. 56 Bibliography [1] J. M. Grey, -AMultidimensional perceptual scaling of musical timbres ...Display, 2005. [10] J. M. Grey, "Perceptual effects of spectral modifications on musical timbres ," Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 63

  4. MOCHA: Multi-Study Ocean Acoustics Human Effects Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    looking at other odontocetes ( killer whales , Risso’s dolphins, false killer whale , melon- headed whale ) and are now beginning to focus on pilot whales ...ranging killer whales . Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. [submitted] Southall, B.L., Moretti, D.J., Abraham, B., Calambokidis, J., DeRuiter...scientists of existing BRS projects (Sirena sonar trials on sperm whales , Bahamas BRS, SOCAL BRS, Norwegian 3S and 3S2, Cape Hatteras EK60

  5. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    in the abyssal oceans , where typically SIW/Stopo > 1 for tall seamounts and ridges , the entire bottom topography contributes to the generation of...internal waves. In contrast, for (a) (b) 18 moderate ocean depths (say less than 4 km), where typically SIW/Stopo < 1 for seamounts and ridges , the...Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods

  6. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    deVries type wave evolution equations and 2D NHP numerical models. 3. Improved 4D deterministic and stochastic acoustic modeling. Improvements to time...Specifically, an analog of the rotation-neglecting Taylor-Goldstein equation was solved , after making reasonable simplifying assumptions. The...positions and sizes than the full NHP model (task 1), but may sacrifice detail and accuracy. Candidate models include those based on Korteweg

  7. Asymptotic Analysis of Ocean Bottom Reflected Acoustic Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    dependence(e-i’t), the reflected spatial part of the acoustic pressure field P in a homogeneous medium due to a point source placed in that medium...reasonable to assume that the water colunm is homogeneous , especially for experiments which involve small source and receiver heights. In many abyssal plain...configuration, a homogeneous layer between two homo- eneous halfspaces. Using a modified uniform asymptotic method, Stickler and Ahluwalia[12] obtained

  8. Analysis of the Acoustic Response of a Railroad Bridge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    atmospheric explosions, surf, missiles, rockets, weather systems and even animal vocalizations [1]. In order for up-going infrasonic energy to be...systems – Animal vocalizations – Urban Noise* PREMISE: Structures generate coupled low-frequency acoustics as fundamental modes of motion What is...rating tests: – Strain Gages (44 Used) • Main Structural Elements – One Train Engine Stringer Bottom Chord Diagonal Chord Diagonal Floor Beam Top

  9. Theoretical studies on the molecular structure, conformational preferences, topological and vibrational analysis of allicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durlak, Piotr; Berski, Sławomir; Latajka, Zdzisław

    2016-01-01

    The molecular structure, conformational preferences, topological and vibrational analysis of allicin has been investigated at two different approaches. Calculations have been carried out on static (DFT and MP2) levels with an assortment of Dunning's basis sets and dynamic CPMD simulations. In this both case within the isolated molecule approximation. The results point out that at least twenty different conformers coexist on the PES as confirmed by the flexible character of this molecule. The topological analysis of ELF showed very similar nature of the Ssbnd S and Ssbnd O bonds. The infrared spectrum has been calculated, and a comparative vibrational analysis has been performed.

  10. Acoustic effects analysis utilizing speckle pattern with fixed-particle Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Ali; Hollmann, Joseph A.; Holt, R. Glynn; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging in a turbid medium is limited because of multiple scattering a photon undergoes while traveling through the medium. Therefore, optical imaging is unable to provide high resolution information deep in the medium. In the case of soft tissue, acoustic waves unlike light, can travel through the medium with negligible scattering. However, acoustic waves cannot provide medically relevant contrast as good as light. Hybrid solutions have been applied to use the benefits of both imaging methods. A focused acoustic wave generates a force inside an acoustically absorbing medium known as acoustic radiation force (ARF). ARF induces particle displacement within the medium. The amount of displacement is a function of mechanical properties of the medium and the applied force. To monitor the displacement induced by the ARF, speckle pattern analysis can be used. The speckle pattern is the result of interfering optical waves with different phases. As light travels through the medium, it undergoes several scattering events. Hence, it generates different scattering paths which depends on the location of the particles. Light waves that travel along these paths have different phases (different optical path lengths). ARF induces displacement to scatterers within the acoustic focal volume, and changes the optical path length. In addition, temperature rise due to conversion of absorbed acoustic energy to heat, changes the index of refraction and therefore, changes the optical path length of the scattering paths. The result is a change in the speckle pattern. Results suggest that the average change in the speckle pattern measures the displacement of particles and temperature rise within the acoustic wave focal area, hence can provide mechanical and thermal properties of the medium.

  11. Contribution of the supraglottic larynx to the vocal product: imaging and acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracco, L. Carol

    1996-04-01

    Horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a mass lesion located in the region of the pharynx superior to the true vocal folds. In contrast to full or partial laryngectomy, patients who undergo horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy often present with little or nor involvement to the true vocal folds. This population provides an opportunity to examine the acoustic consequences of altering the pharynx while sparing the laryngeal sound source. Acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were acquired in a group of four patients before and after supraglottic laryngectomy. Acoustic measures included the identification of vocal tract resonances and the fundamental frequency of the vocal fold vibration. 3D reconstruction of the pharyngeal portion of each subjects' vocal tract were made from MRIs taken during phonation and volume measures were obtained. These measures reveal a variable, but often dramatic difference in the surgically-altered area of the pharynx and changes in the formant frequencies of the vowel/i/post surgically. In some cases the presence of the tumor created a deviation from the expected formant values pre-operatively with post-operative values approaching normal. Patients who also underwent radiation treatment post surgically tended to have greater constriction in the pharyngeal area of the vocal tract.

  12. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: A density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindasamy, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2014-09-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator’s strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  13. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: a density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Govindasamy, P; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2014-09-15

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1) respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator's strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  14. Planetary surface research with acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, C.; Seidensticker, K. J.

    2007-08-01

    Planetary space missions like Rosetta and ExoMars put more and more emphasis on the in-situ investigation of planetary surfaces. The use of mechanical vibrations in the audible frequency range provide a new means to study the structure and properties of the surface layers of terrestrial planets and minor bodies like comets. As the first of this new type of instruments, the Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) on the Rosetta Lander Philae intends to determine elastic parameters and the structure of the surface layer of the target comet. One drawback of CASSE is unknown possibly weak coupling to the cometary surface. A DFG project is being conducted at the DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt - to test the applicability of planetary penetration instruments like PLUTO, planetary sampling tool, developed for the Mars Express lander Beagle 2, or MUPUS, a heat probe instrument also on Philae, as stronger acoustic sources as well as to develop new methods for the analysis of acoustic data. From the analysis of the polarisation of the recorded acoustic signals it is possible to separate the mixture of different propagating wave types. These identified waves can be used for the determination of mechanical soil properties and near-surface layering. We also will present how acoustic receivers can be used to locate acoustic penetrators or nearby seismic sources using the travel time and/or the polarisation of the acoustic waves.

  15. Spectral analysis, vibrational assignments, NBO analysis, NMR, UV-Vis, hyperpolarizability analysis of 2-aminofluorene by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Jone Pradeepa, S; Sundaraganesan, N

    2014-05-05

    In this present investigation, the collective experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational analysis and NBO analysis has been reported for 2-aminofluorene. FT-IR spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-400 cm(-1). FT-Raman spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-50 cm(-1). The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) were calculated for 2-aminofluorene using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) model chemistry. (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of 2-aminofluorene were calculated using GIAO method. The computed vibrational and NMR spectra were compared with the experimental results. The total energy distribution (TED) was derived to deepen the understanding of different modes of vibrations contributed by respective wavenumber. The experimental UV-Vis spectra was recorded in the region of 400-200 nm and correlated with simulated spectra by suitably solvated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) model. The HOMO-LUMO energies were measured with time dependent DFT approach. The nonlinearity of the title compound was confirmed by hyperpolarizabilty examination. Using theoretical calculation Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) was investigated.

  16. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  17. Vibration analysis of rotating thin laminated composite shell of revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Shikanai, G.; Takayama, K.

    1995-11-01

    An exact solution procedure is presented for solving free vibrations of a rotating thin laminated composite shell of revolution having meridionally constant curvature. Based on the classical lamination theory, equations of motion and boundary conditions are obtained from the stationally conditions of the Lagrangian. The equations of motion are solved exactly by using a power series expansion for symmetrically laminated, cross-ply shells. Frequencies and mode shapes of the shells having both ends clamped and both ends freely supported are presented showing their variations with rotating angular velocity, number of laminae and other parameters.

  18. Analysis of proposed criteria for human response to vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janeway, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    The development of criteria for human vibration response is reviewed, including the evolution of the ISO standard 2631. The document is analyzed to show why its application to vehicle ride evaluation is strongly opposed. Alternative vertical horizontal limits for comfort are recommended in the ground vehicle ride frequency range above 1 Hz. These values are derived by correlating the absorbed power findings of Pradko and Lee with other established criteria. Special emphasis is placed on working limits in the frequency range of 1 to 10 Hz since this is the most significant area in ground vehicle ride evaluation.

  19. Free vibration analysis of Mindlin plates with linearly varying thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksu, G.; Al-Kaabi, S. A.

    1987-12-01

    A method based on the variational principles in conjunction with the finite difference technique is applied to examine the free vibration characteristics of isotropic rectangular plates of linearly varying thickness by including the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia. The validity of the present approach is demonstrated by comparing the results with other solutions proposed for plates with uniform and linearly varying thickness. Natural frequencies and mode shapes of Mindlin plates with simply supported and clamped edges are determined for various values of relative thickness ratio and the taper thickness constant.

  20. Correlation of AH-1G airframe flight vibration data with a coupled rotor-fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, K.; Shamie, J.

    1990-01-01

    The formulation and features of the Rotor-Airframe Comprehensive Analysis Program (RACAP) is described. The analysis employs a frequency domain, transfer matrix approach for the blade structural model, a time domain wake or momentum theory aerodynamic model, and impedance matching for rotor-fuselage coupling. The analysis is applied to the AH-1G helicopter, and a correlation study is conducted on fuselage vibration predictions. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the state-of-the-art in helicopter fuselage vibration prediction technology. The fuselage vibration predicted using RACAP are fairly good in the vertical direction and somewhat deficient in the lateral/longitudinal directions. Some of these deficiencies are traced to the fuselage finite element model.

  1. Nonlinear dynamic analysis for coupled vehicle-bridge vibration system on nonlinear foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shihua; Song, Guiqiu; Wang, Rongpeng; Ren, Zhaohui; Wen, Bangchun

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear dynamics of a parametrically excited coupled vehicle-bridge vibration system (CVBVS) is investigated, and the coupled system is subjected to a time-dependent transverse load including a constant value together with a harmonic time-variant component. The dynamic equations of the CVBVS are established by using the generalized Lagrange's equation. With the Galerkin truncation method, a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations are derived by discretizing the continuous governing equation. The influences of parametric excitation with nonlinear support stiffness, mass ratio, excitation amplitude and position relation on the dynamic behaviors are studied for the interaction between vehicle and the bridge. The analysis results indicate that the nonlinear dynamic characteristics are strongly attributed to the interaction of the coupled system. Nonlinear support stiffness of foundation and mass ratio can lead to complex dynamic behaviors such as jump discontinuous phenomenon, periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic motions. Vibration amplitude increases depending on the position, where the maximum vibration displacement does not occur at the center of the bridge. The excitation amplitude has an obvious influence on the nonlinear dynamic behaviors and the increase of the excitation amplitude makes the vibration strengthen. The bifurcation diagram and 3-D frequency spectrum are used to analyze the complex nonlinear dynamic behaviors of the CVBVS. The presented results can provide an insight to the understanding of the vibration characteristics of the coupled vehicle-bridge vibration system in engineering.

  2. Analysis of Dynamic Stiffness Effect of Primary Suspension Helical Springs on Railway Vehicle Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Thompson, D. J.; Zhou, J.; Gong, D.

    2016-09-01

    Helical springs within the primary suspension are critical components for isolating the whole vehicle system from vibration generated at the wheel/rail contact. As train speeds increase, the frequency region of excitation becomes larger, and a simplified static stiffness can no longer represent the real stiffness property in a vehicle dynamic model. Coil springs in particular exhibit strong internal resonances, which lead to high vibration amplitudes within the spring itself as well as degradation of the vibration isolation. In this paper, the dynamic stiffness matrix method is used to determine the dynamic stiffness of a helical spring from a vehicle primary suspension. Results are confirmed with a finite element analysis. Then the spring dynamic stiffness is included within a vehicle-track coupled dynamic model of a high speed train and the effect of the dynamic stiffening of the spring on the vehicle vibration is investigated. It is shown that, for frequencies above about 50 Hz, the dynamic stiffness of the helical spring changes sharply. Due to this effect, the vibration transmissibility increases considerably which results in poor vibration isolation of the primary suspension. Introducing a rubber layer in series with the coil spring can attenuate this effect.

  3. Optical vibration analysis of MEMS devices with pm-resolution in x, y, and z directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesen, Moritz; Kowarsch, Robert; Ochs, Wanja; Winter, Marcus; Rembe, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Laser-Doppler vibrometry has become the state-of-the-art technique for broadband vibration analysis with picometer resolution in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Displacement or velocity is detected only in direction of the measurement beam and, thus, three impinging laser beams are necessary to investigate all components of a threedimensional (3D) motion. This requirement is not problematic for 3D-vibration measurements on macroscopic objects with scattering surfaces but for reflective microstructures. A general problem of measuring 3D vibrations with three laser beams is optical crosstalk. This problem is especially critical for MEMS applications because the three beams have to be positioned closely to achieve high lateral resolution. In this paper, we prove that it is possible to impinge the small laser focus of a single laser beam with 3.3 μm diameter on a proper edge, corner or etch hole of a MEMS device to obtain real-time, 3D-vibration measurements with picometer amplitude resolution without optical crosstalk. We present the first measurements of the 3D-vibrations in MEMS devices. We prove that our method can meet the requirement of the MEMS community for fast, full-3D, broad-bandwidth, vibration measurements with picometer amplitude resolution and micrometer spatial resolution.

  4. Analysis of In-Situ Vibration Monitoring for End-Point Detection of CMP Planarization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hetherington, Dale L.; Lauffer, James P.; Shingledecker, David M.; Stein, David J.; Wyckoff, Edward E.

    1999-05-14

    This paper details the analysis of vibration monitoring for end-point control in oxide CMP processes. Two piezoelectric accelerometers were integrated onto the backside of a stainless steel polishing head of an IPEC 472 polisher. One sensor was placed perpendicular to the carrier plate (vertical) and the other parallel to the plate (horizontal). Wafers patterned with metal and coated with oxide material were polished at different speeds and pressures. Our results show that it is possible to sense a change in the vibration signal over time during planarization of oxide material on patterned wafers. The horizontal accelerometer showed more sensitivity to change in vibration amplitude compared to the vertical accelerometer for a given polish condition. At low carrier and platen rotation rates, the change in vibration signal over time at fixed frequencies decreased approximately ½ - 1 order of magnitude (over the 2 to 10 psi polish pressure ranges). At high rotation speeds, the vibration signal remained essentially constant indicating that other factors dominated the vibration signaL These results show that while it is possible to sense changes in acceleration during polishing, more robust hardware and signal processing algorithms are required to ensure its use over a wide range of process conditions.

  5. Correction of vibration for classical free-fall gravimeters with correlation-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Hu, H.; Wu, K.; Wang, L. J.

    2017-03-01

    In a free-fall absolute gravimeter, a laser interferometer is used to track the falling retro-reflector. To buffer the reference retro-reflector from seismic noise, a low-frequency vertical vibration isolator is traditionally used. However, an isolation device is usually complicated and expensive. A strap-down system using a seismometer to record the vibration and correct the measurement resolves the issue, but the actual recorded vibration cannot be directly used because of signal transfer delay and amplitude attenuation. Nevertheless, by quadratically fitting the trajectory of the falling retro-reflector and the motion of the reference retro-reflector, we find that their residuals are significantly correlated. Moreover, the transfer delay and the amplitude attenuation can be calculated using correlation analysis. With this capability, a vibration correction method for absolute gravimeters is proposed and demonstrated. The transfer delay and the gain attenuation are determined from data of only 25 drops, and can be used to correct subsequent measurements. The method is also applied in the T-1 absolute gravimeter. The standard deviation of the measurement results is improved by a factor of 20 after correction in a noisy environment, and improved by a factor of 5 in a quiet environment. Compared with vibration isolators, the strap-down system using this correction method is much more compact, enabling its use in field conditions or even dynamic environments not suitable for vibration isolators.

  6. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) program : Bell Helicopter Textron accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate vibration prediction for helicopter airframes is needed to 'fly from the drawing board' without costly development testing to solve vibration problems. The principal analytical tool for vibration prediction within the U.S. helicopter industry is the NASTRAN finite element analysis. Under the NASA DAMVIBS research program, Bell conducted NASTRAN modeling, ground vibration testing, and correlations of both metallic (AH-1G) and composite (ACAP) airframes. The objectives of the program were to assess NASTRAN airframe vibration correlations, to investigate contributors to poor agreement, and to improve modeling techniques. In the past, there has been low confidence in higher frequency vibration prediction for helicopters that have multibladed rotors (three or more blades) with predominant excitation frequencies typically above 15 Hz. Bell's findings under the DAMVIBS program, discussed in this paper, included the following: (1) accuracy of finite element models (FEM) for composite and metallic airframes generally were found to be comparable; (2) more detail is needed in the FEM to improve higher frequency prediction; (3) secondary structure not normally included in the FEM can provide significant stiffening; (4) damping can significantly affect phase response at higher frequencies; and (5) future work is needed in the areas of determination of rotor-induced vibratory loads and optimization.

  7. Integrated framework for jitter analysis combining disturbance, structure, vibration isolator and optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Yoon, Jae-San; Han, Jae-Hung

    2012-04-01

    Micro-vibration induced by actuating components of the satellite can severely degrade the optical performance of high precision observation satellites. In this paper, an integrated analysis framework combining disturbance, structure, vibration isolator and optical system model is developed for evaluating the performance of optical payloads in the presence of micro-vibration, and the effectiveness of using a vibration isolator for performance enhancement. Reaction wheel generated disturbance, usually the largest anticipated disturbance, is modeled including the disturbances' interaction with the structural modes of the wheel. For structure modeling, a finite element program is used to solve for eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a structure model which are then used to create a state space model in modal form. A vibration isolator model capturing dynamics of an active isolator utilizing piezoelectric based actuator and load cell for feedback control is included to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel disturbances to the base structure. Dynamic response of the structure to reaction wheel disturbances is calculated with and without vibration isolator. The resulting jitter is used to obtain modulation transfer function (MTF) of diffraction limited optical system model, and the obtained MTF is used as spatial frequency filter for image simulation.

  8. Design and analysis of an intelligent vibration isolation platform for reaction/momentum wheel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei-Yong; Li, Dong-Xu

    2012-06-01

    This study focuses on design and analysis of an intelligent vibration isolation platform for reaction wheel assemblies (RWAs) and momentum wheel assemblies (MWAs). A passive platform consisting of four folded beams is designed and analysed for MWAs. A simple and effective mathematical model is developed for the system consisting of the platform and MWAs, and this model is used to investigate the passive vibration isolation performance. Further development is performed to produce an intelligent platform for RWAs, with piezoelectric sensors and actuators bonded to the vertical beams. The flywheel imbalance and impulse load are assumed to be input disturbances for the investigation of the active vibration isolation performance by the finite element method (FEM). The simulation results show that the passive vibration isolation platform is particularly effective for the suppression of a high frequency range vibration for MWAs, and the intelligent platform using velocity feedback control effectively attenuates the dynamic amplification of amplitude at resonance for RWAs. Thus, it is concluded that the passive platform can be used as a vibration isolation platform for MWAs and that the intelligent one can be used for RWAs.

  9. Statistical correlation analysis for comparing vibration data from test and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.; Strang, R. F.; Purves, L. R.; Hershfeld, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A theory was developed to compare vibration modes obtained by NASTRAN analysis with those obtained experimentally. Because many more analytical modes can be obtained than experimental modes, the analytical set was treated as expansion functions for putting both sources in comparative form. The dimensional symmetry was developed for three general cases: nonsymmetric whole model compared with a nonsymmetric whole structural test, symmetric analytical portion compared with a symmetric experimental portion, and analytical symmetric portion with a whole experimental test. The theory was coded and a statistical correlation program was installed as a utility. The theory is established with small classical structures.

  10. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling of Broadband Signals - Analysis of Potential Disturbances during CTBT On-Site Inspection Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Altmann, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    For the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) the precise localisation of possible underground nuclear explosion sites is important. During an on-site inspection (OSI) sensitive seismic measurements of aftershocks can be performed, which, however, can be disturbed by other signals. To improve the quality and effectiveness of these measurements it is essential to understand those disturbances so that they can be reduced or prevented. In our work we focus on disturbing signals caused by airborne sources: When the sound of aircraft (as often used by the inspectors themselves) hits the ground, it propagates through pores in the soil. Its energy is transferred to the ground and soil vibrations are created which can mask weak aftershock signals. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is still incomplete. However, it is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. We present our recent advances in this field. We performed several measurements to record sound pressure and soil velocity produced by various sources, e.g. broadband excitation by jet aircraft passing overhead and signals artificially produced by a speaker. For our experimental set-up microphones were placed close to the ground and geophones were buried in different depths in the soil. Several sensors were shielded from the directly incident acoustic signals by a box coated with acoustic damping material. While sound pressure under the box was strongly reduced, the soil velocity measured under the box was just slightly smaller than outside of it. Thus these soil vibrations were mostly created outside the box and travelled through the soil to the sensors. This information is used to estimate characteristic propagation lengths of the acoustically induced signals in the soil. In the seismic data we observed interference patterns which are likely caused by the

  11. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  12. Vibration Analysis of the Space Shuttle External Tank Cable Tray Flight Data With and Without PAL Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Bruce E.; Panda, Jayanta; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    External Tank Cable Tray vibration data for three successive Space Shuttle flights were analyzed to assess response to buffet and the effect of removal of the Protuberance Air Loads (PAL) ramp. Waveform integration, spectral analysis, cross-correlation analysis and wavelet analysis were employed to estimate vibration modes and temporal development of vibration motion from a sparse array of accelerometers and an on-board system that acquired 16 channels of data for approximately the first 2 min of each flight. The flight data indicated that PAL ramp removal had minimal effect on the fluctuating loads on the cable tray. The measured vibration frequencies and modes agreed well with predicted structural response.

  13. Vibration Analysis of the Space Shuttle External Tank Cable Tray Flight Data with and without PAL Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, B. E.; Panda, B. E.; Sutliff, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    External Tank Cable Tray vibration data for three successive Space Shuttle flights were analyzed to assess response to buffet and the effect of removal of the Protuberance Air Loads (PAL) ramp. Waveform integration, spectral analysis, cross-correlation analysis and wavelet analysis were employed to estimate vibration modes and temporal development of vibration motion from a sparse array of accelerometers and an on-board system that acquired 16 channels of data for approximately the first two minutes of each flight. The flight data indicated that PAL ramp removal had minimal effect on the fluctuating loads on the cable tray. The measured vibration frequencies and modes agreed well with predicted structural response.

  14. Analysis of possibility of applying the PVDF foil in industrial vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, A.

    2015-11-01

    There are many machines using the piezoelectric effects. Systems with smart materials are often used because they have high potential applications for example transducers can be applied to receive required characteristic of projected system. Every engineer and designer know how important it is properly mathematical model and method of the analysis. Also it is important to consider all parameters of analyzed system for example glue layer between elements. Geometrical and material parameters has a significant impact on the characteristics of the all system's components because the omission of the influence of one of them results in inaccuracy in the analysis of the system. In article the modeling and testing of vibrating systems with piezoelectric ceramic materials transducers used as actuators and vibration dampers. The method of analysis of the vibrating sensor systems will be presented, mathematical model, and characteristics, to determine the influence of the system's properties on these characteristics. Main scientific point of the project is to analyze and demonstrate possibility of applying new construction with the PVDF foil or any other belonging to a group of smart materials in industrial sensors. Currently, the vibration level sensors are used by practically all manufacturers of piezoelectric ceramic plates to generate and detect the vibration of the fork.

  15. Conformational analysis and vibrational assignments of benzohydroxamic acid and benzohydrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2012-09-01

    The structures of benzohydroxamic acid (BHA) and benzohydrazide (BH) were investigated at the B3LYP, MP2 and MP4(SDQ) levels of theory and compared to the corresponding structures of formyl analogs. All levels of theory predicted the two molecules to exist predominantly in a near-planar structure adopting a cis conformation where the hydroxyl group of the acid and the amino group of the hydrazide eclipse the carbonyl bond. The stability of the near-planar structure is explained on the basis of mutual conjugation between the phenyl and the Nsbnd H moieties with the Cdbnd O group. The intramolecular interaction between the carbonyl group and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxyl group of the acid or the amino group of the hydrazide plays a significant role in stabilizing the near-cis form in both molecules. The degree of the non-planarity was predicted to increase as going from BHA to BH molecules. The computed vibrational frequencies of the near-cis structure were combined with experimental infrared and Raman data to provide reliable vibrational assignments for the two molecules.

  16. Modal analysis of dislocation vibration and reaction attempt frequency

    DOE PAGES

    Sobie, Cameron; Capolungo, Laurent; McDowell, David L.; ...

    2017-02-04

    Transition state theory is a fundamental approach for temporal coarse-graining. It estimates the reaction rate for a transition processes by quantifying the activation free energy and attempt frequency for the unit process. To calculate the transition rate of a gliding dislocation, the attempt frequency is often obtained from line tension estimates of dislocation vibrations, a highly simplified model of dislocation behavior. This work revisits the calculation of attempt frequency for a dislocation bypassing an obstacle, in this case a self-interstitial atom (SIA) loop. First, a direct calculation of the vibrational characteristics of a finite pinned dislocation segment is compared tomore » line tension estimates before moving to the more complex case of dislocation-obstacle bypass. The entropic factor associated with the attempt frequency is calculated for a finite dislocation segment and for an infinite glide dislocation interacting with an SIA loop. Lastly, it is found to be dislocation length independent for three cases of dislocation-self interstitial atom (SIA) loop interactions.« less

  17. Vibration characteristics analysis of rotating shrouded blades with impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Xie, Fangtao; Nai, Haiqiang; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-09-01

    A dynamic model of rotating shrouded blades with impacts among adjacent shrouded blades is established considering the effects of the centrifugal stiffening, spin softening and Coriolis force, and the model is validated using finite element method. In the proposed model, the shrouded blade is simplified as a cantilever Euler-Bernoulli beam with a mass point at the free end, and the flexural dynamic stiffness of shrouded blade is selected as contact stiffness during collision. Based on the developed model, the effects of symmetric and asymmetric shroud gaps, rotational speeds, and aerodynamic force amplitudes on the dynamic characteristics of shrouded blades are analyzed through Newmark-β numerical method. The results indicate that (1) the vibro-impact responses of shrouded blades under some asymmetric gaps are more complicated than that under symmetric gap. (2) With the increase of rotational speed from 6000 to 10,000 rev/min, the system vibration experiences from period-three motion, through chaotic motion, finally to period-one motion during collision process because the increasing rotational speed changes the flexural dynamic stiffness of rotating blade. (3) The vibration displacements of shrouded blades increase linearly, and impact force increases linearly with the increase of aerodynamic force amplitude.

  18. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program: A government overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    LaRC, under the Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program, set out in 1984 to establish the technology base needed by the rotorcraft industry for developing an advanced finite-element-based dynamics design analysis capability for vibrations. Considerable work was performed by the industry participants in the program since that time. Because the DAMVIBS Program is being phased out, a government/industry assessment of the program was made to identify those accomplishments and contributions which may be ascribed to the program. The purpose is to provide an overview of the program and its accomplishments and contributions from the perspective of the government sponsoring organization.

  19. Analysis of hypersonic nozzles including vibrational nonequilibrium and intermolecular force effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canupp, Patrick W.; Candler, Graham V.; Perkins, John N.; Erickson, Wayne D.

    1992-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics algorithm is developed for the study of high-pressure axisymmetric hypersonic nozzle flows. The effects of intermolecular forces and vibrational nonequilibrium are included in the analysis. The numerical simulation of gases with an arbitrary equation of state is discussed. Simulations for a high pressure nozzle (p(0) = 138 MPa) demonstrate that both intermolecular forces and vibrational nonequilibrium have a significant affect on the flow. These nonideal effects tend to increase the Mach number at the nozzle exit plane. Thus, they must be included in the design and analysis of high pressure hypersonic nozzles.

  20. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) program: A government overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1993-01-01

    NASA-Langley, under the Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program, set out in 1984 to establish the technology base needed by the rotorcraft industry for developing an advanced finite-element-based dynamics design analysis capability for vibrations. Considerable work has been done by the industry participants in the program since that time. Because the DAMVIBS Program is being phased out, a government/industry assessment of the program has been made to identify those accomplishments and contributions which may be ascribed to the program. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the program and its accomplishments and contributions from the perspective of the government sponsoring organization.

  1. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis, and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, R. J.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Acoustic Oscillations (TAO) can occur in cryogenic systems and produce significant sources of heat. This source of heat can increase the boil off rate of cryogenic propellants in spacecraft storage tanks and reduce mission life. This paper discusses the causes of TAO, how it can be detected, what analyses can be done to predict it, and how to prevent it from occurring.The paper provides practical insight into what can aggravate instability, practical methods for mitigation, and when TAO does not occur. A real life example of a cryogenic system with an unexpected heat source is discussed, along with how TAO was confirmed and eliminated.

  2. An Analysis of the Transient Responses of Acoustic Delay Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Tatsuo; Tominaga, Goroh

    1981-09-01

    Transient responses of acoustic delay lines (ADLs) were simulated on the assumptions that gas molecules in each segment of an ADL were in thermal equilibrium and that the straight-through component in the intruding gas was negligibly small. The flow rate of gas through an orifice was evaluated by using expressions of orifice conductance applicable in a wide pressure range. In order to examine the adequateness of the present method, the results of simulations were compared with several experimental data. The influence of the location of vacuum pumps and of arranging a high speed shutter at the entrance of an ADL were also simulated.

  3. Acoustic Analysis of Plutonium and Nuclear Weapon Components at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, T. A.; Reynolds, J. J.; Rowe, C. A.; Freibert, F. J.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Farrow, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the primary missions of Los Alamos National Laboratory is to use science based techniques to certify the nuclear weapons stockpile of the United States. As such we use numerous NDE techniques to monitor materials and systems properties in weapons. Two techniques will be discussed in this presentation, Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) and Acoustic Emission (AE). ARS is used to observe manufacturing variations or changes in the plutonium containing component (pit) of the weapon system. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons can be used to determine variation in the pit components. Piezoelectric transducer driven acoustic resonance experiments will be described along with initial qualitative and more complex analysis and comparison techniques derived from earthquake analysis performed at LANL. Similarly, AE is used to measure the time of arrival of acoustic signals created by mechanical events that can occur in nuclear weapon components. Both traditional time of arrival techniques and more advanced techniques are used to pinpoint the location and type of acoustic emission event. Similar experiments on tensile tests of brittle phases of plutonium metal will be described.

  4. Energy Finite Element Analysis for Computing the High Frequency Vibration of the Aluminum Testbed Cylinder and Correlating the Results to Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas

    2005-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) is a finite element based computational method for high frequency vibration and acoustic analysis. The EFEA solves with finite elements governing differential equations for energy variables. These equations are developed from wave equations. Recently, an EFEA method for computing high frequency vibration of structures either in vacuum or in contact with a dense fluid has been presented. The presence of fluid loading has been considered through added mass and radiation damping. The EFEA developments were validated by comparing EFEA results to solutions obtained by very dense conventional finite element models and solutions from classical techniques such as statistical energy analysis (SEA) and the modal decomposition method for bodies of revolution. EFEA results have also been compared favorably with test data for the vibration and the radiated noise generated by a large scale submersible vehicle. The primary variable in EFEA is defined as the time averaged over a period and space averaged over a wavelength energy density. A joint matrix computed from the power transmission coefficients is utilized for coupling the energy density variables across any discontinuities, such as change of plate thickness, plate/stiffener junctions etc. When considering the high frequency vibration of a periodically stiffened plate or cylinder, the flexural wavelength is smaller than the interval length between two periodic stiffeners, therefore the stiffener stiffness can not be smeared by computing an equivalent rigidity for the plate or cylinder. The periodic stiffeners must be regarded as coupling components between periodic units. In this paper, Periodic Structure (PS) theory is utilized for computing the coupling joint matrix and for accounting for the periodicity characteristics.

  5. Effects of vibration and shock on the performance of gas-bearing space-power Brayton cycle turbomachinery. Part 3: Sinusoidal and random vibration data reduction and evaluation, and random vibration probability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessarzik, J. M.; Chiang, T.; Badgley, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The random vibration response of a gas bearing rotor support system has been experimentally and analytically investigated in the amplitude and frequency domains. The NASA Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU), a 36,000 rpm, 10 KWe turbogenerator had previously been subjected in the laboratory to external random vibrations, and the response data recorded on magnetic tape. This data has now been experimentally analyzed for amplitude distribution and magnetic tape. This data has now been experimentally analyzed for amplitude distribution and frequency content. The results of the power spectral density analysis indicate strong vibration responses for the major rotor-bearing system components at frequencies which correspond closely to their resonant frequencies obtained under periodic vibration testing. The results of amplitude analysis indicate an increasing shift towards non-Gaussian distributions as the input level of external vibrations is raised. Analysis of axial random vibration response of the BRU was performed by using a linear three-mass model. Power spectral densities, the root-mean-square value of the thrust bearing surface contact were calculated for specified input random excitation.

  6. DFT computation and experimental analysis of vibrational and electronic spectra of phenoxy acetic acid herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Dhas, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Roy, S. D. D.; Balachandran, S.

    2013-05-01

    An absolute vibrational analysis has been attempted on the basis of experimental FTIR and NIR-FT Raman spectra with calculated vibrational wavenumbers and intensities of phenoxy acetic acids. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been calculated with the help of B3LYP method with Dunning correlation consistent basis set aug-cc-pVTZ. The electronic structures of molecular fragments were described in terms of natural bond orbital analysis, which shows intermolecular Osbnd H⋯O and intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The electronic absorption spectra with different solvents have been investigated in combination with time-dependent density functional theory calculation. The pKa values of phenoxy acetic acids were compared.

  7. Theoretical and experimental analysis of bispectrum of vibration signals for fault diagnosis of gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guoji, Shen; McLaughlin, Stephen; Yongcheng, Xu; White, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis is an important issue for gearbox maintenance and safety. The critical process involved in such activities is to extract reliable features representative of the condition of the gears or gearbox. In this paper a framework is presented for the application of bispectrum to the analysis of gearbox vibration. The bispectrum of a composite signal consisting of multiple periodic components has peaks at the bifrequencies that correspond to closely related components which can be produced by any nonlinearity. As a result, biphase verification is necessary to decrease false-alarming for any bispectrum-based method. A model based on modulated signals is adopted to reveal the bispectrum characteristics for the vibration of a faulty gear, and the corresponding amplitude and phase of the bispectrum expression are deduced. Therefore, a diagnostic approach based on the theoretical result is derived and verified by the analysis of a set of vibration signals from a helicopter gearbox.

  8. Application of analysis techniques for low frequency interior noise and vibration of commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landmann, A. E.; Tillema, H. F.; Macgregor, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA), statistical energy analysis (SEA), and a power flow method (computer program PAIN) were used to assess low frequency interior noise associated with advanced propeller installations. FEA and SEA models were used to predict cabin noise and vibration and evaluate suppression concepts for structure-borne noise associated with the shaft rotational frequency and harmonics (less than 100 Hz). SEA and PAIN models were used to predict cabin noise and vibration and evaluate suppression concepts for airborne noise associated with engine radiated propeller tones. Both aft-mounted and wing-mounted propeller configurations were evaluated. Ground vibration test data from a 727 airplane modified to accept a propeller engine were used to compare with predictions for the aft-mounted propeller. Similar data from the 767 airplane was used for the wing-mounted comparisons.

  9. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  10. Acoustical analysis and multiple source auralizations of charismatic worship spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard W.

    2004-05-01

    Because of the spontaneity and high level of call and response, many charismatic churches have verbal and musical communication problems that stem from highly reverberant sound fields, poor speech intelligibility, and muddy music. This research looks at the subjective dimensions of room acoustics perception that affect a charismatic worship space, which is summarized using the acronym RISCS (reverberation, intimacy, strength, coloration, and spaciousness). The method of research is to obtain acoustical measurements for three worship spaces in order to analyze the objective parameters associated with the RISCS subjective dimensions. For the same spaces, binaural room impulse response (BRIR) measurements are done for different receiver positions in order to create an auralization for each position. The subjective descriptors of RISCS are analyzed through the use of listening tests of the three auralized spaces. The results from the measurements and listening tests are analyzed to determine if listeners' perceptions correlate with the objective parameter results, the appropriateness of the subjective parameters for the use of the space, and which parameters seem to take precedent. A comparison of the multi-source auralization to a conventional single-source auralization was done with the mixed down version of the synchronized multi-track anechoic signals.

  11. Analysis of acoustic reduction using spectral similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Annika; Gubian, Michele; ten Bosch, Louis; Boves, Lou

    2009-12-01

    Articulatory and acoustic reduction can manifest itself in the temporal and spectral domains. This study introduces a measure of spectral reduction, which is based on the speech decoding techniques commonly used in automatic speech recognizers. Using data for four frequent Dutch affixes from a large corpus of spontaneous face-to-face conversations, it builds on an earlier study examining the effects of lexical frequency on durational reduction in spoken Dutch [Pluymaekers, M. et al. (2005). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 2561-2569], and compares the proposed measure of spectral reduction with duration as a measure of reduction. The results suggest that the spectral reduction scores capture other aspects of reduction than duration. While duration can--albeit to a moderate degree--be predicted by a number of linguistically motivated variables (such as word frequency, segmental context, and speech rate), the spectral reduction scores cannot. This suggests that the spectral reduction scores capture information that is not directly accounted for by the linguistically motivated variables. The results also show that the spectral reduction scores are able to predict a substantial amount of the variation in duration that the linguistically motivated variables do not account for.

  12. Feigned depression and feigned sleepiness: a voice acoustical analysis.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Nicole; Cannizzaro, Michael S; Harel, Brian T; Snyder, Peter J

    2004-07-01

    We sought to profile the voice acoustical correlates of simulated, or feigned depression by neurologically and psychiatrically healthy control subjects. We also sought to identify the voice acoustical correlates of feigned sleepiness for these same subjects. Twenty-two participants were asked to speak freely about a cartoon, to count from 1 to 10, and to sustain an "a" sound for approximately 5s. These exercises were completed three times (within the same testing session) with three differing sets of instructions to the participants. These three conditions were presented in pseudo-random order to control for any order effects, and all subjects were naïve to the intended purpose of this study. For all three conditions, mean speaking rates and pitch ranges were calculated. A series of paired t tests showed significant differences in the speaking rates (counting numbers and free-speech exercises) between the 'normal' and feigned sleepy conditions, and between the normal and feigned depression conditions, but not between the 'sleepy' and 'depressed' conditions. The results for pitch range, for all speech exercises, were not different between the normal and either the feigned depression or feigned sleepiness conditions. These results indicate that persons feigning depression and sleepiness demonstrate some level of conscious control of their speech rate, but they did not convincingly alter their pitch ranges while feigning depression or sleepiness.

  13. Analysis of vibrational resonance in bi-harmonically driven plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Layinde, T. O.; Laoye, J. A.; Popoola, O. O.; Vincent, U. E.

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of vibrational resonance (VR) is examined and analyzed in a bi-harmonically driven two-fluid plasma model with nonlinear dissipation. An equation for the slow oscillations of the system is analytically derived in terms of the parameters of the fast signal using the method of direct separation of motion. The presence of a high frequency externally applied electric field is found to significantly modify the system's dynamics, and consequently, induce VR. The origin of the VR in the plasma model has been identified, not only from the effective plasma potential but also from the contributions of the effective nonlinear dissipation. Beside several dynamical changes, including multiple symmetry-breaking bifurcations, attractor escapes, and reversed period-doubling bifurcations, numerical simulations also revealed the occurrence of single and double resonances induced by symmetry breaking bifurcations.

  14. The terahertz spectroscopic investigation and vibration analysis of triadimefon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gu, Xiaohong; Li, Lanyu

    2016-04-01

    The terahertz spectra of triadimefon has been investigated using time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the range of 0.4~2.0 THz. Calculations of the vibrational modes and intensities are carried out using solid-state density functional theory (DFT) with periodic boundary condition employing the B3LYP and PW91 density functions. Good agreement between the calculated and experimentally measured spectra has been achieved where isolated-molecule calculations fail to reproduce the observed spectral characters. These simulations reveal that the solid-state DFT calculations provide high quality structural and spectral reproductions. All the experimental THz absorption peaks are assigned utilizing the PW91 and BLYP method.

  15. Acoustic Propagation Studies For Sperm Whale Phonation Analysis During LADC Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Caruthers, Jerald W.

    2004-11-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) conducted a series of passive acoustic experiments in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and the Ligurian Sea in 2001 and 2002. Environmental and acoustic moorings were deployed in areas of large concentrations of marine mammals (mainly, sperm whales). Recordings and analysis of whale phonations are among the objectives of the project. Each mooring had a single autonomously recording hydrophone (Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS)) obtained from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office after modification to record signals up to 5,859 Hz in the Gulf of Mexico and up to 12,500 Hz in the Ligurian Sea. Self-recording environmental sensors, attached to the moorings, and concurrent environmental ship surveys provided the environmental data for the experiments. The results of acoustic simulations of long-range propagation of the broad-band (500-6,000 Hz) phonation pulses from a hypothetical whale location to the recording hydrophone in the experimental environments are presented. The utilization of the simulation results for an interpretation of the spectral features observed in whale clicks and for the development of tracking algorithms from single hydrophone recordings based on the identification of direct and surface and bottom reflected arrivals are discussed. [Research supported by ONR.

  16. A finite difference analysis of the field present behind an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Andrew M

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of an incident sound wave with an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier is considered. Of particular interest is the presence of several acoustic wave components in the shadow region of this barrier. A finite difference model capable of simulating this geometry is validated by comparison to the analytical solution for an idealized, hard-soft barrier. A panel comprising a high air-content closed cell foam backed with an elastic (metal) back plate is then examined. The insertion loss of this panel was found to exceed the dynamic range of the measurement system and was thus acoustically impenetrable. Experimental results from such a panel are shown to contain artifacts not present in the diffraction solution, when acoustic waves are incident upon the soft surface. A finite difference analysis of this experimental configuration replicates the presence of the additional field components. Furthermore, the simulated results allow the additional components to be identified as arising from the S(0) and A(0) Lamb modes traveling in the elastic plate. These Lamb mode artifacts are not found to be present in the shadow region when the acoustic waves are incident upon the elastic surface.

  17. Data-driven automated acoustic analysis of human infant vocalizations using neural network tools

    PubMed Central

    Warlaumont, Anne S.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Buder, Eugene H.; Dale, Rick; Kozma, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of infant vocalizations has typically employed traditional acoustic measures drawn from adult speech acoustics, such as f0, duration, formant frequencies, amplitude, and pitch perturbation. Here an alternative and complementary method is proposed in which data-derived spectrographic features are central. 1-s-long spectrograms of vocalizations produced by six infants recorded longitudinally between ages 3 and 11 months are analyzed using a neural network consisting of a self-organizing map and a single-layer perceptron. The self-organizing map acquires a set of holistic, data-derived spectrographic receptive fields. The single-layer perceptron receives self-organizing map activations as input and is trained to classify utterances into prelinguistic phonatory categories (squeal, vocant, or growl), identify the ages at which they were produced, and identify the individuals who produced them. Classification performance was significantly better than chance for all three classification tasks. Performance is compared to another popular architecture, the fully supervised multilayer perceptron. In addition, the network’s weights and patterns of activation are explored from several angles, for example, through traditional acoustic measurements of the network’s receptive fields. Results support the use of this and related tools for deriving holistic acoustic features directly from infant vocalization data and for the automatic classification of infant vocalizations. PMID:20370038

  18. Data-driven automated acoustic analysis of human infant vocalizations using neural network tools.

    PubMed

    Warlaumont, Anne S; Oller, D Kimbrough; Buder, Eugene H; Dale, Rick; Kozma, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Acoustic analysis of infant vocalizations has typically employed traditional acoustic measures drawn from adult speech acoustics, such as f(0), duration, formant frequencies, amplitude, and pitch perturbation. Here an alternative and complementary method is proposed in which data-derived spectrographic features are central. 1-s-long spectrograms of vocalizations produced by six infants recorded longitudinally between ages 3 and 11 months are analyzed using a neural network consisting of a self-organizing map and a single-layer perceptron. The self-organizing map acquires a set of holistic, data-derived spectrographic receptive fields. The single-layer perceptron receives self-organizing map activations as input and is trained to classify utterances into prelinguistic phonatory categories (squeal, vocant, or growl), identify the ages at which they were produced, and identify the individuals who produced them. Classification performance was significantly better than chance for all three classification tasks. Performance is compared to another popular architecture, the fully supervised multilayer perceptron. In addition, the network's weights and patterns of activation are explored from several angles, for example, through traditional acoustic measurements of the network's receptive fields. Results support the use of this and related tools for deriving holistic acoustic features directly from infant vocalization data and for the automatic classification of infant vocalizations.

  19. Acoustic analysis of voice in patients treated by reconstructive subtotal laryngectomy. Evaluation and critical review

    PubMed Central

    Di Nicola, V; Fiorella, ML; Spinelli, DA; Fiorella, R

    2006-01-01

    Summary Aim of this investigation was to analyse the voice in a group of 20 patients submitted to supracricoid partial laryngectomy (cricohyoidopexy, sparing two arytenoids) by the Multi Dimensional Voice Programme acoustic analysis system. Results revealed the following sound characteristics: high rate of noise, lack of periodic component of the signal, high rate of segments with no sound signal, vocal segments with marked air-turbulent flow, variation amplitude and frequency coefficients doubled compared to normal values, average fundamental frequency, if present, extremely variable and unsteady. These results show that the phonatory ability of the residual larynx, due to the altered anatomo-physiology of the structure after surgery, has to be completely re-estimated. In fact, the residual larynx determines a definitely reduced periodic acoustic signal, rich in noise and which can not be modulated. Good phonatory results of this treatment are basically due to preservation of a still understandable (but not perfect!) speech which, by ensuring the subjects’ speech ability, overcomes and has little influence on the really poor quality of the vocal signal in these patients. However, the patient obtains a “new voice” as far as concerns acoustic features and this is very important for communication and social life. Moreover, the possibility of objectively estimating acoustic vocal function ability allows monitoring of the trend and results of possible speech therapy and/or phonosurgical rehabilitation treatment which should start from new anatomical and physiological bases, as well as from the new physical acoustic mechanism of signal production. PMID:16886848

  20. Acoustic analysis of voice in patients treated by reconstructive subtotal laryngectomy. Evaluation and critical review.

    PubMed

    Di Nicola, V; Fiorella, M L; Spinelli, D A; Fiorella, R

    2006-04-01

    Aim of this investigation was to analyse the voice in a group of 20 patients submitted to supracricoid partial laryngectomy (cricohyoidopexy, sparing two arytenoids) by the Multi Dimensional Voice Programme acoustic analysis system. Results revealed the following sound characteristics: high rate of noise, lack of periodic component of the signal, high rate of segments with no sound signal, vocal segments with marked air-turbulent flow, variation amplitude and frequency coefficients doubled compared to normal values, average fundamental frequency, if present, extremely variable and unsteady. These results show that the phonatory ability of the residual larynx, due to the altered anatomo-physiology of the structure after surgery, has to be completely re-estimated. In fact, the residual larynx determines a definitely reduced periodic acoustic signal, rich in noise and which can not be modulated. Good phonatory results of this treatment are basically due to preservation of a still understandable (but not perfect!) speech which, by ensuring the subjects' speech ability, overcomes and has little influence on the really poor quality of the vocal signal in these patients. However, the patient obtains a "new voice" as far as concerns acoustic features and this is very important for communication and social life. Moreover, the possibility of objectively estimating acoustic vocal function ability allows monitoring of the trend and results of possible speech therapy and/or phonosurgical rehabilitation treatment which should start from new anatomical and physiological bases, as well as from the new physical acoustic mechanism of signal production.

  1. Continuous adjoint sensitivity analysis for aerodynamic and acoustic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayour, Kaveh

    1999-11-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization methodology based on continuous adjoint sensitivities has been developed for two-dimensional steady Euler equations on unstructured meshes and the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation. The continuous adjoint sensitivities of the Helmholtz equation for acoustic applications have also been derived and discussed. The highlights of the developments for the steady two-dimensional Euler equations are the generalization of the airfoil surface boundary condition of the adjoint system to allow a proper closure of the Lagrangian functional associated with a general cost functional and the results for an inverse problem with density as the prescribed target. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that a transformation to the natural coordinate system, in conjunction with the reduction of the governing state equations to the control surface, results in sensitivity integrals that are only a function of the tangential derivatives of the state variables. This approach alleviates the need for directional derivative computations with components along the normal to the control surface, which can render erroneous results. With regard to the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation (UTSD), the continuous adjoint methodology has been successfully extended to unsteady flows. It has been demonstrated that for periodic airfoil oscillations leading to limit-cycle behavior, the Lagrangian functional can be only closed if the time interval of interest spans one or more periods of the flow oscillations after the limit-cycle has been attained. The steady state and limit-cycle sensitivities are then validated by comparing with the brute-force derivatives. The importance of accounting for the flow circulation sensitivity, appearing in the form of a Dirac delta in the wall boundary condition at the trailing edge, has been stressed and demonstrated. Remarkably, the cost of an unsteady adjoint solution is about 0.2 times that of a UTSD solution

  2. Wavelet analysis of baryon acoustic structures in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, P.; Labatie, A.; Clerc, N.; Martínez, V. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.; Saar, E.; Paredes, S.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are imprinted in the density field by acoustic waves travelling in the plasma of the early universe. Their fixed scale can be used as a standard ruler to study the geometry of the universe. Aims: The BAO have been previously detected using correlation functions and power spectra of the galaxy distribution. We present a new method to detect the real-space structures associated with BAO. These baryon acoustic structures are spherical shells of relatively small density contrast, surrounding high density central regions. Methods: We design a specific wavelet adapted to search for shells, and exploit the physics of the process by making use of two different mass tracers, introducing a specific statistic to detect the BAO features. We show the effect of the BAO signal in this new statistic when applied to the Λ - cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, using an analytical approximation to the transfer function. We confirm the reliability and stability of our method by using cosmological N-body simulations from the MareNostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE). Results: We apply our method to the detection of BAO in a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the "main" catalogue to trace the shells, and the luminous red galaxies (LRG) as tracers of the high density central regions. Using this new method, we detect, with a high significance, that the LRG in our sample are preferentially located close to the centres of shell-like structures in the density field, with characteristics similar to those expected from BAO. We show that stacking selected shells, we can find their characteristic density profile. Conclusions: We delineate a new feature of the cosmic web, the BAO shells. As these are real spatial structures, the BAO phenomenon can be studied in detail by examining those shells. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  3. Analysis of Fumarole Acoustics at Aso Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, K. F.; Yokoo, A.; Fee, D.; Huang, Y. C.; Yoshikawa, S.; Utsugi, M.; Minami, T.; Ohkura, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lowermost portion of large eruption columns is the momentum-driven, fluid flow portion known as a volcanic jet. The perturbation of the atmosphere from this region produces a sound known as jetting or jet noise. Recent work has shown that this volcanic jet noise produced by a volcano has similar characteristics as the sound from jet and rocket engines. The study of volcanic jet noise has gained much from laboratory jet engine studies; however, jet engines have been engineered to reduce noise thereby limiting their use as a comparison tool to the complex, ever-changing volcanic jet. Previous studies have noted that fumaroles produce jet noise without further detailed investigation. The goal of this work is to enhance our understanding of large-scale volcanic jets by studying an accessible, less hazardous fumarolic jet. We aim to characterize the acoustic signature of fumaroles and evaluate if fumarolic jets scale to that of large volcanic jets. To investigate this, we deployed a 6-element acoustic array at two different locations along the edge of the crater wall at Aso Volcano, Japan from early July through mid-August 2015. Approximately two months before this deployment, the pyroclastic cone within Aso's crater partially collapsed into the vent. The cone was constructed during both ash venting and strombolian-style explosive activity in the last year. After the deployment, on July 13 a new small vent opened on the southwest flank of the pyroclastic cone. The vent is several meters in diameter and has consistent gas jetting which produces audible jet noise. To better capture the acoustic signature of the gas jetting we moved the array to the southwestern edge of the crater. The array is 230 meters from the vent and is positioned 54 degrees from the vertical jet axis, a recording angle usually not feasible in volcanic environments. Preliminary investigations suggest directionality at the source and the influence of topography along the propagation path as

  4. Acoustic Analysis of the Tremulous Voice: Assessing the Utility of the Correlation Dimension and Perturbation Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Jun; MacCallum, Julia K.; Zhang, Yu; Sprecher, Alicia; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic analysis may provide a useful means to quantitatively characterize the tremulous voice. Signals were obtained from 25 subjects with diagnoses of either Parkinson's disease or vocal polyps exhibiting vocal tremor. These were compared to signals from 24 subjects with normal voices. Signals were analyzed via correlation dimension and several…

  5. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush–cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae)

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush–cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochia sp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior. PMID:23378813

  6. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush-cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae).

    PubMed

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush-cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochiasp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior.

  7. Automated pattern analysis: A newsilent partner in insect acoustic detection studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This seminar reviews methods that have been developed for automated analysis of field-collected sounds used to estimate pest populations and guide insect pest management decisions. Several examples are presented of successful usage of acoustic technology to map insect distributions in field environ...

  8. Quantitative and Descriptive Comparison of Four Acoustic Analysis Systems: Vowel Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burris, Carlyn; Vorperian, Houri K.; Fourakis, Marios; Kent, Ray D.; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines accuracy and comparability of 4 trademarked acoustic analysis software packages (AASPs): Praat, WaveSurfer, TF32, and CSL by using synthesized and natural vowels. Features of AASPs are also described. Method: Synthesized and natural vowels were analyzed using each of the AASP's default settings to secure 9…

  9. Infrared overtone spectroscopy and vibrational analysis of a Fermi resonance in nitric acid: Experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Konen, Ian M; Li, Eunice X J; Lester, Marsha I; Vázquez, Juana; Stanton, John F

    2006-08-21

    High resolution infrared spectra of nitric acid have been recorded in the first OH overtone region under jet-cooled conditions using a sequential IR-UV excitation method. Vibrational bands observed at 6933.39(3), 6938.75(4), and 6951.985(3) cm(-1) (origins) with relative intensities of 0.42(1), 0.38(1), and 0.20(1) are attributed to strongly mixed states involved in a Fermi resonance. A vibrational deperturbation analysis suggests that the optically bright OH overtone stretch (2nu1) at 6939.2(1) cm(-1) is coupled directly to the nu1 + 2nu2 state at 6946.4(1) cm(-1) and indirectly to the 3nu2 + nu3 + nu7 state at 6938.5(1) cm(-1). Both the identity of the zero-order states and the indirect coupling scheme are deduced from complementary CCSD(T) calculations in conjunction with second-order vibrational perturbation theory. The deperturbation analysis also yields the experimental coupling between 2nu1 and nu1 + 2nu2 of -6.9(1) cm(-1), and that between the two dark states of +5.0(1) cm(-1). The calculated vibrational energies and couplings are in near quantitative agreement with experimentally derived values except for a predicted twofold stronger coupling of 2nu1 to nu1 + 2nu2. Weaker coupling of the strongly mixed states to a dense background of vibrational states via intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution is evident from the experimental linewidths of 0.08 and 0.25 cm(-1) for the higher energy and two overlapping lower energy bands, respectively. A comprehensive rotational analysis of the higher energy band yields spectroscopic parameters and the direction of the OH overtone transition dipole moment.

  10. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  11. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara; Osellame, Roberto; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Cristiani, Ilaria; Minzioni, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental apparatus parameters before performing the cell-characterization experiments, including a non-destructive method to characterize the optical force distribution inside the microchannel. The chip was used to study important cell-mechanics parameters in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231. Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze the response of different cellular structures. We also demonstrate that it is possible to perform both measurements on a single cell, and that the order of the two experiments does not affect the retrieved values.

  12. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara; Osellame, Roberto; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Cristiani, Ilaria; Minzioni, Paolo

    2016-04-04

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental apparatus parameters before performing the cell-characterization experiments, including a non-destructive method to characterize the optical force distribution inside the microchannel. The chip was used to study important cell-mechanics parameters in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231. Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze the response of different cellular structures. We also demonstrate that it is possible to perform both measurements on a single cell, and that the order of the two experiments does not affect the retrieved values.

  13. Operational Performance Analysis of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Killer Whales

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Deng, Zhiqun; Sun, Yannan; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-09-30

    For the planned tidal turbine site in Puget Sound, WA, the main concern is to protect Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) due to their Endangered Species Act status. A passive acoustic monitoring system is proposed because the whales emit vocalizations that can be detected by a passive system. The algorithm for detection is implemented in two stages. The first stage is an energy detector designed to detect candidate signals. The second stage is a spectral classifier that is designed to reduce false alarms. The evaluation presented here of the detection algorithm incorporates behavioral models of the species of interest, environmental models of noise levels and potential false alarm sources to provide a realistic characterization of expected operational performance.

  14. Prototype partial one-third octave band spectrum analyzer for acoustic, vibration and other wideband data for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design refinement of a compact frequency analyzer for measurement and analysis on board flight vehicles is discussed. The analyzer has been constructed in a partial one-third octave band configuration with six filters and detectors spaced by the square root of 10 from 316 Hz to 100,000 Hz and a broadband detector channel. The analyzer has been tested over a temperature range of 40 to 120 F at a pressure of one atmosphere, and at a temperature of 75 F at an absolute pressure of 0.000001 torr, and has demonstrated at least 60 db of dynamic range.

  15. PVAST Propeller Vibration and Strength Analysis Program Version 7.3 User’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    Copy No: ___ _ PVAST Propeller Vibration and Strength Analysis Program Version 7.3 User’s Manual Koko ,T S, Palmeter, M F, Chernuka, M.W. MARTEC...34St name, rruddle mittal If rruhtary, show rank, e g. Doe, Maj. John E.) Koko ,T.S., Palmeter, M.F., Chernuka, M.W. DATE OF PUBLICATION (month and

  16. Wavelet Transform for Time-Frequency Analysis of the Vibrational Signature and its Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-17

    Wavelet transform is applied to the analysis of vibration signatures in order to verify the ability of the detection of abnormal condition. It can...first stage. The objective of this report outlines the definition of the wavelet transform and is to discuss the properties of the wavelet transform as

  17. Vibrational spectra and natural bond orbital analysis of organic crystal L-prolinium picrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwin, Bismi; Amalanathan, M.; Hubert Joe, I.

    2012-10-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis and quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed on the organic crystal L-prolinium picrate (LPP). The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of LPP have been investigated using B3LYP method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA 4 program. The various intramolecular interactions confirming the biological activity of the compound have been exposed by natural bond orbital analysis. The distribution of Mulliken atomic charges and bending of natural hybrid orbitals associated with hydrogen bonding also reflects the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding thereby enhancing bioactivity. The analysis of the electron density of HOMO and LUMO gives an idea of the delocalization and low value of energy gap indicates electron transport in the molecule and thereby bioactivity. Vibrational analysis reveals the presence of strong O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O interaction between L-prolinium and picrate ions providing evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity.

  18. Vibrational spectra and natural bond orbital analysis of organic crystal L-prolinium picrate.

    PubMed

    Edwin, Bismi; Amalanathan, M; Hubert Joe, I

    2012-10-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis and quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed on the organic crystal L-prolinium picrate (LPP). The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of LPP have been investigated using B3LYP method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA 4 program. The various intramolecular interactions confirming the biological activity of the compound have been exposed by natural bond orbital analysis. The distribution of Mulliken atomic charges and bending of natural hybrid orbitals associated with hydrogen bonding also reflects the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding thereby enhancing bioactivity. The analysis of the electron density of HOMO and LUMO gives an idea of the delocalization and low value of energy gap indicates electron transport in the molecule and thereby bioactivity. Vibrational analysis reveals the presence of strong O-H···O and N-H···O interaction between L-prolinium and picrate ions providing evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity.

  19. Free vibration analysis of linear particle chain impact damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharib, Mohamed; Ghani, Saud

    2013-11-01

    Impact dampers have gained much research interest over the past decades that resulted in several analytical and experimental studies being conducted in that area. The main emphasis of such research was on developing and enhancing these popular passive control devices with an objective of decreasing the three parameters of contact forces, accelerations, and noise levels. To that end, the authors of this paper have developed a novel impact damper, called the Linear Particle Chain (LPC) impact damper, which mainly consists of a linear chain of spherical balls of varying sizes. The LPC impact damper was designed utilizing the kinetic energy of the primary system through placing, in the chain arrangement, a small-sized ball between each two large-sized balls. The concept of the LPC impact damper revolves around causing the small-sized ball to collide multiple times with the larger ones upon exciting the primary system. This action is believed to lead to the dissipation of part of the kinetic energy at each collision with the large balls. This paper focuses on the outcome of studying the free vibration of a single degree freedom system that is equipped with the LPC impact damper. The proposed LPC impact damper is validated by means of comparing the responses of a single unit conventional impact damper with those resulting from the LPC impact damper. The results indicated that the latter is considerably more efficient than the former impact damper. In order to further investigate the LPC impact damper effective number of balls and efficient geometry when used in a specific available space in the primary system, a parametric study was conducted and its result is also explained herein. Single unit impact damper [14-16]. Multiunit impact damper [17,18]. Bean bag impact damper [19,20]. Particle/granular impact damper [21,23,22]. Resilient impact damper [24]. Buffered impact damper [25-27]. Multiunit impact damper consists of multiple masses instead of a single mass. This

  20. Motion and vibration control of a slewing flexible structure by SMA actuators and parameter sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, F. C.; Tusset, A. M.; Piccirillo, V.; Balthazar, J. M.; Brasil, R. M. L. R. F.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents two approaches to the problem of vibration and positioning control of a flexible structural beam driven by a DC motor. The position is controlled by the current applied to the DC motor armature. A Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuator controls vibrations of the flexible structural beam. The State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) technique is used to provide a control action which uses sub-optimal control and system local stability search. The robustness of these two controllers is tested by sensitivity analysis to parametric uncertainties. Numerical simulations results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  1. High-tip-speed fiber composite compressor blades: Vibration and strength analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lynch, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical procedure is described which couples composite mechanics computer codes with NASTRAN. This procedure was used to perform a detailed analysis of a high-tip-speed fiber composite compressor fan blade. The results indicate that the various vibration modes of this blade are highly coupled. Mechanical load ply stresses are well below the corresponding room temperature strengths. Lamination residual stresses are likely to cause transply cracks and interply delamination. Transply cracks and relaxation of root fixity decrease the vibrational frequencies whereas centrifugal stiffening increases them. Comparisons of results for various parameters are presented in tabular and graphical form.

  2. Modal analysis and dynamic stresses for acoustically excited shuttle insulation tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.; Ogilvie, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    Improvements and extensions to the RESIST computer program developed for determining the normalized modal stress response of shuttle insulation tiles are described. The new version of RESIST can accommodate primary structure panels with closed-cell stringers, in addition to the capability for treating open-cell stringers. In addition, the present version of RESIST numerically solves vibration problems several times faster than its predecessor. A new digital computer program, titled ARREST (Acoustic Response of Reusable Shuttle Tiles) is also described. Starting with modal information contained on output tapes from RESIST computer runs, ARREST determines RMS stresses, deflections and accelerations of shuttle panels with reusable surface insulation tiles. Both programs are applicable to stringer stiffened structural panels with or without reusable surface insulation titles.

  3. In-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianjie; Shi, Dongyan; Qin, Zhengrong; Wang, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    In comparison with the out-of-plane vibrations of annular plates, far less attention has been paid to the in-plane vibrations which may also play a vital important role in affecting the sound radiation from and power flows in a built-up structure. In this investigation, a generalized Fourier series method is proposed for the in-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions along each of its edges. Regardless of the boundary conditions, the in-plane displacement fields are invariantly expressed as a new form of trigonometric series expansions with a drastically improved convergence as compared with the conventional Fourier series. All the unknown expansion coefficients are treated as the generalized coordinates and determined using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. Unlike most of the existing studies, the presented method can be readily and universally applied to a wide spectrum of in-plane vibration problems involving different boundary conditions, varying material, and geometric properties with no need of modifying the basic functions or adapting solution procedures. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of the current solution for predicting the in-plane vibration characteristics of annular plates subjected to different boundary conditions.

  4. Vibration-based damage detection in plates by using time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, Irina; Manoach, Emil

    2008-07-01

    This paper deals with the problem of vibration health monitoring (VHM) in structures with nonlinear dynamic behaviour. It aims to introduce two viable VHM methods that use large amplitude vibrations and are based on nonlinear time series analysis. The methods suggested explore some changes in the state space geometry/distribution of the structural dynamic response with damage and their use for damage detection purposes. One of the methods uses the statistical distribution of state space points on the attractor of a vibrating structure, while the other one is based on the Poincaré map of the state space projected dynamic response. In this paper both methods are developed and demonstrated for a thin vibrating plate. The investigation is based on finite element modelling of the plate vibration response. The results obtained demonstrate the influence of damage on the local dynamic attractor of the plate state space and the applicability of the proposed strategies for damage assessment. The approach taken in this study and the suggested VHM methods are rather generic and permit development and applications for other more complex nonlinear structures.

  5. Longitudinal vibration and stability analysis of carbon nanotubes conveying viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oveissi, Soheil; Toghraie, Davood; Eftekhari, Seyyed Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, carbon nanotubes (CNT) play an important role in practical applications in fluidic devices. To this end, researchers have studied various aspects of vibration analysis of a behavior of CNT conveying fluid. In this paper, based on nonlocal elasticity theory, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is simulated. To investigate and analyze the effect of internal fluid flow on the longitudinal vibration and stability of SWCNT, the equation of motion for longitudinal vibration is obtained by using Navier-Stokes equations. In the governing equation of motion, the interaction of fluid-structure, dynamic and fluid flow velocity along the axial coordinate of the nanotube and the nano-scale effect of the structure are considered. To solve the nonlocal longitudinal vibration equation, the approximate Galerkin method is employed and appropriate simply supported boundary conditions are applied. The results show that the axial vibrations of the nanotubesstrongly depend on the small-size effect. In addition, the fluid flowing in nanotube causes a decrease in the natural frequency of the system. It is obvious that the system natural frequencies reach zero at lower critical flow velocities as the wave number increases. Moreover, the critical flow velocity decreases as the nonlocal parameter increases.

  6. A Dimensional Analysis Approach to Study Blast-Induced Ground Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manoj; Saadat, Mahdi

    2015-03-01

    The prediction of ground vibration is of great importance in the alleviation of the detrimental effects of blasting. Therefore, a vibration control study to minimize the harm of ground vibration and its influence on nearby structures can play an important role in the mining industry. In this paper, a dimensional analysis (DA) technique has been performed on various blast design parameters to propose a new formula for the prediction of the peak particle velocity (PPV). After obtaining the DA formula, 105 data sets were used to determine the unknown coefficients of the DA equation, as well as site constants of different conventional predictor equations. Then, 12 new blast data sets were used to compare the capability of the DA formula with conventional predictor equations. The results were compared based on the coefficient of determination and mean absolute error between measured and predicted values of the PPV.

  7. Comparative analysis and exprimental results of advanced control strategies for vibration suppression in aircraft wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birs, Isabela R.; Folea, Silviu; Copot, Dana; Prodan, Ovidiu; Muresan, Cristina-I.

    2017-01-01

    The smart beam is widely used as a means of studying the dynamics and active vibration suppression possibilities in aircraft wings. The advantages obtained through this approach are numerous, among them being aircraft stability and manoeuvrability, turbulence immunity, passenger safety and reduced fatigue damage. The paper presents the tuning of two controllers: Linear Quadratic Regulator and Fractional Order Proportional Derivative controller. The active vibration control methods were tested on a smart beam, vibrations being mitigated through piezoelectric patches. The obtained experimental results are compared in terms of settling time and control effort, experimentally proving that both types of controllers can be successfully used to reduce oscillations. The analysis in this paper provides for a necessary premise regarding the tuning of a fractional order enhanced Linear Quadratic Regulator, by combining the advantages of both control strategies.

  8. An Analysis of the Rotational Spectrum of Acetonitrile (CH_3CN) in Excited Vibrational States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Christopher F.; McMillan, James; Fortman, Sarah; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    Acetonitrile (CH_3CN) is a well-known interstellar molecule whose vibrationally excited states need to be accounted for in searches for new molecules in the interstellar medium. To help catalog such `weed' molecules, we have developed a technique that involves recording complete spectra over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures. With such a data set, we can experimentally measure the line strengths and lower state energies of unassigned lines in the spectrum. In this talk we will present the ongoing analysis of complete temperature resolved spectra in the 215-265 GHz and 570-650 GHz regions. We have been able to assign many vibrationally hot lines from this data and a room temperature data set spanning 165-700 GHz. To date, we have assigned lines from most of the vibrational states below ν_6 at 1448 wn.

  9. Developing Uncertainty Models for Robust Flutter Analysis Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Starr; Lind, Rick; Kehoe, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A ground vibration test can be used to obtain information about structural dynamics that is important for flutter analysis. Traditionally, this information#such as natural frequencies of modes#is used to update analytical models used to predict flutter speeds. The ground vibration test can also be used to obtain uncertainty models, such as natural frequencies and their associated variations, that can update analytical models for the purpose of predicting robust flutter speeds. Analyzing test data using the -norm, rather than the traditional 2-norm, is shown to lead to a minimum-size uncertainty description and, consequently, a least-conservative robust flutter speed. This approach is demonstrated using ground vibration test data for the Aerostructures Test Wing. Different norms are used to formulate uncertainty models and their associated robust flutter speeds to evaluate which norm is least conservative.

  10. Vibration analysis of magnetostrictive thin-film composite cantilever actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Shang, Xinchun

    2016-09-01

    The transverse vibration of a composed cantilever beam with magnetostrictive layer is analyzed, which is employed to simulate dynamic response of an actuator. The high-order shear deformation theory of beam and the coupling magnetoelastic constitutive relationship are introduced to construct the governing equations, all interface conditions between magnetostrictive film and elastic substrate as well as the free stress condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the beam can be satisfied. In order to demonstrate validity of the presented mathematical modeling, the verification examples are also given. Furthermore, the effect of geometry and material parameters on dynamic characteristics of magnetostrictive cantilever beam, such as the nature frequency and amplitude, is discussed. Moreover, through computing the magneto-mechanical coupling factor of the beam structure, the variation tendency curves of the factor along with different parameters and frequencies of magnetostrictive cantilever beam actuator have been presented. These numerical results should be useful for the design of beam-type with magnetostrictive thin-film actuators.

  11. Statistical analysis of vibration-induced bone and joint damages.

    PubMed

    Schenk, T

    1995-01-01

    Vibration-induced damages to bones and joints are still occupational diseases with insufficient knowledge about causing and moderating factors and resulting damages. For a better understanding of these relationships also retrospective analyses of already acknowledged occupational diseases may be used. Already recorded detailed data for 203 in 1970 to 1979 acknowledged occupational diseases in the building industry and the building material industry of the GDR are the basis for the here described investigations. The data were gathered from the original documents of the occupational diseases and scaled in cooperation of an industrial engineer and an industrial physician. For the purposes of this investigations the data are to distinguish between data which describe the conditions of the work place (e.g. material, tools and posture), the exposure parameters (e.g. beginning of exposure and latency period) and the disease (e.g. anamnestical and radiological data). These data are treated for the use with sophisticated computerized statistical methods. The following analyses were carried out. Investigation of the connections between the several characteristics, which describe the occupational disease (health damages), including the comparison of the severity of the damages at the individual joints. Investigation of the side dependence of the damages. Investigation of the influence of the age at the beginning of the exposure and the age at the acknowledgement of the occupational disease and herewith of the exposure duration. Investigation of the effect of different occupational and exposure conditions.

  12. Chaotic and ambient vibration analysis of composite lap joint damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Lou; Nichols, Jon; Seaver, Mark; Trickey, Steve; Motley, Sara

    2007-04-01

    We examined strain time series from fiber Bragg gratings sensors located in various positions on a composite material beam attached to a steel plate by a lap joint. The beam was vibrated using both broad-band chaotic signals (Lorenz system), and a narrow band signal conforming to the Pierson-Moskowitz frequency distribution for wave height (ambient excitation). The system was damaged by decreasing the torque on instrumented bolts in the lap joint from very tight all the way through to a joint with a gap and slippage. We analyzed the strain data by reconstructing the attractor of the system in the case of chaotic forcing and a pseudo-attractor in the case of sea-wave forcing. Using the highest torque case as an "undamaged" baseline, we calculated the continuity statistic between the baseline attractor and the attractors of the various damage levels for both forcing cases. We show where one can and cannot say that the functional relationship between the attractors changes and how those changes are related to damage levels.

  13. Analysis of the vibration regimes of vascular walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, A. V.; Rozenblyum, L. A.; Khurlapova, T. V.; Yakhno, V. G.

    1980-11-01

    The theoretical description exposed here can be used for explaining the differences which are sometimes observed between the values of the diastolic pressure derived from direct measurements and those derived from indirect measurements. Nervous and emotional action may alter markedly the mechanical properties of the muscular layer of the wall. In this respect it is important to what side the hysteresis loop in the radiusstress curve will be shifted. If the hysteresis is shifted towards the region of high pressures, then tones will be recorded at higher pi — P l values and, hence, the error in an indirect measurement of the pressure will increase. From this point of view the phenomenon of an "infinite tone" is explained by the dependence of the hysteresis of the radius on the stress on the wall in the pressure range Pdiastvibrations of the wall appear. From the hypothesis proposed it follows that the duration of the main phase of the tone can be used as a parameter characterizing the viscosity of a vascular wall. The rigidity and the mass of a vascular wall can be estimated from the high-frequency phase of the tone (this phase being determined by the resonance characteristics of the vessel). A check of the clinical value of these parameters requires additional investigations.

  14. Analysis of In-Flight Vibration Measurements from Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne; Huff, Ed; Barszcz

    2004-01-01

    In-flight vibration measurements from the transmission of an OH-58C KIOWA are analyzed. In order to understand the effect of normal flight variation on signal shape, the first gear mesh components of the planetary gear system and bevel gear are studied in detail. Systematic patterns occur in the amplitude and phase of these signal components with implications for making time synchronous averages and interpreting gear metrics in flight. The phase of the signal component increases as the torque increases; limits on the torque range included in a time synchronous average may now be selected to correspond to phase change limits on the underlying signal. For some sensors and components, an increase in phase variation and/or abrupt change in the slope of the phase dependence on torque are observed in regions of very low amplitude of the signal component. A physical mechanism for this deviation is postulated. Time synchronous averages should not be constructed in torque regions with wide phase variation.

  15. Damage Assessment Using Vibration Analysis on the Z24-BRIDGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeck, J.; de Roeck, G.

    2003-01-01

    Vibration monitoring is a useful evaluation tool in the development of a non-destructive damage-identification technique, and relies on the fact that occurrence of damage in a structural system leads to changes in its dynamic properties. It can give global information of a structure, and the location of the damage has not to be known in advance. The damage-identification technique is based on the observed shifts in eigenfrequencies and modeshapes and relate the dynamic characteristics to a damage pattern of the structure. The presented technique makes use of the calculation of modal bending moments and curvatures to derive the bending stiffness at each location. The basic assumption is that damage can be directly related to a decrease of stiffness in the structure. Damage-assessment techniques are validated on the progressively damaged prestressed concrete bridge Z24 in Switzerland, tested in the framework of the Brite Euram project SIMCES. A series of full modal surveys are carried out on the bridge before and after applying a number of damage scenarios.

  16. Free vibration analysis of skewed open circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Selvakumar; Singh, Anand V.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a numerical study is presented for the free vibration of skewed open circular cylindrical deep shells. The formulation considers first-order shear deformation theory of shells and includes rotary inertia and shear deformation so that thin-to-moderately thick shells can be analyzed. A set of grid points, the number of which depends upon the orders of the polynomials chosen for the displacement and rotation components, on the middle surface of the shell is defined first. For a particular displacement component, the field functions are derived corresponding to each node from the above-mentioned set of points and are used in the Rayleigh-Ritz method to calculate frequencies and mode shapes. Convergence study with reference to the order of the polynomials used for the displacement fields was performed first. Numerical results obtained from the present method are compared with those from the finite element method and very good agreement is observed. Additional results are presented and discussed in this paper for skewed panels clamped at the curved edges and free at the straight parallel edges.

  17. Laboratory test and acoustic analysis of cabin treatment for propfan test assessment aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Helmholtz resonators were attached to the cabin trim panels to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL). Resonators (448) were located between the trim panels and fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a 235 Hz resonance frequency. After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, the enclosure was tested in the Kelly Johnson R and D Center Acoustics Lab. Laboratory noise reduction (NR) test results are discussed. The enclosure was placed in a Gulfstream 2 fuselage section. Broadband (138 dB overall SPL) and tonal (149 dB overall SPL) excitations were used in the lab. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The fundamental tone was stepped in 2 Hz intervals from 225 through 245 Hz. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin adsorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured.

  18. Dynamic analysis of submerged microscale plates: the effects of acoustic radiation and viscous dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the dynamic characteristics of micromechanical rectangular plates used as sensing elements in a viscous compressible fluid. A novel modelling procedure for the plate–fluid interaction problem is developed on the basis of linearized Navier–Stokes equations and no-slip conditions. Analytical expression for the fluid-loading impedance is obtained using a double Fourier transform approach. This modelling work provides us an analytical means to study the effects of inertial loading, acoustic radiation and viscous dissipation of the fluid acting on the vibration of microplates. The numerical simulation is conducted on microplates with different boundary conditions and fluids with different viscosities. The simulation results reveal that the acoustic radiation dominates the damping mechanism of the submerged microplates. It is also proved that microplates offer better sensitivities (Q-factors) than the conventional beam type microcantilevers being mass sensing platforms in a viscous fluid environment. The frequency response features of microplates under highly viscous fluid loading are studied using the present model. The dynamics of the microplates with all edges clamped are less influenced by the highly viscous dissipation of the fluid than the microplates with other types of boundary conditions. PMID:27118914

  19. Sister chromatid exchange analysis in workers exposed to noise and vibration.

    PubMed

    Silva, M J; Carothers, A; Branco, N C; Dias, A; Boavida, M G

    1996-07-10

    Workers chronically exposed to whole-body vibration and noise are known to develop pathophysiological and psychological disturbances. The frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and of cells with high frequencies of SCEs (HFCs) were analyzed in lymphocytes of 50 workers occupationally exposed to vibration and noise and of 34 controls. The exposed group included: individuals operating hand-vibrating tools (group 1), 'test-cell operators' (group 2) and 'run-up' operators (group 3) from an air base and helicopter pilots (group 4). The statistical analysis of the mean SCE count per cell was carried out by multiple regression analysis, comparing various predictor variables: exposure group, duration of exposure, age and cigarette consumption. Only cigarette consumption and exposure group were found to be significantly correlated with the mean SCE frequency. After allowing for the effects of smoking, the analysis indicates that: (1) there was no significant difference between group 1 and controls (p > 0.05); (2) the differences between group 2 and group 0, group 3 and group 0 and group 4 and group 0 were all highly significant (p < 0.001); (3) there was no significant difference between groups 2 and 3 (p > 0.05), nor between groups 2 and 3 combined and group 4 (p > 0.05); (4) exposure groups 2, 3 and 4 combined, had a significantly elevated mean SCE frequency compared to the control group (p < 0.0001). Statistical analysis of the proportion of HFCs was consistent with these results. Our data suggest that chronic exposure to whole-body vibration and noise may lead to an increase in the level of SCEs in man. The observed effects may not reflect a direct action of these physical agents on DNA. Alternative explanations may include some of the whole-body vibration and noise-induced or stress-induced pathophysiological alterations which may indirectly induce SCE formation.

  20. Risk Factors of Acoustic Neuroma: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mantao; Fan, Zuoxu; Cao, Fei; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many epidemiological studies have investigated environmental risk factors for the development of acoustic neuroma. However, these results are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of case-control studies to identify any potential relationship between history of noise exposure, smoking, allergic diseases, and risk of acoustic neuroma. Materials and Methods We searched PubMed to identify relevant articles. Two researchers evaluated the eligibility and extracted the data independently. Results Eleven case-control studies were included in our meta-analysis. Acoustic neuroma was found to be associated with leisure noise exposure [odds ratio (OR)=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–1.68], but not with occupational noise exposure and ever noise exposure (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 0.84–1.72 and OR=1.15, 95% CI: 0.80–1.65). The OR of acoustic neuroma for ever (versus never) smoking was 0.53 (95% CI: 0.30–0.94), while the subgroup analysis indicated ORs of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81–1.10) and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.41–0.59) for ex-smoker and current smoker respectively. The ORs for asthma, eczema, and seasonal rhinitis were 0.98 (95% CI: 0.80–1.18), 0.91 (95% CI: 0.76–1.09), and 1.52 (95% CI: 0.90–2.54), respectively. Conclusion Our meta-analysis is suggestive of an elevated risk of acoustic neuroma among individuals who were ever exposed to leisure noise, but not to occupational noise. Our study also indicated a lower acoustic neuroma risk among ever and current cigarette smokers than never smokers, while there was no significant relationship for ex-smokers. No significant associations were found between acoustic neuroma and history of any allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and seasonal rhinitis. PMID:26996581